WorldWideScience

Sample records for dysprosium 161 reactions

  1. Extension of the energy range of the experimental activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium up to 65MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2015-04-01

    Activation cross-sections data of longer-lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on dysprosium were extended up to 65MeV by using stacked foil irradiation and gamma spectrometry experimental methods. Experimental cross-sections data for the formation of the radionuclides (159)Dy, (157)Dy, (155)Dy, (161)Tb, (160)Tb, (156)Tb, (155)Tb, (154m2)Tb, (154m1)Tb, (154g)Tb, (153)Tb, (152)Tb and (151)Tb are reported in the 36-65MeV energy range, and compared with an old dataset from 1964. The experimental data were also compared with the results of cross section calculations of the ALICE and EMPIRE nuclear model codes and of the TALYS nuclear reaction model code as listed in the latest on-line libraries TENDL 2013. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Luminescence properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium silicate phosphor by solid state reaction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Ishwar Prasad, E-mail: ishwarprasad1986@gmail.com [School of Studies in Physics & Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur, C.G. 492010 (India); Chandrakar, Priya; Baghel, R.N.; Bisen, D.P.; Brahme, Nameeta [School of Studies in Physics & Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur, C.G. 492010 (India); Tamrakar, Raunak Kumar [Department of Applied Physics, Bhilai Institute of Technology, Durg, C.G. 491001 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Dysprosium doped calcium magnesium silicate (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+}) white light emitting phosphor was synthesized by solid state reaction process. The crystal structure of sintered phosphor was monoclinic structure with space group C2/c. Chemical composition of the sintered CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor was confirmed by EDX. The prepared CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor was excited from 352 nm and their corresponding emission spectra were recorded at blue (470 nm), yellow (570 nm) and red (675 nm) line due to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} → {sup 6}H{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} → {sup 6}H{sub 13/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} → {sup 6}H{sub 11/2} transitions of Dy{sup 3+} ions. The combination of these three emissions constituted as white light confirmed by the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromatic coordinate diagram. The possible mechanism of the white light emitting long lasting CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor was also investigated. Investigation on afterglow property show that phosphor held fast and slow decay process. The peak of mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity increases linearly with increasing impact velocity of the moving piston. Thus the present investigation indicates that the local piezoelectricity-induced electron bombardment model is responsible to produce ML in prepared CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor is consistent with standard monoclinic structure. • CIE coordinates of CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor is suitable as white light emitting phosphor. • The local piezoelectricity-induced electron bombardment model is responsible to produce ML in CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of tetraphenylporphyrinate of dysprosium route dysprosium acetylacetonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez M, V.

    1992-01-01

    Dysprosium bis (tetraphenylporphyrinate) and bis (dysprosium) Tris (tetraphenylporphyrinate) were synthesized from dysprosium tetraphenylporphyrinate prepared in situ, and characterized by IR, UV-vis, TGA, DTA, EPR and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The double decker compound was obtained by direct oxidation of the HDy(TPP) 2 intermediate. The existence of the radical anion, (TPP) - , in the double decker product was conformed by EPR spectrometry. Dysprosium monoporphyrinate was isolated and characterized by the same techniques. (Author)

  4. Neutron capture measurements and resonance parameters of dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S.G.; Kye, Y.U.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M.H. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Y.R.; Lee, M.W. [Dongnam Inst. of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Research Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G.N. [Kyungpook National University, Department of Physics, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Ro, T.I. [Dong-A University, Department of Physics, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Danon, Y.; Williams, D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Troy, NY (United States); Leinweber, G.; Block, R.C.; Barry, D.P.; Rapp, M.J. [Naval Nuclear Laboratory, Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Neutron capture yields of dysprosium isotopes ({sup 161}Dy, {sup 162}Dy, {sup 163}Dy, and {sup 164}Dy) were measured using the time-of-flight method with a 16 segment sodium iodide multiplicity detector. The measurements were made at the 25m flight station at the Gaerttner LINAC Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Resonance parameters were obtained using the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. The neutron capture data for four enriched dysprosium isotopes and one natural dysprosium sample were sequentially fitted. New resonances not listed in ENDF/B-VII.1 were observed. There were 29 and 17 new resonances from {sup 161}Dy and {sup 163}Dy isotopes, respectively. Six resonances from {sup 161}Dy isotope, two resonances from {sup 163}Dy, and four resonances from {sup 164}Dy were not observed. The capture resonance integrals of each isotope were calculated with the resulting resonance parameters and those of ENDF/B-VII.1 in the energy region from 0.5 eV to 20 MeV and were compared to the capture resonance integrals with the resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VII.1. A resonance integral value of the natural dysprosium calculated with present resonance parameters was 1405 ± 3.5 barn. The value is ∝ 0.3% higher than that obtained with the ENDF/B-VII.1 parameters. The distributions of the present and ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron widths were compared to a Porter-Thomas distribution. Neutron strength functions for {sup 161}Dy and {sup 163}Dy were calculated with the present resonance parameters and both values were in between the values of ''Atlas of Neutron Resonances'' and ENDF/B-VII.1. The present radiation width distributions of {sup 161}Dy and {sup 163}Dy were fitted with the χ{sup 2} distribution by varying the degrees of freedom. (orig.)

  5. High temperature oxidation kinetics of dysprosium particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaques, Brian J.; Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: DarrylButt@BoiseState.edu

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • The oxidation behavior of dysprosium particles was studied from 500 to 1000 °C. • Activation energy in initial region found as 8–25 kJ/mol, depending on atmosphere. • Activation energy in intermediate region found as 80–95 kJ/mol. • The oxide grows at the metal–oxide interface. • Generally, the formed oxide behaved as a p-type semiconductor. - Abstract: Rare earth elements have been recognized as critical materials for the advancement of many strategic and green technologies. Recently, the United States Department of Energy has invested many millions of dollars to enhance, protect, and forecast their production and management. The work presented here attempts to clarify the limited and contradictory literature on the oxidation behavior of the rare earth metal, dysprosium. Dysprosium particles were isothermally oxidized from 500 to 1000 °C in N{sub 2}–(2%, 20%, and 50%) O{sub 2} and Ar–20% O{sub 2} using simultaneous thermal analysis techniques. Two distinct oxidation regions were identified at each isothermal temperature in each oxidizing atmosphere. Initially, the oxidation kinetics are very fast until the reaction enters a slower, intermediate region of oxidation. The two regions are defined and the kinetics of each are assessed to show an apparent activation energy of 8–25 kJ/mol in the initial region and 80–95 kJ/mol in the intermediate oxidation reaction region. The effects of varying the oxygen partial pressure on the reaction rate constant are used to show that dysprosium oxide (Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}) generally acts as a p-type semiconductor in both regions of oxidation (with an exception above 750 °C in the intermediate region)

  6. Generation of White Light from Dysprosium-Doped Strontium Aluminate Phosphor by a Solid-State Reaction Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ishwar Prasad; Bisen, D. P.; Brahme, N.; Tamrakar, Raunak Kumar

    2016-04-01

    A single-host lattice, white light-emitting SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure of prepared SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was in a monoclinic phase with space group P21. The chemical composition of the sintered SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was confirmed by the energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy technique. Under ultra-violet excitation, the characteristic emissions of Dy3+ are peaking at 475 nm, 573 nm and 660 nm, originating from the transitions of 4F9/2 → 6H15/2, 4F9/2 →&!nbsp; 6H13/2 and 4F9/2 → 6H11/2 in the 4f9 configuration of Dy3+ ions. Commission International de I'Eclairage color coordinates of SrAl2O4:Dy3+ are suitable for white light-emitting phosphor. In order to investigate the suitability of the samples as white color light sources for industrial uses, correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI) values were calculated. Values of CCT and CRI were found well within the defined acceptable range. Mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity of SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor increased linearly with increasing impact velocity of the moving piston. Thus, the present investigation indicates piezo-electricity was responsible for producing ML in sintered SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor. Decay rates of the exponential decaying period of the ML curves do not change significantly with impact velocity. The photoluminescence and ML results suggest that the synthesized SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was useful for the white light-emitting diodes and stress sensor respectively.

  7. On polymorphism of dysprosium trichloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Khokhlov, Vladimir A.; Salyulev, Alexander B.; Korzun, Iraida V. [RAS Ural Branch, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation). Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry

    2015-07-01

    For the first time, the structure of crystalline DyCl{sub 3} over a wide temperature range from room temperature to melting point was studied by Raman spectroscopy. The phonon modes (cm{sup -1}) of dysprosium trichloride (monoclinic crystal lattice of AlCl{sub 3} type, Z = 4, CN = 6) at room temperature are 257 (A{sub 1g}), 201 (E{sub g}), 112 (E{sub g}), 88 (A{sub 1g}), and 63 (E{sub g}). The monoclinic structure of the crystalline DyCl{sub 3} C{sub 2h}{sup 3} symmetry was found to remain constant over the studied temperature range. No polymorphic transformation in the solid state was detected. Gravimetry, calorimetry, and mass spectrometry have been used in addition to support the conclusions made on the basis of Raman spectroscopic data.

  8. On polymorphism of dysprosium trichloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Khokhlov, Vladimir A.; Salyulev, Alexander B.; Korzun, Iraida V.

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, the structure of crystalline DyCl 3 over a wide temperature range from room temperature to melting point was studied by Raman spectroscopy. The phonon modes (cm -1 ) of dysprosium trichloride (monoclinic crystal lattice of AlCl 3 type, Z = 4, CN = 6) at room temperature are 257 (A 1g ), 201 (E g ), 112 (E g ), 88 (A 1g ), and 63 (E g ). The monoclinic structure of the crystalline DyCl 3 C 2h 3 symmetry was found to remain constant over the studied temperature range. No polymorphic transformation in the solid state was detected. Gravimetry, calorimetry, and mass spectrometry have been used in addition to support the conclusions made on the basis of Raman spectroscopic data.

  9. In situ characterization of the nitridation of dysprosium during mechanochemical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaques, Brian J.; Osterberg, Daniel D.; Alanko, Gordon A.; Tamrakar, Sumit; Smith, Cole R.; Hurley, Michael F.; Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: DarrylButt@BoiseState.edu

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • A nitridation reaction in a high energy planetary ball mill was monitored in situ. • Dysprosium mononitride was synthesized from Dy at low temperatures in short times. • Ideal gas law and in situ temperature and pressure used to assess reaction extent. • It is proposed that reaction rate is proportional to the creation of new surface. - Abstract: Processing of advanced nitride ceramics traditionally requires long durations at high temperatures and, in some cases, in hazardous atmospheres. In this study, dysprosium mononitride (DyN) was rapidly formed from elemental dysprosium in a closed system at ambient temperatures. An experimental procedure was developed to quantify the progress of the nitridation reaction during mechanochemical processing in a high energy planetary ball mill (HEBM) as a function of milling time and intensity using in situ temperature and pressure measurements, SEM, XRD, and particle size analysis. No intermediate phases were formed. It was found that the creation of fresh dysprosium surfaces dictates the rate of the nitridation reaction, which is a function of milling intensity and the number of milling media. These results show clearly that high purity nitrides can be synthesized with short processing times at low temperatures in a closed system requiring a relatively small processing footprint.

  10. Can a dysprosium shortage threaten green energy technologies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenderdaal, Sander; Tercero Espinoza, Luis; Marscheider-Weidemann, Frank; Graus, Wina

    2013-01-01

    Dysprosium, one of the various rare earth elements, is currently for more than 99% mined in China. As China is reducing its exports, new mining projects outside of China are needed to sustain supply and meet future demands. Dysprosium is mainly used in permanent magnets to retain the magnet's strength at elevated temperatures. Therefore, the use of dysprosium doped permanent magnets is preferred in electric vehicles and direct-drive wind turbines. Based on four scenarios it could be shown that dysprosium demand will probably outstrip supply in the short term (up to 2020). Although new mines are being developed, it takes several years for them to become productive. For the long term it is expected that enough dysprosium oxide is available in the earth crust (which is economically feasible to mine with current dysprosium prices) to fulfil the projected demand of dysprosium up to 2050. Recycling of dysprosium can further secure dysprosium supply in the long term by reducing primary dysprosium use by 35% in 2050. Electric vehicles are likely to play a dominant role in future increases in dysprosium demand. Even with the limited market share in 2011, electric vehicles already contribute to 20% of dysprosium use. -- Highlights: ► Dysprosium may hamper the implementation of electric cars and wind mills. ► In the short term (up to 2020) a deficit of dysprosium supply can be expected. ► In the long term (up to 2050) sufficient dysprosium is available. ► Electric vehicles are expected to dominate future dysprosium demand. ► China's dominance in dysprosium supply is likely to decrease by 2020.

  11. Resonance ionization spectroscopy in dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, D., E-mail: dstuder@uni-mainz.de; Dyrauf, P.; Naubereit, P.; Heinke, R.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We report on resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of high-lying energy levels in dysprosium. We developed efficient excitation schemes and re-determined the first ionization potential (IP) via analysis of Rydberg convergences. For this purpose both two- and three-step excitation ladders were investigated. An overall ionization efficiency of 25(4) % could be demonstrated in the RISIKO mass separator of Mainz University, using a three-step resonance ionization scheme. Moreover, an extensive analysis of the even-parity 6sns- and 6snd-Rydberg-series convergences, measured via two-step excitation was performed. To account for strong perturbations in the observed s-series, the approach of multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) was applied. Considering all individual series limits we extracted an IP-value of 47901.76(5) cm{sup −1}, which agrees with the current literature value of 47901.7(6) cm{sup −1}, but is one order of magnitude more precise.

  12. Nature of the magnetic susceptibility of dysprosium. Paramagnetic susceptibility of dysprosium - yttrium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidov, V.G.; Levitin, R.Z.; Chistyakov, O.D.

    1976-01-01

    The paramagnetic susceptibility of single crystals of dysprosium-yttirum alloys is measured in the basal plane and along the hexagonal axis. It is shown that the susceptibility of the alloys obeys the Curie-Weiss law, the effective magnetic moments allong the different directions being the same and the paramagnetic Curie temperatures being different. The difference between the paramagnetic Curie temperatures in the basal plane and along the hexagonal axis is independent of the dysprosium concentration in the alloy. As a comparison with the theoretical models of magnetic anisotropy shows, this is an indication that the magnetic anisotropy of dysprosium - yttrium alloys is of a single-ion nature

  13. Semiconductor composition containing iron, dysprosium, and terbium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooser, Raphael C.; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Malasi, Abhinav; Taz, Humaira; Farah, Annettee E.; Kalyanaraman, Ramakrishnan; Duscher, Gerd Josef Mansfred; Patel, Maulik K.

    2017-09-26

    An amorphous semiconductor composition includes 1 to 70 atomic percent iron, 15 to 65 atomic percent dysprosium, 15 to 35 atomic percent terbium, balance X, wherein X is at least one of an oxidizing element and a reducing element. The composition has an essentially amorphous microstructure, an optical transmittance of at least 50% in at least the visible spectrum and semiconductor electrical properties.

  14. Dysprosium complexes with the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez M, V.; Padilla, J.; Ramirez, F.M.

    1992-04-01

    In this report, the results obtained on the synthesis, characterization and study of the chemical behavior of dysprosium complex with the acetylacetone chelating agent (Hacac) and the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand (H 2 TFP) are given. Based on the literature but according to our necessities and interest, the appropriate methodology settled down from the synthesis of prime matters until the obtaining and characterization of the products. The acetyl acetonate complex was obtained of mono hydrated dysprosium [Dy(acac) 3 . H 2 0] and trihydrated [Dy(acac) 3 .3 H 2 0], the mono tetra phenyl porphyrinate [Dy(TFP)(acac). 2 ac] the double sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP) 2 ] and the triple sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP) 3 . 2 TCB] (TCB = trichlorobenzene). Its were characterized by their melting points, solubility, IR, UV, TGA and DTA both first and besides the techniques already mentioned for NMR'H, RPE and Magnetic susceptibility the three last complexes. From the spectroscopic point of view, IR and RPE its suggested the existence of a complex of inverse mixed valence [Dy(TFP) 2- (TFP) 1- ] for the Dy(TFP) 2 as a result of the existence of the free radical (TFP' 1- and that it was not in none of the other porphyrin compounds. In the NMR'H spectra of the compounds were not observed signals in the region from 0 to 10 ppm that which shows that the dysprosium complexes in special those of the porphyrin type are highly paramagnetic and its could be used as displacement reagents, creators of images and contrast agents of great utility in these days in studies of NMR, technique today by today used in medical diagnoses. (Author)

  15. Compounds of divalent thulium, neodymium, and dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochkarev, M.N.; Fedushkin, I.L.; Trifonov, A.A.; Fagin, A.A.; Kirillov, E.N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Judging on the Ln(II)/Ln(III) potentials Tm, Nd, and Dy are the first candidates after Sm, Eu, and Yb for the preparation of Ln(II) compounds. The first molecular Tm(II) derivatives, TmI 2 (DME) 3 (I), has been obtained recently by the reduction of TmI 3 with thulium metal in DME (1,2-dimethoxyethane). The tetrahydrofuran (THF) analogue, TmI 2 (THF) 5 , was synthesized similarly. In the case of TmBI 3 and TmCl 3 the same reaction does not occur. The compound I is inert toward naphthalene, anthracene, phenylacetylene, CpH, (Me 3 Si) 2 NH, 2,4,6-t-Bu 3 C 6 H 2 OH, Cp 2 V, Cp 2 Fe, or Cp 3 Er. The reactions of I with PhOH, Ph 3 COH, 3,6-t-Bu 2 C 6 H 2 (OH) 2 -1,2 (Cat), and calixarene (Cal) produce, Ph 3 COTmI 2 (DME) 2 , (Cat)TmI(DME) 2 , and (Cal)TmI, correspondingly. The attempts to use I for preparation of the other Tm(II) complexes failed. In all cases (reactions with C 10 H 8 Li, CpK, [1,3-(Me 3 Si) 2 C 5 H 3 ]MgCl, and [Cp'-SiMe 2 -Ind']K 2 ) the Tm(III) derivatives (respectively, (C 10 H 8 Tm) 2 C 10 H 8 , Cp 3 Tm, [1,3-(Me 3 Si) 2 C 5 H 3 ] 2 TmCl, and Cp'-SiMe 2 -Ind')TmI) were obtained. The new stable Tm(II) complex, PhOTmI(DME) 2 (II), has been synthesized by the reduction of I with potassium metal in DME. The product was isolated as the green crystals with μ eff 4.6 BM. Unlike TmI 3 , NdI 3 and DyI 3 can not be reduced by metallic neodymium, dysprosium or sodium in DME or THF. Re-investigation of the product formed in the reaction of NdCl 3 with a lack of Li and naphthalene which was claimed before as NdCl 2 (THF) 2 has shown that this is a mixture of Nd(III) naphthalene complexes of the type [(NdCl 2 (THF) 2 ]nC 10 H 8 (n = 4- 7) (III). Nevertheless the product may be used instead of NdCl 2 for the preparation of RNdCl 2 type complexes. The reactions of III with t-BuNCH=CHNBu-t (DAD), PhCH=CHCH=CHPh (DBD), and PhCH=CHPh afford (DAD)NdCl 2 (THF) 2 , (DBD)[NdCl 2 (THF) 2 ] 2 , and (PhCHCHPh)[NdCl 2 ] 2 (THF) 3 , respectively. The iodides of Nd

  16. Isotopic shifts and configuration mixing in the dysprosium II spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufmuth, P.

    1977-01-01

    Using a photoelectric Fabry-Perot spectrometer with digital data acquisition, the isotopic shifts of all stable dysprosium isotopes (Z = 66, A = 156, 158, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164) have been measured in transitions from the groundstate configuration 4f 10 6s to the excited configurations 4f 9 5d6s, 4f 9 5d 2 , and 4f 10 6p of the spark spectrum. Mass and volume effects have been seperated; the results are compared with arc spectrum measurements. From the volume effect of a pure s-p transition the change of the mean electric quadratic nuclear radius delta 2 > has been calculated. In order to test fine structure calculations of the Dy II spectrum, the isotopic shifts of 29 lines of the isotopes 162 Dy and 164 Dy have been measured. Based on the sharing rule, the reported configuration mixing could be confirmed in principle; for one energy level (E = 22908 K) the asignement has been proved to be false, in the case of three other levels (E = 22467, 22672, and 28885 K) the asignement is doubtfull. For the ground state levels 4f 10 6s 6 I the influence of relativistic effects could be proved; these effects can be interpreted in the framework of a parametric representation of the isotopic shift. The order of magnitude of the crossed second order effects has been estimated. (orig.) [de

  17. Heat capacity measurements on dysprosium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandan, R.; Prabhakara Reddy, B.; Panneerselvam, G.; Nagarajan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Dysprosium titanate is considered as a candidate material for use in the control rods of future nuclear reactors. The Dy 2 TiO 5 compound was prepared by solid-state synthesis and characterized by XRD technique. The high temperature enthalpy increments of dysprosium titanates have been measured for the first time by employing the method of inverse drop calorimetry in the temperature range 748-1645 K by using high temperature drop calorimeter. The calorimeter, the method of measurement and the procedure adopted for enthalpy increment measurements and analysis of the measured data to compute thermodynamic functions have been described elsewhere. The measured enthalpy increments were fitted to polynomial in temperature by using the least squares method. The fit equation in the temperature range from 298 to 1800 K is given

  18. Sandwich-type tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) dysprosium-cadmium quadruple-decker SMM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Qian, Kang; Wang, Kang; Bian, Yongzhong; Jiang, Jianzhuang; Gao, Song

    2011-09-14

    Homoleptic tetrakis[2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octa(butyloxy)phthalocyaninato] dysprosium-cadmium quadruple-decker complex 1 was isolated in relatively good yield of 43% from a simple one-pot reaction. This compound represents the first sandwich-type tetrakis(phthalocyaninato) rare earth-cadmium quadruple-decker SMM that has been structurally characterized. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  19. Kinetic stability of the dysprosium(3) complex with tetraazaporphine in acetic acid-water and acetic acid-methanol mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelevina, O.G.; Vojnov, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    Water-soluble dysprosium tetraazaporphine with acetylacetonate-ion as extraligand is synthesized for the first time. Its kinetic stability in acetic acid solutions is investigated. It is shown that the complex is dissociated with formation of free tetraazaporphine. Kinetic parameters of dissociation reaction are determined [ru

  20. Can a dysprosium shortage threaten green energy technologies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderdaal, S.; Tercero Espinoza, L.; Marschneider-Weidemann, F.; Crijns - Graus, Wina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/308005015

    2013-01-01

    Dysprosium, one of the various rare earth elements, is currently for more than 99% mined in China. As China is reducing its exports, new mining projects outside of China are needed to sustain supply and meet future demands. Dysprosium is mainly used in permanent magnets to retain the magnet's

  1. Kinetics of the nitridation of dysprosium during mechanochemical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanko, Gordon A.; Osterberg, Daniel D.; Jaques, Brian J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Hurley, Michael F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Boulevard, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: darrylbutt@boisestate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Boulevard, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • DyN was mechanochemically synthesized by milling pure metal under nitrogen. • Temperature and pressure were monitored to investigate reaction progress. • The effects of metal adhered to media on the impact energetics was measured. • The reactive milling kinetics are described in terms of reactive surface formation. - Abstract: Dysprosium nitride was synthesized by the reactive milling of the rare earth metal under 400 kPa nitrogen gas in a planetary ball mill. The nitrogen consumption rate was calculated from in situ temperature and pressure measurements to find the reaction extent as a function of milling time at milling speeds from 350 to 650 rpm. The results are analyzed in terms of a fundamental milling dynamics model in which the input milling energy is the primary driving force for reaction and the rate limiting step of the nitridation kinetics is the formation of chemically active surfaces. The model differs from traditional gas–solid reactions which are often limited by diffusion of a species through a surface layer or by dissociation of the gas molecule. These results give fresh insight into reactive gas–solid milling kinetics.

  2. Ethanolamine derivatives of dysprosium and holmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharia, K.S.; Singh, M.; Mathur, S.; Sankhla, B.S.

    1981-01-01

    The preparation and properties of dysprosium and holmium derivatives of mono-, di- and tri-ethanolamine derivatives are described. Compounds of general formulae: Ln(OPrsup(i)) 2 (mea), Ln(OPrsup(i))(mea) 2 , Ln(mea) 3 , Ln(OPrsup(i))(dea), Ln 2 (dea) 3 , Ln(dea)(deaH) and Ln(tea) (where Ln = Dy or Ho and mea, dea and tea are the anions of respective ethanolamine) were obtained and characterized by elemental analysis and IR spectra. (author)

  3. Synthesis and characterization of tetraphenylporphyrinate of dysprosium route dysprosium acetylacetonate.; Sintesis y caracterizacion de un porfirinato de disprosio via acetilacetonato de disprosio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez M, V

    1993-12-31

    Dysprosium bis (tetraphenylporphyrinate) and bis (dysprosium) Tris (tetraphenylporphyrinate) were synthesized from dysprosium tetraphenylporphyrinate prepared in situ, and characterized by IR, UV-vis, TGA, DTA, EPR and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The double decker compound was obtained by direct oxidation of the HDy(TPP){sub 2} intermediate. The existence of the radical anion, (TPP){sup -} , in the double decker product was conformed by EPR spectrometry. Dysprosium monoporphyrinate was isolated and characterized by the same techniques. (Author).

  4. Nuclear statistics of dysprosium resonance parameters in the energy range 10 - 1000 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, S. G.; Kye, Y. U.; Cho, M. H.; Kim, G. N.; Namkung, W.; Lee, M. W.; Kang, Y. R.; Roe, T. I.

    2016-01-01

    A resonance parameter analysis is often performed in the Resolved Resonance Region (RRR) in order to estimate the average level spacing, distribution of the reduced widths and so on. Neutron Capture experiments on dysprosium isotopes were performed at the electron linear accelerator (LINAC) facility of the Rensselear Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in the neutron energy region from 10 eV to 1 keV. The following nuclear statistics of the resonance parameters will be discussed in this paper. The D 0 for 161 Dy and 163 Dy were judged to be constant up to 120.6 and 163.9 eV, respectively. It was assumed that the D 0 of 162 Dy and 164 Dy is constant up to 1000 eV because they have few resonances. The results were compared with the values from Reference 11 as shown in Figure 1. Statistical distributions of reduced neutron were investigated for the three isotopes in the region from 0 to 1000 eV; 161 Dy, 162 Dy, and 163 Dy, but not for 164 Dy because of a few number of resonances. The reduced neutron widths Γ n 0 were divided by the unweighted average reduced neutron width < Γ n 0 > for each isotope. A cumulative distribution of these unitless ratios is compared with the integral of the Porter-Thomas distribution (χ 2 distribution with one degree of freedom). The results agree reasonably with the Porter Thomas distributions.

  5. Method for producing dysprosium-iron-boron alloy powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, F.E.; Wooden, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    A method for producing a dysprosium-iron alloy adapted for use in the manufacture of rare-earth element containing, iron-boron permanent magnets, the method including providing a particle mixture comprising dysprosium oxide, iron and calcium, compacting the particle mixture to produce a consolidated article, heating the article for a time at temperature to form a metallic compound comprising dysprosium and iron and to form calcium oxide, producing a particle mass of -35 mesh from the compact, washing the particle mass with water at a temperature no greater than 10 0 C to react to the calcium and to the calcium oxide therewith to form a calcium hydroxide, while preventing oxidation of the particle mass, and removing the calcium hydroxide from the particle mass

  6. Mixed (phthalocyaninato)(Schiff-base) di-dysprosium sandwich complexes. Effect of magnetic coupling on the SMM behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Tao; Zeng, Suyuan; Cao, Wei; Ma, Qi; Duan, Chunying; Dou, Jianmin; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2013-11-21

    Reaction between Schiff-base ligand and half-sandwich complex M(Pc)(acac) led to the isolation of new sandwich-type mixed (phthalocyaninato)(Schiff-base) di-lanthanide compounds M2(Pc)2(L)H2O (M = Dy, Gd) (1, 2) [H2Pc = metal free phthalocyanine, Hacac = acetylacetone, H2L = N,N'-bis(3-methyloxysalicylidene)benzene-1,2-diamine] with the triple-decker molecular structure clearly revealed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. For the comparative studies, sandwich triple-decker analogues with pure Schiff-base ligand M2(L)3H2O (M = Dy, Gd) (3, 4) were also prepared. Dynamic magnetic measurement result reveals the single-molecule magnet (SMM) nature of the di-dysprosium derivative 1, while the static magnetic investigation over both pure and the diamagnetic diluted samples of this compound discloses the interionic ferromagnetic coupling between the two dysprosium ions, which in turn effectively suppresses the QTM and enhances the energy barrier of this SMM. Nevertheless, comparative studies over the static magnetic properties of the di-dysprosium triple-decker complexes 1 and 3 indicate the stronger magnetic coupling between the two lanthanide ions in mixed (phthalocyaninato)(Schiff-base) species than in the pure Schiff-base triple-decker analogue, suggesting the special coordination sphere around the dysprosium ions in the former compound over the latter one on the more intense inter-ionic ferromagnetic coupling. As a very small step towards understanding the structure-property relationship, the present result will be surely helpful for the design and synthesis of the multinuclear lanthanide-based SMMs with good properties.

  7. Synthesis and thermal decomposition study of dysprosium trifluoroacetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opata, Y. A.; Grivel, J.-C.

    2018-01-01

    A study of the thermal decomposition process of dysprosium trifluoroacetate hydrate under flowing argon is presented. Thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, evolved gas analysis and ex-situ x-ray diffraction techniques have been employed in the investigation. Three main stages were...

  8. Electrochemical behaviour of dysprosium in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at W and Al electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castrillejo, Y.; Bermejo, M.R.; Barrado, A.I.; Pardo, R.; Barrado, E.; Martinez, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of DyCl 3 was studied in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at different temperatures. The cathodic reaction can be written:Dy(III)+3e-bar Dy(0)which can be divided in two very close cathodic steps:Dy(III)+1e-bar Dy(II)andDy(II)+2e-bar Dy(0)Transient electrochemical techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and chronoamperometry were used in order to study the reaction mechanism and the transport parameters of electroactive species at a tungsten electrode. The results showed that in the eutectic LiCl-KCl, electrocrystallization of dysprosium seems to be the controlling electrochemical step. Chronoamperometric studies indicated instantaneous nucleation of dysprosium with three dimensional growth of the nuclei whatever the applied overpotential.Mass transport towards the electrode is a simple diffusion process, and the diffusion coefficient of the electroactive species, i.e. Dy(III), has been calculated. The validity of the Arrhenius law was also verified by plotting the variation of the logarithm of the diffusion coefficient versus 1/T.In addition, the electrode reactions of the LiCl-KCl-DyCl 3 solutions at an Al wire were also investigated by cyclic voltammetry and open circuit chronopotentiometry. The redox potential of the Dy(III)/Dy couple at the Al electrode was observed at more positive potentials values than those at the inert electrode. This potential shift was thermodynamically analyzed by a lowering of activity of Dy in the metal phase due to the formation of intermetallic compounds

  9. Magnon contribution to electrical resistance of gadolinium-dysprosium alloy single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, S.A.; Slobodchikov, S.S.; Solomkin, I.K.

    1978-01-01

    The magnon, phonon and interelectron collision contributions to the electric resistance of single crystals of gadolinium-dysprosium alloys were quantified. A relationship was found to exist between the electric resistance and the variation of the topology of the Fermi surface on melting of gadolinium with dysprosium. It was found that gadolinium-dysprosium alloys, which have no helicoidal magnetic structure in magnetically ordered state, feature a spin-spin helicoidal-type correlations in the paramagnetic field

  10. Properties of Polydisperse Tin-doped Dysprosium and Indium Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinovskaya Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the complex permittivity, diffuse-reflectance, and characteristics of crystal lattices of tin-doped indium and dysprosium oxides are presented. Using the methods of spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, it is shown that doping of indium oxide with tin results in a significant increase of the components of the indium oxide complex permittivity and an appearance of the plasma resonance in its diffuse-reflectance spectra. This indicates the appearance of charge carriers with the concentration of more than 1021 cm−3 in the materials. On the other hand, doping of the dysprosium oxide with the same amount of tin has no effect on its optical and electromagnetic properties.

  11. Charge transfer cross sections for dysprosium and cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Hajime; Tamura, Koji; Okazaki, Tetsuji; Shibata, Takemasa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-06-01

    Symmetric resonant charge transfer cross sections between singly ionized ions and the parent atoms were measured for dysprosium and cerium in the impact energy of 200-2000eV. The cross sections were determined from the ratio between the number of ions produced by charge transfer and those in primary ion beam. The primary ion beam was produced by a laser ion source in which their atoms were ionized by laser resonant photo-ionization. The slow ions produced by charge transfer and fast primary ions were detected with Faraday cups. The obtained cross sections were (1.82{+-}0.14) x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2} for dysprosium and (0.88{+-}0.12) x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2} for cerium in the above energy range. The difference of these values can mostly be explained by considering the electron configurations of these atoms and ions. (author)

  12. Charge transfer cross sections for dysprosium and cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hajime; Tamura, Koji; Okazaki, Tetsuji; Shibata, Takemasa

    1998-06-01

    Symmetric resonant charge transfer cross sections between singly ionized ions and the parent atoms were measured for dysprosium and cerium in the impact energy of 200-2000eV. The cross sections were determined from the ratio between the number of ions produced by charge transfer and those in primary ion beam. The primary ion beam was produced by a laser ion source in which their atoms were ionized by laser resonant photo-ionization. The slow ions produced by charge transfer and fast primary ions were detected with Faraday cups. The obtained cross sections were (1.82±0.14) x 10 -14 cm 2 for dysprosium and (0.88±0.12) x 10 -14 cm 2 for cerium in the above energy range. The difference of these values can mostly be explained by considering the electron configurations of these atoms and ions. (author)

  13. The development of dysprosium-165 hydroxide macroaggregates for radiation synovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, A.B.; Hetherington, E.L.R.; Maddalena, D.J.; Snowden, G.M.

    1988-06-01

    The development of a dysprosium-165 product, Dy-HMA, which is suitable for the radiation synovectomy of arthritic joints is described. Dysprosium-165 is a short-lived (t 1/2 = 139 min) beta-emitter produced by the neutron irradiation of natural dysprosium. Dy-HMA is a suspension of macroaggregated hydroxide particles in saline with the majority of particles in the 3-5 μm range. Studies in rabbits have demonstrated minimal leakage following the intra-articular injection of a knee joint. At 24 hours, the accumulation in the liver is about 0.003% of the injected dose and there is considerably less in other organs and tissue. The use of Dy-HMA has considerable advantages over the presently used yttrium-90 products. The undesired leakage to and subsequent irradiation of other organs is considerably reduced. The period of hospitalisation is reduced from four days to one and the production of 165 Dy in Australia will overcome the difficulties of supply 90 Y from overseas. 21 refs., 1 fig., 18 tabs

  14. Electrocatalytic approach for the efficiency increase of electrolytic hydrogen production: Proof-of-concept using platinum-dysprosium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, D.M.F.; Šljukić, B.; Sequeira, C.A.C.; Macciò, D.; Saccone, A.; Figueiredo, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Development of electrocatalytic materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is attempted with the aim of reducing the water electrolysis overpotential and increasing its efficiency. Using linear scan voltammetry measurements of the hydrogen discharge enables evaluation of the electrocatalytic activity for the HER of platinum–dysprosium (Pt–Dy) intermetallic alloy electrodes of different compositions. Understanding of materials electrocatalytic performance is based on determination of several crucial kinetic parameters, including the Tafel coefficients, b, charge transfer coefficients, α, exchange current densities, j 0 , and activation energies, E a . Influence of temperature on HER is investigated by performing studies at temperatures ranging from 25 °C to 85 °C. The effect of the Dy amount in the efficiency of the HER on the Pt–Dy alloys is analysed. Results demonstrate that Dy can substantially increase the electrocatalytic activity of the Pt alloys, in comparison to the single Pt electrode. Efforts are made to correlate the microstructure of the alloys with their performance towards the HER. - Highlights: ► Development of electrocatalysts to increase efficiency of electrolytic hydrogen production. ► Synthesis and evaluation of composition and morphology of platinum–dysprosium (Pt–Dy) alloys. ► Hydrogen evolution reaction on Pt–Dy alloys electrodes studied using linear scan voltammetry in alkaline medium. ► Pt–Dy alloy with equiatomic composition enhances kinetics of hydrogen discharge compared to single Pt

  15. The decay of hot dysprosium nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atac, A.; Rekstad, J.; Guttormsen, M.; Messelt, S.; Ramsoey, T.; Thorsteinsen, T.F.; Loevhoeiden, G.; Roedland, T.

    1987-03-01

    The γ-decay following the 162,163 Dy( 3 He,αxn) reactions with E 3 He =45 MeV has been studied. Non-statistical γ-radiation with energies of E γ ≅1 MeV and ≅2 MeV is found for various residual nuclei. The properties of these γ-ray bumps depend on the number of emitted neutrons and reveal an odd-even mass dependence. New techniques to extract average neutron energies as a function of excitation energy and of the number of emitted neutrons are employed. The deduced neutron energies are consistent with Fermi-gas model predictions

  16. Dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass irradiated by 6 MV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ab Rasid, A.; Wagiran, H.; Hashim, S.; Ibrahim, Z.; Ali, H.

