WorldWideScience

Sample records for dysprosium tungstates

  1. CMS lead tungstate crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    These crystals are made from lead tungstate, a crystal that is as clear as glass yet with nearly four times the density. They have been produced in Russia to be used as scintillators in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the CMS experiment, part of the LHC project at CERN. When an electron, positron or photon passes through the calorimeter it will cause a cascade of particles that will then be absorbed by these scintillating crystals, allowing the particle's energy to be measured.

  2. Dysprosium magneto-optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Youn, Seo Ho; Ray, Ushnish; Lev, Benjamin L

    2010-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps (MOTs) of highly magnetic lanthanides open the door to explorations of novel phases of strongly correlated matter such as lattice supersolids and quantum liquid crystals. We recently reported the first MOTs of the five high abundance isotopes of the most magnetic atom, dysprosium. Described here are details of the experimental technique employed for repumper-free Dy MOTs containing up to half a billion atoms. Extensive characterization of the MOTs' properties---population, temperature, loading, metastable decay dynamics, trap dynamics---is provided.

  3. On polymorphism of dysprosium trichloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Khokhlov, Vladimir A.; Salyulev, Alexander B.; Korzun, Iraida V. [RAS Ural Branch, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry

    2015-07-01

    For the first time, the structure of crystalline DyCl{sub 3} over a wide temperature range from room temperature to melting point was studied by Raman spectroscopy. The phonon modes (cm{sup -1}) of dysprosium trichloride (monoclinic crystal lattice of AlCl{sub 3} type, Z = 4, CN = 6) at room temperature are 257 (A{sub 1g}), 201 (E{sub g}), 112 (E{sub g}), 88 (A{sub 1g}), and 63 (E{sub g}). The monoclinic structure of the crystalline DyCl{sub 3} C{sub 2h}{sup 3} symmetry was found to remain constant over the studied temperature range. No polymorphic transformation in the solid state was detected. Gravimetry, calorimetry, and mass spectrometry have been used in addition to support the conclusions made on the basis of Raman spectroscopic data.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of nanophased silver tungstate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thresiamma George; Sunny Joseph; Suresh Mathew

    2005-11-01

    Silver tungstate (Ag2WO4) nanoparticles in two different morphologies are prepared by controlling the reaction kinetics of aqueous precipitation. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the silver tungstate nanoparticles are in the -phase. SEM images show the rod-like and fiber-like morphologies of the nanoparticles with high aspect ratios. The TGA and DTA studies show the high thermal stability of the nanorods. The average crystallite sizes (20–30 nm) of the rod-like silver tungstate estimated from TEM is consistent with the XRD results.

  5. Thermal expansion in dysprosium tungstate Dy10W2O21

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The complex oxide Dy10W2O21 was synthesized by a solid-state reaction and isolated in cubic symmetry by an X-ray diffractometry (XRD) method. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements show that the compound is thermodynamically stable. The intrinsic thermal expansion coefficients were determined by extra-power powder Xray diffractometry from room temperature to 1000 ℃: linear coefficient α = 1.07 × 10-5 ℃-1 and bulk coefficient β=3.20 × 10-5℃-1. Dilatometry was used to measure the extrinsic thermal expansion coefficient (9.2 × 10-6℃-1).

  6. Lattice dynamics of strontium tungstate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabhatasree Goel; R Mittal; S L Chaplot; A K Tyagi

    2008-11-01

    We report here measurements of the phonon density of states and the lattice dynamics calculations of strontium tungstate (SrWO4). At ambient conditions this compound crystallizes to a body-centred tetragonal unit cell (space group I41/a) called scheelite structure. We have developed transferable interatomic potentials to study the lattice dynamics of this class of compounds. The model parameters have been fitted with respect to the experimentally available Raman and infra-red frequencies and the equilibrium unit cell parameters. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements have been carried out in the triple-axis spectrometer at Dhruva reactor. The measured phonon density of states is in good agreement with the theoretical calculations, thus validating the inter-atomic potential developed.

  7. Resonance ionization spectroscopy in dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, D., E-mail: dstuder@uni-mainz.de; Dyrauf, P.; Naubereit, P.; Heinke, R.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We report on resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of high-lying energy levels in dysprosium. We developed efficient excitation schemes and re-determined the first ionization potential (IP) via analysis of Rydberg convergences. For this purpose both two- and three-step excitation ladders were investigated. An overall ionization efficiency of 25(4) % could be demonstrated in the RISIKO mass separator of Mainz University, using a three-step resonance ionization scheme. Moreover, an extensive analysis of the even-parity 6sns- and 6snd-Rydberg-series convergences, measured via two-step excitation was performed. To account for strong perturbations in the observed s-series, the approach of multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) was applied. Considering all individual series limits we extracted an IP-value of 47901.76(5) cm{sup −1}, which agrees with the current literature value of 47901.7(6) cm{sup −1}, but is one order of magnitude more precise.

  8. The dysprosium-tin phase diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremenko, V.N.; Bulanova, M.V.; Martsenjuk, P.S. (I.N. Frantsevich Inst. for Problems of Materials Science, Kiev (Ukraine))

    1992-12-07

    The dysprosium-tin phase diagram was established by means of differential thermal, X-ray and microscopic analyses of 22 alloys. Seven intermetallic compounds were found to exist in the system. Dy[sub 5]Sn[sub 3] melts congruently at 1870 degC, and undergoes a polymorphous transformation at 1823 [+-] 6 degC. The intermetallics Dy[sub 5]Sn[sub 4], Dy[sub 11]Sn[sub 10], DySn, Dy[sub 4]Sn[sub 5], DySn[sub 2], DySn[sub 3] are formed peritectically at 1712 [+-]11, 1605 [+-]12, 1208 [+-]3, 1166 [+-]7, 1138 [+-]3 and 747 [+-]6 degC respectively. DySn[sub 3] exists in a narrow temperature range, in two polymorphous modifications. The transformation [beta]-DySn[sub 3] [yields] [alpha]-DySn[sub 3] occurs at 608 [+-] 12 degC, and at 499 [+-]2 degC [alpha]-DySn[sub 3] decomposes to DySn[sub 2] and the tin-rich melt. The dysprosium-rich eutectic crystallizes at 1204 [+-]10 degC and contains 13 at.% tin. The solid-state solubility of tin in dysprosium is about 3 at.%, and that of dysprosium in tin is negligible.

  9. Lead-Tungstate Crystal of the ALICE Photon Spectrometer (PHOS)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The photon spectrometer (PHOS) is designed to measure the temperature of collisions by detecting photons emerging from them. It will be made of lead tungstate crystals like these. When high-energy photons strike lead tungstate, they make it glow, or scintillate, and this glow can be measured. Lead tungstate is extremely dense (denser than iron), stopping most photons that reach it.

  10. Thermal structural properties of calcium tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senyshyn, Anatoliy; Hoelzel, Markus [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. for Materials Science; Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz FRM-II; Hansen, Thomas [Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Vasylechko, Leonid [Lviv Polytechnic National Univ. (Ukraine). Semiconductor Electronics Dept.; Mikhailik, Vitaliy [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot (United Kingdom); Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kraus, Hans [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Ehrenberg, Helmut [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. for Materials Science; IFW Dresden (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The results of in-situ temperature-resolved powder diffraction studies of CaWO{sub 4} scheelite using both synchrotron radiation and neutron scattering are reported. The studies performed over a broad temperature range of 5-1773 K confirm the scheelite type of structure for calcium tungstate over the whole temperature range. The anisotropy of thermal expansion in calcium tungstate as well as the rigidity of WO{sub 4} complexes have been analysed in terms of bond distances, interatomic angles and anisotropic displacement parameters. The WO{sub 4}{sup 2-} complex anions showed a remarkable robustness in the whole studied temperature range, thus pointing out that the layered structure formed by two-dimensional CsCl-type arrangements of Ca cations and WO{sub 4} complexes is the primary reason for the anisotropy of thermal expansion in calcium tungstate. (orig.)

  11. Towards a new measurement of parity violation in dysprosium

    CERN Document Server

    Leefer, N; Antypas, D; Budker, D

    2014-01-01

    The dysprosium parity violation experiment concluded nearly 17 years ago with an upper limit on weak interaction induced mixing of nearly degenerate, opposite parity states in atomic dysprosium. While that experiment was limited in sensitivity by statistics, a new apparatus constructed in the interim for radio-frequency spectroscopy is expected to provide significant improvements to the statistical sensitivity. Preliminary work from the new PV experiment in dysprosium is presented with a discussion of the current statistical sensitivity and outlook.

  12. Dysprosium Modification of Cobalt Ferrite Ionic Magnetic Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Rong-li; LIU Yong-chao; GENG Quan-rong; ZHAO Wen-tao

    2005-01-01

    Dysprosium composite cobalt ferrite ionic magnetic fluids were prepared by precipitation in the presence of Tri-sodium citrate. Influence of dysprosium modification on magnetic property is studied. The result shows that magnetic response toward exterior magnetic field can be improved by adding Dy3+. Studies also show that the increase of reaction temperature may improve the modification effect of dysprosium. By adding dysprosium ions, the average diameter of the magnetic nanoparticles will be decreased evidently. It is clear that the particles appear as balls, Cobalt ferrite with sizes of 12-15 nm, rare earth composite cobalt ferrite with sizes of 6-8 nm.

  13. Improved light yield of lead tungstate scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Annenkov, A N; Hofstäetter, A; Korzhik, M V; Ligun, V; Lecoq, P; Missevitch, O V; Novotny, R; Peigneux, J P

    2000-01-01

    The application at medium and low energies of lead tungstate scintillators, so far optimized for the ECAL calorimeter of CMS for the future LHC, is strongly limited by their poor light yield. Suitable dopants like molybdenum and terbium can help to overcome this problem. Concepts, results, advantages and drawbacks of this approach are discussed. (11 refs).

  14. Can a dysprosium shortage threaten green energy technologies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderdaal, S.; Tercero Espinoza, L.; Marschneider-Weidemann, F.; Crijns - Graus, Wina

    2013-01-01

    Dysprosium, one of the various rare earth elements, is currently for more than 99% mined in China. As China is reducing its exports, new mining projects outside of China are needed to sustain supply and meet future demands. Dysprosium is mainly used in permanent magnets to retain the magnet's streng

  15. Application prospects of cadmium-containing crystals based on tungstates and double tungstates

    CERN Document Server

    Nagornaya, L; Apanasenko, A; Tupitsyna, I; Chernikov, V; Vostretsov, V

    2002-01-01

    Tungstate and double tungstate crystals of high scintillation efficiency and detectors based on them are applied widely in the medical imaging and radiation monitoring because of their high sensitivity to the ionizing radiation, small radiation length, high radiation hardness, low afterglow level. In this work a possibility to broaden the application field of CWO crystals have been investigated by improvement of their spectrometric quality and decreasing of their afterglow level. CWO crystals with improved characteristics have been obtained (resolution for sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs <8%, afterglow <0.02% after 20 ms). A possibility is considered to use these crystals for spectrometry of thermal and resonance neutrons, which is possible due to the presence of nuclei with large cross-section for these neutrons in the crystal lattice. Compounds of a new type based on Cd, La-containing double tungstates doped with rare earth elements have been synthesized, and their luminescent characteristics have been studied. ...

  16. Phenalenyl-based mononuclear dysprosium complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Lan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The phenalenyl-based dysprosium complexes [Dy(PLN2(HPLNCl(EtOH] (1, [Dy(PLN3(HPLN]·[Dy(PLN3(EtOH]·2EtOH (2 and [Dy(PLN3(H2O2]·H2O (3, HPLN being 9-hydroxy-1H-phenalen-1-one, have been synthesized. All compounds were fully characterized by means of single crystal X-ray analysis, paramagnetic 1H NMR, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, UV–vis spectrophotometry and magnetic measurements. Both static (dc and dynamic (ac magnetic properties of these complexes have been investigated, showing slow relaxation of magnetization, indicative of single molecule magnet (SMM behavior. Attempts to synthesize sublimable phenalenyl-based dysprosium complexes have been made by implementing a synthetic strategy under anhydrous conditions. The sublimed species were characterized and their thermal stability was confirmed. This opens up the possibility to deposit phenalenyl-based lanthanides complexes by sublimation onto surfaces, an important prerequisite for ongoing studies in molecular spintronics.

  17. Anisotropy in the Interaction of Ultracold Dysprosium

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the interaction between ultracold atoms with a large orbital and spin angular momentum has attracted considerable attention. It was suggested that such interactions can lead to the realization of exotic states of highly correlated matter. Here, we report on a theoretical study of the competing anisotropic dispersion, magnetic dipole-dipole, and electric quadrupole-quadrupole forces between two dysprosium atoms. Each dysprosium atom has an orbital angular momentum L=6 and magnetic moment $\\mu=10\\mu_B$. We show that the dispersion coefficients of the ground state adiabatic potentials lie between 1865 a.u. and 1890 a.u., creating a non-negligible anisotropy with a spread of 25 a.u. and that the electric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction is weak compared to the other interactions. We also find that for interatomic separations $R< 50\\,a_0$ both the anisotropic dispersion and magnetic dipole-dipole potential are larger than the atomic Zeeman splittings for external magnetic fields of order 10 G to ...

  18. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza; Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh; Omrani, Ismail

    2012-12-01

    Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO4 nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO4 particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO4 were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence. Finally, catalytic activity of the nanoparticles in a cycloaddition reaction was examined.

  19. Microhardness studies of nanocrystalline calcium tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anandakumar, V.M. [Department of Physics, Mahatma Gandhi College, Thiruvananthapuram (India); Khadar, M.A. [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Thiruvananthapuram (India)

    2008-02-15

    Nanocrystals of calcium tungstate (CaWO{sub 4}) of three different grain sizes were synthesized through chemical precipitation technique and the grain sizes and crystal structure were determined using the broadening of X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy. The microhardness of compacted pellets of nanocrystalline calcium tungstate (CaWO{sub 4}) with different grain sizes were measured using a Vickers microhardness tester for various applied loads ranging from 0.049 N to 1.96 N. The values of microhardness showed significant reverse indentation size effect at low indentation loads. The microhardness data obtained for samples of different grain sizes showed grain size dependent strengthening obeying normal Hall-Petch relation. The dependence of compacting pressure and annealing temperature on microhardness of the nanostructured sample with grain size of 13 nm were also studied. The samples showed significant increase in microhardness as the compacting pressure and annealing time were increased. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi, E-mail: pourmortazavi@yahoo.com [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi, E-mail: rahiminasrabadi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh [Islamic Azad University, Varamin Pishva Branch, Varamin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omrani, Ismail [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared via precipitation technique. Experimental parameters of procedure were optimized statistically. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiWO{sub 4} spherical nanoparticles were synthesized via direct precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of synthesis reaction parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition and structural properties of NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV-vis and photoluminescence techniques were employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic activity of the product in a cyclo-addition reaction was investigated. - Abstract: Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO{sub 4} particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO{sub 4} were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV

  1. First search for double $\\beta$ decay of dysprosium

    CERN Document Server

    Belli, P; Cappella, F; Cerulli, R; Danevich, F A; d'Angelo, S; Di Vacri, M L; Incicchitti, A; Laubenstein, M; Nagorny, S S; Nisi, S; Tolmachev, A V; Tretyak, V I; Yavetskiy, R P

    2011-01-01

    A search for double $\\beta$ decay of dysprosium was realized for the first time with the help of an ultra low-background HP Ge $\\gamma$ detector. After 2512 h of data taking with a 322 g sample of dysprosium oxide limits on double beta processes in $^{156}$Dy and $^{158}$Dy have been established on the level of $T_{1/2}\\geq 10^{14}-10^{16}$ yr. Possible resonant double electron captures in $^{156}$Dy and $^{158}$Dy were restricted on a similar level. As a by-product of the experiment we have measured the radioactive contamination of the Dy$_2$O$_3$ sample and set limits on the $\\alpha$ decay of dysprosium isotopes to the excited levels of daughter nuclei as $T_{1/2}\\geq 10^{15} - 10^{17}$ yr.

  2. Neutron resonance parameters of dysprosium isotopes using neutron capture yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S. G.; Kye, Y. U.; Cho, M. H. [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Namkung, W. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G. N. [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M. W.; Kang, Y. R. [Dongnam Inst. Of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Dysprosium is used in the field of nuclear reactor system because it has a very large thermal neutron absorption cross-section. The dysprosium alloyed with special stainless steels is attractive for control in nuclear reactor because of the ability to absorb neutrons readily without swelling or contracting over time and its high melting point. Dysprosium is also one of fission products from the thermal fission of {sup 234}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 239}Pu. The fission products are accumulated in the reactor core by the burn-up of the nuclear fuel and the poison effect is increased. Therefore, it is required to understand how Dysprosium as both a poison and an absorbing material in the control rod has an effect on the neutron population in a nuclear reactor system over all energy regions. Neutron Capture experiments on Dy isotopes were performed at the electron linear accelerator (LINAC) facility of the Rensselear Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in the neutron energy region from 10 eV to 1 keV. Resonance parameters were extracted by fitting the neutron capture data using the SAMMY multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code.

  3. Properties of Polydisperse Tin-doped Dysprosium and Indium Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinovskaya Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the complex permittivity, diffuse-reflectance, and characteristics of crystal lattices of tin-doped indium and dysprosium oxides are presented. Using the methods of spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, it is shown that doping of indium oxide with tin results in a significant increase of the components of the indium oxide complex permittivity and an appearance of the plasma resonance in its diffuse-reflectance spectra. This indicates the appearance of charge carriers with the concentration of more than 1021 cm−3 in the materials. On the other hand, doping of the dysprosium oxide with the same amount of tin has no effect on its optical and electromagnetic properties.

  4. Dysprosium titanate as an absorber material for control rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risovany, V. D.; Varlashova, E. E.; Suslov, D. N.

    2000-09-01

    Disprosium titanate is an attractive control rod material for the thermal neutron reactors. Its main advantages are: insignificant swelling, no out-gassing under neutron irradiation, rather high neutron efficiency, a high melting point (˜1870°C), non-interaction with the cladding at temperatures above 1000°C, simple fabrication and easily reprocessed non-radioactive waste. It can be used in control rods as pellets and powder. The disprosium titanate control rods have worked off in the MIR reactor for 17 years, in VVER-1000 - for 4 years without any operating problems. After post-irradiation examinations this type of control rod having high lifetime was recommended for the VVER and RBMK. The paper presents the examination results of absorber element dummies containing dysprosium titanate, irradiated in the SM reactor to the neutron fluence of 3.4×10 22 cm -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) and, also, the data on structure, thermal-physical properties of dysprosium titanate, efficiency of dysprosium titanate control rods.

  5. Tungstate and Carbonate Ions Sorption Using Anion Exchangers AV-17-8 and Purolite A400

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chegrintsev S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper shows the results of tungstate and carbonate ion sorption using strongly basic anion exchangers AV-17-8 and Purolite A400. It has been established that anion exchanger AV-17-8 in the chloride form with parameters of 168 g of tungstate ion and 157 g of carbonate ion per 1 kg of anion exchanger has the maximum capacity for the tungstate and carbonate ions.

  6. Growth of transition metals on cerium tungstate model catalyst layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skála, T.; Tsud, N.; Stetsovych, V.; Mysliveček, J.; Matolín, V.

    2016-10-01

    Two model catalytic metal/oxide systems were investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The mixed-oxide support was a cerium tungstate epitaxial thin layer grown in situ on the W(1 1 0) single crystal. Active particles consisted of palladium and platinum 3D islands deposited on the tungstate surface at 300 K. Both metals were found to interact weakly with the oxide support and the original chemical state of both support and metals was mostly preserved. Electronic and morphological changes are discussed during the metal growth and after post-annealing at temperatures up to 700 K. Partial transition-metal coalescence and self-cleaning from the CO and carbon impurities were observed.

  7. Measurement of the Muon Stopping Power in Lead Tungstate

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00165402; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; 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Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; 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    2010-01-01

    A large sample of cosmic ray events collected by the CMS detector is exploited to measure the specific energy loss of muons in the lead tungstate of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The measurement spans a momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The results are consistent with the expectations over the entire range. The calorimeter energy scale, set with 120 GeV/c electrons, is validated down to the sub-GeV region using energy deposits, of order 100 MeV, associated with low-momentum muons. The muon critical energy in lead tungstate is measured to be 160+5/-6 plus or minus 8 GeV, in agreement with expectations. This is the first experimental determination of muon critical energy.

  8. Measurement of the Muon Stopping Power in Lead Tungstate

    CERN Document Server

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Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    A large sample of cosmic ray events collected by the CMS detector is exploited to measure the specific energy loss of muons in the lead tungstate of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The measurement spans a momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The results are consistent with the expectations over the entire range. The calorimeter energy scale, set with 120 GeV/c electrons, is validated down to the sub-GeV region using energy deposits, of order 100 MeV, associated with low-momentum muons. The muon critical energy in lead tungstate is measured to be 160+5/-6 plus or minus 8 GeV, in agreement with expectations. This is the first experimental determination of muon critical energy.

  9. Luminescence of lead-containing tungstates with perovskite structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, K.C.; Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    The luminescence of perovskites with formula Sr1-xPbxLaLiWO6 and Ba2-xPbxMgWO6 is reported. The lower-energy emission in the lead-containing compounds is ascribed to a transition within a centre consisting of a tungstate octahedron with lead-ion neighbours. The presence of Bi3+ is SrLaLiWO6 causes a

  10. Positorn annihilation study on point defects in lead tungstate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A study on point defects in lead tungstate (PbWO4) by using positron annihilation lifetime method is presented. The measurement was carried out for the cases of untreated, vacuum-annealed, oxygen- annealed and La-doped PbWO4 crystals. It was found that the components T2, which reflect the positron annihilation in point defects, are different from each other for each case. Some tentative models for the defects are discussed.

  11. Lead tungstate crystal of the ALICE Photon Spectrometer (PHOS)

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    A consignment of 500 lead tungstate crystals arrived at CERN from the northern Russian town of Apatity in May. Destined for the ALICE heavy-ion experiment in preparation for the Large Hadron Collider, each crystal is an 18 cm long rod with a 2.2 cm square section, and weighs some 750 g. A total of 17 000 crystals will make up the experiment's photon spectrometer.

  12. Luminescence of lead-containing tungstates with perovskite structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, K.C.; Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    The luminescence of perovskites with formula Sr1-xPbxLaLiWO6 and Ba2-xPbxMgWO6 is reported. The lower-energy emission in the lead-containing compounds is ascribed to a transition within a centre consisting of a tungstate octahedron with lead-ion neighbours. The presence of Bi3+ is SrLaLiWO6 causes a

  13. Rare-earth-ion-doped double-tungstate waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been recognized that the monoclinic double tungstates KY(WO4)2, KGd(WO4)2, and KLu(WO4)2 possess a high potential as rare-earth-ion-doped solid-state laser materials, partly due to the high absorption and emission cross-sections of rare-earth ions when doped into these materials. Besides, the

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Nanocrystalline Zirconium (IV Tungstate Semiconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manoj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline zirconium (IV tungstate is prepared by chemical coprecipitation method using ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid as the templating agent. Elemental composition is determined by EDS. The characteristic bonding position is identified using FTIR. XRD is used to find the theoritical value of size and phase identification using JCPDS. Morphology is examined using SEM and HRTEM. UV absorption at 260 nm corresponds to an energy gap of 4.48 eV, characteristic of semiconducting nanoparticles.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Nanocrystalline Zirconium (IV) Tungstate Semiconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj, S.; Beena, B.

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zirconium (IV) tungstate is prepared by chemical coprecipitation method using ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid as the templating agent. Elemental composition is determined by EDS. The characteristic bonding position is identified using FTIR. XRD is used to find the theoritical value of size and phase identification using JCPDS. Morphology is examined using SEM and HRTEM. UV absorption at 260 nm corresponds to an energy gap of 4.48 eV, characteristic of semiconducting nanopar...

  16. Dysprosium electrodeposition from a hexaalkylguanidinium-based ionic liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Claudia A.; Arkhipova, Maria; Maas, Gerhard; Jacob, Timo

    2016-07-01

    The rare-earth element dysprosium (Dy) is an important additive that increases the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of neodymium magnets and additionally prevents from demagnetizing at high temperatures. Therefore, it is one of the most important elements for high-tech industries and is mainly used in permanent magnetic applications, for example in electric vehicles, industrial motors and direct-drive wind turbines. In an effort to develop a more efficient electrochemical technique for depositing Dy on Nd-magnets in contrast to commonly used costly physical vapor deposition, we investigated the electrochemical behavior of dysprosium(iii) trifluoromethanesulfonate in a custom-made guanidinium-based room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). We first examined the electrodeposition of Dy on an Au(111) model electrode. The investigation was carried out by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The initial stages of metal deposition were followed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). CV measurements revealed a large cathodic reduction peak, which corresponds to the growth of monoatomic high islands, based on STM images taken during the initial stages of deposition. XPS identified these deposited islands as dysprosium. A similar reduction peak was also observed on an Nd-Fe-B substrate, and positively identified as deposited Dy using XPS. Finally, we varied the concentration of the Dy precursor, electrolyte flow and temperature during Dy deposition and demonstrated that each of these parameters could be used to increase the thickness of the Dy deposit, suggesting that these parameters could be tuned simultaneously in a temperature-controlled flow cell to enhance the thickness of the Dy layer.The rare-earth element dysprosium (Dy) is an important additive that increases the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of neodymium magnets and additionally prevents from demagnetizing at high temperatures. Therefore, it is one of the most important

  17. Local structure of nanosized tungstates revealed by evolutionary algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timoshenko, Janis; Anspoks, Andris; Kuzmin, Alexei [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia); Kalinko, Alexandr [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia); Synchrotron SOLEIL, l' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-02-01

    Nanostructured tungstates, such as CoWO{sub 4} and CuWO{sub 4}, are very promising catalytic materials, particularly for photocatalytic oxidation of water. The high catalytic activity of tungstate nanoparticles partially is a result of their extremely small sizes, and, consequently, high surface-to-volume ratio. Therefore their properties depend strongly on the atomic structure, which differ significantly from that of the bulk material. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique to address the challenging problem of the local structure determination in nanomaterials. In order to fully exploit the structural information contained in X-ray absorption spectra, in this study we employ a novel evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the interpretation of the Co and Cu K-edges as well as the W L{sub 3}-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of nanosized CoWO{sub 4} and CuWO{sub 4}. The combined EA-EXAFS approach and simultaneous analysis of the W L{sub 3} and Co(Cu) K-edge EXAFS spectra allowed us for the first time to obtain a 3D structure model of the tungstate nanoparticles and to explore in details the effect of size, temperature and transition metal type. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Energy transfer between octahedral tungstate and uranate groups in oxides with perovskite structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, A.C. van der; Hair, J.Th.W. de; Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    Energy transfer between tungstate and uranate groups in oxides with perovskite structure is reported. The critical distance for this process is about 25 Å. Evidence is given for energy transfer between tungstate groups. In this case the critical distance is estimated to be about 8 Å.

  19. Temperature-dependent absorption and emission of potassium double tungstates with high ytterbium content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yong, Yean Sheng; Aravazhi, S.; Vázquez-Córdova, Sergio Andrés; Carvajal, J.J.; Diaz, F.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Pollnau, Markus

    2016-01-01

    We study the spectroscopic properties of thin films of potassium ytterbium gadolinium double tungstates, KYb0.57Gd0.43(WO4)2, and potassium ytterbium lutetium double tungstates, KYb0.76Lu0.24(WO4)2, specifically at the central absorption line near 981 nm wavelength, which is important for amplifiers

  20. Energy transfer between octahedral tungstate and uranate groups in oxides with perovskite structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, A.C. van der; Hair, J.Th.W. de; Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    Energy transfer between tungstate and uranate groups in oxides with perovskite structure is reported. The critical distance for this process is about 25 Å. Evidence is given for energy transfer between tungstate groups. In this case the critical distance is estimated to be about 8 Å.

  1. The growth units and hydrothermal preparation of lead tungstate (PbWO4) crystallites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    元如林; 施尔畏; 李汶军; 郑燕青; 吴南春; 仲维卓

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of lead tungstate (PbWO4) can be regarded as ordered combination of the tungsten oxide tetrahedrons (WO4) and lead ions (Pb2+). According to the growth unit model, the growth units of lead tungstate are the aggregations of the tungsten oxide tetrahedrons and lead cations with various geometry configurations. It is suggested that the favorable growth units of lead tungstate crystal are pyramidal, tetragonal prism and quadrangular units corresponding to geometric orientations of the simple forms of the crystal. Under low restricted growth conditions, the growth form of lead tungstate crystallites is the aggregation of the geometric configurations of these favorable growth units. The above conclusions are completely confirmed by the experiment on hydrothermal preparation of lead tungstate crystallites.

  2. The growth units and hydrothermal preparation of lead tungstate (PbWO4) crystallites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of lead tungstate (PbWO4) can be regarded as ordered combination of the tungsten oxide tetrahedrons (WO4) and lead ions (Pb2+). According to the growth unit model, the growth units of lead tungstate are the aggregations of the tungsten oxide tetrahedrons and lead cations with various geometry configurations. It is suggested that the favorable growth units of lead tungstate crystal are pyramidal, tetragonal prism and quadrangular units corresponding to geometric orientations of the simple forms of the crystal. Under low restricted growth conditions, the growth form of lead tungstate crystallites is the aggregation of the geometric configurations of these favorable growth units. The above conclusions are completely confirmed by the experiment on hydrothermal preparation of lead tungstate crystallites.

  3. Development of metal tungstate alloys for photoelectrochemical water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasher, D.; Chong, M.; Chang, Y.; Sarker, P.; Huda, M. N.; Gaillard, N.

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report our efforts on the development of metal tungstate alloys for efficient and economical photoelectrochemical water splitting. As suggested by density functional theory (DFT), the addition of copper to the host tungsten trioxide improves the visible light absorption. Past studies at the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute have demonstrated that water splitting with co-sputtered and spray-deposited CuWO4 with 2.2 eV band gap was feasible, although the efficiency of the process was severely limited by charge carrier recombination. Density functional theory calculation showed that CuWO4 contains unfilled mid-gap states and high electron effective mass. To improve transport properties of CuWO4, we hypothesized that copper tungstate (CuWO4) hollow nanospheres could improve holes transfer to the electrolyte and reduce recombination, improving the water splitting efficiency. Nanospheres were synthesized by sonochemical technique in which the precursors used were copper acetate, ammonium meta-tungstate and thiourea (used as a fuel to complete the reaction). All chemicals undergo a high-energy sonication by using ethylene glycol as a solvent. Preliminary linear scan voltammetry (LSV) performed for annealed CuWO4 under front side and back side simulated AM-1.5 illumination demonstrated that the CuWO4 hollow nanospheres were photoactive. Subsequent scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy studies revealed the clear formation of nano sized hollow spherical shaped CuWO4 particles. X-ray diffraction analysis showed a clear formation of triclinic CuWO4 structure during the sonochemical process.

  4. Dual-Readout Calorimetry with Lead Tungstate Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Akchurin, N; Cardini, A; Ferrari, R; Gaudio, G; Hauptman, J; Kim, H; La Rotonda, L; Livan, M; Meoni, E; Paar, H; Penzo, Aldo L; Pinci, D; Policicchio, Antonio; Popescu, S; Susinno, G; Roh, Y; Vandelli, W; Wigmans, R

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented of beam tests in which a small electromagnetic calorimeter consisting of lead tungstate crystals was exposed to 50 GeV electrons and pions. This calorimeter was backed up by the DREAM Dual-Readout calorimeter, which measures the scintillation and \\v{C}erenkov light produced in the shower development, using two different media. The signals from the crystal calorimeter were analyzed in great detail in an attempt to determine the contributions from these two types of light to the signals, event by event. This information makes it possible to eliminate the dominating source of fluctuations and thus achieve an important improvement in hadronic calorimeter performance.

  5. Luminescence spectra of lead tungstate, spodumene and topaz crystals Thermoluminescence

    CERN Document Server

    Ramachandran, V

    2002-01-01

    A detailed set of thermoluminescence, cathodoluminescence and radioluminescence (TL, CLTL and RLTL) data of lead tungstate, Spodumene and Topaz have been reported for the first time over a wide temperature range from 25 to 500K. Lead tungstate (PbWO sub 4), a widely known scintillating material, gives TL glow peaks which are related to complex defect centres. Doping of this crystal with trivalent rare earth ions (La sup 3 sup + , Y sup 3 sup +) reduces the slow component of the emission thereby making it more suitable for its applications. The pentavalent dopants on the other hand, enhance the green emission and quench the blue emission at temperatures 100K. The origin and the irradiation temperature definitely have an effect on the spectrum. No strong relationship could be derived from the dose dependence data. Two less studied minerals, Spodumene and Topaz have also been investigated with the luminescence techniques. The glow peak near 250degC is thought to have originated from Mn sup 2 sup + centres. As th...

  6. Anti-obesity sodium tungstate treatment triggers axonal and glial plasticity in hypothalamic feeding centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Amigó-Correig

    Full Text Available This study aims at exploring the effects of sodium tungstate treatment on hypothalamic plasticity, which is known to have an important role in the control of energy metabolism.Adult lean and high-fat diet-induced obese mice were orally treated with sodium tungstate. Arcuate and paraventricular nuclei and lateral hypothalamus were separated and subjected to proteomic analysis by DIGE and mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemistry and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging were also performed.Sodium tungstate treatment reduced body weight gain, food intake, and blood glucose and triglyceride levels. These effects were associated with transcriptional and functional changes in the hypothalamus. Proteomic analysis revealed that sodium tungstate modified the expression levels of proteins involved in cell morphology, axonal growth, and tissue remodeling, such as actin, CRMP2 and neurofilaments, and of proteins related to energy metabolism. Moreover, immunohistochemistry studies confirmed results for some targets and further revealed tungstate-dependent regulation of SNAP25 and HPC-1 proteins, suggesting an effect on synaptogenesis as well. Functional test for cell activity based on c-fos-positive cell counting also suggested that sodium tungstate modified hypothalamic basal activity. Finally, in vivo magnetic resonance imaging showed that tungstate treatment can affect neuronal organization in the hypothalamus.Altogether, these results suggest that sodium tungstate regulates proteins involved in axonal and glial plasticity. The fact that sodium tungstate could modulate hypothalamic plasticity and networks in adulthood makes it a possible and interesting therapeutic strategy not only for obesity management, but also for other neurodegenerative illnesses like Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Potassium double tungstate waveguides with high ytterbium concentration for optical amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yong, Yean-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, the research work concerning high ytterbium concentration potassium double tungstate waveguides catered for optical amplification purpose is presented. The scope of the research work includes the investigation of spectroscopic and optical gain properties in epitaxy layers with

  8. Raman studies of A2MWO6 tungstate double perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R L; Heyns, A M; Woodward, P M

    2015-06-21

    The Raman spectra of seven A(2)MWO(6) tungstate double perovskites are analysed. Ba(2)MgWO(6) is a cubic double perovskite with Fm3[combining macron]m symmetry and its Raman spectrum contain three modes that can be assigned in a straightforward manner. A fourth mode, the asymmetric stretch of the [WO(6)](6-) octahedron, is too weak to be observed. The symmetry of Ba(2)CaWO(6) is lowered to tetragonal I4/m due to octahedral tilting, but the distortion is sufficiently subtle that the extra bands predicted to appear in the Raman spectrum are not observed. The remaining five compounds have additional octahedral tilts that lower the symmetry to monoclinic P2(1)/n. The further reduction of symmetry leads to the appearance of additional lattice modes involving translations of the A-site cations and librations of the octahedra. Comparing the Raman spectra of fourteen different A(2)MWO(6) tungstate double perovskites shows that the frequency of the symmetric stretch (ν(1)) of the [WO(6)](6-) octahedron is relatively low for cubic perovskites with tolerance factors greater than one due to underbonding of the tungsten and/or M cation. The frequency of this mode increases rapidly as the tolerance factor drops below one, before decreasing gradually as the octahedral tilting gets larger. The frequency of the oxygen bending mode (ν(5)) is shown to be dependent on the mass of the A-site cation due to coupling of the internal bending mode with external A-site cation translation modes.

  9. Dysprosium detector for neutron dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostinelli, A.; Berlusconi, C.; Conti, V.; Duchini, M.; Gelosa, S.; Guallini, F.; Vallazza, E.; Prest, M.

    2014-09-01

    Radiotherapy treatments with high-energy (>8 MeV) photon beams are a standard procedure in clinical practice, given the skin and near-target volumes sparing effect, the accurate penetration and the uniform spatial dose distribution. On the other hand, despite these advantages, neutrons may be produced via the photo-nuclear (γ,n) reactions of the high-energy photons with the high-Z materials in the accelerator head, in the treatment room and in the patient, resulting in an unwanted dose contribution which is of concern, given its potential to induce secondary cancers, and which has to be monitored. This work presents the design and the test of a portable Dysprosium dosimeter to be used during clinical treatments to estimate the "in vivo" dose to the patient. The dosimeter has been characterized and validated with tissue-equivalent phantom studies with a Varian Clinical iX 18 MV photon beam, before using it with a group of patients treated at the S. Anna Hospital in Como. The working principle of the dosimeter together with the readout chain and the results in terms of delivered dose are presented.

  10. Dysprosium detector for neutron dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostinelli, A.; Berlusconi, C.; Conti, V.; Duchini, M.; Gelosa, S. [Medical Physics - Sant' Anna Hospital, Como (Italy); Guallini, F. [EL.SE s.r.l. (Italy); Vallazza, E. [INFN, Trieste (Italy); Prest, M. [University of Insubria, Como (Italy)

    2014-09-21

    Radiotherapy treatments with high-energy (>8MeV) photon beams are a standard procedure in clinical practice, given the skin and near-target volumes sparing effect, the accurate penetration and the uniform spatial dose distribution. On the other hand, despite these advantages, neutrons may be produced via the photo-nuclear (γ,n) reactions of the high-energy photons with the high-Z materials in the accelerator head, in the treatment room and in the patient, resulting in an unwanted dose contribution which is of concern, given its potential to induce secondary cancers, and which has to be monitored. This work presents the design and the test of a portable Dysprosium dosimeter to be used during clinical treatments to estimate the “in vivo” dose to the patient. The dosimeter has been characterized and validated with tissue-equivalent phantom studies with a Varian Clinical iX 18 MV photon beam, before using it with a group of patients treated at the S. Anna Hospital in Como. The working principle of the dosimeter together with the readout chain and the results in terms of delivered dose are presented.

  11. Low Field Magnetic and Thermal Hysteresis in Antiferromagnetic Dysprosium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliia Liubimova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic and thermal hysteresis (difference in magnetic properties on cooling and heating have been studied in polycrystalline Dy (dysprosium between 80 and 250 K using measurements of the reversible Villari effect and alternating current (AC susceptibility. We argue that measurement of the reversible Villari effect in the antiferromagnetic phase is a more sensitive method to detect magnetic hysteresis than the registration of conventional B(H loops. We found that the Villari point, recently reported in the antiferromagnetic phase of Dy at 166 K, controls the essential features of magnetic hysteresis and AC susceptibility on heating from the ferromagnetic state: (i thermal hysteresis in AC susceptibility and in the reversible Villari effect disappears abruptly at the temperature of the Villari point; (ii the imaginary part of AC susceptibility is strongly frequency dependent, but only up to the temperature of the Villari point; (iii the imaginary part of the susceptibility drops sharply also at the Villari point. We attribute these effects observed at the Villari point to the disappearance of the residual ferromagnetic phase. The strong influence of the Villari point on several magnetic properties allows this temperature to be ranked almost as important as the Curie and Néel temperatures in Dy and likely also for other rare earth elements and their alloys.

  12. A Low-Symmetry Dysprosium Metallocene Single-Molecule Magnet with a High Anisotropy Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Thomas; Chilton, Nicholas F; Layfield, Richard A

    2016-09-05

    The single-molecule magnet (SMM) properties of the isocarbonyl-ligated dysprosium metallocene [Cp*2 Dy{μ-(OC)2 FeCp}]2 (1Dy ), which contains a rhombus-shaped Dy2 Fe2 core, are described. Combining a strong axial [Cp*](-) ligand field with a weak equatorial field consisting of the isocarbonyl ligands leads to an anisotropy barrier of 662 cm(-1) in zero applied field. The dominant thermal relaxation pathways in 1Dy involves at least the fourth-excited Kramers doublet, thus demonstrating that prominent SMM behavior can be observed for dysprosium in low-symmetry environments.

  13. Malonate complexes of dysprosium: synthesis, characterization and application for LI-MOCVD of dysprosium containing thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanov, Andrian P; Seidel, Rüdiger W; Barreca, Davide; Gasparotto, Alberto; Winter, Manuela; Feydt, Jürgen; Irsen, Stephan; Becker, Hans-Werner; Devi, Anjana

    2011-01-07

    A series of malonate complexes of dysprosium were synthesized as potential metalorganic precursors for Dy containing oxide thin films using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) related techniques. The steric bulkiness of the dialkylmalonato ligand employed was systematically varied and its influence on the resulting structural and physico-chemical properties that is relevant for MOCVD was studied. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the five homoleptic tris-malonato Dy complexes (1-5) are dimers with distorted square-face bicapped trigonal-prismatic geometry and a coordination number of eight. In an attempt to decrease the nuclearity and increase the solubility of the complexes in various solvents, the focus was to react these dimeric complexes with Lewis bases such as 2,2'-biypridyl and pyridine (6-9). This resulted in monomeric tris-malonato mono Lewis base adduct complexes with improved thermal properties. Finally considering the ease of synthesis, the monomeric nature and promising thermal characteristics, the silymalonate adduct complex [Dy(dsml)(3)bipy] (8) was selected as single source precursor for growing DySi(x)O(y) thin films by liquid injection metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LI-MOCVD) process. The as-deposited films were analyzed for their morphology and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  14. Exploration of dysprosium: the most critical element for Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Dysprosium (Dy), one of the heavy rare earth elements, is used mainly as an additive for NdFeB permanent magnets which are installed in various modern industrial products such as voice coil motors in computers, factory automation machinery, hybrid and electric vehicles, home electronics, and wind turbine, to improve heat resistance of the magnets. Dy has been produced about 2,000t per year from the ores from ion adsorption type deposits in southern China. However, the produced amount of Dy was significantly reduced in 2011 in China due to reservation of heavy rare earth resources and protection of natural environment, resulting in soaring of Dy price in the world. In order to respond the increasing demand of Dy, unconventional supply sources are inevitably developed, in addition to heavy rare earth enriched ion adsorption type deposits outside China. Heavy rare earth elements including Dy are dominantly hosted in xenotime, fergusonite, zircon, eudialyte, keiviite, kainosite, iimoriite, etc. Concentration of xenotime is found in placer deposits in Malaysia and India, hydrothermal deposits associated with unconformity-type uranium mineralization (Athabasca basin in Canada, Western Australia), iron-oxide fluorite mineralization (South Africa) and Sn-bearing alkaline granite (Brazil). Zircon and fergusontie concentration is found as igneous and hydrothermal products in peralkaline syenite, alkaline granite and pegmatite (e.g., Nechalacho in Canada). Eudialyte concentration is found in some peralkaline syenite bodies in Greenland, Canada, Sweden and Russia. Among these sources, large Dy resources are estimated in the deposits hosted in peralkaline rocks (Nechalacho: 79,000t, Kvanefjeld: 49,000t, Norra Karr: 15,700t, etc.) compared to the present demand of Dy. Thus, Dy will be supplied from the deposits associated with peralkaline and alkaline deposits in future instead of ion adsorption type deposits in southern China.

  15. Long afterglow of trivalent dysprosium doped strontium aluminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuan Ming, E-mail: dongshanisland@126.com [School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou University, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Ma, Qing-lan [School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou University, Jiangsu 213164 (China); School of Electronics and Information, Nantong University, Jiangsu 226019 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Trivalent dysprosium doped strontium aluminate (SrA1{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+}) was synthesized via the sol–gel combustion method to realize green afterglow in the absence of Eu{sup 2+} luminescent centers. The morphology, crystal structure, photoluminescence and long afterglow of the SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy, respectively. The bluish-green photoluminescence of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} consists of a broad emission band centered at about 520 nm and two characteristic emissions of Dy{sup 3+} ions centered at 480 and 575 nm, respectively. The green afterglow of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} is a broad emission band centered at around 520 nm, and the lifetime extracted from afterglow decay is found to be 53 s. The mechanism on the green afterglow from SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} is discussed in terms of the possible defect levels in the host. - Highlights: • Broad band long-lasting afterglow is observed in SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors. • Characteristic emissions of Dy{sup 3+} ions are superimposed on the broad PL of phosphors. • Dy{sup 3+} ions can also act as luminescent centers in addition to electron traps. • A mechanism on long afterglow of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} is proposed without Eu{sup 2+} activator.

  16. Low temperature spin reorientation in dysprosium iron garnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahoubi, M; Younsi, W; Soltani, M L [Department of Physics, Badji-Mokhtar University, BP-12 Annaba, 23000 (Algeria); Voiron, J; Schmitt, D, E-mail: mlahoubi@gmail.co [Louis Neel Laboratory, CNRS-UJF, BP-166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-03-01

    The spin reorientation (SR) phase transition in dysprosium iron garnet (Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} or DyIG) have been studied by specific heat C{sub p}(T) and high field magnetisation measurements M{sub T}(H) and M{sub H}(T) on single crystals at low temperature. A first order SR is observed with a sharp jump at T{sub SR} = 14.5+-0.5 K in the C{sub p}(T) curve which corresponds to a spontaneous change from the high temperature (HT) easy direction (111) to an (uuw) angular low temperature (LT) phases. Above T{sub SR}, the magnetic structure is described by the irreducible representation (IR) A{sub 2g} of the rhombohedral space group R 3 c. Below T{sub SR}, the magnetic structure changes in the monoclinic the space group C2/c with the IR A{sub g}. When the field H is kept aligned along the hard symmetry directions (100) and (110), we obtain respectively the variation of the angular positions theta(T) and theta'(T) from the total spontaneous magnetisation down to 1.5 K (theta = 39.23 deg. and theta' = 30.14 deg.) and the results are in good agreement with the previous observations in low fields. When the sample is allowed to rotate freely on itself, the critical field H{sub c}(T) between the HT(111) and the LT(uuw) angular phases permits us to precise the transition line up to 15 T and 40 K between the so called canted field induced (FI) and the associated collinear magnetic phases. The experimental magnetic phase diagram (MPD) is precisely determined in the (H{sub c}-T) plane and the domains of the existence and the stability of the two magnetic phases are specified.

  17. Anisotropic magnetic properties of dysprosium iron garnet (DyIG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahoubi, M; Younsi, W; Soltani, M-L [Department of Physics, Badji-Mokhtar University, BP 12 - 23000 Annaba (Algeria); Ouladdiaf, B, E-mail: mlahoubi@gmail.co [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156 - 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic properties of dysprosium iron garnet (DyIG) have been studied by performing high resolution powder neutron diffraction experiments and high dc fields magnetizations on single crystals. Among all the reflections (hkl) indexed in the nuclear cubic space group (CSG) Ia 3-bar d with h+k+l=2n and k=[000], the superstructure lines (hkl)* forbidden by the symmetry (222)* and (622)* are not observed in the patterns at all temperatures. The pattern at 130 K is well interpreted within the magnetic modes F belonging to the irreducible representation (IR) T{sub 1g} of the CSG and identified to the room temperature ferrimagnetic Neel model. The high magnetic field behavior of the spontaneous collinear magnetic structure (MS) along the easy axis (EA) <111> is isotropic. Below 130 K, the patterns exhibit additional magnetic superstructure lines. They are associated to the appearance of the spontaneous non collinear MS which is described in the subgroup of the CSG, R 3-bar c within the IR A{sub 2g}. A strong magnetization anisotropy (MA) is observed at 1.5 K in the low symmetry phases were the spin reorientation transition (SR) occur at T{sub RS}=14.5 K. The onset of MA is detected below two characteristic temperatures, Ta{sub 1}=125 K and Ta{sub 2}=75 K respectively to the hard axis (HA) <100> and <110>. Symmetry arguments are used in the framework of the theory of representation analysis (RA) applied to the subgroup of R 3-bar c, C2/c within the IR A{sub g}. It seems that this MA results essentially from the difference between the spontaneous non collinear MS and the field induced (FI) configurations. All results are discussed with previous neutrons studies.

  18. Synergistic Effect of Tungstate and Benzotriazole on Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel in Solutions Containing Cl-

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; XI Dan-li; LU Zhu

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition of tungstate, benzotriazole (BTA) and their combination in solutions containing Cl- was studied by electrochemical techniques. The results indicated that the inhibition efficiency of tungstate was higher than that of BTA. The efficiency increased with increasing concentration of tungstate or BTA. In the studies of synergistic effect of tungstate and BTA, it had been found that in Ph 9.0 solution, the largest Rt could be obtained with the concentration ratio of tungstate / BTA being 1:1. Lowering the Ph value of solution would reduce the efficiency of inhibitors, especially in binary inhibitors. Increasing the concentration of Cl- accelerated the corrosion of carbon steel in the solutions with various inhibitors, but the influence of Cl- on corroding rate in binary inhibitors was not so strong as in single component. The results of surface analysis showed that W, C, N, O and Fe elements existed in the protecting film formed with binary inhibitors. The thickness of the film was about 12-15nm.

  19. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny

    2015-10-23

    A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  20. Synthesis of lanthanum tungstate interconnecting nanoparticles by high voltage electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keereeta, Yanee, E-mail: ynkeereeta@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongtem, Titipun, E-mail: ttpthongtem@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongtem, Somchai [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • La{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} as one of semiconducting materials. • H.V. electrospinning was used to synthesize La{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} interconnecting nanoparticles. • A promising material for photoemission. - Abstract: Lanthanum tungstate (La{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}) interconnecting nanoparticles in the shape of fibers were successfully synthesized by electrospinning in combination with high temperature calcination. In this research, calcination temperature for the synthesis of the fibers evidently influenced the diameter, morphology and crystalline degree. The crystalline monoclinic La{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} fibers with 200–700 nm in diameter, two main Raman peaks at 945 and 927 cm{sup −1}, FTIR stretching modes at 936 and 847 cm{sup −1}, 2.02 eV energy gap and 415–430 nm blue emission were synthesized by calcination of inorganic/organic hybrid fibers at 750 °C for 5 h, characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The surface of the composite fibers before calcination was very smooth. Upon calcination the composite fibers at 750 °C for 5 h, they were transformed into nanoparticles join together in the shape of fibers with rough surface.

  1. Combustion synthesis of tungsten powder from sodium tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Guojian, E-mail: guojianjiang@sit.edu.cn [Shanghai Institute of Technology, 120 Caobao Road, Shanghai 200235 (China); Xu Jiayue [Shanghai Institute of Technology, 120 Caobao Road, Shanghai 200235 (China); Zhuang Hanrui; Li Wenlan [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2011-08-25

    Highlights: > Phase compositions of the combustion products synthesized at different mole ratios of Mg/Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}. > Phase compositions of combustion products synthesized at different relative densities. > Phase compositions of combustion product after the acid enrichment and distilled water washing. > Morphology of the combustion product after the acid enrichment and distilled water washing. - Abstract: Tungsten powders were prepared by Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS) method directly from hitherto unreported system: sodium tungstate (Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}) and magnesium (Mg). The adiabatic temperatures of self-propagating combustion reactions with different amount of Mg in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} + Mg system were calculated. The influences of different starting conditions (molar ratios of Mg/Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and relative densities of samples) on the compositions and microstructure of reaction products were investigated. It shown that, the complete reduction of WO{sub 3} required a 60% excess of magnesium over the stoichiometric molar ratio Mg/Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} of 3. The amount of the impurities is minimal at appropriate relative density. At last, tungsten powders can be obtained after the acid enrichment and distilled water washing.

  2. Fascinating morphologies of lead tungstate nanostructures by chimie douce approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Thresiamma; Joseph, Sunny; Sunny, Anu Tresa; Mathew, Suresh [Mahatma Gandhi University, School of Chemical Sciences (India)], E-mail: smathew_mgu@yahoo.com

    2008-04-15

    Lead tungstate occurs in nature as tetragonal stolzite of scheelite (CaWO{sub 4}) type and monoclinic raspite. In this work, we report, the typical growth of snowflake-like tetragonal stolzite and bamboo-leaf-like monoclinic raspite nanocrystals of PbWO{sub 4} via a simple aqueous precipitation method and a polyol (polyethylene glycol-200) mediated precipitation method at room temperature (27 deg. C). The synthesised PbWO{sub 4} nanocrystals were characterised by XRD, SEM, EDAX and TGA-DTA. The UV-Vis absorption and photoluminescence studies of PbWO{sub 4} nanocrystals in the two morphologies were performed. The nuclei of PbWO{sub 4} nanocrystals in aqueous medium self-assemble in a tetragonal manner to form the snowflake-like crystals. In polyol medium, PbWO{sub 4} nuclei preferentially grow by oriented attachment process to form the bamboo-leaf-like morphology. The specific morphology of the regularly assembled PbWO{sub 4} nanocrystals in the two phases finds applications in nanoelectronics and photonics. Compared to other well-known scintillators, PbWO{sub 4} is most attractive for high-energy physics applications, because of its high density, short decay time and high irradiation damage resistance.

  3. Effects of Dysprosium Oxide Doping on Microstructure and Properties of Barium Titanate Ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Yongping; Ren Huijun; Chen Wei; Chen Shoutian

    2005-01-01

    Different amounts of dysprosium oxide were incorporated into barium titanate powders synthesized by hydrothermal method. Relations of substitution behaviors and lattice parameters with solid-solubility were studied. Furthermore, the influences of dysprosium oxide doping fraction on grain size and dielectric properties of barium titanate ceramic, including dielectric constant and breakdown electric field strength, were investigated via scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and electric property tester. The results show that dysprosium oxide can restrain abnormal grain growth during sintering and that fine-grained and high density of barium titanate ceramic can result in excellent dielectric properties. As mass fraction of dysprosium oxide is 0.6%, the lattice parameters of grain increase to the maximum because of the lowest vacancy concentration. The electric property parameters are cited as following: dielectric constant (25 ℃) reaches 4100, the change in relative dielectric constant with temperature is -10% to 10% within the range of -15~100 ℃, breakdown electric field strength (alternating current) achieves 3.2 kV·mm-1, which can be used in manufacturing high voltage ceramic capacitors.

  4. Sandwich-type tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) dysprosium-cadmium quadruple-decker SMM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Qian, Kang; Wang, Kang; Bian, Yongzhong; Jiang, Jianzhuang; Gao, Song

    2011-09-14

    Homoleptic tetrakis[2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octa(butyloxy)phthalocyaninato] dysprosium-cadmium quadruple-decker complex 1 was isolated in relatively good yield of 43% from a simple one-pot reaction. This compound represents the first sandwich-type tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) rare earth-cadmium quadruple-decker SMM that has been structurally characterized.

  5. In situ characterization of the nitridation of dysprosium during mechanochemical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaques, Brian J.; Osterberg, Daniel D.; Alanko, Gordon A.; Tamrakar, Sumit; Smith, Cole R.; Hurley, Michael F.; Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: DarrylButt@BoiseState.edu

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • A nitridation reaction in a high energy planetary ball mill was monitored in situ. • Dysprosium mononitride was synthesized from Dy at low temperatures in short times. • Ideal gas law and in situ temperature and pressure used to assess reaction extent. • It is proposed that reaction rate is proportional to the creation of new surface. - Abstract: Processing of advanced nitride ceramics traditionally requires long durations at high temperatures and, in some cases, in hazardous atmospheres. In this study, dysprosium mononitride (DyN) was rapidly formed from elemental dysprosium in a closed system at ambient temperatures. An experimental procedure was developed to quantify the progress of the nitridation reaction during mechanochemical processing in a high energy planetary ball mill (HEBM) as a function of milling time and intensity using in situ temperature and pressure measurements, SEM, XRD, and particle size analysis. No intermediate phases were formed. It was found that the creation of fresh dysprosium surfaces dictates the rate of the nitridation reaction, which is a function of milling intensity and the number of milling media. These results show clearly that high purity nitrides can be synthesized with short processing times at low temperatures in a closed system requiring a relatively small processing footprint.

  6. A comparative study of the proton transport properties of metal (IV) tungstates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alpana Parikh; Uma Chudasama

    2003-02-01

    Tetravalent metal acid (TMA) salts are cation exchangers due to the presence of structural hydroxyl groups. The presence of protons makes the TMA salt, a potential candidate for solid state protonic conduction. In the present endeavour, amorphous inorganic ion exchangers of the class of TMA salts, tin tungstate (SnW), titanium tungstate (TiW) and zirconium tungstate (ZrW) have been synthesized and characterized for elemental analysis, thermal analysis (TGA, DSC), FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray analysis. Chemical resistivity of these materials have been assessed in various acidic, basic and organic media. Ion exchange capacity has been determined and effect of heating on ion exchange capacity has been studied. The proton conduction behaviour of these materials has been studied by measuring specific conductance () at different temperatures in the range 30-175°C using HP 4192 A impedance analyzer. The specific conductance values for the three materials have been compared.

  7. Dysprosium complexes with the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand; Complejos de disprosio con el ligante macrociclico tetrafenilporfirina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez M, V.; Padilla, J.; Ramirez, F.M

    1992-04-15

    In this report, the results obtained on the synthesis, characterization and study of the chemical behavior of dysprosium complex with the acetylacetone chelating agent (Hacac) and the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand (H{sub 2}TFP) are given. Based on the literature but according to our necessities and interest, the appropriate methodology settled down from the synthesis of prime matters until the obtaining and characterization of the products. The acetyl acetonate complex was obtained of mono hydrated dysprosium [Dy(acac){sub 3}. H{sub 2}0] and trihydrated [Dy(acac){sub 3} .3 H{sub 2}0], the mono tetra phenyl porphyrinate [Dy(TFP)(acac). 2 ac] the double sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP){sub 2}] and the triple sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP){sub 3}. 2 TCB] (TCB = trichlorobenzene). Its were characterized by their melting points, solubility, IR, UV, TGA and DTA both first and besides the techniques already mentioned for NMR'H, RPE and Magnetic susceptibility the three last complexes. From the spectroscopic point of view, IR and RPE its suggested the existence of a complex of inverse mixed valence [Dy(TFP){sup 2-} (TFP) {sup 1-}] for the Dy(TFP){sub 2} as a result of the existence of the free radical (TFP' {sup 1-} and that it was not in none of the other porphyrin compounds. In the NMR'H spectra of the compounds were not observed signals in the region from 0 to 10 ppm that which shows that the dysprosium complexes in special those of the porphyrin type are highly paramagnetic and its could be used as displacement reagents, creators of images and contrast agents of great utility in these days in studies of NMR, technique today by today used in medical diagnoses. (Author)

  8. Hydrothermal syntheses and characterization of uranyl tungstates with electro-neutral structural units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Enviromental Engineering and Earth Sciences; Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2015-11-01

    Two uranyl tungstates, (UO{sub 2})(W{sub 2}O{sub 7})(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (1) and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(W{sub 2}O{sub 8})F{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions at 220 C and were structurally, chemically, and spectroscopically characterized. 1 Crystallizes in space group Pbcm, a = 6.673(5) Aa, b = 12.601(11) Aa, c = 11.552 Aa; 2 is in C2/m, a = 13.648(1) Aa, b = 16.852(1) Aa, c = 9.832(1) Aa, β = 125.980(1) {sup circle}. In 1 the U(VI) cations are present as (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ions that are coordinated by five oxygen atoms to give pentagonal bipyramids. These share two edges with two tungstate octahedra and single vertices with four additional octahedra, resulting in a sheet with the iriginite-type anion topology. Only water molecules are located in the interlayer. The structural units of 2 consist of (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl oxy-fluoride pentagonal bipyramids present as either [UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}O{sub 3}]{sup -6} or [UO{sub 2}FO{sub 4}]{sup -5}, and strongly distorted tungstate octahedra. The linkage of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and tungstate octahedra gives a unique sheet anion topology consisting of pentagons, squares and triangles. In 2, the uranyl tungstates sheets are connected into a novel electro-neutral three-dimensional framework through dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. These dimers connecting the sheets share an edge defined by F anions. 2 is the first example of a uranyl tungstate oxy-fluoride, and 1 and 2 are rare examples of uranyl compounds containing electro-neutral structural units.