    2015-01-01

    Undoped and dysprosium doped lithium borate glass system with empirical formula (70–x) B 2 O 3 –30 Li 2 O–(x) Dy 2 O 3 (x=0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0 mol%) were prepared using the melt-quenching technique. The dosimetric measurements were performed by irradiating the samples to 6 MV photon beam using linear accelerator (LINAC) over a dose range of 0.5–5.0 Gy. The glass series of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass produced the best thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve with the highest intensity peak from sample with 1.0 mol% Dy 2 O 3 concentration. Minimum detectable dose was detected at 2.24 mGy, good linearity of regression coefficient, high reproducibility and high sensitivity compared to the undoped glass are from 1.0 mol% dysprosium doped lithium borate glass. The results indicated that the series of dysprosium doped lithium glasses have a great potential to be considered as a thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). - Highlights: • TL response of undoped and dysprosium doped lithium borate glass subjected to 6 MV photons irradiation at low dose range. • TL linear response of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass. • The sensitivity of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass is approximately 93 times higher than undoped glass

  17. Elevated temperature study of Nd-Fe-B--based magnets with cobalt and dysprosium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauder, D.R.; Froning, M.H.; White, R.J.; Ray, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the elevated temperature performance of Nd-Fe-B magnets containing 0--15 wt. % cobalt substitutions for iron and 0--10 wt. % dysprosium substitutions for neodymium. Test samples were prepared using conventional powder metallurgy techniques. Elevated temperature hysteresis loop and open-circuit measurements were performed on the samples to investigate irreversible losses and long term aging losses at 150 0 C. Magnets with high amounts of both cobalt and dysprosium exhibited lower losses of coercivity and magnetization. Dysprosium had more influence on the elevated temperature performance of the material than did cobalt

  18. Study on the electrochemical of the metal deposition from ionic liquids for lithium, titanium and dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Claudia A.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis was aimed to the characterization of electrochemically deposited film of lithium, titanium and dysprosium on Au(111) from different ionic liquids, finally dysprosium on neodymium-iron-boron magnate for industrial applications. The investigation of the deposits were performed using cyclic voltametry, in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy, electrochemical quartz microbalance, XPS and Auger electron spectroscopy. The sample preparation is described in detail. The deposition rate showed a significant temperature dependence.

  19. A terminal fluoride ligand generates axial magnetic anisotropy in dysprosium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norel, Lucie [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ Rennes, CNRS, ISCR (Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes) - UMR 6226, Rennes (France); Darago, Lucy E.; Chakarawet, Khetpakorn; Gonzalez, Miguel I.; Olshansky, Jacob H.; Long, Jeffrey R. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Le Guennic, Boris; Rigaut, Stephane [Univ Rennes, CNRS, ISCR (Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes) - UMR 6226, Rennes (France)

    2018-02-12

    The first dysprosium complexes with a terminal fluoride ligand are obtained as air-stable compounds. The strong, highly electrostatic dysprosium-fluoride bond generates a large axial crystal-field splitting of the J=15/2 ground state, as evidenced by high-resolution luminescence spectroscopy and correlated with the single-molecule magnet behavior through experimental magnetic susceptibility data and ab initio calculations. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Terbium and dysprosium complexes luminescence at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkova, S B; Kravchenko, T B; Kononenko, L.I.; Poluehktov, N S [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Odessa. Fiziko-Khimicheskij Inst.

    1979-01-01

    The variation is studied of the luminescence intensity of terbium and dysprosium complexes used in the analysis as solutions are cooled down to the liquid nitrogen temperature. Three groups of methods have been studied: observation of fluorescence of aqueous solutions, precipitate and extract suspensions in organic solvents. The brightest luminescence and greatest increase in luminescence intensity are observed at freezing of complex solvents with 1,2-dioxybenzene-3,5-disulfonic acid (DBSA) and iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and DBSA+EDTA, as well as in the case of benzene extracting of complexes with phenanthroline and salicylic acid. Otherwise the intensity increases 2-14-fold and for the complex of terbium with acetoacetic ester 36-fold.

  1. Dysprosium (holmium) determination in the presence of erbium and dysprosium (holmium, erbium) determination in the presence of cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolubara, A.I.; Kochubej, A.I.; Usatenko, Yu.I.

    1978-01-01

    Effect of salicylic acid upon complex formation in the systems REE - boronsulfoalizarinate, REE - oxine and REE - boronsulfoalizarinate - oxine is investigated. Comparison of optical characteristics of the above systems in the absence and in the presence of salicylic acid is carried out. It is established that in all the cases the effect of salicylic acid depends both on the nature of REE and the ratio of all the components of the system. Under certain conditions the given dependence is observed only for erbium complexes. Extraction-photometric methods of dysprosium and holmium determination in the presence of equal erbium amounts, as well as holmium and erbium determination in the presence of cerium equal amounts is developed

  2. Dysprosium (holmium) determination in the presence of erbium and dysprosium (holmium, erbium) determination in the presence of cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolubara, A I; Kochubei, A I; Usatenko, Yu I

    1978-01-01

    Effect of salicylic acid upon complex formation in the systems REE - boronsulfoalizarinate, REE - oxine and REE - boronsulfoalizarinate - oxine is investigated. Comparison of optical characteristics of the above systems in the absence and in the presence of salicylic acid is carried out. It is established that in all the cases the effect of salicylic acid depends both on the nature of REE and the ratio of all the components of the system. Under certain conditions the given dependence is observed only for erbium complexes. Extraction-photometric methods of dysprosium and holmium determination in the presence of equal erbium amounts, as well as holmium and erbium determination in the presence of cerium equal amounts is developed.

  3. Physico-chemical characterization of terbium-161-chloride (161TbCl3) radioisotope from irradiated natural gadolinium oxide target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmairit Aziz; Nana Suherman

    2015-01-01

    Currently cancer patients are increasing every year in Indonesia and become the third leading cause of death after heart disease and high blood pressure. Terbium-161 ( 161 Tb) is a low β- emitter (E β - = 0.155 MeV, T 1/2 = 6.9 d) and very similar to 177 Lu in terms of half-life, E β - energy and chemical properties.However, 161 Tb also ejects internal conversion electrons and Auger electrons which can provide a greater therapeutic effect than 177 Lu. Radioisotope of 161 Tb can be produced as a carrier-free for use in labeling of biomolecules as a targeted radiopharmaceutical for cancer therapy. 161 Tb was obtained through 160 Gd(n,γ) 161 Tb nuclear reaction by thermal neutron bombardment on 100 mg of natural gadolinium oxide target in RSG-G.A. Siwabessy at a thermal neutron flux of ~10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 and followed by radiochemical separation of 161 Tb from Gd isotopes using extraction chromatography method. The physico-chemical characterization of 161 TbCl 3 solution was studied by determination of its radionuclide purity by means of a γ-rays spectrometry with HP-Ge detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer (MCA). Radiochemical purity was determined using paper chromatography and paper electrophoresis methods. The results showed that 161 TbCl 3 radioisotope has a pH of 2, radiochemical purity of 99.64 ± 0.34%, radionuclide purity of 99.69 ± 0.20%, specific activity and radioactive concentration at the end of irradiation (EOI) of 2.26 – 5.31 Ci/mg and 3.84 – 9.03 mCi/mL, respectively. 161 TbCl 3 solution stable for 3 weeks at room temperature with a radiochemical purity of 98.41 ± 0.42%. 161 TbCl 3 solution from irradiated natural gadolinium oxide target has the physico-chemical characteristic that meets the requirements for use as a precursor in preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  4. 28 CFR 16.1 - General provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General provisions. 16.1 Section 16.1 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL OR INFORMATION... administration of the Department of Justice. ...

  5. Low Field Magnetic and Thermal Hysteresis in Antiferromagnetic Dysprosium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliia Liubimova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic and thermal hysteresis (difference in magnetic properties on cooling and heating have been studied in polycrystalline Dy (dysprosium between 80 and 250 K using measurements of the reversible Villari effect and alternating current (AC susceptibility. We argue that measurement of the reversible Villari effect in the antiferromagnetic phase is a more sensitive method to detect magnetic hysteresis than the registration of conventional B(H loops. We found that the Villari point, recently reported in the antiferromagnetic phase of Dy at 166 K, controls the essential features of magnetic hysteresis and AC susceptibility on heating from the ferromagnetic state: (i thermal hysteresis in AC susceptibility and in the reversible Villari effect disappears abruptly at the temperature of the Villari point; (ii the imaginary part of AC susceptibility is strongly frequency dependent, but only up to the temperature of the Villari point; (iii the imaginary part of the susceptibility drops sharply also at the Villari point. We attribute these effects observed at the Villari point to the disappearance of the residual ferromagnetic phase. The strong influence of the Villari point on several magnetic properties allows this temperature to be ranked almost as important as the Curie and Néel temperatures in Dy and likely also for other rare earth elements and their alloys.

  6. 7 CFR 1717.161 - Application process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application process. 1717.161 Section 1717.161 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Consolidations of Electric Borrowers § 1717.161 Application process. (a) Borrowers are responsible for ensuring...

  7. 7 CFR 1427.161 - Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administration. 1427.161 Section 1427.161 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.161 Administration...

  8. 21 CFR 161.136 - Olympia oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Olympia oysters. 161.136 Section 161.136 Food and... oysters. Olympia oysters, raw Olympia oysters, shucked Olympia oysters, are of the species Ostrea lurida and conform to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for oysters in § 161.130. ...

  9. 46 CFR 161.012-7 - Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction. 161.012-7 Section 161.012-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Personal Flotation Device Lights § 161.012-7 Construction. (a...

  10. 46 CFR 161.012-9 - Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance. 161.012-9 Section 161.012-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Personal Flotation Device Lights § 161.012-9 Performance. (a) If...

  11. Systems of pyridine, piperidine, piperazine, morpholine hydrochlorides-terbium (dysprosium) chloride-water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajfutdinova, R.K.; Sharafutdinova, A.A.; Murinov, Yu.I.

    1988-01-01

    The isothermal cross section method at 25 and 50 deg C is applied to study pyridine hydrochloride-terbium chloride-water (1) piperidine hydrochloride-dysprosium chloride-water (2), piperazine dihydrochloride-dysprosium chloride-water (3) and morpholine hydrochloride-terbium chloride (4) systems. Solubility isotherma prove the formation of incongruently soluble compound of the TbCl 3 x6C 5 H 5 NxHCl composition systems (1). The individuality of the new solid phase is proved by the chemical and DTA methods. Systems (2-4) are of a simple eutonic type

  12. Exploration of dysprosium: the most critical element for Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Dysprosium (Dy), one of the heavy rare earth elements, is used mainly as an additive for NdFeB permanent magnets which are installed in various modern industrial products such as voice coil motors in computers, factory automation machinery, hybrid and electric vehicles, home electronics, and wind turbine, to improve heat resistance of the magnets. Dy has been produced about 2,000t per year from the ores from ion adsorption type deposits in southern China. However, the produced amount of Dy was significantly reduced in 2011 in China due to reservation of heavy rare earth resources and protection of natural environment, resulting in soaring of Dy price in the world. In order to respond the increasing demand of Dy, unconventional supply sources are inevitably developed, in addition to heavy rare earth enriched ion adsorption type deposits outside China. Heavy rare earth elements including Dy are dominantly hosted in xenotime, fergusonite, zircon, eudialyte, keiviite, kainosite, iimoriite, etc. Concentration of xenotime is found in placer deposits in Malaysia and India, hydrothermal deposits associated with unconformity-type uranium mineralization (Athabasca basin in Canada, Western Australia), iron-oxide fluorite mineralization (South Africa) and Sn-bearing alkaline granite (Brazil). Zircon and fergusontie concentration is found as igneous and hydrothermal products in peralkaline syenite, alkaline granite and pegmatite (e.g., Nechalacho in Canada). Eudialyte concentration is found in some peralkaline syenite bodies in Greenland, Canada, Sweden and Russia. Among these sources, large Dy resources are estimated in the deposits hosted in peralkaline rocks (Nechalacho: 79,000t, Kvanefjeld: 49,000t, Norra Karr: 15,700t, etc.) compared to the present demand of Dy. Thus, Dy will be supplied from the deposits associated with peralkaline and alkaline deposits in future instead of ion adsorption type deposits in southern China.

  13. Dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass irradiated by 6 MV photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Rasid, A.; Wagiran, H.; Hashim, S.; Ibrahim, Z.; Ali, H.

    2015-07-01

    Undoped and dysprosium doped lithium borate glass system with empirical formula (70-x) B2O3-30 Li2O-(x) Dy2O3 (x=0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0 mol%) were prepared using the melt-quenching technique. The dosimetric measurements were performed by irradiating the samples to 6 MV photon beam using linear accelerator (LINAC) over a dose range of 0.5-5.0 Gy. The glass series of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass produced the best thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve with the highest intensity peak from sample with 1.0 mol% Dy2O3 concentration. Minimum detectable dose was detected at 2.24 mGy, good linearity of regression coefficient, high reproducibility and high sensitivity compared to the undoped glass are from 1.0 mol% dysprosium doped lithium borate glass. The results indicated that the series of dysprosium doped lithium glasses have a great potential to be considered as a thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD).

  14. A model for additive transport in metal halide lamps containing mercury and dysprosium tri-iodide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beks, M.L.; Haverlag, M.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of additives in a metal halide lamp is examined through numerical modelling. A model for a lamp containing sodium iodide additives has been modified to study a discharge containing dysprosium tri-iodide salts. To study the complex chemistry the method of Gibbs minimization is used

  15. Neutronography of an intermediate phase in dysprosium near the Neel point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessergenev, V G; Gogava, V V; Kovalevskaya, Yu A; Mandzhavidze, A G; Fedorov, V M; Shilo, S I

    1985-11-25

    Neutronographical study of dysprosium magnetic structure near the point of magnetic disordering depending on thermal prehistory of the sample is carried out. Intermediate vortex phase transformed then into the helical one is shown to occur from the paramagnetic phase under cooling.

  16. Synthesis and X-ray structure of the dysprosium(III) complex derived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis and X-ray structure of the dysprosium(III) complex derived from the ligand 5-chloro-1 ... Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia ... synthesized and its crystal structure determined by single X-ray diffraction at room temperature.

  17. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny

    2015-10-23

    A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  18. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny; Sá nchez Jimé nez, Cecilia; Gurinov, Andrei; Pé rez Centeno, Armando; Ceja Andrade, Israel; Carbajal Arí zaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  19. Dysprosium complexes with the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand; Complejos de disprosio con el ligante macrociclico tetrafenilporfirina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez M, V.; Padilla, J.; Ramirez, F.M

    1992-04-15

    In this report, the results obtained on the synthesis, characterization and study of the chemical behavior of dysprosium complex with the acetylacetone chelating agent (Hacac) and the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand (H{sub 2}TFP) are given. Based on the literature but according to our necessities and interest, the appropriate methodology settled down from the synthesis of prime matters until the obtaining and characterization of the products. The acetyl acetonate complex was obtained of mono hydrated dysprosium [Dy(acac){sub 3}. H{sub 2}0] and trihydrated [Dy(acac){sub 3} .3 H{sub 2}0], the mono tetra phenyl porphyrinate [Dy(TFP)(acac). 2 ac] the double sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP){sub 2}] and the triple sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP){sub 3}. 2 TCB] (TCB = trichlorobenzene). Its were characterized by their melting points, solubility, IR, UV, TGA and DTA both first and besides the techniques already mentioned for NMR'H, RPE and Magnetic susceptibility the three last complexes. From the spectroscopic point of view, IR and RPE its suggested the existence of a complex of inverse mixed valence [Dy(TFP){sup 2-} (TFP) {sup 1-}] for the Dy(TFP){sub 2} as a result of the existence of the free radical (TFP' {sup 1-} and that it was not in none of the other porphyrin compounds. In the NMR'H spectra of the compounds were not observed signals in the region from 0 to 10 ppm that which shows that the dysprosium complexes in special those of the porphyrin type are highly paramagnetic and its could be used as displacement reagents, creators of images and contrast agents of great utility in these days in studies of NMR, technique today by today used in medical diagnoses. (Author)

  20. Dysprosium complexes with the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand; Complejos de disprosio con el ligante macrociclico tetrafenilporfirina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez M, V; Padilla, J; Ramirez, F M

    1992-04-15

    In this report, the results obtained on the synthesis, characterization and study of the chemical behavior of dysprosium complex with the acetylacetone chelating agent (Hacac) and the tetraphenylporphyrin macrocyclic ligand (H{sub 2}TFP) are given. Based on the literature but according to our necessities and interest, the appropriate methodology settled down from the synthesis of prime matters until the obtaining and characterization of the products. The acetyl acetonate complex was obtained of mono hydrated dysprosium [Dy(acac){sub 3}. H{sub 2}0] and trihydrated [Dy(acac){sub 3} .3 H{sub 2}0], the mono tetra phenyl porphyrinate [Dy(TFP)(acac). 2 ac] the double sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP){sub 2}] and the triple sandwich of the dysprosium porphyrinate [Dy(TFP){sub 3}. 2 TCB] (TCB = trichlorobenzene). Its were characterized by their melting points, solubility, IR, UV, TGA and DTA both first and besides the techniques already mentioned for NMR'H, RPE and Magnetic susceptibility the three last complexes. From the spectroscopic point of view, IR and RPE its suggested the existence of a complex of inverse mixed valence [Dy(TFP){sup 2-} (TFP) {sup 1-}] for the Dy(TFP){sub 2} as a result of the existence of the free radical (TFP' {sup 1-} and that it was not in none of the other porphyrin compounds. In the NMR'H spectra of the compounds were not observed signals in the region from 0 to 10 ppm that which shows that the dysprosium complexes in special those of the porphyrin type are highly paramagnetic and its could be used as displacement reagents, creators of images and contrast agents of great utility in these days in studies of NMR, technique today by today used in medical diagnoses. (Author)

  1. Dysprosium, the balance problem, and wind power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshkaki, Ayman; Graedel, T.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate the impacts of the increasing market share of wind power on the demand and supply of REE. • The analysis is carried out using a dynamic material flow and stock model and three scenarios for Dy supply. • The supply of Dy from all deposits will likely lead to an oversupply of the total REEs, Nd, La, Ce and Y. • The supply of Dy from critical REE or Dy rich deposits will likely lead to an oversupply of Ce and Y only. • Large quantities of thorium will be co-produced as a result of Dy demand that needs to be managed carefully. - Abstract: Wind power technology is one of the cleanest electricity generation technologies that are expected to have a substantial share in the future electricity mix. Nonetheless, the expected increase in the market share of wind technology has led to an increasing concern of the availability, production capacity and geographical concentration of the metals required for the technology, especially the rear earth elements (REE) neodymium (Nd) and the far less abundant dysprosium (Dy), and the impacts associated with their production. Moreover, Nd and Dy are coproduced with other rare earth metals mainly from iron, titanium, zirconium, and thorium deposits. Consequently, an increase in the demand for Nd and Dy in wind power technology and in their traditional applications may lead to an increase in the production of the host metals and other companion REE, with possible implications on their supply and demand. In this regard, we have used a dynamic material flow and stock model to study the impacts of the increasing demand for Nd and Dy on the supply and demand of the host metals and other companion REE. In one scenario, when the supply of Dy is covered by all current and expected producing deposits, the increase in the demand for Dy leads to an oversupply of 255 Gg of total REE and an oversupply of the coproduced REE Nd, La, Ce and Y. In the second and third scenarios, however, when the supply of Dy is

  2. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny [Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Centro Universitario Tonalá, Universidad de Guadalajara, Av. Nuevo Periférico No. 555, C.P. 48525, Tonalá, Jalisco (Mexico); Sánchez Jiménez, Cecilia [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Gurinov, Andrey [Research Resources Center for Magnetic Resonance, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskiy pr. 26, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); NMR Core Lab, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Pérez Centeno, Armando; Ceja Andrade, Israel [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe, E-mail: gregoriocarbajal@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • LDH structure including dysprosium was prepared by co-precipitation. • LDH was capable to produce contrast in the T1 mode of MRI. • LDH were intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions. - Abstract: A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  3. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny; Sánchez Jiménez, Cecilia; Gurinov, Andrey; Pérez Centeno, Armando; Ceja Andrade, Israel; Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • LDH structure including dysprosium was prepared by co-precipitation. • LDH was capable to produce contrast in the T1 mode of MRI. • LDH were intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions. - Abstract: A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  4. 40 CFR 161.153 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions. 161.153 Section 161.153 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS..., destroy, repel or mitigate any pest, or that functions as a plant regulator, desiccant, or defoliant...

  5. 22 CFR 161.2 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Policy. 161.2 Section 161.2 Foreign Relations... environmental review procedures with the Department's decisionmaking process; (d) Invite and facilitate, when appropriate, Federal, State and local governmental authorities and public involvement in decisions which...

  6. 40 CFR 161.60 - Minor uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minor uses. 161.60 Section 161.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS... until it is applied to the major use registrations. (3) EPA will accept extrapolations and regional data...

  7. 33 CFR 161.18 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting requirements. 161.18 Section 161.18 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... call. H HOTEL Date, time and point of entry system Entry time expressed as in (B) and into the entry...

  8. 16 CFR 1.61 - Injunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Injunctions. 1.61 Section 1.61 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES... believe that it would be to the interest of the public, the Commission will apply to the courts for...

  9. 14 CFR 406.161 - Witness fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Witness fees. 406.161 Section 406.161 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... the same fees and mileage expenses as are paid to a witness in a court of the United States in...

  10. Dysprosium-Catalyzed Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this letter, we report that dysprosium is an effective catalyst for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs growth via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD process for the first time. Horizontally superlong well-oriented SWNT arrays on SiO2/Si wafer can be fabricated by EtOH-CVD under suitable conditions. The structure and properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that the SWNTs from dysprosium have better structural uniformity and better conductivity with fewer defects. This rare earth metal provides not only an alternative catalyst for SWNTs growth, but also a possible method to generate high percentage of superlong semiconducting SWNT arrays for various applications of nanoelectronic device.

  11. Synthesis and X-ray diffraction studies of dysprosium-calcium ferrites Dy1-xCaxFeO3-y (0≤x≤2/3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Song, D.; Su, Z.; Wang, T.M.

    1997-01-01

    Samples of dysprosium-calcium ferrites Dy 1-x Ca x FeO 3-y with x ranging from 0 to 2/3 were novelly prepared in air by solid state reaction and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. These samples are single-phased orthorhombic perovskite-type compounds belonging to the space group D 2h 16 -Pbnm. The lattice constants of the Dy 1-x Ca x FeO 3-y samples have been refined by Cohen's least-squares method. The initial substitution of Ca for Dy leads to a decrease of the lattice constants. Further substitution of Ca for Dy has hardly any influence on the lattice dimensions. (orig.)

  12. {Delta}I = 2 energy staggering in normal deformed dysprosium nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, M.A.; Brown, T.B.; Archer, D.E. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Very high spin states (I{ge}50{Dirac_h}) have been observed in {sup 155,156,157}Dy. The long regular band sequences, free from sharp backbending effects, observed in these dysprosium nuclei offer the possibility of investigating the occurence of any {Delta}I = 2 staggering in normal deformed nuclei. Employing the same analysis techniques as used in superdeformed nuclei, certain bands do indeed demonstrate an apparent staggering and this is discussed.

  13. Analysis of the x-ray spectrum emitted by laser-produced plasma of dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, Gilad; Louzon, Einat; Henis, Zohar; Maman, Shlomo; Mandelbaum, Pinchas

    2007-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the x-ray spectrum (5-10.2 A ring ) emitted by laser-produced plasma of dysprosium (Dy) is given using ab initio calculations with the HULLAC relativistic code and isoelectronic trends. Resonance 3d-4p, 3d-nf (n=4 to 7), 3p-4s, and 3p-4d transitions of Ni I-like Dy XXXIX and neighboring ion satellite transitions (from Dy XXXIV to Dy XL) are identified

  14. Phosphor Dysprosium-Doped Layered Double Hydroxides Exchanged with Different Organic Functional Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ricardo Martínez Vargas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The layers of a Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH were doped with Dy3+ cations. Among some compositions, the Zn2+ : Al3+ : Dy3+ molar ratio equal to 30 : 9 : 1 presented a single crystalline phase. Organic anions with carboxylic, amino, sulfate, or phosphate functional groups were intercalated as single layers between LDH layers as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Photoluminescence spectra of the nitrate intercalated LDH showed a wide emission band with strong intensity in the yellow region (around 574 nm, originated due to symmetry distortion of the octahedral coordination in dysprosium centers. Moreover, a broad red band emission was also detected apparently due to the presence of zinc oxide. The distorted symmetry of the dysprosium coordination environment, also confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, was modified after the intercalation with phenyl phosphonate (PP, aspartate (Asp, adipate (Adip, and serinate (Ser anions; the emission as measured from PL spectra of these LDH was more intense in the blue region (ca. 486 nm, thus indicating an increase in symmetry of dysprosium octahedrons. The red emission band from zinc oxide kept the same intensity after intercalation of dodecyl sulfate (DDS. An additional emission of unknown origin at λ = 767 nm was present in all LDHs.

  15. Synovectomy of the rheumatoid knee using intra-articular injection of dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Shortkroff, S.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Venkatesan, P.; Snyder, M.A.; Barrett, W.P.

    1987-01-01

    One hundred and eleven patients who had seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with intra-articular injection of 270 millicuries of dysprosium-165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregates. A two-year follow-up was available for fifty-nine of the treated knees. Thirty-nine had a good result; nine, a fair result; and eleven, a poor result. Of the twenty-five knees that had Stage-I radiographic changes, nineteen had a good result. Of the thirty-four knees that had Stage-II radiographic changes, twenty showed a good result. Systemic spread of the radioactivity from the injected joint was minimum. The mean whole-body dose was calculated to be 0.3 rad and that to the liver twenty-four hours after injection, 3.2 rads. The results indicated that dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for performing radiation synovectomy, particularly in knees that have Stage-I radiographic changes. Because of the minimum rate of systemic spread of the dysprosium-165, it offers a definite advantage over agents that previously have been used

  16. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  17. Development and mastering of production of dysprosium hafnate as absorbing material for control rods of promising thermal neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, A.V.; Risovany, V.D.; Muraleva, E.M.; Sokolov, V.F.

    2011-01-01

    The main advantages of dysprosium hafnate as an absorbing material for LWR control rods are the following: -) unlimited radiation resistance; - two absorbing components, Dy and Hf, increasing physical efficiency of the material compared to Dy 2 O 3 -TiO 2 and alloy 80% Ag - 15% In - 5% Cd; -) variability of physical efficiency by changing a composition, but maintaining other performance characteristics of the material; -) high process-ability due to the absence of phase transients and single-phase structure (solid solution); -) production of high density pellets. Lab-scale mastering of dysprosium hafnate pellets production showed a possibility of material synthesis using a solid-phase method, as well as of dysprosium hafnate pellets production by cold pressing and subsequent sintering. Within a whole range of examined compositions (23 mol% - 75 mol% Dy 2 O 3 ), a single-phase material with a highly radiation resistant fluorite-like structure was produced. Experiments on cold pressing and sintering of pellets confirmed a possibility of producing high quality dysprosium hafnate pellets from synthesized powder. A pilot batch of dysprosium hafnate pellets with standard sizes was produced. The standard sizes corresponded to the absorbing elements of the WWER-1000 control rods and met the main requirements to the absorbing element columns. The pilot batch size was approximately 6 kg. Acceptance testing of the pilot batch of dysprosium hafnate pellets was conducted, fulfillment of the requirements of technical conditions was checked and preirradiation properties of the pellets were examined. High quality of the produced pellets was confirmed, thus, demonstrating a real possibility of producing large batches of the dysprosium hafnate pellets. The next step is the production of test absorbing elements and cluster assemblies for the WWER-1000 control rods with their further installation for pilot operation at one of the Russian nuclear power plants

  18. 50 CFR 648.161 - Closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Bluefish Fishery § 648.161 Closures. (a) EEZ closure. NMFS shall close the EEZ to fishing for bluefish by... dealer permit holders that no commercial quota is available for landing bluefish in that state. ...

  19. Systematic study on surface and magnetostructural changes in Mn-substituted dysprosium ferrite by hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekha, G. [Department of Physics, College of Engineering Guindy, Anna University, Sardar Patel Road, Chennai 600025 (India); Tholkappiyan, R. [Department of Physics, College of Engineering Guindy, Anna University, Sardar Patel Road, Chennai 600025 (India); Department of Physics, College of Science, UAE University, Al-Ain 15551 (United Arab Emirates); Vishista, K., E-mail: raovishista@gmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Engineering Guindy, Anna University, Sardar Patel Road, Chennai 600025 (India); Hamed, Fathalla [Department of Physics, College of Science, UAE University, Al-Ain 15551 (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Garnet type Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5-x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 12} (x = 0–0.06) nanoparticles of 88.4–86.8 nm were synthesized by hydrothermal method. • The Dy, Mn, Fe and O elements in the ferrites were confirmed from XPS. • The multiple oxidation states of Fe and Mn ions, bonding energy and cationic distributions of the samples were examined by XPS. • The magnetic property shows ferromagnetic behavior from VSM technique. • The results from these studies are correlated with respect to Mn dopant. - Abstract: Dysprosium iron garnets are of scientific importance because of the wide range of magnetic properties that can be obtained in substituting dysprosium by a rare earth metal. In the present work, the effect of Mn substitution on magnetostructural changes in dysprosium ferrite nanoparticles is studied. Highly crystalline pure and Mn doped dysprosium ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The samples were calcined at 1100 °C for 2 h in air atmosphere which is followed by characterization using XRD, FT-IR analysis, SEM, XPS and VSM. The average crystallite size of synthesized samples were calculated by X-ray diffraction falls in the range of 88.4–86.8 nm and was found to be in cubic garnet structure. For further investigation of the structure and corresponding changes in the tetrahedral and octahedral stretching vibrational bonds, FT-IR was used. The synthesized samples consist of multiple oxidation (Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}) states for Fe ions and (Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+}) Mn ions analyzed in three ways of Fe 2p and Mn 2p spectra from the XPS analysis. With respect to Mn dopant in Dy{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, the cationic distributions of elements were discussed from high resolution XPS spectra by peak position and shift, area, width. To find out the porous/void surface morphology of the sample, scanning electron microscopy was used. From XPS analysis, the presence of elements (Dy, Mn, Fe and O) and their composition in the

  20. Synthesis, structural characterization and in vitro testing of dysprosium containing silica particles as potential MRI contrast enhancing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiriac, L.B.; Trandafir, D.L. [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Turcu, R.V.F. [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Todea, M. [Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Simon, S., E-mail: simons@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Dysprosium containing silica microparticles obtained by freeze and spray drying. • Higher structural units interconnection achieved in freeze vs. spray dried samples. • Dy occurance on the outermost layer of the microparticles evidenced by XPS. • Enhanced MRI contrast observed for freeze dried samples with 5% mol Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}. - Abstract: The work is focused on synthesis and structural characterization of novel dysprosium-doped silica particles which could be considered as MRI contrast agents. Sol-gel derived silica rich particles obtained via freeze-drying and spray-drying processing methods were structurally characterized by XRD, {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR and XPS methods. The occurrence of dysprosium on the outermost layer of dysprosium containing silica particles was investigated by XPS analysis. The MRI contrast agent characteristics have been tested using RARE-T{sub 1} and RARE-T{sub 2} protocols. The contrast of MRI images delivered by the investigated samples was correlated with their local structure. Dysprosium disposal on microparticles with surface structure characterised by decreased connectivity of the silicate network units favours dark T{sub 2}-weighted MRI contrast properties.

  1. Synthesis, structural characterization and in vitro testing of dysprosium containing silica particles as potential MRI contrast enhancing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiriac, L.B.; Trandafir, D.L.; Turcu, R.V.F.; Todea, M.; Simon, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dysprosium containing silica microparticles obtained by freeze and spray drying. • Higher structural units interconnection achieved in freeze vs. spray dried samples. • Dy occurance on the outermost layer of the microparticles evidenced by XPS. • Enhanced MRI contrast observed for freeze dried samples with 5% mol Dy_2O_3. - Abstract: The work is focused on synthesis and structural characterization of novel dysprosium-doped silica particles which could be considered as MRI contrast agents. Sol-gel derived silica rich particles obtained via freeze-drying and spray-drying processing methods were structurally characterized by XRD, "2"9Si MAS-NMR and XPS methods. The occurrence of dysprosium on the outermost layer of dysprosium containing silica particles was investigated by XPS analysis. The MRI contrast agent characteristics have been tested using RARE-T_1 and RARE-T_2 protocols. The contrast of MRI images delivered by the investigated samples was correlated with their local structure. Dysprosium disposal on microparticles with surface structure characterised by decreased connectivity of the silicate network units favours dark T_2-weighted MRI contrast properties.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and sup 23 Na NMR shift studies of a novel dysprosium(III) crown ether texaphyrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, J.L.; Mody, T.D. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Ramasamy, R.; Sherry, A.D. (Texas Univ., Dallas, TX (United States))

    1992-05-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a novel dysprosium(III) crown-ether texaphyrin (Dy(BCTxp)){sup 2+} is reported. This complex was designed to serve as a ditopic chelate for both dysprosium(III) and sodium cations. {sup 23}Sodium NMR spectroscopic studies indicates that titration of Na{sup +} with increasing concentrations of (Dy(BCTxp)){sup 2+} results in a shift toward higher frequency and gives a net hyperfine shift of 0.86 ppm. Sodium complexation is taking place into the crown subunit in (Dy(BCTxp)){sup 2+} and the degree of complexation is not reduced substantially by the positive charge on the dysprosium(III) portion of this binucleating system.

  3. Transition rates in {sup 161}Dy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, V; Malmskog, S G

    1969-06-15

    The decay of {sup 161}Tb has been studied using a high resolution Ge(Li)-detector. Five new transitions were observed and fitted into the earlier proposed decay scheme. The half-life of the 131.8 keV level in {sup 161}Dy was determined in a delayed coincidence measurement to be 145 {+-} 15 psec. The low level scheme in {sup 161}Dy is discussed within a quasi-particle model allowing for Coriolis mixing. Special attention is given to the strongly retarded, K-allowed 131.8 keV E1 transition with a retardation factor F{sub W} > 1.5 x 10{sup 8}.

  4. Dysprosium disilicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Gangfeng; Nogami, Jun; Crimp, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure of self-assembled dysprosium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The studies focused on nanostructures that involve multiple atomic layers of the silicide. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy images and fast Fourier transform analysis showed that both hexagonal and orthorhombic/tetragonal silicide phases were present. Both the magnitude and the anisotropy of lattice mismatch between the silicide and the substrate play roles in the morphology and epitaxial growth of the nanostructures formed

  5. Major conformations of the ligand skeleton of a tetranuclear dysprosium (3) tartrate complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevela, V.V.; Semenov, V.Eh.; Bezryadin, S.G.; Savitskaya, T.V.; Kolesar, I.R.; Matveev, S.N.; Shamov, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    By the molecular mechanics method (MIND program, stoichiometry was studied and basic conformations of ligand frame of dysprosium (3) tetranuclear complex bis-(d-tartrato) bis-(l-tartrato)tetradysprosiate (3) - anion Dy 4 (d-L) 2 (l-L) 2 4- (1) (d-H 4 L = d-tartaric acid, l-H 4 L = l - tartaric acid) were revealed. It is shown that theoretically calculated mP τ constants for so-called compact conformations of 1, where tartratoligands are in gosh conformation, agree with experimentally obtained constant of paramagnetic birefringence (mP e ) of complex 1 [ru

  6. Incinerator carryover tests with dysprosium as a stand-in for plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, R.L.

    1981-11-01

    A full-scale (5 kg/h) incinerator is being tested with nonradioactive feed materials which simulate SRP-generator combustible transuranic wastes. The incinerator is two-stage and is designed to provide relatively quiescent conditions in the primary chamber where the ash is formed. This feature should minimize entrainment of Pu-bearing particles into the off-gas system. A series of runs have been completed in which incinerator feed was spiked with dysprosium to simulate Pu. Carryover of Dy into the off-gas system was found to be low (about 1/4%). 4 figures, 3 tables

  7. Incorporation of dysprosium ions into PbTiO3 ferroelectric ceramic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Peláiz-Barranco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A structural analysis concerning the incorporation of dysprosium into A- and/or B-sites of the lead titanate is shown. The two "boundary" refinements are presented, i.e., Dy2+ substitutes for Pb2+ (Dy3+ substitutes for Ti4+ and Dy3+ substitutes for Pb2+ (Dy3+ substitutes for Ti4+. The results offer quantitative information about the incorporation into both crystallographic sites. The increase of Dy3+ fraction into B-site provides the increase of the Ti4+ atomic displacement along the [001] direction and the tetragonal distortion.

  8. Determination of Diclofenac on a Dysprosium Nanowire- Modified Carbon Paste Electrode Accomplished in a Flow Injection System by Advanced Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Moosavi-Movahedi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A new detection technique called Fast Fourier Transform Square-Wave Voltammetry (FFT SWV is based on measurements of electrode admittance as a function of potential. The response of the detector (microelectrode, which is generated by a redox processes, is fast, which makes the method suitable for most applications involving flowing electrolytes. The carbon paste electrode was modified by nanostructures to improve sensitivity. Synthesized dysprosium nanowires provide a more effective nanotube-like surface [1-4] so they are good candidates for use as a modifier for electrochemical reactions. The redox properties of diclofenac were used for its determination in human serum and urine samples. The support electrolyte that provided a more defined and intense peak current for diclofenac determination was a 0.05 mol L−1 acetate buffer pH = 4.0. The drug presented an irreversible oxidation peak at 850 mV vs. Ag/AgCl on a modified nanowire carbon paste electrode which produced high current and reduced the oxidation potential by about 100 mV. Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratio was significantly increased by application of a discrete Fast Fourier Transform (FFT method, background subtraction and two-dimensional integration of the electrode response over a selected potential range and time window. To obtain the much sensivity the effective parameters such as frequency, amplitude and pH was optimized. As a result, CDL of 2.0 × 10−9 M and an LOQ of 5.0 × 10−9 M were found for the determination for diclofenac. A good recovery was obtained for assay spiked urine samples and a good quantification of diclofenac was achieved in a commercial formulation.

  9. 36 CFR 13.161 - Permit application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 13.161 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... blueprint, sketch or photograph of the cabin or structure; (d) A map that shows the geographic location of... cabin or structure. All information may be provided orally except the cabin blueprint, sketch or...

  10. 21 CFR 161.130 - Oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... water. Before packing into the containers for shipment or other delivery for consumption the oysters are... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FISH AND SHELLFISH Requirements for Specific Standardized Fish and Shellfish § 161.130 Oysters. (a...