  9. Solid state synthesis of copper tungstate nanoparticles and its electrochemical detection of 4-chlorophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthamizh, S.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Manigandan, R.; Kumar, S. Praveen; Munusamy, S.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.; Narayanan, V.

    2014-04-01

    Copper tungstate (CuWO4) nanoparticles were prepared by Solid state synthesis. The CuWO4 nanoparticles were synthesized by reacting 1:1 mole ratio of copper chloride and sodium tungstate. The XRD pattern reveals that the synthesized CuWO4 has anorthic (triclinic) structure. In addition, the average grain size, lattice parameter values were also calculated using XRD data. The FT-IR analysis confirm the presence of Cu-O and W-O bonds in CuWO4 nanoparticles. The electrochemical sensing behavior of CuWO4 nanoparticles towards 4-chlorophenol was investigated using cyclic voltammetry.

  10. Synthesis, structural characterization and in vitro testing of dysprosium containing silica particles as potential MRI contrast enhancing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiriac, L. B.; Trandafir, D. L.; Turcu, R. V. F.; Todea, M.; Simon, S.

    2016-11-01

    The work is focused on synthesis and structural characterization of novel dysprosium-doped silica particles which could be considered as MRI contrast agents. Sol-gel derived silica rich particles obtained via freeze-drying and spray-drying processing methods were structurally characterized by XRD, 29Si MAS-NMR and XPS methods. The occurrence of dysprosium on the outermost layer of dysprosium containing silica particles was investigated by XPS analysis. The MRI contrast agent characteristics have been tested using RARE-T1 and RARE-T2 protocols. The contrast of MRI images delivered by the investigated samples was correlated with their local structure. Dysprosium disposal on microparticles with surface structure characterised by decreased connectivity of the silicate network units favours dark T2-weighted MRI contrast properties.

  11. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny [Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Centro Universitario Tonalá, Universidad de Guadalajara, Av. Nuevo Periférico No. 555, C.P. 48525, Tonalá, Jalisco (Mexico); Sánchez Jiménez, Cecilia [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Gurinov, Andrey [Research Resources Center for Magnetic Resonance, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskiy pr. 26, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); NMR Core Lab, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Pérez Centeno, Armando; Ceja Andrade, Israel [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe, E-mail: gregoriocarbajal@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • LDH structure including dysprosium was prepared by co-precipitation. • LDH was capable to produce contrast in the T1 mode of MRI. • LDH were intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions. - Abstract: A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  12. Role of sodium tungstate as a potential antiplatelet agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Ruiz R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rebeca Fernández-Ruiz,1,2 Marc Pino,3 Begoña Hurtado,4 Pablo García de Frutos,4 Carolina Caballo,3 Ginés Escolar,3 Ramón Gomis,1,2,5 Maribel Diaz-Ricart3 1Diabetes and Obesity Research Laboratory, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS, Rosellón, Barcelona, 2Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas Asociadas, Barcelona, 3Hemotherapy–Hemostasis, Hospital Clínic, Universidad de Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Villarroel, Barcelona, 4Institutode Investigaciones Biomédicas de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Institut d’Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer, Rosellón, Barcelona, 5Hospital Clinic, Universitat de Barcelona, Villarroel, Barcelona, Spain Purpose: Platelet inhibition is a key strategy in the management of atherothrombosis. However, the large variability in response to current strategies leads to the search for alternative inhibitors. The antiplatelet effect of the inorganic salt sodium tungstate (Na2O4W, a protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B inhibitor, has been investigated in this study.Methods: Wild-type (WT and PTP1B knockout (PTP1B-/- mice were treated for 1 week with Na2O4W to study platelet function with the platelet function analyzer PFA-100, a cone-and-plate analyzer, a flat perfusion chamber, and thrombus formation in vivo. Human blood aliquots were incubated with Na2O4W for 1 hour to measure platelet function using the PFA-100 and the annular perfusion chamber. Aggregometry and thromboelastometry were also performed.Results: In WT mice, Na2O4W treatment prolonged closure times in the PFA-100 and decreased the surface covered (%SC by platelets on collagen. Thrombi formed in a thrombosis mice model were smaller in animals treated with Na2O4W (4.6±0.7 mg vs 8.9±0.7 mg; P<0.001. Results with Na2O4W were similar to those in untreated PTP1B-/- mice (5.0±0.3 mg. Treatment of the PTP1B-/- mice with Na2O4W modified only

  13. Slow magnetic relaxation in a hydrogen-bonded 2D array of mononuclear dysprosium(III) oxamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortea-Pérez, Francisco R; Vallejo, Julia; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; De Munno, Giovanni; Armentano, Donatella; Pardo, Emilio

    2013-05-01

    The reaction of N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)oxamic acid with dysprosium(III) ions in a controlled basic media afforded the first example of a mononuclear lanthanide oxamate complex exhibiting a field-induced slow magnetic relaxation behavior typical of single-ion magnets (SIMs). The hydrogen-bond-mediated self-assembly of this new bifunctional dysprosium(III) SIM in the solid state provides a unique example of 2D hydrogen-bonded polymer with a herringbone net topology.

  14. Direct Hydrothermal Precipitation of Pyrochlore-Type Tungsten Trioxide Hemihydrate from Alkaline Sodium Tungstate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobin; Li, Jianpu; Zhou, Qiusheng; Peng, Zhihong; Liu, Guihua; Qi, Tiangui

    2012-04-01

    Pyrochlore-type tungsten trioxide hemihydrate (WO3·0.5H2O) powder with the average particle size of 0.5 μm was prepared successfully from the weak alkaline sodium tungstate solution by using organic substances of sucrose or cisbutenedioic acid as the acidification agent. The influences of solution pH and acidification agents on the precipitation process were investigated. The results showed that organic acidification agents such as sucrose and cisbutenedioic acid could improve the precipitation of pyrochlore WO3·0.5H2O greatly from sodium tungstate solution compared with the traditional acidification agent of hydrochloric acid. In addition, the pH value of the hydrothermal system played a critical role in the precipitation process of WO3·0.5H2O, and WO3·0.5H2O precipitation mainly occured in the pH range of 7.0 to 8.5. The precipitation rate of tungsten species in the sodium tungstate solution could reach up to 98 pct under the optimized hydrothermal conditions. This article proposed also the hydrothermal precipitation mechanism of WO3·0.5H2O from the weak alkaline sodium tungstate solution. The novel method reported in this study has a great potential to improve the efficiency of advanced tungsten trioxide-based functional material preparation, as well as for the pollution-reducing and energy-saving tungsten extractive metallurgy.

  15. Rare-earth activated potassium double tungstate waveguide amplifiers and lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Geskus, D.; van Dalfsen, Koop; Aravazhi, S.; Pollnau, Markus

    Several fields, including optical communications, bio-sensing, health, and safety, will greatly benefit from on-chip high-gain amplifiers and high-power, compact, efficient, tunable or short-pulse lasers in channel waveguide geometry. The rare-earth (RE) doped potassium double tungstates KY(WO4)2,

  16. The construction of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter: lead-tungstate (PWO) crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    APD (Avalanche PhotoDiodes) photodetectors are being glued onto the rear face of PWO (lead tungstate, PbWO4) crystals ready for assembly. Fig. 2 shows a PWO crystal and Fig. 3 five crystals put on a tray to feed the automatic measurement machine. Two APDs are shown on pictures n. 4 and 5.

  17. Efficient channel waveguide lasers in monoclinic double tungstates: towards further integration with on-chip mirrors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalfsen, Koop; van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; Dijkstra, Mindert; Aravazhi, S.; Bernhardi, Edward; García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Pollnau, Markus

    2012-01-01

    By varying the thulium concentration in the range of 1.5 – 8.0 at.% in thulium- gadolinium-lutetium-yttrium-co-doped monoclinic double tungstate channel waveguides, a maximum laser slope efficiency of 70% with respect to the absorbed pump power was obtained. Further integration of these channel

  18. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenstein, Kaspar; Comellas-Bigler, Mireia; Bevers, Loes E; Feiters, Martin C; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Locher, Kaspar P

    2009-06-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO(4) (2-)) and tungstate (WO(4) (2-)). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across the cell membrane. We have recently reported a crystal structure of the molybdate/tungstate binding protein ModA/WtpA from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, which revealed an octahedrally coordinated central metal atom. By contrast, the previously determined structures of three bacterial homologs showed tetracoordinate molybdenum and tungsten atoms in their binding pockets. Until then, coordination numbers above four had only been found for molybdenum/tungsten in metalloenzymes where these metal atoms are part of the catalytic cofactors and coordinated by mostly non-oxygen ligands. We now report a high-resolution structure of A. fulgidus ModA/WtpA, as well as crystal structures of four additional homologs, all bound to tungstate. These crystal structures match X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements from soluble, tungstate-bound protein, and reveal the details of the distorted octahedral coordination. Our results demonstrate that the distorted octahedral geometry is not an exclusive feature of the A. fulgidus protein, and suggest distinct binding modes of the binding proteins from archaea and bacteria.

  19. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, K.; Comellas-Bigler, M.; Bevers, L.E.; Feiters, M.C.; Meyer-Klaucke, W.; Hagedoorn, P.-L.; Locher, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO4 2−) and tungstate (WO4 2−). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across th

  20. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, K.; Comellas-Bigler, M.; Bevers, L.E.; Feiters, M.C.; Meyer-Klaucke, W.; Hagedoorn, P.-L.; Locher, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO4 2−) and tungstate (WO4 2−). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across

  1. A comparative study of proton transport properties of metal (IV) tungstates and their organic derivatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heemanshu Patel; Alpana Parikh; Uma Chudasama

    2005-04-01

    New hybrid inorgano–organic materials were synthesized by anchoring organic moieties, ortho chlorophenol and para chlorophenol onto metal (IV) tungstates viz. tin tungstate (SnW), titanium tungstate (TiW) and zirconium tungstate (ZW) to give SnWoCP, SnWpCP, TiWoCP, TiWpCP, ZWoCP and ZWpCP, respectively. The materials were characterized for elemental analysis, thermal analysis (TGA, DSC), X-ray analysis and FTIR spectroscopy. Chemical resistivity of these materials were assessed in several acidic, basic and organic media. Further, the study of transport properties of these materials has been explored by measuring proton conductivity at different temperatures in the range 30–175°C using HP4192A impedance analyser over a frequency range 5 Hz–13 MHz at a signal level below 1 V. Based on the specific conductance data and Arrhenius plots, a suitable mechanism was proposed and conductance performance of derivatized and nonderivatized materials compared.

  2. Dysprosium-Catalyzed Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this letter, we report that dysprosium is an effective catalyst for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs growth via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD process for the first time. Horizontally superlong well-oriented SWNT arrays on SiO2/Si wafer can be fabricated by EtOH-CVD under suitable conditions. The structure and properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that the SWNTs from dysprosium have better structural uniformity and better conductivity with fewer defects. This rare earth metal provides not only an alternative catalyst for SWNTs growth, but also a possible method to generate high percentage of superlong semiconducting SWNT arrays for various applications of nanoelectronic device.

  3. Direct Search for keV Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter with a Stable Dysprosium Target

    CERN Document Server

    Lasserre, T; Cribier, M; Merle, A; Mertens, S; Vivier, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a new method to search for keV-scale sterile neutrinos that could account for Dark Matter. Neutrinos trapped in our galaxy could be captured on stable $^{163}$Dy if their mass is greater than 2.83~keV. Two experimental realizations are studied, an integral counting of $^{163}$Ho atoms in dysprosium-rich ores and a real-time measurement of the emerging electron spectrum in a dysprosium-based detector. The capture rates are compared to the solar neutrino and radioactive backgrounds. An integral counting experiment using several kilograms of $^{163}$Dy could reach a sensitivity for the sterile-to-active mixing angle $\\sin^2\\theta_{e4}$ of $10^{-5}$ significantly exceeding current laboratory limits. Mixing angles as low as $\\sin^2\\theta_{e4} \\sim 10^{-7}$ / $\\rm m_{^{163}\\rm Dy}\\rm{(ton)}$ could possibly be explored with a real-time experiment.

  4. Reactive magnetron sputtering deposition of bismuth tungstate onto titania nanoparticles for enhancing visible light photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratova, Marina; Kelly, Peter J.; West, Glen T.; Tosheva, Lubomira; Edge, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Titanium dioxide - bismuth tungstate composite materials were prepared by pulsed DC reactive magnetron sputtering of bismuth and tungsten metallic targets in argon/oxygen atmosphere onto anatase and rutile titania nanoparticles. The use of an oscillating bowl placed beneath the two magnetrons arranged in a co-planar closed field configuration enabled the deposition of bismuth tungstate onto loose powders, rather than a solid substrate. The atomic ratio of the bismuth/tungsten coatings was controlled by varying the power applied to each target. The effect of the bismuth tungstate coatings on the phase, optical and photocatalytic properties of titania was investigated by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and an acetone degradation test. The latter involved measurements of the rate of CO2 evolution under visible light irradiation of the photocatalysts, which indicated that the deposition of bismuth tungstate resulted in a significant enhancement of visible light activity, for both anatase and rutile titania particles. The best results were achieved for coatings with a bismuth to tungsten atomic ratio of 2:1. In addition, the mechanism by which the photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 nanoparticles was enhanced by compounding it with bismuth tungstate was studied by microwave cavity perturbation. The results of these tests confirmed that such enhancement of the photocatalytic properties is due to more efficient photogenerated charge carrier separation, as well as to the contribution of the intrinsic photocatalytic properties of Bi2WO6.

  5. Preparation of Dysprosium Ferrite/Polyacrylamide Magnetic Composite Microsphere and Its Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hidehiro Kumazawa; Wang Zhifeng; Zhou Lanxiang; Zhang Hong; Li Yourong; Zhang Ming

    2005-01-01

    Using the technique of microemulsion polymerization with nano-reactor, dysprosium ferrite/polyacrylamide magnetic composite microsphere was prepared by one-step method in a single inverse microemulsion. The structure, average particle size, morphology of composite microsphere were characterized by FTIR, XRD, TEM and TGA. The magnetic responsibility of composite microsphere was also investigated. The results indicate that the magnetic composite microsphere possess high magnetic responsibility and suspension stability.

  6. {Delta}I = 2 energy staggering in normal deformed dysprosium nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, M.A.; Brown, T.B.; Archer, D.E. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Very high spin states (I{ge}50{Dirac_h}) have been observed in {sup 155,156,157}Dy. The long regular band sequences, free from sharp backbending effects, observed in these dysprosium nuclei offer the possibility of investigating the occurence of any {Delta}I = 2 staggering in normal deformed nuclei. Employing the same analysis techniques as used in superdeformed nuclei, certain bands do indeed demonstrate an apparent staggering and this is discussed.

  7. Poly[[[μ3-N′-(carboxymethylethylenediamine-N,N,N′-triacetato]dysprosium(III] trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Zhuang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title coordination polymer, {[Dy(C10H13N2O8]·3H2O}n, the dysprosium(III ion is coordinated by two N atoms and six O atoms from three different (carboxymethylethylenediaminetriacetate ligands in a distorted square-antiprismatic geometry. The ligands connect the metal atoms, forming layers parallel to the ab plane. O—H...O hydrogen bonds further assemble adjacent layers into a three-dimensional supramolecular network.

  8. Making two dysprosium atoms rotate - Einstein-de Haas effect revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Górecki, Wojciech; Rzążewski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the behaviour of two magnetic dipolar atoms trapped in a harmonic potential and exhibiting the standard Einstein-de Haas effect while subject to a time dependent homogeneous magnetic field. Using a simplified description of the short range interaction and the full expression for the dipole-dipole forces we show, that under experimentally realisable conditions two dysprosium atoms may be pumped to a high ($l>20$) value of the relative orbital angular momentum.

  9. Tungsten transport protein A (WtpA) in Pyrococcus furiosus: the first member of a new class of tungstate and molybdate transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Krijger, Gerard C; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2006-09-01

    A novel tungstate and molybdate binding protein has been discovered from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This tungstate transport protein A (WtpA) is part of a new ABC transporter system selective for tungstate and molybdate. WtpA has very low sequence similarity with the earlier-characterized transport proteins ModA for molybdate and TupA for tungstate. Its structural gene is present in the genome of numerous archaea and some bacteria. The identification of this new tungstate and molybdate binding protein clarifies the mechanism of tungstate and molybdate transport in organisms that lack the known uptake systems associated with the ModA and TupA proteins, like many archaea. The periplasmic protein of this ABC transporter, WtpA (PF0080), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, WtpA was observed to bind tungstate (dissociation constant [K(D)] of 17 +/- 7 pM) and molybdate (K(D) of 11 +/- 5 nM) with a stoichiometry of 1.0 mol oxoanion per mole of protein. These low K(D) values indicate that WtpA has a higher affinity for tungstate than do ModA and TupA and an affinity for molybdate similar to that of ModA. A displacement titration of molybdate-saturated WtpA with tungstate showed that the tungstate effectively replaced the molybdate in the binding site of the protein.

  10. Phosphor Dysprosium-Doped Layered Double Hydroxides Exchanged with Different Organic Functional Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ricardo Martínez Vargas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The layers of a Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH were doped with Dy3+ cations. Among some compositions, the Zn2+ : Al3+ : Dy3+ molar ratio equal to 30 : 9 : 1 presented a single crystalline phase. Organic anions with carboxylic, amino, sulfate, or phosphate functional groups were intercalated as single layers between LDH layers as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Photoluminescence spectra of the nitrate intercalated LDH showed a wide emission band with strong intensity in the yellow region (around 574 nm, originated due to symmetry distortion of the octahedral coordination in dysprosium centers. Moreover, a broad red band emission was also detected apparently due to the presence of zinc oxide. The distorted symmetry of the dysprosium coordination environment, also confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, was modified after the intercalation with phenyl phosphonate (PP, aspartate (Asp, adipate (Adip, and serinate (Ser anions; the emission as measured from PL spectra of these LDH was more intense in the blue region (ca. 486 nm, thus indicating an increase in symmetry of dysprosium octahedrons. The red emission band from zinc oxide kept the same intensity after intercalation of dodecyl sulfate (DDS. An additional emission of unknown origin at λ = 767 nm was present in all LDHs.

  11. Time- and energy-efficient solution combustion synthesis of binary metal tungstate nanoparticles with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Abegayl; Janáky, Csaba; Samu, Gergely F; Huda, Muhammad N; Sarker, Pranab; Liu, J Ping; van Nguyen, Vuong; Wang, Evelyn H; Schug, Kevin A; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2015-05-22

    In the search for stable and efficient photocatalysts beyond TiO2 , the tungsten-based oxide semiconductors silver tungstate (Ag2 WO4 ), copper tungstate (CuWO4 ), and zinc tungstate (ZnWO4 ) were prepared using solution combustion synthesis (SCS). The tungsten precursor's influence on the product was of particular relevance to this study, and the most significant effects are highlighted. Each sample's photocatalytic activity towards methyl orange degradation was studied and benchmarked against their respective commercial oxide sample obtained by solid-state ceramic synthesis. Based on the results herein, we conclude that SCS is a time- and energy-efficient method to synthesize crystalline binary tungstate nanomaterials even without additional excessive heat treatment. As many of these photocatalysts possess excellent photocatalytic activity, the discussed synthetic strategy may open sustainable materials chemistry avenues to solar energy conversion and environmental remediation.

  12. Systematic study on surface and magnetostructural changes in Mn-substituted dysprosium ferrite by hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekha, G. [Department of Physics, College of Engineering Guindy, Anna University, Sardar Patel Road, Chennai 600025 (India); Tholkappiyan, R. [Department of Physics, College of Engineering Guindy, Anna University, Sardar Patel Road, Chennai 600025 (India); Department of Physics, College of Science, UAE University, Al-Ain 15551 (United Arab Emirates); Vishista, K., E-mail: raovishista@gmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Engineering Guindy, Anna University, Sardar Patel Road, Chennai 600025 (India); Hamed, Fathalla [Department of Physics, College of Science, UAE University, Al-Ain 15551 (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Garnet type Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5-x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 12} (x = 0–0.06) nanoparticles of 88.4–86.8 nm were synthesized by hydrothermal method. • The Dy, Mn, Fe and O elements in the ferrites were confirmed from XPS. • The multiple oxidation states of Fe and Mn ions, bonding energy and cationic distributions of the samples were examined by XPS. • The magnetic property shows ferromagnetic behavior from VSM technique. • The results from these studies are correlated with respect to Mn dopant. - Abstract: Dysprosium iron garnets are of scientific importance because of the wide range of magnetic properties that can be obtained in substituting dysprosium by a rare earth metal. In the present work, the effect of Mn substitution on magnetostructural changes in dysprosium ferrite nanoparticles is studied. Highly crystalline pure and Mn doped dysprosium ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The samples were calcined at 1100 °C for 2 h in air atmosphere which is followed by characterization using XRD, FT-IR analysis, SEM, XPS and VSM. The average crystallite size of synthesized samples were calculated by X-ray diffraction falls in the range of 88.4–86.8 nm and was found to be in cubic garnet structure. For further investigation of the structure and corresponding changes in the tetrahedral and octahedral stretching vibrational bonds, FT-IR was used. The synthesized samples consist of multiple oxidation (Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}) states for Fe ions and (Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+}) Mn ions analyzed in three ways of Fe 2p and Mn 2p spectra from the XPS analysis. With respect to Mn dopant in Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, the cationic distributions of elements were discussed from high resolution XPS spectra by peak position and shift, area, width. To find out the porous/void surface morphology of the sample, scanning electron microscopy was used. From XPS analysis, the presence of elements (Dy, Mn, Fe and O) and their composition in the

  13. Studies of lead tungstate crystal matrices in high energy beams for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeev, G; Baillon, Paul; Barney, D; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Bateman, E; Bell, K W; Benhammou, Ya; Bloch, P; Bomestar, D; Borgia, B; Bourotte, J; Burge, S R; Cameron, W; Chipaux, Rémi; Cockerill, D J A; Connolly, J; Dafinei, I; Denes, P; Depasse, P; Deiters, K; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; El-Mamouni, H; Faure, J L; Felcini, Marta; Finger, M H; Flügel, T; Gautheron, F; Givernaud, Alain; Gninenko, S N; Godinovic, N; Graham, D J; Guillaud, J P; Guschin, E; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hillemanns, H; Hofer, H; Ille, B; Jääskeläinen, S; Katchanov, V A; Kennedy, B W; Kirn, T; Korzhik, M V; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebeau, M; Lebrun, P; Lecoq, P; Lecoeur, Gérard; Lecomte, P; Leonardi, E; Locci, E; Loos, R; Ma, D; Martin, F; Mendiburu, J P; Musienko, Yu V; Nédélec, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newbold, D; Newman, H; Oukhanov, M; Pacciani, L; Peigneux, J P; Pirro, S; Popov, S; Puljak, I; Purves, C; Renker, D; Rondeaux, F; Rosso, E; Rusack, R W; Rykaczewski, H; Schmitz, D; Schneegans, M; Schwenke, J; Seez, Christopher J; Semeniouk, I N; Shagin, P M; Shevchenko, S; Shi, X; Sillou, D; Simohand, D; Singovsky, A V; Soric, I; Smith, B; Stephenson, R; Verrecchia, P; Vialle, J P; Virdee, Tejinder S; Zhu, R Y

    1997-01-01

    Using matrices of lead tungstate crystals energy resolutions better than 0.6% at 100 GeV have been achieved in the test beam in 1995. It has been demonstrated that a lead tungstate electromagnetic calorimeter read out by avalanche photodiodes can consistently achieve the excellent energy resolutions necessary to justify its construction in the CMS detector. The performance achieved has been understood in terms of the properties of the crystals and photodetectors.

  14. Synthesis, structural characterization and in vitro testing of dysprosium containing silica particles as potential MRI contrast enhancing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiriac, L.B.; Trandafir, D.L. [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Turcu, R.V.F. [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Todea, M. [Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Simon, S., E-mail: simons@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Dysprosium containing silica microparticles obtained by freeze and spray drying. • Higher structural units interconnection achieved in freeze vs. spray dried samples. • Dy occurance on the outermost layer of the microparticles evidenced by XPS. • Enhanced MRI contrast observed for freeze dried samples with 5% mol Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}. - Abstract: The work is focused on synthesis and structural characterization of novel dysprosium-doped silica particles which could be considered as MRI contrast agents. Sol-gel derived silica rich particles obtained via freeze-drying and spray-drying processing methods were structurally characterized by XRD, {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR and XPS methods. The occurrence of dysprosium on the outermost layer of dysprosium containing silica particles was investigated by XPS analysis. The MRI contrast agent characteristics have been tested using RARE-T{sub 1} and RARE-T{sub 2} protocols. The contrast of MRI images delivered by the investigated samples was correlated with their local structure. Dysprosium disposal on microparticles with surface structure characterised by decreased connectivity of the silicate network units favours dark T{sub 2}-weighted MRI contrast properties.

  15. Tungstated zirconia as promising carrier for DeNOx catalysts with improved resistance towards alkali poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Kustov, Arkadii; Rasmussen, Søren Birk;

    2006-01-01

    Use of biomass as an alternative to fossil fuels has achieved increasing interest since it is considered neutral regarding CO2 accumulation in the atmosphere. The by far most energy-efficient use of solid bio-resources in energy production is combustion in combined biomass and coal or oilfired po......, and NH3-TPD methods. The influence of calcination temperature of zirconia modified with tungsten oxide on the textural characteristics, acidity and catalytic performance was studied. The resistance of the catalysts towards model poisoning with potassium was found to depend dramatically...... on the crystallinity of the zirconia and on the surface acidity. Vanadia supported on tungstated zirconia calcined at 700 8C revealed superior catalytic performance and resistance towards alkali poisoning in comparison with a traditional catalyst. The improved poisoning resistance of the samples based on tungstated...

  16. Studies of the effect of charged hadrons on lead tungstate crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Scintillating crystals are used for calorimetry in several high-energy physics experiments. For some of them, performance has to be ensured in difficult operating conditions, like a high radiation environment, very large particle fluxes and high collision rates. Results are presented here from a thorough series of measurements concerning mainly the effect of charged hadrons on lead tungstate. It is also shown how these results can be used to predict the effect on crystals due to a given flux of particles.

  17. Study of Radiation Damage in Lead Tungstate Crystals Using Intense High Energy Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Batarin, V; Butler, J; Cheung, H; Datsko, V S; Davidenko, A; Derevshchikov, A A; Dzhelyadin, R I; Fomin, Y; Frolov, V; Goncharenko, Yu M; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Khroustalev, K; Konoplyannikov, A K; Konstantinov, A S; Kravtsov, V; Kubota, Y; Leontiev, V M; Lukanin, V S; Maisheev, V; Matulenko, Yu A; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Mikhalin, N; Minaev, N G; Mochalov, V; Morozov, D A; Mountain, R; Nogach, L V; Pikalov, V A; Ryazantsev, A; Semenov, P A; Shestermanov, K E; Soloviev, L; Solovyanov, V L; Stone, S; Ukhanov, M N; Uzunian, A V; Vasilev, A; Yakutin, A; Yarba, J V

    2003-01-01

    We report on the effects of radiation on the light output of lead tungstate crystals. The crystals were irradiated by pure, intense high energy electron and hadron beams as well as by a mixture of hadrons, neutrons and gammas. The crystals were manufactured in Bogoroditsk, Apatity (both Russia), and Shanghai (China). These studies were carried out at the 70-GeV proton accelerator in Protvino.

  18. Study of radiation damage in lead tungstate crystals using intense high-energy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batarin, V.A.; Brennan, T.; Butler, J.; Cheung, H.; Datsko, V.S.; Davidenko, A.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Dzhelyadin, R.I.; Fomin, Y.V.; Frolov, V.; Goncharenko, Y.M.; Grishin, V.N.; Kachanov, V.A.; Khodyrev, V.Y.; Khroustalev, K.; Konoplyannikov, A.K.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kubota, Y.; Leontiev, V.M.; Lukanin, V.S.; Maisheev, V.A.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Melnick, Y.M.; Meschanin, A.P.; Mikhalin, N.E.; Minaev, N.G.; Mochalov, V.V.; Morozov, D.A.; Mountain, R.; Nogach, L.V.; Pikalov, V.A.; Ryazantsev, A.V.; Semenov, P.A. E-mail: semenov@mx.ihep.su; Shestermanov, K.E.; Soloviev, L.F.; Solovianov, V.L.; Stone, S.; Ukhanov, M.N.; Uzunian, A.V.; Vasiliev, A.N.; Yakutin, A.E.; Yarba, J

    2003-10-21

    We report on the effects of radiation on the light output of lead tungstate crystals. The crystals were irradiated by pure, intense high-energy electron and hadron beams as well as by a mixture of hadrons, neutrons and gammas. The crystals were manufactured in Bogoroditsk, Apatity (both Russia), and Shanghai (China). These studies were carried out at the 70-GeV proton accelerator in Protvino.

  19. High-power Yb- and Tm-doped double tungstate channel waveguide lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalfsen, van K.; Geskus, D.; Ay, F.; Wörhoff, K.; Aravazhi, S.; Pollnau, M.

    2011-01-01

    The potassium double tungstates KGd(WO4)2, KY(WO4)2, and KLu(WO4)2 are excellent candidates for solid-state lasers because of their high refractive index of ~2.0-2.1, the large transition cross-sections of rare-earth (RE3+) ions doped into these hosts, and a reasonably large thermal conductivity of

  20. Solid-State Laser Cooling of Ytterbium-Doped Tungstate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KGW but with a slightly higher cooling figure-of-merit,13 and zirconium-barium-lanthanum-aluminum- sodium fluoride glass ( ZBLAN ). This figure shows...namely the heavy metal fluoride glass ZBLAN and yttrium aluminum garnet. Favorable properties of the ytterbium-tungstates include exceptionally high...had shown net cooling was an ytterbium-doped heavy metal fluoride glass . Reasons for the lack of success with other materials include energy transfer

  1. Tungstate decreases weight gain and adiposity in obese rats through increased thermogenesis and lipid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, Marc; Corominola, Helena; Canals, Ignasi; Saura, Josep; Barcelo-Batllori, Silvia; Guinovart, Joan J; Gomis, Ramon

    2005-10-01

    The increasing worldwide incidence of obesity and the limitations of current treatments raise the need for finding novel therapeutic approaches to treat this disease. The purpose of the current study was first to investigate the effects of tungstate on body weight and insulin sensitivity in a rat model of diet-induced obesity. Second, we aimed to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying its action. Oral administration of tungstate significantly decreased body weight gain and adiposity without modifying caloric intake, intestinal fat absorption, or growth rate in obese rats. Moreover, the treatment ameliorated dislipemia and insulin resistance of obese rats. These effects were mediated by an increase in whole-body energy dissipation and by changes in the expression of genes involved in the oxidation of fatty acids and mitochondrial uncoupling in adipose tissue. Furthermore, treatment increased the number of small adipocytes with a concomitant induction of apoptosis. Our results indicate that tungstate treatment may provide the basis for a promising novel therapy for obesity.

  2. Specific adsorption of tungstate by cell surface display of the newly designed ModE mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Nishitani, Takashi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-10-01

    By cell surface display of ModE protein that is a transcriptional regulator of operons involved in the molybdenum metabolism in Escherichia coli, we have constructed a molybdate-binding yeast (Nishitani et al., Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 86:641-648, 2010). In this study, the binding specificity of the molybdate-binding domain of the ModE protein displayed on yeast cell surface was improved by substituting the amino acids involved in oxyanion binding with other amino acids. Although the displayed S126T, R128E, and T163S mutant proteins adsorbed neither molybdate nor tungstate, the displayed ModE mutant protein (T163Y) abolished only molybdate adsorption, exhibiting the specific adsorption of tungstate. The specificity of the displayed ModE mutant protein (T163Y) for tungstate was increased by approximately 9.31-fold compared to the displayed wild-type ModE protein at pH 5.4. Therefore, the strategy of protein design and its cell surface display is effective for the molecular breeding of bioadsorbents with metal-specific adsorption ability based on a single species of microorganism without isolation from nature.

  3. Influence of exchange splitting on optical properties in gadolinium and dysprosium single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knyazev, Yu.V.; Bolotin, G.A. (AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Fiziki Metallov)

    1984-12-01

    The temperature dependences of optical conductivity in gadolinium and dysprosium single crystals at the light wave vector polarization along a hexagonal axis and in the basis plane are considered. A substantial anisotropy of interzonal absorption has been found. The sample transition into magnetically ordered state is shown to be accompanied by the emergence of resonance absorption peaks in the near infrared spectral region. The manifestation of these peculiarities is associated with quantum electron transitions between the s-, d-f- interaction-split energy bands near the Fermi level. Main peculiarities of the experimental spectrum of gadolinium optical conductivity found their reflection in theoretically calculated dispersion dependence.

  4. Therapeutic application of dysprosium-165-FHMA in the treatment of rheumatoid knee effusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, R.J.; Zalutsky, M.; Venkatesan, P.; Sledge, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    Radiation synovectomy utilizing a variety of radionuclides has proven to be an effective technique in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The recent introduction of the short-lived radionuclide, Dysprosium-165 (/sup 165/Dy), as a replacement for the longer-lived radiocolloids has reduced nontarget dosimetry caused by leakage of the agent from the articular cavity. A review of the methods and status of radiation synovectomy, and the application of /sup 165/Dy-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates (FHMA) as an alternative therapeutic agent is described.

  5. Properties of dysprosium-doped gallium lanthanum sulfide fiber amplifiers operating at 1.3 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, B N; Schweizer, T; Hewak, D W; Laming, R I

    1997-05-15

    In light of recent progress in the fabrication of gallium lanthanum sulfide (GaLaS) fibers, we have modeled the performance of dysprosium-doped GaLaS fiber amplifiers operating at 1.3 microm . Based on experimental data, we find that the incorporation of a codopant (terbium) in the fiber core significantly shortens the optimum amplifier length from >30 m to approximately 3 m . Such a device may be practical, given the fiber losses currently achieved in GaLaS fibers.

  6. EFFECTS OF TUNGSTATE ON THE GROWTH OF DESULFOVIBRIO-GIGAS NCIMB-9332 AND OTHER SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA WITH ETHANOL AS A SUBSTRATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENSGENS, CMH; NIENHUISKUIPER, ME; HANSEN, TA

    1994-01-01

    Growth of Desulfovibrio gigas NCIMB 9332 in mineral, vitamin-supplemented media with ethanol as substrate was strongly stimulated by the addition of tungstate (optimal level approximately 10(-7) M). At suboptimal tungstate concentrations, up to 1.0 mM acetaldehyde was detected in the culture superna

  7. Effect of dysprosium on the kinetics and structural transformations during the decomposition of the supersaturated solid solution in magnesium-samarium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhlin, L. L.; Luk'yanova, E. A.; Tabachkova, N. Yu.; Dobatkina, T. V.; Tarytina, I. E.; Korol'kova, I. G.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of dysprosium added in the amounts such that it does not form an individual phase in equilibrium with solid magnesium on the decomposition of the supersaturated magnesium solid solution in Mg-Sm alloys is studied. The presence of dysprosium in Mg-Sm alloys is found to retard the decomposition of the supersaturated magnesium solid solution and to increase the hardening effect upon aging. When these alloys are aged, dysprosium is partly retained in the magnesium solid solution and partly enters into the compositions of the phases that form during the decomposition of the solid solution and are characteristic of Mg-Sm alloys.

  8. Cyclic single-molecule magnets: from the odd-numbered heptanuclear to a dimer of heptanuclear dysprosium clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Haiquan; Bao, Song-Song; Zheng, Li-Min

    2016-02-01

    A heptanuclear and a dimer of heptanuclear dysprosium clusters (Dy7 and Dy14) have been successfully synthesized by ingenious coalescence of the single and double pyrazinyl hydrazone as well as phosphonate ligands. The complexes feature the largest odd-numbered cyclic lanthanide clusters reported thus far. Both exhibit single molecule magnet behaviors at low temperature.

  9. A comparison of the effects of symmetry and magnetoanisotropy on paramagnetic relaxation in related dysprosium single ion magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ursula J; Mahoney, Brian D; DeGregorio, Patrick T; Carroll, Patrick J; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kikkawa, James M; Schelter, Eric J

    2012-06-07

    Dysprosium complexes of the tmtaa(2-) ligand were synthesized and characterized by X-band EPR and magnetism studies. Both complexes demonstrate magnetoanisotropy and slow paramagnetic relaxation. Comparison of these compounds with the seminal phthalocyanine complex [Dy(Pc)(2)](-) shows the azaannulide complexes are more susceptible to relaxation through non-thermal pathways.

  10. Dual responsive dysprosium-doped hydroxyapatite particles and toxicity reduction after functionalization with folic and glucuronic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez Lafarga, Ana Karen; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín P. [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Gurinov, Andrey [Research Resources Center for Magnetic Resonance, Saint Petersburg State University, Universitetskij pr. 26, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel [Laboratorio Desarrollo-Envejecimiento, Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Occidente (CIBO), Instituto Mexicano de Seguro Social (IMSS), Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe, E-mail: gregoriocarbajal@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2015-03-01

    The development of probes for biomedical applications demands materials with low toxicity levels besides fluorescence or magnetic properties to be detected by confocal microscopes or MRI resonators. Several drug delivery systems or other biomedical materials prepared with hydroxyapatite have been proposed, however, toxicity effects might arise when the size of particles is nanometric. In this study, hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic or folic acids presented lower oxidative stress, measured from lipoperoxides and nitric oxide indicators in rats than pure hydroxyapatite. In separated experiments, hydroxyapatite was doped with dysprosium cations by coprecipitation producing a single crystal phase with fluorescent properties easily visualized by confocal microscopy when excited at 488 nm. These particles also presented the ability to modify the proton relaxation time in T1 maps collected by magnetic resonance imaging. These modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles could be candidates to design bimodal probes with low toxicity. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic acid reduced oxidative stress in rats. • Functionalization with folic acid reduced oxidative stress in rats. • Dysprosium doping does not affect the crystalline structure of hydroxyapatite. • Dysprosium doped particles are visible in fluorescent microscope. • Dysprosium doped particles act as MRI contrast agents.

  11. Tuning Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Two-Dimensional Dysprosium Layer Compound through Guest Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Li, Jian; Meng, Yin-Shan; Sun, Hao-Ling; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Sun, Jun-Liang; Gao, Song

    2016-08-15

    A novel two-dimensional dysprosium(III) complex, [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF·H2O·2CH3OH (1), has been successfully synthesized from a new pyridine-N-oxide (PNO)-containing ligand, namely, N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)pyridine-N-oxidecarbohydrazide (H2L). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that complex 1 is composed of a dinuclear dysprosium subunit, which is further extended by the PNO part of the ligand to form a two-dimensional layer. Magnetic studies indicate that complex 1 shows well-defined temperature- and frequency-dependent signals under a zero direct-current (dc) field, typical of slow magnetic relaxation with an effective energy barrier Ueff of 33.6 K under a zero dc field. Interestingly, powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis reveal that compound 1 undergoes a reversible phase transition that is induced by the desorption and absorption of methanol and water molecules. Moreover, the desolvated sample [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF (1a) also exhibits slow magnetic relaxation but with a higher anisotropic barrier of 42.0 K, indicating the tuning effect of solvent molecules on slow magnetic relaxation.

  12. Dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium borate glass subjected to Co-60 gamma ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, R. S., E-mail: ratnasuffhiyanni@gmail.com; Wagiran, H., E-mail: husin@utm.my; Saeed, M. A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium borate (CMB:Dy) glass are presented. This study is deemed to understand the application of calcium as the modifier in magnesium borate glass with the presence of dysprosium as the activator to be performed as TL dosimeter (TLD). The study provides fundamental knowledge of a glass system that may lead to perform new TL glass dosimetry application in future research. Calcium magnesium borate glass systems of (70-y) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} − 20 CaO – 10 MgO-(y) Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} with 0.05  mol % ≤ y ≤ 0.7  mol % of dyprosium were prepared by melt-quenching technique. The amorphous structure and TL properties of the prepared samples were determined using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TL reader; model Harshaw 4500 respectively. The samples were irradiated to Co-60 gamma source at a dose of 50 Gy. Dosimetric properties such as annealing procedure, time temperature profile (TTP) setting, optimization of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration of 0.5 mol % were determined for thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) reader used.

  13. Phase equilibria diagrams, crystal growth peculiarities and Raman investigations of lead and sodium-bismuth tungstate-molybdate solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Andrei V.; Avanesov, Samvel A.; Yunalan, Tyliay M.; Klimenko, Valeriy A.; Ignatyev, Boris V.; Isaev, Vladislav A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a comprehensive study of lead and sodium-bismuth tungstate-molybdate solid solutions was carried out, including the clarification of their structural peculiarities and phase diagrams of PbMoO4-PbWO4 and NaBi(MoO4)2-NaBi(WO4)2 systems, the study of spontaneous Raman spectra of these compounds, as well as preliminary experiments on single crystals growth of lead tungstate-molybdate. The linewidths, peak and integral intensities of the totally symmetric Raman vibrations of solid solutions were estimated in comparison with known SRS-active crystals. The conditions of the Czochralski growth of optically transparent lead tungstate-molybdate mixed crystals were found and SRS effect was observed in these crystals when pumping by 12 ns 1064 nm laser pulses.

  14. A damage and recovery study for lead tungstate crystal samples from BTCP and SIC

    CERN Document Server

    Jianming, Chen; Li Yuan Zhang; Ren Yuan Zhu

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an in depth study on radiation damage and recovery in lead tungstate crystals produced at BTCP and SIC. Correlations were observed between initial light output and initial longitudinal transmittance at 360 nm, between the loss of longitudinal transmittance at 440 nm and the amplitude of radiation damage, and between radiation damage levels at different dose rates. Excellent linearity was observed between the variations of crystal's light output and its longitudinal transmittance at 440 nm in repeated cycles of irradiation at a dose rate up to 400 rad/h followed by recovery, indicating these PWO crystals can be monitored in situ at LHC.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and application of an inorgano organic material: -chlorophenol anchored onto zirconium tungstate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Beena Pandit; Uma Chudasama

    2001-06-01

    Tetravalent metal acid (TMA) salt zirconium tungstate (ZW) has been synthesized, followed by its derivatization using para-chlorophenol (CP). The resulting compound is abbreviated as ZWCP. ZWCP has been characterized for elemental analysis, spectral analysis (FTIR), X-ray analysis and thermal analysis (TGA). Its chemical stability has been assessed in various mineral acids, bases and organic solvents. Ion exchange capacity (IEC) has been determined and distribution behaviour towards several metal ions in different electrolyte solutions with varying concentrations has been studied and a few binary separations achieved.

  16. Adsorptional removal of methylene blue by guar gum-cerium (IV) tungstate hybrid cationic exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V K; Pathania, Deepak; Singh, Pardeep; Kumar, Amit; Rathore, B S

    2014-01-30

    Guar gum-cerium (IV) tungstate nanocomposite (GG/CTNC) cationic exchanger was synthesized using simple sol gel method. The GG/CTNC was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometer (EDX). The XRD studies confirmed amorphous and fibrous in nature of GG/CTNC. The high percentage of oxygen in the nanocomposite material confirmed the functionality tungstate (WO4(-)). The ion exchange capacity of GG/CTNC for Na(+) ion was observed to be 1.30 mequivg(-1). The hybrid exchanger was used as potential adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous system. The correlation coefficients value indicated a good fit of monolayer Langmuir model to the adsorption of methylene blue onto GG/CTNC. The adsorption kinetic study revealed that the adsorption process followed the pseudo second order kinetic. The Gibbs free energy (ΔG) values confirmed the spontaneous nature of adsorption process.

  17. DTA/TG, IR, EPR and XPS studies of some praseodymium(III) tungstates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, S.M., E-mail: skaczmarek@zut.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Al. Piastow 17, 70-310 Szczecin (Poland); Tomaszewicz, E. [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Al. Piastow 42, 71-065 Szczecin (Poland); Moszynski, D. [Institute of Chemical and Environment Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Ul. Pulaskiego 10, 70-322 Szczecin (Poland); Jasik, A.; Leniec, G. [Institute of Physics, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Al. Piastow 17, 70-310 Szczecin (Poland)

    2010-11-01

    The praseodymium(III) tungstates (Pr{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 9} and Pr{sub 2}WO{sub 6}) have been prepared as polycrystalline powders by thermal treatments of Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}/WO{sub 3} mixtures in air. It was found the existence of only two polymorphic modification of Pr{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 9}. The low-temperature polymorph of Pr{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 9} undergoes reversible polymorphic transition at 1390 K. Pr{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 9} melts incongruently at 1462 K. Low-temperature modification of Pr{sub 2}WO{sub 6} is thermally stable up to 1773 K. EPR spectra had shown weak only interactions between tungstate W{sup 5+} ions that were confirmed also by XPS measurements. Hyperfine structure of W{sup 4+} ions was also recognized. The spectra characteristics for Pr{sup 4+} ions were not observed both in EPR and XPS experiments.

  18. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K.; Shiju, N. R.; Brown, D. R.; Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2010-07-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 Å = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  19. Double aberration-corrected TEM/STEM of tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, K; Boyes, E D; Gai, P L [York JEOL Nanocentre (United Kingdom); Shiju, N R; Brown, D R, E-mail: pgb500@york.ac.u [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    We report highly active tungstated zirconia nanocatalysts for the synthesis of paracetamol by Beckmann rearrangement of 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime. Double aberration-corrected (2AC)-TEM/STEM studies were performed in a JEOL 2200FS FEG TEM/STEM at the 1 Angstrom (1 A = 0.1 nanometer) level. Observations at close to zero defocus were carried out using the AC-TEM as well as AC-STEM including high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, from the same areas of the catalyst crystallites. The studies from the same areas have revealed the location and the nanostructure of the polytungstate species (clusters) and the nanograins of zirconia. The AC (S)TEM was crucial to observe the nanostructure and location of polytungstate clusters on the zirconia grains. Polytungstate clusters as small as 0.5 nm have been identified using the HAADF-STEM. The nanostructures of the catalyst and the W surface density have been correlated with paracetamol reaction studies. The results demonstrate the nature of active sites and high activity of the tungstated zirconia nanocatalyst, which is an environmentally clean alternative to the current homogeneous process.

  20. Luminescent properties of dysprosium(Ⅲ) ions in LaAlO3 nanocrystallites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Lema(n)ski; P.J. Dere(n)

    2011-01-01

    The absorption and emission spectra as well as decay time profile of Dy3+ ions in LaAlO3 nanocrystals were analyzed.The crystal structure of LaAlO3 was confirmed from XRD measurement.The emission peaks from blue to red came from main emitting level of dysprosium 4F9/2 to the ground and other excited levels of Dy3+ ions.Cross relaxation process led to non-radiative quenching of luminescence,so that the lifetime of the 4F9/2 energy level ions decreased with increasing amount of doped Dy3+ ions.The cross relaxation transfer rates were experimentally determined as a function of Dy3+ concentration.

  1. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to a pressure of 69 GPa and a temperature of 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were able to track magnetic ordering temperature only till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed (hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. This is followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hcp phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remains localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.

  2. Electrochemical behaviour of dysprosium in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at W and Al electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrillejo, Y. [Dpto de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: ycastril@qa.uva.es; Bermejo, M.R. [Dpto de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Barrado, A.I. [Dpto de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Pardo, R. [Dpto de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Barrado, E. [Dpto de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Martinez, A.M. [Department of Materials Technology, Sem Saelands vei 6, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2005-03-15

    The electrochemical behaviour of DyCl{sub 3} was studied in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at different temperatures. The cathodic reaction can be written:Dy(III)+3e-bar Dy(0)which can be divided in two very close cathodic steps:Dy(III)+1e-bar Dy(II)andDy(II)+2e-bar Dy(0)Transient electrochemical techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and chronoamperometry were used in order to study the reaction mechanism and the transport parameters of electroactive species at a tungsten electrode. The results showed that in the eutectic LiCl-KCl, electrocrystallization of dysprosium seems to be the controlling electrochemical step. Chronoamperometric studies indicated instantaneous nucleation of dysprosium with three dimensional growth of the nuclei whatever the applied overpotential.Mass transport towards the electrode is a simple diffusion process, and the diffusion coefficient of the electroactive species, i.e. Dy(III), has been calculated. The validity of the Arrhenius law was also verified by plotting the variation of the logarithm of the diffusion coefficient versus 1/T.In addition, the electrode reactions of the LiCl-KCl-DyCl{sub 3} solutions at an Al wire were also investigated by cyclic voltammetry and open circuit chronopotentiometry. The redox potential of the Dy(III)/Dy couple at the Al electrode was observed at more positive potentials values than those at the inert electrode. This potential shift was thermodynamically analyzed by a lowering of activity of Dy in the metal phase due to the formation of intermetallic compounds.

  3. Loss compensation in metal-loaded hybrid plasmonic waveguides using Yb3+ potassium double tungstate gain materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Sefünç, Mustafa; van Voorden, M.H.; Pollnau, Markus

    The compensation of propagation losses of plasmonic nanowaveguides will constitute an important milestone towards the widespread use of these structures as enabling components for highly dense, fast, on-chip nanophotonic circuitry. Rare-earth doped double tungstate gain materials can not only

  4. Ultra-high, broadband gain in a lattice-engineered, Yb-doped double tungstate channel waveguide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geskus, D.; Aravazhi, S.; Bernhardi, E.H.; Agazzi, L.; García-Blanco, S.M.; Pollnau, M.

    2012-01-01

    150 dB/cm gain over 55 nm wavelength range between 977-1032 nm is obtained in a 47.5% Yb-doped potassium double tungstate waveguide amplifier. The dependence of luminescence lifetime and gain on Yb concentration is investigated.

  5. Simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in welding fume alkaline extracts by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ščančar, Janez; Berlinger, Balázs; Thomassen, Yngvar; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    A novel analytical procedure was developed for the simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Linear gradient elution from 100% water to 100% 0.7 M NaCl was applied for chromatographic separation of metal species. In standard aqueous solution at neutral pH molybdate, tungstate and vanadate exist in several aqueous species, while chromate is present as a single CrO4(2-) species. Consequently, only chromate can be separated from this solution in a sharp chromatographic peak. For obtaining sharp chromatographic peaks for molybdate, tungstate and vanadate, the pH of aqueous standard solutions was raised to 12. At highly alkaline conditions single CrO4(2-), MoO4(2-) and WO4(2-) are present and were eluted in sharp chromatographic peaks, while VO4(3-) species, which predominates at pH 12 was eluted in slightly broaden peak. In a mixture of aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate were eluted at retention times from 380 to 420 s, 320 to 370 s, 300 to 350 s and 240 to 360 s, respectively. Eluted species were simultaneously detected on-line by ICP-MS recording m/z 52, 95, 182 and 51. The developed procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of leachable concentrations of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in alkaline extracts (2% NaOH+3% Na2CO3) of manual metal arc (MMA) welding fumes loaded on filters. Good repeatability and reproducibility of measurement (RSD±3.0%) for the investigated species were obtained in both aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) and in alkaline extracts of welding fumes. Low limits of detection (LODs) were found for chromate (0.02 ng Cr mL(-1)), molybdate (0.1 ng Mo mL(-1)), tungstate (0.1 ng W mL(-1)) and vanadate (0.2 ng V mL(-1)). The accuracy of analytical procedure for the determination of chromate was checked by analysis of

  6. Structural, optical, thermal, mechanical and dielectric studies of Sulfamic acid single crystals: An influence of dysprosium (Dy3+) doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Budhendra; Shkir, Mohd.; AlFaify, S.; Kaushal, Ajay; Nasani, Narendar; Bdikin, Igor; Shoukry, H.; Yahia, I. S.; Algarni, H.

    2016-09-01

    Sulfamic acid is a potential material that exhibits excellent optical properties. A good quality, pure and dysprosium (Dy3+) doped (2.5 and 5 mol %) Sulfamic acid (SA) single crystals were grown successfully by slow cooling method. Structural study revealed a slight change in its lattice parameters and volume, suggesting the successful incorporation of Dy3+ in crystal system. The existence of dysprosium in the system was also confirmed. Presence of various vibrational modes was confirmed. Optical transparency was found to have a significant effect with variation in the doping concentration. Furthermore, a marked enhancement in its mechanical parameters with doping was also identified by nanoindentation technique. Etching study was also performed on the grown crystals to study the etch-pit formation and growth mechanism. Effect of doping on the thermal stability was analysed. All the results were compared and discussed in detail to get insight of the effect of doping concentration on Sulfamic acid crystal.

  7. Optical trapping of ultracold dysprosium atoms: transition probabilities, dynamic dipole polarizabilities and van der Waals $C_6$ coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui; Dulieu, Olivier; Nascimbene, Sylvain; Lepers, Maxence

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of optical trapping of ultracold atoms depend on the atomic dynamic dipole polarizability governing the atom-field interaction. In this article, we have calculated the real and imaginary parts of the dynamic dipole polarizability of dysprosium in the ground and first excited level. Due to the high electronic angular momentum of those two states, the polarizabilities possess scalar, vector and tensor contributions that we have computed, on a wide range of trapping wavelengths, using the sum-over-state formula. Using the same formalism, we have also calculated the $C_6$ coefficients characterizing the van der Waals interaction between two dysprosium atoms in the two lowest levels. We have computed the energies of excited states and the transition probabilities appearing in the sums, using a combination of \\textit{ab initio} and least-square-fitting techniques provided by the Cowan codes and extended in our group. Regarding the real part of the polarizability, for field frequencies far from atomic...

  8. Mixed (phthalocyaninato)(Schiff-base) di-dysprosium sandwich complexes. Effect of magnetic coupling on the SMM behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Tao; Zeng, Suyuan; Cao, Wei; Ma, Qi; Duan, Chunying; Dou, Jianmin; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2013-11-21

    Reaction between Schiff-base ligand and half-sandwich complex M(Pc)(acac) led to the isolation of new sandwich-type mixed (phthalocyaninato)(Schiff-base) di-lanthanide compounds M2(Pc)2(L)H2O (M = Dy, Gd) (1, 2) [H2Pc = metal free phthalocyanine, Hacac = acetylacetone, H2L = N,N'-bis(3-methyloxysalicylidene)benzene-1,2-diamine] with the triple-decker molecular structure clearly revealed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. For the comparative studies, sandwich triple-decker analogues with pure Schiff-base ligand M2(L)3H2O (M = Dy, Gd) (3, 4) were also prepared. Dynamic magnetic measurement result reveals the single-molecule magnet (SMM) nature of the di-dysprosium derivative 1, while the static magnetic investigation over both pure and the diamagnetic diluted samples of this compound discloses the interionic ferromagnetic coupling between the two dysprosium ions, which in turn effectively suppresses the QTM and enhances the energy barrier of this SMM. Nevertheless, comparative studies over the static magnetic properties of the di-dysprosium triple-decker complexes 1 and 3 indicate the stronger magnetic coupling between the two lanthanide ions in mixed (phthalocyaninato)(Schiff-base) species than in the pure Schiff-base triple-decker analogue, suggesting the special coordination sphere around the dysprosium ions in the former compound over the latter one on the more intense inter-ionic ferromagnetic coupling. As a very small step towards understanding the structure-property relationship, the present result will be surely helpful for the design and synthesis of the multinuclear lanthanide-based SMMs with good properties.

  9. Improvement of several properties of lead tungstate crystals with different doping ions

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Baccaro, Stefania; Cecilia, Angelica; Dafinei, Ioan; Diemoz, Marcella; Jarolímek, O; Korzhik, Mikhail; Lecoq, Paul; Nikl, M

    1998-01-01

    A very good radiation resistance of Lead Tungstate crystals is mandatory for their use in the high precision electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at LHC. Since the beginning of 1996 we have organised systematic investigations of the parameters influencing the radiation hardness of this crystal. Two classes of parameters have been particularly studied, the first one related to the control of the stoichiometry and structure associated defects, the second one connected with the suppression and the charge compensation of existing defects with different kinds of doping ions. This paper reports about the second part of this study and complements a first paper where the role of the stoichiometry was already discussed. Results of tests are given on a significant statistical sample of full size crystals ( 23cm) which show a considerable improvement in the optical properties and the radiation resistance of appropriately doped crystals.

  10. The pressure-amorphized state in zirconium tungstate: a precursor to decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Akhilesh K [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sastry, V S [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sahu, P Ch [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Mary, T A [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2004-02-25

    In contrast to widely accepted view that pressure-induced amorphization arises due to kinetic hindrance of equilibrium phase transitions, here we provide evidence that the metastable pressure-amorphized state in zirconium tungstate is a precursor to decomposition of the compound into a mixture of simple oxides. This is from the volume collapse {delta}V across amorphization, which is obtained for the first time by measuring linear dimensions of irreversibly amorphized samples during their recovery to the original cubic phase upon isochronal annealing up to 1000 K. The anomalously large {delta}V of 25.7 {+-} 1.2% being the same as that expected for the decomposition indicates that this amorphous state is probably a precursor to kinetically hindered decomposition. A P-T diagram of the compound is also proposed.

  11. Monitoring light source for CMS lead tungstate crystal calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Liang Ying; Zhu, R Y; Liu, D T

    2001-01-01

    Light monitoring will serve as an intercalibration for Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) lead tungstate crystals in situ at the Large Hadronic Collider, which is crucial for maintaining crystal calorimeter's subpercent constant term in the energy resolution. This paper presents the design of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter monitoring light source and high-level distribution system. The correlations between variations of the light output and the transmittance for the CMS choice of yttrium-doped PbWO/sub 4/ crystals were investigated and were used to study monitoring linearity and sensitivity as a function of wavelength. The monitoring wavelength was determined so that a good linearity as well as adequate sensitivity can be achieved. The performance of a custom manufactured tunable laser system is presented. Issues related to monitoring precision are discussed. (12 refs).

  12. Monitoring light source for CMS lead tungstate crystal calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Li Yuan Zhang; Ren Yuan Zhu; Duncan, Liu

    2000-01-01

    Light monitoring will serve as an inter calibration for the CMS lead tungstate crystals in situ at LHC, which is crucial for maintaining the crystal calorimeter's sub percent constant term in energy resolution. This paper presents the design of the CMS ECAL monitoring light source and high level distribution system. The correlations between variations of the light output and the transmittance for the CMS choice of Y doped PbWO/sub 4/ crystals were investigated, and were used to study monitoring linearity and sensitivity as a function of the wavelength. The monitoring wavelength was determined so that a good linearity as well as adequate sensitivity can be achieved. The performance of a custom manufactured tunable laser system is presented. Issues related to monitoring precision are discussed. (13 refs).

  13. Monitoring light source for CMS lead tungstate crystal calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L; Wei, Q; Zhu, R Y; Liu, D T

    2002-01-01

    Light monitoring will track variations of the calibration of the CMS lead tungstate crystals in situ at LHC, which is crucial for maintaining crystal calorimeter's subpercent constant term in the energy resolution. This paper presents the design of the CMS ECAL monitoring light source and high level distribution system. The correlations between variations of the light output and the transmittance for the CMS choice of yttrium doped PbWO/sub 4/ crystals were investigated, and were used to study monitoring linearity and sensitivity as a function of wavelength. The monitoring wavelength was determined so that a good linearity as well as adequate sensitivity can be achieved. The performance of a custom manufactured tunable laser system is presented. Issues related to monitoring precision are discussed. (13 refs).

  14. Vanadia-based SCR Catalysts Supported on Tungstated and Sulfated Zirconia: Influence of Doping with Potassium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Boghosian, Soghomon; Kustov, Arkadii

    2007-01-01

    A series of vanadium-based SCR catalysts supported on sulfated or tungstated ZrO2 were synthesized and characterized by means of N2-BET, XRD, NH3-TPD and in situ Raman spectroscopy. The effect of potassium doping on the properties of vanadia species is studied in detail. A number of catalyst...... and morphology, the surface composition and the molecular configuration of the dispersed vanadates. It was observed that poisoning with potassium had a negligible effect on the surface vanadate species (especially the V=O stretching frequency observed by in situ Raman spectroscopy) if supported on the sulfated...... the observed decrease in V=O stretching frequency and the higher proportion of dimers and higher polymers through coordination between K+ and two neighbouring V=O. The results suggest an increased resistance towards potassium doping for the vanadia-based catalysts supported on sulfated zirconia....

  15. Scintillation of lead tungstate crystal studied with single-electron beam from KUFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizwan, Mohamad, E-mail: rizwan@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Uozumi, Yusuke; Matsuo, Kazuki [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohgaki, Hideaki; Kii, Toshiteru; Zen, Heishun [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Tsamalaidze, Zviadi; Evtoukhovitch, Petr; Valentin, Samoilov [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, Joliot-Curie Str.6, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-29

    Lead tungstate (PWO) crystal has a very fast response, high atomic density and high radiation hardness. Therefore, they are suitable to be used for high-energy nuclear data measurements under high-background circumstances. Although a good electron-ion separation with a pulse shape analysis technique is essential, scintillation pulse shapes have not been observed with electron beams of a wide energy range. A single-electron beam technique has been developed at Kyoto University Free Electron Laser (KUFEL), and electron beams of 4-38 MeV are available. During the experiments, single electron beams bombarded a PWO crystal. By using oscilloscope we observed scintillation pulses of a PWO crystal coupled with a photomultiplier tube. Measured spectra were compared with the simulation code of EGS5 to analyze scattering effects. As the result, the pulse amplitudes show good linearity and the pulse shapes are almost constant in the observed energy range.

  16. Anodic oxides on InAlP formed in sodium tungstate electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suleiman, A. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Skeldon, P. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: p.skeldon@manchester.ac.uk; Thompson, G.E. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Echeverria, F. [Corrosion and Protection Group, University of Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia); Graham, M.J.; Sproule, G.I.; Moisa, S.; Quance, T. [Institute for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, Montreal Road, Ottawa K1A 0R6 (Canada); Habazaki, H. [Graduate Engineering School, Hokkaido University, N13 W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Amorphous anodic oxide films on InAlP have been grown at high efficiency in sodium tungstate electrolyte. The films are shown to comprise an outer layer containing indium species, an intermediate layer containing indium and aluminium species and an inner layer containing indium, aluminium and phosphorus species{sub .} The layering correlates with the influence on cation migration rates of the energies of In{sup 3+}-O, Al{sup 3+}-O and P{sup 5+}-O bonds, which increase in this order. The film surface becomes increasingly rough with increase of the anodizing voltage as pores develop in the film, which appear to be associated with generation of oxygen gas.

  17. Specific directions of ultrasound propagation in double potassium tungstates for light modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, M M; Mazur, L I; Pozhar, V E

    2017-01-01

    Acousto-optical characteristics of double potassium tungstates are analyzed and specific directions for light modulation are found. First, an important subgroup of elasto-optic coefficients of KYb(WO4)2 and KLu(WO4)2 crystals are calculated with use of experimental data. It is revealed that with proper choice of ultrasound direction the acousto-optical figure-of-merit approximately 2 times exceeds the maximum value detected in previous experiments. Another unique direction is determined, which permits modulation of randomly polarized light. The elasto-optic characteristics of KYb(WO4)2 and KLu(WO4)2 crystals are compared to those of previously investigated materials of the same crystal group: KY(WO4)2, KGd(WO4)2.

  18. Monitoring light source for CMS lead tungstate crystal calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Li Yuan; Zhu Ren Yuan; Liu Dun Can

    2000-01-01

    Light monitoring will serve as an inter calibration for CMS lead tungstate crystals in situ at LHC, which is crucial for maintaining crystal calorimeter's sub percent constant term in the energy resolution. This paper presents the design of the CMS ECAL monitoring light source and high level distribution system. The correlations between variations of the light output and the transmittance for the CMS choice of Y doped PbWO//4 crystals were investigated, and were used to study monitoring linearity and sensitivity as a function of the wavelength. The monitoring wavelength was determined so that a good linearity as well as adequate sensitivity can be achieved. The performance of a custom manufactured tunable laser system is presented. Issues related to monitoring precision are discussed. 29 Refs.

  19. Monitoring and Correcting for Response Changes in the CMS Lead-tungstate Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Ferri, Federico

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) comprises 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. Changes in the ECAL response, due to crystal radiation damage or changes in photo-detector output, are monitored in real time with a sophisticated system of lasers and LEDs to allow corrections to the energy measurements to be calculated and used. The excellent intrinsic resolution of the CMS ECAL requires the monitoring system itself to be calibrated to a high precision and its stability to be controlled and understood. The components of the CMS ECAL monitoring system, and how it has evolved to include modern solid-state lasers, are described. Several physics channels are exploited to normalize the ECAL response to the changes measured by the monitoring system. These include low energy di-photon resonances, electrons from W and Z decays (using shower energy versus track momentum measurements), and the azimuthal symmetry of low energy deposits in minimum bias events. This talk describes how the monitoring system ...

  20. Experimental Study of the Lead Tungstate Scintillator Proton-Induced Damage and Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Singovski , A

    2011-01-01

    Lead tungstate (PbWO4, or PWO) scintillating crystals are used by two of the four experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): 75848 in CMS and 17920 in ALICE. For the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter, one of the most important crystal properties is its radiation hardness. With the increase of luminosity, the radiation level will increase drastically, particularly in the high pseudorapidity regions of the calorimeter. Beside the effects of color-centre formation caused by gamma-radiation, additional measurable effect originated by hadron irradiation could appear, which will further deteriorate the optical transmission of the crystals and therefore their efficiency. In this paper, we will present results of the proton-induced damage in PWO and a study of optical transmission recovery at different temperatures and under different light-induced "bleaching" conditions for proton-irradiated crystals.

  1. Comparison between high-energy proton and charged pion induced damage in Lead Tungstate calorimeter crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Lecomte, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pauss, F; Renker, D

    2007-01-01

    A Lead Tungstate crystal produced for the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at the LHC was cut into three equal-length sections. The central one was irradiated with 290 MeV/c positive pions up to a fluence of (5.67 +- 0.46)x10^13 /cm^2, while the other two were exposed to a 24 GeV/c proton fluence of (1.17 +- 0.11) x 10^13/ cm^2. The damage recovery in these crystals, stored in the dark at room temperature, has been followed over two years. The comparison of the radiation-induced changes in light transmission for these crystals shows that damage is proportional to the star densities produced by the irradiation.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin (IV Tungstate Nanoparticles – A Solid Acid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Sadanandan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tin (IV tungstate, a tetravalent metal acid salt was synthesized in the nanoform by chemical coprecipitation method using EDTA as capping agent. The material was found to be stable in mineral acids, bases and organic solvents except  in HF and aquaregia. The material was characterized using EDS, TG/DTA, FTIR, XRD, SEM, HRTEM and BET surface area measurement. The molecular formula of the compound is 2SnO2 3WO3.5H2O determined from elemental analysis using TG/DTA. Surface morphology and particle size were obtained using SEM and HRTEM. The surface area was found to be 205-225m2/g. The Na+ exchange capacity found to be 3.8 meq/g, indicates the presence of surface hydroxyl group and hence the presence of Bronsted acid sites. The catalytic activity of the material was tested by using esterification and oxidation as model reactions. For the esterification of different alcohols, the percentage yield was found to be high for n-alcohol compared to isomeric alcohols. Oxidation of benzyl alcohol gives benzaldehyde and benzoic acid as the only products. Copyright © 2012 by BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 12nd June 2012, Revised: 23rd July 2012, Accepted: 29th July 2012[How to Cite: S. Manoj, R. Beena, (2012. Synthesis and Characterization of tin(IV Tungstate Nanoparticles – A Solid Acid Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (2: 105-111. doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.2.3622.105-111] [How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.2.3622.105-111 ] | View in 

  3. Evaluating United States and world consumption of neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium in final products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Matthew

    This paper develops scenarios of future rare-earth-magnet metal (neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium) consumption in the permanent magnets used in wind turbines and hybrid electric vehicles. The scenarios start with naive base-case scenarios for growth in wind-turbine and hybrid-electric-vehicle sales over the period 2011 to 2020, using historical data for each good. These naive scenarios assume that future growth follows time trends in historical data and does not depend on any exogenous variable. Specifically, growth of each technological market follows historical time trends, and the amount of rare earths used per unit of technology remains fixed. The chosen reference year is 2010. Implied consumptions of the rare earth magnet metals are calculated from these scenarios. Assumptions are made for the material composition of permanent magnets, the market share of permanent-magnet wind turbines and vehicles, and magnet weight per unit of technology. Different scenarios estimate how changes in factors like the material composition of magnets, growth of the economy, and the price of a substitute could affect future consumption. Each scenario presents a different method for reducing rare earth consumption and could be interpreted as potential policy choices. In 2010, the consumption (metric tons, rare-earth-oxide equivalent) of each rare-earth-magnet metal was as follows. Total neodymium consumption in the world for both technologies was 995 tons; dysprosium consumption was 133 tons; terbium consumption was 50 tons; praseodymium consumption was zero tons. The base scenario for wind turbines shows there could be strong, exponential growth in the global wind turbine market. New U.S. sales of hybrid vehicles would decline (in line with the current economic recession) while non-U.S. sales increase through 2020. There would be an overall increase in the total amount of magnetic rare earths consumed in the world. Total consumption of each rare earth in the short

  4. A visualization of the damage in Lead Tungstate calorimeter crystals after exposure to high-energy hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dissertori, G.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pauss, F.; Wallny, R.; Spikings, R.; Van der Lelij, R.; Arnau Izquierdo, G.

    2012-01-01

    The anticipated performance of calorimeter crystals in the environment expected after the planned High-Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN has to be well understood, before informed decisions can be made on the need for detector upgrades. Throughout the years of running at the HL-LHC, the detectors will be exposed to considerable fluences of fast hadrons that have been shown to cause cumulative transparency losses in Lead Tungstate scintillating crystals. In this study, we present direct evidence of the main underlying damage mechanism. Results are shown from a test that yields a direct insight into the nature of the hadron-specific damage in Lead Tungstate calorimeter crystals exposed to 24 GeV/c protons.

  5. Expanded Industrial Experiments of Free-alkali Recovery from Sodium Tungstate Solution by the Membrane Electrolysis Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉岭; 古海云; 檀柏梅; 桑建新

    2001-01-01

    The expanded industrial experiments were conducted with practical industrial liquor to separate free alkali from sodium tungstate solution by electrolysis with cation-exchange membrane. Experimental results show that on the condition that the temperature is 50-55 ℃ and the current:density is 1000 A/m2, the single electrolysis cell is operated stably and 80% free-alkali in mass fraction is separated from the anode feed liquor of sodium tungstate, with electric ef ficiency up to more than 88% and the unit energy consumption E lower than 1900 kWh/t; while three electrolysis cells in series are operated, under the condition that the temperature is 60-65 ℃ and the current density is 1000 A/m2, the elec tric efficiency can reach higher than 88% and the unit energy consumption E can be lower than 2250 kWh/t.

  6. Luminescence features of dysprosium and phosphorus oxide co-doped lithium magnesium borate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, S.; Mhareb, M. H. A.; Ghoshal, S. K.; Alajerami, Y. S. M.; Saripan, M. I.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    Lithium magnesium borate (LMB) glass system co-doped with the oxides of dysprosium (Dy2O3) and phosphorus (P2O5) were synthesized using melt-quenching method. Prepared samples were characterized using various techniques to determine the effects of co-dopants concentration variation on their thermoluminescence (TL) and photoluminescence (PL) properties. TL glow curves of LMB:0.5Dy sample revealed a single prominent peak at Tm=190 °C, where TL intensity was enhanced by a factor of 2.5 with the increase of P2O5 concentration up to 1 mol%. This enhancement was accompanied by a shift in Tm towards higher temperature. Good linearity in the range of 1-100 Gy with linear correlation coefficient of 0.998 was achieved. PL spectra displayed two significant peaks centred at 481 nm and 573 nm. These attractive luminescence features of the proposed glass system may be useful for the development of radiation dosimetry.

  7. Single-molecule magnet behavior for an antiferromagnetically superexchange-coupled dinuclear dysprosium(III) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jérôme; Habib, Fatemah; Lin, Po-Heng; Korobkov, Ilia; Enright, Gary; Ungur, Liviu; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Murugesu, Muralee

    2011-04-13

    A family of five dinuclear lanthanide complexes has been synthesized with general formula [Ln(III)(2)(valdien)(2)(NO(3))(2)] where (H(2)valdien = N1,N3-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)diethylenetriamine) and Ln(III) = Eu(III)1, Gd(III)2, Tb(III)3, Dy(III)4, and Ho(III)5. The magnetic investigations reveal that 4 exhibits single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior with an anisotropic barrier U(eff) = 76 K. The step-like features in the hysteresis loops observed for 4 reveal an antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the two dysprosium ions. Ab initio calculations confirm the weak antiferromagnetic interaction with an exchange constant J(Dy-Dy) = -0.21 cm(-1). The observed steps in the hysteresis loops correspond to a weakly coupled system similar to exchange-biased SMMs. The Dy(2) complex is an ideal candidate for the elucidation of slow relaxation of the magnetization mechanism seen in lanthanide systems.

  8. A comparative study of donor formation in dysprosium, holmium, and erbium implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emtsev, V.V.; Emtsev, V.V. Jr.; Poloskin, D.S.; Shek, E.I.; Sobolev, N.A. [Division of Solid State Electronics, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-01

    Formation of donor centers in Czochralski grown silicon doped with dysprosium, holmium, and erbium is discussed. Donor states of three kinds are introduced in the implanted layers after annealing at T=700C. Shallow donor states with ionization energies between 20 and 40 meV are attributed to oxygen -related thermal donors. Other donor centers in the energy range of E{sub C}-(60...70) meV and E{sub C}-(100...120) meV appear to be dependent on dopants. After a 900C anneal strong changes in the donor formation are observed only in silicon doped with erbium. Instead of donors at E{sub C}-(118{+-}5) meV, new donor centres at E{sub C}-(145{+-}5) meV are formed. Reportedly, the latter ones are involved in the excitation process of the Er{sup 3+} ions with a characteristic luminescence line at {approx}1.54 {mu}m. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Thermoluminescence properties of lithium magnesium borate glasses system doped with dysprosium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhareb, M H A; Hashim, S; Ghoshal, S K; Alajerami, Y S M; Saleh, M A; Razak, N A B; Azizan, S A B

    2015-12-01

    We report the impact of dysprosium (Dy(3+)) dopant and magnesium oxide (MgO) modifier on the thermoluminescent properties of lithium borate (LB) glass via two procedures. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves reveal a single prominent peak at 190 °C for 0.5 mol% of Dy(3+). An increase in MgO contents by 10 mol% enhances the TL intensity by a factor of 1.5 times without causing any shift in the maximum temperature. This enhancement is attributed to the occurrence of extra electron traps created via magnesium and the energy transfer to trivalent Dy(3+) ions. Good linearity in the range of 0.01-4 Gy with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.998, fading as low as 21% over a period of 3 months, excellent reproducibility without oven annealing and tissue equivalent effective atomic numbers ~8.71 are achieved. The trap parameters, including geometric factor (μg), activation energy (E) and frequency factor (s) associated with LMB:Dy are also determined. These favorable TL characteristics of prepared glasses may contribute towards the development of Li2O-MgO-B2O3 radiation dosimeters.

  10. Optical properties of zinc borotellurite glass doped with trivalent dysprosium ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ami Hazlin, M. N.; Halimah, M. K.; Muhammad, F. D.; Faznny, M. F.

    2017-04-01

    The zinc borotellurite doped with dysprosium oxide glass samples with chemical formula {[(TeO2) 0 . 7(B2O3) 0 . 3 ] 0 . 7(ZnO) 0 . 3 } 1 - x(Dy2O3)x (where x=0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05 M fraction) were prepared by using conventional melt quenching technique. The structural and optical properties of the proposed glass systems were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and UV-VIS spectroscopy. The amorphous nature of the glass systems is confirmed by using XRD technique. The infrared spectra of the glass systems indicate three obvious absorption bands which are assigned to BO3 and TeO4 vibrational groups. Based on the absorption spectra obtained, the direct and indirect optical band gaps, as well as the Urbach energy were calculated. It is observed that both the direct and indirect optical band gaps increase with the concentration of Dy3+ ions. On the other hand, the Urbach energy is observed to decrease as the concentration of Dy3+ ions increases.

  11. Isolation of {sup 163}Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne A.; Nortier, Francois M.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Pollington, Anthony D.; Kunde, Gerd J.; Rabin, Michael W.; Birnbaum, Eva R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Div.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J. [Univ. Wisconsinn, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Medical Physics

    2015-07-01

    The rare earth isotope {sup 163}Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of {sup 163}Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, {sup 163}Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm{sup -3} α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MS to determine the {sup 163}Ho/{sup 165}Ho ratio, {sup 163}Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4 x 10{sup 5} for Dy. The isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ± 1.3 ng of {sup 163}Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.

  12. Assessing the performance under ionising radiation of lead tungstate scintillators for EM calorimetry in the CLAS12 Forward Tagger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegan, S., E-mail: fegan@ge.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Auffray, E. [CERN, European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Battaglieri, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Buchanan, E. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Caiffi, B.; Celentano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Colaneri, L.; D' Angelo, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Roma2 Tor Vergata and Università degli studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Via Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); De Vita, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Dormenev, V. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); Fanchini, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova and Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universitá, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Lanza, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Roma2 Tor Vergata and Università degli studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Via Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Novotny, R.W. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Gießen, 35392 Gießen (Germany); and others

    2015-07-21

    The well-established technology of electromagnetic calorimetry using Lead Tungstate crystals has recently seen an upheaval, with the closure of one of the most experienced large-scale suppliers of such crystals, the Bogoroditsk Technical Chemical Plant (BTCP), which was instrumental in the development of mass production procedures for PWO-II, the current benchmark for this scintillator. Obtaining alternative supplies of Lead Tungstate crystals matching the demanding specifications of contemporary calorimeter devices now presents a significant challenge to detector research and development programmes. In this paper we describe a programme of assessment carried out for the selection, based upon the performance under irradiation, of Lead Tungstate crystals for use in the Forward Tagger device, part of the CLAS12 detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The crystals tested were acquired from SICCAS, the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The tests performed are intended to maximise the performance of the detector within the practicalities of the crystal manufacturing process. Results of light transmission, before and after gamma ray irradiation, are presented and used to calculate dk, the induced radiation absorption coefficient, at 420 nm, the peak of the Lead Tungstate emission spectrum. Results for the SICCAS crystals are compared with identical measurements carried out on Bogoroditsk samples, which were acquired for the Forward Tagger development program before the closure of the facility. Also presented are a series of tests performed to determine the feasibility of recovering radiation damage to the crystals using illumination from an LED, with such illumination available in the Forward Tagger from a light monitoring system integral to the detector.

  13. Acute dysprosium toxicity to Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and development of the biotic ligand approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukov, Oliver; Smith, D Scott; McGeer, James C

    2016-01-01

    The toxicological understanding of rare earth elements (REEs) in the aquatic environment is very limited but of increasing concern. The objective of this research is to compare the toxicological effect of the REE dysprosium to the freshwater invertebrates Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and in the more sensitive organism, understand the toxicity modifying influence of Ca, Na, Mg, pH and dissolved organic matter (DOM). Standard methods (Environment Canada) were followed for testing and culture in media of intermediate hardness (60mg CaCO3 mg/L) at pH 7.8 with Ca at 0.5, Na 0.5, Mg 0.125 (mM) and 23°C. Acute toxicity tests were done with azteca and D. pulex revealed Hyalella to be 1.4 times more sensitive than Daphnia. Additions of Ca and Na but not Mg provided significant protection against Dy toxicity to Hyalella. Similarly, low pH was associated with reduction in toxicity. Exposures which were pH buffered with and without MOPS were significantly different and indicated that MOPS enhanced Dy toxicity. DOM also mitigated Dy toxicity. Biotic ligand based parameters (LogK values) were calculated based on free ion relationships as determined by geochemical equilibrium modeling software (WHAM ver. 7.02). The logK value for Dy(3+) toxicity to Hyalella was 7.75 while the protective influence of Ca and Na were 3.95 and 4.10, respectively. This study contributes data towards the development of site specific water quality guidelines and criteria for Dy and possibly REEs in general and offers insight into the complex bio-geochemical nature of this element.

  14. Zirconium tungstate/epoxy nanocomposites: effect of nanoparticle morphology and negative thermal expansivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongchao; Rogalski, Mark; Kessler, Michael R

    2013-10-09

    The ability to tailor the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a polymer is essential for mitigating thermal residual stress and reducing microcracks caused by CTE mismatch of different components in electronic applications. This work studies the effect of morphology and thermal expansivity of zirconium tungstate nanoparticles on the rheological, thermo-mechanical, dynamic-mechanical, and dielectric properties of ZrW2O8/epoxy nanocomposites. Three types of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles were synthesized under different hydrothermal conditions and their distinct properties were characterized, including morphology, particle size, aspect ratio, surface area, and CTE. Nanoparticles with a smaller particle size and larger surface area led to a more significant reduction in gel-time and glass transition temperature of the epoxy nanocomposites, while a higher initial viscosity and significant shear thinning behavior was found in prepolymer suspensions containing ZrW2O8 with larger particle sizes and aspect ratios. The thermo- and dynamic-mechanical properties of epoxy-based nanocomposites improved with increasing loadings of the three types of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles. In addition, the introduced ZrW2O8 nanoparticles did not negatively affect the dielectric constant or the breakdown strength of the epoxy resin, suggesting potential applications of ZrW2O8/epoxy nanocomposites in the microelectronic insulation industry.

  15. ROLE OF TUNGSTEN IN THE AQUEOUS PHASE HYDRODEOXYGENATION OF ETHYLENE GLYCOL ON TUNGSTATED ZIRCONIA SUPPORTED PALLADIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin-Flores, Oscar G.; Karim, Ayman M.; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-15

    The focus of the present work was specifically on the elucidation of the role played by tungsten on the catalytic activity and selectivity of tungstated zirconia supported palladium (Pd-mWZ) for the aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation (APHDO) of ethylene glycol (EG). Zirconia supported palladium (Pd-mZ) was used as reference. The catalysts were prepared via incipient wet impregnation and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), CO pulse chemisorption, CO-DRIFTS, ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and pyridine adsorption. The presence of W results in larger Pd particles on supported Pd catalysts, i.e., 0.9 and 6.1 nm Pd particles are for Pd-mZ and Pd-mWZ, respectively. For comparison purposes, the activity of the catalytic materials used in this work was obtained using a well-defined set of operating conditions. The catalytic activity measurements show that the overall intrinsic activity of Pd particles on mWZ is 1.9 times higher than on mZ. APHDO process appears to be highly favored on Pd-mWZ whereas Pd-mZ exhibits a higher selectivity for reforming. This difference in terms of selectivity seems to be related to the high concentration of Brønsted acid sites and electron-deficient Pd species present on Pd-mWZ.

  16. Efficient photodegradation of methylthioninium chloride dye in aqueous using barium tungstate nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShehri, Saad M.; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Ahamad, Tansir; Almaswari, Basheer M.; Khan, Aslam

    2017-08-01

    BaWO4 nanoparticles were successfully used as the photocatalysts in the degradation of methylthioninium chloride (MTC) dye at different pH levels of aqueous solution. Pure phase of barium tungstate (BaWO4) nanoparticles was synthesized by modified molten salt process at 500 °C for 6 h. Structural and morphological characterizations of BaWO4 nanoparticles (average particle size of 40 nm) were studied in details using powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR, Raman, energy-dispersive, electron microscopic, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Direct band gap energy of BaWO4 nanoparticles was found to be 3.06 eV from the UV-visible absorption spectroscopy followed by Tauc's model. Photocatalytic properties of the nanoparticles were also investigated systematically for the degradation of MTC dye solution in various mediums. BaWO4 nanoparticles claim the significant enhancement of the photocatalytic degradation of aqueous MTC dye to non-hazardous inorganic constitutes under alkaline, neutral, and acidic mediums. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of silver tungstate/iron phthalocyanine nanocomposite for electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedevi, Aikkara; Priyanka, Karathan Parakkandi; Babitha, Kurup Kuniyil; Sankararaman, Sankaranarayana Iyer; Thomas, Varghese

    2017-06-01

    Silver tungstate/iron phthalocyanine nanocomposite (Ag2WO4/FePc) was prepared by simple solvent evaporation method. Thermodynamic stability of the synthesized nanocomposite was studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The nanocomposite was structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results confirm the formation of Ag2WO4/FePc nanocomposite. The size and morphology of the prepared nanocomposite were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The optical properties were analyzed by ultraviolet-visible and photoluminescence spectroscopic techniques. UV-visible absorption studies indicate that Ag2WO4/FePc nanocomposite has extended visible absorption in the wavelength range 662 to 782 nm. The nanocomposite shows high emission intensity and greenish-blue emission when excited with near-ultraviolet light. The resistivity of the sample was measured at different temperatures. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and AC conductivity values were measured in the frequency range 100 Hz-20 MHz. The results obtained from thermal, structural, optical and electrical characterization suggests that the synthesized Ag2WO4/FePc nanocomposite can be used as a potential material for varied optoelectronic and solid state applications. The present study constitutes the first report for the synthesis and characterization of Ag2WO4/FePc nanocomposite.

  18. Infrared spectroscopic and laser characterization of Tm in disordered double tungstates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano-Torres, J.M.; Han, X.; Garcia-Cortes, A.; Serrano, M.D. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, c/ Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Zaldo, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, c/ Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: cezaldo@icmm.csic.es; Valle, F.J. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, c/Kelsen 5, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Mateos, X.; Rivier, S.; Griebner, U.; Petrov, V. [Max-Born-Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, 2A Max-Born-Street, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The relative energy and characteristics of the Tm{sup 3+} levels in tetragonal double tungstate (DT) and double molybdate (DMo) crystals are investigated by low temperature optical spectroscopy with special emphasis on NaLa(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}. In this host the transition bandwidths are intermediate between those found in ordered monoclinic DT and in other disordered tetragonal DT and DMo crystals. This allows for better band resolution of the S{sub 4} site symmetry features in the disordered scheelite-like structure. The potential of such Tm-doped crystals for building infrared tunable lasers is discussed on the basis of the calculated cross sections and their comparison with the experimental photoluminescence. Information on the crystal growth and Tm{sup 3+} spectroscopic details are provided. Tm:NaLa(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} laser operation with the available sample is more efficient for {sigma}-polarized configuration. Up to 200 mW of output power was obtained at {lambda} = 1888 nm and laser tunability extends from 1789 to 1950 nm.

  19. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Ammonium cis-Dioxo Dibenzilato Tungstate (VI) Dihydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hong; JIANG Ya-Qi; ZHANG Hui; ZHOU Zhao-Hui

    2004-01-01

    A mononuclear tungsten-benzilate, (NH4)2[WO2(Ph2COCOO)2]·2H2O was ob- tained by the reaction of ammonium tungstate(VI) with excess benzilic acid in ethanol solution at pH 5~6. The title compound crystallizes in monoclinic system, space group P21/n with a = 8.1078(5), b = 25.797(2), c = 13.6815(8) (A。), β = 91.001(1)°, V = 2861.1(3) (A。)3, Dc = 1.719 g/cm3, F(000) = 1472, C28H32N2O10W, Mr = 740.41,μ(MoKα) = 4.097 mm-1 and Z = 4. The full-matrix least-squares refinement resulted in R = 0.033 and Rw = 0.068 for 3974 observed reflections with I >2σ(I). The tungsten atom is six-coordinated by two cis-oxo groups and two bidentate benzilate ligands through deprotonated α-alkoxyl and α-carboxyl groups, forming a stable five-membered chelate ring. The compound has a distorted octahedral geometry, which is mainly attributable to the bulky ligand-ligand repulsions.

  20. Two molybdate/tungstate ABC transporters that interact very differently with their substrate binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigonsky, Elena; Ovcharenko, Elena; Lewinson, Oded

    2013-04-02

    In all kingdoms of life, ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters participate in many physiological and pathological processes. Despite the diversity of their functions, they have been considered to operate by a largely conserved mechanism. One deviant is the vitamin B12 transporter BtuCD that has been shown to operate by a distinct mechanism. However, it is unknown if this deviation is an exotic example, perhaps arising from the nature of the transported moiety. Here we compared two ABC importers of identical substrate specificity (molybdate/tungstate), and find that their interactions with their substrate binding proteins are utterly different. One system forms a high-affinity, slow-dissociating complex that is destabilized by nucleotide and substrate binding. The other forms a low-affinity, transient complex that is stabilized by ligands. The results highlight significant mechanistic divergence among ABC transporters, even when they share the same substrate specificity. We propose that these differences are correlated with the different folds of the transmembrane domains of ABC transporters.

  1. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over tungstated zirconia catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao Ginjupalli, Srinivasa; Mugawar, Sowmya; Rajan N., Pethan; Kumar Balla, Putra; Chary Komandur, V. R.

    2014-08-01

    Tetragonal (TZ) and monoclinic (MZ) polymorphs of zirconia supports were synthesised by sol-gel method followed by variation of the calcination temperature. Tungstated (10 wt% WO3) supported on the zirconia polymorphs were prepared by impregnation method by using ammonium metatungstate precursor. The physico-chemical properties of the calcined catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area and pore size distribution measurements to gain insight into the effect of morphology of the catalyst textural properties, and structure. The surface acidic properties have been determined by NH3 TPD method and also with FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was employed to investigate the catalytic functionalities. Glycerol conversion and acrolein selectivity was mainly dependent on the fraction of moderate acid sites with majority of them are due to Brønsted acidic sites. Monoclinic zirconia based catalysts have shown the highest activity and acrolein selectivity compared to the corresponding tetragonal zirconia catalysts.

  2. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over tungstated zirconia catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao Ginjupalli, Srinivasa; Mugawar, Sowmya; Rajan, Pethan N.; Kumar Balla, Putra; Chary Komandur, V.R., E-mail: kvrchary@iict.res.in

    2014-08-01

    Tetragonal (TZ) and monoclinic (MZ) polymorphs of zirconia supports were synthesised by sol–gel method followed by variation of the calcination temperature. Tungstated (10 wt% WO{sub 3}) supported on the zirconia polymorphs were prepared by impregnation method by using ammonium metatungstate precursor. The physico-chemical properties of the calcined catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction, UV–vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area and pore size distribution measurements to gain insight into the effect of morphology of the catalyst textural properties, and structure. The surface acidic properties have been determined by NH{sub 3} TPD method and also with FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was employed to investigate the catalytic functionalities. Glycerol conversion and acrolein selectivity was mainly dependent on the fraction of moderate acid sites with majority of them are due to Brønsted acidic sites. Monoclinic zirconia based catalysts have shown the highest activity and acrolein selectivity compared to the corresponding tetragonal zirconia catalysts.

  3. Photo- and electroluminescence properties of lanthanide tungstate-doped porous anodic aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staninski, Krzysztof; Piskuła, Zbigniew; Kaczmarek, Małgorzata

    2017-02-01

    A new cathode material for the potential use in light-emitting devices, based on porous anodic alumina (PAA), aluminum and ITO layers has been synthesized. Porous alumina samples with ordered pore arrays were prepared electrochemically from high purity Al sheet in H2SO4 and H3PO4. To be able to apply the matrix obtained in the electroluminescence cell, the thickness of the barrier layer of aluminum oxide was decreased by slow reduction of the anodization voltage to zero. The luminescence and electroluminescence (EL) properties of the Al2O3 matrix admixtured with Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions as well as europium and terbium tungstates, were determined. The particles of inorganic luminophore were synthesized on the walls of the matrix cylindrical nanopores in the two-step process of immersion in solutions of TbCl3 or EuCl3 and Na2WO4. The effect of the nanopores diameter and the thickness of the porous Al2O3 layer on the intensity and relative yield of electroluminescence was analyzed, the best results were obtained for 80-90 μm PAA layers with 140 nm nanopores.

  4. Monitoring and Correcting for Response Changes in the CMS Lead-tungstate Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Federico

    2012-12-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) comprises 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. Changes in the ECAL response, due to crystal radiation damage or changes in photo-detector output, are monitored in real time with a sophisticated system of lasers to allow corrections to the energy measurements to be calculated and used. The excellent intrinsic resolution of the CMS ECAL requires the monitoring system itself to be calibrated to a high precision and its stability to be controlled and understood. The components of the CMS ECAL monitoring system, and how it has evolved to include modern solid-state lasers, are described. Several physics channels are exploited to normalise the ECAL response to the changes measured by the monitoring system. These include low energy diphoton resonances, electrons from W and Z decays (using shower energy versus track momentum measurements), and the azimuthal symmetry of low energy deposits in minimum bias events. This paper describes how the monitoring system is operated, how the corrections are obtained, and the resulting ECAL performance.

  5. Characterization of CALET prototype TASC lead tungstate calorimeter using CERN beam test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Amir

    2013-04-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a high-energy cosmic ray experiment that will be placed on the International Space Station in 2014. The primary goals of CALET are to measure the cosmic ray electron spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, gamma rays from 10 GeV to 10 TeV, and protons and nuclei from 10 GeV up to 1000 TeV. The detector consists of three main components: a Charge Detector (CHD), Imaging Calorimeter (IMC), and Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC). The TASC consists of 192 lead tungstate (PbWO4) logs arranged in 12 layers. An understanding of the major characteristics of the TASC is important for accurately determining the incident particle shower energy deposition. In September 2012, a prototype CALET detector was exposed to electron, muon, and proton beams from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN. Muon beams can be used to determine the detector response to minimum ionizing particles (MIP). In the present paper, we discuss the response of the TASC logs to muon beams as a function of position, and signal attenuation during propagation. Included is a discussion of parameterizations of position-dependent muon energy deposition and signal attenuation functions for the TASC logs based on the CERN beam test data.

  6. Photocatalytic generation of syngas using combustion-synthesized silver bismuth tungstate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tacconi, Norma R; Timmaji, Hari Krishna; Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Huda, Muhammad N; Sarker, Pranab; Janáky, Csaba; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2012-08-27

    Silver bismuth tungstate (AgBiW(2)O(8)) nanoparticles were prepared for the first time by solution combustion synthesis by using the corresponding metal nitrates as the precursor and urea as the fuel. These nanoparticles were subsequently modified with Pt catalyst islands using a photocatalytic procedure and used for the photogeneration of syngas (CO+H(2)). Formic acid was used for this purpose for the in situ generation of CO(2) and its subsequent reduction to CO. In the absence of Pt modification, H(2) was not obtained in the gas products evolved. These results were compared with those obtained with acetic acid in place of formic acid. The combustion process was simulated by thermogravimetry and the synthesized powder was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance UV/Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, surface area measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Tauc plots derived from the diffuse reflectance data yielded an optical band gap of 2.74 eV. The photocatalytic activity of these nanoparticles was superior to a sample prepared by solid-state synthesis. Mechanistic aspects are finally presented, as are structural models and electronic calculations, using density functional theory (DFT).

  7. Optical trapping of ultracold dysprosium atoms: transition probabilities, dynamic dipole polarizabilities and van der Waals C 6 coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Wyart, J.-F.; Dulieu, O.; Nascimbène, S.; Lepers, M.

    2017-01-01

    The efficiency of the optical trapping of ultracold atoms depends on the atomic dynamic dipole polarizability governing the atom-field interaction. In this article, we have calculated the real and imaginary parts of the dynamic dipole polarizability of dysprosium in the ground and first excited levels. Due to the high electronic angular momentum of those two states, the polarizabilities possess scalar, vector and tensor contributions that we have computed, on a wide range of trapping wavelengths, using the sum-over-state formula. Using the same formalism, we have also calculated the C 6 coefficients characterizing the van der Waals interaction between two dysprosium atoms in the two lowest levels. We have computed the energies of excited states and the transition probabilities appearing in the sums, using a combination of ab initio and least-square-fitting techniques provided by the Cowan codes and extended in our group. Regarding the real part of the polarizability, for field frequencies far from atomic resonances, the vector and tensor contributions are two-orders-of-magnitude smaller than the scalar contribution, whereas for the imaginary part, the vector and tensor contributions represent a noticeable fraction of the scalar contribution. Finally, our anisotropic C 6 coefficients are much smaller than those published in the literature.

  8. Effect of tungstate on acetate and ethanol production by the electrosynthetic bacterium Sporomusa ovata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammam, Fariza; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Lizak, Dawid Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    successfully converted to their corresponding alcohols 1-propanol and 1-butanol by S. ovata during gas fermentation. Increasing tungstate concentration enhanced conversion efficiency for both propionate and butyrate. Gene expression analysis suggested that tungsten-containing aldehyde ferredoxin...... oxidoreductases (AORs) and a tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase (FDH) were involved in the improved biosynthesis of acetate, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol. AORs and FDH contribute to the fatty acids re-assimilation pathway and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, respectively. This study presented here shows...

  9. Preparation, characterization, dielectric properties and diffusion studies of styrene butadiene rubber (SBR)/manganous tungstate (MnWO4) nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasna, V. C.; Ramesan, M. T.

    2017-06-01

    Nanocomposites based on SBR with different content of manganous tungstate nanoparticles were prepared and characterized by FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, TGA, DSC and impedance analysis. The interaction between nanoparticles and the elastomer was clear from the shift in peaks of UV and FTIR. XRD and SEM analysis showed the uniform arrangement of nanoparticles in SBR matrix. Glass transition temperature, thermal stability and dielectric properties of composites were enhanced by the addition of nanoparticles. Sorption studies of nanocomposites were done in aromatic solvents at different temperature. Sorption data obtained were used to estimate the thermodynamic properties.

  10. Beam tests of lead tungstate crystal matrices and a silicon strip preshower detector for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Barney, D; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Benhammou, Ya; Blick, A M; Bloch, P; Bonamy, P; Bourotte, J; Buiron, L; Cavallari, F; Chipaux, Rémi; Cockerill, D J A; Dafinei, I; Davies, G; Depasse, P; Deiters, K; Diemoz, M; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Donskov, S V; Mamouni, H E; Ercoli, C; Faure, J L; Felcini, Marta; Gautheron, F; Géléoc, M; Givernaud, Alain; Gninenko, S N; Godinovic, N; Graham, D J; Guillaud, J P; Guschin, E; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hillemanns, H; Hofer, H; Ille, B; Inyakin, A V; Jääskeläinen, S; Katchanov, V A; Kirn, T; Kloukinas, Kostas C; Korzhik, M V; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebrun, P; Lecoq, P; Lecoeur, Gérard; Lecomte, P; Leonardi, E; Locci, E; Loos, R; Longo, E; MacKay, C K; Martin, E; Mendiburu, J P; Musienko, Yu V; Nédélec, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Organtini, G; Paoletti, S; Pansart, J P; Peigneux, J P; Puljak, I; Qian, S; Reid, E; Renker, D; Rosowsky, A; Rosso, E; Rusack, R W; Rykaczewski, H; Schneegans, M; Seez, Christopher J; Semeniouk, I N; Shagin, P M; Sillou, D; Singovsky, A V; Sougonyaev, V; Soric, I; Verrecchia, P; Vialle, J P; Virdee, Tejinder S; Zhu, R Y

    1998-01-01

    Tests of lead tungstate crystal matrices carried out in high-energy electron beams in 1996, using new crystals, new APDs and an improved test set-up, confirm that an energy resolution of better than 0 .6% at 100 GeV can be obtained when the longitudinal uniformity of the struck crystal is adequate. Light loss measurements under low dose irradiation are reported. It is shown that there is no loss of energy resolution after irradiation and that the calibration change due to light loss can be tracked with a precision monitoring system. Finally, successuful tests with a preshower device, equipped wi th silicon strip detector readout, are described.

  11. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase interactions with decaniobate, decavanadate, vanadate, tungstate and molybdate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, Gil; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H; Aureliano, Manuel

    2012-02-01

    Over the last few decades there has been increasing interest in oxometalate and polyoxometalate applications to medicine and pharmacology. This interest arose, at least in part, due to the properties of these classes of compounds as anti-cancer, anti-diabetic agents, and also for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, among others. However, our understanding of the mechanism of action would be improved if biological models could be used to clarify potential toxicological effects in main cellular processes. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles, containing a large amount of Ca(2+)-ATPase, an enzyme that accumulates calcium by active transport using ATP, have been suggested as a useful model to study the effects of oxometalates on calcium homeostasis. In the present article, it is shown that decavanadate, decaniobate, vanadate, tungstate and molybdate, all inhibited SR Ca(2+)-ATPase, with the following IC(50) values: 15, 35, 50, 400 μM and 45 mM, respectively. Decaniobate (Nb(10)), is the strongest P-type enzyme inhibitor, after decavanadate (V(10)). Atomic-absorption spectroscopy (AAS) analysis, indicates that decavanadate binds to the protein with a 1:1 decavanadate:Ca(2+)-ATPase stoichiometry. Furthermore, V(10) binds with similar extension to all the protein conformations, which occur during calcium translocation by active transport, namely E1, E1P, E2 and E2P, as analysed by AAS. In contrast, it was confirmed that the binding of monomeric vanadate (H(2)VO(4)(2-); V(1)) to the calcium pump is favoured only for the E2 and E2P conformations of the ATPase, whereas no significant amount of vanadate is bound to the E1 and E1P conformations. Scatchard plot analysis, confirmed a 1:1 ratio for decavanadate-Ca(2+)-ATPase, with a dissociation constant, k(d) of 1 μM(-1). The interaction of decavanadate V(10)O(28)(6-) (V(10)) with Ca(2+)-ATPase is prevented by the isostructural and isoelectronic decaniobate Nb(10)O(28)(6-) (Nb(10)), whereas no significant effects were

  12. Acute dysprosium toxicity to Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and development of the biotic ligand approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukov, Oliver, E-mail: vuko3930@mylaurier.ca [Biology Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); Smith, D. Scott [Chemistry Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); McGeer, James C. [Biology Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    The toxicological understanding of rare earth elements (REEs) in the aquatic environment is very limited but of increasing concern. The objective of this research is to compare the toxicological effect of the REE dysprosium to the freshwater invertebrates Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and in the more sensitive organism, understand the toxicity modifying influence of Ca, Na, Mg, pH and dissolved organic matter (DOM). Standard methods (Environment Canada) were followed for testing and culture in media of intermediate hardness (60 mg CaCO{sub 3} mg/L) at pH 7.8 with Ca at 0.5, Na 0.5, Mg 0.125 (mM) and 23 °C. Acute toxicity tests were done with <24 h old neonates for 48 h in the case of D. pulex and with 2–9 days old offspring for 96 h tests with Hyalella. The potential protective effect of cationic competition was tested with Ca (0.5–2.0 mM), Na (0.5–2.0 mM) and Mg (0.125–0.5 mM). The effect of pH (6.5–8.0) and Suwannee River DOM complexation (at dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of 9 and 13 mg C/L) were evaluated. Dissolved Dy concentrations were lower than total (unfiltered) indicating precipitation, particularly at higher concentrations. Acute toxicity of Dy to H. azteca and D. pulex revealed Hyalella to be 1.4 times more sensitive than Daphnia. Additions of Ca and Na but not Mg provided significant protection against Dy toxicity to Hyalella. Similarly, low pH was associated with reduction in toxicity. Exposures which were pH buffered with and without MOPS were significantly different and indicated that MOPS enhanced Dy toxicity. DOM also mitigated Dy toxicity. Biotic ligand based parameters (Log K values) were calculated based on free ion relationships as determined by geochemical equilibrium modeling software (WHAM ver. 7.02). The log K value for Dy{sup 3+} toxicity to Hyalella was 7.75 while the protective influence of Ca and Na were 3.95 and 4.10, respectively. This study contributes data towards the development of site specific

  13. White light emission of dysprosium doped lanthanum calcium phosphate oxide and oxyfluoride glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luewarasirikul, N.; Kim, H. J.; Meejitpaisan, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2017-04-01

    Lanthanum calcium phosphate oxide and oxyfluoride glasses doped with dysprosium oxide were prepared by melt-quenching technique with chemical composition 20La2O3:10CaO:69P2O5:1Dy2O3 and 20La2O3:10CaF2:69P2O5:1Dy2O3. The physical, optical and luminescence properties of the glass samples were studied to evaluate their potential to using as luminescence materials for solid-state lighting applications. The density, molar volume and refractive index of the glass samples were carried out. The optical and luminescence properties were studied by investigating absorption, excitation, and emission spectra of the glass samples. The absorption spectra were investigated in the UV-Vis-NIR region from 300 to 2000 nm. The excitation spectra observed under 574 nm emission wavelength showed the highest peak centered at 349 nm (6H15/2 → 6P7/2). The emission spectra, excited with 349 nm excitation wavelength showed two major peaks corresponding to 482 nm blue emission (4F9/2 → 6H15/2) and 574 nm yellow emission (4F9/2 → 6H13/2). The experimental lifetime were found to be 0.539 and 0.540 for oxide and oxyfluoride glass sample, respectively. The x,y color coordinates under 349 nm excitation wavelength were (0.38, 0.43) for both glass samples, that be plotted in white region of CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram. The CCT values obtained from the glass samples are 4204 K for oxide glass and 4228 K for oxyfluoride glass corresponding to the commercial cool white light (3100-4500 K). Judd-Ofelt theory had also been employed to obtain the J-O parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6), oscillator strength, radiative transition possibility, stimulated emission cross section and branching ratio. The Ω2 > Ω4 > Ω6 trend of J-O parameters of both glass samples may indicate the good quality of a glass host for using as optical device application. Temperature dependence of emission spectra was studied from 300 K to 10 K and found that the intensity of the emission peak was found to be increased with

  14. Structural, microstructural and vibrational analyses of the monoclinic tungstate BiLuWO{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Ahsaine, H. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106 Cité Dakhla, Agadir (Morocco); Taoufyq, A. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106 Cité Dakhla, Agadir (Morocco); Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université de Toulon, BP 20132, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France); Patout, L. [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université de Toulon, BP 20132, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France); Ezahri, M.; Benlhachemi, A.; Bakiz, B. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106 Cité Dakhla, Agadir (Morocco); Villain, S.; Guinneton, F. [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université de Toulon, BP 20132, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France); Gavarri, J.-R., E-mail: gavarri.jr@univ-tln.fr [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université de Toulon, BP 20132, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France)

    2014-10-15

    The bismuth lutetium tungstate phase BiLuWO{sub 6} has been prepared using a solid state route with stoichiometric mixtures of oxide precursors. The obtained polycrystalline phase has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. In the first step, the crystal structure has been refined using Rietveld method: the crystal cell was resolved using monoclinic system (parameters a, b, c, β) with space group A2/m. SEM images showed the presence of large crystallites with a constant local nominal composition (BiLuW). TEM analyses showed that the actual local structure could be better represented by a superlattice (a, 2b, c, β) associated with space groups P2 or P2/m. The Raman spectroscopy showed the presence of vibrational bands similar to those observed in the compounds BiREWO{sub 6} with RE=Y, Gd, Nd. However, these vibrational bands were characterized by large full width at half maximum, probably resulting from the long range Bi/Lu disorder and local WO{sub 6} octahedron distortions in the structure. - Graphical abstract: The average structure of BiLuWO{sub 6} determined from X-ray diffraction data can be represented by A2/m space group. Experimental Electron Diffraction patterns along the [0vw] zone axes of the monoclinic structure and associated simulated patterns show the existence of a monoclinic superstructure with space group P2 or P2/m. - Highlights: • A new monoclinic BiLuWO{sub 6} phase has been elaborated from solid-state reaction. • The space group of the monoclinic disordered average structure should be A2/m. • Transmission electron microscopy leads to a superlattice with P2/m space group. • Raman spectroscopy suggests existence of local disorder.

  15. Some peculiarities of zirconium tungstate synthesis by thermal decomposition of hydrothermal precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubanov, Alexander I., E-mail: gubanov@niic.nsc.su [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akad. Lavrentiev Prospekt 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Dedova, Elena S. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Akademicheskii 2/4, 634021 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Plyusnin, Pavel E.; Filatov, Eugeny Y. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akad. Lavrentiev Prospekt 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kardash, Tatyana Y. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akad. Lavrentiev Prospekt 5, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Korenev, Sergey V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akad. Lavrentiev Prospekt 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kulkov, Sergey N. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Akademicheskii 2/4, 634021 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • Synthesis of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} using hydrothermal method. • On hydrothermal synthesis optimal conc. of HCl in the reaction mixture is 2.3 M. • Thermal decomposition of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}((OH){sub 1.5},Cl{sub 0.5})·2H{sub 2}O begins are 200 °S. • Amorphous intermediate crystallizes into cubic single-phase ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} above 550 °S. • ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} destructed at temperatures above 700 °S. - Abstract: This article discusses some peculiarities of the synthesis of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} (1) using thermal decomposition of the precursor ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}((OH){sub 1.5},Cl{sub 0.5})·2H{sub 2}O (2) prepared by hydrothermal method. On hydrothermal synthesis of 2 the optimal concentration of hydrochloric acid in the reaction mixture is about 2.3 M. TG approach to determine the chemical composition of the precursor was suggested. It has been found that the precursor for the synthesis of zirconium tungstate has chemical formula 2. Thermal decomposition of the precursor 2 begins at 200 °S and affords an amorphous intermediate, which crystallizes as a cubic phase 1 above 550 °S with an exoeffect. The temperature of the beginning of the transition from amorphous to the crystalline state is 350 ± 25 °S.

  16. Optimization of the scintillation parameters of the lead tungstate crystals for their application in high precision electromagnetic calorimetry; Optimisation des parametres de scintillation des cristaux de tungstate de plomb pour leur application dans la calorimetrie electromagnetique de haute precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drobychev, G

    2000-04-12

    In the frame of this dissertation work scintillation properties of the lead tungstate crystals (PWO) and possibilities of their use were studied foreseeing their application for electromagnetic calorimetry in extreme radiation environment conditions of new colliders. The results of this work can be summarized in the following way. 1. A model of the scintillations origin in the lead tungstate crystals which includes processes influencing on the crystals radiation hardness and presence of slow components in scintillations was developed. 2. An analysis of the influences of the PWO scintillation properties changes on the parameters of the electromagnetic calorimeter was done. 3. Methods of the light collection from the large scintillation elements of complex shape made of the birefringent scintillation crystal with high refraction index and low light yield in case of signal registration by a photodetector with sensitive surface small in compare with the output face of scintillator were Studied. 4. Physical principles of the methodology of the scintillation crystals certification during their mass production foreseeing their installation into a calorimeter electromagnetic were developed. Correlations between the results of measurements of the PWO crystals parameters by different methods were found. (author)

  17. Tungstate as a synergist to phosphonate-based formulation for corrosion control of carbon steel in nearly neutral aqueous environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B V Appa Rao; M Venkateswara Rao; S Srinivasa Rao; B Sreedhar

    2010-07-01

    Synergistic inhibition of corrosion of carbon steel in low chloride aqueous medium using tungstate as a synergist in combination with ,-(phosphonomethyl) glycine (BPMG) and zinc ions is presented. The synergistic action of tungstate has been established through the present studies. The new ternary inhibitor formulation is effective in neutral and slightly acidic as well as slightly alkaline media. Potentiodynamic polarisation studies inferred that the formulation functions as a mixed inhibitor. Impedance studies of the metal/solution interface revealed that the surface film is highly protective. Characterisation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the surface film formed in presence of the inhibitor revealed the presence of iron, phosphorus, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon, zinc and tungsten in the surface film. The chemical shifts in the binding energies of these elements inferred that the surface film is composed of iron oxides/hydroxides, zinc hydroxide, heteropolynuclear complex [Fe(III), Zn(II)-BPMG] and WO3. Reflection absorption FTIR spectroscopic studies also supported the presence of these compounds in the surface film. Morphological features of the metal surface studied in the absence and presence of the inhibitor by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are also presented. Based on all these results, a plausible mechanism of corrosion inhibition is proposed.

  18. Structural characterization of bismuth rare earth tungstates obtained by fast microwave-assisted solid-state synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, G.N.; Melo, L.F.L. [Grupo de Química de Materiais Avançados (GQMAT), Departamento de Química Analítica e Físico-Química, Universidade Federal do Ceará – UFC, Campus do Pici, CP 12100, CEP 60451-970 Fortaleza – CE (Brazil); Castro, M.C.; Ayala, A.P. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará (Brazil); Menezes, A.S. de [Departamento de Física – CCET, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Campus do Bacanga, 65085-580 São Luís, MA (Brazil); Fechine, P.B.A., E-mail: fechine@ufc.br [Grupo de Química de Materiais Avançados (GQMAT), Departamento de Química Analítica e Físico-Química, Universidade Federal do Ceará – UFC, Campus do Pici, CP 12100, CEP 60451-970 Fortaleza – CE (Brazil)

    2013-05-15

    A new synthetic route was used to obtain bismuth rare earth tungstates: BiREWO{sub 6}, where RE = Y, Gd and Nd. These materials were obtained by microwave radiation in air at 900–1100 °C for 10 min, depend on the rare earth composition in the ceramic. Structural characterization was performed by X-ray powder diffraction, Infrared and Raman spectroscopy. It was observed that all samples are isostructural materials with monoclinic phase with space group A12/m1 and member of the Aurivillius family, as Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} ferroelectric phase. It was observed moderated values for dielectric measurements (14<ε{sub r}{sup ′}>19 and 0.018 < tg δ > 0.079) at microwaves frequencies, which can be used as Dielectric Resonator Antenna or for size reduction of the electric device. - Highlights: ► New synthetic route to obtain bismuth rare earth tungstates by microwave radiation. ► Vibration spectroscopy was based in Group Theory and observed in FTIR and Raman. ► BiGdWO{sub 6} presented simultaneously higher ε{sub r}{sup ′} and smaller tg δ values at microwaves frequencies. ► The samples can be used as a DRA or for size reduction of the electric device.

  19. A Novel Technique for the Deposition of Bismuth Tungstate onto Titania Nanoparticulates for Enhancing the Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ratova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel powder handling technique was used to allow the deposition of bismuth tungstate coatings onto commercial titanium dioxide photocatalytic nanoparticles. The coatings were deposited by reactive pulsed DC magnetron sputtering in an argon/oxygen atmosphere. The use of an oscillating bowl with rotary particle propagation, positioned beneath two closed-field planar magnetrons, provided uniform coverage of the titania particle surfaces. The bismuth/tungsten atomic ratio of the coatings was controlled by varying the power applied to each target. The resulting materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET surface area measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Photocatalytic properties under visible light irradiation were assessed using an acetone degradation test. It was found that deposition of bismuth tungstate onto titania nanoparticles resulted in significant increases in visible light photocatalytic activity, compared to uncoated titania. Of the coatings studied, the highest photocatalytic activity was measured for the sample with a Bi/W atomic ratio of 2/1.

  20. Limits on violations of Lorentz symmetry and the Einstein equivalence principle using radio-frequency spectroscopy of atomic dysprosium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohensee, M A; Leefer, N; Budker, D; Harabati, C; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V

    2013-08-02

    We report a joint test of local Lorentz invariance and the Einstein equivalence principle for electrons, using long-term measurements of the transition frequency between two nearly degenerate states of atomic dysprosium. We present many-body calculations which demonstrate that the energy splitting of these states is particularly sensitive to violations of both special and general relativity. We limit Lorentz violation for electrons at the level of 10(-17), matching or improving the best laboratory and astrophysical limits by up to a factor of 10, and improve bounds on gravitational redshift anomalies for electrons by 2 orders of magnitude, to 10(-8). With some enhancements, our experiment may be sensitive to Lorentz violation at the level of 9 × 10(-20).

  1. Nonlinear optical properties of lutetium and dysprosium bisphthalocyanines at 1550 nm with femto- and nanosecond pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plekhanov, A. I.; Basova, T. V.; Parkhomenko, R. G.; Gürek, A. G.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the nonlinear optical properties of unsubstituted lutetium (LuPc2) and dysprosium (DyPc2) bisphthalocyanines as well as octasubstituted Lu(PcR8)2 derivative with R=-S(C6H13) were studied at a wavelength of 1550 nm with 10 ns and 300 fs pulses. Based on Z-scan measurements the nonlinear absorption and refraction coefficient as well as the nature of nonlinear optical properties were analyzed for these materials. Open aperture Z-scan indicates strong two-photon absorption in all three bisphthalocyanines in nano- and femtosecond regimes. With good nonlinear optical coefficients, bisphthalocyanines of rare earth elements are expected to be promising materials for the creation of optical limiters.

  2. Novel Inducers of the Envelope Stress Response BaeSR in Salmonella Typhimurium: BaeR Is Critically Required for Tungstate Waste Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Patrick, Elaine; J. Sullivan, Matthew; Alston, Mark J.; Field, Sarah J.; AbuOun, Manal; Anjum, Muna F.; Rowley, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The RpoE and CpxR regulated envelope stress responses are extremely important for SalmonellaTyphimurium to cause infection in a range of hosts. Until now the role for BaeSR in both the Salmonella Typhimurium response to stress and its contribution to infection have not been fully elucidated. Here we demonstrate stationary phase growth, iron and sodium tungstate as novel inducers of the BaeRregulon, with BaeR critically required for Salmonella resistance to sodium tungstate. We show that functional overlap between the resistance nodulation-cell division (RND) multidrug transporters, MdtA, AcrD and AcrB exists for the waste disposal of tungstate from the cell. We also point to a role for enterobactinsiderophores in the protection of enteric organisms from tungstate, akin to the scenario in nitrogen fixing bacteria. Surprisingly, BaeR is the first envelope stress response pathway investigated in S. Typhimurium that is not required for murine typhoid in either ityS or ityR mouse backgrounds. BaeR is therefore either required for survival in larger mammals such as pigs or calves, an avian host such as chickens, or survival out with the host altogether where Salmonella and related enterics must survive in soil and water. PMID:21886814

  3. Novel inducers of the envelope stress response BaeSR in Salmonella Typhimurium: BaeR is critically required for tungstate waste disposal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Appia-Ayme

    Full Text Available The RpoE and CpxR regulated envelope stress responses are extremely important for Salmonella Typhimurium to cause infection in a range of hosts. Until now the role for BaeSR in both the Salmonella Typhimurium response to stress and its contribution to infection have not been fully elucidated. Here we demonstrate stationary phase growth, iron and sodium tungstate as novel inducers of the BaeRregulon, with BaeR critically required for Salmonella resistance to sodium tungstate. We show that functional overlap between the resistance nodulation-cell division (RND multidrug transporters, MdtA, AcrD and AcrB exists for the waste disposal of tungstate from the cell. We also point to a role for enterobactinsiderophores in the protection of enteric organisms from tungstate, akin to the scenario in nitrogen fixing bacteria. Surprisingly, BaeR is the first envelope stress response pathway investigated in S. Typhimurium that is not required for murine typhoid in either ity(S or ity(R mouse backgrounds. BaeR is therefore either required for survival in larger mammals such as pigs or calves, an avian host such as chickens, or survival out with the host altogether where Salmonella and related enterics must survive in soil and water.