  11. 46 CFR 161.012-1 - Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Personal Flotation Device Lights § 161.012-1 Scope. (a) This subpart... approving personal flotation device lights fitted on Coast Guard approved life preservers, bouyant vests...

  12. 46 CFR 161.012-3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Personal Flotation Device Lights § 161.012-3 Definitions. (a) As used in this subpart, PFD means Coast Guard approved personal flotation device. (b) For the purpose of...

  13. 40 CFR 161.150 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry Data Requirements § 161.150 General. (a) Applicability. This subpart describes the product chemistry data that are required to support the registration... characteristics must be considered. (iv) Certain data are needed as basic or supportive evidence in initiating or...

  14. 50 CFR 14.161 - Primary enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Wild Mammals and Birds to the United States Specifications for Other Terrestrial Mammals § 14.161... primary enclosure shall provide adequate space for the animal to stand upright in a normal posture with... lie in a full prone position. Specifications for Birds ...

  15. 27 CFR 17.161 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....161 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE... organized to enable appropriate TTB officers to trace each operation or transaction, monitor compliance with... invoices and cost accounting records, are acceptable if they show the required information or are annotated...

  16. EC/β+ decay of 161Er

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinnikov, V.G.; Ibraheem, Y.S.; Stegailov, V.I.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The study of odd-proton nuclei in rare-earth region has been performed to get more information on the nuclear structure of these nuclei. In the framework of a program at the ISOL complex of YASNAPP-2 at JINR to study the decay of odd-nuclei, 161 Er has been investigated. The experiments have been focused on the 161 Ho level scheme populated in the EC/β + decay of 161 Er for which a few results have been previously reported [1,2]. Spectra of single γ-ray, γ-γ coincidence and internal conversion electrons were measured. There are appreciable disagreements between results of some γ-ray intensities obtained by us and in [2]. The greatest difference was for relative γ-ray intensity of the 11.28 keV, which has reported value I γ ∼ 10 (I γ 211 =1000) in [2], but this leads to an overpopulation of the 211 keV level by 14% of the decay [3]. The relative intensities of transitions with Eγ γ211 =1000). Inaccuracy of Iγ in [2] is probably due to a sudden change in the efficiency curve of their Ge(Li) detector in the low energy region while our HPGe detector feature a much smoother variation in the efficiency curve in this γ-ray energy region. Besides, the levels earlier introduced by us in [4], three new levels in 161 Ho were proposed from γ-γ coincidences at energies 693.2 keV, 859.6 keV, and 957.97 keV. Spins, parities and Nilsson quantum characteristics of some 161 Ho levels were established

  17. Dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium borate glass subjected to Co-60 gamma ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, R. S., E-mail: ratnasuffhiyanni@gmail.com; Wagiran, H., E-mail: husin@utm.my; Saeed, M. A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium borate (CMB:Dy) glass are presented. This study is deemed to understand the application of calcium as the modifier in magnesium borate glass with the presence of dysprosium as the activator to be performed as TL dosimeter (TLD). The study provides fundamental knowledge of a glass system that may lead to perform new TL glass dosimetry application in future research. Calcium magnesium borate glass systems of (70-y) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} − 20 CaO – 10 MgO-(y) Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} with 0.05  mol % ≤ y ≤ 0.7  mol % of dyprosium were prepared by melt-quenching technique. The amorphous structure and TL properties of the prepared samples were determined using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TL reader; model Harshaw 4500 respectively. The samples were irradiated to Co-60 gamma source at a dose of 50 Gy. Dosimetric properties such as annealing procedure, time temperature profile (TTP) setting, optimization of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration of 0.5 mol % were determined for thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) reader used.

  18. Treatment of rheumatoid synovitis of the knee with intraarticular injection of dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Zalutsky, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred eight knees of 93 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with an intraarticular injection of 270 mCi of dysprosium 165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregate. Leakage of radioactivity from the injected joint was minimal. Mean leakage to the venous blood 3 hours after injection was 0.11% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean whole body dose of 0.2 rads. Mean leakage to the liver 24 hours after injection was 0.64% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean liver dose of 3.2 rads. In 7 additional patients examined, there was negligible or near negligible activity found in the draining inguinal lymph nodes. One-year followup was possible for 74 knees (63 patients). Sixty-one percent of the knees had good results, 23% had fair results, and 16% had poor results. There was a direct correlation between the radiographic stage and response to treatment. In knees with stage I radiographic changes, 72% showed good results; 93% showed improvement. In knees with stage II changes, 59% showed good results; 81% showed improvement. These preliminary results indicate that dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for radiation synovectomy. The low leakage rates observed offer a definite advantage over agents previously used

  19. Dual responsive dysprosium-doped hydroxyapatite particles and toxicity reduction after functionalization with folic and glucuronic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez Lafarga, Ana Karen; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín P. [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Gurinov, Andrey [Research Resources Center for Magnetic Resonance, Saint Petersburg State University, Universitetskij pr. 26, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel [Laboratorio Desarrollo-Envejecimiento, Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Occidente (CIBO), Instituto Mexicano de Seguro Social (IMSS), Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe, E-mail: gregoriocarbajal@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2015-03-01

    The development of probes for biomedical applications demands materials with low toxicity levels besides fluorescence or magnetic properties to be detected by confocal microscopes or MRI resonators. Several drug delivery systems or other biomedical materials prepared with hydroxyapatite have been proposed, however, toxicity effects might arise when the size of particles is nanometric. In this study, hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic or folic acids presented lower oxidative stress, measured from lipoperoxides and nitric oxide indicators in rats than pure hydroxyapatite. In separated experiments, hydroxyapatite was doped with dysprosium cations by coprecipitation producing a single crystal phase with fluorescent properties easily visualized by confocal microscopy when excited at 488 nm. These particles also presented the ability to modify the proton relaxation time in T1 maps collected by magnetic resonance imaging. These modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles could be candidates to design bimodal probes with low toxicity. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic acid reduced oxidative stress in rats. • Functionalization with folic acid reduced oxidative stress in rats. • Dysprosium doping does not affect the crystalline structure of hydroxyapatite. • Dysprosium doped particles are visible in fluorescent microscope. • Dysprosium doped particles act as MRI contrast agents.

  20. Dual responsive dysprosium-doped hydroxyapatite particles and toxicity reduction after functionalization with folic and glucuronic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez Lafarga, Ana Karen; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín P.; Gurinov, Andrey; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    The development of probes for biomedical applications demands materials with low toxicity levels besides fluorescence or magnetic properties to be detected by confocal microscopes or MRI resonators. Several drug delivery systems or other biomedical materials prepared with hydroxyapatite have been proposed, however, toxicity effects might arise when the size of particles is nanometric. In this study, hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic or folic acids presented lower oxidative stress, measured from lipoperoxides and nitric oxide indicators in rats than pure hydroxyapatite. In separated experiments, hydroxyapatite was doped with dysprosium cations by coprecipitation producing a single crystal phase with fluorescent properties easily visualized by confocal microscopy when excited at 488 nm. These particles also presented the ability to modify the proton relaxation time in T1 maps collected by magnetic resonance imaging. These modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles could be candidates to design bimodal probes with low toxicity. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic acid reduced oxidative stress in rats. • Functionalization with folic acid reduced oxidative stress in rats. • Dysprosium doping does not affect the crystalline structure of hydroxyapatite. • Dysprosium doped particles are visible in fluorescent microscope. • Dysprosium doped particles act as MRI contrast agents

  1. 7 CFR 1260.161 - Establishment and membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....161 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEEF PROMOTION AND RESEARCH Beef Promotion and Research Order Beef Promotion Operating Committee § 1260.161...

  2. 36 CFR 406.161-406.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 406.161-406.169 Section 406.161-406.169 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION... BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION §§ 406.161-406.169 [Reserved] ...

  3. 46 CFR 161.013-11 - Prototype test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prototype test. 161.013-11 Section 161.013-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electric Distress Light for Boats § 161.013-11 Prototype test. (a) Each manufacturer must test a prototype light identical to the lights to be certified prior to...

  4. 40 CFR 161.340 - Toxicology data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toxicology data requirements. 161.340... Toxicology data requirements. (a) Table. Sections 161.100 through 161.102 describe how to use this table to determine the toxicology data requirements and the substance to be tested. Kind of data required (b) Notes...

  5. 28 CFR 39.161-39.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 39.161-39.169 Section 39.161-39.169 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE §§ 39.161-39.169 [Reserved] ...

  6. 21 CFR 161.170 - Canned Pacific salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned Pacific salmon. 161.170 Section 161.170... § 161.170 Canned Pacific salmon. (a) Identity. (1) Canned Pacific salmon is the food prepared from one... forms of canned Pacific salmon are processed from fish prepared by removing the head, gills, and tail...

  7. 45 CFR 2490.161-2490.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 2490.161-2490.169 Section 2490.161-2490.169 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL... CONDUCTED BY THE JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION §§ 2490.161-2490.169 [Reserved] ...

  8. 7 CFR 1789.161 - Conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conflicts of interest. 1789.161 Section 1789.161... Consultant Services Funded by Borrowers-General § 1789.161 Conflicts of interest. The standard for determining organizational conflicts of interest shall be as set forth in the FAR subpart 9.5 (48 CFR part 9...

  9. 49 CFR 28.161-28.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 28.161-28.169 Section 28.161-28.169 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION §§ 28.161-28.169 [Reserved] ...

  10. Watt-level dysprosium fiber laser at 315 μm with 73% slope efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R. I.; Majewski, M. R.; Bharathan, G.; Hudson, D. D.; Fuerbach, A.; Jackson, S. D.

    2018-04-01

    Rare-earth-doped fiber lasers are emerging as promising high-power mid-infrared sources for the 2.6-3.0 {\\mu}m and 3.3-3.8 {\\mu}m regions based on erbium and holmium ions. The intermediate wavelength range, however, remains vastly underserved, despite prospects for important manufacturing and defense applications. Here, we demonstrate the potential of dysprosium-doped fiber to solve this problem, with a simple in-band pumped grating-stabilized linear cavity generating up to 1.06 W at 3.15 {\\mu}m. A slope efficiency of 73% with respect to launched power (77% relative to absorbed power) is achieved: the highest value for any mid-infrared fiber laser to date, to the best of our knowledge. Opportunities for further power and efficiency scaling are also discussed.

  11. Proton NMR relaxivity of blood samples in the presence of some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coroiu, I.; Darabont, Al.; Bogdan, M.

    1999-01-01

    The use of some new compounds in MRI tissue and blood characterisation based on nuclear spin relaxation time measurements cannot be sustained until the molecular sources of these variations are understood. Tissues and blood are complex molecular systems with complex NMR properties. A better comprehension of the molecular basis of relaxation offers the possibility to predict the changes expected for a given pathology. The purpose of this contribution is to evidence the different relaxation characteristics of some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds in the presence and absence of the blood and to give a possible explanation about the molecular processes that cause occurrence of changes. Some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds such as: Gd-CIT (gadolinium citrate), Dy-DTPA (DTPA-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid), iron oxide - gadolinium oxide (or dysprosium oxide)- dextran complexes were prepared. The longitudinal T 1 -1 and transverse T 2 -1 'relaxation rates' measurements have been carried out as a function of molar concentrations. All measurements have been made at room temperature (about 25 deg.C) and the proton Larmor frequency ν o = 90 MHz. The pulsed NMR spectrometer utilised was a commercial Bruker SXP4/100 spectrometer. Transverse relaxation rate measurements have been made using the Carr-Purcell method, while longitudinal relaxation rate measurements using the inversion recovery pulse sequence, 180 angle-τ-90 angle. The accuracy was about 2-3% for the longitudinal relaxation rates and about 5-7% for the transverse relaxation rates. R 1 and R 2 relaxivities, in mM -1 s -1 were determined from the least square determination of the slopes of plots 1/T 1,2 versus compound molar concentration, using at least five independent measurements at several concentrations between 0 and 2 mM. Increased R 2 relaxivity observed for dysprosium compounds in the blood presence can be explained by PRE effect. The largest gain in R 2 relaxivity seems to imply a noncovalent

  12. Investigation on rare earth magnets recycling by organophosphoric extractant encapsulated polymeric beads for separation of dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Kartikey K.; Singh, D.K.; Kain, V.

    2017-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are a basic requirement of the electronics and new industries including green technology. In the present work an organophosphoric extractant encapsulating polyethersulfone (PES) beads has been developed and employed for dysprosium (Dy) separation from aqueous stream. Polyethersulfonic beads encapsulating PC88A were prepared by phase inversion method. During the synthesis of the beads, preparatory parameters were also optimized to obtain best suited beads which were subsequently characterized for their encapsulation capacity and micro structural investigation. The results obtained in the present investigation suggested that PES/PVAJPC88A composite beads could be used for separation of rare earths from aqueous medium obtained from the solubilisation of magnetic scrap materials

  13. Design and validation of a photon insensitive multidetector neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Ros, J.M.; Bedogni, R.; Palermo, I.; Esposito, A.; Delgado, A.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.

    2011-01-01

    This communication describes a photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of Dysprosium (Dy) activation foils located along three perpendicular axes within a single moderating polyethylene sphere. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.6 was used to optimize the spatial arrangement of the detectors and to derive the spectrometer response matrix. Nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence for energies up to 20 MeV was obtained by combining the readings of the detectors located at the same radius value. The spectrometer was calibrated using a previously characterized 14 MeV neutron beam produced in the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG). The overall uncertainty of the spectrometer response matrix at 14 MeV, assessed on the basis of this experiment, was ±3%.

  14. Influence of modifiers on the separation of dysprosium from neodymium using organophosphorus acid derivates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elwert, Tobias; Schwarz, Sabrina; Goldmann, Daniel [TU Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Rohstoffaufbereitung und Recycling

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of three organophosphorus acid derivates (D2EHPA, EHEHPA and Cyanex 572) for the separation of terbium and dysprosium from praseodymium and neodymium from NdFeB magnets in chloride solution. A special focus was put on the effect of phase modifiers. The investigations revealed that all extractants show in general a similar extraction behavior but the extraction is shifted to higher pH values in the order D2EHPA < EHEHPA < Cyanex 572. Therefore, and due to higher realizable loadings, EHEHPA and Cyanex 572 are more suitable for the investigated separation problem than D2EHPA. Whereas EHEHPA requires 1-decanol as phase modifier, Cyanex 572 can be employed without modifier addition.

  15. Automated spectrofluorimetric determinations of terbium and dysprosium in rare earth mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle, S.J.; Za' tar, N. (Kent Univ., Canterbury (UK))

    1983-12-01

    Several methods involving the use of water-soluble binary and ternary complexes have been proposed for the spectrofluorimetric determination based on terbium(III) emission at 545 nm. These are terbium(III) with (A) ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid), (B) o-hydroxyphenyliminodiacetic acid, (C) EDTA + 5-sulphosalicylic acid, (D) EDTA + 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-3,5-disulphonic acid disodium salt (Tiron), and (E) iminodiacetic acid (IDA) + Tiron. Two of the reagent mixtures (D and E) can also be used for the fluorimetric determination of dysprosium(III) at 582 nm. A comparison has been made of these methods in order to select the most satisfactory procedure with respect to selectivity, sensitivity and suitability for adaption to automatic operation. Results are given and discussed.

  16. Spectrographic determination of dysprosium in doped crystals of calcium sulfate used for dosimetric material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoletto, T.; Lordello, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A spectrographic method is described for the quantitative determination of dysprosium in doped crystals of calcium sulphate. The consequences of the changes in some parameters of the excitation conditions, such as arc current, electrode type and total or partial burning of sample, in the analytical results are discussed. Matrix effects are investigated. Variations in the intensity of the spectral lines are verified by recording the spectrum in distinct photographic plates. The role of internal standard in analytical reproducibility and in counterbalance of the variations in the arc current and in the weight of sample is studied. Accuracy is estimated by comparative analysis of two calcium sulphate samples by X-Ray Fluorescence, Neutron Activation and Inductive Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy. (M.A.C.) [pt

  17. Use of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for simultaneous preconcentration of samarium, europium, gadolinium and dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallah, M.H.; Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran; Shemirani, F.; Ghannadi Maragheh, M.

    2008-01-01

    A new preconcentration method of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was developed for simultaneous preconcentration of samarium, europium, gadolinium and dysprosium. DLLME technique was successfully used as a sample preparation method. In this preconcentration method, an appropriate mixture of extraction solvent, disperser solvent was injected rapidly into an aqueous solution containing Sm, Eu, Gd and Dy after complex formation using chelating reagent of the 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN). After phase separation, 0.5 mL of the settled phase containing enriched analytes was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The main factors affected the preconcentration of Sm, Eu, Gd and Dy were extraction and dispersive solvent type and their volume, extraction time, volume of chelating agent (PAN), centrifuge speed and drying temperature of the samples. Under the best operating condition simultaneous preconcentration factors of 80, 100, 103 and 78 were obtained for Sm, Eu, Gd and Dy, respectively. (author)

  18. A model for additive transport in metal halide lamps containing mercury and dysprosium tri-iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beks, M L; Haverlag, M; Mullen, J J A M van der

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of additives in a metal halide lamp is examined through numerical modelling. A model for a lamp containing sodium iodide additives has been modified to study a discharge containing dysprosium tri-iodide salts. To study the complex chemistry the method of Gibbs minimization is used to decide which species have to be taken into account and to fill lookup tables with the chemical composition at different combinations of elemental abundance, lamp pressure and temperature. The results from the model with dysprosium additives were compared with earlier results from the lamp containing sodium additives and a simulation of a pure mercury lamp. It was found that radial segregation creates the conditions required for axial segregation. Radial segregation occurs due to the unequal diffusion of atoms and molecules. Under the right conditions convection currents in the lamp can cause axial demixing. These conditions depend on the ratio of axial convection and radial diffusion as expressed by the Peclet number. At a Peclet number of unity axial segregation is most pronounced. At low Peclet numbers radial segregation is at its worst, while axial segregation is not present. At large Peclet numbers the discharge becomes homogeneously mixed. The degree of axial segregation at a Peclet number of unity depends on the temperature at which the additive under consideration fully dissociates. If the molecules dissociate very close to the walls no molecules are transported by the convective currents in the lamp, and hence axial segregation is limited. If they dissociate further away from the walls in the area where the downward convective currents are strongest, more axial segregation is observed

  19. Dysprosium lithium borate glass mircrospheres for radiation synovectomy: The in vitro and in vivo performance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Di; Yu Jing [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Center for Advanced Materials and Nano-Biomedicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Huang Wenhai, E-mail: whhuang@tongji.edu.cn [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Center for Advanced Materials and Nano-Biomedicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Zhou Nai; Wang Deping [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Center for Advanced Materials and Nano-Biomedicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Yin Wei [Institute of Isotope Research, Sinitic Academy of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Chen Yaqing [The Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2010-08-30

    The radioactive dysprosium lithium borate glass (DyLB) microspheres with different glass compositions were prepared for radiation synovectomy. The biodegradability and biocompatibility of these DyLB microspheres were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The DyLB microspheres studied in this work were partially biodegradable in a simulated body fluid (SBF), with the final weight loss of the microspheres in the range of 24.6% and 55.0% (wt.%) after 8 days of immersion. The ICP results revealed that the dissolution of lithium significantly decreased from 100% to 53.7% with increasing content of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the microspheres from 18% to 22% (wt.%, from S-1 to S-3). However, for all of the three samples, nearly all of the dysprosium (> 99.997%, wt.%) remained in the microspheres, in the form of insoluble phosphates and carbonates, which was proved by the SEM and EDX analyses. The degradation of DyLB microspheres in SBF gradually decreased with immersion time and eventually reached equilibrium after 7 days of immersion. Compared to the other two samples, the S-3 sample with the lowest Dy{sup 3+} dissolution (about 0.002%) was considered more secure for clinical application. Furthermore, the S-3 DyLB microspheres exhibited good biocompatibility, since neither tissue damage nor inflammation was observed, after they were implanted in the liver of rat for two weeks. After neutron activation, the radionuclide purity of radioactive S-3 DyLB microspheres was 99.999%, which were suitable for radiation synovectomy.

  20. Photoluminescence study on amino functionalized dysprosium oxide-zinc oxide composite bifunctional nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Aswathy; Praveen, G.L; Abha, K.; Lekha, G.M [Department of Chemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Kerala 695581 (India); George, Sony, E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Kerala 695581 (India)

    2012-08-15

    An organic dispersion of 9-15 nm size stable dysprosium oxide incorporated zinc oxide nanocomposites exhibiting luminescence in the visible region has been synthesised by a wet chemical precipitation technique at room temperature. Tetraethoxysilane TEOS [(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O){sub 4}Si], (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTS) and a 1:1 mixture of TEOS-APTS have been used as capping agents to control the particle size as well as to achieve uniform dispersion of composite nanoparticles in methanol medium. X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis reveals the formation phase of amino-functionalised colloidal dysprosium oxide incorporated ZnO composite nanoparticles to be of zincite structure. The Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images show that the particles are spheroids in shape, having average crystalline sizes ranging from 9 to 15 nm. The photoluminescence (PL) observed in these composites has been attributed to the presence of near band edge excitonic emission and existence of defect centres. The time correlated single photon counting studies of the composite nanoparticles exhibited three decay pathways. The enhanced PL emission intensity of solid state fluorescence spectra of samples is attributed to the absence of vibrational relaxation process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano-composites are synthesised using a one step wet chemical precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significant fluorescence life time of 8.25 ns is obtained for the nano-composite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano-composite particles exhibited pale yellow fluorescence rather than blue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vibrational cascade free enhanced fluorescence is obtained for the dry sample.

  1. Simultaneous determination of dysprosium, holmium and erbium in high purity rare earth oxides by second order derivative spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbu, M.; Prasada Rao, T.; Iyer, C. S. P.; Damodaran, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    High purity individual rare earth oxides are increasingly used as major components in lasers (Y 2 O 3 ), phosphors (YVO 3 , Eu 2 O 3 ), magnetic bubble memory films (Gd 2 O 3 ) and refractive-index lenses and fibre optics (La 2 O 3 ). The determination of individual lanthanides in high purity rare earth oxides is a more important and difficult task. This paper reports the utilization of higher order derivative spectrophotometry for the simultaneous determination of dysprosium, holmium and erbium in high purity rare earth oxides. The developed procedure is simple, reliable and allows the determination of 0.001 to 0.2% of dysprosium, holmium and erbium in several rare earth. (author). 9 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Evaluating United States and world consumption of neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium in final products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Matthew

    This paper develops scenarios of future rare-earth-magnet metal (neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium) consumption in the permanent magnets used in wind turbines and hybrid electric vehicles. The scenarios start with naive base-case scenarios for growth in wind-turbine and hybrid-electric-vehicle sales over the period 2011 to 2020, using historical data for each good. These naive scenarios assume that future growth follows time trends in historical data and does not depend on any exogenous variable. Specifically, growth of each technological market follows historical time trends, and the amount of rare earths used per unit of technology remains fixed. The chosen reference year is 2010. Implied consumptions of the rare earth magnet metals are calculated from these scenarios. Assumptions are made for the material composition of permanent magnets, the market share of permanent-magnet wind turbines and vehicles, and magnet weight per unit of technology. Different scenarios estimate how changes in factors like the material composition of magnets, growth of the economy, and the price of a substitute could affect future consumption. Each scenario presents a different method for reducing rare earth consumption and could be interpreted as potential policy choices. In 2010, the consumption (metric tons, rare-earth-oxide equivalent) of each rare-earth-magnet metal was as follows. Total neodymium consumption in the world for both technologies was 995 tons; dysprosium consumption was 133 tons; terbium consumption was 50 tons; praseodymium consumption was zero tons. The base scenario for wind turbines shows there could be strong, exponential growth in the global wind turbine market. New U.S. sales of hybrid vehicles would decline (in line with the current economic recession) while non-U.S. sales increase through 2020. There would be an overall increase in the total amount of magnetic rare earths consumed in the world. Total consumption of each rare earth in the short

  3. 40 CFR 63.161 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... process; and/or transformed by chemical reaction into materials that are not organic hazardous air... good engineering judgement and standards, such as ANSI B31-3. In food/medical service means that a... meet written specifications, (2) An exothermic reaction which is a safety hazard, (3) The intended...

  4. Spectrographic determination of dysprosium dopant in calcium sulphate used as dosimetric material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoletto, T.

    1982-01-01

    A spectrographic method is described for the quantitative determination of dysprosium in doped crystals of calcium sulphate. The consequences of the changes in some parameters of the excitation conditions, such as arc current, electrode type and total or partial burning of sample, in the analytical results are discussed. Matrix effects are investigated by comparison among analytical curves obtained from three different methods of standard preparations. Variations in the intensity of the spectral lines are verificated by recording the spectrum in distinct photographic plates (SA-1). The role of internal standard in analytical reproducibility and in counterbalance of the variations in the arc current and in the weight of sample are studied. The great similarity in excitation behavior of many of the rare earths is used to provide a high degree of internal standardization. Precision studies show a standard deviation of about + - 2,4 percent by use of lanthanum as an internal standard. Accuracy is estimate by comparative analysis of two calcium sulphate samples by X-Rays Fluorescence, Neutron Activation and Inductive Coupled Plasma (ICP) Emission Spectroscopy. (Author) [pt

  5. Combustion of gadolinium and dysprosium chelates as a cellular integrity marker in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericsson, A.; Bach-Gansmo, T.; Niklasson, F.; Hemmingsson, A.

    1995-01-01

    A combination of gadolinium (Gd) and dysprosium (Dy) chelates was investigated as a potential marker of cell-membrane integrity by means of a double-contrast effect in MR imaging. Blood samples with varying hematocrit (Hct) levels containing intact or lysed cells were used as model systems. With intact cells, the agents were assumed to be distributed solely extracellularly and the highest Hct studied (69%) was assumed to mimic the ratio of extracellular to intracellular water in tissue. The combined effect on image intensity of Gd (in a concentration corresponding to 0.2 mmol/kg b.w. in humans) and Dy (0.6 mmol/kg b.w.) applied simultaneously was a marked difference in signal intensity between samples with intact and lysed cells in both the T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images with a corresponding increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio. This was the result of a T1 reduction caused by Gd with a negligible Dy susceptibility effect in areas with lysed cells. On the other hand, the Dy susceptibility effect (i.e. reduced apparent T2) dominated in areas with intact cells. Thus, the combination of Gd and Dy may serve as a marker of cell-membrane integrity in MR examinations. (orig.)

  6. Isolation of {sup 163}Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne A.; Nortier, Francois M.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Pollington, Anthony D.; Kunde, Gerd J.; Rabin, Michael W.; Birnbaum, Eva R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Div.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J. [Univ. Wisconsinn, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Medical Physics

    2015-07-01

    The rare earth isotope {sup 163}Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of {sup 163}Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, {sup 163}Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm{sup -3} α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MS to determine the {sup 163}Ho/{sup 165}Ho ratio, {sup 163}Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4 x 10{sup 5} for Dy. The isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ± 1.3 ng of {sup 163}Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.

  7. Self-organized dysprosium-directed alginate hydrogels and its chemical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qianmin [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Gao, Jinwei [Institute for Advanced Materials, Academy of Advanced Optoelectronics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Peng, Huojun [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Qianming, E-mail: qmwang@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion and Storage, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Rational use of self-organized materials may contribute in developing new structures and devices in practical technology. Synthetic metallo-supramolecular gels are generally designed with transitional metal-directed process. However, the assembly of both lanthanide and sodium alginate in macromolecular systems would find a new way of utilizing its physical properties. The stimuli-responsive molecule (alginate) could firmly form stable hydrogels upon the encapsulation of dysprosium ions. In addition, the immobilization of YVO{sub 4}: Eu{sup 3+} nanoparticle in the soft matrix has been achieved and it has never been explored in the fabrication of phosphor-incorporated luminescent alginate gels. The key feature of the present soft matter is that its red emission could be switched off in the presence of sodium ascorbate and the results may have a tremendous impact on the extension of photophysical application based on soft nanoscale devices. - Highlights: • Dy{sup 3+} can be used for the gelation of the dissolved alginate. • Lanthanide hydrogels could exhibit red emissions under excitations. • Luminescence could be switched “off” in the presence of sodium ascorbate.

  8. Optical properties of zinc borotellurite glass doped with trivalent dysprosium ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ami Hazlin, M. N.; Halimah, M. K.; Muhammad, F. D.; Faznny, M. F.

    2017-04-01

    The zinc borotellurite doped with dysprosium oxide glass samples with chemical formula {[(TeO2) 0 . 7(B2O3) 0 . 3 ] 0 . 7(ZnO) 0 . 3 } 1 - x(Dy2O3)x (where x=0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05 M fraction) were prepared by using conventional melt quenching technique. The structural and optical properties of the proposed glass systems were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and UV-VIS spectroscopy. The amorphous nature of the glass systems is confirmed by using XRD technique. The infrared spectra of the glass systems indicate three obvious absorption bands which are assigned to BO3 and TeO4 vibrational groups. Based on the absorption spectra obtained, the direct and indirect optical band gaps, as well as the Urbach energy were calculated. It is observed that both the direct and indirect optical band gaps increase with the concentration of Dy3+ ions. On the other hand, the Urbach energy is observed to decrease as the concentration of Dy3+ ions increases.

  9. The liquid membrane for extraction of Yttrium and Dysprosium from Acid Nitric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johny, W.S.; Raldi-Artono-Koestoer; Kris-Tri-Basuki; Sudibyo

    1996-01-01

    The determination of surfactant in liquid membrane has been done. The surfactant is span-80 (sorbitol-monooleate), the liquid membrane phase was the organic phase (O), the internal liquid phase (W) with ratio O/W = 1, and surfactant. The organic phase using D 2 EHPA in the kerosene and the internal liquid phase using aqua des or acid nitric. The determination of surfactant with variation of span-80 (0,25 - 2%) in the liquid membrane volume. The speed of stirrer was 3500 rpm in 20 minute. The ratio of liquid membrane phase form and external phase (aqua des or acid nitric) was 1, the speed of stirrer was 350 rpm in 10 minute (permeation process). The liquid phase and the liquid membrane phase was separated and then determinated the volume of liquid membrane, the result of percentage of span-80 was 0,25 % volume. The extraction of yttrium and dysprosium in 2 M HNO 3 was Kd y = 2.945 and Kd D y = 0.019

  10. 21 CFR 516.161 - Modifications to indexed drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Modifications to indexed drugs. 516.161 Section 516.161 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Index...

  11. 40 CFR 161.35 - Flexibility of the data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flexibility of the data requirements. 161.35 Section 161.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE... periodically to reflect new scientific knowledge, new trends in pesticide development, and new Agency policies...

  12. 7 CFR 1150.161 - Promotion, research and nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Promotion, research and nutrition education. 1150.161... MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and Research Order Promotion, Research and Nutrition Education § 1150.161 Promotion...

  13. 33 CFR 161.20 - Position Report (PR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Position Report (PR). 161.20 Section 161.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Report (PR). A vessel must report its name and position: (a) Upon point of entry into a VMRS area; (b) At...

  14. 12 CFR 563.161 - Management and financial policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Management and financial policies. 563.161... ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Financial Management Policies § 563.161 Management and financial policies. (a)(1) For... corporation must be well managed and operate safely and soundly. Each also must pursue financial policies that...

  15. 21 CFR 161.175 - Frozen raw breaded shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... additives as defined in section 201(s) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; or if they are food... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen raw breaded shrimp. 161.175 Section 161.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.161 - Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. 1910.161 Section... § 1910.161 Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. (a) Scope and application. This section applies to all fixed extinguishing systems, using dry chemical as the extinguishing agent, installed to meet a...

  17. 24 CFR 982.161 - Conflict of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conflict of interest. 982.161... and PHA Administration of Program § 982.161 Conflict of interest. (a) Neither the PHA nor any of its... prospective interest to the PHA and HUD. (c) The conflict of interest prohibition under this section may be...

  18. 30 CFR 75.161 - Plans for training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plans for training programs. 75.161 Section 75... Provision] § 75.161 Plans for training programs. Each operator must submit to the district manager, of the Coal Mine Safety and Health District in which the mine is located, a program or plan setting forth what...

  19. 12 CFR 410.161-410.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 410.161-410.169 Section 410.161-410.169 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES §§ 410...

  20. 22 CFR 161.11 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements. 161.11 Section 161.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) Coordination of Other Requirements... comments. (d) Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, 16 U.S.C. 661 et seq. (e) Section 309 of the Clean Air...

  1. 27 CFR 1.61 - Use of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of wine. 1.61 Section..., NONINDUSTRIAL USE OF DISTILLED SPIRITS AND WINE, BULK SALES AND BOTTLING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Nonindustrial Use of Distilled Spirits and Wine Uses Regarded As Industrial § 1.61 Use of wine. The following uses of...

  2. The unpaired spectroscopy of sup 161,162 Er at spins up to 50 Dirac h

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, M.A.; Roberts, J.W.; Alderson, A.; Ali, I.; Cullen, D.M.; Fallon, P.; Forsyth, P.D.; Sharpey-Schafer, J.F. (Liverpool Univ. (UK). Oliver Lodge Lab.); Simpson, J.; Bentley, M.A.; Bruce, A.M. (Science and Engineering Research Council, Daresbury (UK). Daresbury Lab.); Chapman, R.; Lisle, J.C.; Mo, J.N. (Manchester Univ. (UK). Schuster Lab.)

    1990-12-24

    High spin states in {sup 161}Er and {sup 162}Er have been populated using the {sup 130}Te+{sup 36}S reaction at a bombarding energy of 170 MeV. In {sup 161}Er, three rotational bands were extended from I {approx equal} 35{Dirac h} to I {approx equal} 50{Dirac h}. In {sup 162}Er the positive parity yrast band was observed to I=44{Dirac h}. These rotational sequences are compared to a simple unpaired model which was successful in predicting the behaviour of similar high spin data on {sup 159,160}Er. These studies of the light Er isotopes constitute the highest spins observed in normal deformed nuclei and yield direct and specific information on the single-neutron spectrum of states. (orig.).

  3. Custom Coordination Environments for Lanthanoids: Tripodal Ligands Achieve Near-Perfect Octahedral Coordination for Two Dysprosium-Based Molecular Nanomagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kwang Soo; Baldoví, José J; Jiang, ShangDa; Koo, Bong Ho; Kang, Dong Won; Lee, Woo Ram; Koh, Eui Kwan; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Coronado, Eugenio; Slota, Michael; Bogani, Lapo; Hong, Chang Seop

    2017-05-01

    Controlling the coordination sphere of lanthanoid complexes is a challenging critical step toward controlling their relaxation properties. Here we present the synthesis of hexacoordinated dysprosium single-molecule magnets, where tripodal ligands achieve a near-perfect octahedral coordination. We perform a complete experimental and theoretical investigation of their magnetic properties, including a full single-crystal magnetic anisotropy analysis. The combination of electrostatic and crystal-field computational tools (SIMPRE and CONDON codes) allows us to explain the static behavior of these systems in detail.

  4. Experimental and theoretical approach on the optical properties of zinc borotellurite glass doped with dysprosium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimah, M. K.; Ami Hazlin, M. N.; Muhammad, F. D.

    2018-04-01

    A series of glass samples with chemical formula {[(TeO2)0.7(B2O3)0.3]0.7(ZnO)0.3}1 - x(Dy2O3)x where x = 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05 M fraction were synthesized through conventional melt-quenching method. The most common way to fabricate a glass material is by fusion of two or more component oxides followed by their quenching. This technique is known as melt-quenching technique. Kaur et al. (2016) [1] highlighted that the melt-quenching method able to enhance the mechanical properties like hardness and flexural strength of the material. The nature of the glass systems is proven to be amorphous based on the XRD pattern. The FTIR spectra of the glass systems confirm the existence of five bands which are assigned for the BO4, BO3, TeO4 and TeO3 vibrational groups. The density of the glass systems is increased with the addition of Dy2O3 while the molar volume is found to be inversely proportional to the density of the proposed glass. The optical properties of the glasses are determined through the absorption spectra obtained from the UV-VIS spectrophotometer. From the absorption spectra, the indirect and direct optical band gaps and the Urbach energy are found to be inversely proportional to each other. As the molar fraction of the Dy2O3 increased, the optical band gaps are observed to increase as opposed to the Urbach energy. For this glass system, the values of refractive index, electronic polarizability, oxide ion polarizability and the optical basicity are found to decrease as the addition of the dysprosium oxide is increased. From the emission spectra, two intense blue and yellow emission bands are observed, which correspond to the 4F9/2 → 6H15/2 and 4F9/2 → 6H13/2 transitions of Dy3 + ions respectively. The CIE chromaticity coordinates of the zinc borotellurite glass systems are found to be located in the white light region. Generation of white light The generation of the white light can be achieved by using two emission bands which comprise of the yellow

  5. Textured dysprosium and gadolinium poles for high-field, short-period hybrid undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murokh, Alex; Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Agustsson, Ron; O'Shea, Finn H.; Chubar, Oleg; Chen, Yung; Grandsaert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the feasibility of enhancement of the gap field in a short-period hybrid undulator by using pole inserts with the saturation inductance B s , over that of iron, 2 T. Dysprosium metal, with the saturation inductance of 3.4 T below 90 K, and Gadolinium with B s =2.7 T, appear as good candidates as the optimized pole material. However, due to the high magnetic anisotropy of Dy, such a high level of magnetization can only be realized when the external field lies in the basal plane. This implies that the pole has to be single-crystalline or highly textured. Considering that growing large, >10mm, Dy single crystals is difficult, we propose secondary recrystallization as a method to induce the required texture in thin Dy and Gd foils. The textured foils can be stacked to produce pole inserts of the desired geometry and orientation. Results of small-scale processing and magnetic measurements of thin (20–60 μ) foils provide evidence that the required texture quality can be achieved by a relatively simple sequence of heat-treatments and cold rolling. The advantage of textured Dy and Gd poles is demonstrated in a several period test undulator. -- Highlights: • Textured rare-earth materials for use as undulator pole materials. • We measure the development of texture in Dy and Gd. • We compare the rare-earth materials with high saturation steel in undulators. • Thin sheets of Dy and Gd materials perform similar to single crystals

  6. 46 CFR 161.006-1 - Applicable specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Nickel Plus Chromium and Nickel Plus Chromium—161.006-4 You may obtain these standards from The American...) Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc.: Standard for flexible cord and fixture wire, third edition, October, 1935. (b...