  4. Low-temperature flux growth of sulfates, molybdates, and tungstates of Ca, Sr, and Ba and investigation of doping with $Mn^{6+}$

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romanyuk, Y.E.; Ehrentraut, D.; Pollnau, M.; Garcia-Revilla, S.; Valiente, R.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of undoped and $Mn^{6+}$-doped molybdates and tungstates of alkali-earth metals and BaSO4 has been investigated. Single crystals were grown by the flux method within the temperature range of 600–475 °C, using the ternary NaCl–KCl–CsCl solvent. Sizes of undoped crystals increase within the

  5. Spectroscopic data of the 1.8-, 2.9-, and 4.3- mu m transitions in dysprosium-doped gallium lanthanum sulfide glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, T.; Hewak, D. W.; Samson, B. N.; Payne, D. N.

    1996-10-01

    Infrared emission at 1.8, 2.9, and 4.3 mu m is measured in dysprosium-doped gallium lanthanum sulfide (Ga:La:S) glass excited at 815 nm. Emission cross sections were calculated by Judd-Ofelt analysis, the Fuchtbauer-Ladenburg equation, and the theory of McCumber. The sigma tau value for the 4.3- mu m transition is \\similar 4000 times larger in the Ga:La:S glass than in a dysprosium-doped LiYF4 crystal, which has lased on this transition. The large sigma tau value and the recently reported ability of Ga:La:S glass to be fabricated into fiber form show the potential for an efficient, low-threshold mid-infrared fiber laser. The fluorescence peak at 4.3 mu m coincides with the fundamental absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide, making the glass a potential laser source for gas-sensing applications.

  6. Spectroscopic data of the 1.8-, 2.9-, and 4.3-microm transitions in dysprosium-doped gallium lanthanum sulfide glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, T; Hewak, D W; Samson, B N; Payne, D N

    1996-10-01

    Infrared emission at 1.8, 2.9, and 4.3 microm is measured in dysprosium-doped gallium lanthanum sulfide (Ga:La:S) glass excited at 815 nm. Emission cross sections were calculated by Judd-Ofelt analysis, the Füchtbauer- Ladenburg equation, and the theory of McCumber. The sigmatau value for the 4.3-microm transition is ~4000 times larger in the Ga:La:S glass than in a dysprosium-doped LiYF(4) crystal, which has lased on this transition. The large sigmatau value and the recently reported ability of Ga:La:S glass to be fabricated into fiber form show the potential for an efficient, low-threshold mid-infrared fiber laser. The f luorescence peak at 4.3 microm coincides with the fundamental absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide, making the glass a potential laser source for gas-sensing applications.

  7. On-line complexation/cloud point preconcentration for the sensitive determination of dysprosium in urine by flow injection inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Claudia; Cerutti, Soledad; Silva, Maria F. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700, San Luis (Argentina); Olsina, Roberto A.; Martinez, Luis D. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700, San Luis (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Avda. Rivadavia 1917, CP C1033AAJJ, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2003-01-01

    An on-line dysprosium preconcentration and determination system based on the hyphenation of cloud point extraction (CPE) to flow injection analysis (FIA) associated with ICP-OES was studied. For the preconcentration of dysprosium, a Dy(III)-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol complex was formed on-line at pH 9.22 in the presence of nonionic micelles of PONPE-7.5. The micellar system containing the complex was thermostated at 30 C in order to promote phase separation, and the surfactant-rich phase was retained in a microcolumn packed with cotton at pH 9.2. The surfactant-rich phase was eluted with 4 mol L{sup -1} nitric acid at a flow rate of 1.5 mL min{sup -1}, directly in the nebulizer of the plasma. An enhancement factor of 50 was obtained for the preconcentration of 50 mL of sample solution. The detection limit value for the preconcentration of 50 mL of aqueous solution of Dy was 0.03 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The precision for 10 replicate determinations at the 2.0 {mu}g L{sup -1}Dy level was 2.2% relative standard deviation (RSD), calculated from the peak heights obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for dysprosium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 100 {mu}g L {sup -1}. The method was successfully applied to the determination of dysprosium in urine. (orig.)

  8. Biospeciation of tungsten in the serum of diabetic and healthy rats treated with the antidiabetic agent sodium tungstate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gómez, M Milagros; Rodríguez-Fariñas, Nuria; Cañas-Montalvo, Benito; Domínguez, Jorge; Guinovart, Joan; Cámara-Rica, Carmen

    2011-05-30

    It is known that oral administration of sodium tungstate preserves the pancreatic beta cell function in diabetic rats. Healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated with sodium tungstate for one, three or six weeks, after which the species of W in serum, were analysed. An increase in serum W with treatment time was observed. After six weeks, the serum W concentration in diabetic rats (70 mg L(-1)) was about 4.6 times higher than in healthy specimens. This different behaviour was also observed for Cu accumulation, while the Zn pattern follows the contrary. The patterns observed in the retention of Cu and Zn may be attributable to a normalization of glycaemia. The speciation analysis of W was performed using 2D separations, including an immunoaffinity packing and a SEC (Size Exclusion Chromatography) column coupled to an ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) for elemental detection. Ultrafiltration data together with SEC-ICP-MS results proved that around 80% of serum W was bound to proteins, the diabetic rats registering a higher W content than their healthy counterparts. Most of the protein-bound W was due to a complex with albumin. An unknown protein with a molecular weight higher than 100 kDa was also found to bind a small amount of W (about 2%). MALDI-TOF (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight) analysis of the desalted and concentrated chromatographic fractions confirmed albumin as the main protein bound to tungstate in rat serum, while no binding to transferrin (Tf) was detected. The interaction between glutathione and W was also evaluated using standard solutions; however, the formation of complexes was not observed. The stability of the complexes between W and proteins when subjected to more stringent procedures, like those used in proteomic methodologies (denaturing with urea or SDS, boiling, sonication, acid media, reduction with β-mercaptoethanol (BME) or DTT (dithiotreitol) and alkylation with

  9. Simulation of light collection in the CMS lead tungstate crystals with the program Litrani: coating and surface effects

    CERN Document Server

    Chipaux, Rémi

    2001-01-01

    The accuracy of the lead tungstate electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment under construction at CERN relies, among other things, on the correction of the calibration parameter from variations dues to crystal ageing. This ageing will be measured by a so-called monitoring system, but the relation between monitoring and calibration parameter variations is not so trivial, and depends much on the overall optical characteristics of crystal and photodetector. We present here simulations done with the program Litrani based on real ageing data for a realistic CMS crystal with a defined surface quality (optically polished, with or without one lateral face slightly depolished), covered by coatings of various characteristics, from totally absorbing to nominal aluminum or diffusing medium. The correlation coefficient between monitoring and scintillation signals depends greatly o n these characteristics, and varies between about 1.3 and more than 10 (the optimum being one). Submitted to or Presented at: Contact ...

  10. Tungstate Oxide for Absorbing Near Infrared Light%新型纳米氧化钨的近红外吸收性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐磊; 夏海平

    2012-01-01

    采用化学沉淀法制备纳米氧化钨粉体,并用氢氮混合气对其进行还原处理,分析了还原处理温度对氧化钨化学组成的影响,用 X 射线粉末衍射仪表征了纳米氧化钨粒子的晶相与化学组成,采用扫描电子显微镜观察了该粒子还原处理前后的晶相形貌,并测定了由该纳米颗粒还原前后制得的胶状液体从可见光到近红外波长范围内的吸收光谱和透过光谱。研究表明:还原后的氧化钨纳米粒子对 1400~1600nm 和 1900~2200nm 波段的近红外光具有显著的吸收增强效应,同时对可见光具有很高的透过性,这种具有特殊光学吸收特性的纳米氧化钨可望在新型太阳能热屏蔽器件的设计中得到应用。%A nano-powder of tungstate oxide was firstly prepared by a chemical precipitation process, and then the powder was reduced in H2/N2 gases at a high temperature. The phase and chemical composition of tungstate oxide before and after reduction were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. The morphology of tungstate oxide before and after reduction was observed by scanning electron microscope. The absorption and transmittance spectra of tungstate oxide in a sol state from visible to near infrared wavelength were determined. The results indicated that the tungstate oxide after reduction had a high absorbance in 1 400-1 600 nm and 1 900-2 200 nm wave band for near infrared light and a high transmittance for visible light. It is suggested that the nano-powder of tungstate oxide with the special absorbing characteristics may be promising to be applied in the design for novel solar heat shielding.

  11. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Tri-(2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide)bis(dimethyl sulfoxide) Dysprosium(Ⅲ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A range of rare earth metal complexes of 2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide (Hmpo) have been synthesized, and studied by elemental analysis and IR spectroscopic technique. Crystal structure of Dy(mpo)3(DMSO)2 (DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide) has been determined. The complex crystallizes in the triclinic system, space group Pī with lattice parameters: a = 9.602(3), b = 9.803(3), c = 15.498(5)A, α= 89.51(1), β= 85.73(1), γ= 62.99(1)°, Dc = 1.787 g/cm3, C19H24N3O5S5Dy, Mr = 697.21, Z = 2, F(000) = 690, μ = 3.321mm-1, the final R = 0.0237 and wR = 0.0587 for 4116 reflections with I>σ2(I). The coordination number of dysprosium Ⅲ is eight, and its coordination geometry is a somewhat distorted square antiprism with O(3), O(4), O(5), S(3) and O(1), O(2), S(1), S(2) at the tetragonal bases (dihedral angle between their mean planes is 2.9(1)0). Around the Dy atom, three five-membered ring planes (Dy, O, N, C, S) make the dihedral angles of 74.42, 11.31 and 83.72, respectively.

  12. Photo-, cathodo- and thermoluminescent properties of dysprosium-doped HfO2 films deposited by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manríquez, R Reynoso; Góngora, J A I Díaz; Guzmán-Mendoza, J; Montalvo, T Rivera; Olguín, J C Guzmán; Ramírez, P V Cerón; García-Hipólito, M; Falcony, C

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the photoluminescent (PL), cathodoluminescent (CL) and thermoluminescent (TL) properties of hafnium oxide films doped with trivalent dysprosium ions are reported. The films were deposited on glass substrates at temperatures ranging from 300 to 600°C, using chlorides as precursor reagents. The surface morphology of films showed a veins shaped microstructure at low deposition temperatures, while at higher temperatures the formation of spherical particles was observed on the surface. X-ray diffraction showed the presence of HfO2 monoclinic phase in the films deposited at temperatures greater than 400°C. The PL and CL spectra of the doped films showed the highest emission band centered at 575nm corresponding to the transitions (4)F9/2→(6)H13/2, which is a characteristic transition of Dy(3+) ion. The greatest emission intensities were observed in samples doped with 1 atomic percent (at%) of DyCl3 in the precursor solution. Regarding the TL behavior, the glow curve of HfO2:Dy(+3) films exhibited spectrum with one broad band centered at about 150°C. The highest intensity TL response was observed on the films deposited at 500°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Workplace testing of the new single sphere neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils (Dy-SSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, R.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Chiti, M.; Palacios-Pérez, L.; Angelone, M.; Tana, L.

    2012-08-01

    A photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of a single moderating polyethylene sphere with Dysprosium activation foils arranged along three perpendicular axes was designed by CIEMAT and INFN. The device is called Dy-SSS (Dy foil-based Single Sphere Spectrometer). It shows nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence up to 20 MeV. The first prototype, previously calibrated with 14 MeV neutrons, has been recently tested in workplaces having different energy and directional distributions. These are a 2.5 MeV nearly mono-chromatic and mono-directional beam available at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) and the photo-neutron field produced in a 15 MV Varian CLINAC DHX medical accelerator, located in the Ospedale S. Chiara (Pisa). Both neutron spectra are known through measurements with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer. In both cases the experimental response of the Dy-SSS agrees with the reference data. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the spectrometric capability of the new device are independent from the directional distribution of the neutron field. This opens the way to a new generation of moderation-based neutron instruments, presenting all advantages of the Bonner sphere spectrometer without the disadvantage of the repeated exposures. This concept is being developed within the NESCOFI@BTF project of INFN (Commissione Scientifica Nazionale 5).

  14. Ferroelectric properties of dysprosium-doped Bi4Ti3O12 thin films crystallized in various atmospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Chuan-pin; TANG Ming-hua; YE Zhi; ZHOU Yic-hun; ZHENG Xue-jun; ZHONG Xiang-li; HU Zeng-shun

    2006-01-01

    Dysprosium-doped Bi4Ti3O12 (Bi3.4Dy0.6Ti3O12,BDT) ferroelectric thin films were deposited on Pt(111)/Ti/SiO2/Si(111) substrates by chemical solution deposition (CSD) and crystallized in nitrogen,air and oxygen atmospheres,respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to identify the crystal structure,the surface and cross-section morphology of the deposited ferroelectric films. The results show that the crystallization atmosphere has significant effect on determining the crystallization and ferroelectric properties of the BDT films. The film crystallized in nitrogen at a relatively low temperature of 650 ℃,exhibits excellent crystallinity and ferroelectricity with a remanent polarization of 2Pr = 24.9 μC/cm2 and a coercive field of 144.5 kV/cm. While the films annealed in air and oxygen at 650 ℃ do not show good crystallinity and ferroelectricity until they are annealed at 700 ℃. The structure evolution and ferroelectric properties of BDT thin films annealed under different temperatures (600-750 ℃) were also investigated. The crystallinity of the BDT films is improved and the average grain size increases when the annealing temperature increases from 600 ℃ to 750 ℃ at an interval of 50 ℃. However,the polarization of the films is not monotonous function of the annealing temperature.

  15. 湿法分解钨酸钴的热力学分析%Thermodynamic analysis of cobalt tungstate ’s hydrometallurgical decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易军; 曹才放

    2013-01-01

    When treating scraps WC-Co hard metal with oxygen or air, cobalt tungstate insoluble in water forms in the oxidation products. Thermodynamic equilibriums of Co-W-H 2O system and Co-W-C-H2O system were studied respectively obtaining a series of equilibrium diagrams to investigate issues related to hydrometallurgical decomposition of cobalt tungstate. The results show that cobalt tungstate is relatively stable in neutral solution. Cobalt tungstate can be decomposed by acid or alkali under certain conditions. Tungsten and cobalt can be separated at the same time. In addition, the decomposition reaction of cobalt tungstate with carbonate can be accomplished at lower excess coefficient of carbonate due to its strong thermodynamic tendency. Solution PH value has a remarkable effect on the reaction.%采用空气(或氧气)氧化法处理WC-Co硬质合金废料时,钴和钨将形成难溶于水的化合物钨酸钴。针对湿法分解钨酸钴的问题,分别对Co-W-H2O体系和Co-W-C-H2O体系进行了热力学分析,获得了一系列平衡关系图。结果表明,钨酸钴在中性溶液中可稳定存在,采用酸分解或碱分解的方式,均可使钨酸钴分解,并实现钨和钴的分离。碳酸盐分解钨酸钴的热力学趋势较大,分解反应可在较低的碳酸盐过量系数下完成。此外,溶液pH值对碳酸盐分解钨酸钴具有较大的影响。

  16. Sensitive search for the temporal variation of the fine structure constant using radio-frequency E1 transitions in atomic dysprosium

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, A T; Lamoreaux, S K; Torgerson, J R

    2003-01-01

    It has been proposed that the radio-frequency electric-dipole (E1) transition between two nearly degenerate opposite-parity states in atomic dysprosium should be highly sensitive to possible temporal variation of the fine structure constant ($\\alpha$) [V. A. Dzuba, V. V. Flambaum, and J. K. Webb, Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 59}, 230 (1999)]. We discuss here an experimental realization of the proposed search, which involves monitoring the E1 transition frequency over a period of time using direct frequency counting techniques. We estimate that a statistical sensitivity of $|\\adota| \\sim 10^{-18}$/yr may be achieved and discuss possible systematic effects in such a measurement.

  17. A role for tungsten in the biology of Campylobacter jejuni: tungstate stimulates formate dehydrogenase activity and is transported via an ultra-high affinity ABC system distinct from the molybdate transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Jonathan P; Cliff, Matthew J; Kelly, David J

    2009-11-01

    The food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni possesses no known tungstoenzymes, yet encodes two ABC transporters (Cj0300-0303 and Cj1538-1540) homologous to bacterial molybdate (ModABC) uptake systems and the tungstate transporter (TupABC) of Eubacterium acidaminophilum respectively. The actual substrates and physiological role of these transporters were investigated. Tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry of the purified periplasmic binding proteins of each system revealed that while Cj0303 is unable to discriminate between molybdate and tungstate (K(D) values for both ligands of 4-8 nM), Cj1540 binds tungstate with a K(D) of 1.0 +/- 0.2 pM; 50 000-fold more tightly than molybdate. Induction-coupled plasma mass spectroscopy of single and double mutants showed that this large difference in affinity is reflected in a lower cellular tungsten content in a cj1540 (tupA) mutant compared with a cj0303c (modA) mutant. Surprisingly, formate dehydrogenase (FDH) activity was decreased approximately 50% in the tupA strain, and supplementation of the growth medium with tungstate significantly increased FDH activity in the wild type, while inhibiting known molybdoenzymes. Our data suggest that C. jejuni possesses a specific, ultra-high affinity tungstate transporter that supplies tungsten for incorporation into FDH. Furthermore, possession of two MoeA paralogues may explain the formation of both molybdopterin and tungstopterin in this bacterium.

  18. Enhanced structural and optical properties of the polyaniline-calcium tungstate (PANI-CaWO4 nanocomposite for electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabu, N. Aloysius; Francis, Xavier; Anjaly, Jose; Sankararaman, S.; Varghese, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    In this article, we report the synthesis and characterization of polyaniline-calcium tungstate nanocomposite, a novel material for potential applications. The PANI-CaWO4 nanocomposite was prepared by in situ oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of CaWO4 nanoparticles dispersed in ethanol. Investigations using X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the formation of the nanocomposite of PANI with CaWO4 nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy revealed almost uniform distribution of CaWO4 nanoparticles in the polyaniline matrix. These studies also confirmed electronic structure modification as a result of incorporating CaWO4 nanoparticles in PANI. Composite formation resulted in large decrease in the optical band gap and enhanced photoluminescence. The augmented structural, optical and photoluminescence properties of the PANI-CaWO4 nanocomposite can be used to explore potential applications in micro- and optoelectronics. This is the first report presenting synthesis and characterization of the PANI-CaWO4 nanocomposite.

  19. Self-Phase-Matched Second-Harmonic and White-Light Generation in a Biaxial Zinc Tungstate Single Crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osewski, Pawel; Belardini, Alessandro; Petronijevic, Emilija; Centini, Marco; Leahu, Grigore; Diduszko, Ryszard; Pawlak, Dorota A; Sibilia, Concita

    2017-03-24

    Second-order nonlinear optical materials are used to generate new frequencies by exploiting second-harmonic generation (SHG), a phenomenon where a nonlinear material generates light at double the optical frequency of the input beam. Maximum SHG is achieved when the pump and the generated waves are in phase, for example through birefringence in uniaxial crystals. However, applying these materials usually requires a complicated cutting procedure to yield a crystal with a particular orientation. Here we demonstrate the first example of phase matching under the normal incidence of SHG in a biaxial monoclinic single crystal of zinc tungstate. The crystal was grown by the micro-pulling-down method with the (102) plane perpendicular to the growth direction. Additionally, at the same time white light was generated as a result of stimulated Raman scattering and multiphoton luminescence induced by higher-order effects such as three-photon luminescence enhanced by cascaded third-harmonic generation. The annealed crystal offers SHG intensities approximately four times larger than the as grown one; optimized growth and annealing conditions may lead to much higher SHG intensities.

  20. A Simulation Study on the Feasibility of Radio Enhancement Therapy with Calcium Tungstate and Hafnium Oxide Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Sherck, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Herein is a simulation study on the radio enhancement potential of calcium tungstate (CaWO4) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) nanoparticles (NPs) relative to gold (Au) NPs. The work utilizes the extensively studied Au NP as the "gold standard" to which the novel materials can be compared. All three materials were investigated in-silico with the software Penetration and Energy Loss of Positrons and Electrons (PENELOPE) developed by Francesc Salvat and distributed in the United States by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The aims are: (1) Do CaWO4 and HfO2 NPs function like Au?, and (2) if not, how else might they function to enhance radio therapy? Our investigations have found that HfO2 likely functions as Au, but not as effectively. CaWO4 likely does not function as Au, and we propose that CaWO4 may exhibit cancer killing traits through its intrinsic UV luminescence property.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and luminescence study of Eu(III) tungstates and molybdates nanotubes using carbon nanotubes as templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ziwei; Zhou, Liqun; Wang, Fen; Zhou, Lirong

    2009-03-01

    Eu(III) tungstates and molybdates nanotubes have been successfully synthesized by the solvothermal method using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as removable templates. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, thermogravimetric and differential thermalanalysis. It is demonstrated that CNTs are fully coated with an amorphous Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo) layer, which is about 10nm thick and almost continuous and uniform. After the Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo)/CNTs composites have been calcined at 700 degrees C, Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo) nanotubes are obtained by removing the CNTs templates. The diameter of the Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo) nanotubes is 40-60 nm, which is consistent with that of CNTs. The luminescence properties of the Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo) nanotubes calcined at various temperatures have been investigated. The result shows that the Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo) nanotubes obtained from the Eu(2)(MO(4))(3) (M=W, Mo)/CNTs composites calcined at 700 degrees C display a strong red emission peak at around 611 nm.

  2. Self-Phase-Matched Second-Harmonic and White-Light Generation in a Biaxial Zinc Tungstate Single Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osewski, Pawel; Belardini, Alessandro; Petronijevic, Emilija; Centini, Marco; Leahu, Grigore; Diduszko, Ryszard; Pawlak, Dorota A.; Sibilia, Concita

    2017-01-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical materials are used to generate new frequencies by exploiting second-harmonic generation (SHG), a phenomenon where a nonlinear material generates light at double the optical frequency of the input beam. Maximum SHG is achieved when the pump and the generated waves are in phase, for example through birefringence in uniaxial crystals. However, applying these materials usually requires a complicated cutting procedure to yield a crystal with a particular orientation. Here we demonstrate the first example of phase matching under the normal incidence of SHG in a biaxial monoclinic single crystal of zinc tungstate. The crystal was grown by the micro-pulling-down method with the (102) plane perpendicular to the growth direction. Additionally, at the same time white light was generated as a result of stimulated Raman scattering and multiphoton luminescence induced by higher-order effects such as three-photon luminescence enhanced by cascaded third-harmonic generation. The annealed crystal offers SHG intensities approximately four times larger than the as grown one; optimized growth and annealing conditions may lead to much higher SHG intensities. PMID:28338074

  3. Synthesis of bismuth tungstate (Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}) nanoflakes and their field emission investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolhe, P. S.; Sonawane, K. M. [Department of Physics, Fergusson College, Pune 411 004 (India); Bankar, P. K.; Gavhane, D. S.; More, M. A., E-mail: mam@physics.unipune.ac.in [Center for Advanced Studies in materials Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune-411 00.7 (India); Maiti, N. [Laser & Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-05-23

    The nanoflakes of Bismuth Tungstate (Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}) were successfully synthesized by a one-step facile hydrothermal route without using any templates or surfactants and field emission investigations of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoflakes emitter are reported. Structural and morphological analysis of as-synthesized Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoflakes has been carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Moreover, the field emission characteristics of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoflakes are found to be superior to the other semiconductor emitters. The synthesized Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoflakes emitter delivers current density of ~222.35 μA/cm{sup 2} at an applied electric field of ~7.2 V/μm. The emission current stability investigated at pre-set value of ~2 μA is observed to be fairly good. These observed results demonstrate potential candidate of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} cathode as an electron source for practical applications in vacuum microelectronic device.

  4. Self-Phase-Matched Second-Harmonic and White-Light Generation in a Biaxial Zinc Tungstate Single Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osewski, Pawel; Belardini, Alessandro; Petronijevic, Emilija; Centini, Marco; Leahu, Grigore; Diduszko, Ryszard; Pawlak, Dorota A.; Sibilia, Concita

    2017-03-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical materials are used to generate new frequencies by exploiting second-harmonic generation (SHG), a phenomenon where a nonlinear material generates light at double the optical frequency of the input beam. Maximum SHG is achieved when the pump and the generated waves are in phase, for example through birefringence in uniaxial crystals. However, applying these materials usually requires a complicated cutting procedure to yield a crystal with a particular orientation. Here we demonstrate the first example of phase matching under the normal incidence of SHG in a biaxial monoclinic single crystal of zinc tungstate. The crystal was grown by the micro-pulling-down method with the (102) plane perpendicular to the growth direction. Additionally, at the same time white light was generated as a result of stimulated Raman scattering and multiphoton luminescence induced by higher-order effects such as three-photon luminescence enhanced by cascaded third-harmonic generation. The annealed crystal offers SHG intensities approximately four times larger than the as grown one; optimized growth and annealing conditions may lead to much higher SHG intensities.

  5. Photoluminescence in solid solutions and thin films of tungstates CaWO{sub 4}-CdWO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taoufyq, A.; Mauroy, V.; Guinneton, F.; Valmalette, J-C. [University of Toulon, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, La Garde, (France); Fiorido, T. [Aix Marseille University, IM2NP, UMR CNRS, 7334, Marseille, (France); Benlhachemi, A. [IBN ZOHR University, Faculty of sciences, Environment and Materials Laboratory, Agadir, (Morocco); Lyoussi, A. [CEA of Cadarache, DEN, Departement of reactors studies, experimental physics, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, (France); Nolibe, G. [Cesigma society, signals and systems, La Garde, (France); Gavarri, J-R. [University of Toulon, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, La Garde, (France)

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we present two types of studies on the luminescence properties under UV and X-ray excitations of solid solutions Ca{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}WO{sub 4} and of thin layers of CaWO{sub 4} and CdWO{sub 4}. These tungstate based solid solutions are susceptible to be integrated into new radiation sensors, in order to be used in different fields of applications such as reactor measurements, safeguards, homeland security, nuclear nondestructive assays, LINAC emission radiation measurement. However these complex materials were rarely investigated in the literature. One first objective of our studies was to establish correlations between luminescence efficiency, chemical substitution and the degree of crystallization resulting from elaboration conditions. A second objective will be to determine the efficiency of luminescence properties of thin layers of these materials. In the present work, we focus our attention on the role of chemical substitution on photon emissions under UV and X-ray irradiations. The luminescence spectra of Ca{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}WO{sub 4} polycrystalline materials have been investigated at room temperature as a function of composition (0≤x≤1). In addition, we present a preliminary study of the luminescence of CaWO{sub 4} and CdWO{sub 4} thin layers: oscillations observed in the case of X-ray excitations in the luminescence spectra are discussed. (authors)

  6. Dysprosium doping induced shape and magnetic anisotropy of Fe3-xDyxO4 (x=0.01-0.1) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Richa; Luthra, Vandna; Gokhale, Shubha

    2016-09-01

    The effect of dysprosium doping on evolution of structural and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles is reported. A standard route of co-precipitation was used for the synthesis of undoped and doped magnetite nanoparticles Fe3-xDyxO4 (x=0.0-0.1). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows formation of round shaped particles with diameter in the range of 8-14 nm for undoped sample. On doping beyond x=0.01, the formation of rod like structures is initiated along with the round shaped particles. The number of rods is found to increase with increasing doping concentration. Magnetic characterization using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) revealed doping dependent magnetic properties which can be correlated with the crystallite size as determined from X-ray diffraction (XRD). Enhancement in the saturation magnetization in the initial stages of doping can be explained on the basis of incorporation of Dy3+ ions in the inverse spinel structure at the octahedral site in place of Fe3+ ions. Subsequent decrease in saturation magnetization observed beyond x=0.03 could be attributed to precipitation of excess Dy in form of dysprosium ferrite phase.

  7. Research progress of modification and application of bismuth tungstate photocatalyst%Bi2WO6光催化剂的改性及其应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗序燕; 赵东方; 黄瑞宇; 祝婷; 邓金梅; 谢小华

    2015-01-01

    Bi2WO6因其能吸收可见光、催化活性高,是一种非常有潜力的光催化剂。综述了Bi2WO6催化剂的制备、修饰改性以及在处理有机污水方面的应用,并对今后Bi2WO6光催化剂的研究方向进行了展望。%Bismuth tungstate is a promising photocatalyst because of narrow band gap and ability of absorbing visible light. In this paper, the preparation ,modification and application of sewage treatment of bismuth tungstate photocatalyst were reviewed. Finally, the direction of future development of bismuth tungstate photocatalyst was prospected.

  8. Immunotoxic effects of sodium tungstate dihydrate on female B6C3F1/N mice when administered in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Rachel P; Smith, Matthew J; White, Kimber L; Elmore, Susan A; Herbert, Ron; Moore, Rebecca; Staska, Lauren M; Behl, Mamta; Hooth, Michelle J; Kissling, Grace E; Germolec, Dori R

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring, high-tensile strength element that has been used in a number of consumer products. Tungsten has been detected in soil, waterways, groundwater, and human tissue and body fluids. Elevated levels of tungsten in urine were reported for populations exposed to tungstate in drinking water in areas where natural tungsten formations were prevalent. Published reports indicated that sodium tungstate may modulate hematopoiesis, immune cell populations, and immune responses in rodent models. The objective of this study was to assess potential immunotoxicity of sodium tungstate dihydrate (STD), a drinking water contaminant. Female B6C3F1/N mice received 0-2000 mg STD/L in their drinking water for 28 d, and were evaluated for effects on immune cell populations in spleen and bone marrow, and humoral-mediated, cell-mediated, and innate immunity. Three different parameters of cell-mediated immunity were similarly affected at 1000 mg STD/L. T-cell proliferative responses against allogeneic leukocytes and anti-CD3 were decreased 32%, and 21%, respectively. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity was decreased at all effector:target cell ratios examined. At 2000 mg STD/L, the absolute numbers of CD3(+) T-cell progenitor cells in bone marrow were increased 86%, but the alterations in B-lymphocyte and other progenitor cells were not significant. There were no effects on bone marrow DNA synthesis or colony forming capabilities. STD-induced effects on humoral-mediated immunity, innate immunity, and splenocyte sub-populations were limited. Enhanced histopathology did not detect treatment-related lesions in any of the immune tissues. These data suggest exposure to STD in drinking water may adversely affect cell-mediated immunity.

  9. A new ion-selective electrode based on aluminium tungstate for Fe(III) determination in rock sample, pharmaceutical sample and water sample

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mu Naushad

    2008-12-01

    An inorganic cation exchanger, aluminum tungstate (AT), has been synthesized by adding 0.1 M sodium tungstate gradually into 0.1 M aluminium nitrate at pH 1.2 with continuous stirring. The ion exchange capacity for Na+ ion and distribution coefficients of various metal ions was determined on the column of aluminium tungstate. The distribution studies of various metal ions showed the selectivity of Fe(III) ions by this cation exchange material. So, a Fe(III) ion-selective membrane electrode was prepared by using this cation exchange material as an electroactive material. The effect of plasticizers viz. dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dioctylphthalate (DOP), di-(butyl) butyl phosphate (DBBP) and tris-(2-ethylhexylphosphate) (TEHP), has also been studied on the performance of membrane sensor. It was observed that the membrane containing the composition AT: PVC: DBP in the ratio 2 : 20 : 15 displayed a useful analytical response with excellent reproducibility, low detection limit, wide working pH range (1–3.5), quick response time (15 s) and applicability over a wide concentration range of Fe(III) ions from 1 × 10-7 M to 1 × 10-1 M with a slope of 20 ± 1 mV per decade. The selectivity coefficients were determined by the mixed solution method and revealed that the electrode was selective for Fe(III) ions in the presence of interfering ions. The electrode was used for atleast 5 months without any considerable divergence in response characteristics. The constructed sensor was used as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Fe(III) ions against EDTA and Fe(III) determination in rock sample, pharmaceutical sample and water sample. The results are found to be in good agreement with those obtained by using conventional methods.

  10. Decavanadate, decaniobate, tungstate and molybdate interactions with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase: quercetin prevents cysteine oxidation by vanadate but does not reverse ATPase inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Fraqueza, Gil; de Carvalho, Luís A. E. Batista; Marques, M. Paula M.; Maia, Luisa; Ohlin, C. André; Casey, William H.; Aureliano, M.

    2012-01-01

    Recently we demonstrated that the decavanadate (V10) ion is a stronger Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor than other oxometalates, such as the isoelectronic and isostructural decaniobate ion, and the tungstate and molybdate monomer ions, and that it binds to this protein with a 1 : 1 stoichiometry. The V10 interaction is not affected by any of the protein conformations that occur during the process of calcium translocation (i.e. E1, E1P, E2 and E2P) (Fraqueza et al., J. Inorg. Biochem., 2012). In the p...

  11. Decavanadate, decaniobate, tungstate and molybdate interactions with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase: quercetin prevents cysteine oxidation by vanadate but does not reverse ATPase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, Gil; Batista de Carvalho, Luís A E; Marques, M Paula M; Maia, Luisa; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H; Aureliano, Manuel

    2012-11-07

    Recently we demonstrated that the decavanadate (V(10)) ion is a stronger Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor than other oxometalates, such as the isoelectronic and isostructural decaniobate ion, and the tungstate and molybdate monomer ions, and that it binds to this protein with a 1 : 1 stoichiometry. The V(10) interaction is not affected by any of the protein conformations that occur during the process of calcium translocation (i.e. E1, E1P, E2 and E2P) (Fraqueza et al., J. Inorg. Biochem., 2012). In the present study, we further explore this subject, and we can now show that the decaniobate ion, [Nb(10) = Nb(10)O(28)](6-), is a useful tool in deducing the interaction and the non-competitive Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibition by the decavanadate ion [V(10) = V(10)O(28)](6-). Moreover, decavanadate and vanadate induce protein cysteine oxidation whereas no effects were detected for the decaniobate, tungstate or molybdate ions. The presence of the antioxidant quercetin prevents cysteine oxidation, but not ATPase inhibition, by vanadate or decavanadate. Definitive V(IV) EPR spectra were observed for decavanadate in the presence of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, indicating a vanadate reduction at some stage of the protein interaction. Raman spectroscopy clearly shows that the protein conformation changes that are induced by V(10), Nb(10) and vanadate are different from the ones induced by molybdate and tungstate monomer ions. Here, Mo and W cause changes similar to those by phosphate, yielding changes similar to the E1P protein conformation. The putative reduction of vanadium(V) to vanadium(IV) and the non-competitive binding of the V(10) and Nb(10) decametalates may explain the differences in the Raman spectra compared to those seen in the presence of molybdate or tungstate. Putting it all together, we suggest that the ability of V(10) to inhibit the Ca(2+)-ATPase may be at least in part due to the process of vanadate reduction and associated protein cysteine oxidation. These

  12. Development of radiopure cadmium tungstate crystal scintillators from enriched {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd to search for double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danevich, F. A.; Boiko, R. S.; Chernyak, D. M.; Kobychev, V. V.; Kropivyansky, B. N.; Mokina, V. M.; Nikolaiko, A. S.; Poda, D. V.; Podviyanuk, R. B.; Tretyak, V. I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Umatov, V. I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; D' Angelo, S. [INFN, Section of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy and Department of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Brudanin, V. B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Cappella, F.; Incicchitti, A. [INFN, Section of Rome La Sapienza, Rome, Italy and Department of Physics, University of Rome La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Caracciolo, V. [INFN, Gran Sasso National Laboratories, Assergi (Aq), Italy and Department of Physics, University of L' Aquila, L' Aquila (Italy); and others

    2013-08-08

    Cadmium tungstate crystal scintillators enriched in {sup 106}Cd up to 66% ({sup 106}CdWO{sub 4}) and in {sup 116}Cd up to 82% ({sup 116}CdWO{sub 4}) have been developed. The low radioactive contamination of the crystals measured on the level of ≤ 1.5 mBq/kg ({sup 40}K), ≤ 0.005 - 0.012 mBq/kg ({sup 226}Ra), 0.04 - 0.07 mBq/kg ({sup 228}Th) allows to carry out high sensitivity experiments to search for double beta processes in {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd.

  13. On halide derivatives of rare-earth metal(III) oxidomolybdates(VI) and -tungstates(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleid, Thomas; Hartenbach, Ingo [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Inorganic Chemistry

    2016-11-01

    Halide derivatives of rare-earth metal(III) oxidomolybdates(VI) have been investigated comprehensively over the last decade comprising the halogens fluorine, chlorine, and bromine. Iodide-containing compounds are so far unknown. The simple composition REXMoO{sub 4} (RE=rare-earth element, X=halogen) is realized for X=F almost throughout the complete lanthanide series as well as for yttrium. While ytterbium and lutetium do not form any fluoride derivative, for lanthanum, only a fluoride-deprived compound with the formula La{sub 3}FMo{sub 4}O{sub 16} is realized. Moreover, molybdenum-rich compounds with the formula REXMo{sub 2}O{sub 7} are also known for yttrium and the smaller lanthanoids. For X=Cl the composition REClMoO{sub 4} is known for yttrium and the whole lanthanide series, although, four different structure types were identified. Almost the same holds for X=Br, however, only two different structure types are realized in this class of compounds. In the case of halide derivatives of rare-earth metal(III) oxidotungstates(VI) the composition REXWO{sub 4} is found for chlorides and bromides only, so far. Due to the similar size of Mo{sup 6+} and W{sup 6+} cations, the structures found for the tungstates are basically the same as for the molybdates. With the larger lanthanides, the representatives for both chloride and bromide derivates exhibit similar structural motifs as seen in the molybdates, however, the crystal structure cannot be determined reliably. In case of the smaller lanthanoids, the chloride derivatives are isostructural with the respective molybdates, although the existence ranges differ slightly. The same is true for rare-earth metal(III) bromide oxidotungstates(VI).

  14. Crystal structures of deuterated sodium molybdate dihydrate and sodium tungstate dihydrate from time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, A Dominic

    2015-07-01

    Time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data have been measured from ∼90 mol% deuterated isotopologues of Na2MoO4·2H2O and Na2WO4·2H2O at 295 K to a resolution of sin (θ)/λ = 0.77 Å(-1). The use of neutrons has allowed refinement of structural parameters with a precision that varies by a factor of two from the heaviest to the lightest atoms; this contrasts with the X-ray based refinements where precision may be > 20× poorer for O atoms in the presence of atoms such as Mo and W. The accuracy and precision of inter-atomic distances and angles are in excellent agreement with recent X-ray single-crystal structure refinements whilst also completing our view of the hydrogen-bond geometry to the same degree of statistical certainty. The two structures are isotypic, space-group Pbca, with all atoms occupying general positions, being comprised of edge- and corner-sharing NaO5 and NaO6 polyhedra that form layers parallel with (010) inter-leaved with planes of XO4 (X = Mo, W) tetra-hedra that are linked by chains of water mol-ecules along [100] and [001]. The complete structure is identical with the previously described molybdate [Capitelli et al. (2006 ▸). Asian J. Chem. 18, 2856-2860] but shows that the purported three-centred inter-action involving one of the water mol-ecules in the tungstate [Farrugia (2007 ▸). Acta Cryst. E63, i142] is in fact an ordinary two-centred 'linear' hydrogen bond.

  15. Simultaneous determination of some trace metal impurities in high-purity sodium tungstate using coprecipitation and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiaoguo; KUANG Tongchun; LIU Qianjun

    2004-01-01

    A method based on the combination of coprecipitation with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spec trometry (ICP-AES) was developed for the determination of impurities in high-purity sodium tungstate. Six elements (Co,Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Pb) were coprecipitated by lanthanum hydroxide so as to be concentrated and separated from the tungsten matrix. Effects of some factors on the recoveries of the analytes and on the residual amount of sodium tungstate were investigated, and the optimum conditions for the coprecipitation were proposed. Matrix-matching calibration curve method was used for the analysis. It is shown that the elements mentioned above can be quantitatively recovered. The detection limits for Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Pb are 0.07, 0.4, 0.2, 0.1, 0.6, and 1.3 μg.g-1, respectively. The recoveries vary from 92.5% to 108%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) are in the range of 3.1%-5.5%.

  16. Reactive-oxygen-species-mediated Cdc25C degradation results in differential antiproliferative activities of vanadate, tungstate, and molybdate in the PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong-Tong; Liu, Yan-Jun; Wang, Qin; Yang, Xiao-Gai; Wang, Kui

    2012-02-01

    The differential antiproliferative effects of vanadate, tungstate, and molybdate on human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 were compared and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. The results demonstrate that all of the three oxoanions can cause G(2)/M cell cycle arrest, which is evidenced by the increase in the level of phosphorylated Cdc2 at its inactive Tyr-15 site. Moreover, even if the difference in cellular uptake among the three oxoanions is excluded from the possible factors affecting their antiproliferative activity, vanadate exerted a much more potent effect in PC-3 cells than the other two oxoanions. Our results also reveal that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated degradation of Cdc25C rather than Cdc25A or Cdc25B is responsible for vanadate-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest. We propose a possible mechanism to clarify the differential effect of the three oxoanions in biological systems beyond just considering that they are structural analogs of phosphate. We suggest that ROS formation is unlikely to be involved in the biological function of tungstate and molybdate, whereas the redox properties of vanadium may be important factors for it to exert pharmacological effects. Further, given the evidence from epidemiology studies of the association between diabetes and prostate cancer, the possibility of vanadate as a good candidate as both an antidiabetic and an anticancer agent or a chemopreventive agent is indicated.

  17. Single-molecule magnet behavior in an octanuclear dysprosium(iii) aggregate inherited from helical triangular Dy3 SMM-building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Lang; Wu, Jianfeng; Guo, Mei; Tang, Jinkui

    2016-06-28

    An unprecedented octanuclear dysprosium(iii) cluster with the formula [Dy8L6(μ3-OH)4(μ2-CH3O)2(CH3OH)6(H2O)2]·6H2O·10CH3OH·2CH3CN () based on a nonlinearly tritopic aroylhydrazone ligand H3L has been isolated, realizing the successful linking of pairwise interesting triangular Dy3 SMMs. It is noteworthy that two enantiomers (Λ and Δ configurations) individually behaving as a coordination-induced chirality presented in the Dy3 helicate are connected in the meso Dy8 cluster. Remarkably, alternating-current magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed that the Dy8 cluster shows typical SMM behavior inherited from its Dy3 helical precursor. It is one of the rare polynuclear Lnn SMMs (n > 7) under zero dc field.

  18. Another challenge to paramagnetic relaxation theory: a study of paramagnetic proton NMR relaxation in closely related series of pyridine-derivatised dysprosium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Nicola J; Finney, Katie-Louise N A; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Parker, David

    2016-02-14

    Measurements of the relaxation rate behaviour of two series of dysprosium complexes have been performed in solution, over the field range 1.0 to 16.5 Tesla. The field dependence has been modelled using Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory, allowing estimates of the electronic relaxation time, T1e, and the size of the magnetic susceptibility, μeff, to be made. Changes in relaxation rate of the order of 50% at higher fields were measured, following variation of the para-substituent in the single pyridine donor. The magnetic susceptibilities deviated unexpectedly from the free-ion values for certain derivatives in each series examined, in a manner that was independent of the electron-releasing/withdrawing ability of the pyridine substituent, suggesting that the polarisability of just one pyridine donor in octadenate ligands can play a significant role in defining the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy.

  19. A study of high-energy proton induced damage in Cerium Fluoride in comparison with measurements in Lead Tungstate calorimeter crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Dissertori, G; Luckey, D; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Otto, Th; Pauss, F; Roesler, S; Urscheler, Ch

    2010-01-01

    A Cerium Fluoride crystal produced during early R&D studies for calorimetry at the CERN Large Hadron Collider was exposed to a 24 GeV/c proton fluence Phi_p=(2.78 +- 0.20) x 10EE13 cm-2 and, after one year of measurements tracking its recovery, to a fluence Phi_p=(2.12 +- 0.15) x 10EE14 cm-2. Results on proton-induced damage to the crystal and its spontaneous recovery after both irradiations are presented here, along with some new, complementary data on proton-damage in Lead Tungstate. A comparison with FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation results is performed and a qualitative understanding of high-energy damage mechanism is attempted.

  20. Synthesis of gels with basis of titanium tungstates as matrixes of radioactive generators; Sintesis de geles a base de titanio tungstenatos como matrices de generadores radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galico C, L

    2005-07-01

    The heteropolyanions, compounds formed by the union of molybdates or tungstates polyanions with atoms of metals like zirconium, titanium, cerium, thorium, tin, etc., have been used as generator matrixes of {sup 99m} Tc or {sup 188} Re. Particularly they have been studied and produced successfully in our laboratory, generators of {sup 99} Mo/ {sup 99}m Tc at basis of gels zirconium molybdates and titanium molybdates. Considering that the molybdenum and tungsten, as well as the technetium and the rhenium, its belong to the same groups of transition metals, it is feasible that gels can be synthesized at basis of titanium tungstates, continuing a methodology similar to that of the gels titanium molybdates or zirconium molybdates, to produce generators {sup 188} W/ {sup 188} Re. The {sup 188} Re possess nuclear characteristics that make it attractive for therapeutic applications, since, it emits {beta}{sup -} particles of a great energy (2.12 MeV); joined to the possibility of being able to unite to different ligands (bifunctional agents) and biomolecules (antibodies or fragments of proteins), as it makes the {sup 99m} Tc, useful in radioimmunotherapy. Commercially the {sup 188} Re generators use a chromatographic column loaded with alumina where the {sup 188} Re, it is adsorbed and eluted the {sup 188} ReO{sub 4}{sup -} by means of a saline solution The alumina adsorbs around 0.2% of the {sup 188} Re, situation that forces to use {sup 188} Re of a high specific activity. The use of the gels technology, allows to work with medium or low specific activities of {sup 188} Re, opening the possibility of their production in countries whose nuclear capacity is medium or low. In particular, the synthesized gels with basis of titanium offer the possibility of being synthesized with non active material, for later on to be irradiated and directly produce the generator, since, the titanium {sup 51} Ti, unique radioisotope produced by the titanium, has a half life of 5.79 min. This

  1. Tuning the composition and magnetostructure of dysprosium iron garnets by Co-substitution: An XRD, FT-IR, XPS and VSM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tholkappiyan, R.; Vishista, K., E-mail: raovishista@gmail.com

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Garnet type Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 12} (x = 0–0.06) nanoparticles were synthesized by glycine assisted combustion method. • To investigate and confirm the phases in the synthesized ferrite nanoparticles by FT-IR and XRD analysis. • To investigate the compositional and oxidation state of the samples by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • The detailed core level spectra of Dy 4d, Fe 2p, Co 2p and O 1s were analyzed using XPS. • The magnetic property was studied by VSM technique. - Abstract: We report the Co-substituting on the synthesis and properties of garnet type dysprosium ferrite nanoparticles by basic composition Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 12} (x = 0–0.06) synthesized through glycine assisted combustion method. A possible formation mechanism of synthesized Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 12} samples by controlling the synthesis process has been proposed. XRD, FT-IR, XPS and VSM studies were used to investigate the compositional and magnetostructural properties of the prepared nanoparticles. XRD results confirm that all the samples are single-phase cubic garnet structure with mean crystallite size of 97–105 nm obtained from Scherrer method and 95–102 nm from W–H method. FT-IR analysis shows the presence of three expected bands in the frequency limit of 450–600 cm{sup −1} attributed to metal–O stretching vibration in tetrahedral site of garnet structure. A typical survey spectrum from XPS results confirmed the presence of Dy, Fe, Co and O elements in the samples. This study also to characterize the different oxidation states of the samples by fitting the parameters of high resolution Dy 4d, Fe 2p, Co 2p and O 1s XPS spectra. The XPS data of Dy 4d spectrum show that Dy{sup 3+} ion occupy in dodecahedral (D) site. The XPS analysis of Fe 2p and Co 2p data suggests that (Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}), (Co{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+}) are distributed in tetrahedral and octahedral sites

  2. A dysprosium-based metal-organic framework: Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and interaction with calf thymus-DNA and bovine serum albumin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biplab Mondal; Buddhadeb Sen; Ennio Zangrando; Pabitra Chattopadhyay

    2014-07-01

    A dysprosium-based metallo-organic framework (MOF) containing calcium ions formulated as {Dy(pyda)3Ca1.5(H2O)6} · 5.5H2O (1) (H2pyda = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid) was solvothermally synthesized in ethanolic medium and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic tools. A detailed structural analysis of the solid state structure of 1 by single crystal X-ray diffraction study showed a tricapped trigonal prism geometry for lanthanide in the [Dy(pyda)3]3− fragment. The mode of interaction of 1 with calf thymus- DNA and with protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by using absorption and emission spectroscopic tools. The apparent association constant of complex 1 with CT-DNA was deduced from an absorption spectral study (b = 4.08 × 104 M-1). Spectral and viscosity measurements indicated a groove-binding mode of 1 with CT-DNA, and from spectroscopic study the formation of a metal complex-BSA adduct was assumed to be the result of the interaction of 1 with BSA.

  3. Dual-mode T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent based on ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and in vivo application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegafaw, Tirusew; Xu, Wenlong; Wasi Ahmad, Md; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Gang Ho

    2015-09-01

    A new type of dual-mode T1 and T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles was synthesized. Gd3+ (8S7/2) plays an important role in T1 MRI contrast agents because of its large electron spin magnetic moment resulting from its seven unpaired 4f-electrons, and Dy3+ (6H15/2) has the potential to be used in T2 MRI contrast agents because of its very large total electron magnetic moment: among lanthanide oxide nanoparticles, Dy2O3 nanoparticles have the largest magnetic moments at room temperature. Using these properties of Gd3+ and Dy3+ and their oxide nanoparticles, ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide (GDO) nanoparticles were synthesized and their potential to act as a dual-mode T1 and T2 MRI contrast agent was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The D-glucuronic acid coated GDO nanoparticles (davg = 1.0 nm) showed large r1 and r2 values (r2/r1 ≈ 6.6) and as a result clear dose-dependent contrast enhancements in R1 and R2 map images. Finally, the dual-mode imaging capability of the nanoparticles was confirmed by obtaining in vivo T1 and T2 MR images.

  4. Experimental and molecular dynamics studies of dysprosium(III) salt solutions for a better representation of the microscopic features used within the binding mean spherical approximation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruas, Alexandre; Guilbaud, Philippe; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moulin, Christophe; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Pierre; Moisy, Philippe

    2006-10-19

    This work is aimed at a predictive description of the thermodynamic properties of actinide(III) salt solutions at high concentration and 25 degrees C. A new solution of the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory, based on the Wertheim formalism, for taking into account 1:1 and also 1:2 complex formation, is used to reproduce, from a simple procedure, experimental osmotic coefficient variation with concentration for three binary salt solutions of the same lanthanide(III) cation: dysprosium(III) perchlorate, nitrate, and chloride. The relevance of the fitted parameters is discussed, and their values are compared with available literature values. UV-vis/near-IR, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy experiments, and molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were conducted for dilute to concentrated solutions (ca. 3 mol.kg-1) for a study of the microscopic behavior of DyCl3 binary solutions. Coupling MD calculations and extended X-ray absorption fine structure led to the determination of reliable distances. The MD results were used for a discussion of the parameters used in the BIMSA.

  5. Experimental and molecular dynamics studies of dysprosium(III) salt solutions for a better representation of the microscopic features used within the binding mean spherical approximation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruas, Alexandre; Guilbaud, Philippe; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moulin, Christophe; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Pierre; Moisy, Philippe [DEN/DRCP/SCPS, CEA-Valrho Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex, DEN/DPC/SECR/LSRM, CEA-Saclay, Bat 391, BP 91191 Gif sur Yvette, Cedex (France); Laboratoire LI2C (UMR 7612), Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Boite No. 51, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2006-07-01

    This work is aimed at a predictive description of the thermodynamic properties of actinide (III) salt solutions at high concentration and 25 deg. C. A new solution of the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory, based on the Wertheim formalism, for taking into account 1: 1 and also 1: 2 complex formation, is used to reproduce, from a simple procedure, experimental osmotic coefficient variation with concentration for three binary salt solutions of the same lanthanide (III) cation: dysprosium (III) perchlorate, nitrate, and chloride. The relevance of the fitted parameters is discussed, and their values are compared with available literature values. UV-vis/near-IR, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy experiments, and molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were conducted for dilute to concentrated solutions (ca. 3 mol, kg{sup -1}) for a study of the microscopic behavior of DyCl{sub 3} binary solutions. Coupling MD calculations and extended X-ray absorption fine structure led to the determination of reliable distances. The MD results were used for a discussion of the parameters used in the BIMSA. (authors)

  6. Elucidation of Dual Magnetic Relaxation Processes in Dinuclear Dysprosium(III) Phthalocyaninato Triple-Decker Single-Molecule Magnets Depending on the Octacoordination Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Keiichi; Aizawa, Yu; Morita, Takaumi; Breedlove, Brian K; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2017-08-07

    When applying single-molecule magnets (SMMs) to spintronic devices, control of the quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) as well as a spin-lattice interactions are important. Attempts have been made to use not only coordination geometry but also magnetic interactions between SMMs as an exchange bias. In this manuscript, dinuclear dysprosium(III) (Dy(III) ) SMMs with the same octacoordination geometry undergo dual magnetic relaxation processes at low temperature. In the dinuclear Dy(III) phthalocyaninato (Pc(2-) ) triple-decker type complex [(Pc)Dy(ooPc)Dy(Pc)] (1) (ooPc(2-) =2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy)phthalocyaninato) with a square-antiprismatic (SAP) geometry, the ground state is divided by the Zeeman effect, and level intersection occurs when a magnetic field is applied. Due to the ground state properties of 1, since the Zeeman diagram where the levels intersect in an Hdc of 2500 Oe, two kinds of QTM and direct processes occur. However, dinuclear Dy(III) -Pc systems with C4 geometry, which have a twist angle (ϕ) of less than 45° do not undergo dual magnetic relaxation processes. From magnetic field and temperature dependences, the dual magnetic relaxation processes were clarified. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Annealing behaviour and crystal structure of RF-sputtered Bi-substituted dysprosium iron-garnet films having excess co-sputtered Bi-oxide content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, M; Nur-E-Alam, M; Alameh, K [Electron Science Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA, 6027 (Australia); Premchander, P; Lee, Y T [Department of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju, 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kotov, V A [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 11 Mohovaya St, Moscow, 125009 (Russian Federation); Lee, Y P, E-mail: m.vasiliev@ecu.edu.au [Quantum Photonic Science Research Center, Department of Physics, Hanyang University, 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-23

    We investigate the magneto-optic properties, crystal structure and annealing behaviour of nano-composite media with record-high magneto-optic quality exceeding the levels reported so far in sputtered iron-garnet films. Bi-substituted dysprosium-gallium iron-garnet films having excess bismuth oxide content are deposited using RF co-sputtering, and a range of garnet materials are crystallized using conventional oven-annealing processes. We report, for the first time ever, the results of optimization of thermal processing regimes for various high-performance magneto-optic iron-garnet compositions synthesized and describe the evolution of the optical and magneto-optical properties of garnet-Bi-oxide composite-material films occurring during the annealing processes. The crystallization temperature boundaries of the system (BiDy){sub 3}(FeGa){sub 5}O{sub 12} : Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} are presented. We also report the results of x-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy studies of this recently developed class of high-performance magneto-optic composites. Our hypothesis of iron oxides being the cause of excess optical absorption in sputtered Bi-iron-garnet films is confirmed experimentally.

  8. Global use structures of the magnetic materials neodymium and dysprosium. A scenario-based analysis of the effect of the diffusion of electromobility on the demand for rare earths; Globale Verwendungsstrukturen der Magnetwerkstoffe Neodym und Dysprosium. Eine szenariobasierte Analyse der Auswirkung der Diffusion der Elektromobilitaet auf den Bedarf an Seltenen Erden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloeser-Chahoud, Simon; Kuehn, Andre; Tercero Espinoza, Luis

    2016-06-15

    Neodymium-iron-boron magnets (NdFeB) have experienced a significant demand as the most powerful permanent magnet in recent years, especially for the manufacture of compact electric servomotors with high efficiency and high power density, especially for mobile applications in hybrid traction motors and electric vehicles or for electric bikes. However, NdFeB magnets are also increasingly being used in general mechanical engineering (conveying and pumping systems, tools, air conditioning systems, lift motors, etc.), in the small electric motors of conventional passenger cars or in the generators of large wind power plants with permanent magnetic direct drive. Nevertheless, there is still high uncertainty in the use structures of NdFeB magnets and the contained rare earth elements neodymium and dysprosium. An effective instrument for increasing the market transparency and the understanding of complex anthropogenic material cycles is the dynamic material flow modeling. In the present work paper, this instrument is used for an in-depth analysis of the use structures of NdFeB magnets and the contained rare earths on a global scale. The dynamic modeling of product usage cycles reveals today's usage structures and quantifies future magnetic quantities in obsolete product flows. It could be shown that the magnets in today's scrap volume are mainly contained in obsolete electronics applications such as hard disks (HDD), CD and DVD drives, which makes the recycling hardly seem to be economical due to the small magnets and the high material spread, but in the foreseeable future with larger magnetic quantities from synchronous servomotors and generators can be expected, which significantly increases the recycling potential. In a further step, the effect of the diffusion of alternative drives in the automotive market on the dysprosium requirement is analyzed using a system dynamics model and possible adaptation mechanisms in the form of different substitution effects in

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Cu(II Substituted Hexa Tungstate and Molybdate of the Anderson Type Anion [Xn+M6O24]-(12-n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Dey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium salts of copper substituted heteropoly compounds having molecular formula Na10[CuIIWVI6O24].22H2O(1 and Na10[CuIIMoVI6O24]. 19H2O(2 analogous to the Anderson type anion [Xn+M6O24]─(12-n were synthesized according to the literature method. Compound(1 was synthesized from aqueous acidic solution containing sodium tungstate and copper chloride and compound(2 from sodium molybdate and copper chloride solution. The elemental analyses show 1:6 atomic ratio of the heteroatom to the addenda in both the compounds. The IR spectra for both the compounds are in good agreement with the reported formulae. A small deviation in IR spectra are observed than that established for Keggin anions. CuO6 acts as hetero group which replaces MO6 (M=W or Mo from the Anderson structure. The thermal analyses of the compounds show the loss of the peripheral water molecules. The molecular weight of the compound (1 and (2 have been found as 2212.5 and 1600.5 respectively.

  10. Aqueous-solution growth of GaP and InP nanowires: a general route to phosphide, oxide, sulfide, and tungstate nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yujie; Xie, Yi; Li, Zhengquan; Li, Xiaoxu; Gao, Shanmin

    2004-02-06

    A general synthetic route has been developed for the growth of metal phosphide, oxide, sulfide, and tungstate nanowires in aqueous solution. In detail, cetyltrimethylammonium cations (CTA(+)) can be combined with anionic inorganic species along a co-condensation mechanism to form lamellar inorganic-surfactant intercalated mesostructures, which serve as both microreactors and reactants for the growth of nanowires. For example, GaP, InP, gamma-MnO(2), ZnO, SnS(2), ZnS, CdWO(4), and ZnWO(4) nanowires have been grown by this route. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the synthesis of GaP and InP nanowires in aqueous solution has been achieved. This strategy is expected to extend to grow nanowires of other materials in solution or by vapor transport routes, since the nanowire growth of any inorganic materials can be realized by selecting an appropriate reaction and its corresponding lamellar inorganic-surfactant precursors.

  11. Use of sodium tungstate as a permanent chemical modifier for slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of indium in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio; Rivas, Ricardo E.; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel [University of Murcia, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Murcia (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    A number of chemical modifiers have been assessed for the direct determination of indium in soils using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and slurry sampling. The best results were obtained when the graphite atomizer was impregnated with sodium tungstate, which acts as a permanent chemical modifier. Slurries were prepared by suspending 100 mg sample in a solution containing 1% (v/v) concentrated nitric acid and 10% (v/v) concentrated hydrofluoric acid and then 15-{mu}L aliquots were directly introduced into the atomizer. Standard indium solutions prepared in the suspension medium in the range 4-80 {mu}g L{sup -1} indium were used for calibration. The relative standard deviation for ten consecutive measurements of a 40 {mu}g L{sup -1} indium solution was 2.8%. The limit of detection in soils was 0.1 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The reliability of the procedures was confirmed by analysing two standard reference materials and by using an alternative procedure. (orig.)