  7. 33 CFR 161.4 - Requirement to carry the rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY VESSEL TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT Vessel Traffic Services General Rules § 161... the Local Notice to Mariners. The VTS User's Manual and the World VTS Guide, an International Maritime...

  8. Eestist osaleb rahvusvahelisel reklaamifestivalil 161 reklaami / Sergo Selder

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Selder, Sergo

    2005-01-01

    Riias toimuvast kuuendast Baltimaade reklaamifestivalist "Kuldne haamer" ("Golden Hammer"). Eestist on esitatud 161 reklaami. Žüriisse kuulub eestlastest Jaanus Vahtra reklaamifirmast Saatchi & Saatchi, kelle Diseli õllereklaam võitis möödunud aastal telereklaamide Kuldhaamri

  9. The application of x-ray spectrometry to isotopic-source activation analysis of dysprosium and holmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, A.E.; Mboweni, R.C.M.

    1990-01-01

    A novel aspect of activation analysis is described for the determination of dysprosium and holmium at low concentrations. The method involves the measurement of K x-rays from radionuclides produced by thermal neutron activation using a 1 mg 252 Cf source. The basis for elemental selection depends largely on the demand for analysis and on the existence of favourable nuclear properties for the production of a practicable x-ray yield. A full appraisal of the analytical potential of the method is presented with particular emphasis on its application to geological matrices. The sensitivity was optimised by employing a detector that was particularly effective at photon energies below 150 keV. Analytical conditions are demonstrated for the elements of interest over a wide range of concentrations in small powdered samples. The investigation formed the basis of a feasibility study to establish if the application could be developed for the routine off-line determination of dysprosium and holmium using an isotopic-neutron source. (author)

  10. Reduction of titanocene dichloride with dysprosium: access to a stable titanocene(ii) equivalent for phosphite-free Takeda carbonyl olefination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousrez, G; Déchamps, I; Vasse, J-L; Jaroschik, F

    2015-05-28

    The reduction of titanocene dichloride with dysprosium yields a new titanocene(ii) equivalent without the need for further stabilising ligands. This reagent can be employed in combination with dithioacetals for the olefination of different carbonyl groups and allows for a simplified all-in-one procedure.

  11. Acute dysprosium toxicity to Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and development of the biotic ligand approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukov, Oliver, E-mail: vuko3930@mylaurier.ca [Biology Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); Smith, D. Scott [Chemistry Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); McGeer, James C. [Biology Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    The toxicological understanding of rare earth elements (REEs) in the aquatic environment is very limited but of increasing concern. The objective of this research is to compare the toxicological effect of the REE dysprosium to the freshwater invertebrates Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and in the more sensitive organism, understand the toxicity modifying influence of Ca, Na, Mg, pH and dissolved organic matter (DOM). Standard methods (Environment Canada) were followed for testing and culture in media of intermediate hardness (60 mg CaCO{sub 3} mg/L) at pH 7.8 with Ca at 0.5, Na 0.5, Mg 0.125 (mM) and 23 °C. Acute toxicity tests were done with <24 h old neonates for 48 h in the case of D. pulex and with 2–9 days old offspring for 96 h tests with Hyalella. The potential protective effect of cationic competition was tested with Ca (0.5–2.0 mM), Na (0.5–2.0 mM) and Mg (0.125–0.5 mM). The effect of pH (6.5–8.0) and Suwannee River DOM complexation (at dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of 9 and 13 mg C/L) were evaluated. Dissolved Dy concentrations were lower than total (unfiltered) indicating precipitation, particularly at higher concentrations. Acute toxicity of Dy to H. azteca and D. pulex revealed Hyalella to be 1.4 times more sensitive than Daphnia. Additions of Ca and Na but not Mg provided significant protection against Dy toxicity to Hyalella. Similarly, low pH was associated with reduction in toxicity. Exposures which were pH buffered with and without MOPS were significantly different and indicated that MOPS enhanced Dy toxicity. DOM also mitigated Dy toxicity. Biotic ligand based parameters (Log K values) were calculated based on free ion relationships as determined by geochemical equilibrium modeling software (WHAM ver. 7.02). The log K value for Dy{sup 3+} toxicity to Hyalella was 7.75 while the protective influence of Ca and Na were 3.95 and 4.10, respectively. This study contributes data towards the development of site specific

  12. Synthesis and characterization of phosphors based on calcium and magnesium silicates doped with europium and dysprosium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misso, Agatha Matos

    2016-01-01

    Ca and Mg silicates based phosphors were prepared by sol-gel method combined with the molten salts process. The gel of silica was obtained from Na 2 SiO 3 solution by using europium, dysprosium, calcium and magnesium chloride solutions. Therefore, those chlorides were homogeneously dispersed into the gel. The obtained gel was dried and heat treated to 900° C for 1h to allow the fusion of the present salts. Then it was water washed until negative test for Cl - , and dried. The reduction of the europium to Eu 2+ was performed under atmosphere of 5% of H 2 and 95% of Ar to 900° C for 3h, to reach CaMgSi 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ and CaMgSi 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ :Dy 3+ phosphors. Diopside was identified as main crystalline phase and quartz, as secondary phase from XRD (X-ray diffraction) patterns. SEM (scanning electron microscopy) micrographs, of the samples showed needles, spheres, leaves and rods of particles and agglomerates. Thermal analysis (TGA-DTGA) curves revealed that the crystallization temperature of CaMgSi 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ lies around 765° C. Photoluminescence spectroscopy of the phosphors was studied based on interconfigurational 4f N → 4f N-1 5d transition of Eu 2+ ion. The spectra of excitation showed 4f N → 4f N-1 5d transition of Eu 2+ ion broad band, related to the ligand to metal charge transfer transition (LMCT) O 2- (2p) → Eu 3+ in the 250 nm region, when the emission is monitored at 583,5 nm. It also presents the 4f ↔ 4f transitions of Eu 3+ ion bands, showing the 7 F 0 → 5 L 6 transition at 393 nm. From emission spectra with excitation monitored at 393 nm, it can be observed fine peaks between 570 and 750 nm which are characteristics of 5 D 0 → 7 F J (J = 0 - 5) transition of Eu 3+ ion, indicating that the Eu 3+ ion occupies a site with center of inversion. Finally, the obtained results indicate that the developed method is suitable to synthesize CaMgSi 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ and CaMgSi 2 O 6 :Eu 2+ :Dy 3+ phosphors, as it has been proposed. (author)

  13. An ICP AES method for determination of dysprosium and terbium in high purity yttrium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2011-01-01

    High purity yttrium finds interesting application in astronavigation, luminescence, nuclear energy and metallurgical industries. Most of these applications require yttrium oxide of highest purity. Consequently there is a need for production of high purity yttrium oxide. Separation and purification of yttrium from other rare earths is a challenging task due to their close chemical properties. Liquid-liquid extraction and ion exchange have been widely used in the production of yttrium oxide of highest purity. Determination of impurities, especially other rare earths, in ppm level is required for process development and chemical characterization of the high purity Y 2 O 3 . Many methods have been described in literature. However since the advent of ICP AES much work in this area has been carried out by this technique. This paper describes the work done for determination of dysprosium (Dy) and terbium (Tb) in yttrium oxide using a high resolution sequential ICP AES. Emission spectra of rare earth elements are very complex and due to this complexity it is important to select spectral interference free analyte lines for determination of rare earths in rare earth matrix. For the determination of Dy and Tb in Y 2 O 3 , sensitive lines of Dy and Tb are selected from the instrument wavelength table and spectral interference free emission lines for the determination is selected by scanning around the selected wavelengths using 5 g/L Y solution and 5 mg/L standard solutions of Dy and Tb prepared in 4% nitric acid. It is found 353.170 nm line of Dy and 350.917 nm line Tb is suitable for quantitative determination. The signal to background ratio increases with increase in matrix concentration, i.e. from 1 to 5 mg/L. The optimum forward power is determined and it is found to be 1100W for Dy and 1000W for Tb. The instrument is calibrated using matrix matched standards containing 5g/L of Y matrix. Samples are dissolved in nitric acid and Y concentration is maintained at 5g/L. Two

  14. Acute dysprosium toxicity to Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and development of the biotic ligand approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukov, Oliver; Smith, D. Scott; McGeer, James C.

    2016-01-01

    The toxicological understanding of rare earth elements (REEs) in the aquatic environment is very limited but of increasing concern. The objective of this research is to compare the toxicological effect of the REE dysprosium to the freshwater invertebrates Daphnia pulex and Hyalella azteca and in the more sensitive organism, understand the toxicity modifying influence of Ca, Na, Mg, pH and dissolved organic matter (DOM). Standard methods (Environment Canada) were followed for testing and culture in media of intermediate hardness (60 mg CaCO 3 mg/L) at pH 7.8 with Ca at 0.5, Na 0.5, Mg 0.125 (mM) and 23 °C. Acute toxicity tests were done with <24 h old neonates for 48 h in the case of D. pulex and with 2–9 days old offspring for 96 h tests with Hyalella. The potential protective effect of cationic competition was tested with Ca (0.5–2.0 mM), Na (0.5–2.0 mM) and Mg (0.125–0.5 mM). The effect of pH (6.5–8.0) and Suwannee River DOM complexation (at dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of 9 and 13 mg C/L) were evaluated. Dissolved Dy concentrations were lower than total (unfiltered) indicating precipitation, particularly at higher concentrations. Acute toxicity of Dy to H. azteca and D. pulex revealed Hyalella to be 1.4 times more sensitive than Daphnia. Additions of Ca and Na but not Mg provided significant protection against Dy toxicity to Hyalella. Similarly, low pH was associated with reduction in toxicity. Exposures which were pH buffered with and without MOPS were significantly different and indicated that MOPS enhanced Dy toxicity. DOM also mitigated Dy toxicity. Biotic ligand based parameters (Log K values) were calculated based on free ion relationships as determined by geochemical equilibrium modeling software (WHAM ver. 7.02). The log K value for Dy 3+ toxicity to Hyalella was 7.75 while the protective influence of Ca and Na were 3.95 and 4.10, respectively. This study contributes data towards the development of site specific water quality

  15. Dual responsive dysprosium-doped hydroxyapatite particles and toxicity reduction after functionalization with folic and glucuronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Lafarga, Ana Karen; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín P; Gurinov, Andrey; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2015-03-01

    The development of probes for biomedical applications demands materials with low toxicity levels besides fluorescence or magnetic properties to be detected by confocal microscopes or MRI resonators. Several drug delivery systems or other biomedical materials prepared with hydroxyapatite have been proposed, however, toxicity effects might arise when the size of particles is nanometric. In this study, hydroxyapatite functionalized with glucuronic or folic acids presented lower oxidative stress, measured from lipoperoxides and nitric oxide indicators in rats than pure hydroxyapatite. In separated experiments, hydroxyapatite was doped with dysprosium cations by coprecipitation producing a single crystal phase with fluorescent properties easily visualized by confocal microscopy when excited at 488nm. These particles also presented the ability to modify the proton relaxation time in T1 maps collected by magnetic resonance imaging. These modified hydroxyapatite nanoparticles could be candidates to design bimodal probes with low toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic anisotropy of dysprosium(III) in a low-symmetry environment: a theoretical and experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernot, Kevin; Luzon, Javier; Bogani, Lapo; Etienne, Mael; Sangregorio, Claudio; Shanmugam, Muralidharan; Caneschi, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta; Gatteschi, Dante

    2009-04-22

    A mixed theoretical and experimental approach was used to determine the local magnetic anisotropy of the dysprosium(III) ion in a low-symmetry environment. The susceptibility tensor of the monomeric species having the formula [Dy(hfac)(3)(NIT-C(6)H(4)-OEt)(2)], which contains nitronyl nitroxide (NIT-R) radicals, was determined at various temperatures through angle-resolved magnetometry. These results are in agreement with ab initio calculations performed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method, validating the predictive power of this theoretical approach for complex systems containing rare-earth ions, even in low-symmetry environments. Susceptibility measurements performed with the applied field along the easy axis eventually permitted a detailed analysis of the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization, providing evidence that the Dy ion transmits an antiferromagnetic interaction between radicals but that the Dy-radical interaction is ferromagnetic.

  17. Watt-level dysprosium fiber laser at 3.15  μm with 73% slope efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R I; Majewski, M R; Bharathan, G; Hudson, D D; Fuerbach, A; Jackson, S D

    2018-04-01

    Rare-earth-doped fiber lasers are emerging as promising high-power mid-infrared sources for the 2.6-3.0 μm and 3.3-3.8 μm regions based on erbium and holmium ions. The intermediate wavelength range, however, remains vastly underserved, despite prospects for important manufacturing and defense applications. Here, we demonstrate the potential of dysprosium-doped fiber to solve this problem, with a simple in-band pumped grating-stabilized linear cavity generating up to 1.06 W at 3.15 μm. A slope efficiency of 73% with respect to launched power (77% relative to absorbed power) is achieved-the highest value for any mid-infrared fiber laser to date, to the best of our knowledge. Opportunities for further power and efficiency scaling are also discussed.

  18. Hindered El Transitions in Eu155 and Tb161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmskog, Sven G.

    1965-02-01

    The absolute E1 transition probabilities from the 3/2 + (411), 5/2 - (532) and 7/2 - (523) single particle levels in Eu 155 and Tb 161 have been measured by the method of delayed coincidences. This gave half lives of T 1/2 1/2 = (1.38 ± 0.06) ns for the 104.4 and 246 keV levels in Eu 155 . T 1/2 = (0.84 ± 0.04) ns and T 1/2 161 . The result has been compared with the calculations of a single particle in a deformed potential made by Nilsson

  19. 12 CFR 16.1 - Authority, purpose, and scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....1 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SECURITIES OFFERING DISCLOSURE RULES § 16.1 Authority, purpose, and scope. (a) Authority. This part is issued under the general... 12 U.S.C. 93a. (b) Purpose. This part sets forth rules governing the offer and sale of securities...

  20. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains a...

  1. 33 CFR 161.12 - Vessel operating requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....0′ N. extending eastward through the Golden Gate, and the navigable waters of San Francisco Bay and... safety beyond that provided by other means. The bridge-to-bridge navigational frequency, 156.650 MHz (Ch... Measures, and Operating Requirements § 161.12 Vessel operating requirements. (a) Subject to the exigencies...

  2. Synthesis and characterization of a family of structurally characterized dysprosium alkoxides for improved fatigue-resistance characteristics of PDyZT thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Timothy J; Bunge, Scott D; Clem, Paul G; Richardson, Jacob; Dawley, Jeffrey T; Ottley, Leigh Anna M; Rodriguez, Mark A; Tuttle, Bruce A; Avilucea, Gabriel R; Tissot, Ralph G

    2005-03-07

    Using either an ammoniacal route, the reaction between DyCl3, Na0, and HOR in liquid ammonia, or preferentially reacting Dy(N(SiMe3)2)3 with HOR in a solvent, we isolated a family of dysprosium alkoxides as [Dy(mu-ONep)2(ONep)]4 (1), (ONep)2Dy[(mu3-ONep)(mu-ONep)Dy(ONep)(THF)]2(mu-ONep) (2), (ONep)2Dy[(mu3-ONep)(mu-ONep)Dy(ONep)(py)]2(mu-ONep) (3), [Dy3(mu3-OBut)2(mu-OBut3(OBut)4(HOBut)2] (4), [Dy3(mu3-OBut)2(mu-OBut)3(OBut)4(THF)2] (5), [Dy3(mu3-OBut)2(mu-OBut)3(OBut)4(py)2] (6), (DMP)Dy(mu-DMP)4[Dy(DMP)2(NH3)]2 (7), [Dy(eta6-DMP)(DMP)2]2 (8), Dy(DMP)3(THF)3 (9), Dy(DMP)3(py)3 (10), Dy(DIP)3(NH3)2 (11), [Dy(eta6-DIP)(DIP)2]2 (12), Dy(DIP)3(THF)2 (13), Dy(DIP)3(py)3 (14), Dy(DBP)3(NH3) (15), Dy(DBP)3 (16), Dy(DBP)3(THF) (17), Dy(DBP)3(py)2 (18), [Dy(mu-TPS)(TPS2]2 (19), Dy(TPS)3(THF)3 (20), and Dy(TPS)3(py)3 (21), where ONep = OCH2CMe3, OBut) = OCMe3, DMP = OC6H3(Me)(2)-2,6, DIP = OC6H3(CHMe2)(2)-2,6, DBP = OC6H3(CMe3)(2)-2,6, TPS = OSi(C6H5)3, tol = toluene, THF = tetrahydrofuran, and py = pyridine. We were not able to obtain X-ray quality crystals of compounds 2, 8, and 9. The structures observed and data collected for the Dy compounds are consistent with those reported for its other congeners. A number of these precursors were used as Dy dopants in Pb(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3 (PZT 30/70) thin films, with compound 12 yielding the highest-quality films. The resulting Pb0.94Dy0.04(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3 [PDyZT (4/30/70)] had similar properties to PZT (30/70), but showed substantial resistance to polarization reversal fatigue.

  3. On-line complexation/cloud point preconcentration for the sensitive determination of dysprosium in urine by flow injection inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Claudia; Cerutti, Soledad; Silva, Maria F.; Olsina, Roberto A.; Martinez, Luis D.

    2003-01-01

    An on-line dysprosium preconcentration and determination system based on the hyphenation of cloud point extraction (CPE) to flow injection analysis (FIA) associated with ICP-OES was studied. For the preconcentration of dysprosium, a Dy(III)-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol complex was formed on-line at pH 9.22 in the presence of nonionic micelles of PONPE-7.5. The micellar system containing the complex was thermostated at 30 C in order to promote phase separation, and the surfactant-rich phase was retained in a microcolumn packed with cotton at pH 9.2. The surfactant-rich phase was eluted with 4 mol L -1 nitric acid at a flow rate of 1.5 mL min -1 , directly in the nebulizer of the plasma. An enhancement factor of 50 was obtained for the preconcentration of 50 mL of sample solution. The detection limit value for the preconcentration of 50 mL of aqueous solution of Dy was 0.03 μg L -1 . The precision for 10 replicate determinations at the 2.0 μg L -1 Dy level was 2.2% relative standard deviation (RSD), calculated from the peak heights obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for dysprosium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 100 μg L -1 . The method was successfully applied to the determination of dysprosium in urine. (orig.)

  4. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with a tantalum boat for the determination of yttrium, samarium, and dysprosium in a mish metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daidoji, Hidehiro; Tamura, Shohei

    1982-01-01

    The determination of yttrium, samarium, and dysprodium by means of graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) was studied by a tantalum boat inserted into a graphite tube atomizer. These elements could not be determined by the use of a commercial graphite tube, In the atomization from a tantalum boat, better analytical sensitivities and negligible memory effects for these rare earths are obtained. The analytical sensitivities of yttrium, samarium, and dysprodium with the tantalum boat were 0.60 ng, 0.86 ng, and 0.17 ng respectively. This method was applied for the determination of yttrium, samarium, and dysprosium in a mish metal. The measurements were performed with slightly acidified solutions (0.01 mol dm 3 HCI or HNO 3 ). The sensitivities and the precisions for these elements decreased with increasing acid concentration. An enhancement in the sensitivities of yttrium and dysprosium upon the addition of a large excess of lanthanum, neodymium, and praseodymium salts were observed. The yttrium, samarium, and dysprosium in a mish metal were determined with both analytical curves of standard solutions containing an excess of lanthanum, cerium, and neodymium ions and of the standard addition. The precisions for this work were in the 3 - 9.3% range. (author)

  5. 38 CFR 3.161 - Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative-Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Adjudication Initiative-Pilot Program. 3.161 Section 3.161 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Claims § 3.161 Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative—Pilot Program. Rules pertaining to the Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative Pilot Program are set forth in part 20, subpart P, of this chapter...

  6. 33 CFR 161.60 - Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... William Sound. 161.60 Section 161.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.60 Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound... Cape Hinchinbrook Light to Schooner Rock Light, comprising that portion of Prince William Sound between...

  7. 40 CFR 161.490 - Wildlife and aquatic organisms data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wildlife and aquatic organisms data... § 161.490 Wildlife and aquatic organisms data requirements. (a) Table. Sections 161.100 through 161.102 describe how to use this table to determine the wildlife and aquatic organisms data requirements and the...

  8. 40 CFR 161.55 - Agricultural vs. non-agricultural pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pesticides. 161.55 Section 161.55 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES General Provisions § 161.55 Agricultural vs. non-agricultural pesticides. Section 25(a)(1) of FIFRA instructs the...

  9. 43 CFR 16.1 - Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. 16.1 Section 16.1 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONSERVATION OF HELIUM § 16.1 Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. (a) Pursuant to his authority and...

  10. 22 CFR 161.10 - Non-Federal applicants for permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-Federal applicants for permits. 161.10 Section 161.10 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) Coordination of Other Requirements of NEPA § 161...

  11. Workplace testing of the new single sphere neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils (Dy-SSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedogni, R.; Gómez-Ros, J.M.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Chiti, M.; Palacios-Pérez, L.; Angelone, M.; Tana, L.

    2012-01-01

    A photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of a single moderating polyethylene sphere with Dysprosium activation foils arranged along three perpendicular axes was designed by CIEMAT and INFN. The device is called Dy-SSS (Dy foil-based Single Sphere Spectrometer). It shows nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence up to 20 MeV. The first prototype, previously calibrated with 14 MeV neutrons, has been recently tested in workplaces having different energy and directional distributions. These are a 2.5 MeV nearly mono-chromatic and mono-directional beam available at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) and the photo-neutron field produced in a 15 MV Varian CLINAC DHX medical accelerator, located in the Ospedale S. Chiara (Pisa). Both neutron spectra are known through measurements with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer. In both cases the experimental response of the Dy-SSS agrees with the reference data. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the spectrometric capability of the new device are independent from the directional distribution of the neutron field. This opens the way to a new generation of moderation-based neutron instruments, presenting all advantages of the Bonner sphere spectrometer without the disadvantage of the repeated exposures. This concept is being developed within the NESCOFI@BTF project of INFN (Commissione Scientifica Nazionale 5).

  12. Workplace testing of the new single sphere neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils (Dy-SSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, R.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Chiti, M.; Palacios-Pérez, L.; Angelone, M.; Tana, L.

    2012-08-01

    A photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of a single moderating polyethylene sphere with Dysprosium activation foils arranged along three perpendicular axes was designed by CIEMAT and INFN. The device is called Dy-SSS (Dy foil-based Single Sphere Spectrometer). It shows nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence up to 20 MeV. The first prototype, previously calibrated with 14 MeV neutrons, has been recently tested in workplaces having different energy and directional distributions. These are a 2.5 MeV nearly mono-chromatic and mono-directional beam available at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) and the photo-neutron field produced in a 15 MV Varian CLINAC DHX medical accelerator, located in the Ospedale S. Chiara (Pisa). Both neutron spectra are known through measurements with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer. In both cases the experimental response of the Dy-SSS agrees with the reference data. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the spectrometric capability of the new device are independent from the directional distribution of the neutron field. This opens the way to a new generation of moderation-based neutron instruments, presenting all advantages of the Bonner sphere spectrometer without the disadvantage of the repeated exposures. This concept is being developed within the NESCOFI@BTF project of INFN (Commissione Scientifica Nazionale 5).

  13. Workplace testing of the new single sphere neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils (Dy-SSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedogni, R., E-mail: roberto.bedogni@lnf.infn.it [INFN-LNF (Frascati National Laboratories), Via E. Fermi n. 40-00044 Frascati (Italy); Gomez-Ros, J.M. [INFN-LNF (Frascati National Laboratories), Via E. Fermi n. 40-00044 Frascati (Italy); CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Chiti, M.; Palacios-Perez, L. [INFN-LNF (Frascati National Laboratories), Via E. Fermi n. 40-00044 Frascati (Italy); Angelone, M. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Tana, L. [A.O. Universitaria Pisana-Ospedale S. Chiara, Via Bonanno Pisano, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-08-21

    A photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of a single moderating polyethylene sphere with Dysprosium activation foils arranged along three perpendicular axes was designed by CIEMAT and INFN. The device is called Dy-SSS (Dy foil-based Single Sphere Spectrometer). It shows nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence up to 20 MeV. The first prototype, previously calibrated with 14 MeV neutrons, has been recently tested in workplaces having different energy and directional distributions. These are a 2.5 MeV nearly mono-chromatic and mono-directional beam available at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) and the photo-neutron field produced in a 15 MV Varian CLINAC DHX medical accelerator, located in the Ospedale S. Chiara (Pisa). Both neutron spectra are known through measurements with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer. In both cases the experimental response of the Dy-SSS agrees with the reference data. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the spectrometric capability of the new device are independent from the directional distribution of the neutron field. This opens the way to a new generation of moderation-based neutron instruments, presenting all advantages of the Bonner sphere spectrometer without the disadvantage of the repeated exposures. This concept is being developed within the NESCOFI@BTF project of INFN (Commissione Scientifica Nazionale 5).

  14. A Tunable and Enantioselective Hetero-Diels-Alder Reaction Provides Access to Distinct Piperidinoyl Spirooxindoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Samydurai; Louven, Kathrin; Strohmann, Carsten; Kumar, Kamal

    2017-12-11

    The active complexes of chiral N,N'-dioxide ligands with dysprosium and magnesium salts catalyze the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction between 2-aza-3-silyloxy-butadienes and alkylidene oxindoles to selectively form 3,3'- and 3,4'-piperidinoyl spirooxindoles, respectively, in very high yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. The exo-selective asymmetric cycloaddition successfully regaled the construction of sp 3 -rich and highly substituted natural-product-based spirooxindoles supporting many chiral centers, including contiguous all-carbon quaternary centers. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Oxide perovskites with tetravalent dysprosium and compounds of the type Ba/sub 3/RE/sub 4/O/sub 9/ (RE = Rare Earth Element)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, G; Kristen, H [Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.)

    1980-03-01

    In analogy to our investigations concerning tetravalent Nd in oxide perovskites, we also tried to stabilize dysprosium(IV) by incorporation in host-lattices with the perovskite structure. As host-lattices we used BaCeO/sub 3/, BaTbO/sub 3/, and SrTbO/sub 3/. Only in Ba(Ce, Dy)O/sub 3/ we could trace Dy(IV) with certainty. Among the prepared mixed oxides, also the phase Ba/sub 3/Dy/sub 4/O/sub 9/ occured. The lattice parameters of several phases of this latter type were redetermined.

  16. Effect of solvents on relation of intensities of bands of luminescence spectra of terbium and dysprosium ions in solutions of their complexes with acetoacetic ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononenko, L.I.; Bel'tyukova, S.V.; Meshkova, S.B.; Kravchenko, T.B.; Poluehktov, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation is made of the effect of different solvents on the ratio of the intensity of luminescence spectrum bands of terbium and dysprosium ions, corresponding and not corresponding to ''supersensitive'' transitions in complex compounds with acetoacetic ether. A dependence is established between these values and the dielectric constant of the solvent, and also parallels in their changes, which indicate the similar manifestation of the effect of solvents in both elements. A correlation is observed between ratios of the intensity of luminescence spectrum bands and values of forces of neodymium complex absorption band oscillators in different solvents

  17. Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, R.H.; Schaffers, K.I.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1997-12-02

    Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 {micro}m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 {micro}m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy{sup 3+}-doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 {micro}m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available. 9 figs.

  18. Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Ralph H. (San Ramon, CA); Schaffers, Kathleen I. (Pleasanton, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 .mu.m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 .mu.m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy.sup.3+ -doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 .mu.m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available.

  19. Oklo natural reactor. Study of uranium and rare earths migration on a core drilled through a reaction zone. Application to determination of the date of the nuclear reaction by measurement of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffenach, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Isotopic and chemical analysis of uranium and five rare earths: neodymium, samarium, europium, gadolinium and dysprosium were effected on fourteen samples taken in the same core drilled through a reaction zone of the Oklo uranium deposit. This study points out the general stability of uranium and fission rare earths; spatial distributions of these elements are quite analogous. Migrations have affected about 5% only of fission neodymium in the core of the reaction zone; corresponding values for samarium and gadolinium are slightly higher. These migration phenomena have carried rare earths to no more than 80 cm out of the core. By study of the europium it is shown that nuclear reactions have stayed in the ground since the time of reactions. On the other hand it is shown by analysis of the dysprosium that rare earths have not undergone an important movement. This study allow also the datation of nuclear reactions from the measurement of the quantity of fission neodymium produced. A value of 1.98x10 9 years is obtained slightly higher than the value obtained by geochronology [fr

  20. Preparation of extractive resins for producing terbium-161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Cruz B, C. C.; Monroy G, F.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the development of a methodology for extractive resins preparation to base of HDEHP, which allows to separation of Tb from Gd generating an own technology of preparation of these resins. The study included the extractive resins preparation from 6 different supports: kieselguhr Dg, alumina, red volcanic rock, chiluca, quarry and fluorite; two treatment types of of supports and varied concentrations of HDEHP extractant (di(2-etil hexyl) orthophosphoric acid), in order to determine which resin has improved efficiency of Gd and Tb separation, and radionuclide purity of 161 Tb. Resins were prepared to base of kieselguhr to determine the most appropriate silicon deposition process. Two silicon deposition treatments were realized: treatment I , by contact with silicon deposition solution (dimethyldichlorosilane / heptane 1:30) and treatment II by contact with vapors of dimethyldichlorosilane in vacuum. The extractant retention was carried out to different concentrations of HDEHP / acetone: 1:4, 1:8, 1:15, 1:20, 1:30 and 1:40. According to the results, there is not direct relation of HDEHP concentration used in extractive resins preparation to base of kieselguhr over the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation and of radionuclide purity of 161 Tb. The effect of support in the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation was studied to prepare resins with the supports kieselguhr, alumina, quarry, chiluca, volcanic rock and fluorite, using the silicon deposition treatment II for the supports and a concentration of HDEHP / acetone 1:20, for extractant retention. Only resins based on kieselguhr could separate to Gd from Tb quantitatively, the resin at a concentration of HDEHP / Acetone 1:20 was the best results obtained in Gd and Tb separation, achieving a separation efficiency greater than 90% and a radionuclide purity higher than 99%. (Author)

  1. On the annealing behaviour of dysprosium ion implanted nickel: a combined study using Rutherford backscattering, transmission electron microscopy, and total current spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderton, L.T.; Johnson, E.

    1977-01-01

    Despite continuing improvements in applications of the analytical method of Rutherford backscattering (RBS) to solid state physics it is recognized that more complete information can be obtained if other techniques - for example transmission electron microscopy (TEM) - are employed simultaneously. Experiments are described in which a combined RBS and TEM study of the annealing of nickel, rendered amorphous by implantation of 20 keV dysprosium ions is supplemented with a completely new technique - total current spectroscopy (TCS). In TCS low energy electrons (0-15 eV) are used to probe the damaged nickel. Observations have been made during annealing of both the reappearance of the bulk band structure of the metal and of a 'surface peak' which is highly sensitive to the recovery process. Changes in the height of the surface peak reveal three sharp annealing stages, the first two being preceded by reverse annealing which correlates well with RBS and TEM results. The first annealing stage - following the amorphous to crystalline transition - may be associated with electronic effects in the vicinity of the Curie point. Changes in the position of the surface peak allow one to trace the diffusion of dysprosium to the surface. Quantum mechanical resonances at the damage/crystal interface have also been followed throughout annealing. The initially amorphous layer (approximately 2.2nm) increases in thickness slightly during recovery. (Auth.)

  2. How Are Substrate Binding and Catalysis Affected by Mutating Glu127 and Arg161 in Prolyl-4-hydroxylase? A QM/MM and MD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Amy; de Visser, Sam P.

    2017-01-01

    Prolyl-4-hydroxylase is a vital enzyme for human physiology involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxyproline, an essential component for collagen formation. The enzyme performs a unique stereo- and regioselective hydroxylation at the C4 position of proline despite the fact that the C5 hydrogen atoms should be thermodynamically easier to abstract. To gain insight into the mechanism and find the origin of this regioselectivity, we have done a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study on wildtype and mutant structures. In a previous study (Timmins et al., 2017) we identified several active site residues critical for substrate binding and positioning. In particular, the Glu127 and Arg161 were shown to form multiple hydrogen bonding and ion-dipole interactions with substrate and could thereby affect the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction. In this work, we decided to test that hypothesis and report a QM/MM and molecular dynamics (MD) study on prolyl-4-hydroxylase and several active site mutants where Glu127 or Arg161 are mutated for Asp, Gln, or Lys. Thus, the R161D and R161Q mutants give very high barriers for hydrogen atom abstraction from any proline C–H bond and therefore will be inactive. The R161K mutant, by contrast, sees the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction change but still is expected to hydroxylate proline at room temperature. By contrast, the Glu127 mutants E127D and E127Q show possible changes in regioselectivity with the former being more probable to react compared to the latter. PMID:29170737

  3. How Are Substrate Binding and Catalysis Affected by Mutating Glu127 and Arg161 in Prolyl-4-hydroxylase? A QM/MM and MD Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Timmins

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prolyl-4-hydroxylase is a vital enzyme for human physiology involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxyproline, an essential component for collagen formation. The enzyme performs a unique stereo- and regioselective hydroxylation at the C4 position of proline despite the fact that the C5 hydrogen atoms should be thermodynamically easier to abstract. To gain insight into the mechanism and find the origin of this regioselectivity, we have done a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM study on wildtype and mutant structures. In a previous study (Timmins et al., 2017 we identified several active site residues critical for substrate binding and positioning. In particular, the Glu127 and Arg161 were shown to form multiple hydrogen bonding and ion-dipole interactions with substrate and could thereby affect the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction. In this work, we decided to test that hypothesis and report a QM/MM and molecular dynamics (MD study on prolyl-4-hydroxylase and several active site mutants where Glu127 or Arg161 are mutated for Asp, Gln, or Lys. Thus, the R161D and R161Q mutants give very high barriers for hydrogen atom abstraction from any proline C–H bond and therefore will be inactive. The R161K mutant, by contrast, sees the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction change but still is expected to hydroxylate proline at room temperature. By contrast, the Glu127 mutants E127D and E127Q show possible changes in regioselectivity with the former being more probable to react compared to the latter.

  4. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(16)-1 - Corporations organized to finance crop operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Corporations organized to finance crop operations. 1.501(c)(16)-1 Section 1.501(c)(16)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(c)(16)-1 Corporations organized to finance crop...

  5. Gpr161 anchoring of PKA consolidates GPCR and cAMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Verena A; Mayrhofer, Johanna E; Ilouz, Ronit; Tschaikner, Philipp; Raffeiner, Philipp; Röck, Ruth; Courcelles, Mathieu; Apelt, Federico; Lu, Tsan-Wen; Baillie, George S; Thibault, Pierre; Aanstad, Pia; Stelzl, Ulrich; Taylor, Susan S; Stefan, Eduard

    2016-07-12

    Scaffolding proteins organize the information flow from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to intracellular effector cascades both spatially and temporally. By this means, signaling scaffolds, such as A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), compartmentalize kinase activity and ensure substrate selectivity. Using a phosphoproteomics approach we identified a physical and functional connection between protein kinase A (PKA) and Gpr161 (an orphan GPCR) signaling. We show that Gpr161 functions as a selective high-affinity AKAP for type I PKA regulatory subunits (RI). Using cell-based reporters to map protein-protein interactions, we discovered that RI binds directly and selectively to a hydrophobic protein-protein interaction interface in the cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal tail of Gpr161. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that a binary complex between Gpr161 and RI promotes the compartmentalization of Gpr161 to the plasma membrane. Moreover, we show that Gpr161, functioning as an AKAP, recruits PKA RI to primary cilia in zebrafish embryos. We also show that Gpr161 is a target of PKA phosphorylation, and that mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site affects ciliary receptor localization. Thus, we propose that Gpr161 is itself an AKAP and that the cAMP-sensing Gpr161:PKA complex acts as cilium-compartmentalized signalosome, a concept that now needs to be considered in the analyzing, interpreting, and pharmaceutical targeting of PKA-associated functions.

  6. Manufacturing of Dysprosium-Iron Alloys by Electrolysis in Fluoride-Based Electrolytes: Oxide Solubility Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ana Maria; Støre, Anne; Osen, Karen Sende

    2018-04-01

    Electrolytic production of light rare earth elements and alloys takes place in a fluoride-based electrolyte using rare earth oxides as raw material. The optimization of this method, mainly in terms of the energy efficiency and environmental impact control, is rather challenging. Anode effects, evolution of fluorine-containing compounds, and side cathode reactions could largely be minimized by a good control of the amount of rare earth oxide species dissolved in the fluoride-based electrolyte and their dissolution rate. The oxide content of the fluoride melts REF3-LiF (RE = Nd, Dy) at different compositions and temperatures were experimentally determined by carbothermal analysis of melt samples. The highest solubility values of oxide species, added as Dy2O3 and Dy2(CO3)3, were obtained to be of ca. 3 wt pct (expressed as Dy2O3) in the case of the equimolar DyF3-LiF melt at 1323 K (1050 °C). The oxide saturation values increased with the amount of REF3 present in the molten bath and the working temperature.

  7. Improvement of high-frequency characteristics of Z-type hexaferrite by dysprosium doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Chunhong; Liu Yingli; Song Yuanqiang; Wang Liguo; Zhang Huaiwu

    2011-01-01

    Z-type hexaferrite has great potential applications as anti-EMI material for magnetic devices in the GHz region. In this work, Dy-doped Z-type hexaferrites with nominal stoichiometry of Ba 3 Co 2 Dy x Fe 24-x O 41 (x 0.0, 0.05, 0.5, 1.0) were prepared by an improved solid-state reaction method. The effects of rare earth oxide (Dy 2 O 3 ) addition on the phase composition, microstructure and electromagnetic properties of the ceramics were investigated. Structure and micromorphology characterizations indicate that certain content of Dy doping will cause the emergence of the second phase Dy 3 Fe 5 O 12 at the grain boundaries of the majority phase Z-type hexaferrite, due to which the straightforward result is the grain refinement during the successive sintering process. Permeability spectra measurements show that the initial permeability reaches its maximum of 17 at 300 MHz with x = 0.5, while the cutoff frequency keeps above 800 MHz. The apparent specific anisotropy field H K of Dy-doped Z-type hexaferrites decreases with x increasing. The relationships among phase composition, grain size, permeability spectra, and anisotropy are theoretically investigated, and according to the analysis, Dy doping effects on its magnetic properties can be well explained and understood.

  8. Four new dysprosium and neodymium octamolybdate hydrates: assembly of RE2(Mo8O27) sheets and topotactic transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xiaojun; Evans, Ivana R

    2010-07-05

    Four new Dy and Nd hydrated octamolybdate materials have been prepared: [Dy(2)(H(2)O)(12)](Mo(8)O(27)) x 8 H(2)O, [Dy(2)(H(2)O)(6)](Mo(8)O(27)), [Nd(2)(H(2)O)(12)](Mo(8)O(27)) x 6 H(2)O, and [Nd(2)(H(2)O)(6)]Mo(8)O(27) x 3 H(2)O. They adopt one known and three new structure types, which we have determined ab initio from powder X-ray diffraction data. The four compounds contain the same basic structural building block, in the form of RE(2)Mo(8)O(27) (RE = Dy, Nd) chains, which are arranged differently for the two rare earths in the fully hydrated precursor materials. [Dy(2)(H(2)O)(12)](Mo(8)O(27)) x 8 H(2)O comprises isolated Dy(2)Mo(8)O(27) chains assembled in a zigzag manner along the a axis with interspersed crystallized water molecules, which differs from the parallel arrangements of isolated Nd(2)Mo(8)O(27) chains in [Nd(2)(H(2)O)(12)](Mo(8)O(27)) x 6 H(2)O. Partial dehydration of the two precursors leads to new phases [Dy(2)(H(2)O)(6)](Mo(8)O(27)) and [Nd(2)(H(2)O)(6)]Mo(8)O(27) x 3 H(2)O, respectively, prior to complete dehydration, which leads to initially amorphous and eventually crystalline rare-earth molybdenum mixed metal oxides. Both initial transformations occur topotactically. Partial dehydration of the Dy phase condenses the assembly of the Dy(2)Mo(8)O(27) chains principally along the a axis, leading to a 3-dimensional (3D) framework, with each Dy bridging two (Mo(8)O(27))(6-) sheets in the product. The partial dehydration of the Nd precursor condenses the assembly of Nd(2)Mo(8)O(27) chains along the [110] axis, leading to a 3D framework where each Nd bridges three (Mo(8)O(27))(6-) units. Both new dysprosium octamolybdates adopt noncentrosymmetric polar structures in space group P2(1) and are second harmonic generation (SHG) active.

  9. Microstructure and thermal properties of dysprosium and thulium co-doped barium titanate ceramics for high performance multilayer ceramic capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinseong; Kim, Dowan; Noh, Taimin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byungmin [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0241 (United States); Lee, Heesoo, E-mail: heesoo@pusan.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Dy/Tm co-doping method in BaTiO{sub 3} was suggested to improve electrical properties and temperature stability simultaneously. > We examined these properties in terms of microstructural analysis and substitution rate. > Increase of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition enhanced dielectric constant. > Increase of Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition enhanced temperature stability. > Improved electrical properties and temperature stability through Dy/Tm co-doping were deduced from formation of electrons and core-shell structure. - Abstract: The co-doping characteristics on microstructure and thermal properties of barium titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}) were investigated to elucidate formation of core-shell structure by dysprosium (Dy) and thulium (Tm) addition in the BaTiO{sub 3}-Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. The dielectrics co-doped with 0.7 mol% Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 0.3 mol% Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} had the dielectric constant up to 2200 as a function of temperature, which was 30% higher than that of specimen containing only Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the room temperature. It could be explained by the fact that the increase of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition contributed to the improvement of dielectric constant. On the other hand, the rapid diffusion rate of Dy{sup 3+} ions in BaTiO{sub 3} showed an adverse effect on temperature stability caused by destruction of core-shell. As the compensation for shell expansion in BaTiO{sub 3}, the reinforcement of the core-shell structure through the addition of Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} was confirmed by TEM-EDS analysis and attributed the temperature coefficient of capacitance (TCC) in a reliability condition (-55 deg. C to 125 deg. C, {Delta}C = {+-}15% or less). The enhanced electrical properties and temperature stability could be deduced from the generation of electrons and the formation core-shell structure in co-doped BaTiO{sub 3} system respectively.

  10. 25 CFR 1000.161 - What is a self-governance compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is a self-governance compact? 1000.161 Section 1000... EDUCATION ACT Negotiation Process for Annual Funding Agreements Negotiating A Self-Governance Compact § 1000.161 What is a self-governance compact? A self-governance compact is an executed document that affirms...

  11. 14 CFR 61.161 - Aeronautical experience: Rotorcraft category and helicopter class rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... category and helicopter class rating. 61.161 Section 61.161 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... helicopter class rating. (a) A person who is applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with a rotorcraft category and helicopter class rating, must have at least 1,200 hours of total time as a pilot that...

  12. 49 CFR 173.161 - Chemical kits and first aid kits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical kits and first aid kits. 173.161 Section... Class 7 § 173.161 Chemical kits and first aid kits. (a) Chemical kits and First aid kits must conform to... 10 kg. (b) Chemical kits and First aid kits are excepted from the specification packaging...

  13. 21 CFR 161.30 - Declaration of quantity of contents on labels for canned oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... canned oysters. 161.30 Section 161.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH....30 Declaration of quantity of contents on labels for canned oysters. (a) For many years packers of canned oysters in the Gulf area of the United States have labeled their output with a declaration of the...

  14. 46 CFR 161.002-15 - Sample extraction smoke detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sample extraction smoke detection systems. 161.002-15..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Fire-Protective Systems § 161.002-15 Sample extraction smoke detection systems. The smoke detecting system must consist of a means for...

  15. 28 CFR 35.161 - Telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD's).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD's). 35.161 Section 35.161 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE... devices for the deaf (TDD's). Where a public entity communicates by telephone with applicants and...

  16. 75 FR 61655 - Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft, Inc. Model PA-28-161 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ...-1006; Directorate Identifier 2009-CE-057-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft... airworthiness directive (AD) for all Piper Aircraft, Inc. (Piper) Model PA-28-161 airplanes equipped with.... Piper Model PA-28-161 airplanes modified by STC No. SA03303AT have a similar unsafe design feature that...

  17. 75 FR 81417 - Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft, Inc. Model PA-28-161 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft, Inc. Model PA-28-161 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... new airworthiness directive (AD): 2010-26-04 Piper Aircraft, Inc: Amendment 39-16543; Docket No. FAA... times may be Airplane approved for this part. Maintenance Manual Piper PA28-161 TAE 125-01, Doc. No...

  18. 21 CFR 150.161 - Artificially sweetened fruit preserves and jams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificially sweetened fruit preserves and jams. 150.161 Section 150.161 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... karaya, gum tragacanth, algin (sodium alginate), sodium carboxymethylcellulose (cellulose gum...

  19. 34 CFR 668.161 - Scope and purpose (cash management rules).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope and purpose (cash management rules). 668.161... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cash Management § 668.161 Scope and purpose (cash management rules). (a) General. (1) This subpart establishes the rules and...

  20. Measurement of 160Tb and 161Tb in nuclear forensics samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, J.; Davies, A.V.; Britton, R.E.

    2017-01-01

    160 Tb and 161 Tb are important radionuclides to measure when analysing a Nuclear Forensics sample. An analytical method for the measurement of both 160 Tb and 161 Tb was developed in this study. Terbium was separated and purified using exchange resin and TrisKem LN Resin. The purified fraction containing 160 Tb and 161 Tb was measured by gamma spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting. The counting efficiencies of 160 Tb and 161 Tb were determined using the CIEMAT/NIST efficiency tracing method. The LSC count rate ratio, R160 Tb /R161 Tb , on the reference date was determined by sequential counting and calculated using a custom script based on their half-lives. (author)

  1. Circulating Glucagon 1-61 Regulates Blood Glucose by Increasing Insulin Secretion and Hepatic Glucose Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J.; Kuhre, Rune E.; Hornburg, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    that PG 1-61 dose-dependently increases levels of cAMP, through the glucagon receptor, and increases insulin secretion and protein levels of enzymes regulating glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. In rats, PG 1-61 increases blood glucose and plasma insulin and decreases plasma levels of amino acids in......Glucagon is secreted from pancreatic α cells, and hypersecretion (hyperglucagonemia) contributes to diabetic hyperglycemia. Molecular heterogeneity in hyperglucagonemia is poorly investigated. By screening human plasma using high-resolution-proteomics, we identified several glucagon variants, among...... which proglucagon 1-61 (PG 1-61) appears to be the most abundant form. PG 1-61 is secreted in subjects with obesity, both before and after gastric bypass surgery, with protein and fat as the main drivers for secretion before surgery, but glucose after. Studies in hepatocytes and in β cells demonstrated...

  2. The Association of PPARγ Pro12Ala and C161T Polymorphisms with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Their Influence on Lipid and Lipoprotein Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Rahimi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of present study was to clarify the role of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR γ Pro12Ala and C161T polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS and their influence on lipid and lipoprotein profiles of patients. Materials and Methods The present cross-sectional study consisted of 50 women with PCOS, who referred to the Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences Clinic between April and October 2015, and 233 unrelated age-matched healthy women from the same region (West Iran. The PPARγ Pro12Ala and PPARγ C161T polymorphisms were gen- otyped using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Fasting blood sugar (FBS, serum triglycerides (TG, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein- cholesterol (LDL-C, high density lipoprotein- cholesterol (HDL-C and estradiol levels were measured. Results The serum level of estradiol was significantly lower in PCOS patients compared to healthy women. The PPARγ Pro12Ala (CG genotype increased the risk of PCOS 2.96-fold. The frequency of the PPARγ T allele (at C161T was 21% in patients and 17.2% in controls with no significant difference (P=0.52. In all studied individuals, the PPARγ CG geno- type was associated with significantly higher levels of TG. However, significantly lower levels of total cholesterol and LDL-C were observed in PPARγ TT individuals compared with those with the CC genotype. Within the PCOS group, the PPARγ CG genotype was significantly associated with lower levels of estradiol compared with the CC genotype. Also, the CG genotype was significantly associated with higher levels of TG when compared with the CC genotype. Conclusion Our study shows that, unlike PPARγ C161T, PPARγ Pro12Ala is associated with the risk of PCOS. Also, we found that the lipid and lipoprotein profiles significantly vary based on PPARγ Pro12Ala and C161T genotypes.

  3. Single-molecule magnet behavior in an octanuclear dysprosium(iii) aggregate inherited from helical triangular Dy3 SMM-building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Lang; Wu, Jianfeng; Guo, Mei; Tang, Jinkui

    2016-06-28

    An unprecedented octanuclear dysprosium(iii) cluster with the formula [Dy8L6(μ3-OH)4(μ2-CH3O)2(CH3OH)6(H2O)2]·6H2O·10CH3OH·2CH3CN () based on a nonlinearly tritopic aroylhydrazone ligand H3L has been isolated, realizing the successful linking of pairwise interesting triangular Dy3 SMMs. It is noteworthy that two enantiomers (Λ and Δ configurations) individually behaving as a coordination-induced chirality presented in the Dy3 helicate are connected in the meso Dy8 cluster. Remarkably, alternating-current magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed that the Dy8 cluster shows typical SMM behavior inherited from its Dy3 helical precursor. It is one of the rare polynuclear Lnn SMMs (n > 7) under zero dc field.

  4. Study for the determination of samarium, europium,terbium, dysprosium and yttrium in gadolinium oxide matrix by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caires, A.C.F.

    1985-01-01

    A study for determination of samarium, europium, terbium, dysprosium and yttrium in a gadolinium oxide matrix by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a graphite furnace is presented. The best charrring and atomization conditions were estabilished for each element, the most convenient ressonance lines being selected as well. The study was carried out for the mentioned lanthanides both when pure and when in binary mixtures with gadolinium, besides those where all for them were together with gadolinium. The determination limits for pure lanthanides were found to be between 1.3 and 9.6 ng assuming a 20% relative standard deviation as acceptable. The detection limits were in the range 0.51 and 7.5 ng, assuming as positive any answer higher than twofold the standard deviation. (author) [pt

  5. A study of the structure of 162Dy through the (n,γ) and (n,e-) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, D.D.; Shi, Z.R.; Gelletly, W.; Borner, H.G.; Hoyler, F.; Schreckenbach, K.; van Isacker, P.

    1987-01-01

    The level structure below 2 MeV in 162 Dy has been investigated using the 161 Dy(n,γ) 162 Dy and 161 Dy(n,e - ) 162 Dy reactions. The results for the positive parity excitations are discussed within the framework of an Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA-2) calculation. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. 34 CFR 403.161 - How must funds be used under the Comprehensive Career Guidance and Counseling Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Guidance and Counseling Programs? 403.161 Section 403.161 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... the Special Programs? Comprehensive Career Guidance and Counseling Programs § 403.161 How must funds be used under the Comprehensive Career Guidance and Counseling Programs? (a) A State shall use not...

  7. 33 CFR 165.161 - Safety zones: Coast Guard Captain of the Port New York annual fireworks displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of the Port New York annual fireworks displays. 165.161 Section 165.161 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.161 Safety zones: Coast Guard Captain of the Port New York annual fireworks displays. (a) Safety zones. The following areas are designated safety zones: (1) Bar Beach fireworks...

  8. Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, W.U.

    1993-08-01

    This report contain papers on the following topics: The Cold-Fusion Saga; Decay Patterns of Dysprosium Nuclei Produced in 32 S + 118,124 Sn Fusion Reactions; Unexpected Features of Reactions Between Very Heavy Ions at Intermediate Bombarding Energies; Correlations Between Neutrons and Charged Products from the Dissipative Reaction 197 Au+ 208 Pb at E/A = 29 MeV; Dissipative Dynamics of Projectile-Like Fragment Production in the Reaction 209 Bi+ 136 Xe at E/A = 28.2 MeV; Dynamical Production of Intermediate-Mass Fragments in Peripheral 209 Bi+ 136 Xe Collisions at E lab /A = 28.2 MeV; The Rochester 960-Liter Neutron Multiplicity Meter; A Simple Pulse Processing Concept for a Low-Cost Pulse-Shape-Based Particle Identification; A One-Transistor Preamplifier for PMT Anode Signals; A Five-Channel Multistop TDC/Event Handler for the SuperBall Neutron Multiplicity Meter; Construction of the SuperBall -- a 16,000-Liter Neutron Detector for Calorimetric Studies of Intermediate-Energy Heavy-Ion Reactions; A Computer Code for Light Detection Efficiency Calculations for Photo-multipliers of a Neutron Detector; Evaluation of Gd-Loaded Liquid Scintillators for the SuperBall Neutron Calorimeter; and Measurement of the Interaction of Cosmic-Ray μ - with a Muon Telescope

  9. The low-energy β(-) and electron emitter (161)Tb as an alternative to (177)Lu for targeted radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehenberger, Silvia; Barkhausen, Christoph; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane; Grünberg, Jürgen; Hohn, Alexander; Köster, Ulli; Schibli, Roger; Türler, Andreas; Zhernosekov, Konstantin

    2011-08-01

    The low-energy β(-) emitter (161)Tb is very similar to (177)Lu with respect to half-life, beta energy and chemical properties. However, (161)Tb also emits a significant amount of conversion and Auger electrons. Greater therapeutic effect can therefore be expected in comparison to (177)Lu. It also emits low-energy photons that are useful for gamma camera imaging. The (160)Gd(n,γ)(161)Gd→(161)Tb production route was used to produce (161)Tb by neutron irradiation of massive (160)Gd targets (up to 40 mg) in nuclear reactors. A semiautomated procedure based on cation exchange chromatography was developed and applied to isolate no carrier added (n.c.a.) (161)Tb from the bulk of the (160)Gd target and from its stable decay product (161)Dy. (161)Tb was used for radiolabeling DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate; the radiolabeling profile was compared to the commercially available n.c.a. (177)Lu. A (161)Tb Derenzo phantom was imaged using a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography camera. Up to 15 GBq of (161)Tb was produced by long-term irradiation of Gd targets. Using a cation exchange resin, we obtained 80%-90% of the available (161)Tb with high specific activity, radionuclide and chemical purity and in quantities sufficient for therapeutic applications. The (161)Tb obtained was of the quality required to prepare (161)Tb-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate. We were able to produce (161)Tb in n.c.a. form by irradiating highly enriched (160)Gd targets; it can be obtained in the quantity and quality required for the preparation of (161)Tb-labeled therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Circulating Glucagon 1-61 Regulates Blood Glucose by Increasing Insulin Secretion and Hepatic Glucose Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon is secreted from pancreatic α cells, and hypersecretion (hyperglucagonemia contributes to diabetic hyperglycemia. Molecular heterogeneity in hyperglucagonemia is poorly investigated. By screening human plasma using high-resolution-proteomics, we identified several glucagon variants, among which proglucagon 1-61 (PG 1-61 appears to be the most abundant form. PG 1-61 is secreted in subjects with obesity, both before and after gastric bypass surgery, with protein and fat as the main drivers for secretion before surgery, but glucose after. Studies in hepatocytes and in β cells demonstrated that PG 1-61 dose-dependently increases levels of cAMP, through the glucagon receptor, and increases insulin secretion and protein levels of enzymes regulating glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. In rats, PG 1-61 increases blood glucose and plasma insulin and decreases plasma levels of amino acids in vivo. We conclude that glucagon variants, such as PG 1-61, may contribute to glucose regulation by stimulating hepatic glucose production and insulin secretion.

  11. Influence of intramolecular f-f interactions on nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetizations in quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes containing two terbium or dysprosium magnetic centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takamitsu; Matsumura, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Naoto

    2013-10-10

    Nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) phenomena, which arise from admixture of more than two orthogonal electronic spin wave functions through the couplings with those of the nuclear spins, are one of the important magnetic relaxation processes in lanthanide single molecule magnets (SMMs) in the low temperature range. Although recent experimental studies have indicated that the presence of the intramolecular f-f interactions affects their magnetic relaxation processes, little attention has been given to their mechanisms and, to the best of our knowledge, no rational theoretical models have been proposed for the interpretations of how the nuclear spin driven QTMs are influenced by the f-f interactions. Since quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes with two terbium or dysprosium ions as the magnetic centers show moderate f-f interactions, these are appropriate to investigate the influence of the f-f interactions on the dynamic magnetic relaxation processes. In the present paper, a theoretical model including ligand field (LF) potentials, hyperfine, nuclear quadrupole, magnetic dipolar, and the Zeeman interactions has been constructed to understand the roles of the nuclear spins for the QTM processes, and the resultant Zeeman plots are obtained. The ac susceptibility measurements of the magnetically diluted quadruple-decker monoterbium and diterbium phthalocyanine complexes, [Tb-Y] and [Tb-Tb], have indicated that the presence of the f-f interactions suppresses the QTMs in the absence of the external magnetic field (H(dc)) being consistent with previous reports. On the contrary, the faster magnetic relaxation processes are observed for [Tb-Tb] than [Tb-Y] at H(dc) = 1000 Oe, clearly demonstrating that the QTMs are rather enhanced in the presence of the external magnetic field. Based on the calculated Zeeman diagrams, these observations can be attributed to the enhanced nuclear spin driven QTMs for [Tb-Tb]. At the H(dc) higher than 2000 Oe, the

  12. Dual-mode T_1 and T_2 magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent based on ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and in vivo application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegafaw, Tirusew; Xu, Wenlong; Ahmad, Md Wasi; Lee, Gang Ho; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong

    2015-01-01

    A new type of dual-mode T_1 and T_2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles was synthesized. Gd"3"+ ("8S_7_/_2) plays an important role in T_1 MRI contrast agents because of its large electron spin magnetic moment resulting from its seven unpaired 4f-electrons, and Dy"3"+ ("6H_1_5_/_2) has the potential to be used in T_2 MRI contrast agents because of its very large total electron magnetic moment: among lanthanide oxide nanoparticles, Dy_2O_3 nanoparticles have the largest magnetic moments at room temperature. Using these properties of Gd"3"+ and Dy"3"+ and their oxide nanoparticles, ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide (GDO) nanoparticles were synthesized and their potential to act as a dual-mode T_1 and T_2 MRI contrast agent was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The D-glucuronic acid coated GDO nanoparticles (d_a_v_g = 1.0 nm) showed large r_1 and r_2 values (r_2/r_1 ≈ 6.6) and as a result clear dose-dependent contrast enhancements in R_1 and R_2 map images. Finally, the dual-mode imaging capability of the nanoparticles was confirmed by obtaining in vivo T_1 and T_2 MR images. (paper)

  13. Extraction of Dysprosium Ions with DTPA Functionalized Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles Probed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence and TEM/High-Angle Annular Dark Field Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Fernando Menegatti de; Almeida, Sabrina da Nobrega; Uezu, Noemi Saori; Ramirez, Carlos Alberto Ospina; Santos, Antonio Domingues Dos; Toma, Henrique Eisi

    2018-06-01

    The extraction of dysprosium (Dy3+) ions from aqueous solution was carried out successfully, using magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles functionalized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (MagNP@DTPA). The process was monitored by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, as a function of concentration, proceeding according to a Langmuir isotherm with an equilibrium constant of 2.57 × 10-3 g(MagNP) L-1 and a saturation limit of 63.2 mgDy/gMagNP. The presence of paramagnetic Dy3+ ions attached to the superparamagnetic nanoparticles led to an overall decrease of magnetization. By imaging the nanoparticles surface using scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with high resolution elemental analysis, it was possible to probe the binding of the Dy3+ ions to DTPA, and to show their distribution in a region of negative magnetic field gradients. This finding is coherent with the observed decrease of magnetization, associated with the antiferromagnetic coupling between the lanthanide ions and the Fe3O4 core.

  14. Percentages of CD4+CD161+ and CD4−CD8−CD161+ T Cells in the Synovial Fluid Are Correlated with Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlin Miao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. CD161 has been identified as a marker of human IL-17-producing T cells that are implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. This study aimed to investigate the potential link between the percentage of CD161+ T cells and disease activity in RA patients. Methods. Peripheral blood (PB from 54 RA patients and 21 healthy controls was evaluated. Paired synovial fluid (SF (n = 17 was analyzed. CD161 expression levels on CD4+, CD8+, and CD4−CD8− T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Results. The percentage of CD4+CD161+ T cells in RA SF was higher than RA PB, and it was positively correlated with DAS28, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, and C-reactive protein (CRP. CD4−CD8−CD161+ T cell percentage was decreased in RA PB and was further reduced in RA SF, and its level in SF was inversely correlated with DAS28, ESR, and CRP. However, CD8+CD161+ T cell percentage was neither changed in RA PB and SF nor correlated with disease activity indices. Conclusion. An increased CD4+CD161+ T cell percentage and a decreased CD4−CD8−CD161+ T cell percentage are present in RA SF and are associated with disease activity, and the accumulation of CD4+CD161+ T cells in SF may contribute to the local inflammation of RA.

  15. Energy Storage Analysis of a Mixed R161/MOF-5 Nanoparticle Nanofluid Based on Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Tang, Shengli; Li, Leilei

    2018-05-20

    The thermal properties of refrigerants can be modified by adding porous nanoparticles into them. Here, molecular simulations, including molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo, were employed to study the thermal energy storage properties of an R161/MOF-5 nanofluid. The results show that the thermodynamic energy change of MOF-5 nanoparticles is linear to the temperature. The adsorption heat calculated by grand canonical Monte Carlo is close to that calculated by the Clausius⁻Clapeyron equation. Additionally, a negative enhancement of the thermal energy storage capacity of the R161/MOF-5 nanofluid is found near the phase transition area.

  16. CD3+CD8+CD161high Tc17 cells are depleted in HIV-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Hartling, Hans Jakob; Thorsteinsson, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ Tc17 cells with pro-inflammatory properties have only recently been acknowledged, and Tc17 cells in HIV-infection are undescribed. CD3+CD8+CD161 Tc17 cells and the production of Interleukin-17 were examined in untreated and treated HIV-infected patients, HIV-HCV co-infected patients...... and healthy controls. Depletion of CD3+CD8+CD161 Tc17 cells and diminished production of Interleukin-17 in HIV-infected patients was found. The level of Tc17 cells was associated with the level of the CD4+ count in treated patients....

  17. The FAA altitude chamber training flight profile : a survey of altitude reactions, 1965-1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    Reactions from 1,161 trainees out of 12,759 trainees subjected to the FAA altitude chamber training flights from 1965-1989 are annotated in this survey. Although there were some mild and expected reactions, these training profiles appear to provide a...

  18. Global use structures of the magnetic materials neodymium and dysprosium. A scenario-based analysis of the effect of the diffusion of electromobility on the demand for rare earths; Globale Verwendungsstrukturen der Magnetwerkstoffe Neodym und Dysprosium. Eine szenariobasierte Analyse der Auswirkung der Diffusion der Elektromobilitaet auf den Bedarf an Seltenen Erden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloeser-Chahoud, Simon; Kuehn, Andre; Tercero Espinoza, Luis

    2016-06-15

    Neodymium-iron-boron magnets (NdFeB) have experienced a significant demand as the most powerful permanent magnet in recent years, especially for the manufacture of compact electric servomotors with high efficiency and high power density, especially for mobile applications in hybrid traction motors and electric vehicles or for electric bikes. However, NdFeB magnets are also increasingly being used in general mechanical engineering (conveying and pumping systems, tools, air conditioning systems, lift motors, etc.), in the small electric motors of conventional passenger cars or in the generators of large wind power plants with permanent magnetic direct drive. Nevertheless, there is still high uncertainty in the use structures of NdFeB magnets and the contained rare earth elements neodymium and dysprosium. An effective instrument for increasing the market transparency and the understanding of complex anthropogenic material cycles is the dynamic material flow modeling. In the present work paper, this instrument is used for an in-depth analysis of the use structures of NdFeB magnets and the contained rare earths on a global scale. The dynamic modeling of product usage cycles reveals today's usage structures and quantifies future magnetic quantities in obsolete product flows. It could be shown that the magnets in today's scrap volume are mainly contained in obsolete electronics applications such as hard disks (HDD), CD and DVD drives, which makes the recycling hardly seem to be economical due to the small magnets and the high material spread, but in the foreseeable future with larger magnetic quantities from synchronous servomotors and generators can be expected, which significantly increases the recycling potential. In a further step, the effect of the diffusion of alternative drives in the automotive market on the dysprosium requirement is analyzed using a system dynamics model and possible adaptation mechanisms in the form of different substitution effects in

  19. Evaluation and application of the low energy electron emitter 161Tb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehenberger, Silvia M.

    2010-01-01

    The low energy electron emitter 161 Tb was produced n.c.a. in quantities sufficient for therapeutic applications and successfully used for labeling of peptides and antibodies. Furthermore, these compounds have been compared to n.c.a. 177 Lu labeled mAbs via cell experiments, a radionuclide that is already used in clinical nuclear oncology.

  20. 46 CFR 161.002-10 - Automatic fire detecting system control unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automatic fire detecting system control unit. 161.002-10...-10 Automatic fire detecting system control unit. (a) General. The fire detecting system control unit... and the battery to be charged. (h) Automatic fire detecting system, battery charging and control—(1...

  1. 20 CFR 702.161 - Liens against assets of insurance carriers and employers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liens against assets of insurance carriers... AND PROCEDURE General Provisions Liens on Compensation § 702.161 Liens against assets of insurance..., be subrogated to all the rights of the person receiving such payments. The Secretary may institute...

  2. African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies, 16(1), 2017 Copyright ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies, 16(1), 2017. Copyright © 2017 ... Linear regression showed that males are more likely to abuse alcohol than females. (β= -.17; t = -3.47; ..... gerians through depression, suicide, road traffic accidents ...

  3. 10 CFR 63.161 - Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Planning Criteria § 63.161 Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area... may occur at the geologic repository operations area, at any time before permanent closure and...

  4. 40 CFR 65.161 - Continuous records and monitoring system data handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... section. (D) Owners and operators shall retain the current description of the monitoring system as long as... Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.161 Continuous records and monitoring system data handling...) Monitoring system breakdowns, repairs, preventive maintenance, calibration checks, and zero (low-level) and...

  5. 22 CFR 161.12 - Environmental effects abroad of major departmental actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental effects abroad of major... Requirements of NEPA § 161.12 Environmental effects abroad of major departmental actions. Departmental officials shall analyze actions under their cognizance with due regard for the environmental effects in the...

  6. 9 CFR 161.4 - Suspension or revocation of veterinary accreditation; criminal and civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension or revocation of veterinary... REVOCATION OF SUCH ACCREDITATION § 161.4 Suspension or revocation of veterinary accreditation; criminal and... to practice veterinary medicine in at least one State. (c) Accreditation shall be automatically...

  7. 27 CFR 31.161 - Conversion between metric and U.S. units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Wholesale Dealers' Records and Reports § 31.161 Conversion between metric and U.S. units. When liters are... number of cases to be converted, as follows: (a) If the conversion from liters to U.S. units is made... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conversion between metric...

  8. An Amphiphysin-Like Domain in Fus2p Is Required for Rvs161p Interaction and Cortical Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Stein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell–cell fusion fulfils essential roles in fertilization, development and tissue repair. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fusion between two haploid cells of opposite mating type generates the diploid zygote. Fus2p is a pheromone-induced protein that regulates cell wall removal during mating. Fus2p shuttles from the nucleus to localize at the shmoo tip, bound to Rvs161p, an amphiphysin. However, Rvs161p independently binds a second amphiphysin, Rvs167p, playing an essential role in endocytosis. To understand the basis of the Fus2p–Rvs161p interaction, we analyzed Fus2p structural domains. A previously described N-terminal domain (NTD is necessary and sufficient to regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic trafficking of Fus2p. The Dbl homology domain (DBH binds GTP-bound Cdc42p; binding is required for cell fusion, but not localization. We identified an approximately 200 amino acid region of Fus2p that is both necessary and sufficient for Rvs161p binding. The Rvs161p binding domain (RBD contains three predicted alpha-helices; structural modeling suggests that the RBD adopts an amphiphysin-like structure. The RBD contains a 13-amino-acid region, conserved with Rvs161p and other amphiphysins, which is essential for binding. Mutations in the RBD, predicted to affect membrane binding, abolish cell fusion without affecting Rvs161p binding. We propose that Fus2p/Rvs161p form a novel heterodimeric amphiphysin required for cell fusion. Rvs161p binding is required but not sufficient for Fus2p localization. Mutations in the C-terminal domain (CTD of Fus2p block localization, but not Rvs161p binding, causing a significant defect in cell fusion. We conclude that the Fus2p CTD mediates an additional, Rvs161p-independent interaction at the shmoo tip.

  9. CD147-mediated chemotaxis of CD4+CD161+ T cells may contribute to local inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Minghua; Miao, Jinlin; Zhao, Peng; Luo, Xing; Han, Qing; Wu, Zhenbiao; Zhang, Kui; Zhu, Ping

    2018-01-01

    CD161 is used as a surrogate marker for Th17 cells, which are implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we evaluated the percentage, clinical significance, and CD98 and CD147 expression of CD4 + CD161 + T cells. The potential role of CD147 and CD98 in cyclophilin A-induced chemotaxis of CD4 + CD161 + T cells was analyzed. Thirty-seven RA patients, 15 paired synovial fluid (SF) of RA, and 22 healthy controls were recruited. The cell populations and surface expression of CD98 and CD147 were analyzed by flow cytometry. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression were applied to calculate the correlations. Chemotaxis assay was used to investigate CD4 + CD161 + T cell migration. We found that the percentage of CD4 + CD161 + T cells and their expression of CD147 and CD98 in SF were higher than in the peripheral blood of RA patients. Percentage of SF CD4 + CD161 + T cells was positively correlated with 28-Joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28). CD147 monoclonal antibody (HAb18) attenuated the chemotactic ability of CD4 + CD161 + T cells. An increased CD4 + CD161 + T cell percentage and expression of CD147 and CD98 were shown in RA SF. Percentage of SF CD4 + CD161 + T cells can be used as a predictive marker of disease activity in RA. CD147 block significantly decreased the chemotactic index of CD4 + CD161 + cells induced by cyclophilin A (CypA). These results imply that the accumulation of CD4 + CD161 + T cells in SF and their high expression of CD147 may be associated with CypA-mediated chemotaxis and contribute to local inflammation in RA.

  10. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In reviewing work at Harwell over the past 25 years on nuclear reactions it is stated that a balance has to be struck in both experiment and theory between work on cross-sections of direct practical relevance to reactors and on those relevant to an overall understanding of reaction processes. The compound nucleus and direct process reactions are described. Having listed the contributions from AERE, Harwell to developments in nuclear reaction research in the period, work on the optical model, neutron capture theory, reactions at doorway states with fine structure, and sum-rules for spectroscopic factors are considered in more detail. (UK)

  11. 28 CFR 0.161 - Acceptance of certain offers by the Deputy Attorney General or Associate Attorney General, as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Deputy Attorney General or Associate Attorney General, as appropriate. 0.161 Section 0.161 Judicial... certain offers by the Deputy Attorney General or Associate Attorney General, as appropriate. (a) In all... § 0.160, the Assistant Attorney General concerned shall, when he is of the opinion that the proposed...

  12. 77 FR 28406 - 161st Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 161st Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 161st open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  13. 42 CFR 84.161 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type B and Type BE respirators; test requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type B and Type BE respirators; test requirements. 84.161 Section 84.161 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air...

  14. Manufacturing of Dysprosium-Iron Alloys by Electrolysis in Fluoride-Based Electrolytes. Electrolysis in a Laboratory-Scale Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ana Maria; Osen, Karen Sende; Støre, Anne; Gudbrandsen, Henrik; Kjos, Ole Sigmund; Solheim, Asbjørn; Wang, Zhaohui; Oury, Alexandre; Namy, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Electrolytic production of light rare earth elements and rare earth alloys with transition elements takes place in a fluoride-based electrolyte using rare earth oxides as raw material. The optimization of this method, mainly in terms of the energy efficiency and environmental impact control, is rather challenging. Anode effects, evolution of fluorine-containing compounds and side cathode reactions could largely be minimized by good control of the amount of rare earth oxide species dissolved in the fluoride-based electrolyte and their dissolution rate. The Dy2O3 feed rate needed for stable cell operation was studied by following up the anode voltage and gas analysis. On-line analysis of the cell off-gases by FTIR showed that the electrochemical reaction for the formation of Dy-Fe alloy gives mainly CO gas and that CF4 is starting to evolve gradually at anode voltages of ca. 3.25 V. The limiting current density for the discharge of the oxide ions at the graphite anode was in the range of 0.1 to 0.18 A cm-2 at dissolved Dy2O3 contents of ca. 1 wt pct. Modeling of the laboratory cell reactor was also carried out by implementing two models, i.e., an electrical model simulating the current density distribution at the electrodes and a laminal bubbly flow model that explains the electrolyte velocity induced by gas bubble production at the anode.

  15. Peripheral blood CD161+ T cells from asthmatic patients are activated during asthma attack and predominantly produce IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hernández, Y; Pedraza-Sánchez, S; Blandón-Vijil, V; del Río-Navarro, B E; Vaughan, G; Moreno-Lafont, M; Escobar-Gutiérrez, A

    2007-04-01

    In humans, T cells expressing the CD161 molecule NKR-P1A constitute around 20% of the circulating CD3(+) cells and are potentially immunoregulatory in several diseases. Their role in asthma is not well known, but they could participate in asthma attacks. To determinate whether activation of CD161(+) T cells and their cytokine production correlate with clinical status of asthma, we analysed blood samples from asthma attack patients (AAP) and stable asthma patients (SAP) in comparison with healthy non-atopic controls (HC). There was a significant higher baseline expression of CD69 on T cells from AAP and the difference was more notorious on CD161(+) T cells; upregulation of CD69 was observed on both CD161(-) and CD161(+) T cells driven by Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus crude extract, whereas polyclonal stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin predominantly induced IFN-gamma but no IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 by CD161(+) T cells in all groups; upon polyclonal stimulation, there were more CD161(+) T cells producing IFN-gamma and less CD161(-) T cells producing this cytokine, contrasting with the opposite results observed in SAP and HC groups. Our results indicate that, during asthma attack, CD161(+) T cells are activated and are able to produce predominantly IFN-gamma but no Th2 cytokines. We hypothesize that during an asthma attack, IFN-gamma produced by CD161(+) T cells could help to reestablish the Th1/Th2 equilibrium. These observations may contribute to the understanding of the immune mechanisms involved in asthma attacks.

  16. Complexes of lanthanum(III), cerium(III), samarium(III) and dysprosium(III) with substituted piperidines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manhas, B S; Trikha, A K; Singh, H; Chander, M

    1983-11-01

    Complexes of the general formulae M/sub 2/Cl/sub 6/(L)/sub 3/.C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH and M/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 6/(L)/sub 2/.CH/sub 3/OH have been synthesised by the reactions of chlorides and nitrates of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Dy(III) with 2-methylpiperidine, 3-methylpiperidine and 4-methylpiperidine. These complexes have been characterised on the basis of their elemental analysis, and IR and electronic reflectance spectra. IR spectral data indicate the presence of coordinated ethanol and methanol molecules and bidentate nitrate groups. Coordination numbers of the metal ions vary from 5 to 8. 19 refs.

  17. 161 | Page

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    the definition limits the understanding of a region to a country and does not in any way ..... in Nigeria under the Presidential Constitution (London: Sweet & Maxwell, 1983) pp. .... Sani Abacha & 3 Ors. v Chief Gani Fawehinmi.78 In that case, the.