  12. The role of dysprosium on the structural and magnetic properties of (Nd1-xDyx)2Fe14B nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Hamed; Ghasemi, Ali; Mozaffarinia, Reza; Tavoosi, Majid

    2017-02-01

    In current work, Nd2Fe14B nanoparticles was synthesized by sol-gel method. Dysprosium powders were added into Nd2Fe14B nanoparticles by mechanical alloying process in order to enhancement of coercivity. The phase analysis, structure, and magnetic properties of annealed (Nd1-xDyx)2Fe14B nanoparticles with different Dy-content (x=0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6) were investigated by employing X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques. The results showed that with an increase in Dy amounts, the coercivity of particles increased from 2.9 kOe to 13.4 kOe and then decreased to 5.6 kOe. By adding an optimum amount of Dy (x=0.4), the coercivity was significantly increased from 2.9 kOe to 13.4 kOe. The average particle size of annealed (Nd1-xDyx)2Fe14B nanoparticles was below 10 nm. Magnetization reversal studies indicate that the coercivity of milled and annealed (Nd1-xDyx)2Fe14B nanoparticles is controlled by the nucleation of reversed magnetic domains. The experimental results in the angular dependence of coercivity for (Nd1-xDyx)2Fe14B permanent magnets showed that the normalized coercivity of the permanent magnets Hc(θ)/Hc(0) increases from 1 to about 1.2-1.5 with increasing θ from 0 to about π/3, for x=0.4-0.6.

  13. 用钨酸钠分离法研究诏安湾甲藻休眠孢子%Study on dinoflagellate resting cysts in Zhaoan Bay using method of sodium tungstate separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾海峰; 蓝东兆

    2001-01-01

    本文介绍了一种分离富集沉积物中甲藻休眠孢子的新方法——钨酸钠法,并用这种方法在诏安湾沉积物中分离到了12种甲藻休眠孢子.%This article states a new method to separate dinoflagellate resting cyst from sediment——method of sodium tungstate separation. We also separate 12 dinoflagellate resting cysts from sediment in Zhaoan Bay using this method.

  14. Inelastic neutron scattering studies of phonon spectra, and simulations of pressure-induced amorphization in tungstates A W O4 (A =Ba ,Sr ,Ca , and Pb )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Prabhatasree; Gupta, M. K.; Mittal, R.; Rols, S.; Achary, S. N.; Tyagi, A. K.; Chaplot, S. L.

    2015-03-01

    Lattice dynamics and high-pressure phase transitions in A W O4 (A =Ba ,Sr ,Ca , and Pb ) have been investigated using inelastic neutron scattering experiments, ab initio density functional theory calculations, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational modes that are internal to W O4 tetrahedra occur at the highest energies consistent with the relative stability of W O4 tetrahedra. The neutron data and the ab initio calculations are found to be in excellent agreement. The neutron and structural data are used to develop and validate an interatomic potential model. The model is used for classical molecular dynamics simulations to study their response to high pressure. We have calculated the enthalpies of the scheelite and fergusonite phases as a function of pressure, which confirms that the scheelite to fergusonite transition is second order in nature. With increase in pressure, there is a gradual change in the A O8 polyhedra, while there is no apparent change in the W O4 tetrahedra. We found that all the four tungstates amorphize at high pressure. This is in good agreement with available experimental observations which show amorphization at around 45 GPa in BaW O4 and 40 GPa in CaW O4 . Further molecular dynamics simulations at high pressure and high temperature indicate that application of pressure at higher temperature hastens the process of amorphization. On amorphization, there is an abrupt increase in the coordination of the W atom while the bisdisphenoids around the A atom are considerably distorted. The pair-correlation functions of the various atom pairs corroborate these observations. Our observations aid in predicting the pressure of amorphization in SrW O4 and PbW O4 .

  15. Technical Note: A Simulation Study on the Feasibility of Radiotherapy Dose Enhancement with Calcium Tungstate and Hafnium Oxide Nano- and Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherck, Nicholas J; Won, You-Yeon

    2017-09-18

    To assess the radiotherapy dose enhancement (RDE) potential of calcium tungstate (CaWO4 ) and hafnium oxide (HfO2 ) nano- and microparticles (NPs). A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to gauge their respective RDE potentials relative to that of the broadly studied gold (Au) NP. The study was warranted due to the promising clinical and preclinical studies involving both CaWO4 and HfO2 NPs as RDE agents in the treatment of various types of cancers. The study provides a baseline RDE to which future experimental RDE trends can be compared to. All three materials were investigated in silico with the software Penetration and Energy Loss of Positrons and Electrons (PENELOPE 2014) developed by Francesc Salvat and distributed in the United States by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The work utilizes the extensively studied Au NP as the "gold standard" for a baseline. The key metric used in the evaluation of the materials was the local dose enhancement factor (DEFloc ). An additional metric used, termed the relative enhancement ratio (RER), evaluates material performance at the same mass concentrations. The results of the study indicate that Au has the strongest RDE potential using the DEFloc metric. HfO2 and CaWO4 both underperformed relative to Au with lower DEFloc of 2-3× and 4-100×, respectively. The computational investigation predicts the RDE performance ranking to be: Au > HfO2 > CaWO4 . This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Dysprosium(III) complexes with a square-antiprism configuration featuring mononuclear single-molecule magnetic behaviours based on different β-diketonate ligands and auxiliary ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Ke, Hongshan; Shi, Quan; Zhang, Jangwei; Yang, Qi; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Wang, Wenyuan; Yang, Desuo; Chen, Sanping

    2016-03-28

    Three mononuclear dysprosium(III) complexes derived from three β-diketonate ligands, 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(4-methylphenyl)-1,3-butanedione (tfmb), 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-butanedione (tffb) and 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-naphthyl)-1,3-butanedione (tfnb) as well as auxiliary ligands, 5-nitro-1,10-phenanthroline (5-NO2-Phen), DMF and 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) have been synthesized and structurally characterized, namely [Dy(5-NO2-Phen)(tfmb)3] (1), [Dy(DMF)2(tffb)3] (2) and [Dy(bpy)2(tfnb)3]·0.5(1,4-dioxane) (3). The metal ions in 1-3 adopt an approximately square-antiprismatic (SAP) coordination environment with D4d axial symmetry. The magnetic properties of 1-3 have been investigated, displaying weak out-of-phase AC signals under a zero-DC field. With an applied DC field of 1200 Oe, the quantum tunnelling of the magnetization was suppressed in 1-3 with the pre-exponential factor τ0 = 5.3 × 10(-7) s and the effective barrier ΔE/kB = 83 K for 1 as well as the pre-exponential factor τ0 = 3.09 × 10(-7) s and the effective barrier ΔE/kB = 39 K for 3. Interestingly, for the frequency dependence of the out-of-phase (χ'') of the AC susceptibility of 2, two slow relaxation of the magnetization processes occurred under the applied magnetic field of 1200 Oe, corresponding to the fast relaxation (FR) phase and slow relaxation (SR) phase, respectively. Arrhenius analysis gave the effective energy barrier (ΔE/kB) of 55 K and the pre-exponential factor (τ0) of 8.23 × 10(-12) for the SR. It is thus very likely that the FR process in complex 2 results from QTM enhanced by dipolar interactions between the Dy ions or the presence of the applied field. The structure-property relationship of some Dy(III) based mononuclear SMMs with the SAP configuration was further discussed.

  17. Magnetic Phase Transition of Nanocrystalline Bulk Metal Gadolinium and Dysprosium%纳米块体金属钆和镝的磁性相变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘凤艳; 侯碧辉; 岳明; 王克军

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic properties of bulk nanocrystalline metal gadolinium (Gd) and dysprosium (Dy)samples were studied.The magnetization and Curie temperature TC of nanocrystalline Gd and Dy decreased usually as compared with the polycrystal.However,when the mean grain size was 10 nm, the Curie temperature Tc of nanocrystalline Dy increased to 100 K instead and there was an antiferromagnetic phase in nanocrystalline Gd.According to the calculation based on Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida exchange interaction, the exchange integral of the grain boundary atoms and crystalline surface atoms had its sign changed from plus to minus or vice versa, and there were three orderly phases in the steady state with the lowest energy, ferromagnetic phase, antiferromagnetic phase and fan phase.For the nanocrystals with mean grain size of 10 nm, the proportion of grain boundary to crystalline surface atoms was high, and as the result of superposition of the three phases, and there appeared a peak near the phase transition temperature for the nanocrystalline Gd.While for the Dy, the magnetization decreased gently with temperature, and showing a higher Curie temperature than in the case of the polycrystal.%对纳米晶钆(Gd)和镝(Dy)块体材料的磁性进行了研究.与多晶比较,通常纳米晶的磁化强度减小,居里温度TC降低,但平均粒径为10 nm的纳米晶Dy的居里温度TC反而升高到100 K,平均粒径为10 nm的纳米晶Gd中还存在明显的反铁磁相.通过RKKY交换作用的计算知道,晶面晶界处原子的交换积分会发生正负号的变化,能量最低的稳定状态对应三种有序相:铁磁相、反铁磁相和扇相,晶粒中在一定条件下出现三相共存.对于平均粒径为10 nm的纳米晶,晶面晶界处原子所占比例很大,三相叠加的结果,对于Gd,即是在相变点附近出现磁化强度尖峰;对于Dy,则是磁化强度随温度升高下降缓慢,表现为居里温度TC比多晶升高.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of poly-o-anisidine Sn(IV tungstate: A new and novel ‘organic–inorganic’ nano-composite material and its electro-analytical applications as Hg(II ion-selective membrane electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif A. Khan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available An organic–inorganic nano-composite poly-o-anisidine Sn(IV tungstate was chemically synthesized by sol–gel mixing of the incorporation of organic polymer o-anisidine into the matrices of inorganic ppt of Sn(IV tungstate in different mixing volume ratios. This composite material has been characterized using various analytical techniques like XRD (X-ray diffraction, FTIR (Fourier transform infrared, SEM (Scanning electron microscopy, TEM (Transmission electron microscopy and simultaneous TGA (Thermogravimetric analysis studies. On the basis of distribution studies, the material was found to be highly selective for Hg(II. Using this nano-composite cation exchanger as electro-active material, a new heterogeneous precipitate based on ion-sensitive membrane electrode was developed for the determination of Hg(II ions in solutions. The membrane electrode was mechanically stable, with a quick response time, and can be operated within a wide pH range. The electrode was also found to be satisfactory in electrometric titrations.

  19. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2016-01-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65 MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides $^{159}$Dy, $^{157}$Dy, $^{155}$Dy, $^{161}$Tb, $^{160}$Tb, $^{156}$Tb, $^{155}$Tb, $^{154m2}$Tb, $^{154m1}$Tb, $^{154g}$Tb, $^{153}$Tb, $^{152}$Tb and $^{151}$Tb are reported in the 36-65 MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013.

  20. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-04-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides (159)Dy, (157)Dy, (155)Dy, (161)Tb, (160)Tb, (156)Tb, (155)Tb, (154m2)Tb, (154m1)Tb, (154g)Tb, (153)Tb, (152)Tb and (151)Tb are reported in the 36-65MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. LOW-TEMPERATURE INFRARED REFLECTION SPECTRA OF LEAD TUNGSTATE CRYSTAL%钨酸铅晶体的低温红外反射谱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙桂芳; 阮树仁; 牟娟; 钱霞; 盛淑芳

    2013-01-01

    The infrared reflection spectra of the Lead tungstate (PbWO4,PWO) crystal were measured at 77K,100K,200K and 300K.The measurement results show that the infrared reflection spectra of the PWO crystal have eight reflection peaks.The crystal structure of PWO crystal was stable at 77~ 300K.Using the Kramers-Kronig (K-K) relation,the data of infrared reflection spectra were processed.The transverse optical (TO) phonon frequency ωTO were obtained at different temperature.The temperature dependence of the lattice vibration mode was obtained.The results show that the frequencies of Pb2+ vibration mode changes toward higher wave numbers with the decrease of temperature,which are attributed to the thermal expansion.The frequencies of WO42-vibration mode changes toward lower wave numbers with the decrease of temperature,which are attributed to the anharmonic coupling of the phonos.%分别在77K、100K、200K和300K温度下测量了钨酸铅(PbWO4,PWO)晶体的红外反射谱,观察到8个反射峰;实验表明PWO晶体在低温77~300K范围内结构稳定.利用Kramers-Kronig(K-K)关系对样品的红外反射谱进行数据处理,获得了不同温度下各振动模的横光学(TO)声子频率ωTO,从而得到了PWO晶体各振动模的温度变化特性,研究表明:Pb2+离子的平动模频率随温度降低发生蓝移,主要是晶格的热膨胀影响;WO42-离子团的振动模频率随温度降低发生红移,主要是非简谐耦合作用影响.

  2. Dysprosium selective potentiometric membrane sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamani, Hassan Ali, E-mail: haszamani@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridbod, Farnoush; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-01

    A novel Dy(III) ion-selective PVC membrane sensor was made using a new synthesized organic compound, 3,4-diamino-N Prime -((pyridin-2-yl)methylene)benzohydrazide (L) as an excellent sensing element. The electrode showed a Nernstian slope of 19.8 {+-} 0.6 mV per decade in a wide concentration range of 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}-1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} mol L{sup -1}, a detection limit of 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1}, a short conditioning time, a fast response time (< 10 s), and high selectivity towards Dy(III) ion in contrast to other cations. The proposed sensor was successfully used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Dy(III) ions with EDTA. The membrane sensor was also applied to the F{sup -} ion indirect determination of some mouth washing solutions and to the Dy{sup 3+} determination in binary mixtures. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novelty of this work is based on the high affinity of the ionophore toward the Dy{sup 3+} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique is very simple, fast and inexpensive and it is not necessary to use sophisticated equipment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The newly developed sensor is superior to the formerly reported Dy{sup 3+} sensors in terms of selectivity.

  3. The magnetocaloric effect in dysprosium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetocaloric effect in polycrystalline Dy was measured in the 84-280-K range in measuring fields from 1 to 7 T. These adiabatic temperature changes reflect structural changes in Dy with applied field and temperature, and include the first magnetocaloric data for a helical antiferromagnet. Above the Neel point (179 K) a field increase always caused heating; below the Neel point fields less than about 2 T cause cooling for some values of initial temperature. The largest temperature increase with a 7 T field occurs at the Neel point and at fields below 2 T near the Curie point. For refrigeration purposes the optimal working region for a Dy cooling element is field dependent.

  4. Preparation of {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generators at base of {sup 188}W-titanium and zirconium tungstates by means of the sol-gel method; Preparacion de generadores {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re a base de {sup 188}W-tungstenatos de titanio y zirconio mediante el metodo sol-gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales T, C.J. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Colon esq. Paseo Tollocan, 50120 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Monroy G, F.; Rivero G, T.; Rojas N, P. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N, 52750 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: c.j.rt@hotmail.com

    2007-07-01

    The {sup 188}Re possess nuclear characteristics that make it attractive for therapeutic application, given their {beta}{sup -} particle emission of high energy 0.764 keV besides the possibility of being able to unite to different ligands. The {sup 188}Re commercial generators use a chromatographic column loaded with alumina where the {sup 188}W is adsorbed and the {sup 188}ReO{sub 4}{sup -} eluted by means of a saline solution. The low capacity of the alumina that only it allows adsorber 0.2% in weight of {sup 188}W demand to use {sup 188}W of a high specific activity. An alternative of production of {sup 188}W / {sup 188}Re generators consists on substituting the high specific activity, for the use of a bigger quantity of {sup 188}W by means of the use of gels with the aid of tungstates. For that, in this work it intends the study of the gel synthesis conditions of {sup 188}W titanium and zirconium tungstates and their effect in the acting of the {sup 188}W / {sup 188}Re generators. The gels were synthesized by means of the sol-gel method starting from titanium and zirconium alcoxis, and solutions of {sup 188}W-sodium tungstates to different pH's. The use of the sol-gel methodology diminishes the time of synthesis of these gels almost in 60% in relation to the precipitation method commonly used. (Author)

  5. Structural characterization of hydrogen separating membranes based on lanthanide-tungstates; Strukturelle Charakterisierung von Wasserstoff trennenden Gasseparationsmembranen auf Lanthanoid-Wolframat-Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherb, Tobias

    2011-08-26

    The global energy supply is currently the most controversial issue discussed in our society. Despite the increasing importance of renewable energies, the largest portion of electrical energy has its origin in fossil fuels. CO{sub 2}, emitted during combustion in power plants is known to be one of the greenhouse gases that contributes significantly to global climate change. The development of technologies for environmentally friendly power generation from coal and gas is an area of significant interest. One possibility is the capture and long-term storage of CO{sub 2} from the exhaust stream of fossil fuel power plants. In the pre-combustion process, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} can be separated after gasification of the fossil fuel. For this purpose gas-tight ceramic membranes with mixed electronic-protonic conductivity can be used. However, these materials have high requirements due to the extreme conditions in power plants. Mixed electronic-protonic conducting lanthanide tungstates (Ln{sub 6}WO{sub 12} Ln = lanthanide or yttrium) are promising materials, which are stable in CO{sub 2}-containing harsh environments. This work presents a study on structure-property relationships of Ln{sub 6}WO{sub 12}. The structural analysis was performed by the use of neutron and high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods for three exemplary systems (Ln = La, Nd, Y). Samples were prepared via solid state reaction (SSR), and also via a sol-gel approach (Pechini). For the systems LaWO and NdWO, new structural models were developed by combined Rietveld analysis and Fourier density maps. The latter was applied to determine the electron and nuclear density distribution. LaWO with a La/W ratio from 5.3 to 5.7 crystallizes with the space group F-43m and forms a superstructure due to a partially ordered arrangement of cations. On Wyckoff site 48h, up to 4.6 % W can be substituted by La. The oxygen atoms around tungsten are highly delocalized and 6 out of 24 possible split positions are occupied

  6. Determination of tannin in feed using spectrophotometric method with sodium tungstate- phosphomolybdic acid%钨酸钠-磷钼酸比色分光光度法测定饲料中的单宁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘娟; 商军; 黄士新

    2012-01-01

    The optimum condition of determination of tannin in feeds using spectrophotometric method with sodium tungstate - molybdphosphoric acid was studied. The linear range of the method for determination of tannin was from 0.50 to 6.00 mg/l and the limit of detection was 17.5 mg/kg. The method was simple, rapid and reliable for the determination of tannin in feeds.%试验研究了用丙酮溶液提取饲料中单宁,溶液经过滤后,取滤液加钨酸钠-磷钼酸混合溶液,显色后,在760 nm波长处测定吸光度值,标准曲线法测定饲料中单宁含量.单宁在0.50~6.00 mg/l浓度范围内与吸光度值呈良好的线性关系,线性回归方程为A=0.056 48×C+0.001 08,相关系数为0.999 7,方法的检出限为17.5 mg/kg.该方法操作简便、快速、结果准确,应用于饲料中单宁的测定,结果满意.

  7. Three-color vibrational CARS thermometry of fuel-rich ethylene/air flames using a potassium gadolinium tungstate Raman-active crystal as a source of narrowband probe radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meißner, Christian; Tröger, Johannes W; Kozlov, Dimitrii N; Beyrau, Frank; Seeger, Thomas

    2017-04-10

    Three-color broadband vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) temperature measurements were carried out in laminar fuel-rich sooting ethylene/air flames. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of a picosecond pump laser pulse in a Raman-active potassium gadolinium tungstate [KGd(WO4)2] crystal was employed as a source of narrowband probe radiation. In the three-color CARS experiment, this wavelength-shifted radiation enables N2-based vibrational CARS temperature measurements in sooting flames free of the signal interference with the absorption/emission bands of the flame intermediate radicals C2. Spatial temperature profiles for different fuel-rich atmospheric pressure ethylene/air flames are presented in comparison with the results of two-color broadband vibrational and dual-broadband pure rotational CARS temperature measurements. The comparison shows the suitability of the three-color CARS measurement technique employing the KGd(WO4)2 crystal for accurate, C2 interference-free, temperature measurements in sooting flames.

  8. The magnetic structures of double tungstates, NaM(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}, M=Fe, Cr: Examples for superexchange couplings mediated by [NaO{sub 6}]-octahedra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyam-Ochir, L. [School of Physics and Electronics, National University of Mongolia, 210646 Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Institute for Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Ehrenberg, H. [Institute for Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Complex Materials, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstr. 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: h.ehrenberg@ifw-dresden.de; Buchsteiner, A. [Hahn Meitner Institute Berlin, D-14092 Berlin (Germany); Senyshyn, A.; Fuess, H. [Institute for Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Sangaa, D. [School of Physics and Electronics, National University of Mongolia, 210646 Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia)

    2008-12-15

    The crystal structures of the double tungstates NaM(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} with M=Fe, Cr and their solid solution are similar to the wolframite-type structure in the space group P2/c, but with doubled a lattice parameter. Magnetization and neutron-diffraction data reveal that NaFe(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} orders antiferromagnetically below 5 K with a commensurate propagation vector k=(1/2 ,1/2 ,1/2 ) and magnetic moments of Fe{sup 3+} ions oriented along the a-axis. NaCr(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} is antiferromagnetic below 10 K. Its magnetic structure is based on the propagation vector k=(1/2 ,1/2 ,0), and the magnetic moments of Cr{sup 3+} ions are aligned along the b-axis. The magnetic structure in the bc-plane is explained by a supersuperexchange mechanism. Long-range magnetic superexchange interactions along paths including [NaO{sub 6}]-octahedra are necessary to explain the observed magnetic structures. Mixed NaFe{sub x}Cr{sub 1-x}(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}, with x=0.25, 0.5, 0.75, do not indicate magnetic order, neither in magnetization nor neutron-diffraction data.

  9. Microstructure and dielectric properties of dysprosium-doped barium titanate ceramics Microestrutura e propriedades dielétricas de cerâmicas de titanato de bário dopado com disprósio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Pu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The substitution behavior and lattice parameter of barium titanate between solid_solubility with a dopant concentration in the range of 0.25 to 1.5 mol% are studied. The influences of dysprosium-doped fraction on the grain size and dielectric properties of barium titanate ceramic, including dielectric constant and breakdown electric field strength, are investigated via scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electric property tester. The results show that, at a dysprosium concentration of 0.75 mol%, the abnormal grain growth is inhibited and the lattice parameters of grain rise up to the maximum because of the lowest vacancy concentration. In addition, the finegrain and high density of barium titanate ceramic result in its excellent dielectric properties. The relative dielectric constant (25 °C reaches to 4100. The temperature coefficient of the capacitance varies from -10 to 10% within the temperature range of -15 °C -100 °C, and the breakdown electric field strength (alternating current achieves 3.2 kV/mm. These data suggest that our barium titanate could be used in the manufacture of high voltage ceramic capacitors.Foram estudados o comportamento da substituição e o parâmetro de rede de titanato de bário da solubilidade sólida com uma concentração de dopante na faixa 0,25-1,5 mol%. As influências da fração do dopante disprósio no tamanho de grão e nas propriedades dielétricas da cerâmica de titanato de bário, incluindo constante dielétrica e rigidez dielétrica foram investigadas por meio de microscopia eletrônica de varredura, difração de raios X e teste de propriedades elétricas. Os resultados mostram que a uma concentração de disprósio de 0,75 mol% o crescimento anormal de grão é inibido e os parâmetros de rede aumentam até um máximo devido a menor concentração de vacâncias. Além disso, as cerâmicas de grãos pequenos e alta densidade resultam em excelentes propriedades dielétricas. A

  10. Neodymium Dysprosium Modified Starch- coated Magnetic Fluid Preparation of Ferrite%淀粉包覆镝钕改性铁氧体磁性液体的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林穗云; 周育辉

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, in order to obtain the ferrite magnetic fluids of higher saturation magnetic intensity with simple technology, nanometer magnetite ( Fe3O4 ) particles ware prepared by chemical co - precipitation. And to a certain proportion of Dysprosium Neodymium ferrite magnetic fluids on the modification, we selected starch prepara- tion for the relief of water - based coating of rare earth iron oxide magnetic fluid composites. We also investigated the amount of Nd - Dy, the amount of coating agent, reaction temperature, coating temperature on the performance of the products and the effects of particle size, and its preliminary characterization was also performed . Through experiment,we summed up, under n (Fe) : [ n ( Nd3+ ) + n ( Dy3+ ) ] = 30:1 and n ( Fe3 + ) : n ( Fe2 + ) = 1.70 ~ 1. 75, the ratio for use of dysprosium and neodymium is n(Dy3+ ) : n(Nd3+ ) =4:1, 25%NH3 · H2O(A. R. ) as precipitating agent and pH value conditioner; the reacting system temperature was controlled in 35 ℃, and the pH value was adjusted to 9 ~ 11 ; the best dosage of starch as the relief is O. 0050g each 6OraL magnetic fluids, the temperature of surfactant was controlled in 50℃ and the pH value was adjusted to 2 ~ 3. In such system under the conditions of a water - based rare - earth compound Nd Dy Fe Magnetic, fluid magnetic oxygen was higher than or- dinary water- based ferrite.%为制备工艺简单且饱和磁化强度高的磁流体,本文采用化学共沉淀法制得了纳米磁性Fe304粒子.然后以一定比例的镝钕对铁氧体磁流体改性,选择淀粉为包覆剂制备水基稀土复合铁氧磁流体.考察了镝钕的用量、包覆剂的用量、反应温度、包覆温度等因素对产物粒径及性能的影响,并对其进行了初步的性能表征.实验总结出适宜的条件:在n(Fe):[n(Nd3+)+n(Dy3+)]=30:1,n(Fe3+):n(Fe2+)=1.70~1.75

  11. 表面修饰对镝铁氧体纳米磁粒子的合成及其磁性能的影响%Effect of Surface Modification on Formation and Magnetic Property of Dysprosium Ferrite Nanomagnetic Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈静; 张茂润; 邓真娟

    2011-01-01

    利用湿化学法制备镝铁氧体纳米磁粒子时,用适量的阴离子表面活性剂进行表面修饰,能够有效地控制磁粒子的粒径,同时避免干燥时产生硬团聚.文章介绍了用月桂酸、月桂酸钠、正十二烷基硫酸钠对磁粒子进行表面修饰的研究结果,探讨了三者及其用量对磁粒子的形成及磁性能的影响.借助X射线衍射仪(XRD)、透射电镜(TEM)、振动样品磁强计(VSM)、红外光谱仪(IR)对产物的性能进行了表征.结果表明,用月桂酸修饰后的产物具有Fe3O4磁粒子的晶型结构且结晶度高、磁性能优异、平均粒径约16nm;用月桂酸钠、正十二烷基硫酸钠修饰后的产物不具有Fe3O4磁粒子的晶型结构,结晶度低且磁性能差.%When wet chemical method are use to prepare dysprosium-doped ferrite magnetic nanoparticles, right a-mount of anionic surfactant were doped as surface modification, which can effectively control the size of magnetic particles, and avoid producing hard reunion when dry out. This paper introduces the research results of magnetic particle surface modification by using lauric acid, laurel acid sodium and lauryl sodium sulfate, discusses the effect of lauric acid, laurel acid sodium and lauryl sodium sulfate and their dosages on the formation of magnetic and its magnetic property. The properties of the product can be characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), infrared spectrometer (IR). The results showed that the product modified with lauric acid have a crystalline structure of Fe3O4 magnetic particles and high crystallin-ity, excellent magnetic properties. The average particle size is about 16 nm; the product modified with laurel acid sodium and lauryl sodium sulfate does not have the crystalline structure of Fe3O4 magnetic particles, with low crystal-linity and low magnetic property.

  12. 防辐射超细钨酸铅的制备及其手套对Y射线屏蔽的研究%Study on Preparation of Ultrafine Lead Tungstate for Radiation Protection and T-ray Shielding of the Gloves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜利成; 何平; 周元林; 宋开平; 杨葵华

    2012-01-01

    Lead tungstate combines the radiation shielding properties of tungsten and lead, and it is quite distinctive to manufacture lead tungstate with ultra-fine granularity to enhance its capacity of radiation shielding. The grain size of lead tungstate has direct impact on the ability of its protection from radioactive materials, the smaller the grain size and more uniform dispersion of lead tungstate, the better protective ability it is going to be. In this paper, soft-template synthesis was introduced to prepare ultra-fine PbWO4. Rigorous experiment conditions are settled to ensure the access to obtain ultra-fine, homogeneous lead tungstate product, and it is better than other physical and chemical preparation methods. The surface-active agent for the soft template, with S-60 for the water system W/O microemulsion zone, was used to synthesize successfully ultra-fine PbWO4. It was shown that dispersing agent S-60 in the soft template method produced ultra-fine PbWO4 with uniform granularity distribution. By using orthogonal experimental method, the best experimental conditions were obtained as follows: S-60 as surfactant dispersant with diluted 30 times concentration, solutions with pH9, 0.01 mol/L concentration of reactant, 1 300 rpm of stirring speed and slowly adding drops of Na2WO4 solution into Pb(Ac)2 solution. Based on the optimal experimental conditions, the product of ultra-fine product for .the anti-radiation protection filler has been made. The fine packing for the preparation of tungsten the gamma rays on the gloves is an average capacity of 5% or so.%钨酸铅集中了钨和铅的辐射屏蔽特性的优点,制造超细的钨酸铅可以提高辐射屏蔽的能力。利用软模板合成法研究超细PbWO4的制备工艺。以表面活性剂作软模板,用s-60为水体系的W/O微乳液区成功地合成了超细PbWO40实验结果证明,以s-60为分散剂的软模板制备的超细PbWO4粒度分布均匀。采用正交实验法探索

  13. Chemical bond properties and charge transfer bands of O(2-)-Eu(3+), O(2-)-Mo(6+) and O(2-)-W(6+) in Eu(3+)-doped garnet hosts Ln3M5O12 and ABO4 molybdate and tungstate phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Ling; Noh, Hyeon Mi; Moon, Byung Kee; Choi, Byung Chun; Jeong, Jung Hyun

    2014-06-21

    Charge transfer (CT) energy from the ligand to the central ions is an important factor in luminescence properties for rare earth doped inorganic phosphors. The dielectric theory of complex crystals was used to calculate chemical bond properties. Combining the photoluminescence and the dielectric theory of complex crystals, the CT bands of O(2-)-Eu(3+), O(2-)-Mo(6+) and O(2-)-W(6+) for Eu(3+)-doped inorganic phosphors have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. Taking Eu(3+)-doped Ln3M5O12 (Ln = Y, Lu and M = Al, Ga), Gd3Ga5O12, MMoO4 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) and MWO4 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) as typical phosphors, we investigated the effects of the cation size on the CT bands and chemical bond properties including the bond length (d), the covalency (fc), the bond polarizability (αb) and the environmental factor (he) of O(2-)-Eu(3+), O(2-)-Mo(6+) and O(2-)-W(6+), respectively. For systematic isostructural Ln3M5O12 (Ln = Y, Lu and M = Al, Ga) phosphors, with the increasing M ion radius, the bond length of Ln-O decreases, but fc and αb increase, which is the main reason that the environmental factor increased. For the isostructural MMoO4:Eu, with the increasing M ion radius, the Mo-O bond length increases, but fc and αb decrease, and thus he decreases. However, in the compound system MWO4:Eu (M = Ca, Ba) with the increasing M ion radius, the O-W bond length increases, but fc and αb increase, and thus he increases and the O-W CT energy decreases. Their O(2-)-Eu(3+), O(2-)-Mo(6+) and O(2-)-W(6+) CT bands as well as their full width at half maximum (FWHM) were directly influenced by he. And with the increasing he, CT bands of O-Eu or O-Mo or O-W decrease and their FWHM increases. These results indicate a promising approach for changing the material properties, searching for new Eu(3+) doped molybdate, tungstate or other oxide phosphors and analyzing the experimental result.

  14. Development of proton conducting materials and membranes based on lanthanum tungstate for hydrogen separation from gas mixtures; Entwicklung protonenleitender Werkstoffe und Membranen auf Basis von Lanthan-Wolframat fuer die Wasserstoffabtrennung aus Gasgemischen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Janka

    2013-07-01

    Lanthanum tungstate La{sub 6-x}WO{sub 12-δ} (named LWO) is a ceramic material with mixed protonic electronic conductivity. Thereby it is a good candidate membrane material for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas in a fossil pre-combustion power plant. This work shows a material optimization by substitution targeted to clearly enhance the mixed conductivity and thereby the hydrogen flow through the LWO membrane. The first part of the work shows the synthesis and characterization of unsubstituted LWO. It points out that monophase LWO powder can be reproducibly synthesized. The La/W-ratio has to be considerably smaller than the nominal ratio of La/W = 6.0. It also depends on the used sintering conditions. Different relevant properties of LWO like stability in conditions close to application, thermal expansion, sintering behavior or microstructure were determined. Furthermore, the electrical conductivity of the material was investigated. LWO exhibits a prevailing protonic conductivity up to 750 C in wet atmospheres. Under dry atmospheres n-type conductivity was dominating. Oxygen ion and n-type conductivity dominated in wet and dry atmospheres above 750 C. The main part of the work is concerned with the development of new LWO based materials by substitutions. The aim is to achieve an improved mixed protonic electronic conductivity. Substitution elements for lanthanum side were Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ce, Nd, Tb, Y and Al, while for the tungsten side Mo, Re and Ir were used. The total conductivity of the developed materials was investigated and compared to that of the unsubstituted LWO. The substitution of lanthanum led to no appreciable enhancement of the conductivity whereas the substitution of tungsten with 20 mol% molybdenum or 20 mol% rhenium clearly improved it. This caused a hydrogen flow about seven times higher for 20 mol% molybdenum- and about ten times higher for 20 mol% rhenium-substituted LWO in comparison with the unsubstituted LWO at 700 C. In the last part

  15. Thermodynamic study on phosphorus removal from tungstate solution via magnesium salt precipitation method%镁盐沉淀法从钨酸盐溶液除磷的热力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何贵香; 何利华; 赵中伟; 陈星宇; 高利利; 刘旭恒

    2013-01-01

    通过计算,绘制了25°C时Mg2+-3-4PO -+4NH -H2O体系的热力学平衡图,并对钨酸盐溶液除磷过程进行系统的热力学研究。结果表明:当采用磷酸镁盐法除磷时,溶液中游离总镁浓度从0.01 mol/L增加到1.0 mol/L,对应的最佳理论除磷pH值从9.8降到8.8,而溶液中残留的总磷含量基本维持在4.0×10-6 mol/L;随着溶液pH值的升高,体系中稳定存在的沉淀组分依次为 MgHPO4、Mg3(PO4)2和 Mg3(PO4)2+Mg(OH)2。当采用磷酸铵镁法除磷时,增大溶液游离总氨浓度有利于除磷,而增大游离总镁量对除磷深度基本无影响。计算所得除磷的最佳 pH值为9~10;当游离总氨浓度为5.0 mol/L时,溶液中残留的总磷为1.4×10-7 mol/L。以自制的钨酸铵溶液(WO350 g/L,P 13 g/L)为原料,采用磷酸铵镁盐法除磷以对理论分析进行验证。结果表明:当氯化镁的加入量为理论量的1.1时,除磷的最佳pH值为9.5,与热力学分析结果一致。%The thermodynamic equilibrium diagrams of Mg2+- 3-4PO - +4NH -H2O system at 298 K were established based on the thermodynamic calculation. From the diagram, the thermodynamic conditions for removing phosphorus from the tungstate solution by magnesium salt precipitation were obtained. The results show that when the concentration of total magnesium increases from 0.01 mol/L to 1.0 mol/L, the optimal pH for the phosphorus removal by magnesium phosphate decreases from 9.8 to 8.8. The residual concentration of total phosphorus almost keeps the level of 4.0×10-6 mol/L in the system. MgHPO4, Mg3(PO4)2 and the mixture of Mg3(PO4)2 and Mg(OH)2 are stabilized in these system, respectively. However, increasing the total concentration of magnesium has little effect on phosphorus removal by magnesium ammonium phosphate, while it is helpful for phosphorus removal by increasing the total ammonia concentration. The calculated results demonstrate that the residual concentration of total

  16. Large lead tungstate crystals for calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Lecomte, P

    2000-01-01

    PbWO//4 crystals have been selected for the CMS Experiment at LHC, rather than the higher light yield but bulkier CeF//3, because space is at a premium in the 4T supraconductive magnet. Early PbWO//4 samples exhibited severe low dose radiation damage, slow components or long term afterglow. Thus, major R&D efforts have been undertaken by the Russian and Chinese producers. Besides improving the control of the raw materials, the stoichiometry and the growth parameters, the R&D efforts explored two avenues: doping of the crystals and oxygen annealing. Both groups have produced full size crystals which satisfy the requirements of CMS, including the low production cost which is an overwhelming consideration and a severe constraint in the optimization of the production process. This paper concentrates on the development of Chinese crystals; it attempts to guide the reader through the complex development process by giving a very brief description of the main steps and issues addressed in the past five years,...

  17. Study on the Ion-associated Complex of Rhodium-tungstate-rhodamine 6G by the Resonance Light-Scattering Technique and Its Application%铑-钨酸盐-罗丹明6G缔合体系的共振光散射技术研究及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗兆涛; 龙巍然; 陶晋飞; 张婷; 曹秋娥

    2012-01-01

    The intensive signal of the resonance light - scattering at 579 nm was observed when the ion -associated complex was formed among rhodium(III) , tungstate and rhodamine 6G in the presence of acacia Senegal. And this phenomenon was used to develop a method for the determination of trace amounts of Rh( III). The method was free from the interference of a lot of common ions with the linear range of 0.01 ~0.25 ng/mL and detection limit of 0. 0024 ng/mL. The results for determination of rhodium in real samples obtained by this method were consistent well with those obtained by SnCl2 standard method.%Rh(Ⅲ)与钨酸盐及罗丹明6G在阿拉伯胶存在下能形成离子缔合物,且该离子缔合物在579nm处具有强烈的共振瑞利光散射信号.据此,建立了一种测定痕量Rh(Ⅲ)的共振瑞利散射光谱法,该方法的线性范围为0.01~0.25ng/mL,检出限为0.0024ng/mL,且大量存在的常见离子对Rh(Ⅲ)的测定不干扰.将方法用于测定催化剂及冶金产品中的铑,结果与标准方法(SnCl2法)测得值基本一致.

  18. Dysprosium-free melt-spun permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D N; Wu, Z; He, F; Miller, D J; Herchenroeder, J W

    2014-02-12

    Melt-spun NdFeB powders can be formed into a number of different types of permanent magnet for a variety of applications in electronics, automotive and clean technology industries. The melt-spinning process produces flake powder with a fine uniform array of nanoscale Nd2Fe14B grains. These powders can be net-shape formed into isotropic polymer-bonded magnets or hot formed into fully dense magnets. This paper discusses the influence of heavy rare earth elements and microstructure on the magnetic performance, thermal stability and material cost of NdFeB magnets. Evidence indicates that melt-spun nanocrystalline NdFeB magnets are less dependent on heavy rare earth elements for high-temperature performance than the alternative coarser-grained sintered NdFeB magnets. In particular, hot-pressed melt-spun magnets are an attractive low-cost solution for applications that require thermal stability up to 175-200 °C.

  19. Structural and magnetic study of dysprosium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Hemaunt, E-mail: hvatsal@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Srivastava, R.C. [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Pal Singh, Jitendra [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Negi, P. [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Agrawal, H.M. [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Das, D. [UGC-DAE CSR Kolkata Centre, Kolkata 700098 (India); Hwa Chae, Keun [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the magnetic behavior of Dy{sup 3+} substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction studies reveal presence of cubic spinel phases in these nanoparticles. Raman spectra of these nanoparticles show change in intensity of Raman bands, which reflects cation redistribution in cubic spinel lattice. Saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease with increase of Dy{sup 3+}concentration in these nanoparticles. Room temperature Mössbauer measurements show the cation redistribution in these nanoparticles and corroborates the results obtained from Raman Spectroscopic measurements. Decrease in magnetization of Dy{sup 3+} substituted cobalt ferrite is attributed to the reduction in the magnetic interaction and cation redistribution. - Highlights: • Slight decrease in crystallite size after Dy{sup 3+} doping. • Saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease after Dy{sup 3+} doping. • Mössbauer measurements show the cation redistribution in the samples.

  20. Dysprosium Acetylacetonato Single-Molecule Magnet Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Nakanishi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dy single-molecule magnets (SMMs, which have several potential uses in a variety of applications, such as quantum computing, were encapsulated in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by using a capillary method. Encapsulation was confirmed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In alternating current magnetic measurements, the magnetic susceptibilities of the Dy acetylacetonato complexes showed clear frequency dependence even inside the MWCNTs, meaning that this hybrid can be used as magnetic materials in devices.

  1. Microscopic study of neutron-rich dysprosium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Carlos E. [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Xalapa (Mexico); Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, Apartado Postal 70-542, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Velazquez, Victor [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, Apartado Postal 70-542, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Lerma, Sergio [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Xalapa (Mexico)

    2013-01-15

    Microscopic studies in heavy nuclei are very scarce due to large valence spaces involved. This computational problem can be avoided by means of the use of symmetry-based models. Ground-state, {gamma} and {beta} bands, and their B(E2) transition strengths in {sup 160-168}Dy isotopes, are studied in the framework of the pseudo-SU(3) model which includes the preserving symmetry Q . Q term and the symmetry-breaking Nilsson and pairing terms, systematically parametrized. Additionally, three rotor-like terms are considered, whose free parameters, fixed for all members of the chain, are used to fine tune the moment of inertia of rotational bands and the band head of {gamma} and {beta} bands. The model succesfully describes in a systematic way rotational features in these nuclei and allows to extrapolate toward the midshell nucleus {sup 170}Dy. The results presented show that it is possible to study a full chain of isotopes or isotones in the region with the present model. (orig.)

  2. Photodissociation spectroscopy of the dysprosium monochloride molecular ion

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, Alexander; Showalter, Steven J; Puri, Prateek; Kotochigova, Svetlana; Hudson, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    We have performed a combined experimental and theoretical study of the photodissociation cross section of the molecular ion DyCl$^+$. The cross section for the photon energy range 35,500 cm$^{-1}$ to 47,500 cm$^{-1}$ is measured using an integrated ion trap and time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and we observe a broad, asymmetric profile that is peaked near 43,000 cm$^{-1}$. The theoretical cross section is determined from electronic potentials and transition dipole moments calculated using the relativistic configuration-interaction valence-bond and coupled-cluster methods. The electronic structure of DyCl$^+$ is unprecedentedly complex due to the presence of multiple open electronic shells, including 4f$^{10}$ orbitals. The molecule has nine attractive potentials with ionically-bonded electrons and 99 repulsive potentials dissociating to a ground state Dy$^+$ ion and Cl atom. We explain the lack of symmetry in the cross section as due to multiple contributions from one-electron-dominated transitions between t...

  3. FTIR and Electrical Study of Dysprosium Doped Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemaunt Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the role of Dy3+ doping on the XRD, TEM, FTIR, and dielectric and electrical properties of CoFe2O4 at room temperature. Cubic spinel phase of CoFe2−xDyxO4 (x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15 was synthesized by using different sintering temperatures (300, 500, 700, and 900°C. The two absorption bands ν1 and ν2 are observed in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR spectra corresponding to the tetrahedral and octahedral sites, which show signature of spinel structure of the sample. For the sample sintered at 300°C, the dielectric constant is almost unchanged with the frequency at the particular concentrations of x = 0.00 and 0.05. Similar result is obtained for the sample sintered at 500°C (x = 0.10, 0.15, 700°C (x = 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15, and 900°C (x = 0.05, 0.10. An increase in the dielectric constant was observed for the undoped cobalt ferrite sintered at 500, 700, and 900°C. The values of electrical resistivity of the materials vary from ~105 to 109 Ω-cm.

  4. Adsorption of D113 Resin for Dysprosium(Ⅲ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and mechanism of D113 resin for Dy(Ⅲ) was investigated by using the method of resin adsorption. Experimental results show that the optimum medium pH of adsorption of D113 resin for Dy3+ is pH=6.00 in the HAc-NaAc medium. The static adsorption capacity of D113 resin for Dy3+chemical analysis and IR spectra.

  5. 1300-nm gain obtained with dysprosium-doped chloride crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, R.H.; Schaffers, K.I.; Beach, R.J.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.

    1996-03-01

    Dy{sup 3+} - doped chloride crystals have high 1300-nm emission quantum yields. Pump - probe experiments on La Cl{sub 3}:Dy{sup 3+} demonstrate optical gain consistent with predictions based on spectroscopic cross sections and lifetimes.

  6. Microscopic study of neutron-rich Dysprosium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Vargas, Carlos E; Lerma, Sergio; 10.1140/epja/i2013-13004-1

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic studies in heavy nuclei are very scarce due to large valence spaces involved. This computational problem can be avoided by means of the use of symmetry based models. Ground-state, gamma and beta-bands, and their B(E2) transition strengths in 160-168Dy isotopes, are studied in the framework of the pseudo-SU(3) model which includes the preserving symmetry Q.Q term and the symmetry-breaking Nilsson and pairing terms, systematically parametrized. Additionally, three rotor-like terms are considered whose free parameters, fixed for all members of the chain are used to fine tune the moment of inertia of rotational bands and the band-head of gamma and beta-bands. The model succesfully describes in a systematic way rotational features in these nuclei and allows to extrapolate toward the midshell nucleus 170Dy. The results presented show that it is possible to study full chain of isotopes or isotones in the region with the present model.

  7. Visible luminescence of dysprosium ions in oxyhalide lead borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarska, Joanna; Żur, Lidia; Pisarski, Wojciech A.

    2011-08-01

    Visible luminescence of Dy 3+ ions in oxyhalide lead borate glasses was examined. Luminescence spectra show two intense bands at 480 nm and 573 nm due to 4F 9/2 → 6H 15/2 (blue) and 4F 9/2 → 6H 13/2 (yellow) transitions of Dy 3+. Luminescence decays from 4F 9/2 state and yellow-to-blue luminescence intensity ratios (Y/B) were analysed with PbX 2 (X = F, Cl) content. An introduction of PbX 2 to the borate glass results in the increasing of 4F 9/2 lifetime and the decreasing of yellow-to-blue luminescence intensity ratio, which is due to reduction of covalency between Dy 3+ and O 2-/X - ions.

  8. MAGNETIC FIELD INDUCED FIRST-ORDER TRANSITIONS IN DYSPROSIUM ORTHOFERRITE

    OpenAIRE

    Eremenko, V.; Gnatchenko, S.; Kharchenko, N.; Lebedev, P.; Piotrowski, K; Szymczak, H.; Szymczak, R.

    1988-01-01

    New type of magnetic first-order phase transition induced by external magnetic field applied in the ab-plane in DyFeO3 is investigated using different magnetooptic techniques. The phenomenological model of this transition is proposed. The phase diagram in H-T plane has been obtained for various H orientation in the ab-plane.

  9. Fabrication and properties of hot pressed bismuth tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streicher, W.L.

    1978-01-01

    Bi/sub 2/WO/sub 6/ is a synthetic polar material that is a possible candidate for energy conversion and detection systems. Previous research on this material has been concerned with crystal growth and sintering characteristics of polycrystalline compacts. This study involves itself with the fabrication of polycrystalline compacts by hot pressing techniques. Densities approaching theoretical crystal density were achieved by hot pressing at 850/sup 0/C for one hour with pressures exceeding 35 MPa. Before hot pressing, the sintering range was determined by high temperature dilatometry of unfired Bi/sub 2/WO/sub 6/ ceramics. Hot pressed discs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and x-ray diffraction. Electrical properties were determined by dc resistivity, capacitance, and conductance measurements, ac poling, dc poling, and current-voltage measurements.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, and properties of reduced europium molybdates and tungstates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysinghe, Dileka [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Gerke, Birgit [Institut für Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universität Münster , Corrensstrasse 30, Münster D-48149 (Germany); Morrison, Gregory; Hsieh, Chun H.; Smith, Mark D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Pöttgen, Rainer [Institut für Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universität Münster , Corrensstrasse 30, Münster D-48149 (Germany); Makris, Thomas M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Loye, Hans-Conrad zur, E-mail: zurloye@mailbox.sc.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Single crystals of K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4}, K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, EuWO{sub 4}, and EuMoO{sub 4} were grown from molten chloride fluxes contained in vacuum-sealed fused silica and structurally characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction. The in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} was carried out using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. All four compounds crystallize in the tetragonal space group of I4{sub 1}/a and adopt the scheelite (CaWO{sub 4}) structure type. The magnetic susceptibility of the reported compounds shows paramagnetic behavior down to 2 K. {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze the relative Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content of the samples. All the compounds were further characterized by EPR, and UV-vis spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: TOC Caption Two new reduced europium containing quaternary oxides, K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4} and K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, and two previously reported ternary reduced oxides, EuWO{sub 4} and EuMoO{sub 4}, were synthesized via an in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} under flux method using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze the relative Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content of the samples. - Highlights: • K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4}, K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, EuWO{sub 4}, and EuMoO{sub 4} have been synthesized and characterized. • The in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} was carried out using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. • Magnetic susceptibility data were collected. • {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content.

  11. Tin Tungstate Nanoparticles: A Photosensitizer for Photodynamic Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Carmen; Ungelenk, Jan; Zittel, Eva; Bergfeldt, Thomas; Sleeman, Jonathan P; Schepers, Ute; Feldmann, Claus

    2016-03-22

    The nanoparticulate inorganic photosensitizer β-SnWO4 is suggested for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of near-surface tumors via reiterated 5 min blue-light LED illumination. β-SnWO4 nanoparticles are obtained via water-based synthesis and comprise excellent colloidal stability under physiological conditions and high biocompatibility at low material complexity. Antitumor and antimetastatic effects were investigated with a spontaneously metastasizing (4T1 cells) orthotopic breast cancer BALB/c mouse model. Besides protamine-functionalized β-SnWO4 (23 mg/kg of body weight, in PBS buffer), chemotherapeutic doxorubicin was used as positive control (2.5 mg/kg of body weight, in PBS buffer) and physiological saline (DPBS) as a negative control. After 21 days, treatment with β-SnWO4 resulted in a clearly inhibited growth of the primary tumor (all tumor volumes below 3 cm(3)) as compared to the doxorubicin and DPBS control groups (volumes up to 6 cm(3)). Histological evaluations of lymph nodes and lungs as well as the volume of ipsilateral lymph nodes show a remarkable antimetastatic effect being similar to chemotherapeutic doxorubicin but-according to blood counts-at significantly reduced side effects. On the basis of low material complexity, high cytotoxicity under blue-light LED illumination at low dark and long-term toxicity, β-SnWO4 can be an interesting addition to PDT and the treatment of near-surface tumors, including skin cancer, esophageal/gastric/colon tumors as well as certain types of breast cancer.

  12. Piezo- and elasto-optic coefficients for calcium tungstate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytsyk, B G; Demyanyshyn, N M; Solskii, I M; Sakharuk, O M

    2016-11-10

    A general equation describing the rotation of an optical indicatrix of tetragonal crystals (4, 4¯, 4/m symmetry classes) around the X3 axis (optical axis) depending on the direction of uniaxial pressure in the plane perpendicular to crystal optical axis is written. Partial cases of the general equation, when pressure is acting along the X1 (X2) axis or along the diagonal between the X1 and X2 axes, are received. The values of piezo-optic coefficients (POCs) π61, π16, and π45 are determined by the conoscopic method on the basis of the appropriate equations. Other POCs πim are determined by the interferometric method. All components of the matrix of elasto-optic coefficients are also determined as pin=πimCmn. These results are being compared to the ones received on the basis of wave-mechanical calculations. Objective pin values are necessary to build indicative surfaces of the elasto-optic effect and to find maximums of these surfaces and appropriate maximum values of acousto-optic quality coefficients.

  13. Luminescence of divalent europium activated spinels synthesized by combustion and the enhanced afterglow by dysprosium incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Haoyi, E-mail: manofchina@gmail.com; Jin, Yahong

    2016-05-01

    Herein we report a luminescent phenomenon of Eu{sup 2+} in the spinel MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples which are successfully synthesized via a combustion method. The XRD shows cubic spinel structure is obtained from the prepared samples. The mean crystal sizes estimated from XRD data are 30 and 10 nm for MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} respectively, and the large grain particles are the agglomeration of crystallites. The Eu{sup 2+} ions show a blue emission at around 480 nm and an afterglow phenomenon is observed after the removal of excitation. The afterglow spectrum of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}: Eu{sup 2+}, Dy{sup 3+} shows two emissions at 480 and 520 nm while only one at 480 nm is observed in ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}: Eu{sup 2+}, Dy{sup 3+}. The afterglow intensity and the persisting duration can be substantially enhanced by the Dy{sup 3+} incorporation because the trapping ability of the electron traps is reinforced. This is confirmed by the TL curves of the samples.

  14. Energy level decay and excited state absorption processes in dysprosium-doped fluoride glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Laércio; Librantz, André Felipe Henriques; Jackson, Stuart D.

    2010-03-01

    The primary excited state decay processes relating to the H613/2→H615/2˜3 μm laser transition in singly Dy3+-doped fluoride (ZBLAN) glass have been investigated in detail using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Selective laser excitation of the F69/2, H67/2 energy levels at 1125 nm and F611/2, H69/2 energy levels at 1358 nm established that the energy levels above the H611/2 level, excluding the F49/2 level, are entirely quenched by multiphonon emission in ZBLAN glass. The H611/2 and H613/2 energy levels emit luminescence with peaks at ˜1700 and ˜2880 nm, respectively, but at low quantum (luminescence) efficiencies. The quantum efficiency of the H611/2 level and H613/2 level is ˜9×10-5 and ˜1.3×10-2, respectively, for [Dy3+]=0.5 mol % based on calculations of the radiative lifetimes using the Judd-Ofelt theory. Excited state absorption (ESA) was detected by monitoring the rise time of the 1700 nm luminescence after tuning the probe wavelength across the spectral range from 1100 to 1400 nm. As a result of nonradiative decay of the higher excited states, ESA contributes to the heating of ˜3 μm fiber lasers based on Dy3+-doped fluoride glass. For [Dy3+] up to 4 mol %, we found no evidence of energy transfer processes between Dy3+ ions that influence the decay characteristics of the H611/2 and H613/2 energy levels.

  15. A naproxen complex of dysprosium intercalates into calf thymus DNA base pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mengsi; Jin, Jianhua; Xu, Guiqing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Cui, Fengling, E-mail: fenglingcui@hotmail.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Luo, Hongxia [Department of Chemistry, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Binding mode to ctDNA was studied by various methods. • Intercalation is the most possible binding mode. • Dynamic and static quenching occurred simultaneously. • Hydrophobic force played a major role. • Binding characteristic of rare earth complexes to DNA are dependent on the element. - Abstract: The binding mode and mechanism of dysprosium–naproxen complex (Dy–NAP) with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) were studied using UV–vis and fluorescence spectra in physiological buffer (pH 7.4). The results showed that more than one type of quenching process occurred and the binding mode between Dy–NAP with ctDNA might be intercalation. In addition, ionic strength, iodide quenching and fluorescence polarization experiments corroborated the intercalation binding mode between Dy–NAP and ctDNA. The calculated thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH and ΔS at different temperature demonstrated that hydrophobic interaction force played a major role in the binding process.

  16. Connecting mononuclear dysprosium single-molecule magnets to form dinuclear complexes via in situ ligand oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yutronkie, Nathan J; Kühne, Irina A; Korobkov, Ilia; Brusso, Jaclyn L; Murugesu, Muralee

    2016-01-14

    A Dy2 complex, exhibiting SMM behaviour, and its Y analogue were prepared via in situ oxidation of Py2TTA, a pincer type ligand, followed by dimerisation. This unique metal complexation and subsequent dimerization were followed by solution NMR studies.

  17. A Linear Tetranuclear Dysprosium(III) Compound Showing Single-Molecule Magnet Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Hongshan; Xu, Gong Feng; Guo, Yun-Nan; Gamez, Patrick; Beavers, Christine M; Teat, Simon J; Tang, Jinkui

    2010-04-20

    Although magnetic measurements reveal a single-relaxation time for a linear tetranuclear Dy(III) compound, the wide distribution of the relaxation time observed clearly suggests the presence of two slightly different anisotropic centres, therefore opening new avenues for investigating the relaxation dynamics of lanthanide aggregates.

  18. A Novel (4,6)-Connected Net Based on Dysprosium Benzenedicarboxylate, [Dy(OAc)(BDC)]n

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; LI Zhao-Ji; QIN Ye-Yan; CHENG Jian-Kai; YAO Yuan-Gen

    2008-01-01

    A new lanthanide coordination polymer, [Dy(OAc)(BDC)]n 1 (OAc= acetate, BDC = 1,4-benzenediacarboxylate), has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that complex 1 has infinite zigzag Dy-OAc chains, which are further connected by BDC to form a 3D metal-organic framework. According to topology analysis, this framework can be characterized as (4,6)-connected (3.4.54)(32.4.56.66) net that has never been reported before. Crystal structure for 1: space group Pbca, a = 13.314(3), b = 8.0269(18), c = 20.275(5) A, V = 2166.8(9) A3, C10H7O6Dy, Mr= 385.66, Z = 8, Dc = 2.364 g/cm3, μ = 6.910 mm-1, F(000) = 1448, the final R = 0.0181 and wR = 0.0520.

  19. Photoluminescence and thermoluminescence properties of tricalcium phosphate phosphors doped with dysprosium and europium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Madhukumar; H K Varma; Manoj Komath; T S Elias; V Padmanabhan; C M K Nair

    2007-10-01

    The suitability of calcium phosphate crystals for thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) applications is investigated, owing to their equivalence to bone mineral. The and phases of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were synthesized through wet precipitation and high temperature solid state routes and doped with Dy and Eu. The photoluminescence and thermoluminescence studies of the phosphors have been carried out. The TL properties were found to be highly dependent on the method of preparation of the material. Eu doping gave good PL emission, whereas Dy doping was more efficient in TL emission. -TCP was found to be less TL sensitive than -TCP, yet it was identified as a better phosphor material owing to its better fading characteristics. The dependence of TL of -TCP : Dy on the energy and dose of radiation, and on the doping concentration were studied. The TL intensity was observed to fade exponentially during a storage period of 20 days, but it stabilized at 70% of the initial value after 30 days. The optimum doping concentration was found to be 0.5 mol%.

  20. Extraction liquide-solide de Dysprosium(III) par le charbon actif ferromagnétique

    OpenAIRE

    khiri, khaira

    2014-01-01

    L’extraction liquide-solide de Dy(III) a été faite par le charbon actif ferromagnétique, dans un milieu nitré. L’effet de pH initial, concentration initial en ion Dy(III), le temps de contact, la force ionique, la température, la masse et l’élution ont été étudiés. La capacité de sorption augmente avec l’augmentation de la concentration initiale en Dy(III), le pH et la température. L’isotherme de Freundlich décrit mieux le processus d’extraction, ainsi que le modèle cinétique de p...

  1. Geometric and electronic structure of dysprosium thin films on tungsten surfaces Structural and magnetic properties

    CERN Document Server

    Moslemzadeh, N

    2001-01-01

    The rare earth thin films are frequently the focus of investigators due to their unusual structural and magnetic properties. Despite the potential interest of Dy/W systems to the surface/rare earth community, they have been little studied. This study is the first try of growing Dy on W(100) and W(112) and W(110) in which almost a complete set of information about film morphology and electronic structure of the surface and interface have been achieved. A set of different experiments have been done for this purpose including LEED, XPS, UPS (with synchrotron radiation) and STM. The growth modes of Dy on different W substrates (W(100), W(112) and W(110)) at RT and at elevated temperatures have been determined by XPS of Dy 3d sub 3 sub / sub 2 and W 4f intensities. Crystallographic ordering and the epitaxial relationship between adsorbate Dy and different W substrates have been studied with LEED and the effect of annealing temperature on the resultant superstructures was investigated. As a complementary study to t...