  18. Hindered El Transitions in Eu{sup 155} and Tb{sup 161}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmskog, Sven G

    1965-02-15

    The absolute E1 transition probabilities from the 3/2{sup +} (411), 5/2{sup -} (532) and 7/2{sup -} (523) single particle levels in Eu{sup 155} and Tb{sup 161} have been measured by the method of delayed coincidences. This gave half lives of T{sub 1/2} < 0.2 ns and T{sub 1/2} = (1.38 {+-} 0.06) ns for the 104.4 and 246 keV levels in Eu{sup 155}. T{sub 1/2} = (0.84 {+-} 0.04) ns and T{sub 1/2} < 0. 2 ns for the 417.6 and 480.6 keV levels in Tb{sup 161}. The result has been compared with the calculations of a single particle in a deformed potential made by Nilsson.

  19. Competitor presence reduces internal attentional focus and improves 16.1km cycling time trial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emily L; Jones, Hollie S; Andy Sparks, S; Marchant, David C; Midgley, Adrian W; Mc Naughton, Lars R

    2015-07-01

    Whilst the presence of a competitor has been found to improve performance, the mechanisms influencing the change in selected work rates during direct competition have been suggested but not specifically assessed. The aim was to investigate the physiological and psychological influences of a visual avatar competitor during a 16.1-km cycling time trial performance, using trained, competitive cyclists. Randomised cross-over design. Fifteen male cyclists completed four 16.1km cycling time trials on a cycle ergometer, performing two with a visual display of themselves as a simulated avatar (FAM and SELF), one with no visual display (DO), and one with themselves and an opponent as simulated avatars (COMP). Participants were informed the competitive avatar was a similar ability cyclist but it was actually a representation of their fastest previous performance. Increased performance times were evident during COMP (27.8±2.0min) compared to SELF (28.7±1.9min) and DO (28.4±2.3min). Greater power output, speed and heart rate were apparent during COMP trial than SELF (pperformance. Competitive cyclists performed significantly faster during a 16.1-km competitive trial than when performing maximally, without a competitor. The improvement in performance was elicited due to a greater external distraction, deterring perceived exertion. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression of LLT1 and its receptor CD161 in lung cancer is associated with better clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braud, Véronique M; Biton, Jérôme; Becht, Etienne; Knockaert, Samantha; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Cosson, Estelle; Damotte, Diane; Alifano, Marco; Validire, Pierre; Anjuère, Fabienne; Cremer, Isabelle; Girard, Nicolas; Gossot, Dominique; Seguin-Givelet, Agathe; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Germain, Claire

    2018-01-01

    Co-stimulatory and inhibitory receptors expressed by immune cells in the tumor microenvironment modulate the immune response and cancer progression. Their expression and regulation are still not fully characterized and a better understanding of these mechanisms is needed to improve current immunotherapies. Our previous work has identified a novel ligand/receptor pair, LLT1/CD161, that modulates immune responses. Here, we extensively characterize its expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We show that LLT1 expression is restricted to germinal center (GC) B cells within tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS), representing a new hallmark of the presence of active TLS in the tumor microenvironment. CD161-expressing immune cells are found at the vicinity of these structures, with a global enrichment of NSCLC tumors in CD161 + CD4 + and CD8 + T cells as compared to normal distant lung and peripheral blood. CD161 + CD4 + T cells are more activated and produce Th1-cytokines at a higher frequency than their matched CD161-negative counterparts. Interestingly, CD161 + CD4 + T cells highly express OX40 co-stimulatory receptor, less frequently 4-1BB, and display an activated but not completely exhausted PD-1-positive Tim-3-negative phenotype. Finally, a meta-analysis revealed a positive association of CLEC2D (coding for LLT1) and KLRB1 (coding for CD161) gene expression with favorable outcome in NSCLC, independently of the size of T and B cell infiltrates. These data are consistent with a positive impact of LLT1/CD161 on NSCLC patient survival, and make CD161-expressing CD4 + T cells ideal candidates for efficient anti-tumor recall responses.

  1. The role of dysprosium on the structural and magnetic properties of (Nd_1_−_xDy_x)_2Fe_1_4B nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, Hamed; Ghasemi, Ali; Mozaffarinia, Reza; Tavoosi, Majid

    2017-01-01

    In current work, Nd2Fe14B nanoparticles was synthesized by sol-gel method. Dysprosium powders were added into Nd2Fe14B nanoparticles by mechanical alloying process in order to enhancement of coercivity. The phase analysis, structure, and magnetic properties of annealed (Nd_1_−_xDy_x)_2Fe_1_4B nanoparticles with different Dy-content (x=0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6) were investigated by employing X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques. The results showed that with an increase in Dy amounts, the coercivity of particles increased from 2.9 kOe to 13.4 kOe and then decreased to 5.6 kOe. By adding an optimum amount of Dy (x=0.4), the coercivity was significantly increased from 2.9 kOe to 13.4 kOe. The average particle size of annealed (Nd_1_−_xDy_x)_2Fe_1_4B nanoparticles was below 10 nm. Magnetization reversal studies indicate that the coercivity of milled and annealed (Nd_1_−_xDy_x)_2Fe_1_4B nanoparticles is controlled by the nucleation of reversed magnetic domains. The experimental results in the angular dependence of coercivity for (Nd_1_−_xDy_x)_2Fe_1_4B permanent magnets showed that the normalized coercivity of the permanent magnets H_c(θ)/H_c(0) increases from 1 to about 1.2–1.5 with increasing θ from 0 to about π/3, for x=0.4–0.6. - Highlights: • Dy was added to Nd_2Fe_1_4B nanoparticles to improve the coercivity. • A maximum squareness ratio of 0.99 was obtained. • The average particle size decreased with an increase in Dy-content.

  2. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1979-01-01

    Quasielastic reaction studies, because of their capability to microscopically probe nuclear structure, are still of considerable interest in heavy-ion reactions. The recent progress in understanding various aspects of the reaction mechanism make this aim appear closer. The relation between microscopic and macroscopic behavior, as suggested, for example, by the single proton transfer data to individual final states or averaged excitation energy intervals, needs to be explored. It seems particularly useful to extend measurements to higher incident energies, to explore and understand nuclear structure aspects up to the limit of the energy range where they are important

  3. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=161, 170 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The reaction e+e- -> HZ is used to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The data sample consists of integrated luminosities of 10.9pb-1 1.1pb-1 and 9.5pb-1 collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP during 1996, at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172GeV, respectively. No candidate events were found, in agreement with the expected background of 0.84 events from all Standard Model processes. This search results in a 95%C.L. lower limit on the Higgs boson mass of 69.4GeV. When combined with earlier ALEPH searches performed at energies at and around the Z peak, this limit increases to 70.7GeV

  4. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in e+e- collisions at sqrt(s)=161, 170 and 172GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino,, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kado, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-10-01

    The reaction e+e--->HZ is used to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The data sample consists of integrated luminosities of 10.9pb-1, 1.1pb-1, and 9.5pb-1 collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP during 1996, at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172GeV, respectively. No candidate events were found, in agreement with the expected background of 0.84 events from all Standard Model processes. This search results in a 95% C.L. lower limit on the Higgs boson mass of 69.4GeV/c2. When combined with earlier ALEPH searches performed at energies at and around the Z peak, this limit increases to 70.7GeV/c2.

  5. cycloaddition reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Molecular Modeling Group, Organic Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology,. Hyderabad ... thus obtained are helpful to model the regioselectivity ... compromise to model Diels–Alder reactions involving ...... acceptance.

  6. Global use structures of the magnetic materials neodymium and dysprosium. A scenario-based analysis of the effect of the diffusion of electromobility on the demand for rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeser-Chahoud, Simon; Kuehn, Andre; Tercero Espinoza, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Neodymium-iron-boron magnets (NdFeB) have experienced a significant demand as the most powerful permanent magnet in recent years, especially for the manufacture of compact electric servomotors with high efficiency and high power density, especially for mobile applications in hybrid traction motors and electric vehicles or for electric bikes. However, NdFeB magnets are also increasingly being used in general mechanical engineering (conveying and pumping systems, tools, air conditioning systems, lift motors, etc.), in the small electric motors of conventional passenger cars or in the generators of large wind power plants with permanent magnetic direct drive. Nevertheless, there is still high uncertainty in the use structures of NdFeB magnets and the contained rare earth elements neodymium and dysprosium. An effective instrument for increasing the market transparency and the understanding of complex anthropogenic material cycles is the dynamic material flow modeling. In the present work paper, this instrument is used for an in-depth analysis of the use structures of NdFeB magnets and the contained rare earths on a global scale. The dynamic modeling of product usage cycles reveals today's usage structures and quantifies future magnetic quantities in obsolete product flows. It could be shown that the magnets in today's scrap volume are mainly contained in obsolete electronics applications such as hard disks (HDD), CD and DVD drives, which makes the recycling hardly seem to be economical due to the small magnets and the high material spread, but in the foreseeable future with larger magnetic quantities from synchronous servomotors and generators can be expected, which significantly increases the recycling potential. In a further step, the effect of the diffusion of alternative drives in the automotive market on the dysprosium requirement is analyzed using a system dynamics model and possible adaptation mechanisms in the form of different substitution effects in the

  7. Direct Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austern, N. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1963-01-15

    In order to give a unified presentation of one point of view, these lectures are devoted only to a detailed development of the standard theories of direct reactions, starting from basic principles. Discussion is given of the present status of the theories, of the techniques used for practical calculation, and of possible future developments. The direct interaction (DI) aspects of a reaction are those which involve only a few of the many degrees of freedom of a nucleus. In fact the minimum number of degrees of freedom which must be involved in a reaction are those required to describe the initial and final channels, and DI studies typically consider these degrees of freedom and no others. Because of this simplicity DI theories may be worked out in painstaking detail. DI processes concern only part of the wave function for a problem. The other part involves complicated excitations of many degrees of freedom, and gives the compound nucleus (CN) effects. While it is extremely interesting to learn how to separate DI and CN effects in an orderly manner, if they are both present in a reaction, no suitable method has yet been found. Instead, current work stresses the kinds of reactions and the kinds of final states in which DI effects dominate and in which CN effects may almost be forgotten. The DI cross-sections which are studied are often extremely large, comparable to elastic scattering cross-sections. (author)

  8. Participation of CD161(+) and invariant natural killer T cells in pediatric asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpio-Pedroza, Juan C; Vaughan, Gilberto; del Rio-Navarro, Blanca E; del Río-Chivardí, Jaime M; Vergara-Castañeda, Arely; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis A; Morales-Flores, Amelia; Rodríguez-Moreno, Guadalupe; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Gonçalves Rossi, Livia M; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Asthma has been defined as a disease of chronic airway inflammation in which many cells and cellular products participate with variable degrees of airflow obstruction and hyperresponsiveness that lead to recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. Prominent among these cellular elements are two cell types referred to as the invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and a subpopulation of T cells expressing the molecule CD161, which are both thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Although the presence of iNKT and other CD161(+) cells in murine models has been associated with asthma, relatively few studies have been performed in the adult patient with asthma that have been often conflicting and even fewer studies are available in children. The present study was performed to investigate the peripheral blood frequencies of iNKT and CD161(+) T cells in children with asthma. A total of 35 children, 19 stable asthmatic patients, 6 who had experienced an asthmatic attack within 24 hours and had not received any treatment, and 10 healthy controls, aged 6-12 years, were enrolled in the study. iNKT and CD161(+) T-cell frequencies in blood were measured together with quantitative levels of IL-4 and interferon (IFN) γ using a cytofluorimetric approach. The results show that iNKT cells are increased in pediatric asthmatic patients undergoing exacerbations of asthma. These cells also produced less IFN-γ and more IL-4 than children with stable asthma and in healthy control children. These results suggest that iNKT cells might participate in the development of the asthmatic exacerbations. The increased production of IL-4 in conjunction with the decrease of IFN-γ may be mechanistically responsible, at least partially, for the heightening of the immunologic response leading to the asthmatic attack in children. Knowledge of these interactive mechanisms involving the iNKT cell and our understanding of its role in the exacerbation of

  9. A 16:1 Serializer ASIC for Data Transmission at 5 Gbps

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A high speed, low power 16:1 serializer has been developed with a commercial 0.25 μm silicon-on-sapphire CMOS technology. The serializer operates from 4.0 to 5.7 Gbps. Total jitter is 62 ps and the eye openning of the bathtub curve is 122 ps at bit rate error of 10-12 at 5 Gbps. Power consumption is 463 mW at 5 Gbps. A proton beam test indicates the serializer is suitable for applications in high energy physics experiments.

  10. A 16:1 Serializer ASIC for Data Transmission at 5 Gbps

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A high speed, low power 16:1 serializer is developed using a commercial 0.25 μm silicon-on-sapphire CMOS technology. It operates from 4.0 to 5.8 Gbps in the lab test. Its total jitter is measured to be 62 ps and the bathtub scan demonstrates a 122 ps opening at BER of less than 10-12 level at 5 Gbps. The measured power consumption is 507 mW at this data rate. A proton test of this chip is scheduled in June and test results will be discussed when available.

  11. Reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Anh

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Reaction Mechanisms laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The research topics are: the valence bond methods, the radical chemistry, the modelling of the transition states by applying geometric constraints, the long range interactions (ion - molecule) in gaseous phase, the reaction sites in gaseous phase and the mass spectroscopy applications. The points of convergence between the investigations of the mass spectroscopy and the theoretical chemistry teams, as well as the purposes guiding the research programs, are discussed. The published papers, the conferences, the congress communications and the thesis, are also reported [fr

  12. Dysprosium doping induced shape and magnetic anisotropy of Fe{sub 3−x}Dy{sub x}O{sub 4} (x=0.01–0.1) nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Richa [School of Sciences, Indira Gandhi National Open University, Maidan Garhi, New Delhi 110068 (India); Department of Physics, ARSD college, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110021 (India); Luthra, Vandna [Department of Physics, Gargi College, Siri Fort Road, New Delhi 110049 (India); Gokhale, Shubha, E-mail: sgokhale@ignou.ac.in [School of Sciences, Indira Gandhi National Open University, Maidan Garhi, New Delhi 110068 (India)

    2016-09-15

    The effect of dysprosium doping on evolution of structural and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles is reported. A standard route of co-precipitation was used for the synthesis of undoped and doped magnetite nanoparticles Fe{sub 3−x}Dy{sub x}O{sub 4} (x=0.0–0.1). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows formation of round shaped particles with diameter in the range of 8–14 nm for undoped sample. On doping beyond x=0.01, the formation of rod like structures is initiated along with the round shaped particles. The number of rods is found to increase with increasing doping concentration. Magnetic characterization using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) revealed doping dependent magnetic properties which can be correlated with the crystallite size as determined from X-ray diffraction (XRD). Enhancement in the saturation magnetization in the initial stages of doping can be explained on the basis of incorporation of Dy{sup 3+} ions in the inverse spinel structure at the octahedral site in place of Fe{sup 3+} ions. Subsequent decrease in saturation magnetization observed beyond x=0.03 could be attributed to precipitation of excess Dy in form of dysprosium ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Report on formation of nanorods in magnetite prompted by Dy doping. • Observation of anisotropic magnetic behaviour emanating from the shape anisotropy. • Evidence of Dy{sup 3+} ions occupying octahedral site in place of Fe{sup 3+} ions. • Nanorods envisaged to be useful as catalysts and in biomedical applications.

  13. Allergic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that don't bother most people (such as venom from bee stings and certain foods, medicines, and pollens) can ... person. If the allergic reaction is from a bee sting, scrape the ... more venom. If the person has emergency allergy medicine on ...

  14. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental investigation of a Solo V161 Stirling cogeneration unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogdakis, E.D.; Antonakos, G.D.; Koronaki, I.P.

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the Stirling engine implementation technology, a Solo Stirling Engine V161 cogeneration module has been installed at the Laboratory of Applied Thermodynamics of National Technical University of Athens. A special thermodynamic analysis of the engine's performance has been conducted introducing and utilizing specially designed computing codes along with the thermal balance study of the unit. Measurements were conducted under different operational conditions concerning various heat load stages of the engine, working pressure, as well as electric power production. Analysis of the experimental results has shown that the overall performance of the Stirling unit proved very promising and quite adequate for various areal applications, equally competing with other CHP systems. The performance of the unit experienced significant stability all over the operating range. The power stand ratio 0.35 differentiates Stirling cogeneration units from others that use diverging technologies significantly. The energy savings using a Stirling CHP unit, in respect to the concurrent use of a thermal and an electrical system at the same equivalent power has revealed 36.8%. -- Highlights: ► Thermodynamic analysis of an a-type Stirling engine. ► Development of generated electrical and thermal power of the m-CHP Solo Stirling Unit to engine's load comparison. ► Stirling m-CHP until heat balance analysis. ► Evaluation of the Solo Stirling V161 unit efficiency.

  15. β-decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich 160,161,162Sm isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron-rich 160,161,162Sm isotopes have been populated at the RIBF, RIKEN via β first time. β-coincident γ rays were observed in all three isotopes including γ rays from the isomeric decay of 160Sm and 162Sm. The isomers in 160Sm and 162Sm have previously been observed but have been populated via β decay for the first time. The isomeric state in 162Sm is assigned a 4−v72+[ 633 ]⊗v12−[ 521 ]${4^ - }v{{7 \\over 2}^ + }\\left[ {633} \\right] \\otimes v{{1 \\over 2}^ - }\\left[ {521} \\right]$ configuration based on the decay pattern. The level schemes of 160Sm and 162Sm are presented. The ground states in the parent nuclei 160Pm and 162Pm are both assigned a 6−v72+[633]⊗π52−[532]${6^ - }v{{7 \\over 2}^ + }\\left[ {633} \\right] \\otimes \\pi {{5 \\over 2}^ - }\\left[ {532} \\right]$ configuration based on the population of states in the daughter nuclei. Blocked BCS calculations were performed to further investigate the spin-parities of the ground states in 160Pm, 161Pm, and 162Pm, and the isomeric state in 162Sm

  16. A de-novo interstitial microduplication involving 2p16.1-p15 and mirroring 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome: Clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimouni-Bloch, Aviva; Yeshaya, Josepha; Kahana, Sarit; Maya, Idit; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina

    2015-11-01

    Microdeletions of various sizes in the 2p16.1-p15 chromosomal region have been grouped together under the 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome. Children with this syndrome generally share certain features including microcephaly, developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, urogenital and skeletal abnormalities. We present a child with a de-novo interstitial 1665 kb duplication of 2p16.1-p15. Clinical features of this child are distinct from those of children with the 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome, specifically the head circumference which is within the normal range and mild intellectual disability with absence of autistic behaviors. Microduplications many times bear milder clinical phenotypes in comparison with corresponding microdeletion syndromes. Indeed, as compared to the microdeletion syndrome patients, the 2p16.1-p15 microduplication seems to have a milder cognitive effect and no effect on other body systems. Limited information available in genetic databases about cases with overlapping duplications indicates that they all have abnormal developmental phenotypes. The involvement of genes in this location including BCL11A, USP34 and PEX13, affecting fundamental developmental processes both within and outside the nervous system may explain the clinical features of the individual described in this report. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dysprosium selective potentiometric membrane sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamani, Hassan Ali, E-mail: haszamani@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridbod, Farnoush; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-01

    A novel Dy(III) ion-selective PVC membrane sensor was made using a new synthesized organic compound, 3,4-diamino-N Prime -((pyridin-2-yl)methylene)benzohydrazide (L) as an excellent sensing element. The electrode showed a Nernstian slope of 19.8 {+-} 0.6 mV per decade in a wide concentration range of 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}-1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} mol L{sup -1}, a detection limit of 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1}, a short conditioning time, a fast response time (< 10 s), and high selectivity towards Dy(III) ion in contrast to other cations. The proposed sensor was successfully used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Dy(III) ions with EDTA. The membrane sensor was also applied to the F{sup -} ion indirect determination of some mouth washing solutions and to the Dy{sup 3+} determination in binary mixtures. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novelty of this work is based on the high affinity of the ionophore toward the Dy{sup 3+} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique is very simple, fast and inexpensive and it is not necessary to use sophisticated equipment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The newly developed sensor is superior to the formerly reported Dy{sup 3+} sensors in terms of selectivity.

  18. Levels in {sup 227}Ac populated in the {sup 230}Th(p,{alpha}) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, D.G. E-mail: dgb@physics.mcmaster.ca; Garrett, P.E.; Qu, Tao

    2003-09-08

    The {sup 230,232}Th(p,{alpha}){sup 227,229}Ac reactions were studied using 20 MeV protons and a magnetic spectrograph to analyze the reaction products. Relative populations of levels in {sup 229}Ac correlated well with previously published (t,{alpha}) results for the same final levels, showing that the similarity of the two reactions observed empirically in the deformed rare earth region extends to actinides. The most strongly populated level in {sup 227}Ac is at 639 keV, and is assigned as the 1/2{sup +}[4 0 0] bandhead. The 435 keV level, previously adopted as the 1/2{sup +}[6 6 0] bandhead, also has a significant intensity that is attributed to {delta}N=2 mixing between these two K=1/2 proton orbitals. The {delta}N=2 matrix element estimated from these data is {approx}80 keV, similar to values observed for the same two Nilsson states as neutron orbitals in the dysprosium isotopes.

  19. Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei. Progress report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, W.U.

    1993-08-01

    This report contain papers on the following topics: The Cold-Fusion Saga; Decay Patterns of Dysprosium Nuclei Produced in {sup 32}S + {sup 118,124}Sn Fusion Reactions; Unexpected Features of Reactions Between Very Heavy Ions at Intermediate Bombarding Energies; Correlations Between Neutrons and Charged Products from the Dissipative Reaction {sup 197}Au+{sup 208}Pb at E/A = 29 MeV; Dissipative Dynamics of Projectile-Like Fragment Production in the Reaction {sup 209}Bi+{sup 136}Xe at E/A = 28.2 MeV; Dynamical Production of Intermediate-Mass Fragments in Peripheral {sup 209}Bi+{sup 136}Xe Collisions at E{sub lab}/A = 28.2 MeV; The Rochester 960-Liter Neutron Multiplicity Meter; A Simple Pulse Processing Concept for a Low-Cost Pulse-Shape-Based Particle Identification; A One-Transistor Preamplifier for PMT Anode Signals; A Five-Channel Multistop TDC/Event Handler for the SuperBall Neutron Multiplicity Meter; Construction of the SuperBall -- a 16,000-Liter Neutron Detector for Calorimetric Studies of Intermediate-Energy Heavy-Ion Reactions; A Computer Code for Light Detection Efficiency Calculations for Photo-multipliers of a Neutron Detector; Evaluation of Gd-Loaded Liquid Scintillators for the SuperBall Neutron Calorimeter; and Measurement of the Interaction of Cosmic-Ray {mu}{sup {minus}} with a Muon Telescope.

  20. Innate signals overcome acquired TCR signaling pathway regulation and govern the fate of human CD161(hi) CD8α⁺ semi-invariant T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Cameron J; Delrow, Jeff; Joslyn, Rochelle C; Swanson, Hillary M; Basom, Ryan; Tabellini, Laura; Delaney, Colleen; Heimfeld, Shelly; Hansen, John A; Riddell, Stanley R

    2011-09-08

    Type 17 programmed CD161(hi)CD8α(+) T cells contribute to mucosal immunity to bacteria and yeast. In early life, microbial colonization induces proliferation of CD161(hi) cells that is dependent on their expression of a semi-invariant Vα7.2(+) TCR. Although prevalent in adults, CD161(hi)CD8α(+) cells exhibit weak proliferative and cytokine responses to TCR ligation. The mechanisms responsible for the dichotomous response of neonatal and adult CD161(hi) cells, and the signals that enable their effector function, have not been established. We describe acquired regulation of TCR signaling in adult memory CD161(hi)CD8α(+) T cells that is absent in cord CD161(hi) cells and adult CD161(lo) cells. Regulated TCR signaling in CD161(hi) cells was due to profound alterations in TCR signaling pathway gene expression and could be overcome by costimulation through CD28 or innate cytokine receptors, which dictated the fate of their progeny. Costimulation with IL-1β during TCR ligation markedly increased proinflammatory IL-17 production, while IL-12-induced Tc1-like function and restored the response to TCR ligation without costimulation. CD161(hi) cells from umbilical cord blood and granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mobilized leukaphereses differed in frequency and function, suggesting future evaluation of the contribution of CD161(hi) cells in hematopoietic stem cell grafts to transplant outcomes is warranted.

  1. Hard-photon production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the process $e^+e^-{\\rightarrow}\\rm n {\\gamma}$ $(\\rm n{\\ge}2)$ at centre-of-mass energies of 161.3 GeV and 172.1 GeV. The analysis is based on a sample of events collected by the L3 detector in 1996 corresponding to total integrated luminosities of 10.7 ${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ and 10.1 ${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ respectively. The observed rates of events with two and more photons and the characteristic distributions are in good agreement with the Standard Model expectations. This is used to set lower limits on contact interaction energy scale parameters, on the QED cut-off parameters and on the mass of excited electrons.

  2. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the experimental and theoretical situation regarding transfer reactions and inelastic scattering. In the first category there is little (very little) precision data for heavy projectiles and consequently almost no experience with quantitative theoretical analysis. For the inelastic scattering the rather extensive data strongly supports the coupled channels models with collective formfactors. At the most back angles, at intensities about 10 -5 of Rutherford scattering, a second, compound-like mechanism becomes dominant. The description of the interplay of these two opposite mechanisms provides a new challenge for our understanding

  3. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corner, J.; Richardson, K.; Fenton, N.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear reactions' marks a new development in the study of television as an agency of public policy debate. During the Eighties, nuclear energy became a major international issue. The disasters at Three-mile Island and Chernobyl created a global anxiety about its risks and a new sensitivity to it among politicians and journalists. This book is a case-study into documentary depictions of nuclear energy in television and video programmes and into the interpretations and responses of viewers drawn from many different occupational groupings. How are the complex and specialist arguments about benefit, risk and proof conveyed through the different conventions of commentary, interview and film sequence? What symbolic associations does the visual language of television bring to portrayals of the issue? And how do viewers make sense of various and conflicting accounts, connecting what they see and hear on the screen with their pre-existing knowledge, experience and 'civic' expectations. The authors examine some of the contrasting forms and themes which have been used by programme makers to explain and persuade, and then give a sustained analysis of the nature and sources of viewers' own accounts. 'Nuclear Reactions' inquires into the public meanings surrounding energy and the environment, spelling out in its conclusion some of the implications for future media treatments of this issue. It is also a key contribution to the international literature on 'television knowledge' and the processes of active viewing. (author)

  4. Differential Effect of Cytomegalovirus Infection with Age on the Expression of CD57, CD300a, and CD161 on T-Cell Subpopulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Hassouneh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Immunosenescence is a progressive deterioration of the immune system with aging. It affects both innate and adaptive immunity limiting the response to pathogens and to vaccines. As chronic cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is probably one of the major driving forces of immunosenescence, and its persistent infection results in functional and phenotypic changes to the T-cell repertoire, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of CMV-seropositivity and aging on the expression of CD300a and CD161 inhibitory receptors, along with the expression of CD57 marker on CD4+, CD8+, CD8+CD56+ (NKT-Like and CD4−CD8− (DN T-cell subsets. Our results showed that, regardless of the T-cell subset, CD57−CD161−CD300a+ T-cells expand with age in CMV-seropositive individuals, whereas CD57−CD161+CD300a+ T-cells decrease. Similarly, CD57+CD161−CD300a+ T-cells expand with age in CMV-seropositive individuals in all subsets except in DN cells and CD57−CD161+CD300a− T-cells decrease in all T-cell subsets except in CD4+ T-cells. Besides, in young individuals, CMV latent infection associates with the expansion of CD57+CD161−CD300a+CD4+, CD57−CD161−CD300a+CD4+, CD57+CD161−CD300a+CD8+, CD57−CD161−CD300a+CD8+, CD57+CD161−CD300a+NKT-like, and CD57+CD161−CD300a+DN T-cells. Moreover, in young individuals, CD161 expression on T-cells is not affected by CMV infection. Changes of CD161 expression were only associated with age in the context of CMV latent infection. Besides, CD300a+CD57+CD161+ and CD300a−CD57+CD161+ phenotypes were not found in any of the T-cell subsets studied except in the DN subpopulation, indicating that in the majority of T-cells, CD161 and CD57 do not co-express. Thus, our results show that CMV latent infection impact on the immune system depends on the age of the individual, highlighting the importance of including CMV serology in any study regarding immunosenescence.

  5. Spallation reactions; Reactions de spallation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugon, J.

    1996-12-31

    Spallation reactions dominate the interactions of hadrons with nuclei in the GeV range (from {approx} 0.1 to {approx} 10 GeV). They correspond to a sometimes important ejection of light particles leaving most of the time a residue of mass commensurate with the target mass. The main features of the experimental data are briefly reviewed. The most successful theoretical model, namely the intranuclear cascade + evaporation model, is presented. Its physical content, results and possible improvements are critically discussed. Alternative approaches are shortly reviewed. (author). 84 refs.

  6. CNV-association meta-analysis in 191,161 European adults reveals new loci associated with anthropometric traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macé, Aurélien; Tuke, Marcus A; Deelen, Patrick; Kristiansson, Kati; Mattsson, Hannele; Nõukas, Margit; Sapkota, Yadav; Schick, Ursula; Porcu, Eleonora; Rüeger, Sina; McDaid, Aaron F; Porteous, David; Winkler, Thomas W; Salvi, Erika; Shrine, Nick; Liu, Xueping; Ang, Wei Q; Zhang, Weihua; Feitosa, Mary F; Venturini, Cristina; van der Most, Peter J; Rosengren, Anders; Wood, Andrew R; Beaumont, Robin N; Jones, Samuel E; Ruth, Katherine S; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Tyrrell, Jessica; Havulinna, Aki S; Boers, Harmen; Mägi, Reedik; Kriebel, Jennifer; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Perola, Markus; Nieminen, Markku; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S; Geller, Frank; Lahti, Jari; Palotie, Aarno; Koponen, Päivikki; Lundqvist, Annamari; Rissanen, Harri; Bottinger, Erwin P; Afaq, Saima; Wojczynski, Mary K; Lenzini, Petra; Nolte, Ilja M; Sparsø, Thomas; Schupf, Nicole; Christensen, Kaare; Perls, Thomas T; Newman, Anne B; Werge, Thomas; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D; Chambers, John C; Koskinen, Seppo; Melbye, Mads; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; Tobin, Martin D; Wain, Louise V; Sinisalo, Juha; Peters, Annette; Meitinger, Thomas; Martin, Nicholas G; Wray, Naomi R; Montgomery, Grant W; Medland, Sarah E; Swertz, Morris A; Vartiainen, Erkki; Borodulin, Katja; Männistö, Satu; Murray, Anna; Bochud, Murielle; Jacquemont, Sébastien; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hansen, Thomas F; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Mangino, Massimo; Province, Michael A; Deloukas, Panos; Kooner, Jaspal S; Freathy, Rachel M; Pennell, Craig; Feenstra, Bjarke; Strachan, David P; Lettre, Guillaume; Hirschhorn, Joel; Cusi, Daniele; Heid, Iris M; Hayward, Caroline; Männik, Katrin; Beckmann, Jacques S; Loos, Ruth J F; Nyholt, Dale R; Metspalu, Andres; Eriksson, Johan G; Weedon, Michael N; Salomaa, Veikko; Franke, Lude; Reymond, Alexandre; Frayling, Timothy M; Kutalik, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    There are few examples of robust associations between rare copy number variants (CNVs) and complex continuous human traits. Here we present a large-scale CNV association meta-analysis on anthropometric traits in up to 191,161 adult samples from 26 cohorts. The study reveals five CNV associations at

  7. 25 CFR 161.603 - Can mediation be used in the event of a permit violation or dispute?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can mediation be used in the event of a permit violation... AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Permit Violations § 161.603 Can mediation be used... to be resolved with the District Grazing Committee through mediation. (a) The District Grazing...

  8. Kui naine tahab olla kangelane : kestvus-perfomance "Äng - 161 km palja rindkerega" / Fideelia-Signe Roots

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Roots, Fideelia-Signe, 1976-

    2014-01-01

    Fideelia-Signe Roots oma aktsioonist tegevuskunstiürituse "Äng" raames, mille käigus kunstnik kõndis jalgsi alasti ülakehaga 161 kilomeetrit Tartust Karepale eesmärgiga testida naise kehakuvandi piire. Kangelase ja superkangelase mõistest

  9. 77 FR 34935 - Foreign-Trade Zone 161; Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority; Siemens Energy, Inc., (Wind...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Docket T-4-2012] Foreign-Trade Zone 161; Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority; Siemens Energy, Inc., (Wind Turbine Nacelles and Hubs); Notice of... temporary/interim manufacturing (T/IM) authority, on behalf of Siemens Energy, Inc., to manufacture wind...

  10. Chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, Brian.

    1991-01-01

    Chain Reaction is a work of recent American political history. It seeks to explain how and why America came to depend so heavily on its experts after World War II, how those experts translated that authority into political clout, and why that authority and political discretion declined in the 1970s. The author's research into the internal memoranda of the Atomic Energy Commission substantiates his argument in historical detail. It was not the ravages of American anti-intellectualism, as so many scholars have argued, that brought the experts back down to earth. Rather, their decline can be traced to the very roots of their success after World War II. The need to over-state anticipated results in order to garner public support, incessant professional and bureaucratic specialization, and the sheer proliferation of expertise pushed arcane and insulated debates between experts into public forums at the same time that a broad cross section of political participants found it easier to gain access to their own expertise. These tendencies ultimately undermined the political influence of all experts. (author)

  11. 25 CFR 161.610 - What will BIA do if livestock is not removed when a permit expires or is cancelled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What will BIA do if livestock is not removed when a permit expires or is cancelled? 161.610 Section 161.610 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... will BIA do if livestock is not removed when a permit expires or is cancelled? If the livestock is not...

  12. A Nonsense Mutation in FAM161A Is a Recurrent Founder Allele in Dutch and Belgian Individuals With Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Schil, Kristof; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Leroy, Bart P.; Pott, Jan Willem R.; Bandah-Rozenfeld, Dikla; Zonneveld-Vrieling, Marijke N.; Sharon, Dror; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; De Baere, Elfride; Collin, Rob W. J.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh

    PURPOSE. To identify mutations in FAM161A underlying autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in the Dutch and Belgian populations and to investigate whether common FAM161A-associated phenotypic features could be identified. METHODS. Homozygosity mapping, amplification-refractory mutation

  13. Precursory activity of the 161 ka Kos Plateau Tuff eruption, Aegean Sea (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, David J. W.; Pe-Piper, Georgia; Lefort, Darren

    2010-08-01

    The Kos Plateau Tuff (KPT) eruption of 161 ka was the largest explosive Quaternary eruption in the eastern Mediterranean. We have discovered an uplifted beach deposit of abraded pumice cobbles, directly overlain by the KPT. The pumice cobbles resemble pumice from the KPT in petrography and composition and differ from Plio-Pleistocene rhyolites on the nearby Kefalos Peninsula. The pumice contains enclaves of basaltic andesite showing chilled lobate margins, suggesting co-existence of two magmas. The deposit provides evidence that the precursory phase of the KPT eruption produced pumice rafts, and defines the paleoshoreline for the KPT, which elsewhere was deposited on land. The beach deposit has been uplifted about 120 m since the KPT eruption, whereas the present marine area south of Kos has subsided several hundred metres, as a result of regional neotectonics. The basaltic andesite is more primitive than other mafic rocks known from the Kos-Nisyros volcanic centre and contains phenocrysts of Fo89 olivine, bytownite, enstatite and diopside. Groundmass amphibole suggests availability of water in the final stages of magma evolution. Geochemical and mineralogical variation in the mafic products of the KPT eruption indicate that fractionation of basaltic magma in a base-of-crust magma chamber was followed by mixing with rhyolitic magma during eruption. Low eruption rates during the precursory activity may have minimised the extent of mixing and preserved the end-member magma types.

  14. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  15. Isolation and characterization of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME)-producing Streptomyces sp. S161 from sheep (Ovis aries) faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Wang, J; Deng, Z; Wu, H; Deng, Q; Tan, H; Cao, L

    2013-09-01

    An actinomycete producing oil-like mixtures was isolated and characterized. The strain was isolated from sheep faeces and identified as Streptomyces sp. S161 based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The strain showed cellulase and xylanase activities. The (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the mixtures showed that the mixtures were composed of fatty acid methyl esters (52·5), triglycerides (13·7) and monoglycerides (9·1) (mol.%). Based on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis, the fatty acid methyl esters were mainly composed of C14-C16 long-chain fatty acids. The results indicated that Streptomyces sp. S161 could produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) directly from starch. To our knowledge, this is the first isolated strain that can produce biodiesel (FAME) directly from starch. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Rate Constants for the Reactions of OH with CH(sub 3)Cl, CH(sub 2) C1(sub 2), CHC1(sub 3)and CH(sub 3)Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H-J.; DeMore, W.

    1994-01-01

    Rate constants for the reactions of OH with CH3C1, CH2Cl2, CHCl3 and CH3Br have been measured by a relative rate technique in which the reaction rate of each compound was compared to that of HFC-152a (CH3CHF2)and for CH2Cl2, HFC-161 (CH3CH2F).

  17. Disruption of δ-opioid receptor phosphorylation at threonine 161 attenuates morphine tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Jing; Xie, Wei-Yan; Hu, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yun

    2012-04-01

    Our previous study identified Threonine 161 (Thr-161), located in the second intracellular loop of the δ-opioid receptor (DOR), as the only consensus phosphorylation site for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). The aim of this study was to assess the function of DOR phosphorylation by Cdk5 in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain and morphine tolerance. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain were acutely dissociated and the biotinylation method was used to explore the membrane localization of phosphorylated DOR at Thr-161 (pThr-161-DOR), and paw withdrawal latency was measured after intrathecal delivery of drugs or Tat-peptide, using a radiant heat stimulator in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Both the total amount and the surface localization of pThr-161-DOR were significantly enhanced in the ipsilateral DRG following CFA injection. Intrathecal delivery of the engineered Tat fusion-interefering peptide corresponding to the second intracellular loop of DOR (Tat-DOR-2L) increased inflammatory hypersensitivity, and inhibited DOR- but not µ-opioid receptor-mediated spinal analgesia in CFA-treated rats. However, intrathecal delivery of Tat-DOR-2L postponed morphine antinociceptive tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Phosphorylation of DOR at Thr-161 by Cdk5 attenuates hypersensitivity and potentiates morphine tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain, while disruption of the phosphorylation of DOR at Thr-161 attenuates morphine tolerance.

  18. CD161+ MAIT cells are severely reduced in peripheral blood and lymph nodes of HIV-infected individuals independently of disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Maria Eberhard

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells are characterized by the combined expression of the semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR Vα7.2, the lectin receptor CD161, as well as IL-18R, and play an important role in antibacterial host defense of the gut. The current study characterized CD161(+ MAIT and CD161-TCRVα7.2(+ T cell subsets within a large cohort of HIV patients with emphasis on patients with slow disease progression and elite controllers. Mononuclear cells from blood and lymph node samples as well as plasma from 63 patients and 26 healthy donors were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry and ELISA for IL-18, sCD14 and sCD163. Additionally, MAIT cells were analyzed after in vitro stimulation with different cytokines and/or fixed E.coli. Reduced numbers of CD161(+ MAIT cells during HIV infection were detectable in the blood and lymph nodes of all patient groups, including elite controllers. CD161+ MAIT cell numbers did not recover even after successful antiretroviral treatment. The loss of CD161(+ MAIT cells was correlated with higher levels of MAIT cell activation; an increased frequency of the CD161-TCRVα7.2(+T cell subset in HIV infection was observed. In vitro stimulation of MAIT cells with IL-18 and IL-12, IL-7 and fixed E.coli also resulted in a rapid and additive reduction of the MAIT cell frequency defined by CD161, IL-18R and CCR6. In summary, the irreversible reduction of the CD161(+ MAIT cell subset seems to be an early event in HIV infection that is independent of later stages of the disease. This loss appears to be at least partially due to the distinctive vulnerability of MAIT cells to the pronounced stimulation by microbial products and cytokines during HIV-infection.

  19. Design and commissioning of a 16.1 MHz multiharmonic buncher for the reaccelerator at NSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Daniel Maloney

    The ReAccelerator (ReA) linear accelerator facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory is a unique resource for the nuclear physics community. The particle fragmentation beam production technique, combined with the ability to stop and then reaccelerate the beam to energies of astrophysical interest, give experimenters an unprecedented range of rare isotopes at energies of nuclear and astrophysical interest. The ReAccelerator also functions as a testbed for technology to be incorporated in the upcoming Facility for Rare Isotope Beams linear accelerator, which will eventually in turn become the beam source for ReA. This prototype nature of the ReAccelerator, however, dictated some design choices which have resulted in a final beam with a time structure that is less than ideal for certain classes of experiments. The cavities and RFQ used in ReA have an operating frequency of 80.5 MHz, which corresponds to a separation between particle bunches at the detectors of 12.4 ns. While this separation is acceptable for many experiments, sensitive time of flight measurements require a greater separation between pulses. As nuclear physics experiments rely on statistics, a solution to increasing bunch separation without simply discarding a large fraction of the beam particles was desired. This document describes the design and construction of such a device, a 16.1 MHz multiharmonic buncher. The first chapter provides backgound information on the NSCL and ReA, and some basic concepts in accelerator physics to lay the groundwork for the project.Next, more specifics are provided on the time structure of accelerated beams, and the experimental motivation for greater separation. The third chapter outlines the basic principles of multiharmonic bunching. In order to evaluate the feasibility of any buncher design, the exact acceptance of the Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ) of the ReAccelerator needed to be empirically measured. Chapter 4 describes the results of that

  20. Completion Report for Well ER-16-1 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2006-12-01

    Well ER-16-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June and July 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit, Number 99. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of the Shoshone Mountain area, especially in the older Tertiary and pre-Tertiary strata. The main 46.99-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 702.9 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 663.7 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to total depth of 1,220.7 meters. A completion string set at the depth of 1,162.4 meters consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless-steel casing, with one continuous slotted interval open to the lower carbonate aquifer. The fluid level in the borehole soon dropped, so the borehole was deepened in July 2006. To deepen the borehole, the slotted section was cemented and a 12.1-centimeter hole was drilled through the bottom of the completion string to the new total depth of 1,391.7 meters, which is 171.0 meters deeper than the original borehole. A string of 6.03-centimeter carbon-steel tubing with one continuous slotted interval at 1,361.8 to 1,381.4 meters, and open to the lower carbonate aquifer, was installed in the well with no gravel packing or cement, to serve as a monitoring string. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 37 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 646.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 744.9 meters

  1. The Oklo natural nuclear reactors: neutron parameters, age and duration of the reactions, uranium and fission products migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffenach, J.-C.

    1979-09-01

    Mass spectrometry and isotopic dilution technique are used in order to carry out, on various samples from the fossil nuclear reactors at Oklo, Gabon, isotopic and chemical analyses of some particular elements involved in the nuclear reactions: uranium, lead, bismuth, thorium, rare gases (krypton, xenon), rare earths (neodymium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, dysprosium), ruthenium and palladium. Interpretations of these analyses lead to the determination of many neutron parameters such as the neutron fluence received by the samples, the spectrum index, the conversion coefficient, and also the percentages of fissions due to uranium-238 and plutonium-239 and the total number of fissions relative to uranium. All these results make it possible to determine the age of the nuclear reactions by measuring the amounts of fission rare earths formed, i.e. 1.97 billion years. This study brings some informations to the general problem of radioactive wastes storage in deep geological formations, the storage of uranium, plutonium and many fission products having been carried out naturally, and for about two billion years [fr

  2. Muscle response to pneumatic hand tool torque reaction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwin, R G; VanBergeijk, E; Armstrong, T J

    1989-06-01

    Surface electromyography was used for studying the effects of torque reaction force acting against the hand, on forearm muscle activity and grip force for five subjects operating right angle, air shut-off nutrunners. Four tools having increasing spindle torque were operated using short and long torque reaction times. Nutrunner spindle torque ranged between 30 Nm and 100 Nm. Short torque reaction time was considered 0.5 s while long torque reaction time was 2 s. Peak horizontal force was the greatest component of the reaction force acting against the hand and accounted for more than 97% of the peak resultant hand force. Peak hand force increased from 89 N for the smallest tool to 202 N for the largest tool. Forearm muscle rms EMG, scaled for grip force, indicated average flexor activity during the Torque-reaction phase was more than four times greater than the Pre-start and Post Shut-off phases, and two times greater than the Run-down phase. Flexor EMG activity during the Torque-reaction phase increased for increasing tool peak spindle torque. Average flexor rms EMG activity, scaled for grip force, during the Torque-reaction phase increased from 372 N for the 30 Nm nutrunner to 449 N for the 100 Nm nutrunner. Flexor rms EMG activity averaged during the Torque-reaction phase and scaled for grip force was 390 N for long torque reaction times and increased to 440 N for short torque reaction times. Flexor rms EMG integrated over the torque reaction phase was 839 Ns for long torque reaction times and decreased to 312 Ns for short torque reaction times. The average latency between tool spindle torque onset and peak initial flexor rms EMG for long torque reaction times was 294 ms which decreased to 161 ms for short torque reaction times. The average latency between peak tool spindle torque, just prior to tool shut-off, and peak final rms EMG for long torque reaction times was 97 ms for flexors and 188 ms for extensors, which decreased for short torque reaction times to 47

  3. Similarities and Differences in Pacing Patterns in a 161-km and 101-km Ultra-Distance Road Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Philip L S; Tan, Frankie H Y; Bosch, Andrew N

    2016-08-01

    Tan, PLS, Tan, FHY, and Bosch, AN. Similarities and differences in pacing patterns in a 161-km and 101-km ultra-distance road race. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2145-2155, 2016-The purpose of this study was to establish and compare the pacing patterns of fast and slow finishers in a tropical ultra-marathon. Data were collected from the Craze Ultra-marathon held on the 22nd and 21st of September in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Finishers of the 161-km (N = 47) and 101-km (N = 120) categories of the race were divided into thirds (groups A-C) by merit of finishing time. Altogether, 17 and 11 split times were recorded for the 161-km and 101-km finishers, respectively, and used to calculate the mean running speed for each distance segment. Running speed for the first segment was normalized to 100, with all subsequent splits adjusted accordingly. Running speed during the last 5 km was calculated against the mean race pace to establish the existence of an end spurt. A reverse J-shaped pacing profile was demonstrated in all groups for both distance categories and only 38% of the finishers executed an end spurt. In the 101-km category, in comparison with groups B and C, group A maintained a significantly more even pace (p = 0.013 and 0.001, respectively) and completed the race at a significantly higher percent of initial starting speed (p = 0.001 and 0.001, respectively). Descriptive data also revealed that the top 5 finishers displayed a "herd-behavior" by staying close to the lead runner in the initial portion of the race. These findings demonstrate that to achieve a more even pace, recreational ultra-runners should adopt a patient sustainable starting speed, with less competitive runners setting realistic performance goals whereas competitive runners with a specific time goal to consider running in packs of similar pace.

  4. Maillard reaction products as antimicrobial components for packaging films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Carolin; Müller, Ulla; Sauer, Tanja; Augner, Kerstin; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2014-02-15

    Active packaging foils with incorporated antimicrobial agents release the active ingredient during food storage. Maillard reaction products (MRPs) show antimicrobial activity that is at least partially mediated by H2O2. De novo generation of H2O2 by an MRP fraction, extracted from a ribose/lysine Maillard reaction mixture by 85% ethanol, was monitored at three concentrations (1.6, 16.1, and 32.3g/L) and three temperatures (4, 25, and 37 °C) between 0 and 96 h, reaching a maximum of 335 μM H2O2 (32.3g/L, 37 °C, 96 h). The active MRP fraction (16.1g/L) completely inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli for 24h and was therefore incorporated in a polyvinyl acetate-based lacquer and dispersed onto a low-density polyethylene film. The coated film generated about 100 μM H2O2 and resulted in a log-reduction of >5 log-cycles against E. coli. Thus, MRPs can be considered as active ingredients for antimicrobial packaging materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Elevated Ratio of Th17 Cell-Derived Th1 Cells (CD161(+)Th1 Cells) to CD161(+)Th17 Cells in Peripheral Blood of Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines. It has been reported that IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. It remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we tried to identify Th17 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells (CD161(+)Th1 cells) in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. We also evaluated the effect of methotrexate on the ratio of Th17 cells in early-onset RA patients. The ratio of Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells to CD161(+)Th17 cells was elevated in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. In addition, MTX reduced the ratio of Th17 cells but not Th1 cells. These findings suggest that IL-17 and Th17 play important roles in the early phase of RA; thus, anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with RA in the early phase.

  6. Complexation behaviour of DADCA and DAPDA with dysprosium-166/holmium-166 parent daughter system and its potential for use in radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsini, S.; University of Technology, Broadway, NSW; Di Bartolo, N.; Smith, S.; Baker, T.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A novel approach for the delivery of therapeutic doses from 166 Ho to cancerous tissue is via the decay of its parent, 166 Dy. When designing radioimmunoconjugte, a crucial question is to determine whether the ligand used in the radiolabeling process is capable of holding the 166 Ho on decay of the parent, 166 Dy. In this study, two pendant arm macrocycles 1, 10-Diaza-4, 7, 13, 16-tetraoxacyclooctadecane-N, N'-diacetic acid, (DACDA) and 1, 10-Diaza-4, 7, 13-trioxacyclopentadecane-N, N'-diacetic acid, (DAPDA) that were reported to forms reasonably stable complexes with Dy and Ho, were synthesised. The synthesis of the two pendant arm macrocycles was first attempted using methods outlined by Chang and Rowland. The yields obtained through this method were low (10 % for both ligands) and it was considered important to investigate alternative approaches to the synthesis. The new method involved an alkylation reaction in the presence of acetonitrile and sodium bicarbonate. The method took considerably less time and the yields increased to 88 %. The ligands were characterised using 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR and mass spectrometry. The chemical and radiolytic stabilities of 166 Dy and 166 Ho complexes of the two ligands were investigated at pH = 5 and the ligands potential for use in the in vivo generator system evaluated

  7. Alterations of in vivo CA1 network activity in Dp(16)1Yey Down syndrome model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveau, Matthieu; Polygalov, Denis; Boehringer, Roman; Amano, Kenji; Yamakawa, Kazuhiro; McHugh, Thomas J

    2018-02-27

    Down syndrome, the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability, results from an extra-copy of chromosome 21. Mice engineered to model this aneuploidy exhibit Down syndrome-like memory deficits in spatial and contextual tasks. While abnormal neuronal function has been identified in these models, most studies have relied on in vitro measures. Here, using in vivo recording in the Dp(16)1Yey model, we find alterations in the organization of spiking of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, including deficits in the generation of complex spikes. These changes lead to poorer spatial coding during exploration and less coordinated activity during sharp-wave ripples, events involved in memory consolidation. Further, the density of CA1 inhibitory neurons expressing neuropeptide Y, a population key for the generation of pyramidal cell bursts, were significantly increased in Dp(16)1Yey mice. Our data refine the 'over-suppression' theory of Down syndrome pathophysiology and suggest specific neuronal subtypes involved in hippocampal dysfunction in these model mice. © 2018, Raveau et al.

  8. Hexanuclear, heterometallic, Ni₃Ln₃ complexes possessing O-capped homo- and heterometallic structural subunits: SMM behavior of the dysprosium analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goura, Joydeb; Guillaume, Rogez; Rivière, Eric; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2014-08-04

    The reaction of hetero donor chelating mannich base ligand 6,6'-{(2-(dimethylamino)ethylazanediyl)bis(methylene)}bis(2-methoxy-4-methylphenol) with Ni(ClO4)2·6H2O and lanthanide(III) salts [Dy(III) (1); Tb(III) (2); Gd (III) (3); Ho(III) (4); and Er(III) (5)] in the presence of triethylamine and pivalic acid afforded a series of heterometallic hexanuclear Ni(II)-Ln(III) coordination compounds, [Ni3Ln3(μ3-O)(μ3-OH)3(L)3(μ-OOCCMe3)3]·(ClO4)·wCH3CN·xCH2Cl2·yCH3OH·zH2O [for 1, w = 8, x = 3, y = 0, z = 5.5; for 2, w = 0, x = 5, y = 0, z = 6.5; for 3, w = 15, x = 18, y = 3, z = 7.5; for 4, w = 15, x = 20, y = 6, z = 9.5; and for 5, w = 0, x = 3, y = 2, z = 3]. The molecular structure of these complexes reveals the presence of a monocationic hexanuclear derivative containing one perchlorate counteranion. The asymmetric unit of each of the hexanuclear derivatives comprises the dinuclear motif [NiLn(L)(μ3-O)(μ3-OH)(μ-Piv)]. The cation contains three interlinked O-capped clusters: one Ln(III)3O and three Ni(II)Ln(III)2O. Each of the lanthanide centers is eight- coordinated (distorted trigonal-dodecahedron), while the nickel centers are hexacoordinate (distorted octahedral). The study of the magnetic properties of all compounds are reported and suggests single molecule magnet behavior for the Dy(III) derivative (1).

  9. The role of dysprosium on the structural and magnetic properties of (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Hamed; Ghasemi, Ali, E-mail: ali13912001@yahoo.com; Mozaffarinia, Reza; Tavoosi, Majid

    2017-02-15

    In current work, Nd2Fe14B nanoparticles was synthesized by sol-gel method. Dysprosium powders were added into Nd2Fe14B nanoparticles by mechanical alloying process in order to enhancement of coercivity. The phase analysis, structure, and magnetic properties of annealed (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanoparticles with different Dy-content (x=0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6) were investigated by employing X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques. The results showed that with an increase in Dy amounts, the coercivity of particles increased from 2.9 kOe to 13.4 kOe and then decreased to 5.6 kOe. By adding an optimum amount of Dy (x=0.4), the coercivity was significantly increased from 2.9 kOe to 13.4 kOe. The average particle size of annealed (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanoparticles was below 10 nm. Magnetization reversal studies indicate that the coercivity of milled and annealed (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanoparticles is controlled by the nucleation of reversed magnetic domains. The experimental results in the angular dependence of coercivity for (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B permanent magnets showed that the normalized coercivity of the permanent magnets H{sub c}(θ)/H{sub c}(0) increases from 1 to about 1.2–1.5 with increasing θ from 0 to about π/3, for x=0.4–0.6. - Highlights: • Dy was added to Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B nanoparticles to improve the coercivity. • A maximum squareness ratio of 0.99 was obtained. • The average particle size decreased with an increase in Dy-content.

  10. Treatment and Managing Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of reactions. Learn more here. Milk Egg Peanut Tree Nuts Soy Wheat Fish Shellfish Sesame Other Food ... a severe reaction. Consider wearing an emergency medical identification (e.g., bracelet, other jewelry). What to Read ...

  11. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng [Irvine, CA; Sui, Guodong [Los Angeles, CA; Elizarov, Arkadij [Valley Village, CA; Kolb, Hartmuth C [Playa del Rey, CA; Huang, Jiang [San Jose, CA; Heath, James R [South Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Michael E [Los Angeles, CA; Quake, Stephen R [Stanford, CA; Tseng, Hsian-rong [Los Angeles, CA; Wyatt, Paul [Tipperary, IE; Daridon, Antoine [Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  12. Preequilibrium Nuclear Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmaier, B.

    1988-01-01

    After a survey on existing experimental data on precompound reactions and a description of preequilibrium reactions, theoretical models and quantum mechanical theories of preequilibrium emission are presented. The 25 papers of this meeting are analyzed separately

  13. Managing Your Emotional Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Managing Your Emotional Reactions KidsHealth / For Teens / Managing Your Emotional Reactions ... Think about what you might do next time. Emotions 101 The skills we use to manage our ...

  14. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    array (CLARA), extensive investigations of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics have been carried out. In the present paper aspects of these studies will be presented, focussing more closely on the reaction mechanism, in particular on the ...

  15. Overlapping trisomies for human chromosome 21 orthologs produce similar effects on skull and brain morphology of Dp(16)1Yey and Ts65Dn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John M; Dutka, Tara; Ratliff, Tabetha S; Reeves, Roger H; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2014-08-01

    Trisomy 21 results in gene-dosage imbalance during embryogenesis and throughout life, ultimately causing multiple anomalies that contribute to the clinical manifestations of Down syndrome. Down syndrome is associated with manifestations of variable severity (e.g., heart anomalies, reduced growth, dental anomalies, shortened life-span). Craniofacial dysmorphology and cognitive dysfunction are consistently observed in all people with Down syndrome. Mouse models are useful for studying the effects of gene-dosage imbalance on development. We investigated quantitative changes in the skull and brain of the Dp(16)1Yey Down syndrome mouse model and compared these mice to Ts65Dn and Ts1Cje mouse models. Three-dimensional micro-computed tomography images of Dp(16)1Yey and euploid mouse crania were morphometrically evaluated. Cerebellar cross-sectional area, Purkinje cell linear density, and granule cell density were evaluated relative to euploid littermates. Skulls of Dp(16)1Yey and Ts65Dn mice displayed similar changes in craniofacial morphology relative to their respective euploid littermates. Trisomy-based differences in brain morphology were also similar in Dp(16)1Yey and Ts65Dn mice. These results validate examination of the genetic basis for craniofacial and brain phenotypes in Dp(16)1Yey mice and suggest that they, like Ts65Dn mice, are valuable tools for modeling the effects of trisomy 21 on development. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Novel Neurovascular Protective Agents: Effects of INV-155, INV-157, INV-159, and INV-161 versus Lipoic Acid and Captopril in a Rat Stroke Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J. Connell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lipoic acid (LA, which has significant antioxidant properties, may also function as a potent neuroprotectant. The synthetic compounds INV-155, INV-157, INV-159, and INV-161 are physiochemical combinations of lipoic acid and captopril. We sought to determine if these compounds have neuroprotective potential following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in rats. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenously with captopril (1–50 mg/kg 30 minutes prior to MCAO. Blood pressure, heart rate, baroreceptor reflex sensitivity, and infarct size were measured. In addition, dose response effect on infarct size and cardiovascular parameters was determined using INV-155, INV-157, INV-159, and INV-161 and compared to captopril and LA. Results. Pretreatment with captopril and LA at all doses tested was neuroprotective. The compounds INV-159 (0.5–10 mg/kg and INV-161 (1–10 mg/kg produced a significant,dose-dependent decrease in infarct size. In contrast, INV-155 and INV-157 had no effect on infarct size. Conclusions. Combined pretreatment with captopril potentiated the neuroprotective benefit observed following LA alone. Both INV-159 and INV-161 were also neuroprotective. These results suggest that patients taking combinations of captopril and LA, either as combination therapy or in the form of INV-159 or INV-161, may also benefit from significant protection against cerebral infarction.

  17. Chemical transport reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Transport Reactions focuses on the processes and reactions involved in the transport of solid or liquid substances to form vapor phase reaction products. The publication first offers information on experimental and theoretical principles and the transport of solid substances and its special applications. Discussions focus on calculation of the transport effect of heterogeneous equilibria for a gas motion between equilibrium spaces; transport effect and the thermodynamic quantities of the transport reaction; separation and purification of substances by means of material transport; and

  18. Thermonuclear reaction rates. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Fowler, W.A.; Caughlan, G.R.; Zimmerman, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    Stellar thermonuclear reaction rates are revised and updated, adding a number of new important reaction rates. Several reactions with large negative Q-values are included, and examples of them are discussed. The importance of the decay rates for Mg-26(p,n) exp 26 Al and Al-26(n,p) exp 26 Mg for stellar studies is emphasized. 19 references

  19. Maillard Reaction: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia d'Almeida Francisquini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction is an important subject of study in food science and technology and different areas of knowledge are involved such as chemistry, food engineering, nutrition and food technology. The objective of this paper is to present the basic concepts of the Maillard reaction, such as the reaction stages, the main compounds producced and some technological consequences for dairy products.

  20. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  1. Pair-Production of W Bosons in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We report on the measurement of W-boson pair-production with the L3 detector at LEP at a centre-of-mass energy of 161.34~\\GeV. In a data sample corresponding to a total luminosity of 11~pb$^{-1}$, we select four-fermion events with high invariant masses of pairs of hadronic jets or leptons. Combining all final states, the measured total cross section for W-pair production is: $\\SWW = 2.89^{+0.81}_{-0.70}~(stat.)\\pm0.14~(syst.)$~pb. Within the Standard Model, this corresponds to a mass of the W boson of: $\\MW = 80.80^{+0.48}_{-0.42}~(exp.)\\pm 0.03$~(LEP)~\\GeV. Limits on anomalous triple-vector-boson couplings are derived. \\end{abstract}

  2. Insights into the mechanisms on chemical reactions: reaction paths for chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Rosen, E.; Eades, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report reaction paths for two prototypical chemical reactions: Li + HF, an electron transfer reaction, and OH + H 2 , an abstraction reaction. In the first reaction we consider the connection between the energetic terms in the reaction path Hamiltonian and the electronic changes which occur upon reaction. In the second reaction we consider the treatment of vibrational effects in chemical reactions in the reaction path formalism. 30 refs., 9 figs

  3. Reaction of the hematopoietic system under long-term emotional stress developed after preliminary gamma-irradiation with low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, B.B.; Deshevoj, Yu.B.; Lebedev, V.G.; Lyrshchikova, A.V.; Vorotnikova, T.V.

    1997-01-01

    In experiments on rats and mice it was shown that the preliminary protected gamma-irradiation with cumulative dose of 0.9 Gy (dose rate - 0.03 Gy/day) or single short-term gamma-irradiation with dose of 0.9 Gy (dose rate - 1.61 Gy/min) inhibited development of adaptive reactions and compensatory abilities of the hematopoietic system under long-term emotional stress

  4. Measurements of 161 Double Stars With a High-Speed CCD: The Winter/Spring 2017 Observing Program at Brilliant Sky Observatory, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshaw, Richard

    2018-04-01

    In the winter and spring of 2017, an aggressive observing program of measuring close double stars with speckle interferometry and CCD imaging was undertaken at Brilliant Sky Observatory, my observing site in Cave Creek, Arizona. A total of 596 stars were observed, 8 of which were rejected for various reasons, leaving 588 pairs. Of these, 427 were observed and measured with speckle interferometry, while the remaining 161 were measured with a CCD. This paper reports the results of the observations of the 161 CCD cases. A separate paper in this issue will report the speckle measurements of the 427 other pairs.

  5. Anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy is more effective with the radiolanthanide terbium-161 compared to lutetium-177 in an ovarian cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenberg, Juergen; Lindenblatt, Dennis; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane; Dorrer, Holger; Zhernosekov, Konstantin; Koester, Ulli; Tuerler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is considered a valuable target for therapeutic intervention in different types of cancer. Recent studies have shown that anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with 67 Cu- and 177 Lu-labelled internalising monoclonal antibody (mAb) chCE7 was effective in the treatment of human ovarian cancer xenografts. In this study, we directly compared the therapeutic efficacy of anti-L1CAM RIT against human ovarian cancer under equitoxic conditions with the radiolanthanide 177 Lu and the potential alternative 161 Tb in an ovarian cancer therapy model. Tb was produced by neutron bombardment of enriched 160 Gd targets. 161 Tb and 177 Lu were used for radiolabelling of DOTA-conjugated antibodies. The in vivo behaviour of the radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) was assessed in IGROV1 tumour-bearing nude mice using biodistribution experiments and SPECT/CT imaging. After ascertaining the maximal tolerated doses (MTD) the therapeutic impact of 50 % MTD of 177 Lu- and 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 was evaluated in groups of ten mice by monitoring the tumour size of subcutaneous IGROV1 tumours. The average number of DOTA ligands per antibody was 2.5 and maximum specific activities of 600 MBq/mg were achieved under identical radiolabelling conditions. RICs were stable in human plasma for at least 48 h. 177 Lu- and 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 showed high tumour uptake (37.8-39.0 %IA/g, 144 h p.i.) with low levels in off-target organs. SPECT/CT images confirmed the biodistribution data. 161 Tb-labelled chCE7 revealed a higher radiotoxicity in nude mice (MTD: 10 MBq) than the 177 Lu-labelled counterpart (MTD: 12 MBq). In a comparative therapy study with equitoxic doses, tumour growth inhibition was better by 82.6 % for the 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 than the 177 Lu-DOTA-chCE7 RIT. Our study is the first to show that anti-L1CAM 161 Tb RIT is more effective compared to 177 Lu RIT in ovarian cancer xenografts. These results suggest that 161 Tb is a promising candidate for future clinical

  6. Anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy is more effective with the radiolanthanide terbium-161 compared to lutetium-177 in an ovarian cancer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenberg, Juergen; Lindenblatt, Dennis; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); Dorrer, Holger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); Zhernosekov, Konstantin [ITG Isotope Technologies Garching GmbH, Garching (Germany); Koester, Ulli [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Tuerler, Andreas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Bern, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Berne (Switzerland); Schibli, Roger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is considered a valuable target for therapeutic intervention in different types of cancer. Recent studies have shown that anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with {sup 67}Cu- and {sup 177}Lu-labelled internalising monoclonal antibody (mAb) chCE7 was effective in the treatment of human ovarian cancer xenografts. In this study, we directly compared the therapeutic efficacy of anti-L1CAM RIT against human ovarian cancer under equitoxic conditions with the radiolanthanide {sup 177}Lu and the potential alternative {sup 161}Tb in an ovarian cancer therapy model. Tb was produced by neutron bombardment of enriched {sup 160}Gd targets. {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu were used for radiolabelling of DOTA-conjugated antibodies. The in vivo behaviour of the radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) was assessed in IGROV1 tumour-bearing nude mice using biodistribution experiments and SPECT/CT imaging. After ascertaining the maximal tolerated doses (MTD) the therapeutic impact of 50 % MTD of {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 was evaluated in groups of ten mice by monitoring the tumour size of subcutaneous IGROV1 tumours. The average number of DOTA ligands per antibody was 2.5 and maximum specific activities of 600 MBq/mg were achieved under identical radiolabelling conditions. RICs were stable in human plasma for at least 48 h. {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 showed high tumour uptake (37.8-39.0 %IA/g, 144 h p.i.) with low levels in off-target organs. SPECT/CT images confirmed the biodistribution data. {sup 161}Tb-labelled chCE7 revealed a higher radiotoxicity in nude mice (MTD: 10 MBq) than the {sup 177}Lu-labelled counterpart (MTD: 12 MBq). In a comparative therapy study with equitoxic doses, tumour growth inhibition was better by 82.6 % for the {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 than the {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-chCE7 RIT. Our study is the first to show that anti-L1CAM {sup 161}Tb RIT is more effective compared to {sup 177}Lu RIT in ovarian cancer xenografts

  7. Noncanonical Reactions of Flavoenzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sobrado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a “molecular scaffold” in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  8. Nuclear reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ''hot'' nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ''flow'' measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study 40 Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs

  9. Knock-out reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Forest, T. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    It is pointed out that the primary motivation for performing high energy single nucleon knock-out reactions is based on the concept of quasi-elastic scattering. The validity of and corrections to the partial wave impulse approximation and kinematical invariance of knock-out reactions and tests of the reaction mechanism are treated. The effect of distortions on the momentum distribution in the effective momentum approximation for given parameters are plotted. 12 references

  10. Reaction kinetics of polybutylene terephthalate polycondensation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darda, P. J.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.; Souren, F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the forward polycondensation reaction of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PBT - prepolymer with an initial degree of polymerization of 5.5 was used as starting material. The PBT prepolymer was prepared from dimethyl

  11. Thermonuclear reaction listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukai, Yuzo

    1993-01-01

    The following 10 elements, including T, are well known as nuclear fusion fuels: p, D, T, 3 He, 4 He, 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, 10 B, 11 B, ( 12 C, 13 C), where 12 C and 13 C are considered only in the calculation of Q value. Accordingly the number of the thermonuclear reactions is 55, and 78, if including carbon elements. The reactions have some branches. For the branches having two and three reaction products, the reaction products, Q value and threshold energy are calculated by using a computer. We have investigated those of the branches having more than three products from the papers of Ajzenberg-Selove and so on. And also, by the same papers, we check whether the above mentioned branch has been observed or not. The results are as follows: (I) the number of reactions which have Q 0 branches only with γ ray production, and Q 0 and neutron production is 36(17), and (IV) that of reactions whose branch with Q > 0 does not produce neutrons is 9(3). The value in the parentheses shows the number of the case of the carbon elements. For 55 thermonuclear reactions induced by lighter nuclides than 11 B, the reaction products, the values of Q and threshold energy, and the papers with reaction cross section data are presented in the tables. (author)

  12. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M Allen [Berkeley, CA; Beeman, Barton V [San Mateo, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Hadley, Dean R [Manteca, CA; Landre, Phoebe [Livermore, CA; Lehew, Stacy L [Livermore, CA; Krulevitch, Peter A [Pleasanton, CA

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  13. Tattoo reaction: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneer Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tattoo is going to be a very common practice especially among young people and we are witnessing a gradual increase of numerous potential complications to tattoo placement which are often seen by physicians, but generally unknown to the public. The most common skin reactions to tattoo include a transient acute inflammatory reaction due to trauma of the skin with needles and medical complications such as superficial and deep local infections, systemic infections, allergic contact dermatitis, photodermatitis, granulomatous and lichenoid reactions, and skin diseases localized on tattooed area (eczema, psoriasis, lichen, and morphea. In this series we present three cases of tattoo reaction.

  14. On the use of polarization modulation in combined interferometry and polarimetry. Corrigendum. 1998 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, v. 40 p. 153-161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segre, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Errors in the main text, the appendix and two curves are corrected in this corrigendum to the paper entitled ''On the use of polarization modulation in combined interferometry and polarimetry'', written by S.E. Segre and published in 1998 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, v. 40 p. 153-161

  15. CD161+CD4+ T cells are enriched in the liver during chronic hepatitis and associated with co-secretion of IL-22 and Interferon-gamma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hoi eKang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease. CD4+ T cells play a key role in disease outcome. However, the critical functions and associated phenotypes of intrahepatic CD4+ T cells are not well defined. We have previously shown that CD8+ T cells expressing the C type lectin CD161 are highly enriched in the human liver, especially during chronic hepatitis. These cells are associated with a type 17 differentiation pattern and express cytokines including IL-17A, IL-22 and IFNγ. We therefore analysed expression of CD161 on CD4+ T cells in blood and liver and addressed the relevant phenotype and functional capacity of these populations. We observed marked enrichment of CD161+CD4+ T cells in the liver during chronic hepatitis such that they are the dominant subtype (mean 55% of CD4+ T cells. IL-22 and IL-17 secreting CD4+ cells were readily found in the livers of HCV+ and NASH donors, although not enriched compared to blood. There was, however, specific enrichment of a novel subset of IL-22/IFN-γ dual secretors (p=0.02 compared to blood, a result reconfirmed with direct ex vivo analyses. These data indicate the dominance of CD161+ expressing lymphocyte populations within the hepatic infiltrate, associated with a distinct cytokine profile. Given their documented roles as antiviral and hepatoprotective cytokines respectively, the impact of co-secretion of IFNγ and IL-22 in the liver may be particularly significant.

  16. Single and multi-photon events with missing energy in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at 161 GeV < $\\sqrt{s}$ < 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for single and multi-photon events with missing energy is performed using data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 161 GeV and 172 GeV for a total of 20.9 pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The results obtained are used to derive the value for the $\

  17. Direct in vitro and in vivo comparison of {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu using a tumour-targeting folate conjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Cristina; Reber, Josefine; Haller, Stephanie [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); Dorrer, Holger; Tuerler, Andreas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Bern, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Bern (Switzerland); Bernhardt, Peter [The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Radiation Physics, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics and Medical Bioengeneering, Gothenburg (Sweden); Zhernosekov, Konstantin [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); Schibli, Roger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    The radiolanthanide {sup 161}Tb (T{sub 1/2} = 6.90 days, Eβ{sup -}{sub av} = 154 keV) was recently proposed as a potential alternative to {sup 177}Lu (T{sub 1/2} = 6.71 days, Eβ{sup -}{sub av} = 134 keV) due to similar physical decay characteristics but additional conversion and Auger electrons that may enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The goal of this study was to compare {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu in vitro and in vivo using a tumour-targeted DOTA-folate conjugate (cm09). {sup 161}Tb-cm09 and {sup 177}Lu-cm09 were tested in vitro on folate receptor (FR)-positive KB and IGROV-1 cancer cells using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) viability assay. In vivo {sup 161}Tb-cm09 and {sup 177}Lu-cm09 (10 MBq, 0.5 nmol) were investigated in two different tumour mouse models with regard to the biodistribution, the possibility for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and the antitumour efficacy. Potentially undesired side effects were monitored over 6 months by determination of plasma parameters and examination of kidney function with quantitative SPECT using {sup 99m}Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). To obtain half-maximal inhibition of tumour cell viability a 4.5-fold (KB) and 1.7-fold (IGROV-1) lower radioactivity concentration was required for {sup 161}Tb-cm09 (IC{sub 50} ∝0.014 MBq/ml and ∝2.53 MBq/ml) compared to {sup 177}Lu-cm09 (IC{sub 50} ∝0.063 MBq/ml and ∝4.52 MBq/ml). SPECT imaging visualized tumours of mice with both radioconjugates. However, in therapy studies {sup 161}Tb-cm09 reduced tumour growth more efficiently than {sup 177}Lu-cm09. These findings were in line with the higher absorbed tumour dose for {sup 161}Tb-cm09 (3.3 Gy/MBq) compared to {sup 177}Lu-cm09 (2.4 Gy/MBq). None of the monitored parameters indicated signs of impaired kidney function over the whole time period of investigation after injection of the radiofolates. Compared to {sup 177}Lu-cm09 we demonstrated equal imaging

  18. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  19. Precompound Reactions: Basic Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Because of the non-zero nuclear equilibration time, the compound-nucleus scattering model fails when the incident energy exceeds 10 or 20 MeV, and precompound reactions become important. Basic ideas used in the quantum-statistical approaches to these reactions are described

  20. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab

  1. Fluorogenic organocatalytic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raeisolsadati Oskouei, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, we introduce fluorescence spectroscopy as a new tool to gain insight into the interactions between the substrates and catalyst during organocatalytic reactions. The ultimate goal is to resolve the kinetics of the binding and reaction steps and obtain detailed understanding of the

  2. Applications of Reaction Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  3. Chemical burn or reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ... leave the person alone and watch carefully for reactions affecting the entire body. Note: If a chemical gets into the eyes, the eyes should be ...

  4. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  5. Post-irradiation examination of A1-61 wt % U3Si fuel rods from the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wang, N.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the post-irradiation examination of 4 intact low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel rods from the national research universal (NRU) reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL. The rods were irradiated during the period 1993 through 1995, under typical driver fuel operating conditions in NRU, i.e., nominal D 2 0 coolant inlet temperature 37 degrees C, inlet pressure 654 kPa and mass flow 12.4 L/s. Irradiation exposures ranged from 147 to 251 full-power days, corresponding to 40 to 84 atom % 235 U burnup. The maximum rod power was ∼2 MW, with element linear power ratings up to 68 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations, conducted in 1997, focused on optical metallography to measure cladding oxide thickness and fuel core and cladding microstructural examinations. The cladding oxide was approximately 24 μm thick at the mid-plane of fuel rods irradiated to 251 full-power days, with small areas up to 34 μm thick on the fins. The cladding retained significant ductility after irradiation, and its microstructure appeared unchanged. Fuel core diametral increases were small (up to 4%) and within the range previously observed on A1-61 wt % U 3 Si fuel irradiated in the NRU reactor. (author)

  6. Central and Eastern European countries between the 16+1 platform and Chinese OBOR - One Belt, One Road - Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Cornel Dumitrescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at analysing the projects and the initiatives of the Central and Eastern European countries that have been finalised, are in progress or will be developed in the near future with the help of the existing or future financial instruments specific to the 16+1 platform and the One Belt, One Road complex program. For our research we selected four countries, namely: Poland, Romania, Serbia and Hungary, the group being relevant from the perspective of the transportation corridors connected to the ”One Belt, One Road” initiative: (1 - Piraeus, Skopje, Belgrade, Budapest, Western Europe; (2 - Suez Canal, Constanta and then Danube, Western Europe, or through Moldova towards Ukraine and Poland; (3 – Constanta, through the Black Sea and Caspian Sea and then the corridors mentioned at the previous point. We based our analysis on the data provided by the National Bureau of Statistics of China, China-CEEC think-tank network and the literature in the field.