  2. Cerium: an unlikely replacement of dysprosium in high performance Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Arjun K; Khan, Mahmud; Gschneidner, Karl A; McCallum, Ralph W; Zhou, Lin; Sun, Kewei; Dennis, Kevin W; Zhou, Chen; Pinkerton, Frederick E; Kramer, Matthew J; Pecharsky, Vitalij K

    2015-04-24

    Replacement of Dy and substitution of Nd in NdFeB-based permanent magnets by Ce, the most abundant and lowest cost rare earth element, is important because Dy and Nd are costly and critical rare earth elements. The Ce, Co co-doped alloys have excellent high-temperature magnetic properties with an intrinsic coercivity being the highest known for T ≥ 453 K.

  3. Studies on Preparation of Dysprosium - 165 Metallic Macroaggregates for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Bae; Kim, Jae Rok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    Irradiation of 20 mg of natural Dy(NO{sub 3})3 in a neutron flux of 2 X10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2} sec for 4 hours gave 5.76 Ci of {sup 165}Dy (specific activity, 610 mCi/mg Dy) with high radionuclidic purity (>99.9%). {sup 165}Dy-MA was prepared in a quantitative yield by reacting the aqueous solution of {sup 165}Dy(NO{sub 3})3 with sodium borohydride solution in 0.2N NaOH. Coulter particle analyzer exhibited mean particle size of 2.6 mum (range 1 approx 6 mum). Even though the {sup 165}Dy-MA suspension in saline was stored at 37 .deg. C for 24 hours of autoclaved at 121 .deg. C for 30 minutes, there was no significant change in particle size and leakage problem indicating the prepared {sup 165}Dy-MA is sufficiently stable. In-vivo retention studies were carried out by administering {sup 165}Dy-MA into the knee joint space of normal rabbits. Gamma camera analysis showed high retention in joint space of normal rabbits. Gamma camera analysis showed high retention in joining space even at 24 hours after administration (>99.9%) The ease with which the{sup 165}Dy-MA can be made in the narrow size range and their high in vitro and vivo stability make them attractive agents for radiation synovectomy.

  4. Dysprosium sorption by polymeric composite bead: robust parametric optimization using Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Kartikey K; Dasgupta, Kinshuk; Singh, Dhruva K; Varshney, Lalit; Singh, Harvinderpal

    2015-03-06

    Polyethersulfone-based beads encapsulating di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid have been synthesized and evaluated for the recovery of rare earth values from the aqueous media. Percentage recovery and the sorption behavior of Dy(III) have been investigated under wide range of experimental parameters using these beads. Taguchi method utilizing L-18 orthogonal array has been adopted to identify the most influential process parameters responsible for higher degree of recovery with enhanced sorption of Dy(III) from chloride medium. Analysis of variance indicated that the feed concentration of Dy(III) is the most influential factor for equilibrium sorption capacity, whereas aqueous phase acidity influences the percentage recovery most. The presence of polyvinyl alcohol and multiwalled carbon nanotube modified the internal structure of the composite beads and resulted in uniform distribution of organic extractant inside polymeric matrix. The experiment performed under optimum process conditions as predicted by Taguchi method resulted in enhanced Dy(III) recovery and sorption capacity by polymeric beads with minimum standard deviation.

  5. Dysprosium(III)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate complexes of aminocyclodextrins as chiral NMR shift reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, T J; Miles, R D; Zomlefer, K; Frederique, D E; Roan, M A; Troughton, J S; Pond, B V; Colby, A L

    2000-01-01

    A metal chelating ligand is bonded to alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrin by the reaction of diethylenetraminepentaacetic dianhydride with the corresponding 6-mono- and 2-mono(amine)cyclodextrin. Adding Dy(III) to the cyclodextrin derivatives causes shifts in the (1)H-NMR spectra of substrates such as propranolol, tryptophan, aspartame, carbinoxamine, pheniramine, doxylamine, and 1-anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate. The Dy(III)-induced shifts enhance the enantiomeric resolution in the NMR spectra of several substrates. Enhancements in enantiomeric resolution using cyclodextrin derivatives with the amine tether are compared to previously described compounds in which the chelating ligand is attached through an ethylenediamine tether. In general, the Dy(III) complex of the 6-beta-derivative with the amine tether is a more effective chiral resolving agent than the complex with the ethylenediamine tether. The opposite trend is observed with the 2-beta-derivatives. The presence of the chelating ligand in the 2-beta-derivative hinders certain substrates from entering the cavity. For cationic substrates, evidence suggests that a cooperative association involving inclusion in the cavity and association with the Dy(III) unit occurs. Enhancements in enantiomeric resolution in the spectrum of tryptophan are greater for the secondary alpha- and gamma-derivatives than the beta-derivative.

  6. The Separation of Dysprosium and Holmium for Production of n.c.a. Ho-166

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, K. H.; Kim, J. B.; Park, U. J.; Nam, S. S.; Jang, K. D.; Yoo, K. M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The uses of radiolanthanide series are increasing in these days because of target therapy which does not require surgery. Certain radiolanthanides is very useful since they have the ability of simultaneous diagnosis and therapeutic effect in nuclear medicine. But this conventional therapeutic method has often limited by specific activity which is important things to affect labeling yield such as radiommunoconjugation and peptide labeling. There are two approaches to produce radiolanthanide in nuclear reactor. One is direct method using (n, γ) reaction and the other is indirect method using (n, γ)β reaction. Among the radiolanthanides, Ho-166 can be produced with two methods. Some radiolanthanides show the good theranostic effect in that they have proper LET (Linear Energy Transfer) to induce apoptosis for cancer treatment and gamma ray to use as a tracer for cancer diagnosis. The aim of this project based on this view is to get the carrier free radioisotopes for applying the nuclear medicine.

  7. Magnetic Properties of Some Gadolinium, Erbium, Dysprosium, Manganese Substituted Samarium-2 Cobalt-17 Intermetallic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    S K AREA B WORK UNIT NUMBERSElect ronic Materials Research Division 61102AUS Army Electronics Technology & Devices Laborator) 1-rrr~ -rrd2An47 02 031...permanent magnet materials having intrinsically temperature compensated magneti- zations. The properties investigated were saturation magnetization...that excellent temperature compensation could be achieved in these compounds in the teinper~ture (cont’d) ~‘ DD I ? ) 1Q3 L°’TI°M °’ INOV BI

  8. Recycling of waste Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets by doping with dysprosium hydride nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘卫强; 李超; ZAKOTNIK Miha; 岳明; 张东涛; 黄秀莲

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of waste sintered Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets by doping DyH3 nanoparticles was investigated. The effect of the DyH3 nanoparticles on the microstructure and magnetic properties of the recycled magnets was studied. As the DyH3 nanoparticles additive increased, the coercivity of recycled magnet increased gradually. The recycled magnets with DyH3 nanoparticle content be-tween 0.0 wt.% and 1.0 wt.% maintained the remanence (Br), but, with higher additions, theBr began to decrease rapidly. The best recycled magnet produced contained 1.0 wt.% of DyH3 nanoparticles when compared to the properties of the starting waste sintering magnet. TheHcj,Br and (BH)max values of 101.7%, 95.4%, and 88.58%, respectively, were recovered.

  9. Photo and cathodoluminescence characteristics of dysprosium doped yttrium oxide nanoparticles prepared by Polyol method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balderas-Xicohténcatl, R., E-mail: rbalderas@fis.cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados-IPN, Departamento de Física, Apdo, Postal 14-470, Del. Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07360, México, D.F. (Mexico); Martínez-Martínez, R. [Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Tecnológica de la Mixteca, Carretera a Acatlima Km. 2.5, Huajuapan de León, Oaxaca 69000 (Mexico); Rivera-Alvarez, Z.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Falcony, C. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados-IPN, Departamento de Física, Apdo, Postal 14-470, Del. Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07360, México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-02-15

    The luminescent characteristics of Dy{sup 3+}-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowders synthesized using the polyol method are reported. The Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles presented a cubic phase crystalline structure of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} after an annealing treatment in oxygen ambient at temperatures above 600 °C. The averaged crystallite size determined from the X-ray diffraction peaks width was in the 20–32 nm range depending on the annealing temperature. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies indicate the formation of nanoparticle aggregates up to 175 nm in diameter. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence measurements show a predominant emission at 573 nm, which is attributed to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 13/2} of the Dy{sup 3+} ion. The luminescence emission dependence with the dopant concentration and post-annealing temperatures is discussed. -- Highlights: • Nanoparticles of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Dy{sup 3+} have been successfully synthesized by the polyol method. • XRD shows a grain size from 20 to 32 nm which is in agreement with SEM and TEM. • Electronic micrographs indicate the formation agglomerates of ∼175 nm. • The method used in the synthesis is industrial scalable and a low cost. • CL emission is observed at naked eye.

  10. Studies of local structure at Zr sites in pressure amorphized zirconium tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindaraj, R; Sundar, C S; Arora, A K [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)], E-mail: govind@igcar.gov.in

    2009-06-10

    Amorphous to crystalline transition in pressure quenched Zr{sub 0.5}Hf{sub 0.5}W{sub 2}O{sub 8} has been studied with respect to local structures of ZrO{sub 6} using the perturbed angular correlation technique. In an untreated crystalline sample close to 0.7 fraction of the probe atoms occupy Zr sites of regular ZrO{sub 6} while the remaining three fractions are understood to be associated with contracted and distorted octahedra. The existence of six distinct ZrO{sub 6} could be deduced based on perturbed angular correlation studies in the pressure amorphized sample. In the amorphous sample these ZrO{sub 6} are associated with appreciable octahedral distortions. Isochronal annealing measurements show that these octahedra remain structurally quite stable up to 800 K. Values of quadrupole frequencies tend to become close to those experienced by probe atoms in a crystalline sample for annealing at 870 K, implying that around this temperature there is an onset of amorphous to crystalline transition. Complete restoration of quadrupole parameters to those of the untreated crystalline sample is seen subsequent to annealing at 975 K.

  11. Novel perovskite-related barium tungstate Ba 11W 4O 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Tae

    2007-11-01

    Ba 11W 4O 23 was synthesized at 1300 °C, followed by quenching with liquid nitrogen. The crystal structure, which was known to be cryolite-related but has remained unclear, was initially determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction for the isostructural Ru-substituted compound Ba 11(W 3.1Ru 0.9)O 22.5, which was discovered during exploratory synthesis in the Ba-Ru-O system. The structure of Ba 11W 4O 23 was refined by a combined powder X-ray and neutron Rietveld method ( Fd-3 m, a=17.1823(1) Å, Z=8, Rp=3.09%, Rwp=4.25%, χ2=2.8, 23 °C). The structure is an example of A-site vacancy-ordered 4×4×4 superstructure of a simple perovskite ABO 3, and it may be written as (Ba 1.75□ 0.25)BaWO 5.75□ 0.25, emphasizing vacancies on both metal and anion sites. The local structure of one of two asymmetric tungsten ions is the WO 6 octahedron, typical of perovskite. The other tungsten, however, is surrounded by oxygen and anionic vacancies statistically distributed over three divided sites to form 18 partially occupied oxygen atoms (˜30% on average), represented as WO 18/3. The A-site cation-vacancies are ordered at the 8a ( {1}/{8}, {1}/{8}, {1}/{8}) site in between adjoining WO 18/3 polyhedra which form 1-D arrangements along [110] and equivalent directions. In situ high-temperature XRD data have shown that the quenched Ba 11W 4O 23 at room temperature is isostructural to the high-temperature phase at 1100 °C.

  12. Non-stoichiometry Defects and Radiation Hardness of Lead Tungstate Crystals PbWO4

    CERN Document Server

    Devitsin, E G; Kozlov, V A; Nefedov, L; Polyansky, E V; Potashov, S Yu; Terkulov, A R; Zadneprovski, B I

    2001-01-01

    It has been stated many times that the formation of radiation infringements in PbWO4 is to big extent stipulated by non-stoichiometry defects of the crystals, arising in the process of their growth and annealing. To refine the idea of characteristics of non-stoichiometry defects and their effect on the radiation hardness of PbWO4 the current study is aimed at the melt composition infringements during its evaporation and at optical transmission of crystals obtained in these conditions after their irradiation (137Cs source). In the optical transmission measurements along with traditional techniques a method "in situ" was used, which provided the measurements in fixed points of the spectrum (380, 470 and 535 nm) directly in the process of the irradiation. X-ray phase and fluorescence analysis of condensation products of vapours over PbWO4 melt has found PbWO4 phase in their content as well as compounds rich in lead, PbO, Pb2WO5, with overall ratio Pb/W = 3.2. Correspondingly the lack of lead and variations in th...

  13. Impact of Sodium Tungstate and Tungsten Alloys on the Growth of Selected Microorganisms with Environmental Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    TUNGSTEN ALLOYS ON THE GROWTH OF SELECTED MICROORGANISMS WITH ENVIROMENTAL SIGNIFICANCE 5a. Contract Number: 5b. Grant Number: 5c. Program Element...either of these effects would be an issue in environmental settings is unclear. The water-soluble components of both alloys inhibited bacterial

  14. Random lasing in Nd{sup 3+} doped potassium gadolinium tungstate crystal powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, André L., E-mail: andre.moura@fis.ufal.br [Grupo de Física da Matéria Condensada, Núcleo de Ciências Exatas – NCEx, Campus Arapiraca, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57309-005, Arapiraca, AL (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Fewo, Serge I. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Laboratory of Mechanics, Department of Physics, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé (Cameroon); Carvalho, Mariana T.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Araújo, Cid B. de [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Prasad, Paras N. [Institute for Lasers, Photonics and Biophotonics, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-3000 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    Random laser (RL) emission in Nd{sup 3+} doped potassium gadolinium tungstate—KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+}—crystal powder is demonstrated. The powder was excited at 813 nm in resonance with the Nd{sup 3+} transition {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}F{sub 5/2}. RL emission at 1067 nm due to the {sup 4}F{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 11/2} transition was observed and characterized. An intensity threshold dependent on the laser spot area and bandwidth narrowing from ≈2.20 nm to ≈0.40 nm were observed and measured. For a beam spot area of 0.4 mm{sup 2}, a RL threshold of 6.5 mJ/mm{sup 2} (90 MW/cm{sup 2}) was determined. For excitation intensity smaller than the RL threshold, only spontaneous emission from level {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} with decay time in the tens microsecond range was observed, but for excitation above the RL threshold, significant shortening of excited level lifetime, characteristic of a stimulated process was found. The overall characteristics measured show that KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+} is an efficient material for operation of solid state RLs in the near-infrared.

  15. New photomultiplier active base for Hall C Jefferson Lab lead tungstate calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Vladimir E. [JLAB; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet G. [Artem Alikhanian National Laboratory

    2012-11-01

    A new photomultiplier tube active base was designed and tested. The base combines active voltage division circuit and fast amplifier, powered by the current flowing through voltage divider. This base is developed to upgrade older photomultiplier bases of Jefferson Lab lead-tungsten calorimeter (about ˜1200 crystals of PbWO{sub 4} from the PrimEx experimental setup). This is needed for the extension of detectors' rate capability to meet requirements of new Hall C proposal PR12-11-102 of measurements of the L/T separated cross sections and their ratio R = πL/πT in neutral-pion p(e,e'π0)p deep exclusive and p(p(e,e'π{sup 0})p)X semi-inclusive scattering regions. New active base is direct replacement of older passive base circuit without adding of additional power or signal lines. However, it extends detectors rate capability with factor over 20. Moreover, transistorized voltage divider improves detector's amplitude resolution due to reduction of photomultiplier gain dependence from tube anode current. The PMT active base is the invention disclosed in V. Popov's U.S. Patent No. 6,791,269, which successfully works over ten years in several Jefferson Lab Cherenkov detectors. The following design is a new revised and improved electronic circuit with better gain stability and linearity in challenge to meet requirements of new Hall C experimental setup. New active base performance was tested using fast LED light source and Pr:LuAG scintillator and gamma sources. Electronics radiation hardness was tested on JLab accelerator. Results of testing R4125 Hamamatsu photomultiplier tube in new active base are presented.

  16. Optical absorption analysis of quaternary molybdate- and tungstate-ordered double perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tablero, C., E-mail: ctablero@etsit.upm.es

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • These compounds present a high optical absorption. • The absorption coefficients using different DFT + U alternatives have been compared. • The absorption coefficients have been split into different contributions. • The maximum efficiency is near the maximum efficiency for multiple-gap solar cells. - Abstract: Quaternary-ordered double perovskite A{sub 2}MM′O{sub 6} (M = Mo,W) semiconductors are a group of materials with a variety of photocatalytic and optoelectronic applications. An analysis focused on the optoelectronic properties is carried out using first-principles density-functional theory with several U orbital-dependent one-electron potentials applied to different orbital subspaces. The structural non-equivalence of the atoms resulting from the symmetry has been taken in account. In order to analyze optical absorption in these materials deeply, the absorption coefficients have been split into inter- and intra-non-equivalent species contributions. The results indicate that the effect of the A and M′ atoms on the optical properties are minimal whereas the largest contribution comes from the non-equivalent O atoms to M transitions.

  17. Tissue Distribution of Tungsten in Mice Following Oral Exposure to Sodium Tungstate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    1mL) solution under a pressure and temperature controlled microwave digestion system (MarsXpress, CEM Inc, Mathews, North Carolina, USA), and then... nickel and cobalt). These findings confirmed most of what has been published on tungsten tissue distribution; they also showed that the brain is...other organ or either of the other two metals that were analyzed ( nickel and cobalt). These findings confirmed most of what has been published on

  18. Members of the ALICE collaboration greet the arrival of the experiment's first 500 lead tungstate crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    L. to r: Vladislav Manko (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, PHOS project leader), Arne Klovning (University of Bergen, PHOS technical coordinator), Vyacheslav Demanov (VNIIEF, Sarov), Bjorn Pommeresche (University of Bergen), Hans de Groot (CERN, ALICE resource coordinator), Dimitri Alexandrov (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow), Mikhail Ippolitov (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow), Yuri Vinogradov (VNIIEF, Sarov), Chris Fabjan (CERN, ALICE technical coordinator), Yuri Sibiriak (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow), Sergei Sadovsky (IHEP, Protvino), Jurgen Schukraft (CERN, ALICE spokesperson).

  19. Polypyrrole-encapsulated iron tungstate nanocomposites: a versatile platform for multimodal tumor imaging and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyin; Peng, Chen; Jiang, Xiaohong; Peng, Yuxuan; Huang, Xiaojuan; Guan, Guoqiang; Zhang, Wenlong; Liu, Xiaoming; Qin, Zongyi; Hu, Junqing

    2016-06-01

    A versatile nanoplatform of FeWO4@Polypyrrole (PPy) core/shell nanocomposites, which was facilely fabricated by first hydrothermal synthesis of FeWO4 nanoparticles and subsequent surface-coating of polypyrrole shell, was developed as an effective nanotheranostic agent of cancer. The as-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated excellent dispersion in saline, long-term colloidal storage, outstanding photo-stability and high photothermal efficiency in solution. In particular, FeWO4@PPy exhibited efficient performance for hyperthermia-killing of cancer cells under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser, accompanied with multimodal contrast capabilities for magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computed tomography and infrared thermal imaging in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the nanocomposites presented impactful tumor growth inhibition and good biocompability in animal experiments. Blood circulation and biodistribution of the nanocomposites were also investigated to understand their in vivo behaviours. Our results verified the platform of FeWO4@PPy nanocomposites as a promising photothermal agent for imaging-guided cancer theranostics.A versatile nanoplatform of FeWO4@Polypyrrole (PPy) core/shell nanocomposites, which was facilely fabricated by first hydrothermal synthesis of FeWO4 nanoparticles and subsequent surface-coating of polypyrrole shell, was developed as an effective nanotheranostic agent of cancer. The as-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated excellent dispersion in saline, long-term colloidal storage, outstanding photo-stability and high photothermal efficiency in solution. In particular, FeWO4@PPy exhibited efficient performance for hyperthermia-killing of cancer cells under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser, accompanied with multimodal contrast capabilities for magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computed tomography and infrared thermal imaging in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the nanocomposites presented impactful tumor growth inhibition and good biocompability in animal experiments. Blood circulation and biodistribution of the nanocomposites were also investigated to understand their in vivo behaviours. Our results verified the platform of FeWO4@PPy nanocomposites as a promising photothermal agent for imaging-guided cancer theranostics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03336a

  20. Optical spectra and spin-Hamiltonian parameters of trivalent ytterbium in lead tungstate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W-L Feng; X-M Li

    2011-01-01

    By using crystal-field theory, the optical spectra and spin-Hamiltonian parameters (abbr. SH parameters, i.e. the anisotropic factors $g_{\\|} g_{⊥}$, and hyperfine structure constants $A_{\\|}, A_{⊥}$) of 171Yb3+ and 173Yb3+ isotopes in the tetragonal PbWO4 are calculated. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental values. The crystal-field parameters and the signs of the hyperfine structure constants for both 171Yb3+ and 173Yb3+ isotopes are determined. The validities of the theoretical results are discussed.

  1. Non-stoichiometry defects and radiation hardness of lead tungstate crystals PbWO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Devitsin, E G; Potashov, S Yu; Terkulov, A R; Nefedov, V A; Polyansky, E V; Zadneprovski, B I; Kjellberg, P; Korbel, V

    2002-01-01

    It has been stated many times that the formation of radiation infringements in PbWO sub 4 is to a big extent stipulated by the non-stoichiometry defects of the crystals, arising in the process of their growth and annealing. To refine the idea of characteristics of the non-stoichiometry defects and their effect on the radiation hardness of PbWO sub 4 , the current study is aimed at the melt composition infringements during its evaporation and at optical transmission of crystals obtained in these conditions after their irradiation ( sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs source). In the optical transmission measurements along with traditional techniques a method 'in situ' was used, which provided the measurements in fixed points of the spectrum (380, 470 and 535 nm) directly in the process of the irradiation. X-ray phase and fluorescence analysis of condensation products of vapours over PbWO sub 4 melt has found PbWO sub 4 phase in their content as well as compounds rich in lead PbO, Pb sub 2 WO sub 5 with overall ratio Pb/W (3....

  2. Sunlight driven photocatalytic water splitting using nanostructured bismuth tungstate (Bi2WO6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, R.; Sakar, M.; Bharathkumar, S.; Balakumar, S.

    2017-05-01

    Sunlight driven photocatalytic water splitting properties of nanosized Bi2WO6 have been demonstrated. Upon the structural confirmation using XRD and Raman studies, the band edge offset deduced from UV-DRS spectra showed that the energy band structure of Bi2WO6 is manifested due to electronic transition in the hybridized orbital of Bi6s and O2p to the W5d orbital. The observed Bi2WO6 nanoparticulates-assisted H2 generation from glycerol-water mixture may be attributed to the following two competitive phenomena: (i) the photocatalytic degradation of glycerol and (ii) photocatalytic splitting of water molecules, where glycerol acts as a sacrificial agent. This study sheds lights on the photocatalytic reformation of contaminated aqueous ecosystems as a green resource to produce hydrogen energy.

  3. Synthesis and ammonolysis of nickel and cobalt tungstates and their characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Rico

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and characterization of NiW and CoW compounds are herein reported. The NiWO4 and CoWO4 samples, successfully synthesised by the hydrothermal method, were treated under NH3 to obtain the metal nitride. The SEM micrographs show that this transformation is a topotactic process. Tungsten trioxide was also treated under NH3 at similar operating conditions, and used as a reference. High nitrogen contents after ammonolysis were calculated, however, the percentages were below the theoretical values assuming the formation of pure NiWN, CoWN and WN. The XRD pattern indicates that WON is likely formed after ammonolysis of tungsten oxide whereas phase segregation was observed on the nickel and cobalt samples. Furthermore, the reactivity of the nitride samples as function of temperature was measured under argon and the results show that most of the nitrogen is removed from the cobalt and nickel samples whereas it was partially released from the tungsten specimen.

  4. Nano-Zirconium Tungstate Reinforced Liquid Crystalline Thermosetting Composites with Near Zero Thermal Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-25

    transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The FTIR spectrum was recorded on a Bruker’s IFS66V FTIR with a...not change much after 154 °C. Nematic LC phase usually displays schlieren texture while smectic LC phase usually shows a fan-shaped focal- conic ...The fan-shaped focal- conic texture for the cure temperatures from 170 °C to 190 °C in the figure is a characteristic of the smectic LC phase. The

  5. Characterization of high-temperature oxide films on dysprosium-doped Fe-20Cr alloys by electrochemical techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Pingyi; ZENG Chaoliu; SHAO Yong; QIN Zeshang

    2012-01-01

    The oxidation propegies of Fe-20Cr,Fe-20Cr-0.2Dy and Fe-20Cr-1Dy alloys were studied using gravimetric and electrochemical techniques.The high-temperature oxide films of Dy-doped Fe-20Cr alloys were prepared in air at 900 ℃ for 24,48 and 100 h,respectively.The electrochemical experiment was performed by a three-electrode electrochemical cell and in 0.1 mol/L Na2SO4 aqueous solution.Proper models were built for describing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the different oxide layers and the spectra were interpreted in terms of a two-layer model of the films.The results revealed that the oxide films of Dy-doped Fe-20Cr alloys became compacter than that of undoped alloys and retained their good protective ability for a relatively long time.With increasing content of Dy,the protection of the oxide films slightly decreased.Mott-Schottky curves indicated that all the oxides were n-type semi-conductors,and the Nd value of oxide film on Fe-20Cr was much larger than that of Dy-doped Fe-20Cr alloys.The results of kinetic curves and SEM were in agreement with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Mott-Schottky data.

  6. Reexamination of Nuclear Shape Transitions in Gadolinium and Dysprosium Isotopes Chains by Using the Geometric Collective Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalaf A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The critical points of potential energy surface (PES’s of the limits of nuclear struc- ture harmonic oscillator, axially symmetric rotor and deformed -soft and discussed in framework of the general geometric collective model (GCM. Also the shape phase transitions linking the three dynamical symmetries are studied taking into account only three parameters in the PES’s. The model is tested for the case of 238 92 U , which shows a more prolate behavior. The optimized model parameters have been adjusted by fit- ting procedure using a simulated search program in order to reproduce the experimental excitation energies in the ground state band up to 6 + and the two neutron separation energies.

  7. Critical Rare Earths, National Security, and U.S.-China Interactions: A Portfolio Approach to Dysprosium Policy Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    yttrium are often used for pigmentation for consumer products such as paint and sunglasses. REE-based lasers are used for cosmetic, epidermal, and... bacterial cell walls (Takahashi 2005). In acidic solutions, from an initial concentration of 100 micrograms of an REE mixture per liter, the bacteria...Logistics Agency Justification Book , Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide,” U.S. Department of Defense, Washington, DC: 2013

  8. Influence of dysprosium addition on the structural, morphological, electrical and magnetic properties of nano-crystalline W-type hexaferrites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ali-Sharbati; Javad-Mola Verdi Khani; G R Amiri; R Mousarezaei

    2015-02-01

    Dysporium (Dy)-substituted W-type barium hexaferrites were prepared by the citrate sol–gel-method. Crystalline structure, morphology, magnetic properties, DC resistivity and microwave absorption properties of BaNi2DyFe16−O27 ( = 0-0.9) were studied using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer and vector network analyzer and sensitive source meter, respectively. Single-phase W-type barium hexaferrites, with a chemical composition of BaNi2DyFe16−O27 ( = 0-0.9), were formed by being heated at 1250°C for 4 h in air. The magnetic properties such as saturation magnetization (s), and coercivity (c) were calculated from hysteresis loops. Hysteresis loop measurements show that the coercivity values lie in the range of 530–560 Oe with increasing Dy content. It was also observed that magnetization decreases with the increase of Dy content. The DC resistivity was observed to increase from 0.83 × 107 to 6.92 × 107 cm with increasing Dy contents due to the unavailability of Fe3+ ions. Microwave absorption properties of hexaferrite (70 wt%)–acrylic resin (30 wt%) composites were measured by the standing-wave-ratio (SWR) method in the range from 12 to 20 GHz. For sample with = 0.6, a minimum reflection loss of −40 dB was obtained at 16.2 GHz for a layer of 1.7 mm in thickness. Sample with = 0.9 had wide bandwidth absorption in the frequency range of 13.5–18 GHz with reflection losses less than −15 dB. Meanwhile the minimum reflection point shifts toward higher frequency with the increase of Dy content.

  9. L-Shell Ionization Cross Section Measurements of Dysprosium and Samarium by Low-Energy Electron Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOU Cheng-Jun; WU Zhang-Wen; YANG Dai-Lun; HE Fu-Qing; PENG Xiu-Feng; AN Zhu; LUO Zheng-Ming

    2005-01-01

    @@ The Lα, Lβ and Lγ x-ray production cross sections of Dy and Sm by electron impact are measured at energies from near threshold to tens of keV. In the experiments, thin targets with thick substrates are used. Meanwhile,the electron transport bipartition model is used to eliminate the influence of electrons reflected from the thick substrates on measurements. The measured x-ray production cross sections are also compared with the theoretical predictions by Gryzinski and McGuire.

  10. Generation of White Light from Dysprosium-Doped Strontium Aluminate Phosphor by a Solid-State Reaction Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ishwar Prasad; Bisen, D. P.; Brahme, N.; Tamrakar, Raunak Kumar

    2016-04-01

    A single-host lattice, white light-emitting SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure of prepared SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was in a monoclinic phase with space group P21. The chemical composition of the sintered SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was confirmed by the energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy technique. Under ultra-violet excitation, the characteristic emissions of Dy3+ are peaking at 475 nm, 573 nm and 660 nm, originating from the transitions of 4F9/2 → 6H15/2, 4F9/2 →&!nbsp; 6H13/2 and 4F9/2 → 6H11/2 in the 4f9 configuration of Dy3+ ions. Commission International de I'Eclairage color coordinates of SrAl2O4:Dy3+ are suitable for white light-emitting phosphor. In order to investigate the suitability of the samples as white color light sources for industrial uses, correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI) values were calculated. Values of CCT and CRI were found well within the defined acceptable range. Mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity of SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor increased linearly with increasing impact velocity of the moving piston. Thus, the present investigation indicates piezo-electricity was responsible for producing ML in sintered SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor. Decay rates of the exponential decaying period of the ML curves do not change significantly with impact velocity. The photoluminescence and ML results suggest that the synthesized SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was useful for the white light-emitting diodes and stress sensor respectively.

  11. Significant enhancement of energy barriers in dinuclear dysprosium single-molecule magnets through electron-withdrawing effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Fatemah; Brunet, Gabriel; Vieru, Veacheslav; Korobkov, Ilia; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Murugesu, Muralee

    2013-09-11

    The effect of electron-withdrawing ligands on the energy barriers of Single-Molecule Magnets (SMMs) is investigated. By introducing highly electron-withdrawing atoms on targeted ligands, the energy barrier was significantly enhanced. The structural and magnetic properties of five novel SMMs based on a dinuclear {Dy2} phenoxo-bridged motif are explored and compared with a previously studied {Dy2} SMM (1). All complexes share the formula [Dy2(valdien)2(L)2]·solvent, where H2valdien = N1,N3-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene) diethylenetriamine, the terminal ligand L = NO3(-) (1), CH3COO(-) (2), ClCH2COO(-) (3), Cl2CHCOO(-) (4), CH3COCHCOCH3(-) (5), CF3COCHCOCF3(-) (6), and solvent = 0.5 MeOH (4), 2 CH2Cl2 (5). Systematic increase of the barrier was observed for all complexes with the most drastic increase seen in 6 when the acac ligand of 5 was fluorinated resulting in a 7-fold enhancement of the anisotropic barrier. Ab initio calculations reveal more axial g tensors as well as higher energy first excited Kramers doublets in 4 and 6 leading to higher energy barriers for those complexes.

  12. Slow Magnetic Relaxation Observed in Dysprosium Compounds Containing Unsupported Near-Linear Hydroxo- and Fluoro-Bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Gabriel; Habib, Fatemah; Korobkov, Ilia; Murugesu, Muralee

    2015-07-06

    The encapsulating N1,N3-bis(3-methoxysalicylidene)diethylenetriamine (H2valdien) ligand was employed to isolate two novel Dy(III) compounds which contain rare bridging pathways for lanthanide systems. Compound 1, [Na2Dy(III)2(valdien)2(μ-OH)(dbm)2(H2O)2][Na2Dy(III)2(valdien)2(μ-OH)(NO3)2(dbm)2], where dbm(-) is dibenzoylmethanido, and compound 2, [Na3Dy(III)2(valdien)2(μ-F)(μ3-F)2(Cl)2(MeOH)2]n·0.5(MeOH)·(H2O), both exhibit linear lone hydroxo- and fluoro-bridges, respectively, between the metal centers. The unit cell of 1 comprises two discrete dinuclear molecules, which differ slightly, forming a cation-anion pair, while 2 forms a coordination polymer. The magnetic investigations indicate that both compounds display ferromagnetic coupling between the Dy(III) ions. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in the temperature range 1.8-300 K reveal that the Dy(III) ions in 1 are weakly coupled, resulting in a mononuclear single-molecule magnet-like behavior under an applied field. In the case of 2, the stronger coupling arising from the fluoride-bridge, leads to zero-field single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior with a non-negligible anisotropy barrier (Ueff) of 42 K.

  13. Effect of Ligand Field Tuning on the SMM Behavior for Three Related Alkoxide-Bridged Dysprosium Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yan; Mereacre, Valeriu; Baniodeh, Amer; Lan, Yanhua; Schlageter, Martin; Kostakis, George E; Powell, Annie K

    2016-01-04

    The synthesis and characterization of three Dy2 compounds, [Dy2(HL1)2(NO3)4] (1), [Dy2(L2)2(NO3)4] (2), and [Dy2(HL3)2(NO3)4] (3), formed using related tripodal ligands with a central tertiary amine bearing picolyl and alkoxy arms, 2-[(2-hydroxy-ethyl)-pyridin-2-ylmethylamino]-ethanol (H2L1), 2-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethylamino)-ethanol (HL2), and 2-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethylamino)-propane-1,3-diol (H2L3), are reported. The compounds are rare examples of alkoxide-bridged {Dy2} complexes and display capped square antiprism coordination geometry around each Dy(III) ion. Changes in the ligand field environment around the Dy(III) ions brought about through variations in the ligand donors can be gauged from the magnetic properties, with compounds 1 and 2 showing antiparallel coupling between the Dy(III) ions and 3 showing parallel coupling. Furthermore, slow relaxation of the magnetization typical of SMM behavior could be observed for compounds 2 and 3, suggesting that small variations in the ligand field can have a significant influence on the slow relaxation processes responsible for SMM behavior of Dy(III)-based systems.

  14. Effects of magnetic annealing on structure and multiferroic properties of pure and dysprosium substituted BiFeO 3

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Shuxia

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the effects of magnetic annealing on crystal structure and multiferroic properties of BiFeO 3 and Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 have been investigated. It is found that the X-ray diffraction patterns of pure BiFeO 3 samples are obviously broadened after magnetic annealing, whereas those of Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 samples are almost unchanged. Magnetic field annealing did not affect the magnetic properties of these two kinds of samples much. However, ferroelectric properties of the two materials exhibited different behaviors after magnetic field annealing. For pure BiFeO 3 samples, the remnant polarizations (P r) are suppressed; in contrast, for Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 samples, P r is greatly enhanced. Possible mechanisms for the effects of magnetic field annealing have been discussed. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dielectric relaxation in double potassium yttrium orthophosphate K 3Y(PO 4) 2 doped by praseodymium and dysprosium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulia, S.; Kosmowska, M.; Kołodziej, H. A.; Mizer, D.; Czupińska, G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the paper presents the results of electric properties of double potassium yttrium orthophosphates doped by lanthanide ions K 3Y( 1-x)Ln x(PO 4) 2 ( x = 0.01, 0.05, Ln = Pr 3+, Dy 3+). Electric permittivity and dielectric loss measurements have been performed on polycrystalline samples in the temperature range -50-120 °C and frequency range 1 kHz-1 MHz by means of HP 4282A impedance meter. The frequency and temperature dependence of electric properties were analyzed by theoretical models of dielectric relaxation in order to obtain information abut molecular dynamic of our solids in external electric field.

  16. Dilution-induced slow magnetic relaxation and anomalous hysteresis in trigonal prismatic dysprosium(III) and uranium(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meihaus, Katie R; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Long, Jeffrey R

    2011-09-05

    Magnetically dilute samples of complexes Dy(H(2)BPz(Me2)(2))(3) (1) and U(H(2)BPz(2))(3) (3) were prepared through cocrystallization with diamagnetic Y(H(2)BPz(Me2)(2))(3) (2) and Y(H(2)BPz(2))(3). Alternating current (ac) susceptibility measurements performed on these samples reveal magnetic relaxation behavior drastically different from their concentrated counterparts. For concentrated 1, slow magnetic relaxation is not observed under zero or applied dc fields of several hundred Oersteds. However, a 1:65 (Dy:Y) molar dilution results in a nonzero out-of-phase component to the magnetic susceptibility under zero applied dc field, characteristic of a single-molecule magnet. The highest dilution of 3 (1:90, U:Y) yields a relaxation barrier U(eff) = 16 cm(-1), double that of the concentrated sample. These combined results highlight the impact of intermolecular interactions in mononuclear single-molecule magnets possessing a highly anisotropic metal center. Finally, dilution elucidates the previously observed secondary relaxation process for concentrated 3. This process is slowed down drastically upon a 1:1 molar dilution, leading to butterfly magnetic hysteresis at temperatures as high as 3 K. The disappearance of this process for higher dilutions reveals it to be relaxation dictated by short-range intermolecular interactions, and it stands as the first direct example of an intermolecular relaxation process competing with single-molecule-based slow magnetic relaxation.

  17. Challenging lanthanide relaxation theory: erbium and thulium complexes that show NMR relaxation rates faster than dysprosium and terbium analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Alexander M; Harvey, Peter; Finney, Katie-Louise N A; Fox, Mark A; Kenwright, Alan M; Rogers, Nicola J; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Parker, David

    2015-07-07

    Measurements of the proton NMR paramagnetic relaxation rates for several series of isostructural lanthanide(III) complexes have been performed in aqueous solution over the field range 1.0 to 16.5 Tesla. The field dependence has been modeled using Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory, allowing values for the electronic relaxation time, Tle and the magnetic susceptibility, μeff, to be estimated. Anomalous relaxation rate profiles were obtained, notably for erbium and thulium complexes of low symmetry 8-coordinate aza-phosphinate complexes. Such behaviour challenges accepted theory and can be interpreted in terms of changes in Tle values that are a function of the transient ligand field induced by solvent collision and vary considerably between Ln(3+) ions, along with magnetic susceptibilities that deviate significantly from free-ion values.

  18. Distance determination from dysprosium induced relaxation enhancement: a case study on membrane-inserted WALP23 polypeptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lueders, P.; Razzaghi, S.; Jäger, H.; Tschaggelar, R.; Hemminga, M.A.; Yulikov, M.; Jeschke, G.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane incorporated synthetic a-helical polypeptides labelled with Dy(III) chelate complexes and nitroxide radicals were studied by the inversion recovery (IR) technique and Dy(III)-nitroxide distances were obtained. A comparison of obtained distances with the previously reported Gd(III)-nitroxide

  19. Crystal structure and ionic conductivity of a new bismuth tungstate, Bi3W2O10.5

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Muktha; T N Guru Row

    2006-01-01

    The compound Bi3W2O10.5 was synthesized by the solid-state technique from Bi2O3 and WO3 in stoichiometric quantities. Single crystals were grown by the melt-cooling technique and the crystal structure was solved in the tetragonal 4/ space group with = 3.839 (1) Å, = 16.382 (5) Å, = 241.4 (1) Å3, = 4 and was refined to an index of 0.0672. The structure represents a modification of the Aurivillius phase and consists of [Bi2O2]2+ units separated by WO8 polyhedra. a.c. impedance studies indicate oxide ion conductivity of 2.91 10-5 Scm-1 at 600°C.

  20. Influence of variable tungsten valency on optical transmittance and radiation hardness of lead tungstate (PWO) scintillation crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Burachas, S; Makov, I; Saveliev, Yu; Ippolitov, M S; Man'ko, V; Nikulin, S P; Nyanin, A; Vasilev, A; Apanasenko, A; Tamulaitis, G

    2003-01-01

    A new approach to interpret the radiation hardness of PbWO//4 (PWO) scintillators is developed by revealing importance of the inclusions of tungsten oxides WO//3//-//x with variable valency. It is demonstrated that the influence of the ionizing radiation on PWO is, in many aspects, similar to the effect of the high-temperature annealing in oxygenless ambient. In both cases, a valency change of the tungsten oxides is initiated and results in induced absorption and, consequently, in crystal coloration. In the PWO crystals doped with L//2O//3 (L = Y, La, Gd), the radiation hardness and the optical properties are mainly affected by inclusions of W//1//-//yL//yO//3//- //x (0 less than x less than 0.3) instead of inclusions of WO//3//- //x prevailing in the undoped samples. It is demonstrated that the radiation-induced bleaching and the photochromic effect of PWO are caused by phase transitions in the inclusions of tungsten oxide. Thermodynamic conditions for the phase transitions are discussed and the optimal oxid...

  1. Crystal structure and ionic conductivity of a new bismuth tungstate,Bi3W2O10.5

    OpenAIRE

    Muktha, B.; Row, TNG

    2006-01-01

    The compound Bi3W2O10.5 was synthesized by the solid-state technique from Bi2O3 and WO3 in stoichiometric quantities. Single crystals were grown by the melt-cooling technique and the crystal structure was solved in the tetragonal 141in space group with a = 3.839 (1) A, c = 16-3S2 (5) A, V = 241.4 (1) angstrom(3), Z = 4 and was refined to an R index of 0.0672. The structure represents a modification of the Aurivillius phase and consists of [Bi2O2](2+) units separated by WO8 polyhedra. a.c. imp...

  2. Effects of sodium tungstate on characteristics of microarc oxidation coatings formed on magnesium alloy in silicate-KOH electrolyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Jun; LIANG Jun; HU Li-tian; HAO Jing-cheng; XUE Qun-ji

    2007-01-01

    Oxide coatings on AM60B magnesium alloy were prepared using the microarc oxidation(MAO) technique in silicate-KOH electrolyte with addition of 0-6.0 g/L Na2WO4. The MAO processes in base electrolyte with different concentrations of Na2WO4 were studied. The microstructure, compositions and mechanical tribological characteristics of the oxide coatings were also investigated by SEM, XRD, XPS, microhardness analysis and ball-on-disc friction testing, respectively. It is found that the addition of Na2WO4 into the base electrolyte has direct effect on the characteristics of voltage-time curves and breakdown voltage in MAO process. The number of micropores at top of the coating surface is increased by the addition of Na2WO4. The fraction of forsterite Mg2SiO4 in the oxide coating increases with increasing concentration of Na2WO4 in base electrolytes. Furthermore, the microhardness and wear resistance of oxide coatings are enhanced as well.

  3. One- and two-electron reduction of molybdate reversibly bound to the archaeal tungstate/molybdate transporter WtpA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevers, L.E.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    Reversible binding of the tetrahedral oxoanions MoO4 2- and WO4 2- to two carboxylato ligands of the soluble scavenger protein WtpA from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus enforces a quasi-octahedral MO6 coordination in which the +VI oxidation state is destabilized.

  4. Organization of the production of 100 tons of lead tungstate crystals for the CMS experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The CMS collaboration at CERN has undertaken at the end of 1994 an ambitious R&D program on Lead Tugstate scintillating crystals for its electromagnetic calorimeter. All the parameters of this crystal have been extensively studied in order to optimize its performances in the context of the Large Hadron Collider. Full size crystals (23 cm in length, up to 2.5 multiplied by 2.5 cm**2 in section) with the desired trapezoidal geometry can now be grown and mechanically processed with a yield in excess of 80%. A thorough investigation of the raw material preparation and of the growing conditions has led to a significant improvement in the optical transparency and in the light yield of the crystals. A detailed understanding of the light emission mechanism was 1995. A systematic analysis of the parameters influencing the structural quality of the crystals was at the origin of a considerable improvement of the radiation hardness of full size crystals. All these progress will be illustrated by results of measuremen...

  5. INFRARED REFLECTION SPECTRA OF LEAD TUNGSTATE CRYSTAL%钨酸铅晶体的红外反射谱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙桂芳; 钱霞; 盛淑芳; 阮树仁

    2009-01-01

    采用提拉法生长了钨酸铅(PbWO4,PWO)晶体.室温下测量了PWO晶体的红外反射谱,观察到7个反射峰,分别位于84,125,260,298.381.785cm-1和854 cm-1,对各个反射峰进行了振动归属;利用Kramers-Kronig(K-K)关系对样品的红外反射谱进行数据处理,获得晶体的静态介电常数ε0=5.25,高频介电常数ε∞=4.30,横光学声子频率ωτ=769.92cm-1和纵光学声子频率ωL=881.19cm-1等物理参量.

  6. Application of analysis by spectrometry of X-fluorescence radiation. Determination of P-W-Zr in phospho tungstate, zirconium tungstate, zirconium phosphate, their mixtures, and their degradation products; Application de l'analyse par spectrometrie du rayonnement de fluorescence X. Dosage de P - W - Zr dans les phosphotungstate, tungstate de zirconium, phosphate de zirconium, leurs melanges et leurs produits de degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillon, A.; Lebrun, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    By chemical methods it is possible to dose accurately the constituents of solid samples containing essentially P, Zr and T. These methods involve prior separation of the elements, an operation which is relatively lengthy and delicate; they are furthermore ill-adapted for large series. In this case, the use of the X-fluorescence technique has many advantages. The process used is the borax-bead method. The fusion eliminates heterogeneity effects such as those dus to the size, the porosity and the composition of the grains, inter-elements effects, however, are not suppressed. These effects have been studied here and corrected for. (author) [French] Les methodes chimiques permettent le dosage precis des constituents d'echantillons solides contenant essentiellement P, Zr, W. Elles necessitent la separation prealable des elements, operation relativement longue et delicate, et se pretent mal a l'analyse de series importantes. dans ce cas, l'utilisation de la technique de fluorscence X ne presente que des avantages. La methode utilisee est celle des perles au borax. La fusion efface les effets d'heterogeneite telles que la taille, la porosite et la composition des grains. Les effets inter-elements, par contre, ne sont pas supprimes. Ce travail les met en evidence et permet leur correction. (auteur)

  7. Influence of dysprosium substitution on magnetic and mechanical properties of high intrinsic coercivity Nd-Fe-B magnets prepared by double-alloy powder mixed method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡志华; 瞿海锦; 马冬威; 罗成; 王会杰

    2016-01-01

    The double-alloy powder mixed method is very proper for developing new small-mass products by changing the composi-tion of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets, and there is little research on this aspect. The variation on magnetic and mechanical properties of high intrinsic coercivity Nd-Fe-B magnets prepared by double-alloy powder mixed method was discussed, which is a method blend-ing two-type main phase alloy powders with different components. The results showed that the intrinsic coercivity and density of sin-tered Nd-Fe-B magnets increased gradually with the increase in Dy content, and the double-alloy powder mixed method could obtain high intrinsic coercivity Nd-Fe-B magnets with good crystallographic alignment and microstructure. The bending strength of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets declined, and the Rockwell hardness of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets first declined, and then increased with the in-crease in Dy content. The microstructure showed that there existed the phenomenon that the Dy element diffused into main phase dur-ing sintering process, and the distribution of Dy content in main phase had some variation in homogeneity as a result of incomplete reaction between the double-alloy powder types.

  8. Effect of dysprosium substitution on electrical properties of SrBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 15}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamatha, B., E-mail: boinanemamatha@gmail.com; Sarah, P.

    2014-10-15

    SrBi{sub 4−x}Dy{sub x}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 15} (with x = 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.08) powders have been synthesized using the stoichiometric amounts of nitrates and oxides of the constituent materials through sol–gel method. The compound so formed is characterized using X-ray diffraction. The density and lattice parameters are calculated. The impedance and electrical conductivity properties are investigated. The imaginary part of impedance as a function of frequency shows Debye like relaxation. Impedance data presented in the Nyquist plot which is used to identify an equivalent circuit and the fundamental circuit parameters are determined at different temperatures. The results of bulk a.c. conductivity as a function of frequency at different temperatures are presented. The dielectric behavior was investigated. Permittivity was calculated based on the relaxation frequency using an alternative approach based on the variation of the imaginary impedance component as a function of reciprocal angular frequency. The frequency dependence of real and imaginary permittivities was also investigated. - Highlights: • SrBi{sub 4−x}Dy{sub x}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 15} (x = 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.08) powders are produced by sol–gel method. Phase formation is confirmed by XRD analysis. • Frequency dependent imaginary part of impedance shows distribution of relaxation in system. • Broadness of Z″ peak shows distribution of relaxation frequency. • Increase in peak width at ½ maxima of Z″ with increase of temperature shows increase of relaxation frequency distribution. • Cole–Cole plots are resolved into two different circles, ascribed to different mechanisms of polarization and relaxation phenomena.

  9. Hexanuclear, heterometallic, Ni₃Ln₃ complexes possessing O-capped homo- and heterometallic structural subunits: SMM behavior of the dysprosium analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goura, Joydeb; Guillaume, Rogez; Rivière, Eric; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2014-08-04

    The reaction of hetero donor chelating mannich base ligand 6,6'-{(2-(dimethylamino)ethylazanediyl)bis(methylene)}bis(2-methoxy-4-methylphenol) with Ni(ClO4)2·6H2O and lanthanide(III) salts [Dy(III) (1); Tb(III) (2); Gd (III) (3); Ho(III) (4); and Er(III) (5)] in the presence of triethylamine and pivalic acid afforded a series of heterometallic hexanuclear Ni(II)-Ln(III) coordination compounds, [Ni3Ln3(μ3-O)(μ3-OH)3(L)3(μ-OOCCMe3)3]·(ClO4)·wCH3CN·xCH2Cl2·yCH3OH·zH2O [for 1, w = 8, x = 3, y = 0, z = 5.5; for 2, w = 0, x = 5, y = 0, z = 6.5; for 3, w = 15, x = 18, y = 3, z = 7.5; for 4, w = 15, x = 20, y = 6, z = 9.5; and for 5, w = 0, x = 3, y = 2, z = 3]. The molecular structure of these complexes reveals the presence of a monocationic hexanuclear derivative containing one perchlorate counteranion. The asymmetric unit of each of the hexanuclear derivatives comprises the dinuclear motif [NiLn(L)(μ3-O)(μ3-OH)(μ-Piv)]. The cation contains three interlinked O-capped clusters: one Ln(III)3O and three Ni(II)Ln(III)2O. Each of the lanthanide centers is eight- coordinated (distorted trigonal-dodecahedron), while the nickel centers are hexacoordinate (distorted octahedral). The study of the magnetic properties of all compounds are reported and suggests single molecule magnet behavior for the Dy(III) derivative (1).

  10. Two-dimensional dysprosium(III triiodate(V dihydrate, Dy(IO33(H2O·H2O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laishun Qin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available During our research into novel nonlinear optical materials using 1,10-phenanthroline as an appending ligand on lanthanide iodates, crystals of an infinite layered DyIII iodate compound, Dy(IO33(H2O·H2O, were obtained under hydrothermal conditions. The DyIII cation has a dicapped trigonal prismatic coordination environment consisting of one water O atom and seven other O atoms from seven iodate anions. These iodate anions bridge the DyIII cations into a two-dimensional structure. Through O—H...O hydrogen bonds, all of these layers stack along [111], giving a supramolecular channel, with the solvent water molecules filling the voids.

  11. Two-dimensional dysprosium(III) triiodate(V) dihydrate, Dy(IO3)3(H2O)·H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Wenxiang; Song, Li; Shi, Hongsheng; Qin, Laishun; Shu, Kangying

    2009-01-01

    During our research into novel nonlinear optical materials using 1,10-phenanthroline as an appending ligand on lanthanide iodates, crystals of an infinite layered DyIII iodate compound, Dy(IO3)3(H2O)·H2O, were obtained under hydro­thermal conditions. The DyIII cation has a dicapped trigonal prismatic coordination environment consisting of one water O atom and seven other O atoms from seven iodate anions. These iodate anions bridge the DyIII cations into a two-dimensional structure. Through O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, all of these layers stack along [111], giving a supra­molecular channel, with the solvent water mol­ecules filling the voids. PMID:21583297

  12. 吡罗昔康镝配合物的合成与表征%Synthesis and characterization of the complex of piroxicam and dysprosium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳军; 石俊; 孙体健; 徐隋意; 曹晓峰

    2009-01-01

    利用热乙醇搅拌法合成吡罗昔康和稀土金属镝的配合物,通过紫外光谱、红外光谱、元素分析、电导率、差热-热重等方法对其进行表征,最后确定其组成为Dy(pir)2C2H5OHCl3·2H2O.

  13. Multicolor photoluminescence and energy transfer properties of dysprosium and europium-doped Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanxia; Liu, Guixia, E-mail: liuguixia22@163.com; Wang, Jinxian; Dong, Xiangting; Yu, Wensheng

    2015-11-15

    In this study, a series of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Ln{sup 3+} (Ln = Dy, Eu) submicrospheres were successfully prepared by a hydrothermal method and a subsequent higher temperature pyrolysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), photoluminescence (PL) spectra and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) were utilized to characterize the as-prepared samples. The precursor sample thoroughly decomposed into Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} submicrospheres with a diameter of about 550 nm after calcination. Under UV excitation, the samples exhibit multicolor emissions including yellow-green, yellow, red as well as white, moreover, the Dy{sup 3+} ions acted as donors can transfer the energy to Eu{sup 3+} served as acceptors in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Dy{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} system. The interaction between Dy{sup 3+} ions and Eu{sup 3+} ions is verified to be phonon-assisted electric quadrupole–quadrupole interaction. Multicolor luminescence including white light emission can be obtained through varying the content of Eu{sup 3+} or adopting different excitation wavelengths in Dy{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} co-doped Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. The energy transfer efficiency reaches 88.2% when the doped concentration of Eu{sup 3+} is 0.035. The CIE chromaticity diagram directly reveals the variability of the hue of the as-prepared samples. Besides, the as-prepared samples exhibit paramagnetic properties at room temperature. This type of color-tunable luminescence phosphors has promising applications in the fields of photoelectronic devices and biomedical science. - Graphical abstract: Tunable multicolor emissions and energy transfer properties of lanthanides (Ln{sup 3+}, Ln{sup 3+} = Dy{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}) doped cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} submicrospheres prepared by hydrothermal method and a subsequent calcination. - Highlights: • The as-prepared samples can exhibit multicolor emissions. • Dy{sup 3+} transfer energy to Eu{sup 3+} in Dy{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} co-doped Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • The as-prepared phosphor has promising applications in the fields of photoelectronic devices and biomedical science.

  14. Emission from Divalent Dysprosium (Dy2+ )in Crystalline Strontium Tetraborate%晶态四硼酸锶中二价镝的发射

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许武; Peterson; J; R

    2001-01-01

    Emission spectra from SrB4O7 doped with Dy2O3 and heated in air have been recorded at room temperature. A change in oxidation state from Dy3+ to Dy2+ was observed. Optimum production of Dy2+ ion occurs when the sample is heated in air at about 650℃. Two broad emission bands centered in the vicinity of 550 and 660nm have been observed from the sample under the excitation of 457.9nm. It is suggested that these bands are due to Dy2 + ion emission from the 5d band into the ground state 4f level (5I8). Several conditions promoting the reduction of Dy3+ion in this matrix are discussed. To aid the reduction of Dy3+ ion, we have also prepared SrB4O7 doped with Dy2O3 in Ar/H2 (4 % ) atmosphere and compared the optical characteristics of Dy2 + ion in these samples with those from the samples prepared in air. The range of g-element reducibility and stabilization in SrB4O7 has been extended from Tm2+[ E0 (Tm3+/Tm2+) = -2.3V] to Dy2+ [E0(Dy3+/Dy2 +) = -2.6V] in the present work; however, the limit of this facile reduction process has not been determined yet.%在室温下测量了在空气中灼烧掺杂Dy2O3的SrB4O7的发射光谱.观测到了由Dy3+到Dy2+氧化态的变化.经优化,当在空气中灼烧温度为650℃时为产生Dy2+的最佳温度.在457.9nm的激发下测出了两个峰位分别位于550和660nm的宽发射带.我们认为这两个宽发射带是由Dy2+离子由5d态向4f基态能级(5I8)跃迁产生的.讨论了几个有益于在这种基质中还原Dy3+离子的条件.为了实现Dy3+离子的还原,我们还在Ar/H2(4%)气氛中制备了Dy2O3掺杂的SrB4O7,比较了这种样品和在空气中所制备的样品的光学特性.本文还对标志SrB4O7还原性和稳定性的g-因子由Tm2+的[Eo(Tm3+/Tm2+=-2.3V]推导出Dy2+的[E0(Dy3+/Dy2+)=-2.6V],但对这种还原过程的局限性尚未确定.

  15. CCDC 1402057: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : pentakis(tetra-n-butylammonium) tetrakis(mu-oxalato)-dodecachloro-tetranitrosyl-ethanol-tetra-ruthenium-dysprosium sesquihydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Kuhn, Paul-Steffen

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  16. New architectures for integrated optics: low-loss tight bends and on-chip high-index-contrast potassium double Tungstate waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sefünç, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis concentrates on improving the performance of low-index-contrast waveguides in terms of reducing the bend losses and increasing the index contrast of waveguides by heterogeneous adhesive bonding and thinning. In the first part of this thesis, we have demonstrated that introducing a thin m

  17. High-resolution measurement and mapping of tungstate in waters, soils and sediments using the low-disturbance DGT sampling technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Dong-Xing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Williams, Paul N. [Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom); Xu, Hua-Cheng [State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Gang [Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Luo, Jun, E-mail: esluojun@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ma, Lena Q. [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2016-10-05

    Highlights: • Two high-resolution diffusive gradients in thin-films samplers were characterized. • For the first time DGT was applied to study the bioavailability of W in soils. • 1D and 2D high resolution profiling of W fluxes across the SWI were obtained. • The apparent diffusion W fluxes across two micro-interfaces were calculated. - Abstract: Increasing tungsten (W) use for industrial and military applications has resulted in greater W discharge into natural waters, soils and sediments. Risk modeling of W transport and fate in the environment relies on measurement of the release/mobilization flux of W in the bulk media and the interfaces between matrix compartments. Diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) is a promising passive sampling technique to acquire such information. DGT devices equipped with the newly developed high-resolution binding gels (precipitated zirconia, PZ, or ferrihydrite, PF, gels) or classic/conventional ferrihydrite slurry gel were comprehensively assessed for measuring W in waters. {sup Ferrihydrite}DGT can measure W at various ionic strengths (0.001–0.5 mol L{sup −1} NaNO{sub 3}) and pH (4–8), while {sup PZ}DGT can operate across slightly wider environmental conditions. The three DGT configurations gave comparable results for soil W measurement, showing that typically W resupply is relatively poorly sustained. 1D and 2D high-resolution W profiling across sediment—water and hotspot—bulk media interfaces from Lake Taihu were obtained using {sup PZ}DGT coupled with laser ablation ICP–MS measurement, and the apparent diffusion fluxes across the interfaces were calculated using a numerical model.

  18. Use of Biomass as a Sustainable and Green Fuel with Alkali-Resistant DeNOx Catalysts based on Sulfated or Tungstated Zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Christensen, Claus H.

    Use of biomass as an alternative to fossil fuels has achieved increasing interest since it does not contribute to CO2 accumulation in the atmosphere. Over the past 10-15 years, heat and electricity production from biomass has increased to almost 7% of all energy supply in the European Union...... and is expected to increase further. The by far most efficient use of solid bio-resources in energy production is combustion in combined biomass and coal or oil-fired power plants. However, in such applications nitrogen oxides are inevitably present in the flue gases. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR......) of NO with ammonia as reductant is the most common method to eliminate NOx from flue gases in stationary sources. Even though biofuels are considered as environmentally benign fuels, the reactions occurring inside the boilers during biomass combustion tend to be more “dirty”. Indeed, traditional V2O5-WO3-TiO2 SCR...

  19. Copper(ii) tungstate nanoflake array films: sacrificial template synthesis, hydrogen treatment, and their application as photoanodes in solar water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dianyi; Diao, Peng; Xu, Di; Xia, Mengyang; Gu, Yue; Wu, Qingyong; Li, Chao; Yang, Shubin

    2016-03-01

    We report the preparation of CuWO4 nanoflake (NF) array films by using a solid phase reaction method in which WO3 NFs were employed as sacrificial templates. The SEM, TEM and XRD results demonstrated that the obtained CuWO4 films possessed a network structure that was composed of single crystalline NFs intersected with each other. The CuWO4 NF films showed superior photoelectrochemical (PEC) activity to other CuWO4 photoanodes reported recently for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We attributed the high activity to the unique morphological and crystalline structure of the CuWO4 film, which enhanced the photoactivity by providing a large specific area, a short hole transport distance from the inside of CuWO4 to the CuWO4/solution interface, and a low grain boundary density. Hydrogen treatment by annealing the CuWO4 NF film in mixed gases of H2 and Ar could further enhance the photoactivity, as hydrogen treatment significantly increased the electron density of CuWO4 by generating oxygen vacancy in the lattice. The photocurrent density for OER obtained on the hydrogen-treated (H-treated) CuWO4 NF film is the largest ever reported on CuWO4 photoanodes in the literature. Moreover, the CuWO4 photoanodes exhibit good stability in weak alkaline solution, while the H-treated CuWO4 photoanodes exhibit acceptable stability. This work not only reveals the potential of CuWO4 as a photoanode material for solar water splitting but also shows that the construction of nanostructured CuWO4 photoanodes is a promising method to achieve high PEC activity toward OER.We report the preparation of CuWO4 nanoflake (NF) array films by using a solid phase reaction method in which WO3 NFs were employed as sacrificial templates. The SEM, TEM and XRD results demonstrated that the obtained CuWO4 films possessed a network structure that was composed of single crystalline NFs intersected with each other. The CuWO4 NF films showed superior photoelectrochemical (PEC) activity to other CuWO4 photoanodes reported recently for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We attributed the high activity to the unique morphological and crystalline structure of the CuWO4 film, which enhanced the photoactivity by providing a large specific area, a short hole transport distance from the inside of CuWO4 to the CuWO4/solution interface, and a low grain boundary density. Hydrogen treatment by annealing the CuWO4 NF film in mixed gases of H2 and Ar could further enhance the photoactivity, as hydrogen treatment significantly increased the electron density of CuWO4 by generating oxygen vacancy in the lattice. The photocurrent density for OER obtained on the hydrogen-treated (H-treated) CuWO4 NF film is the largest ever reported on CuWO4 photoanodes in the literature. Moreover, the CuWO4 photoanodes exhibit good stability in weak alkaline solution, while the H-treated CuWO4 photoanodes exhibit acceptable stability. This work not only reveals the potential of CuWO4 as a photoanode material for solar water splitting but also shows that the construction of nanostructured CuWO4 photoanodes is a promising method to achieve high PEC activity toward OER. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr09210h

  20. High-resolution measurement and mapping of tungstate in waters, soils and sediments using the low-disturbance DGT sampling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Dong-Xing; Williams, Paul N; Xu, Hua-Cheng; Li, Gang; Luo, Jun; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-10-05

    Increasing tungsten (W) use for industrial and military applications has resulted in greater W discharge into natural waters, soils and sediments. Risk modeling of W transport and fate in the environment relies on measurement of the release/mobilization flux of W in the bulk media and the interfaces between matrix compartments. Diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) is a promising passive sampling technique to acquire such information. DGT devices equipped with the newly developed high-resolution binding gels (precipitated zirconia, PZ, or ferrihydrite, PF, gels) or classic/conventional ferrihydrite slurry gel were comprehensively assessed for measuring W in waters. (Ferrihydrite)DGT can measure W at various ionic strengths (0.001-0.5molL(-1) NaNO3) and pH (4-8), while (PZ)DGT can operate across slightly wider environmental conditions. The three DGT configurations gave comparable results for soil W measurement, showing that typically W resupply is relatively poorly sustained. 1D and 2D high-resolution W profiling across sediment-water and hotspot-bulk media interfaces from Lake Taihu were obtained using (PZ)DGT coupled with laser ablation ICP-MS measurement, and the apparent diffusion fluxes across the interfaces were calculated using a numerical model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Monte Carlo analysis of megavoltage x-ray interaction-induced signal and noise in cadmium tungstate detectors for cargo container inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Park, J.; Kim, J.; Kim, D. W.; Yun, S.; Lim, C. H.; Kim, H. K.

    2016-11-01

    For the purpose of designing an x-ray detector system for cargo container inspection, we have investigated the energy-absorption signal and noise in CdWO4 detectors for megavoltage x-ray photons. We describe the signal and noise measures, such as quantum efficiency, average energy absorption, Swank noise factor, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE), in terms of energy moments of absorbed energy distributions (AEDs) in a detector. The AED is determined by using a Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that the signal-related measures increase with detector thickness. However, the improvement of Swank noise factor with increasing thickness is weak, and this energy-absorption noise characteristic dominates the DQE performance. The energy-absorption noise mainly limits the signal-to-noise performance of CdWO4 detectors operated at megavoltage x-ray beam.

  2. Synthesize of Nano-- Tungstate Calcium and Study of Fluorescence%纳米钨酸钙的制备及荧光性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雯雯; 王磊; 牛锛

    2012-01-01

    This topic focuses on nano--CaWO4 by hydro--thermal synthesis through taking the citric acid as capping agent. The TEM and XRD results indicate the most superior conditions to attain the product is: pH is 7, the amount of surfactant used is 1 : 4, the final appearance of product is rod, which is remarkably influenced by the amount of surfactant used. When the certain amuont of rare earth ion adding to the sample, it will not change the structure and the appearance of nano--CaWO4, when the amount of Ce3+ is 2% and Eu3+ is 4%, it will improve the fluorescence performance.%以柠檬酸为帽型剂的水热法合成纳米CaWO4,综合透射电镜照片及其XRD表征结果得出合成产品的最优条件为:pH为7、柠檬酸用量为1:4,此时产品形貌为棒状。其中,柠檬酸的用量对产品最终形貌的影响尤为显著。纳米CaWO4样品掺入一定量稀土元素离子不会改变其结构,当Ce3+含量为2%,Eu3+含量为4%时,明显提高纳米CaWO4的荧光性能。

  3. Potassium bis(μ-sulfato-1κO:2κO')bis[cis-dioxido-cis-bis(sulfato-κO)tungstate(VI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäffer, Susan Jeanne Cline; Berg, Rolf W.

    2005-01-01

    The title compound, K8[{WO2(SO4)2}2(μ-SO4)2], precipitated from a melt of tungsten trioxide and potassium sulfate in potassium disulfate. The W(VI) coordination sphere in the independent K4[WO2(SO4)3] moiety is completed by inversion symmetry, resulting in a dimer with two bridging sulfato ligands...

  4. Activation of Small Molecules by DyI_2 and Dy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The reactivities of dysprosium diiodide and metallic dysprosium toward small molecules are discussed.For instance,DyI2-induced silyl radical reactions are described.The combination of dysprosium diiodide and dichloromethane can serve as an effective methylene transfer reagent for cyclopropanation of unfunctionalized alkenes beyond that possible with other metal-dichloromethane systems.Furthermore,we report that the combination of chlorosilane and metallic Dy can also serve as an effective prom...

  5. Heterometallic octanuclear RE(III)3Ni(II)5 (RE = Dy(III), Gd(III) and Y(III)) clusters with slow magnetic relaxation for the dysprosium derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiyu; Ke, Hongshan; Lin, Shuang-Yan; Guo, Yang; Zhao, Lang; Tang, Jinkui; Li, Yun-Hui

    2013-04-21

    Reactions of rare earth benzoate and nickel perchlorate with a Schiff-base ligand, 2-([(2-hydroxyphenyl)imino]methyl) phenol (H2L), in the presence of triethylamine yielded three heterobimetallic octanuclear clusters of general formula [RE3Ni5L5(PhCOO)3(μ3-OH)5(μ3-OCH3)(CH3OH)4(H2O)]·xCH3OH·yH2O (RE = Dy(III), x = 4, y = 4 (1), RE = Gd(III), x = 5, y = 4 (2), RE = Y(III), x = 5, y = 3 (3)). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that the metal core of each cluster consists of two distorted [RE2Ni2O4] cubane-like moieties and a heterobimetallic triangular [RE2NiO2] unit, with RE ions arranged in a typical triangular fashion. Variable-temperature solid state magnetic susceptibilities of these complexes were measured in the temperature range 2-300 K and the results indicate that an overall ferromagnetic interaction among the metal ions is operative for compounds 2 and 3. Under zero external field, the Dy3Ni5 compound shows a frequency dependence of the out-of-phase (χ'') signals, which indicates slow relaxation of the magnetization.

  6. Poly[(6-carboxypicolinato-κ3O2,N,O6(μ3-pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato-κ5O2,N,O6:O2′:O6′dysprosium(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [Dy(C7H3NO4(C7H4NO4]n, one of the ligands is fully deprotonated while the second has lost only one H atom. Each DyIII ion is coordinated by six O atoms and two N atoms from two pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate and two 6-carboxypicolinate ligands, displaying a bicapped trigonal-prismatic geometry. The average Dy—O bond distance is 2.40 Å, some 0.1Å longer than the corresponding Ho—O distance in the isotypic holmium complex. Adjacent DyIII ions are linked by the pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate ligands, forming a layer in (100. These layers are further connected by π–π stacking interactions between neighboring pyridyl rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.827 (3 Å] and C—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions, assembling a three-dimensional supramolecular network. Within each layer, there are other π–π stacking interactions between neighboring pyridyl rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.501 (2 Å] and O—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions, which further stabilize the structure.

  7. Two new lithium uranyl tungstates Li 2(UO 2)(WO 4) 2 and Li 2(UO 2) 4(WO 4) 4O with framework based on the uranophane sheet anion topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbade, S.; Yagoubi, S.; Dion, C.; Saadi, M.; Abraham, F.

    2004-04-01

    Two new lithium uranyl tangstates Li 2(UO 2)(WO 4) 2 and Li 2(UO 2) 4(WO 4) 4O have been prepared by high-temperature solid state reactions of Li 2CO 3, U 3O 8 and WO 3. For each compound, the crystal structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction data, using a Brucker diffractometer, equipped with a SMART CCD detector and Mo Kα radiation. The crystal structures were solved at room temperature by direct methods followed by Fourier difference techniques, and refined by a least square procedure on the basis of F2 for all independent reflections, to R1=0.035 for 65 refined parameters and 807 reflections with I⩾2 σ( I) for Li 2(UO 2)(WO 4) 2 and to R1=0.051 for 153 refined parameters and 1766 reflections with I⩾2 σ( I) for Li 2(UO 2) 4(WO 4) 4O. The crystal structure of Li 2(UO 2)(WO 4) 2 is formed by perovskite sheets of WO 6 octahedra, one octahedron thickness, connected together by (UO 5) ∞ infinite chains, and creating tunnels parallel to the c-axis. The lithium atoms are localized in the tunnels. The structure can be deduced from that of U MO 5 ( M=Mo, V, Nb) compounds by the replacement of half U atoms by Li. The crystal structure of Li 2(UO 2) 4(WO 4) 4O consists of UO 7 pentagonal bipyramids, UO 6 tetragonal bipyramids and WO 6 distorted octahedra linked together to form a three-dimensional framework creating paralleled channels filled with lithium cations. The structure can also be described by the stacking of layers with the uranophane sheet anion topology similar to those obtained in U MO 5 ( M=Mo, V, Nb, Sb) compounds with an ordered population of pentagons by U and Li and of squares by U and W. The measured conductivities are comparable to those of the better Li + ion conductor solid electrolytes such as LISICON or Li- β-alumina. Crystallographic data: Li 2(UO 2)(WO 4) 2, orthorhombic symmetry, space group Pbcn and unit cell parameters a=7.9372(15) Å, b=12.786(2) Å, c=7.4249(14) Å, ρcal=6.87(2) g/cm 3, ρmes=6.89(1) g/cm 3 and Z=4. Li 2(UO 2) 4(WO 4) 4O, monoclinic symmetry, space group C2/ c and unit cell parameters a=14.019(4) Å, b=6.3116(17) Å, c=22.296(6) Å, β=98.86(3)°, ρcal=7.16(2) g/cm 3, ρmes=7.25(3) g/cm 3 and Z=4.

  8. 碳修饰钨酸铋光催化降解水体中的邻苯二甲酸酯%Photocatalytic degradation of phthalic acid esters in water by carbon modified bismuth tungstate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高学鹏; 欧阳海平

    2013-01-01

    Carbon modified Bi2 WO6 (C-Bi2 WO6 ) catalyst was synthesized by hydrothermal car-bonization of glucose (C6 H12 O6 ) in the presence of Bi(NO3 )3・5H2 O and Na2 WO4・2H2 O as raw materials .The catalytic performance of as-prepared C-Bi2 WO6 catalyst for the photocatalytic degradation of three kinds of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in water was evaluated .Results show that C-Bi2 WO6 exhibits better photocatalytic performance than Bi2 WO6 ;and in particular ,C-Bi2 WO6 obtained under C6 H12 O6 to Na2 WO4・2H2 O mass ratio of about 10∶100 possesses the best photocatalytic activity towards PAEs degradation .In the meantime ,the best degradation efficiency is obtained at a PAEs pH of 6 ,and the initial concentration of PAEs also has a cer-tain degree of effect on the photocatalytic degradation of PAEs .%  以Bi(NO3)3・5H2 O、Na2 WO4・2H2 O为反应物,采用水热法,经由葡萄糖炭化合成了碳修饰Bi2 WO6(C-Bi2 WO6)催化剂;考察了C-Bi2 WO6光催化降解3种邻苯二甲酸酯(PAEs)的催化性能。结果表明:C-Bi2 WO6对PAEs的降解效果优于Bi2 WO6,特别是在葡萄糖与Na2 WO4・2H2 O质量比约10∶100条件下得到的催化剂的催化性能最优。与此同时,当PAEs的pH =6时,降解效果最好;而PAEs的浓度也对PAEs的光催化降解有一定的影响。

  9. Study on Synergistic Effect of Tungstate and Benzotriazole on Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel%钨酸盐与BTA对碳钢协同缓蚀作用的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李燕; 奚旦立; 陆柱

    2003-01-01

    采用电化学阻抗谱方法研究了钨酸盐和苯并三氮唑(BTA)对碳钢的协同缓蚀作用.两者单独使用时钨酸盐的缓蚀作用比BTA显著,复配使用时表现出协同缓蚀效应,升高pH对协同缓蚀作用有利.此外还用表面分析法分析了碳钢表面膜,证明Na2WO4和BTA参与了表面膜的形成.

  10. Mechanism of Synergistic Effect of Corrosion Inhibition on Carbon Steel with Tungstate and Benzotriazole%钨酸盐与苯并三氮唑协同缓蚀机理的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李燕; 陆柱; 吴羡蓉

    2002-01-01

    采用静态挂片法研究了钨酸钠与苯并三氮唑(BTA)对碳钢的协同缓蚀作用.实验发现,在氯离子浓度为1.4×10-3mol/L的水中,钨酸钠与苯并三氮唑对碳钢没有明显的协同缓蚀作用;在同样氯离子浓度的水中投加6.2×10-5mol/L锌离子后,钨酸钠与苯并三氮唑总浓度为1×10-3mol/L、Na2WO4∶BTA=8∶2(摩尔比)时,碳钢的腐蚀速率比单独使用Na2WO4或BTA时有所降低,表明两者间有协同作用.利用BTA溶液的紫外-可见吸收光谱解释了锌离子的作用,根据极化曲线测定及碳钢表面膜的分析结果,对Na2WO4-BTA-锌离子的协同缓蚀机理进行了探讨.

  11. SYNERGISTIC EFFECT OF TUNGSTATE AND BENZOTRIAZOLE ON CORROSION INHIBITION OF X70 STEEL%钨酸盐与苯并三唑对X70钢协同缓蚀作用的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张付宝; 余晓鹏; 潘献晓; 肖亦; 李容; 蔡铎昌

    2006-01-01

    应用动电位扫描法和电化学阻抗法研究了钨酸盐和苯并三唑(BTA)在氯化钠介质中对X70钢的协同缓蚀作用.结果表明:X70钢在0.03%的NaCl溶液中的腐蚀为混合控制过程.Na2WO4·2H2O和苯并三唑均为阳极型缓蚀剂.在保持缓蚀剂总浓度为2×10-3mol/L时,Na2WO4·2HO:BTA为1:1时缓蚀率达最大,为83.01%.

  12. Study of the Complex of Tungstate and Benzotriazole as Inhibitor for Copper Corrosion by Photoelectrochemical and SERS Methods%复方钨酸盐对铜缓蚀协同作用的光电化学和SERS研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐群杰; 周国定; 陆柱; 田中群; 林昌健

    2001-01-01

    主要采用光电化学方法和表面增强拉曼光谱技术对具有环境友好性的钨酸盐与BTA复配使用对铜的缓蚀协同效应和作用机理进行了研究.实验表明Na2WO4对铜的缓蚀作用机理与BTA不同,在电位正向扫描过程中,光电流并不发生转型,其大小变化也不大;但在电位负向扫描过程中产生的阴极光电流峰值明显增大,缓蚀剂浓度越大,光电流越大,缓蚀效果越好.而Na2WO4与BTA复配使用时具有较好的协同效应,光电化学和SERS结果都说明其协同机理为两者都能对铜的缓蚀产生作用,前者能促使电极表面产生的铜的氧化物增多;后者能与铜(Ⅰ)生成聚合物膜.

  13. 电化学交流阻抗法研究钨酸盐与BTA的协同缓蚀作用%EIS STUDY ON SYNERGISTIC EFFECT OF TUNGSTATE AND BENZOTRIAZOLE ON CORROSION INHIBITION OF CARBON STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李燕; 陆柱

    2001-01-01

    通过电化学阻抗谱技术和表面分析方法研究了钨酸盐和苯并三氮唑对碳钢的协同缓蚀作用.结果发现:在pH=9.0,氯离子浓度为5×10-3mol/L的水中,钨酸盐和BTA单独用作缓蚀剂对碳钢均有一定的缓蚀作用,钨酸盐和BTA具有协同缓蚀作用.提高溶液pH、降低氯离子浓度有助于增强钨酸盐-BTA复配缓蚀作用.复配缓蚀剂的缓蚀机理为WO24-与BTA分别与Fe3+和Fe2+发生反应生成稳定的膜覆盖于电极表面.

  14. Research on Rare-earth Tungstates Red Phosphors for White-light Emitting Diodes%稀土多钨酸盐红色荧光粉在白光LED中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾琦华; 张信果; 何沛; 梁宏斌; 龚孟濂

    2010-01-01

    利用高温固相法合成了Ca9Gd2W4O24:Eu3+和Sr9Gd2W4O24:Eu3+两个系列四钨酸盐体系以及Ca3La2W2O12:Eu3+二钨酸盐体系荧光粉,对比其荧光性能,结果发现此三种多钨酸盐荧光粉在395 nm的近紫外和460 nm的蓝光区都有较高的激发强度,与现有商业化近紫外光、蓝光LED芯片的发射光谱吻合,可以被这两种LED芯片有效激发,发射色纯度较高的红光,是潜在的紫光和蓝光转换型白光LED用红色荧光粉.Eu3+离子在Ca9Gd2W4O24和Sr9Gd2W4O24两个四钨酸盐体系中没有浓度猝灭效戍,而在Ca3La2W2O12二钨酸盐体系中的最佳掺杂浓度为40%.以其中性能优良的Ca9Eu2W4O24、Sr9Eu2W4O24和Ca3La1.2Eu0.8W2O12结合400nm发射的紫光InGaN芯片以及460nm发射的蓝光InGaN芯片制备LED器件,探讨稀士多钨酸盐红色荧光粉在白光LED中实际应用存在的优点和局限性.

  15. 特性Na离子吸附剂的制备及其从钨酸铵溶液深度除钠%Preparation of Na specific absorbent and application of sodium removal from ammonium tungstate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵中伟; 杨茂峰; 何利华; 张家靓; 陈星宇; 刘旭恒

    2014-01-01

    在Na2O-Al2O3-CaO-TiO2-P2O5体系中通过控制结晶合成了多孔吸附剂Na1.6Al0.6Ti1.4(PO4)3(NATP)。XRD分析表明,合成的玻璃体会弥散结晶为NATP和Ca9Al(PO4)7两相;通过酸浸可将Ca9Al(PO4)7相溶出,从而使主相NATP中留下大量孔道。实验研究了平衡时间、溶液pH和Na+浓度对吸附剂离子交换性能的影响。吸附动力学和平衡热力学研究表明,吸附过程可以很好地用准二级动力学方程和 Langmuir 等温方程进行描述。此外,在工业钨酸铵溶液中深度除钠的实验表明,除钠率高于97%,且循环实验表明该吸附剂具备良好的循环性能。%An adsorbent, Na1.6Al0.6Ti1.4(PO4)3 (or NATP), was prepared by controlled crystallization of glasses in the Na2O-Al2O3-CaO-TiO2-P2O5 system. The crystalline phases characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) show that the sample glasses crystallizes into two phases, i.e. NATP and Ca9Al(PO4)7, while the Ca9Al(PO4)7 phase can be leached selectively with HCl, leaving a massive number of pores in the material. Through the experimental research, the effects of contact time, solution pH, and the initial concentration of Na+on the cation exchange properties were investigated. The batch sorption kinetics and equilibria can be described by Pseudo-second-order kinetic equations and Langmuir isotherm equations respectively. Furthermore, the experiments with an industrial solution show that the removal rate of sodium from industrial (NH4)2WO4 is higher than 97%. Cycle experiment also shows that the NATP has a good cyclic performance.

  16. Optical Spectra of Yb(3+) in Crystals with Scheelite Structure. I. Explanation of the Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    Czochralski method at this laboratory, 1 6 with the exception of the LiYF4 samples.* For the tungstates and the molybdates, the melt composition...without remounting the crystal. 16R. M. Curnutt, Czochralski Growth of Tungstate and Molybdate Scheelites, Harry Diamond Laboratories HDL-TM-70-8...1970), 4249. (16) R. M4. Curnutt, Czochralski Growth of Tungstate and Molybdate Scheelites, Harry Diamond Laboratories HDL-TM-70-8 (July 1970). (17

  17. 10 CFR Appendix B to Part 30 - Quantities 1 of Licensed Material Requiring Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Cesium-135 10 Cesium-136 10 Cesium-137 10 Chlorine-36 10 Chlorine-38 10 Chromium-51 1,000 Cobalt-58m 10 Cobalt-58 10 Cobalt-60 1 Copper-64 100 Dysprosium-165 10 Dysprosium-166 100 Erbium-169 100 Erbium-171...

  18. 10 CFR 33.100 - Schedule A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... .1 Cesium-137 .1 .001 Chlorine-36 1 .01 Chlorine-38 100 1. Chromium-51 100 1. Cobalt-57 10 0.1 Cobalt-58m 100 1. Cobalt-58 1 .01 Cobalt-60 .1 .001 Copper-64 10 .1 Dysprosium-165 100 1. Dysprosium-166...

  19. Phase II Tungsten Fate-and Transport Study for Camp Edwards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    cubic meters degrees Fahrenheit (oF-32)/1.8 degrees Celsius (oC) feet 0.3048 meters gallons (U.S. liquid) 3.785412 E-03 liters inches 0.0254 meters...1 Desorption/dissolution of tungsten 451 39 8.1 2 Sorption of sodium tungstate and desorption/dissolution of tungsten and sodium tungstate 124

  20. Study on Magnetic Responsibility of Rare Earth Ferrite/Polyacrylamide Magnetic Microsphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ming; Wang Zhifeng; Zhang Hong; Dai Shaojun; Qiu Guanming; Okamoto Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    In inverse microemulsion, rare earth ferrite/polyacrylamide magnetic microsphere were prepared and their magnetic responsibility were studied by magnetic balance. Results indicate that the magnetic responsibility of microsphere relates to magnetic moment of rare earth ion, and it can be improved by the addition of dysprosium ion of high magnetic moment. Dysprosium content has an effect on magnetic responsibility of dysprosium ferrite/polyacrylamide magnetic microsphere. The microsphere displays strong magnetic responsibility when the molar ratio of Dy3+/iron is 0.20.

  1. Poly[hexaaquatri-μ-malonato-didysprosium(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Dy2(C3H2O43(H2O6]n, forms a coordination polymeric structure comprising hydrated dysprosium ions and malonate ligands. In the asymmetric unit, there are one dysprosium ion, one and a half malonate ligands, and three water molecules. Each DyIII atom is coordinated by six O atoms from four malonate ligands and by three water molecules, and displays a tricapped trigonal–prismatic coordination geometry. The malonate ligands adopt two types of coordination mode, linking dysprosium centres to form a three-dimensional coordination polymer. The extensive network of hydrogen bonds in this polymer enhances the structural stability.

  2. A Thermally Actuated Flux Pump for Energizing YBCO Pucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    antiferromagnetic, so heat pulses that go above and below 85 K should create a wave of magnetism across the face of the YBCO puck. The YBCO and dysprosium...temperature sensors were located at the centre and the outer perimeter on the surface of the dysprosium closest to the cold head, and on the side of the YBCO...outer perimeter of the dysprosium, the edge of the YBCO and the coldhead. In the following figures various curves are removed to give a clear picture of

  3. Maximum Permissible Concentrations and Negligible Concentrations for Rare Earth Elements (REEs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sneller FEC; Kalf DF; Weltje L; Wezel AP van; CSR

    2000-01-01

    In dit rapport worden maximaal toelaatbare risiconiveaus (MTR) en verwaarloosbare risiconiveaus (VR) afgeleid voor zeldzame aardmetalen (ZAM). De geselecteerde ZAMs zijn Yttrium (Y), Lanthanum (La), Cerium (Ce), Praseodymium (Pr), Neodymium (Nd), Samarium (Sm), Gadolinium (Gd), en Dysprosium (Dy

  4. Atomic physics: A strange kind of liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laburthe-Tolra, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Interactions between the magnetic dipoles of dysprosium atoms in an ultracold gas can produce a 'self-bound' droplet. This provides a useful isolated system for probing the quantum-mechanical properties of ultracold gases. See Letter p.259

  5. China Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Active demands from downstream industry drove the price rise of rare earth products in Chinese domestic marketrecently, particularly didymium and dysprosium products. Prices of other rare earth products remained stable.

  6. Luminescence investigation of Dy2O2S and Dy2O2SO4 obtained by thermal decomposition of sulfate hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RV Rodrigues; L Marciniak; LU Khan; JR Matos; HF Brito; W Strk

    2016-01-01

    The yellow emitting dysprosium oxysulfide (Dy2O2S) and dysprosium oxysulfate (Dy2O2SO4) compounds were prepared from the thermal decomposition of hydrated dysprosium sulphate. The materials were characterized by using thermogravimetry (TG/DTG), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopies. The thermal stability temperatures at around 1151 and 1313 K were determined for the Dy2O2S and Dy2O2SO4 materials, respectively. The photolumines-cence properties of the dysprosium oxysulfide were investigated, showing narrow emission bands assigned to the 4F9/2→6HJ intracon-figurational transitions of the Dy3+ion. The yellow emission color of this phosphor suggests that the Dy2O2S is a promising material for applications in LEDs.

  7. EST Table: BP124755 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BP124755 fbS20263 10/09/28 93 %/160 aa pdb|3C7T|A Chain A, Crystal Structure Of The Ecdyson...3C7T|C Chain C, Crystal Structure Of The Ecdysone Phosphate Phosphatase, Eppase, ...From Bombix Mori In Complex With Tungstate pdb|3C7T|D Chain D, Crystal Structure Of The Ecdysone Phosphate P...e Phosphate Phosphatase, Eppase, From Bombix Mori In Complex With Tungstate pdb|3C7T|B Chain B, Crys...tal Structure Of The Ecdysone Phosphate Phosphatase, Eppase, From Bombix Mori In Complex With Tungstate pdb|

  8. Yb3+ and Tm3+ doped KGdxLuyY1-x-y(WO4)2 channel waveguide lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geskus, D.; van Dalfsen, Koop; Aravazhi, S.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Pollnau, Markus

    Channel waveguides with high refractive-index contrast are fabricated in double tungstates. Yb3+ lasers with 71% slope efficiency and 418 mW output power are demonstrated. Tm3+ lasers at 1843 nm have also been demonstrated.

  9. OXIDATION OF CYCLIC AMINES BY MOLYBDENUM(II) AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    oC was recovered in sufficient amounts for elemental analysis, melting point and .... vapours in traps cooled using dry-ice/acetone slush bath to protect the pump. ... This treatment prevents precipitation of tungsten either as silver tungstate or.

  10. Syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties of a family of tetranuclear hydroxido-bridged Ni(II)2Ln(III)2 (Ln = La, Gd, Tb, and Dy) complexes: display of slow magnetic relaxation by the zinc(II)-dysprosium(III) analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtab, Sk Md Towsif; Maity, Manoranjan; Bhattacharya, Kisholoy; Sañudo, E Carolina; Chaudhury, Muktimoy

    2012-10-01

    A new family of [2 × 2] tetranuclear 3d-4f heterometallic complexes have been synthesized. These are [Zn(2)Dy(2)L(2)(μ(3)-OH)(2)(μ(4)-OH)(dbm)(2)(MeOH)(2)](NO(3))·2H(2)O·MeOH (3), [Ni(2)Dy(2)L(2)(μ(3)-OH)(2)(μ(4)-OH)(dbm)(2)(MeOH)(2)](NO(3))·MeOH (4), [Ni(2)La(2)L(2)(μ(3)-OH)(2)(μ(4)-OH)(dbm)(2)(MeOH)(2)](ClO(4))·H(2)O·2MeOH (5), [Ni(2)Tb(2)L(2)(μ(3)-OH)(2)(μ(4)-OH)(dbm)(2) (MeOH)(2)](NO(3))·MeOH (6), and [Ni(2)Gd(2)L(2)(μ(3)-OH)(2)(μ(4)-OH)(dbm)(2)(MeOH)(2)](NO(3))·MeOH (7), [H(2)L = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-3,5-dimethylbenzyl)ethylenediamine and Hdbm = dibenzoylmethane] obtained through a single-pot synthesis using [Zn(HL)(dbm)] (for 3)/[Ni(HL)(dbm)]·2CH(3)OH (for 4, 5, 6, and 7) as 3d-metal ion precursors. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectroscopy have been used to establish their identities. Compounds are isostructural, in which the metal ions are all connected together by a bridging hydroxido ligand in a rare μ(4)-mode. In complexes 3-7, the metal ions are antiferromagnetically coupled. Taking a cue from the results of 3 and 5, precise estimations have been made for the antiferromagnetic Ni···Ni (J(Ni) = -50 cm(-1)), Ni···Gd (J(NiGd) = -4.65 cm(-1)), and Gd···Gd (J(Gd) = -0.02 cm(-1)) exchange interactions in 7, involving the gadolinium(III) ions. The Zn(II)(2)Dy(III)(2) compound 3 has shown the tail of an out-of-phase signal in alternating current (AC) susceptibility measurement, indicative of slow relaxation of magnetization. Interestingly, the Ni(II)(2)Dy(III)(2) compound 4 in which both the participating metal ions possess large single ion anisotropy, has failed to show up any slow magnetic relaxation.

  11. 镝与二甘醇酸的配位聚合物的水热合成、晶体结构及荧光性质%Hydrothermal Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Fluorescence Property of Dysprosium Coordination Polymer with Diglycolic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳斌; 鞠艳玲; 李艳秋; 李夏

    2007-01-01

    A new lanthanide coordination polymer {[Dy2(dga)3(H2O)4]·2H2O}n was prepared by hydrothermal method with DyCl3·6H2O and diglycolic acid (H2dga), and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The complex crystallizes in Orthorhombic system, C2221 space group with a=1.773 5(11) nm, b =0.875 2(6) nm, c=1.504 3(9) nm, V=2.335 0(3) nm3, Dc=2.359 Mg·m-3, Z=4,μ=6.447 mm-1, F(000)=1 584.0, R=0.0507, wR=0.121 6. In the complex, there are two types of coordination environments for Dy3+ ion. One Dy1 ion is nine-coordinated by three diglycolato groups via six carboxyl oxygen atoms and three ether oxygen atoms. The Dy1 ion is in a distorted monocapped square-antiprism coordination geometry. Whereas the other Dy2 ion is eight-coordinated and the coordination sphere around each Dy2 ion consists of four carboxyl oxygen atoms from four diglycolato ligands and four oxygen atoms from four coordinated water molecules. The coordination polyhedron of Dy2 ion can be described as a distorted square-antiprism. Eight- and nine-coordinate Dy3+ ions are linked by diglycolato ligands to form a 2D network structure. The fluorescence spectral of the complex in solid state at room temperature shows that the diglycolic acid is suitable for the sensitization on the luminescence of Dy3+ ion. CCDC: 660435.%DyCl3·6H2O与二甘醇酸(H2dga)在水热条件下反应得到配位聚合物{[Dy2(dga)3(H2O)4]·2H2O}n,用X-射线衍射单晶结构分析方法确定了其晶体结构.该配合物的晶体属于正交晶系,C2221空间群.在配合物中,Dy3+离子存在两种类型的配位环境.九配位的Dy1离子与3个二甘醇酸根的6个羧基氧原子和3个醚氧原子配位,其配位多面体可描述为一个扭曲的单帽四方反棱柱;八配位的Dy2离子周围的8个配位氧原子形成一个扭曲的四方反棱柱配位多面体,其中4个氧原子来自4个二甘醇酸根,另外4个氧原子由4个配位水分子提供.二甘醇酸配体的2个羧基和其醚氧原子同时与Dy3+离子配位而形成2D网状结构.该配合物在室温下的固体荧光光谱显示了中心Dy3+离子的特征荧光,位于483 nm和574 nm的发射峰分别对应于Dy3+离子的4F9/2→6H15/2和4F9/2→6H13/2跃迁.

  12. 稀土金属 Dy 掺杂 TiO2光催化剂的制备及其对孔雀石绿降解性能的研究%Study on preparation of rare earth element dysprosium doped with TiO2 photocatalyst and its degradation property to malachite green

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高航; 高梅; 李松田; 马威; 吴晓兵

    2015-01-01

    To improve the oxidation efficiency of heterogeneous photocatalysis,TiO2 doped by rare-earth elements was adopted. The results indicate that:there was red-shift adsorption spectra of synthetic product which could enhance malachite green oxidative decolorization effectively under the action of normal visible light. Due to Dy3 + -TiO2 doped photocatalyst,activation energy of photooxidation was decreased so that the efficiency of photolysis could be improved significantly. What’s more,the treatment of malachite green model wastewater with Dy3 + -TiO2 was studied and optimal conditions has been determined as follows:the concentration of malachite green is 20 mg / L,molar ratio of Dy-doping is 1. 5% . Under that reaction con-dition,after 150 min,the decolorization rates of malachite green will be over 60% .%采用稀土元素掺杂法制备改性的二氧化钛,以改善非均相光催化的氧化效率。研究结果表明,在掺杂镝元素之后,产物的吸收光谱发生了红移,在可见光作用下,可以有效地促进孔雀石绿的氧化脱色。引入掺杂型光催化剂 Dy3+-TiO2后,可降低光氧化体系所需的能量,提高光解效率。以孔雀石绿溶液作为模拟废水,考察了 Dy3+离子掺杂量、底物浓度等因素的影响,确定了优化的实验条件:在孔雀石绿的浓度为20 mg/ L,稀土元素 Dy 掺杂量为1.5%(摩尔比)时,反应150 min 后孔雀石绿脱色率达到60%以上。

  13. N-对甲苯磺酰β-丙氨酸镝配合物的合成、晶体结构及抑菌活性%Synthesis crystal structure and antibacterial activity of dysprosium complex with N-p-tolysulfonyl-β-Alanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李森兰; 马录芳; 王利亚; 黄世稳; 韦启后; 梁福沛; 张漫波

    2005-01-01

    稀土由于其特殊的电子结构,容易与一些中性、酸性和碱性生物配体形成配合物。本文合成并测定了对甲苯磺酰β-丙氨酸与稀土镝配合物的晶体结构及抑菌活性。

  14. Bis[μ-2-(4-hydroxyphenylacetato]-κ3O,O′:O;κ3O:O,O′-bis{aqua(4,4′-bipyridine-κNbis[2-(4-hydroxyphenylacetato-κ2O,O′]dysprosium(III} monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Lu Liu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the title dinuclear complex, [Dy2(C8H7O36(C10H8N22(H2O2]·H2O, the DyIII atoms are coordinated by eight O atoms from four 2-(4-hydroxyphenylacetate (HPAA ligands and a water molecule, and one N atom from a 4,4′-bipyridine (bipy ligand in a distorted tricapped trigonal prismatic geometry. Whereas four HPAA ligands coordinate to just two DyIII atoms, the remaining two ligands bridge the two DyIII atoms. In the crystal, O—H...O and O—H...N hydrogen bonds link the molecules into a three-dimensional network.

  15. A study of electron excitations in CaWO sub 4 and PbWO sub 4 single crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Muerk, V; Mihoková, E; Nitsch, K

    1997-01-01

    The excitation spectra of photo- and thermo-luminescence were compared in the VUV-UV spectral region in CaWO sub 4 and PbWO sub 4 scheelite tungstates. Temperature dependences of emission intensities and decay times were measured for PbWO sub 4 in the 80-300 K range and approximated by a simple phenomenological model. The energy level structure of the emission centre excited state and related kinetic processes are discussed for both tungstates. (author)

  16. China’s Tungsten Resources Supply and Demand Situation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>China’s production of tungsten products mainly includes tungsten ore concentrates and a series of intermediate tungsten products such as ferro-tungsten, tungstic acid, sodium tungstate, calcium tungstate, tungsten trioxide, tungsten blue oxide, ammonium paratungstate, ammonium metatungstate, tungsten powder etc. During the period between 1949-1997, China produced 1.85 million tons of tungsten ore concentrates, in which 873,000 tons were exported with US$3.1 billion in value.

  17. Process for the recovery of tungsten in a pure form from tungsten-containing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchter, M.; Moscovici, A.

    1986-12-16

    A process is described for the recovery of tungsten from tungsten-containing materials which comprises the steps of (i) admixing the tungsten-containing material with a melt at a temperature of between 680/sup 0/C and 750/sup 0/C. The melt consists of a salt selected from the group consisting of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite and mixtures thereof in a substantially stoichiometrical amount to the tungsten constituent of the tungsten-containing material. This is done to disintegrate the tungsten-containing material and to form sodium tungstate, cooling the melt, and leaching the cooled melt with water to obtain an aqueous solution of sodium tungstate; (ii) admixing a solution of calcium chloride with the aqueous solution of sodium tungstate at a temperature of between 40/sup 0/C and 95/sup 0/C to form a calcium tungstate precipitate and separating the calcium tungstate; (iii) admixing the calcium tungstate with a preheated concentrated hydrochloric acid solution to form a tungstic acid precipitate and a CaCl/sub 2/ solution having a concentration of between 80 g/l and 180 g/l free HCl and separating the tungstic acid precipitate and obtaining tungstic acid which is substantially free of calcium ions, and (iv) calcining the tungstic acid to convert it to tungstic oxide and reducing the tungstic oxide to form metallic tungsten.

  18. Dispersion and consolidation of WO{sub x}-doped zirconia from zirconium tungstate and triethanolamine in aqueous medium; Dispersao e consolidacao de zirconia dopada com WO{sub x} a partir do tungstato de zirconio e trietanolamina em meio aquoso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, M.; Zorzi, J.E.; Perottoni, C.A., E-mail: jezorzi@ucs.br [Universidade de Caxias do Sul (UCS), RS (Brazil); Machado, G. [Centro de Tecnologias Estrategicas do Nordeste, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    In recent studies, it was possible to produce hydrous zirconia nanoparticles with crystallite sizes as small as 2 nm from ZrW{sub 2} O{sub 8} powder with initial particle size of 1.7 μm in an aqueous medium. The zirconia nanoparticles formed transparent polycrystalline aggregates. However, the controlled production of transparent zirconia solids by centrifugation of stable suspensions, deagglomerated in the moment of the synthesis, has not been explored yet. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate the dispersion and consolidation of hydrous zirconia nanoparticles produced from ZrW{sub 2} O{sub 8} , in aqueous medium and using triethanolamine (TEOA) as surfactant, and to understand the effect of experimental conditions on the tungsten content in the consolidated solids. The synthesis and dispersion were carried out in aqueous medium at 80 °C with the use of NaOH and TEOA; the colloidal solutions were dialysed, their pH values were adjusted to 6, and then ultracentrifuged at 28000 rpm for 24 h. It has been found that the use of TEOA in the synthesis allowed obtaining stable sols of zirconia nanoparticles which, after centrifugation, originated transparent and yellowish solids that were characterized using various techniques (scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and simultaneous thermal analysis). Although TEOA assists in the dispersion of nanoparticles, it interfered in the synthesis mechanism, leading to the production of zirconia doped with WO{sub x} , with tungsten concentrations that varied depending on the experimental conditions employed. (author)

  19. Poly[hexa-aqua-tri-μ-malonato-didysprosium(III)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhan-Qiang; Zeng, Rong-Hua; Song, Zhao-Feng; Yang, Mei

    2008-06-07

    The title compound, [Dy(2)(C(3)H(2)O(4))(3)(H(2)O)(6)](n), forms a coordination polymeric structure comprising hydrated dysprosium ions and malonate ligands. In the asymmetric unit, there are one dysprosium ion, one and a half malonate ligands, and three water mol-ecules. Each Dy(III) atom is coordinated by six O atoms from four malonate ligands and by three water mol-ecules, and displays a tricapped trigonal-prismatic coordination geometry. The malonate ligands adopt two types of coordination mode, linking dysprosium centres to form a three-dimensional coordination polymer. The extensive network of hydrogen bonds in this polymer enhances the structural stability.

  20. Poly[hexa­aqua­tri-μ-malonato-didysprosium(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhan-Qiang; Zeng, Rong-Hua; Song, Zhao-Feng; Yang, Mei

    2008-01-01

    The title compound, [Dy2(C3H2O4)3(H2O)6]n, forms a coordination polymeric structure comprising hydrated dysprosium ions and malonate ligands. In the asymmetric unit, there are one dysprosium ion, one and a half malonate ligands, and three water mol­ecules. Each DyIII atom is coordinated by six O atoms from four malonate ligands and by three water mol­ecules, and displays a tricapped trigonal–prismatic coordination geometry. The malonate ligands adopt two types of coordination mode, linking dysprosium centres to form a three-dimensional coordination polymer. The extensive network of hydrogen bonds in this polymer enhances the structural stability. PMID:21202748

  1. Poly[hexa­aqua­tri-μ-malonato-didysprosium(III)

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The title compound, [Dy2(C3H2O4)3(H2O)6]n, forms a coordination polymeric structure comprising hydrated dysprosium ions and malonate ligands. In the asymmetric unit, there are one dysprosium ion, one and a half malonate ligands, and three water molecules. Each DyIII atom is coordinated by six O atoms from four malonate ligands and by three water molecules, and displays a tricapped trigonal–prismatic coordination geometry. The malonate ligands adopt two types of coordination mode, linkin...

  2. Photoluminescence, trap states and thermoluminescence decay process study of Ca2MgSi2O7 : Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravi Shrivastava; Jagjeet Kaur; Vikas Dubey; Beena Jaykumar

    2014-06-01

    Europium and dysprosium-doped calcium magnesium silicate powder with different concentrations of dysprosium were synthesized using solid-state reaction. The Fourier transform infrared (FT–IR) spectra confirmed the proper preparation of the sample. The prepared phosphors were characterized using photoluminescence excitation and emission spectra. Prominent green colour emission was obtained under ultraviolet excitation. The thermoluminescence glow curves of the samples were measured at various delay times. With increased delay time, the intensity of the thermoluminescence peak decays and the position of the thermoluminescence peak shifts towards higher temperature, indicating the considerable retrapping associated with general order kinetics.

  3. Anthocyanins facilitate tungsten accumulation in Brassica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, K.L.

    2002-11-01

    Accumulation of molybdenum in Brassica was recently found to be correlated with anthocyanin content, involving the formation of a blue complex. Here the role of anthocyanins in tungsten sequestration was investigated using three species of Brassica: B. rapa (cv. Fast plants), B. juncea (Indian mustard) and B. oleracea (red cabbage). Seedlings of B. rapa and B. juncea turned blue when supplied with colourless tungstate. The blue compound co-localized with anthocyanins in the peripheral cell layers, and the degree of blueness was correlated with anthocyanin content. The direct involvement of anthocyanins in the blue coloration was evident when purified anthocyanins showed a colour change from pink to blue in vitro upon addition of tungstate, over a wide pH range. Anthocyanin production was upregulated 3-fold by W in B. juncea, possibly reflecting a function for anthocyanins in W tolerance or sequestration. The presence of anthocyanins facilitated W accumulation in B. rapa: anthocyanin-containing seedlings accumulated 3-fold more W than an anthocyaninless mutant. There was no correlation between anthocyanin content and W tolerance under these conditions. The nature of the interaction between anthocyanins and tungstate was investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed no change in the local chemical environment of Wupon uptake of tungstate by the plant; HPLC analysis of purified anthocyanin with or without tungstate showed no peak shift after metal treatment.

  4. Development of a new electrolyte matrix for MCFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, I.; Higaki, K.; Terada, S.; Suemitsu, T. [Akashi Technical Institute (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    To prolong the life of cell is one of the most important issues for MCFC to be brought into actual application. In this respect, investigators have been proposing the addition of tungstate salt such as K2WO4 into MCFC electrolyte, which is supposed effectively to reduce the sintering of anode probably by precipitates formed through the reduction of tungstate with dissolved hydrogen near the anode surface. In this research, such effect upon sintering of anode was quantitatively examined by out-of-cell tests and the validity of above assumption for the mechanism was confirmed. Also other effects of tungstate salt addition into electrolyte, such upon corrosion of separator, solubility of cathode, stability of matrix substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}) were investigated.

  5. Surface morphology, composition and thermal behavior of tungsten-containing anodic spark coatings on aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukiyanchuk, I.V.; Rudnev, V.S.; Kuryavyi, V.G.; Boguta, D.L.; Bulanova, S.B.; Gordienko, P.S

    2004-01-01

    Anodic spark coatings on aluminium alloy were prepared in aqueous electrolytes with sodium tungstate. The influence of boric acid addition in the electrolyte on the surface morphology, elemental and phase composition of the coatings was investigated. In both cases the coatings contained O, Al and W. The coatings obtained in electrolyte with boric acid and sodium tungstate contain also B at approximately 1 at.%. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the coatings had three layers: the grey underlayer of anodic alumina, the second black layer of crystalline or amorphous aluminium tungstate agglomerated into fibers and the outer green layer of WO{sub 3}. It was proposed that isopoly- and heteropolyanions in the electrolyte used take part in the coating growth.

  6. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC transporter HI1470/71 through its cognate molybdate periplasmic binding protein, MolA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C; Pinkett, Heather W

    2011-11-09

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB(2)C(2) (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 Å resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The ∼100 μM binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate. The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus.

  7. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC Transporter HI1470/71 through Its Cognate Molybdate Periplasmic Binding Protein, MolA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C.; Pinkett, Heather W. (CIT); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB{sub 2}C{sub 2} (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The {approx}100 {mu}M binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate. The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus.

  8. Structure–acidity correlation of supported tungsten(VI)-oxo-species: FT-IR and TPD studies of adsorbed pyridine and catalytic decomposition of 2-propanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaki, M.I., E-mail: mizaki@mu.edu.eg; Mekhemer, G.A.H.; Fouad, N.E.; Rabee, A.I.M.

    2014-07-01

    The amount of 10 wt%-WO{sub 3} was supported on alumina, titania or silica by impregnation with aqueous solution of ammonium paratungstate and subsequent calcination at 500 °C for 10 h. Tungstate-related chemical and physical changes in the calcination products were resolved by ex-situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Nature of exposed surface acid sites were probed by in-situ IR spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine (Py) molecules at room temperature (RT). The relative strength of the acid sites thus probed was gauged by combining results of temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) measurements of the RT-adsorbed Py with those communicated by in-situ IR spectra of residual Py on the surface after a brief thermoevacuation at high temperatures (100–300 °C). Reactivity of the surface acid sites was tested toward 2-propanal catalytic decomposition, and observed by in-situ IR gas phase spectra. Results obtained were correlated with predominant structures assumed by the supported tungstate species. Accordingly, polymerization of the supported tungstate into 2-/3-dimensional structures, was found to be relatively most advanced on favorable locations of titania surfaces as compared to the case on alumina or silica surfaces. Consequently, the Lewis acidity was strengthened, and strong Bronsted acidity was evolved, leading to a 2-propanol dehydration catalyst (tungstate/titania) of optimal activity and selectivity. Strong tungstate/support interfacial interactions were found to hamper the formation of the strongly acidic and catalytically active polymeric structures of the supported tungstate (i.e., the case on alumina or silica).

  9. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  10. Rare Earths; The Fraternal Fifteen (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. [Iowa State University; Ames Laboratory

    1966-01-01

    Rare earths are a set of 15 elements: lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium and lutetium. They are not rare and not earths; they are metals and quite abundant. They are studied to develop commercial products which are beneficial to mankind, and because some rare earths are important to fission products.

  11. An organometallic sandwich lanthanide single-ion magnet with an unusual multiple relaxation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeletic, Matthew; Lin, Po-Heng; Le Roy, Jennifer J; Korobkov, Ilia; Gorelsky, Serge I; Murugesu, Muralee

    2011-12-07

    A dysprosium(III) sandwich complex, [Dy(III)(COT″)(2)Li(THF)(DME)], was synthesized using 1,4-bis(trimethylsilyl)cyclooctatetraenyl dianion (COT″). The complex behaves as a single-ion magnet and demonstrates unusual multiple relaxation modes. The observed relaxation pathways strongly depend on the applied static dc fields.

  12. On the use of Liouville relaxation supermatrices in Mössbauer studies. III : Application to Mössbauer relaxation in superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann-Boutron, F.

    1980-01-01

    Wagner et al. recently studied the Mössbauer relaxation of paramagnetic dysprosium as an impurity in superconducting thorium. In connection with this study, we have derived simple formulas for interpreting relaxation effects in 2+ 0+ Mössbauer transitions of rare earth ions in superconductors.

  13. High-pressure synthesis of {nu}-DyBO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emme, H.; Huppertz, H. [Dept. Chemie und Biochemie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    {nu}-Dysprosium borate ({nu}-DyBO{sub 3}) was synthesized under conditions of high temperature and pressure in a Walker-type multi-anvil apparatus at 3 GPa and 1323 K. The compound is isotypic with the already known {nu}-samarium and {nu}-europium orthoborates. (orig.)

  14. Note: Simple means for selective removal of the 365 nm line from the Hg spectrum using Dy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; Chorkendorff, Ib; Brock-Nannestad, T.

    2011-01-01

    The emission spectrum of mercury has a notable line at about 365 nm under both low and medium-high pressure conditions. A simple filter based on a solution of dysprosium ions, Dy3+, is shown to be very useful for applications of Hg-light sources where this line is unwanted. The presented filter i...

  15. Benzoxazole-based heterometallic dodecanuclear complex [Dy(III)4Cu(II)8] with single-molecule-magnet behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasco, Olga; Novitchi, Ghenadie; Jeanneau, Erwann; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Luneau, Dominique

    2011-08-15

    Three Cu-Ln (Ln = Dy, Gd, Y) dodecanuclear clusters assembled by a novel ligand of the benzoxazole type are reported. The dysprosium cluster exhibits a frequency dependence of the alternating-current susceptibility and hysteresis loop at low temperature, indicating single-molecule-magnet behavior.

  16. Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ RE Market Dec. 10-20 Price of Pr-Nd oxide and Pr-Nd mischrnetal kept on rising in domestic market recently due to the tight supply of RE carbonate. Short supply of ion adsorption clay in southern China did not affect the prices of dysprosium and terbium obviously.

  17. China Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    June 20-30, 2011 Prices of heavy rare earth products remained soaring. The same happened to dysprosium and its related products due to tight supply. Separation plants held tightly of europium oxide. Refining plants took a positive attitude toward the ma

  18. Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Rare earth market was inactive affected by sluggish demand for didymium mischmetal and dysprosium metal by NdFeB industry. Most enterprises were waiting to see what was going on with the industry. However, price of didymium oxide rose again and price of heavy rare earths kept strong. Price of Dy oxide and Yt oxide Kept on rising.

  19. Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ RE Market May 10-20 Learned from Inner Mongolia Rare Earth Association,domestic rare earth market was in good situation driven by high demand. Price of neodymium rose strongly. Dysprosium oxide and terbium oxide still hovered at the higher price level. Price of europia remained stable.

  20. Market Review RE Market April 20-30

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Driven by high demand, China rare earth market was in good situation. Dysprosium oxide and terbium oxide hovered at the higher price level. Price of Pr-Nd oxide kept upward.Price of SmEuGd rose on small extent.

  1. Infrared Transparent Selenide Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-14

    crystalline halides, silica and fluoride glasses, and chalcogenide glasses. Crystalline halides undergo plastic deformation and are hygroscopic...mainly for applications operating at wavelengths less than 3 microns. Silicate and fluoride glasses have been developed as optical fiber amplifiers...activity. Preferred rare earths includes praseodymium, neodymium, erbium, cerium , dysprosium, holmium, thulium, terbium, ytterbium or mixtures of

  2. Synthesis and structure of didysprosium complexes with a tetraketone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Luqin; Yang, Rudong

    1996-06-01

    Two novel didysprosium (Dy 2) complexes of 1,5-bis(1'-phenyl-3'-methyl-5'-pyrazolone-4')-1,5-pentanedione (H 2L), Dy 2L 3·2H 2O and Dy 2L 3·5DMF (DMF = dimethylformamide), have been synthesized. The crystal structure of Dy 2L 3·5DMF was determined by X-ray diffraction. Crystals are triclinic, space group P1¯, with a = 16.99(1), b = 17.970(9), c = 18.28(1) Å, α = 110.36(4), β = 101.47(6), γ = 111.11(5)°, V = 4533(9) Å 3, Mr = 2017.91, Z = 2, D x = 1.48 g cm -3, μ = 17.22 cm -1, F(000) = 2056, R = 0.074 with 3804 reflections used in the refinement. In the complex, each L bonds two dysprosium atoms with its two β-diketone groups. Two DMF solvent molecules bond to each dysprosium ion. The coordination number of the two dysprosium ions is eight. The eight oxygen atoms around the dysprosium ion make up a distorted square antiprism coordination polyhedron. The resonance structures of coordinated β-diketonates are also discussed. Different lanthanide ions may stabilize the specific structure.

  3. Scanning Electron Microscope-Cathodoluminescence Analysis of Rare-Earth Elements in Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Kawai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis was performed for neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) and samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnets to analyze the rare-earth elements present in the magnets. We examined the advantages of SEM-CL analysis over conventional analytical methods such as SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and SEM-wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectroscopy for elemental analysis of rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets. Luminescence spectra of chloride compounds of elements in the magnets were measured by the SEM-CL method. Chloride compounds were obtained by the dropwise addition of hydrochloric acid on the magnets followed by drying in vacuum. Neodymium, praseodymium, terbium, and dysprosium were separately detected in the NdFeB magnets, and samarium was detected in the Sm-Co magnet by the SEM-CL method. In contrast, it was difficult to distinguish terbium and dysprosium in the NdFeB magnet with a dysprosium concentration of 1.05 wt% by conventional SEM-EDX analysis. Terbium with a concentration of 0.02 wt% in an NdFeB magnet was detected by SEM-CL analysis, but not by conventional SEM-WDX analysis. SEM-CL analysis is advantageous over conventional SEM-EDX and SEM-WDX analyses for detecting trace rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets, particularly dysprosium and terbium.

  4. Material flow analysis of NdFeB magnets for Denmark: a comprehensive waste flow sampling and analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Komal; Schibye, Peter Klausen; Vestbø, Andreas Peter; Dall, Ole; Wenzel, Henrik

    2014-10-21

    Neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets have become highly desirable for modern hi-tech applications. These magnets, in general, contain two key rare earth elements (REEs), i.e., neodymium (Nd) and dysprosium (Dy), which are responsible for the very high strength of these magnets, allowing for considerable size and weight reduction in modern applications. This study aims to explore the current and future potential of a secondary supply of neodymium and dysprosium from recycling of NdFeB magnets. For this purpose, material flow analysis (MFA) has been carried out to perform the detailed mapping of stocks and flows of NdFeB magnets in Denmark. A novel element of this study is the value added to the traditionally practiced MFAs at national and/or global levels by complementing them with a comprehensive sampling and elemental analysis of NdFeB magnets, taken out from a sample of 157 different products representing 18 various product types. The results show that the current amount of neodymium and dysprosium in NdFeB magnets present in the Danish waste stream is only 3 and 0.2 Mg, respectively. However, this number is estimated to increase to 175 Mg of neodymium and 11.4 Mg of dysprosium by 2035. Nevertheless, efficient recovery of these elements from a very diverse electronic waste stream remains a logistic and economic challenge.

  5. Evidence for triaxial deformation near N=86 : Collective bands in Dy-152,Dy-153 and Ho-153

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelbe, DE; Twin, PJ; Beausang, CW; Cullen, DM; Curien, D; Duchene, G; Erturk, S; Finck, C; Haas, B; Paul, ES; Radford, DC; Rigollet, C; Smith, MB; Stezowski, O; Waddington, JC; Wilson, AN

    2002-01-01

    The N=86,87 isotopes of dysprosium and holmium have been investigated using the Eurogam II gamma-ray spectrometer. A new collective rotational band has been observed in Ho-153 and the previously observed nui(13/2) band in Dy-153 has been extended to much higher spin. Comparing these bands and

  6. Using T2-Exchange from Ln3+DOTA-Based Chelates for Contrast-Enhanced Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer with MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    specific ana - tomic features or dynamic processes. The most widely used MRI contrast agents consist of various chelated forms of Gd3þ where the...Vymazal J, Holla M, Frank JA. Dysprosium-DOTA-PAMAM dendrimers as macromolecu- lar T2 contrast agents - preparation and relaxometry. Invest Radiol

  7. Preparation, Structure Characterization and Thermal Decomposition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    The unit cell contains a dinuclear molecule of the title compound. ... The carboxylate groups are bonded to the dysprosium ions in two modes: chelating bidentate ..... 5 R.F. Wang, L.S. Li, L.P. Jin and S.Z. Lu,J. Rare Earths,1998,16, 149–152.

  8. Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Rare earth market went downward recently.Consumers worried about the continuous price falling in the following one month and were not active in the purchasing.Price of southern ion adsorption clay dropped as well,which consequently resulted in the falling of dysprosium and terbium.

  9. Systematic Study of the PbWO4 Crystal Short Term Instalibity Under Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Annenkov, Alexander; Chipaux, Rémi; Drobychev, Gleb; Fedorov, Andrey; Géléoc, Marie; Golubev, Nikolai; Korzhik, Mikhail; Lecoq, Paul; Ligun, A B; Missevitch, Oleg; Pavlenko, V B; Peigneux, Jean-Pierre; Singovsky, Alexander

    1997-01-01

    The effect of the irradiation on the lead tungstate ( PWO) scintillator properties has been studied at different irradiation facilities. Lead tungstate crystals grown with the tuning of oxides content in the melt to the stoichiometry of pure sheelite or sheelite-like type crystals and doped with heterovalent, trivalent and pentavalent impurities have been studied in order to optimize their resistance to irradiation. A combination of a selective cleaning of raw materials, a tuning of the melt from crystallization to crystallisation, and a destruction or compensation of the point structure defects has been used to minimize the short-term instability of PWO parameters under irradiation.

  10. EST Table: FS894763 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS894763 E_FL_ftes_16A22_R_0 10/09/28 91 %/139 aa pdb|3C7T|A Chain A, Crystal Structure Of The Ecdyson...ain B, Crystal Structure Of The Ecdysone Phosphate Phosphatase, Eppase, From Bombix Mori In Complex With Tun...gstate pdb|3C7T|C Chain C, Crystal Structure Of The Ecdysone Phosphate Phosphatas...e, Eppase, From Bombix Mori In Complex With Tungstate pdb|3C7T|D Chain D, Crystal Structure Of The Ecdysone

  11. Electroless Deposition of W-doped Ag Dendrites from HF Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Wei-Chun; MA Chuan-Li; CHANG Yan-Long; WANG Chun-Ming

    2008-01-01

    A simple method was developed for the preparation of W-doped Ag dendrites by using electroless deposition from hydrofluoride solution. The samples characterized by XPS, XRD, SEM and TEM techniques, show that the growth of silver is leading and can not be changed essentially by tungstate ions in the Ag-W binary system. A doping mode of W element was proposed, i.e., the doping of W may occur during silver deposition through chemi-sorption-chemical bonding of oxygen atoms of tungstate dimer with silver. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to determine the chemical bonding energy between silver and oxygen.

  12. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC transporter HI1470/71 through its cognate molybdate periplasmic binding protein, MolA

    OpenAIRE

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C.; Pinkett, Heather W

    2011-01-01

    molA(HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB2C2 (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7-Å resolution, respectively. The MolA binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate binding protein structurally solved. The ~100 μM binding affinity...

  13. Molecular dynamics and reverse Monte Carlo modeling of scheelite-type AWO4 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba) W L 3-edge EXAFS spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinko, Aleksandr; Bauer, Matthias; Timoshenko, Janis; Kuzmin, Alexei

    2016-11-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) and reverse Monte Carlo methods coupled with ab initio multiple-scattering extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) calculations were used for modeling of scheelite-type AWO4 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba) W L 3-edge EXAFS spectra. The two theoretical approaches are complementary and allowed us to perform analysis of full EXAFS spectra. Both methods reproduce well the structure and dynamics of tungstates in the outer coordination shells, however the classical MD simulations underestimate the W-O bond MSRD due to a neglect of quantum zero-point-motion. The thermal vibration amplitudes, correlation effects and anisotropy of the tungstate structure were also estimated.

  14. Tungsten based electrocatalyst for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, Joel B. [OSRAM SYLVANIA Inc., Global Tungsten and Powders R and D, Hawes Street, Towanda, PA 18848 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States); Smith, Sean P.E. [OSRAM SYLVANIA Inc., Global Tungsten and Powders R and D, Hawes Street, Towanda, PA 18848 (United States); Whittingham, M. Stanley [Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States); Abruna, Hector D. [Cornell University, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Ithaca, NY 14653 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    A barrier to the widespread use of fuel cells is their reliance on expensive and scarce platinum and other precious metal catalysts. We present a catalyst for hydrogen oxidation, prepared electrochemically from high-purity aqueous tungstate salt precursors. The 24-electron reduction of ammonium metatungstate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 6}[H{sub 2}W{sub 12}O{sub 40}]) yields a material with electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of hydrogen in acid electrolyte which approaches 25% that of platinum. Moreover, the tungstate catalyst is unusually tolerant to CO and H{sub 2}S contaminants in the fuel stream. (author)

  15. Dielectric Waveguide lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, Markus; Orlovic, V.A.; Pachenko, V.; Scherbakov, I.A.

    2007-01-01

    Our recent results on planar and channel waveguide fabrication and lasers in the dielectric oxide materials Ti:sapphire and rare-earth-ion-doped potassium yttrium double tungstate (KYW) are reviewed. We have employed waveguide fabrication methods such as liquid phase epitaxy and reactive ion etching

  16. The CMS ECAL Project - Overview and Status Report

    CERN Document Server

    Nessi-Tedaldi, F

    1999-01-01

    An overview is given of the Lead Tungstate ( PbWO4) electromagnetic crystal calorimeter for the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider ( LHC) at CERN in Geneva. This includes a description of the engineering design, the development of the calorimeter components, the read-out system and results obtained in particle beams.

  17. The electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Diemoz, M

    2003-01-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment is made of about 80000 lead tungstate scintillating crystals. This project aims to achieve an extreme precision in photons and electrons energy measurement. General motivations, main technical challenges and key points in energy resolution will be discussed in the following.

  18. An Inexpensive Device for Studying Electrochromism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; Puente-Caballero, Rodrigo; Torres-Perez, Jonatan; Bustos, Daniel; Carmona-Orbezo, Aranzazu; Sevilla, Fortunato B., III

    2012-01-01

    A novel procedure for the preparation of electrochromic WO[subscript 3] films from readily available materials is presented. It is based on the electrochemical preparation of potassium tungstate from tungsten filaments of incandescent light bulbs in a potassium hydroxide solution. Tungstic acid is then produced by proton exchange using a…

  19. The relationship between the molecular structure and ion adsorption on goethite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietra, R.P.J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Keywords:Ion adsorption modeling, goethite, iron oxide, CD-MUSIC, phosphate, arsenate, vanadate, molybdate, tungstate, sulfate, selenate.A study is presented on the adsorption of inorganic ions on goethite with emphasis on the adsorption of oxyanions. Experimental results for a range of oxyanions (P

  20. Surface Structure and Photocatalytic Properties of Bi2WO6 Nanolatelets Modified by Molybdena Islands from Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittmer, A.; Menze, J.; Mei, B.T.; Strunk, J.; Luftman, H.S.; Gutkowski, R.; Wachs, I.E.; Schuhmann, W.; Muhler, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a novel route of preparing molybdena-modified bismuth tungstates and their successful application in the photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction and the oxidation of glycerol. Hierarchically assembled monocrystalline Bi2WO6 nanoplatelets with a specific surface area of 10 m2/g were obt

  1. Integration of CMS-ECAL supermodules : electronic components (VFE cards) and supermodule overview

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Each ECAL supermodule (composed by 1700 lead tungstate crystals) contains 68 motherboards, connected, via flexible kapton cables, to the photodetectors of 25 crystals each. Signals belonging to groups of five crystals are amplificated and digitized by Very Front End (VFE) cards. Signals from the sensor capsules are routed to the VFE cards for temperature monitoring thermistors.

  2. Pressure-induced structural transformations in the molybdate Sc-2(MoO4)(3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paraguassu, W.; Maczka, M.; Filho, A. G. Sonza

    2004-01-01

    . The crystal to amorphous transition is irreversible. Our results point out that the amorphization process in Sc-2(MoO4)(3) may be due to a kinetic hindrance of a phase transition rather than due to chemical decomposition effects as have been proposed to occur for some molybdates and tungstates....

  3. WC@meso-Pt core-shell nanostructures for fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao-Yang; Ma, Chun-An; Chu, You-Qun; Jin, Jia-Mei; Lin, Xiao; Hardacre, Christopher; Lin, Wen-Feng

    2013-12-25

    We developed a facile method to synthesize core-shell WC@meso-Pt nanocatalysts by carburizing ammonium tungstate and copper nitrate via gas-solid reactions, followed by a Pt replacement reaction. The mesoporous nanocomposite displays higher activity and stability towards methanol electrooxidation than commercial Pt/C catalysts.

  4. Iodination of Alcohols over Keggin-type Heteropoly Compounds: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Reaction of TiCl4 with aqueous solutions of sodium tungstate and sodium ... All of above catalysts were characterized and identified by comparing their spectral .... must result in an increase in the anion charge, the anion basicity increased and ...

  5. The BTeV electromagnetic calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, T.; Butler, J.; Cheung, H.; Frolov, V.; Khroustalev, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mountain, R.; Stone, S.; Yarba, J.; Alexeev, S.N.; Batarin, V.A.; Goncharenko, Y.M.; Grishin, V.N.; Datsko, V.S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Fomin, Yu.V.; Kachanov, V.A.; Khodyrev, V.Y.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kormilitsin, V.A.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Leontiev, V.M.; Lukanin, V.S.; Maisheev, V.A.; Matulenko, Ya.A.; Meschanin, A.P.; Melnick, Y.M.; Minaev, N.G.; Mikhalin, N.E.; Mochalov, V.V.; Morozov, D.A.; Nogach, L.V.; Pikalov, V.I.; Semenov, P.A. E-mail: semenov@mx.ihep.su; Shestermanov, K.E.; Soloviev, L.F.; Solovyanov, V.L.; Ukhanov, M.N.; Uzunian, A.V.; Vasiliev, A.N.; Yakutin, A.E

    2002-11-21

    The electromagnetic calorimeter for a new Fermilab collider program named BTeV is based on lead tungstate scintillating crystals (PbWO{sub 4}). Various properties of crystals manufactured by Russian and Chinese companies were measured at the U70 accelerator in Protvino. A dedicated beam momentum tagging system was used to measure the energy and spatial resolution.

  6. Surface Structure and Photocatalytic Properties of Bi2WO6 Nanolatelets Modified by Molybdena Islands from Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittmer, A.; Menze, J.; Mei, Bastian Timo; Strunk, J.; Luftman, H.S.; Gutkowski, R.; Wachs, I.E.; Schuhmann, W.; Muhler, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a novel route of preparing molybdena-modified bismuth tungstates and their successful application in the photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction and the oxidation of glycerol. Hierarchically assembled monocrystalline Bi2WO6 nanoplatelets with a specific surface area of 10 m2/g were

  7. Theoretical study of loss compensation in long-range dielectric loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Pollnau, Markus; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    In this paper, a theoretical study of loss compensation in long-range dielectric loaded surface plasmon waveguides (LR-DLSPPs) is presented. Although extendable to other gain materials, rare-earth doped double tungstates are used as gain material in this work. Two different structures are studied

  8. Loss compensation in long-range dielectric loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Zouhdi, Said; Begaud, Xavier; Pollnau, Markus; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.

    Loss compensation in long-range dielectric loaded surface plasmon polariton (LR-DLSPP) waveguides has been theoretically studied. Rare-earth-ion-doped potassium double tungstates have been proposed as gain materials because of the elevated gain that they can provide, together with a favorable

  9. Loss compensation in long-range dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polariton waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Pollnau, Markus; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2011-01-01

    Loss compensation in long-range dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polariton waveguides is theoretically analyzed when rare-earth-doped double tungstate crystalline material is used as the gain medium in three different waveguide configurations. We study the effect of waveguide geometry on loss

  10. Comparison of x-radiation doses between conventional and rare earth panoramic radiographic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoczylas, L.J.; Preece, J.W.; Langlais, R.P.; McDavid, W.D.; Waggener, R.G. (Univ. of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The radiation dose to radiobiologically critical organs at various anatomic sites in a phantom was compared with the use of rare earth screen/film combinations and calcium tungstate screen/film combinations. Rare earth screens and films produced a reduction in dose up to 40% to 50% depending on the anatomic site.

  11. Energy transfer phenomena in lead sulphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that lead sulphate, PbSO4, shows Pb2+ emission with a large Stokes shift. Energy transfer has been observed from the Pb2+ ions to several luminescent centres, viz., tungstate, molybdate, vanadate and rare earths. No transfer occurs to the Pr3+ ion.

  12. WO3 nano-ribbons: their phase transformation from tungstite (WO3·H2O) to tungsten oxide (WO3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, Majid; Sahoo, Satyaprakash; Younesi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten oxide (WO3) nano-ribbons (NRs) were obtained by annealing tungstite (WO3·H2O) NRs. The latter was synthesized below room temperature using a simple, environmentally benign, and low cost aging treatment of precursors made by adding hydrochloric acid to diluted sodium tungstate solutions (Na...

  13. Tungsten biochemistry of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevers, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    Tungsten is the heaviest element that exhibits biological activity (atomic number 74), when it is present in an enzyme. It is taken up by cells in the form of tungstate, and it is subsequently processed into an organic cofactor referred to as tungstopterin, which is found as active center in several

  14. Material Flow Analysis of NdFeB magnets for Denmark: A comprehensive waste flow sampling and analysis approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Komal; Schibye, Peter Klausen; Vestbø, Andreas Peter

    2014-01-01

    Neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets have become highly desirable for modern hi-tech applications. These magnets, in general, contain two key Rare Earth Elements (REEs) i.e. neodymium (Nd) and dysprosium (Dy), which are responsible for the very high strength of these magnets allowing for consider......Neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets have become highly desirable for modern hi-tech applications. These magnets, in general, contain two key Rare Earth Elements (REEs) i.e. neodymium (Nd) and dysprosium (Dy), which are responsible for the very high strength of these magnets allowing...... of stocks and flows of NdFeB magnets in Denmark. A novel element of this study is the value added to the traditionally practiced MFAs at national and/or global level by complementing them with a comprehensive sampling and elemental analysis of NdFeB magnets, taken out from a sample of 157 different products...

  15. Magnetic Properties of the Dy1-xUxCo3 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupşa, Ileana; Petrişor, T.; Balasz-Mureşan, I.

    The magnetic properties of Dy1-xUxCo3 system were investigated in the 4.3-1150 K temperature range and magnetic field up to 120 kOe. The crystalline structure is rhombohedral of PuNi3 type. For x≤0.8, the samples exhibit a ferrimagnetic behavior. The uranium substitution for dysprosium leads to the decreasing of the exchange field and the reducing of the magnetization and the transition temperatures. The Co mean moments (1.9μB/Co for x=0) opposite to the dysprosium ones and the mean effective Co moments (3.75μB/Co for x=0) are gradually decreasing as Dy is replaced by uranium.

  16. Tetraanionic biphenyl lanthanide complexes as single-molecule magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenliang; Le Roy, Jennifer J; Khan, Saeed I; Ungur, Liviu; Murugesu, Muralee; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2015-03-02

    Inverse sandwich biphenyl complexes [(NN(TBS))Ln]2(μ-biphenyl)[K(solvent)]2 [NN(TBS) = 1,1'-fc(NSi(t)BuMe2)2; Ln = Gd, Dy, Er; solvent = Et2O, toluene; 18-crown-6], containing a quadruply reduced biphenyl ligand, were synthesized and their magnetic properties measured. One of the dysprosium biphenyl complexes was found to exhibit antiferromagnetic coupling and single-molecule-magnet behavior with Ueff of 34 K under zero applied field. The solvent coordinated to potassium affected drastically the nature of the magnetic interaction, with the other dysprosium complex showing ferromagnetic coupling. Ab initio calculations were performed to understand the nature of magnetic coupling between the two lanthanide ions bridged by the anionic arene ligand and the origin of single-molecule-magnet behavior.

  17. Spectroscopy of Neutron-Rich $^{168,170}$Dy: Yrast Band Evolution Close to the $N_{p}N_{n}$ Valence Maximum

    CERN Document Server

    Söderström, P A; Regan, P H; Algora, A; de Angelis, G; Ashley, S F; Aydin, S; Bazzacco, D; Casperson, R J; Catford, W N; Cederkäll, J; Chapman, R; Corradi, L; Fahlander, C; Farnea, E; Fioretto, E; Freeman, S J; Gadea, A; Gelletly, W; Gottardo, A; Grodner, E; He, C Y; Jones, G A; Keyes, K; Labiche, M; Liang, X; Liu, Z; Lunardi, S; Muarginean, N; Mason, P; Menegazzo, R; Mengoni, D; Montagnoli, G; Napoli, D; Ollier, J; Pietri, S; Podolyák, Z; Pollarolo, G; Recchia, F; Şahin, E; Scarlassara, F; Silvestri, R; Smith, J F; Spohr, K M; Steer, S J; Stefanini, A M; Szilner, S; Thompson, N J; Tveten, G M; Ur, C A; Valiente-Dobón, J J; Werner, V; Williams, S J; Xu, F R; Zhu, J Y

    2010-01-01

    The yrast sequence of the neutron-rich dysprosium isotope Dy-168 has been studied using multi-nucleon transfer reactions following the collision of a 460-MeV Se-82 beam and a Er-170 target. The reaction products were identified using the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer and the gamma rays detected using the CLARA HPGe-detector array. The 2+ and 4+ members of the previously measured ground state rotational band of Dy-168 was confirmed and the yrast band extended up to 10+. A tentative candidate for the 4+ to 2+ transition in Dy-170 was also identified. The data on this and lighter even-even dysprosium isotopes are interpreted in terms of Total Routhian Surface calculations and the evolution of collectivity approaching the proton-neutron valence product maximum is discussed.

  18. Development of a coprecipitation system for the speciation/preconcentration of chromium in tap waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatepe, Aslihan, E-mail: karatepea@gmail.com [Nevsehir University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, 50000 Nevsehir (Turkey); Korkmaz, Esra [Bozok University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, Yozgat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Elci, Latif [Pamukkale University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, 20020 Denizli (Turkey)

    2010-01-15

    A method for the speciation of chromium(III), chromium(VI) and determination of total chromium based on coprecipitation of chromium(III) with dysprosium hydroxide has been investigated and applied to tap water samples. Chromium(III) was quantitatively recovered by the presented method, while the recovery values for chromium(VI) was below 10%. The influences of analytical parameters including amount of dysprosium(III), pH, centrifugation speed and sample volume for the quantitative precipitation were examined. No interferic effects were observed from alkali, earth alkali and some transition metals for the analyte ions. The detection limits (k = 3, N = 15) were 0.65 {mu}g/L for chromium(III) and 0.78 {mu}g/L for chromium(VI). The validation of the presented method was checked by the analysis of certified reference materials.

  19. Development of bulk metallic glasses based on the Dy-Al binary eutectic composition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Lin; TIAN Rui; XIAO Xueshan

    2008-01-01

    A series of dysprosium-based ternary, quadruple, and quintuple bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) based on Dy-Al binary eutectic compo-sition were obtained with the partial substitution of Co, Gd, and Ni elements, for dysprosium. The results showed that the Dy31Gd25Co20Al24 alloy, which had the best glass forming ability (GFA), could be cast into an amorphous rod with a diameter of 5 mm. The GFA of alloys was evaluated on the basis of the supercooled liquid region width, γ parameter, the formation enthalpy, and the equivalent electronegativity difference of amor-phous alloys. It was found that the eutectic composition was closely correlated with the GFA of the Dy-based BMGs.

  20. Dysprosium carbide iodides Dy{sub 10}(C{sub 2}){sub 2}I{sub 18}, Dy{sub 4}(C{sub 2})I{sub 6} and Dy{sub 12}(C{sub 2}){sub 3}I{sub 17}; Dysprosiumcarbidiodide Dy{sub 10}(C{sub 2}){sub 2}I{sub 18}, Dy{sub 4}(C{sub 2})I{sub 6} und Dy{sub 12}(C{sub 2}){sub 3}I{sub 17}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattausch, H.; Hoch, C.; Simon, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    The title compounds are formed by reaction of DyI{sub 3}, Dy metal and C in stoichiometric amounts in closed Ta ampoules, Dy{sub 10}(C{sub 2}){sub 2}I{sub 18} at 930 C for 7 days, Dy{sub 4}(C{sub 2})I{sub 6} at 950 C for 6 days and Dy{sub 12}(C{sub 2}){sub 3}I{sub 17} at 900 C for 11 days as pure samples according to X-ray powder diffraction. Dy{sub 10}(C{sub 2}){sub 2}I{sub 18} crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}/c with a = 10.470(2), b = 17.152(3), c = 13.983(3) Aa and {beta} = 121.14(3) , Dy{sub 4}(C{sub 2})I{sub 6} in Pnnm with a = 13.622(3), b = 14.335(3) and c = 8.396(2) Aa, and Dy{sub 12}(C{sub 2}){sub 3}I{sub 17} in C2/c with a = 19.149(4), b = 12.069(2), c = 18.595(4) Aa, and {beta} = 90.54(3) . The crystal structure of Dy{sub 10}(C{sub 2}){sub 2}I{sub 18} is composed of Dy double octahedra centered by (C{sub 2}){sup 6-} groups (ethanide) with the iodide ions above the edges and the corners of the Dy{sub 10}(C{sub 2}){sub 2} units. In Dy{sub 4}(C{sub 2})I{sub 6} the Dy atoms form chains of trans-edge sharing octahedra with embedded (C{sub 2}) groups. In the structure of Dy{sub 12}(C{sub 2}){sub 3}I{sub 17} alternately cis-, trans-edge-condensed Dy{sub 6} octahedra centered by (C{sub 2}) groups occur. The iodine atoms surround the chains like in the M{sub 6}X{sub 12} cluster and interconnect neighboring chains. (orig.)

  1. Concepts for using trapped-flux bulk high-temperature superconductor in motors and generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.; Strasik, Michael

    2010-12-01

    We review previous concepts for using bulk high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in motors and generators and discuss methods for using trapped-flux (TF) HTSs in motors and generators that have been recently investigated in our laboratory. We examine the expected performance of a brushless motor/generator that uses TF bulk HTSs to provide magnetomotive force, where the stator windings are used to create the TF. A key feature is the use of dysprosium for the stator and rotor cores.

  2. Concepts for using trapped-flux HTS in motors and generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.; Strasik, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We examine the expected performance of a brushless motor/generator that uses trapped-flux (TF) bulk high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) to provide magnetomotive force, where the stator windings are used to create the TF. A key feature is the use of dysprosium (Dy) for the stator and rotor cores. We also examine methods to energize TF in HTS for generators used in pulsed-power applications.

  3. Concepts for using trapped-flux bulk high-temperature superconductor in motors and generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R; Strasik, Michael [Boeing Research and Technology, PO Box 3707, MC 2T-50, Seattle, WA 98124-2207 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We review previous concepts for using bulk high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in motors and generators and discuss methods for using trapped-flux (TF) HTSs in motors and generators that have been recently investigated in our laboratory. We examine the expected performance of a brushless motor/generator that uses TF bulk HTSs to provide magnetomotive force, where the stator windings are used to create the TF. A key feature is the use of dysprosium for the stator and rotor cores.

  4. Rare earth optogalvanic spectroscopy: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destro, Marcelo G.; Neri, Jose W.; Rodrigues, Nicolau A.S.; Silveira, Carlos A.B.; Riva, Rudimar [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/EFO), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Fotonica]. E-mail: destro@ieav.cta.br; Victor, Alessandro R. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The IEAv has special interest in the studies of rare earth isotope applications in laser medium and integrated optics as well as aerospace research. We are starting to work with Ytterbium, Erbium, Dysprosium and Neodymium laser selective photoionization research. This paper describes the preliminary results of emission and optogalvanic spectroscopy obtained from a Neodymium hollow cathode lamps. Furthermore these results were used to setup our laser systems to work to leads a Nd isotopes selective laser photoionization. (author)

  5. Rotating Magnetocaloric Effect in an Anisotropic Molecular Dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, Giulia; Roubeau, Olivier; Evangelisti, Marco

    2016-03-01

    In contrast to the mainstream research on molecular refrigerants that seeks magnetically isotropic molecules, we show that the magnetic anisotropy of dysprosium acetate tetrahydrate, [{Dy(OAc)3 (H2 O)2}2]⋅4 H2O (1), can be efficiently used for cooling below liquid-helium temperature. This is attained by rotating aligned single-crystal samples in a constant applied magnetic field. The envisioned advantages are fast cooling cycles and potentially compact refrigerators.

  6. Energy dependence of thermoluminescent response of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy, LiF:Mg and micro LiF:Mg,Ti in clinical beams of electrons by using different simulator objects; Dependencia energetica da resposta TL de dosimetros de CaSO{sub 4}:Dy, LiF:Mg e microLiF:Mg,Ti em feixes clinicos de eletrons utilizando diferentes objetos simuladores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravim, Amanda; Campos, Leticia Lucente, E-mail: abravin@ipen.b, E-mail: rsakuraba@einstein.b, E-mail: lcrodri@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sakuraba, Roberto K.; Cruz, Jose Carlos da, E-mail: rsakuraba@einstein.b, E-mail: josecarlosc@einstein.b [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    Yet not so widely applied in radiotherapy, the calcium sulfate doped with dysprosium (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy) is used in radioprotection and studies has been demonstrated its great potential for the dosimetry in radiotherapy. This work evaluates the energy dependence of the thermoluminescent answer of the CaSO{sub 4}:D, LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) and micro LiF:Mg,Ti in clinical beams of electrons by using water simulators, PMMA and solid water

  7. Surface analysis of model systems: From a metal-graphite interface to an intermetallic catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwolek, Emma J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-10-25

    This thesis summarizes research completed on two different model systems. In the first system, we investigate the deposition of the elemental metal dysprosium on highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and its resulting nucleation and growth. The goal of this research is to better understand the metal-carbon interactions that occur on HOPG and to apply those to an array of other carbon surfaces. This insight may prove beneficial to developing and using new materials for electronic applications, magnetic applications and catalysis.

  8. New Realities: Energy Security in the 2010s and Implications for the U.S. Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    of the main renewable energy technologies (RETs)—such as wind power or photovoltaics (PV)—used in electric power generation. Wind turbines , PV... turbines and e-vehicle motors, and neodymium is a light REE used in the same applications as dysprosium as well as in e-vehicle batteries. China supplies...energy sector. For example, supercomputing is a key component to seismic analysis; refineries are increasingly driven by Supervisory Control and Data

  9. Properties of strongly dipolar Bose gases beyond the Born approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Ołdziejewski, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    Strongly dipolar Bose gases can form liquid droplets stabilized by quantum fluctuations. In theoretical description of this phenomenon, low energy scattering amplitude is utilized as an effective potential. We show that for magnetic atoms corrections with respect to Born approximation arise, and derive modified pseudopotential using realistic interaction model. We discuss the resulting changes in collective mode frequencies and droplet stability diagram. Our results are relevant for recent experiments with erbium and dysprosium atoms.

  10. Thermokinetics of Liquid-Liquid Reaction of Dy(NO3)3 with Histidine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李仲谨; 陈三平; 房艳; 高胜利

    2003-01-01

    The thermokinetics of liquid-liquid reaction of dysprosium nitrate with histidine were studied using a microcalorimeter. On the basis of experimental and calculated results, three thermodynamic parameters (the activation enthalpy, the activation entropy and the activation free energy), the rate constant, three kinetic parameters (the activation energy, the pre-exponential constant and the reaction order) were obtained. On the basis of thermodynamics and kinetics, the formation reaction of the complex was discussed.

  11. China rare earth market review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Rare earth market remained weak recently. Dealings of light and heavy rare earth products were sluggish. Demand for didymium and dysprosium related products was soft and purchasers were not interested in replenishing their stocks. The market of NdFeB magnetic materials and phosphors remained inactive. Meanwhile, ceramic, catalyst and polishing powder industries were weak. Affected by global economical recession, export market of rare earth remained weak.

  12. China Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    November 20-30.2011 Weak demand resulted in the slack rare market. Consumers did not intend to rep earth enish inventories yet and transactions of rare earth products were stagnant. The market of didymium-related products was in the doldrums. Demand for dysprosium-related products was sluggish. Inquiries for europium oxide (99.9%) were few and dealings of the product were difficult.

  13. High Density Ion Implanted Contiguous Disk Bubble Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    of 0.504pm. A second melt producing films of (Sm1 2Lu 1.7Tm0 . 1( FeGa )5O1 2) was also developed for sub- micron bubbles. Data from films typical of the...Dysprosium film composition was to be (Sm0 .3 Dyl.1 Gd 0 .4Lu0 .7( FeGa ) 50 2) which would have magnetostriction coefficients of -2.8x10 6 and a mismatch of

  14. Single molecule magnet behaviour in a rare trinuclear {Cr(III)Dy} methoxo-bridged complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Car, Pierre-Emmanuel; Favre, Annaïck; Caneschi, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta

    2015-09-28

    The reaction of the chromium(iii) chloride tetrahydrofuran complex with the dipivaloylmethane ligand, the lanthanide alcoholic salt DyCl3·CH3OH and the 1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl)-ethane ligand resulted in the formation of a new trinuclear chromium-dysprosium complex. Magnetic investigations revealed that the new 3d-4f complex exhibits single molecule magnet behaviour.

  15. Glass microspheres for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conzone, Samuel David

    Radioactive dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres have been developed as biodegradable radiation delivery vehicles for the radiation synovectomy treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Once injected into a diseased joint, the microspheres deliver a potent dose of radiation to the diseased tissue, while a non-uniform chemical reaction converts the glass into an amorphous, porous, hydrated dysprosium phosphate reaction product. The non-radioactive, lithium-borate component is dissolved from the glass (up to 94% weight loss), while the radioactive 165Dy reacts with phosphate anions in the body fluids, and becomes "chemically" trapped in a solid, dysprosium phosphate reaction product that has the same size as the un-reacted glass microsphere. Ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA) chelation therapy can be used to dissolve the dysprosium phosphate reaction product after the radiation delivery has subsided. The dysprosium phosphate reaction product, which formed in vivo in the joint of a Sprague-Dawley rat, was dissolved by EDTA chelation therapy in 100 Gy) of localized beta radiation to a treatment site within the body, followed by complete biodegradability. The non-uniform reaction process is a desirable characteristic for a biodegradable radiation delivery vehicle, but it is also a novel material synthesis technique that can convert a glass to a highly porous materials with widely varying chemical composition by simple, low-temperature, glass/solution reaction. The reaction product formed by nonuniform reaction occupies the same volume as the un-reacted glass, and after drying for 1 h at 300°C, has a specific surface area of ≈200 m2/g, a pore size of ≈30 nm, and a nominal crushing strength of ≈10 MPa. Finally, rhenium glass microspheres, composed of micron-sized, metallic rhenium particles dispersed within a magnesium alumino borate glass matrix were produced by sintering ReO2 powder and glass frit at 1050°C. A 50 mg injection of radioactive rhenium glass

  16. Measurements and simulations on position dependencies in the response of single PWO crystals and a prototype for the $\\overline{P}ANDA$ EMC

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, Daniel Andreas

    The PANDA experiment, which will be located at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, aims at the study of strong interaction within the charm sector via antiproton- proton collisions. An essential component of the PANDA detector to achieve the ambitious physics goals is the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC). Reason for this is particularly its high detection efficiency for photons and electrons over a large dynamic range, since most of the expected physics channels are accompanied by secondary photons. The EMC is based on second generation lead tungstate scintillator crystals and thus features a very compact design and improved performance. To guarantee a homogeneous and precise energy and momentum response, an exact knowledge on the incident particle position is mandatory. In the scope of this work, non-uniformities in the light yield of single lead tungstate crystals with tapered geometry are investigated. This effect was studied with the SLitrani simulation package in comparison to a series ...

  17. First test of an enriched $^{116}$CdWO$_4$ scintillating bolometer for neutrinoless double-beta-decay searches

    CERN Document Server

    Danevich, F A; Giuliani, A; Konovalov, S I; Mancuso, M; de Marcillac, P; Marnieros, S; Novati, V; Pessina, G; Poda, D V; Polischuk, O G; Shlegel, V N; Tretyak, V I; Umatov, V I; Zolotarova, A S

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, a cadmium tungstate crystal scintillator enriched in $^{116}$Cd has been succesfully tested as a scintillating bolometer. The measurement was performed above ground at a temperature of 18 mK. The crystal mass was 34.5 g and the enrichment level ~82 %. Despite a substantial pile-up effect due to above-ground operation, the detector demonstrated a high energy resolution (2-7 keV FWHM in 0.2-2.6 MeV $\\gamma$ energy range), a powerful particle identification capability and a high level of internal radiopurity. These results prove that cadmium tungstate is an extremely promising detector material for a next-generation neutrinoless double-beta decay bolometric experiment, like that proposed in the CUPID project (CUORE Upgrade with Particle IDentification).

  18. First test of an enriched {sup 116}CdWO{sub 4} scintillating bolometer for neutrinoless double-beta-decay searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barabash, A.S.; Konovalov, S.I.; Umatov, V.I. [ITEP, National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Danevich, F.A. [MSP, Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Gimbal-Zofka, Y. [Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, CSNSM, Orsay (France); Linnaeus University, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Kalmar (Sweden); Giuliani, A.; Mancuso, M. [Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, CSNSM, Orsay (France); DISAT, Universita dell' Insubria, Como (Italy); Marcillac, P. de; Marnieros, S.; Novati, V.; Olivieri, E. [Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, CSNSM, Orsay (France); Nones, C.; Zolotarova, A.S. [DSM/IRFU, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Poda, D.V. [MSP, Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, CSNSM, Orsay (France); Shlegel, V.N. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Tretyak, V.I. [MSP, Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); INFN, Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2016-09-15

    For the first time, a cadmium tungstate crystal scintillator enriched in {sup 116}Cd has been succesfully tested as a scintillating bolometer. The measurement was performed above ground at a temperature of 18 mK. The crystal mass was 34.5 g and the enrichment level ∝ 82 %. Despite a substantial pile-up effect due to above-ground operation, the detector demonstrated high energy resolution (2-7 keV FWHM in 0.2-2.6 MeV γ energy range and 7.5 keV FWHM at the {sup 116}Cd double-beta decay transition energy of 2813 keV), a powerful particle identification capability and a high level of internal radio-purity. These results prove that cadmium tungstate is a promising detector material for a next-generation neutrinoless double-beta decay bolometric experiment, like that proposed in the CUPID project (CUORE Upgrade with Particle IDentification). (orig.)

  19. Graphene Q-switched Tm:KY(WO4)2 waveguide laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kifle, E.; Mateos, X.; Loiko, P.; Yumashev, K.; Yasukevich, A.; Petrov, V.; Griebner, U.; Aguiló, M.; Díaz, F.

    2017-04-01

    We report on the first Tm3+-doped double tungstate waveguide laser passively Q-switched by a graphene saturable absorber using a 12.4 µm-thick 3 at.% Tm:KY0.58Gd0.22Lu0.17(WO4)2 epitaxial layer grown on a (0 1 0)-oriented pure KY(WO4)2 substrate. This laser generated 5.8 nJ/195 ns pulses at 1831.8 nm corresponding to a pulse repetition frequency of 1.13 MHz. These are the shortest pulses achieved in passively Q-switched Tm waveguide lasers. The laser slope efficiency was 9% and the Q-switching conversion efficiency reached 45%. Graphene is promising for the generation of ns pulses at ~2 µm in Tm3+-doped double tungstate waveguide lasers operating in the MHz-range.

  20. Piezo-optic coefficients of CaWO4 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytsyk, B. G.; Kost', Ya. P.; Demyanyshyn, N. M.; Andrushchak, A. S.; Solskii, I. M.

    2015-01-01

    All components of the piezo-optic coefficient matrix of calcium tungstate crystals, belonging to the 4/ m symmetry class, are determined. The reliability of the piezo-optic effect measurements in CaWO4 crystals is achieved by determining each piezo-optic coefficient from several experimental geometries and is also based on the correlation of the absolute piezo-electric coefficients and the path-difference coefficients. The rotation-shear diagonal coefficients π44 and π66 and three principal piezo-optic coefficients π11, π13, and π31 are refined by the polarization-optical method. It is confirmed that both the interferometric and polarization-optical methods should be used to study the piezo-optic effect with high accuracy. The results show that calcium tungstate is a promising material for acousto-optical and photoelastic modulation.

  1. Synthesis of tungsten oxide nanoparticles using a hydrothermal method at ambient pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, Majid; Younesi, Reza; Guinel, Maxime J-F

    2014-01-01

    ) nanoparticles were synthesized using a simple and inexpensive low temperature and low pressure hydrothermal (HT) method. The precursor solution used for the HT process was prepared by adding hydrochloric acid to diluted sodium tungstate solutions (Na2WO4 center dot 2H(2)O) at temperatures below 5 degrees C...... of WO3 nanoparticles using this method is therefore a three step process: protonation of tungstate ions, crystallization of tungstite, and phase transformation to WO3. Furthermore, this process can be tailored. For example, we show that WO3 can be doped with cesium and that nanorods can also be obtained......Tungsten oxide (WO3) nanostructures receive sustained interest for a wide variety of applications, and especially for its usage as a photocatalyst. It is therefore important to find suitable methods allowing for its easy and inexpensive large scale production. Tungstite (WO3 center dot H2O...

  2. Bacterial transport of sulfate, molybdate, and related oxyanions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Barajas, Esther; Díaz-Pérez, César; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Cervantes, Carlos

    2011-08-01

    Sulfur is an essential element for microorganisms and it can be obtained from varied compounds, sulfate being the preferred source. The first step for sulfate assimilation, sulfate uptake, has been studied in several bacterial species. This article reviews the properties of different bacterial (and archaeal) transporters for sulfate, molybdate, and related oxyanions. Sulfate uptake is carried out by sulfate permeases that belong to the SulT (CysPTWA), SulP, CysP/(PiT), and CysZ families. The oxyanions molybdate, tungstate, selenate and chromate are structurally related to sulfate. Molybdate is transported mainly by the high-affinity ModABC system and tungstate by the TupABC and WtpABC systems. CysPTWA, ModABC, TupABC, and WtpABC are homologous ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type transporters with similar organization and properties. Uptake of selenate and chromate oxyanions occurs mainly through sulfate permeases.

  3. Measurements and simulations on position dependencies in the response of single PWO crystals and a prototype for the $\\overline{P}ANDA$ EMC

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, Daniel Andreas

    The PANDA experiment, which will be located at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, aims at the study of strong interaction within the charm sector via antiproton- proton collisions. An essential component of the PANDA detector to achieve the ambitious physics goals is the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC). Reason for this is particularly its high detection efficiency for photons and electrons over a large dynamic range, since most of the expected physics channels are accompanied by secondary photons. The EMC is based on second generation lead tungstate scintillator crystals and thus features a very compact design and improved performance. To guarantee a homogeneous and precise energy and momentum response, an exact knowledge on the incident particle position is mandatory. In the scope of this work, non-uniformities in the light yield of single lead tungstate crystals with tapered geometry are investigated. This effect was studied with the SLitrani simulation package in comparison to a series ...

  4. Organic solvent- and phase transfer catalyst-free oxida-tion of cyclohexanol to cyclo-hexanone with dilute H2O2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The oxidation of cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone with 30% aqueous hydrogen peroxide by using peroxotungstate complexes formed in situ from sodium tungstate dihydrate and various bidentate organic ligands as the catalysts, without organic solvents, halide and phase transfer catalyst has been carried out. The influence of 13 ligands on the oxidation is investigated. The maximum yield of cyclohexanone is obtained when using 1,10-phenanthroline (96%) and oxalic acid (95%) as the ligand. Very high yields (around 90%) have also been obtained for the instances of using salicylic acid, 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid, and 8-hydro- xylquinoline as ligands. A research to improve the reaction condition using cheap oxalic acid as the ligand indicates that the optimum condition is that the reaction mixture with a molar ratio of cycohexanol︰tungstate dihydrate︰oxalic acid︰30% H2O2=100︰2︰2︰120 was stirred at 85-90℃ for 12 h.

  5. First results of the experiment to search for double beta decay of 106Cd with 106CdWO4 crystal scintillator in coincidence with four crystals HPGe detector

    CERN Document Server

    Tretyak, V I; Bernabei, R; Brudanin, V B; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Cerulli, R; Chernyak, D M; Danevich, F A; d'Angelo, S; Incicchitti, A; Laubenstein, M; Mokina, V M; Poda, D V; Polischuk, O G; Podviyanuk, R B; Tupitsyna, I A

    2013-01-01

    An experiment to search for double beta processes in 106Cd by using cadmium tungstate crystal scintillator enriched in 106Cd (106CdWO4) in coincidence with the four crystals HPGe detector GeMulti is in progress at the STELLA facility of the Gran Sasso underground laboratory of INFN (Italy). The 106CdWO4 scintillator is viewed by a low-background photomultiplier tube through a lead tungstate crystal light-guide produced from deeply purified archaeological lead to suppress gamma quanta from the photomultiplier tube. Here we report the first results of the experiment after 3233 hours of the data taking. A few new improved limits on double beta processes in 106Cd are obtained, in particular T1/2(2nuECb+) > 8.4e20 yr at 90% C.L.

  6. Precipitation Synthesis, Characterization, Morphological Control, and Photocatalyst Application of ZnWO4 Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour-Mashkani, S. Mostafa; Maddahfar, Mahnaz; Sobhani-Nasab, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Zinc tungstate nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by a precipitation method in the presence of different polymeric surfactants. This study aimed to investigate the effect of different solvents and polymeric surfactants such as carboxymethyl cellulose, polyethylene glycol, and polyvinyl alcohol on the morphology, particle size, and crystal structure of the final product. The as-synthesized products were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques. Furthermore, the hysteresis loop of the zinc tungstate nanoparticles at room temperature revealed paramagnetic behavior. Photocatalysis results revealed that maximum methyl orange decolorization of 85% was achieved with ZnWO4 nanoparticles in 240 min under visible-light irradiation. The saturation magnetization, remanent magnetization, and coercivity of the ZnWO4 nanoparticles were 0.003 emu/g, 0.0005 emu/g, and 110 Oe, respectively.

  7. Advanced selective non-invasive ketone body detection sensors based on new ionophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyapalan, A.; Sarswat, P. K.; Zhu, Y.; Free, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    New molecules and methods were examined that can be used to detect trace level ketone bodies. Diseases such as type 1 diabetes, childhood hypo-glycaemia-growth hormone deficiency, toxic inhalation, and body metabolism changes are linked with ketone bodies concentration. Here we introduce, selective ketone body detection sensors based on small, environmentally friendly organic molecules with Lewis acid additives. Density functional theory (DFT) simulation of the sensor molecules (Bromo-acetonaphthone tungstate (BANT) and acetonaphthophenyl ether propiono hydroxyl tungstate (APPHT)), indicated a fully relaxed geometry without symmetry attributes and specific coordination which enhances ketone bodies sensitivity. A portable sensing unit was made in which detection media containing ketone bodies at low concentration and new molecules show color change in visible light as well as unique irradiance during UV illumination. RGB analysis, electrochemical tests, SEM characterization, FTIR, absorbance and emission spectroscopy were also performed in order to validate the ketone sensitivity of these new molecules.

  8. Last crystals for the CMS chandelier

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    In March, the last crystals for CMS’s electromagnetic calorimeter arrived from Russia and China. Like dedicated jewellers crafting an immense chandelier, the CMS ECAL collaborators are working extremely hard to install all the crystals before the start-up of the LHC. One of the last CMS end-cap crystals, complete with identification bar code. Lead tungstate crystals mounted onto one section of the CMS ECAL end caps. Nearly 10 years after the first production crystal arrived at CERN in September 1998, the very last shipment has arrived. These final crystals will be used to complete the end-caps of the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) at CMS. All in all, there are more than 75,000 crystals in the ECAL. The huge quantity of CMS lead tungstate crystals used in the ECAL corresponds to the highest volume ever produced for a single experiment. The excellent quality of the crystals, both in ter...

  9. Study on an Eco-Friendly Corrosion and Scale Inhibitor in Simulated cooling water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defang Zeng1

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a composite eco-friendly phosphate-free corrosion and scale inhibitor used in simulated cooling water has been developed by sodium polyacrylate, zinc sulfate, sodium tungstate, sodium gluconate and triethanolamine . The corrosion and scale inhibition rate were respectively evaluated by weight loss experiment , the static scale inhibition test and electrochemical test. The results indicated that the corrosion and scale inhibitor was consisted of polyacrylate 14ppm,zinc sulfate 3ppm,sodium tungstate 7ppm,sodium gluconate 2ppm and triethanolamine12ppm.The corrosion inhibition rate could reached 92.79%, and anti-scaling inhibition rate could reached 96.01%. The formula was efficient , phosphate-free and environmental, it would be widely used

  10. Raman crystal lasers in the visible and near-infrared

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EICHLERH.J.; GADG.M.A.; KAMINSKIIA.A.; RHEEH.

    2003-01-01

    Raman lasers based on potassium gadolinium tungstate and lead tungstate crystals pumped by a≈120 ps Nd: YAG laser at 1.064/μm were developed. High reflection mirrors for the Stokes wavelength have been used to generate near-infrared and eye safe spectral region of 1.15 - 1.32/μm. Second harmonic generation of the generated Raman lasers was observed. Eifficient multiple Stokes and anti-Stokes picosecond generation in 64 crystals have been shown to exhibit stimulated Raman scattering on about 700 lines covering the whole visible and near-infrared spectrum. All stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectrum are identified and attributed to the SRS-active vibration modes of these crystals.

  11. Raman crystal lasers in the visible and near-infrared

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Raman lasers based on potassium gadolinium tungstate and lead tungstate crystals pumped by a≈120 ps Nd: YAG laser at 1.064 μm were developed. High reflection mirrors for the Stokes wavelength have been used to generate near-infrared and eye safe spectral region of 1.15-1.32 μm. Second harmonic generation of the generated Raman lasers was observed. Eifficient multiple Stokes and anti-Stokes picosecond generation in 64 crystals have been shown to exhibit stimulated Raman scattering on about 700 lines covering the whole visible and near-infrared spectrum. All stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectrum are identified and attributed to the SRS-active vibration modes of these crystals.

  12. The textural properties and microstructure of konjac glucomannan - tungsten gels induced by DC electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixia; Zhuang, Yuanhong; Li, Jingliang; Pang, Jie; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-12-01

    Konjac glucomannan - tungsten (KGM-T) gels were successfully prepared under DC electric fields, in the presence of sodium tungstate. The textural properties and microstructure of the gels were investigated by Texture Analyzer, Rheometer and SEM. Based on the response surface methodology (RSM) results, the optimum conditions for KGM-T gel springiness is 0.32% sodium tungstate concentration, 0.54% KGM concentration, 24.66V voltage and 12.37min treatment time. Under these conditions, the maximum springiness value of KGM-T gel is 1.21mm. Steady flow measurement indicated that KGM-T gel showed characteristic non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behaviour, with low flow behaviour indexes in the shear thinning region. SEM demonstrated the porosity of the freeze-dried samples. These findings may pave the way to use DC electric fields for the design and development of KGM gels and to apply KGM gels for practical applications.

  13. Tungsten Speciation in Firing Range Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    thus are composed of single minerals. Iron minerals used in fitting included ferrihydrite, hematite , goethite, biotite, hornblende, and pyrite, which...tungstate adsorbing on ferrihy- drite. Ferrihydrite was selected for these tests as earlier X-ray microprobe studies indicated that this was the primary ...Camp Edwards soil profile 31T as a function of depth. The spectra all indicate that the primary coordination sphere of tungsten is dominated by

  14. China Report, Political, Sociological and Military Affairs, PRC State Council Bulletin, No. 13, 20 May 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    oil, liquid paraffin, naphtha, residue, heavy oil and liquid hydrocarbon. 13 Tungsten and tungsten Tungsten products refer to ammonium products...tungstate, tungstic trioxide, tungsten powder, tungsten carbide powder, and tungsten carbide powder for casting 14 Coal Includes raw coal, screened coal...Includes brass, bronze and red copper. products Copper products include various types of copper products, copper threads, copper wire and bare copper wire 36

  15. Hollow Sodium Tungsten Bronze (Na0.15WO3) Nanospheres: Preparation, Characterization, and Their Adsorption Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo Guanke; Guo He; Liu Hui; Zhang Jingyan; Hou Jing; Shen Guangxia; Cheng Ping; Guo Shouwu

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We report herein a facile method for the preparation of sodium tungsten bronzes hollow nanospheres using hydrogen gas bubbles as reactant for chemical reduction of tungstate to tungsten and as template for the formation of hollow nanospheres at the same time. The chemical composition and the crystalline state of the as-prepared hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres were characterized complementarily, and the hollow structure formation mechanism was proposed. The hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres sho...

  16. The CMS crystal calorimeter for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Seez, Christopher J

    1999-01-01

    The CMS crystal calorimeter, comprising about 80,000 scintillating lead tungstate crystals read out by avalanche photodiodes ( in the barrel) and vacuum phototriodes ( in the endcap) is designed to give excellent energy resolution in the demanding LHC environment. It is now entering the construction phase. A status report on the project is presented, including recent results from test beam verification, crystal production and photodetector development.

  17. New crystals for dual-readout calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Akchurin, N; Cardini, A; Carosi, R; Ciapetti, G; Ferrari, R; Franchino, S; Fraternali, M; Gaudio, G; Hauptman, J; Incagli, M; Korzhik, M; Lacava, F; La Rotonda, L; Livan, M; Meoni, E; Nikl, M; Pinci, D; Policicchio, A; Popescu, S; Scuri, F; Sill, A; Vandelli, W; Vedda, A; Venturelli, T; Voena, C; Volobouev, I; Wigmans, R

    2009-01-01

    Lead tungstate crystals doped with small fractions of praesodynium or molybdenum have been tested in beams of high-energy electrons. The goal of these tests was to study the effects of such dopants on the capability to separate the signal components deriving from the Cherenkov and scintillation light generated by the beam particles. These studies were carried out in view of the possible application of such crystals in dual-readout calorimeters.

  18. CdWO4 crystal scintillators from enriched isotopes for double beta decay experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Poda, D V; Belli, P; Bernabei, R; Boiko, R S; Brudanin, V B; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Castellano, S; Cerulli, R; Chernyak, D M; Danevich, F A; d'Angelo, S; Degoda, V Ya; Di Vacri, M L; Dossovitskiy, A E; Galashov, E N; Incicchitti, A; Kobychev, V V; Konovalov, S I; Kovtun, G P; Laubenstein, M; Mikhlin, A L; Mokina, V M; Nikolaiko, A S; Nisi, S; Podviyanuk, R B; Polischuk, O G; Shcherban, A P; Shlegel, V N; Solopikhin, D A; Tretyak, V I; Umatov, V I; Vasiliev, Ya V; Virich, V D

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium tungstate crystal scintillators enriched in 106Cd and 116Cd were developed. The produced scintillators exhibit good optical and scintillation properties, and a low level of radioactive contamination. Experiments to search for double beta decay of 106Cd and 116Cd are in progress at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories of the INFN (Italy). Prospects to further improve the radiopurity of the detectors by recrystallization are discussed.

  19. Search for 2{\\beta} decay of 116Cd with the help of enriched 116CdWO4 crystal scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Poda, D V; Belli, P; Bernabei, R; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Castellano, S; Chernyak, D M; Cerulli, R; Danevich, F A; d'Angelo, S; Incicchitti, A; Kobychev, V V; Konovalov, S I; Laubenstein, M; Podviyanuk, R B; Polischuk, O G; Shlegel, V N; Tretyak, V I; Umatov, V I; Vasiliev, Ya V

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium tungstate crystal scintillators enriched in $^{116}$Cd to 82% ($^{116}$CdWO$_4$, total mass of $\\approx$1.2 kg) are used to search for 2$\\beta$ decay of $^{116}$Cd deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the INFN (Italy). The radioactive contamination of the $^{116}$CdWO$_4$ crystals has been studied carefully to reconstruct the background of the detector. The measured half-life of $^{116}$Cd relatively to 2$\

  20. FT-IR Spectroscopic characterization of the intermediates in the selective catalytic reduction of NO with methane on Pd/ZrO(formula)-WO(formula) catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Çayırtepe, İlknur

    2004-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. This work involves in situ FT-IR spectroscopic study of the routes of formation, composition and thermal stability of strongly bound NOx complexes on the surface of Pd/tungstated zirconia, and transformation of the surface NOx complexes in the presence of methane in order to elucidate the mechanism of selective catalytic reduction of NO with methane. Sol-gel polymer-template synthesis was chosen to obtain high surface area in the prepar...

  1. Impact of Coherent Neutrino Nucleus Scattering on Direct Dark Matter Searches based on CaWO$_4$ Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Gütlein, A.; Angloher, G.; Bento, A; Bucci, C; Canonica, L.; Erb, A.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Ferreiro Iachellini, N.; Gorla, P; Hauff, D.; Jochum, J.; M. Kiefer; Kluck, H.; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J. -C.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric and solar neutrinos scattering coherently off target nuclei will be an important background source for the next generation of direct dark matter searches. In this work we focus on calcium tungstate as target material. For comparison with existing works we calculate the neutrino floor indicating which sensitivities can be reached before the neutrino background appears. In addition, we investigate the sensitivities of future direct dark matter searches using CRESST-II like detectors...

  2. Installation of CMS EB (ECAL Barrel) Supermodules 5 and 13 inside HB+ (HCAL Barrel) on 26/27 April 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The first two barrel "supermodules" of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) have been inserted into the barrel hadron calorimeter (HCAL) in the CMS experimental hall (called SX5) in Cessy in preparation for the forthcoming magnet test and cosmic challenge (MTCC). Each of the two supermodules contains 1700 lead tungstate crystals in glass-fibre alveolar support structures, with associated avalanche photodiodes (APDs, for scintillation light detection), electronics and cooling system.

  3. ALICE photon spectrometer crystals

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Members of the mechanical assembly team insert the last few crystals into the first module of ALICE's photon spectrometer. These crystals are made from lead-tungstate, a crystal as clear as glass but with nearly four times the density. When a high-energy particle passes through one of these crystals it will scintillate, emitting a flash of light allowing the energy of photons, electrons and positrons to be measured.

  4. Performance and Operation of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; 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    2010-01-01

    The operation and general performance of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter using cosmic-ray muons are described. These muons were recorded after the closure of the CMS detector in late 2008. The calorimeter is made of lead tungstate crystals and the overall status of the 75848 channels corresponding to the barrel and endcap detectors is reported. The stability of crucial operational parameters, such as high voltage, temperature and electronic noise, is summarised and the performance of the light monitoring system is presented.

  5. Time Reconstruction and Performance of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

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Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The resolution and the linearity of time measurements made with the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied with samples of data from test beam electrons, cosmic rays, and beam-produced muons. The resulting time resolution measured by lead tungstate crystals is better than 100 ps for energy deposits larger than 10 GeV. Crystal-to-crystal synchronization with a precision of 500 ps is performed using muons produced with the first LHC beams in 2008.

  6. Precision measurement of energy and position resolutions of the BTeV electromagnetic calorimeter prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batarin, V.A.; Brennan, T.; Butler, J.; Cheung, H.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Fomin, Y.V.; Frolov, V.; Goncharenko, Y.M.; Grishin, V.N.; Kachanov, V.A.; Khodyrev, V.Y.; Khroustalev, K.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kubota, Y.; Leontiev, V.M.; Maisheev, V.A.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Melnick, Y.M.; Meschanin, A.P.; Mikhalin, N.E.; Minaev, N.G.; Mochalov, V.V.; Morozov, D.A.; Mountain, R.; Nogach, L.V.; Ryazantsev, A.V.; Semenov, P.A. E-mail: semenov@mx.ihep.su; Shestermanov, K.E.; Soloviev, L.F.; Solovianov, V.L.; Stone, S.; Ukhanov, M.N.; Uzunian, A.V.; Vasiliev, A.N.; Yakutin, A.E.; Yarba, J

    2003-09-11

    The energy dependence of the energy and position resolutions of the electromagnetic calorimeter prototype made of lead tungstate crystals produced in Bogoroditsk (Russia) and Shanghai (China) is presented. These measurements were carried out at the Protvino accelerator using a 1-45 GeV electron beam. The crystals were coupled to photomultiplier tubes. The dependence of energy and position resolutions on different factors as well as the measured electromagnetic shower lateral profile are presented.

  7. Precision Measurement of Energy and Position Resolutions of the BTeV Electromagnetic Calorimeter Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Batarin, V; Butler, J; Cheung, H; Derevshchikov, A A; Fomin, Y; Frolov, V; Goncharenko, Yu M; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Khroustalev, K; Konstantinov, A S; Kravtsov, V; Kubota, Y; Leontiev, V M; Maisheev, V; Matulenko, Yu A; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Mikhalin, N; Minaev, N G; Mochalov, V; Morozov, D A; Mountain, R; Nogach, L V; Ryazantsev, A; Semenov, P A; Shestermanov, K E; Soloviev, L; Solovianov, Vladimir L; Stone, S; Ukhanov, M N; Uzunian, A V; Vasilev, A; Yakutin, A; Yarba, J V

    2003-01-01

    The energy dependence of the energy and position resolutions of the electromagnetic calorimeter prototype made of lead tungstate crystals produced in Bogoroditsk (Russia) and Shanghai (China) is presented. These measurementswere carried out at the Protvino accelerator using a 1 to 45 GeV electron beam. The crystals were coupled to photomultiplier tubes. The dependence of energy and position resolutions on different factors as well as the measured electromagnetic shower lateral profile are presented.

  8. Homogenous Silver-Tungsten Composite Production for Electrical Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid M. Azhar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver-tungsten composite materials have been widely used as medium duty electrical contacts since they offer the advantages of both refractory tungsten (welding and erosion resistance and silver (efficient electro-thermal conductivities. Since there is no alloying between the two elements (Ag and W, the properties of the composite depends on their composition. So for any particular application, a balance must be struck between the desirable properties of the two metals. Both welding and erosion resistance properties of silver-tungsten contacts depend on particle size, morphology and distribution of both elements within the composite, with finer W particles in Ag matrix give better performance. The main objective of this study is to produce an intimately mixed silver-tungsten powder with homogeneous distribution of both phases (silver and tungsten in the composite. Thus, to produce homogenous elemental silver-tungsten powder, the reduction behavior of each tungstate is studied at various reduction temperatures using TGA technique. Based on the results obtained from TGA, the reduction of silver tungstate carried out in two stage reduction process for producing elemental silver-tungsten powder with controlled particle size of tungsten. Also, small quantities of Fe and Co as sinter aids are introduced into tungstates by co-precipitation technique. However, the precipitated Fe and Co doped silver tungstates are reduced to yield Iron and cobalt doped silver-tungsten powders. The effect of Fe and Co on the morphology and particle size of the tungsten is studied using SEM. The reduced products will be used for subsequent sintering experiments to produce high density sintered compact for contact fabrication.

  9. Stimulated recovery of the optical transmission of PbWO 4 scintillation crystals for electromagnetic calorimeters after radiation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormenev, V.; Kuske, T.; Novotny, R. W.; Borisevich, A.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Mechinski, V.; Missevitch, O.; Lugert, S.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we describe the phenomenon of the stimulated recovery of radiation damage in lead tungstate scintillation crystals achieved via illumination by visible and infrared light. It allows fast and efficient in-situ recovery of the optical transmission either during beam-off periods or on-line during data accumulation. The application can substantially improve or extend the running period of the experiment by keeping the damage at a tolerable level.

  10. One module of the ALICE photon spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The first module for the ALICE photon spectrometer has been completed. Each of the five modules will contain 3584 lead-tungstate crystals, a material as transparent as ordinary silica glass but with nearly four times the density. When a high-energy particle passes through one of these crystals it will scintillate, allowing the energy of electrons, positrons and photons to be measured through the 17 920 detection channels.

  11. Performance and Operation of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

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    2010-01-01

    The operation and general performance of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter using cosmic-ray muons are described. These muons were recorded after the closure of the CMS detector in late 2008. The calorimeter is made of lead tungstate crystals and the overall status of the 75848 channels corresponding to the barrel and endcap detectors is reported. The stability of crucial operational parameters, such as high voltage, temperature and electronic noise, is summarised and the performance of the light monitoring system is presented.

  12. Time Reconstruction and Performance of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

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