  7. CNV-association meta-analysis in 191,161 European adults reveals new loci associated with anthropometric traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macé, Aurélien; Tuke, Marcus A; Deelen, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    There are few examples of robust associations between rare copy number variants (CNVs) and complex continuous human traits. Here we present a large-scale CNV association meta-analysis on anthropometric traits in up to 191,161 adult samples from 26 cohorts. The study reveals five CNV associations......-scale genome-wide meta-analysis of structural variation and find rare CNVs associated with height, weight and BMI with large effect sizes.......)). Burden analysis shows a 0.41 cm decrease in height, a 0.003 increase in waist-to-hip ratio and increase in BMI by 0.14 kg/m(2) for each Mb of total deletion burden (P = 2.5 × 10(-10), 6.0 × 10(-5), and 2.9 × 10(-3)). Our study provides evidence that the same genes (e.g., MC4R, FIBIN, and FMO5) harbor...

  8. Di-Jet Production in Photon-Photon Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{ee}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    Di-jet production is studied in collisions of quasi-real photons radiated by the LEP beams at e+e- centre-of-mass energies 161 and 172 GeV. The jets are reconstructed using a cone jet finding algorithm. The angular distributions of direct and double-resolved processes are measured and compared to the predictions of leading order and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD. The jet energy profiles are also studied. The inclusive two-jet cross-section is measured as a function of transverse energy and rapidity and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The inclusive two-jet cross-section as a function of rapidity is compared to the prediction of the leading order Monte Carlo generators PYTHIA and PHOJET. The Monte Carlo predictions are calculated with different parametrisations of the parton distributions of the photon. The influence of the `underlying event' has been studied to reduce the model dependence of the predicted jet cross-sections from the Monte Carlo generators.

  9. 16.1% Efficient Hysteresis-Free Mesostructured Perovskite Solar Cells Based on Synergistically Improved ZnO Nanorod Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Significant efficiency improvements are reported in mesoscopic perovskite solar cells based on the development of a low-temperature solution-processed ZnO nanorod (NR) array exhibiting higher NR aspect ratio, enhanced electron density, and substantially reduced work function than conventional ZnO NRs. These features synergistically result in hysteresis-free, scan-independent, and stabilized devices with an efficiency of 16.1%. Electron-rich, nitrogen-doped ZnO (N:ZnO) NR-based electron transporting materials (ETMs) with enhanced electron mobility produced using ammonium acetate show consistently higher efficiencies by one to three power points than undoped ZnO NRs. Additionally, the preferential electrostatic interaction between the -nonpolar facets of N:ZnO and the conjugated polyelectrolyte polyethylenimine (PEI) has been relied on to promote the hydrothermal growth of high aspect ratio NR arrays and substantially improve the infiltration of the perovskite light absorber into the ETM. Using the same interactions, a conformal PEI coating on the electron-rich high aspect ratio N:ZnO NR arrays is -successfully applied, resulting in a favorable work function shift and altogether leading to the significant boost in efficiency from <10% up to >16%. These results largely surpass the state-of-the-art PCE of ZnO-based perovskite solar cells and highlight the benefits of synergistically combining mesoscale control with doping and surface modification. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Searches for charginos and neutralinos in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Marumi, M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170, and 172 GeV are analysed for signals of chargino and neutralino production. No evidence of a signal is found, although candidate events consistent with the expectations from Standard Model processes are observed. Limits at 95% C.L. on the production cross sections are derived and bounds on the parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model are set. The lower limit on the mass of the lightest chargino is 85.5 GeV/c^2 for gaugino-like charginos (mu = -500 GeV/c^2), and 85.0 GeV/c^2 for Higgsino-like charginos (M_2 = 500 GeV/c^2), for heavy sneutrinos (M(snu) > 200 GeV/c^2) and tanb = sqrt(2). The effect of light sleptons on chargino and neutralino limits is investigated. The assumptions of a universal slepton mass and a universal gaugino mass are relaxed, allowing less model-dependent limits to be obtained.

  11. Experimental system description for air-water CCFL tests of the 161-rod FLECHT-SEASET test vessel upper plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogdall, S.P.; Anderson, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A series of countercurrent flow limiting (CCFL) experiments has been performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc. in the Steam-Air-Water (SAW) test facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory on behalf of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Tests were performed in a mockup of the vessel for the 161-Rod Systems Effects Test (SET) facility of the FLECHT-SEASET program, conducted by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Westinghouse and the NRC will use the test results to provide a CCFL correlation to predict the flooding behavior in the upper plenum of the SET vessel. This paper presents a description of the experimental system and the test conduct, including data validation and uncertainty analysis. The test objectives centered on experimentally obtaining coefficients in the Wallis correlation for flooding with the specific vessel geometry. The test conditions and vessel configuration are described and the design of the test loop, instrumentation, and data acquisition are discussed. The establishment of a test point and the resultant data are described

  12. Measurement and interpretation of the W-pair cross-section in $e^+ e^-$ interactions at 161 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    In 1996 LEP ran at a centre-of-mass energy of 161~GeV, just above the threshold of W-pair production. DELPHI accumulated data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $9.93 {\\mathrm{~pb^{-1}}}$, and observed 29 events that are considered as candidates for W-pair production. From these, a cross-section for the doubly resonant $e^+e^-\\to\\mathrm{WW}$ process of $3.67~^{+0.97}_{-0.85} \\pm 0.19{\\mathrm{~pb}}$ has been measured. Within the Standard Model, this cross-section corresponds to a mass of the W-boson of ${\\mathrm{80.40~\\pm~0.44~(stat.)~\\pm~0.09~(syst.) ~\\pm 0.03~(LEP)~GeV}}/c^2$. Alternatively, if $m_{\\mathrm{W}}$ is held fixed at its current value determined by other experiments, the observed cross-section is used to obtain limits on trilinear ${\\mathrm{WWV (V \\equiv \\gamma, Z)}}$ couplings.

  13. Is there a gender equity for women farmers? Reflections on public policy and social CONPES 161/2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Marin Hermann

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Domestic roles ( reproductive and productive Colombian rural women are different and are marked by the dynamics of their own territories , but also developed in the areas of public and private unevenly and unfairly compared to men rural sector. Considering the above, raises feminist economics "care economy" as an effort to validate and make visible the contribution of women to the economy. But this trend can go further, can contribute to the transformation of reproductive and productive roles, encouraging participation and democracy for women. Considering this, the equitable use of the time in the private ( family enters debate. Women no longer want and seek only equality in public but do not want to share your time at home on an unequal footing . Public policies are needed to contribute to these disparities disappear. To this extent it is possible to ask yourself the current Public Policy Of Gender Equity for Women ( SOCIAL CONPES 161/2013 , can guarantee the full enjoyment of the rights of Colombian women applying the principles of equality and non-discrimination? This reflection tries to do, from a gender perspective, an analytical reading of the impact of public policy on the transformation of the reality of the Colombian rural women.

  14. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisser, D.C.

    1977-06-01

    To complement discussions on the role of γ rays in heavy ion induced reactions, the author discusses the role played by particle detection. Transfer reactions are part of this subject and are among those in which one infers the properties of the residual nucleus in a reaction by observing the emerging light nucleus. Inelastic scattering ought not be excluded from this subject, although no particles are transferred, because of the role it plays in multistep reactions and in fixing O.M. parameters describing the entrance channel of the reaction. Heavy ion transfer reaction studies have been under study for some years and yet this research is still in its infancy. The experimental techniques are difficult and the demands on theory rigorous. One of the main products of heavy ion research has been the thrust to re-examine the assumptions of reaction theory and now include many effects neglected for light ion analysis. This research has spurred the addition of multistep processes to simple direct processes and coupled channel calculations. (J.R.)

  15. Enhancing chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  16. The Reaction Wheel Pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Block, Daniel J; Spong, Mark W

    2007-01-01

    This monograph describes the Reaction Wheel Pendulum, the newest inverted-pendulum-like device for control education and research. We discuss the history and background of the reaction wheel pendulum and other similar experimental devices. We develop mathematical models of the reaction wheel pendulum in depth, including linear and nonlinear models, and models of the sensors and actuators that are used for feedback control. We treat various aspects of the control problem, from linear control of themotor, to stabilization of the pendulum about an equilibrium configuration using linear control, t

  17. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  18. Firefighter Nozzle Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Selena K.; Sunderland, Peter B.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    to anchor forces, the hose becomes straight. The nozzle reaction is found to equal the jet momentum flow rate, and it does not change when an elbow connects the hose to the nozzle. A forward force must be exerted by a firefighter or another anchor that matches the forward force that the jet would exert...... on a perpendicular wall. Three reaction expressions are derived, allowing it to be determined in terms of hose diameter, jet diameter, flow rate, and static pressure upstream of the nozzle. The nozzle reaction predictions used by the fire service are 56% to 90% of those obtained here for typical firefighting hand...

  19. DLEU2, frequently deleted in malignancy, functions as a critical host gene of the cell cycle inhibitory microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, Mikael; Harada, Masako; Loven, Jakob; Castro, Juan; Davis, Zadie; Oscier, David; Henriksson, Marie; Sangfelt, Olle; Grander, Dan; Corcoran, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1 are downregulated in multiple tumor types and are frequently deleted in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Despite their abundance in most cells the transcriptional regulation of miR-15a/16-1 remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the putative tumor suppressor DLEU2 acts as a host gene of these microRNAs. Mature miR-15a/miR-16-1 are produced in a Drosha-dependent process from DLEU2 and binding of the Myc oncoprotein to two alterative DLEU2 promoters represses both the host gene transcript and levels of mature miR-15a/miR-16-1. In line with a functional role for DLEU2 in the expression of the microRNAs, the miR-15a/miR-16-1 locus is retained in four CLL cases that delete both promoters of this gene and expression analysis indicates that this leads to functional loss of mature miR-15a/16-1. We additionally show that DLEU2 negatively regulates the G1 Cyclins E1 and D1 through miR-15a/miR-16-1 and provide evidence that these oncoproteins are subject to miR-15a/miR-16-1-mediated repression under normal conditions. We also demonstrate that DLEU2 overexpression blocks cellular proliferation and inhibits the colony-forming ability of tumor cell lines in a miR-15a/miR-16-1-dependent way. Together the data illuminate how inactivation of DLEU2 promotes cell proliferation and tumor progression through functional loss of miR-15a/miR-16-1.

  20. On the description of the (HI, xn) reaction excitation functions for the case of weakly fissioning compound nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamanin, V.V.; Karamyan, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    A possibility to obtain parameters of nuclear temperature and critical angular momentum for the compound nucleus production on the base of the (HI, xn) reaction excitation function description are considered for the case of weakly fissioning nuclei. Experimental data on 152 Sm( 12 C, 2n) 162 Er, 148 Nd( 16 O, 3n) 161 Er, sup(150)Nd(sup(16)O, 3-5n)sup(163-161)Er, sup(148)Nd(sup(18)O, 4-5n)sup(162,161)Er, sup(118)Sn(sup(40)Ar, 5-6n)sup(153,152)Er and sup(74)Ge(sup(84)Kr, 5-6n)sup(153,152)Er reactions are discussed. The formulae, taking into accout the distribution of compound nuclei in angular momentum and competition between channels of the neutron and γ-ray emission, are given. The formulae are applied for the description of the excitation functions, characterized by a good accuracy of the particle energy measuring. A satisfactory accordance between the calculation and experiment is achieved. The conclusion on sensitivity of the nuclear temperature values to exact evaluation of competition between the neutron and γ-ray emission channels is drawn

  1. Nucleon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuca, S.; Antalik, R.; Kristiak, J.

    1988-01-01

    The collection contains full texts of 37 contributions; all fall within the INIS Subject Scope. The topics treated include some unsolved problems of nuclear reactions and relevant problems of nuclear structure at low and intermediate energies. (Z.S.)

  2. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  3. Statistical nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilaire, S.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the statistical model of nuclear reactions is presented. The main relations are described, together with the ingredients necessary to perform practical calculations. In addition, a substantial overview of the width fluctuation correction factor is given. (author)

  4. Photon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecking, B.A.

    1982-04-01

    Various aspects of medium energy nuclear reactions induced by real photons are reviewed. Special emphasis is put on high accuracy experiments that will become possible with the next generation of electron accelerators. (orig.)

  5. Transfusion reaction - hemolytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Names Blood transfusion reaction Images Surface proteins causing rejection References Choate JD, Maitta RW, Tormey CA, Wu ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 177. Hall JE. Blood types; transfusion; tissue and organ transplantation. In: Hall JE, ...

  6. Sequential charged particle reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Jun-ichi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Sato, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    The effective cross sections for producing the sequential reaction products in F82H, pure vanadium and LiF with respect to the 14.9-MeV neutron were obtained and compared with the estimation ones. Since the sequential reactions depend on the secondary charged particles behavior, the effective cross sections are corresponding to the target nuclei and the material composition. The effective cross sections were also estimated by using the EAF-libraries and compared with the experimental ones. There were large discrepancies between estimated and experimental values. Additionally, we showed the contribution of the sequential reaction on the induced activity and dose rate in the boundary region with water. From the present study, it has been clarified that the sequential reactions are of great importance to evaluate the dose rates around the surface of cooling pipe and the activated corrosion products. (author)

  7. Reaction Qualifications Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    to a person's effectiveness by causing a favourable reaction in customers, co-workers etc. (for short: recipients) - are involved, this assumption is false. Building on work by Wertheimer, Mason, and Miller, this paper proposes an account of the reaction qualifications that count, from the point of view...... preferences, recipients should not respond to the applicant actually hired on the basis of their (the recipients') racial preferences. My account decomposes the meritocratic ideal into four separate norms, one of which applies to recipients rather than to selectors. Finally, it defends the view that reaction...... qualifications based on antimeritocratic reactions, while not unproblematic, are not entirely irrelevant from the point of view of merit. Notably, selectors need not discount them when no one - including the targets of the objectionable preferences - is unfairly disadvantaged. Because not all problematic...

  8. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CADRs).1 ... patient's management is thought to be responsible for the reaction. Some clinical ... In SJS/TEN hypotension, diarrhoea, hypothermia and confusion suggest ... and a pain management team, centred around a good core of experienced ...

  9. Reaction Qualifications Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper

    2009-01-01

      When, in a competitive sphere, people are selected on the basis of qualifications only, their chances of acquiring positions of advantage may seem to depend entirely upon their abilities, not discriminatory bias. However, if reaction qualifications - i.e. characteristics which contribute...... to a person's effectiveness by causing a favourable reaction in customers, co-workers etc. (for short: recipients) - are involved, this assumption is false. Building on work by Wertheimer, Mason, and Miller, this paper proposes an account of the reaction qualifications that count, from the point of view...... of merit. Specifically, it preserves symmetry between negative evaluations of antimeritocratic bases of selection and negative evaluations of qualifications rooted in comparable antimeritocratic reactions. So if employers should not select among applicants on the basis of their (the employers') racial...

  10. Firefighter Nozzle Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Selena K.; Sunderland, Peter B.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    Nozzle reaction and hose tension are analyzed using conservation of fluid momentum and assuming steady, inviscid flow and a flexible hose in frictionless contact with the ground. An expression that is independent of the bend angle is derived for the hose tension. If this tension is exceeded owing...... to anchor forces, the hose becomes straight. The nozzle reaction is found to equal the jet momentum flow rate, and it does not change when an elbow connects the hose to the nozzle. A forward force must be exerted by a firefighter or another anchor that matches the forward force that the jet would exert...... on a perpendicular wall. Three reaction expressions are derived, allowing it to be determined in terms of hose diameter, jet diameter, flow rate, and static pressure upstream of the nozzle. The nozzle reaction predictions used by the fire service are 56% to 90% of those obtained here for typical firefighting hand...

  11. An intermediate level of CD161 expression defines a novel activated, inflammatory, and pathogenic subset of CD8+ T cells involved in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Bryan; Salou, Marion; Vogel, Isabel; Garcia, Alexandra; Dugast, Emilie; Morille, Jeremy; Kilens, Stéphanie; Charpentier, Eric; Donnart, Audrey; Nedellec, Steven; Jacq-Foucher, Marylène; Le Frère, Fabienne; Wiertlewski, Sandrine; Bourreille, Arnaud; Brouard, Sophie; Michel, Laure; David, Laurent; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Degauque, Nicolas; Nicot, Arnaud B; Berthelot, Laureline; Laplaud, David-Axel

    2018-03-01

    Several lines of evidence support a key role for CD8 + T cells in central nervous system tissue damage of patients with multiple sclerosis. However, the precise phenotype of the circulating CD8 + T cells that may be recruited from the peripheral blood to invade the CNS remains largely undefined to date. It has been suggested that IL-17 secreting CD8 (Tc17) T cells may be involved, and in humans these cells are characterized by the expression of CD161. We focused our study on a unique and recently described subset of CD8 T cells characterized by an intermediate expression of CD161 as its role in neuroinflammation has not been investigated to date. The frequency, phenotype, and function of CD8 + T cells with an intermediate CD161 expression level were characterized ex-vivo, in vitro, and in situ using RNAseq, RT-PCR, flow cytometry, TCR sequencing, and immunohistofluorescence of cells derived from healthy volunteers (n = 61), MS subjects (n = 90), as well as inflammatory (n = 15) and non-inflammatory controls (n = 6). We report here that CD8 + CD161 int T cells present characteristics of effector cells, up-regulate cell-adhesion molecules and have an increased ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and to secrete IL-17, IFNγ, GM-CSF, and IL-22. We further demonstrate that these cells are recruited and enriched in the CNS of MS subjects where they produce IL-17. In the peripheral blood, RNAseq, RT-PCR, high-throughput TCR repertoire analyses, and flow cytometry confirmed an increased effector and transmigration pattern of these cells in MS patients, with the presence of supernumerary clones compared to healthy controls. Our data demonstrate that intermediate levels of CD161 expression identifies activated and effector CD8 + T cells with pathogenic properties that are recruited to MS lesions. This suggests that CD161 may represent a biomarker and a valid target for the treatment of neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  12. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  13. Spallation reactions: calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, H.W.

    1975-01-01

    Current methods for calculating spallation reactions over various energy ranges are described and evaluated. Recent semiempirical fits to existing data will probably yield the most accurate predictions for these reactions in general. However, if the products in question have binding energies appreciably different from their isotropic neighbors and if the cross section is approximately 30 mb or larger, then the intranuclear-cascade-evaporation approach is probably better suited. (6 tables, 12 figures, 34 references) (U.S.)

  14. Structural characterization and optical properties of Eu"2"+ and Dy"2"+ doped Sr_2SiO_4 phosphor by solid state reaction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Durga; Verma, Mohan L.; Upma; Patel, R.P.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoluminescence, SEM, FTIR Divalent dysprosium and europium doped strontium silicate (Sr_2SiO_4) phosphors were synthesized with the high-temperature solid-state reaction technique. The obtained phosphor was well characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopy and thermoluminescence. The crystal structure of the prepared phosphor has an orthorhombic structure with space group Pnma. From scanning electron microscopy (SEM), agglomerations of particles were observed due to the high temperature synthesis process. The chemical composition of the sintered Sr_2SiO_4:Dy"2"+ and Sr_2SiO_4: Eu"2"+ phosphor was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The UV-VIS analysis can be thought as a good quality check for the optical behavior of materials. The Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirms the present elements in phosphor. Thermoluminescence study was carried out for the phosphor with UV irradiation show one glow peak. The trapping parameters associated with the prominent glow peak of Sr_2SiO_4:Dy"2"+ and Sr_2SiO_4:Eu"2"+ are calculated using Chen's glow curve method. The release of holes/electrons from defect centers at the characteristic trap site initiates the luminescence process in this material. (author)

  15. Rates of intraoperative complications and conversion to laparotomy during laparoscopic ovariectomy performed by veterinary students: 161 cases (2010-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylund, Adam M; Drury, Adam; Weir, Heather; Monnet, Eric

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess rates of intraoperative complications and conversion to laparotomy associated with supervised veterinary students performing laparoscopic ovariectomy in dogs. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 161 female shelter dogs for which elective laparoscopic ovariectomy had been performed by supervised senior (fourth-year) veterinary students from 2010 through 2014. PROCEDURES Medical records of all dogs were reviewed and data collected regarding duration of surgery, surgical complications and other characteristics, and whether conversion to laparotomy was required. RESULTS Laparoscopic ovariectomy was performed with a 2-cannula technique and a 10-mm vessel-sealing device for hemostasis in all dogs. A Veress needle was used for initial insufflation in 144 (89.4%) dogs; method of insufflation was not reported for the remaining 17 (10.6%) dogs. Mean ± SD duration of surgery was 114.90 ± 33.40 minutes. Surgical complications, all classified as minor blood loss, occurred in 24 (14.9%) dogs. These included splenic puncture during insertion of the Veress needle (n = 20 [12.4%]) and minor bleeding from the ovarian pedicle (4 [2.5%]). Splenic puncture required no intervention, and ovarian pedicle bleeding required application of the vessel-sealing device an additional time to control the bleeding. Two ovaries were dropped in the abdominal cavity at the time of removal. Both were retrieved without complication. Conversion to laparotomy was not required for any dog. All dogs were discharged from the hospital within 24 hours after surgery. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Laparoscopic ovariectomy in dogs was performed safely by closely supervised novice surgeons, with only minor intraoperative complications encountered and no need for conversion to laparotomy.

  16. Epidemiologia e distribuição de lesões extrarrenais de uremia em 161 cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora P. Silveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Com o objetivo de determinar a epidemiologia e as características morfológicas, incluindo a localização anatômica, das lesões extrarrenais de uremia, bem como determinar as principais lesões do sistema urinário associadas à ocorrência de uremia, foram revisados os protocolos de necropsias de cães realizadas no Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria de janeiro de 1996 a dezembro de 2012 (17 anos. Nesse período foram necropsiados 4.201 cães, sendo que 161 (3,8% apresentaram lesões extrarrenais de uremia. Em 134 cães (83,2% foram descritos sinais clínicos associados à uremia. As lesões extrarrenais mais frequentes, em ordem decrescente, foram: gastrite ulcerativa e hemorrágica (56,5%, mineralização de tecidos moles (55,9%, edema pulmonar (47,2%, estomatite e/ou glossite ulcerativa (30,4%, endocardite/trombose atrial e aórtica (28,6%, hiperplasia das paratireoides (9,3%, osteodistrofia fibrosa (8,1%, anemia (6,2%, laringite ulcerativa (5%, enterite ulcerativa/hemorrágica (3,7%, esofagite fibrinonecrótica (1,9% e pericardite fibrinosa (1.9%. Na maioria dos casos as lesões extrarrenais de uremia foram decorrentes de azotemia prolongada por lesões renais graves, sendo as mais prevalentes a nefrite intersticial e a glomerulonefrite.

  17. Towards a Balanced Synergy of Visions and Interests: Latvia’s Perspectives in 16+1 and Belt and Road Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spruds Andris

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses China’s 16+1 and Belt and Road initiatives from Latvia’s perspective. Although the initiatives provide engagement on a large scale, it is challenging to achieve the task of achieving a synergy between a variety of stakeholders and interests in the context of a diversity of visions and agendas. The strategic dimension of transcontinental initiatives complicates further the building of synergy. Connectivity is an important and promising principle of both initiatives and transcontinental infrastructural linkages are especially high on the agenda. Mutually beneficial progress, however, must yet be achieved. In times of uncertainty, Central and Eastern European countries, including Latvia, are engaged in a balancing process of potential economic benefits and strategic implications of the 16+1 and Belt and Road initiatives.

  18. Search for anomalous production of dilepton events with missing transverse momentum in $e^{+} e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    Events containing a pair of charged leptons and significant missing transverse momentum are selected from a data sample corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 20.6 pb^-1 at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV. The observed number of events, four at 161 GeV and nine at 172 GeV, is consistent with the number expected from Standard Model processes, predominantly arising from W+W- production with each W decaying leptonically. This topology is also an experimental signature for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. Further event selection criteria are described that optimise the sensitivity to particular new physics channels. No evidence for new phenomena is observed and limits on the production of scalar charged lepton pairs and other new particles are presented.

  19. Magnetic properties of the ternary carbide DyCoC2 studied by magnetization measurements, neutron diffraction and 161Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanai, H.; Onodera, H.; Ohashi, M.; Matsuo, S.; Yamauchi, H.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic properties of DyCoC 2 have been investigated by means of magnetization measurements, powder neutron diffraction and 161 Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy. The magnetization versus temperature curves of a single-crystalline sample reveal that the magnetic structure of DyCoC 2 is a simple collinear ferromagnetic one below T C =10.0 K. At 4.2 K, the magnitude of the Dy moment is 8.7(1)μ B , whose direction is defined by an angle of 38.0(5) from the a-axis toward the c-axis. The magnetic structure and the magnitude of the moment are also confirmed by the results of powder neutron diffraction experiments and 161 Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy, respectively. ((orig.))

  20. Search for sleptons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV were analysed to search for sleptons, the supersymmetric partners of leptons. No evidence for the production of these particles was found. The number of candidates observed is consistent with the background expected from four-fermion processes and gammagamma-interactions. Improved mass limits at 95% C.L. are reported.

  1. Search for sleptons in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Sau, Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-02-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV were analysed to search for sleptons, the supersymmetric partners of leptons. No evidence for the production of these particles was found. The number of candidates observed is consistent with the background expected from four-fermion processes and yy-interactions. Improved mass limits at 95% C.L. are reported.

  2. Global Controllability of Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Drexler, Dániel András; Tóth, János

    2015-01-01

    Controllability of chemical reactions is an important problem in chemical engineering science. In control theory, analysis of the controllability of linear systems is well-founded, however the dynamics of chemical reactions is usually nonlinear. Global controllability properties of chemical reactions are analyzed here based on the Lie-algebra of the vector fields associated to elementary reactions. A chemical reaction is controllable almost everywhere if all the reaction rate coefficients can...

  3. Introduction to chemical reaction engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong Geol

    1990-10-01

    This deals with chemical reaction engineering with thirteen chapters. The contents of this book are introduction on reaction engineering, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics and chemical reaction, abnormal reactor, non-isothermal reactor, nonideal reactor, catalysis in nonuniform system, diffusion and reaction in porosity catalyst, design catalyst heterogeneous reactor in solid bed, a high molecule polymerization, bio reaction engineering, reaction engineering in material process, control multi-variable reactor process using digital computer.

  4. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  5. T-cell receptor repertoire of human peripheral CD161hiTRAV1-2+ MAIT cells revealed by next generation sequencing and single cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Kathrin; Beltrán, Eduardo; Moser, Markus; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Dornmair, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a T-cell subset that expresses a conserved TRAV1-2 (Vα7.2) T-cell receptor (TCR) chain and the surface marker CD161. They are involved in the defence against microbes as they recognise small organic molecules of microbial origin that are presented by the non-classical MHC molecule 1 (MR1). MAIT cells express a semi-restricted TCR α chain with TRAV1-2 preferentially linked to TRAJ33, TRAJ12, or TRAJ20 which pairs with a limited set of β chains. To investigate the TCR repertoire of human CD161(hi)TRAV1-2(+) T cells in depth we analysed the α and β chains of this T-cell subset by next generation sequencing. Concomitantly we analysed 132 paired α and β chains from single cells to assess the αβ pairing preferences. We found that the CD161(hi)TRAV1-2(+) TCR repertoire in addition to the typical MAIT TCRs further contains polyclonal elements reminiscent of classical αβ T cells. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Sigeki; Sato, Keiji; Sugiura, Hideshi; Iwata, Hisashi

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  7. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Sigeki [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sato, Keiji [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sugiura, Hideshi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Iwata, Hisashi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  8. Knockout reactions: experimental aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina Gil, D. [Santiago de Compostela Univ. (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The availability of radioactive beams has given rise to intense activity in the field of direct reactions. The removal of one(two)-nucleon (referred to as nucleon knockout in this text) from a fast exotic projectile has been extensively investigated. This lecture provides a general overview of the experimental results achieved using this technique. The sensitivity of the method to different experimental aspects is illustrated with a few examples. Special attention is given to the application of nucleon-knockout reactions as a general purpose spectroscopic tool. (author)

  9. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    OpenAIRE

    David, T J

    1987-01-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either ...

  10. Nuclear fission and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear fission research programs are designed to elucidate basic features of the fission process. Specifically, (1) factors determining how nucleons of a fissioning nucleus are distributed between two fission fragments, (2) factors determining kinetic energy and excitation energies of fragments, and (3) factors controlling fission lifetimes. To these ends, fission studies are reported for several heavy elements and include investigations of spontaneous and neutron-induced fission, heavy ion reactions, and high energy proton reactions. The status of theoretical research is also discussed. (U.S.)

  11. Modeling of Reaction Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Farzad, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to model the reaction calorimeter in order to calculate the heat of absorption which is the most important parameter in this work. Reaction calorimeter is an apparatus which is used in measuring the heat of absorption of CO2 as well as the total pressure in vapor phase based on vapor-liquid equilibrium state. Mixture of monoethanolamine (MEA) and water was used as a solvent to absorb the CO2.Project was divided in to three parts in order to make the programming...

  12. Introduction to nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satchler, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    This introduction to nuclear reaction phenomena is aimed primarily but not exclusively at readers at the undergraduate student level. An overview of the subject is presented in the first two chapters entitled - Some background information and Introduction to nuclear reactions. The third chapter reviews scattering theory with emphasis on the underlying physical ideas and also provides schematic entrees to the more advanced topics. The physical models which have been developed to account for the various aspects of nuclear phenomena are described in more detail in chapter 4. References and exercises are appended to each chapter. (U.K.)

  13. Knockout reactions: experimental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina Gil, D.

    2007-01-01

    The availability of radioactive beams has given rise to intense activity in the field of direct reactions. The removal of one(two)-nucleon (referred to as nucleon knockout in this text) from a fast exotic projectile has been extensively investigated. This lecture provides a general overview of the experimental results achieved using this technique. The sensitivity of the method to different experimental aspects is illustrated with a few examples. Special attention is given to the application of nucleon-knockout reactions as a general purpose spectroscopic tool. (author)

  14. (MIRC) reaction w

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudesh Kumari

    eco-friendly solvents, high yields and easy work-up procedure. Keywords. Ethylene glycol; 4-hydroxycoumarin; ... ability and also compatibility with most organic and inorganic compounds. Because of these properties it is ..... phenyl amino)-2H-chromen-2-one (8a) was isolated from the reaction mixture to confirm the ...

  15. Explaining competitive reaction effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, D.R.

    Changes in promotional expenditure decisions for a brand, as in other marketing decisions, should be based on the expected impact on purchase and consumption behavior as well as on the likely reactions by competitors. Purchase behavior may be predicted from estimated demand functions. Competitive

  16. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ulcers. Affected individuals may complain of a burning sensation and mouth sensitivity to cold, hot, and spicy foods. Lichenoid ... melon, and pineapple, are all associated with this syndrome. You should inform your ... reaction in the mouth, though some are more common than others. If ...

  17. Reaction Formulation: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Reaction formation was studied by Sigmund Freud. This defense mechanism may be related to repression, substitution, reversal, and compensation (or over-compensation). Alfred Adler considered compensation a basic process in his individual psychology. Anna Freud discussed some defense mechanisms, and Bibring, Dwyer, Huntington, and Valenstein…

  18. Reaction schemes of immunoanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaage, M.; Barbet, J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors apply a general theory for multiple equilibria to the reaction schemes of immunoanalysis, competition and sandwich. This approach allows the manufacturer to optimize the system and provide the user with interpolation functions for the standard curve and its first derivative as well, thus giving access to variance [fr

  19. Allergic reactions in anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigaard, M; Garvey, L H; Menné, T

    2005-01-01

    a significant number of patients at unnecessary risk. Some patients may be labelled with a wrong allergy, leading to unnecessary warnings against harmless substances, and some patients may be put at risk of subsequent re-exposure to the real allergen. Patients with suspected allergic reactions during...

  20. Reaction product imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, D.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  1. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  2. Kinetics of Bio-Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    his chapter predicts the specific rates of reaction by means of a mathematical expression, the kinetics of the reaction. This expression can be derived through a mechanistic interpretation of an enzymatically catalyzed reaction, but it is essentially of empirical nature for cell reactions. The mo...

  3. New Mechanism of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions Using Superlow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I. E.

    2006-03-01

    We proposed a new mechanism of LENR (low energy nuclear reactions) cooperative processes in the whole system - nuclei+atoms+condensed matter can occur at smaller threshold than the corresponding ones assoiciated with free constituents. The cooperative processes can be induced and enhanced by (``superlow energy'') external fields. The excess heat is the emission of internal energy, and transmutations from LENR are the result of redistribution of the internal energy of the whole system. A review of possible stimulation mechanisms of LENR is presented. We have concluded that transmutation of nuclei at low energies and excess heat are possible in the framework of the known fundamental physical laws: The universal resonance synchronization principle, and based on it, different enhancement mechanisms of reaction rates are responsible for these processes. The excitation and ionization of atoms may play the role of a trigger for LENR. F.A. Gareev, I.E. Zhidkova, E-print arXiv Nucl-th/0511092 v1 30 Nov 2005. F.A. Gareev, In: FPB-98, Novosibirsk, June 1998, p.92; F.A.Gareev, G.F. Gareeva, in: Novosibirsk, July 2000, p.161. F.A. Gareev, I.E. Zhidkova and Yu.L. Ratis, Preprint JINR P4-2004-68, Dubna, 2004. F.A. Gareev, I.E. Zhidkova, E-print arXiv Nucl-th/0505021 9 May 2005.

  4. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, T J

    1987-02-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either by the parents or the nursing staff after the administration of placebo or active substances. Twenty two patients returned to a normal diet without problems, but the parents of two children insisted on continuing the diet. While popular belief has it that additives may have harmful behavioural effects, objective verification is required to prevent overdiagnosis.

  5. Photooxidative reactions of psoralens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapenko, A.Ya.; Sukhorukov, V.L.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism and biological significance of photooxidative reactions of psoralens are reviewed. Skin-photosensitizing activities of bifunctional and monofunctional psoralens are compared. Antioxidants tocopherols and butilated hydroxytoluene inhibit photochemical reactions of psoralens responsible for induction of erythema. The same antioxidants do not inhibit PUVA-therapy of psriasis. Though psoralens can generate singlet oxygen under UVA-irradiation (315 - 400 nm), nevertheless singlet oxygen does not play significant role in 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) sensitized photooxidation of tocopherol or dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). SH-compounds enhance the rate of 8-MOP sensitized photooxidation of DOPA by a factor of four, simultaneously the rate of oxidation of SH-groups is enhanced many fold in the presence of DOPA. Under UVA-irradiation in organic solvents psoralens are photooxidized. Dimeric photooxidized psoralens are easily destructed in water medium, their destruction induce oxidation of unsaturated lipids and DOPA. (author)

  6. Solar nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocharov, G

    1978-04-01

    The current state of neutrino solar astrophysics is outlined, showing the contradictions between the experimental results of solar neutrino detection and the standard solar models constructed on the basis of the star structure and development theory, which give values for high-energy neutrino fluxes considerably exceeding the upper experimental limit. A number of hypotheses interpreting the experimental results are summarized. The hypotheses are critically assessed and experiments are recommended for refining or verifying experimental data. Also dealt with are nuclear reactions in the Sun, as is the attempt to interpret the anomalous by high /sup 3/He fluxes from the Sun and the relatively small amounts of solar neutrinos and gamma quanta. The importance is emphasized of the simultaneous and complex measurement of the fluxes of neutrons, gamma radiation, and isotopes of hydrogen, helium, and boron from the Sun as indicators of nuclear reactions in the Sun.

  7. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  8. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, T J

    1987-01-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either by the parents or the nursing staff after the administration of placebo or active substances. Twenty two patients returned to a normal diet without problems, but the parents of two children insisted on continuing the diet. While popular belief has it that additives may have harmful behavioural effects, objective verification is required to prevent overdiagnosis. PMID:3548601

  9. Hadron reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, P.D.B.; Martin, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of hadron scattering at high energies are reviewed in such a way as to combine the ideas of the parton model and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) with Regge theory and phenomenology. After a brief introduction to QCD and the basic features of hadron scattering data, scaling and the dimensional counting rules, the parton structure of hadrons, and the parton model for large momentum transfer processes, including scaling violations are discussed. Hadronic jets and the use of parton ideas in soft scattering processes are examined, attention being paid to Regge theory and its applications in exclusive and inclusive reactions, the relationship to parton exchange being stressed. The mechanisms of hadron production which build up cross sections, and hence the underlying Regge singularities, and the possible overlap of Regge and scaling regions are discussed. It is concluded that the key to understanding hadron reaction mechanisms seems to lie in the marriage of Regge theory with QCD. (author)

  10. Nuclear reactions in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is revised the nuclear reactions which present an interest in astrophysics regarding the explanation of some problems such as the relative quantity of the elements, the structure and evolution of the stars. The principal object of the study is the determination of the experimental possibilities in the field of astrophysics, of an accelerator Van de Graaff's 700 KeV type. Two hundred nuclear reactions approximately, were found, and nothing or very little has been done in the intervals of energy which are of interest. Since the bombardment energies and the involved sections are low in some cases, there are real possibilities, for the largest number of stars to obtain important statistical data with the above mentioned accelerator, taking some necessary precautions. (author)

  11. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  12. Polyneutron Chain Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John C. Fisher

    2000-01-01

    Although helium atoms do not form molecules, a sufficiently large number will bind into a stable liquid droplet. A comparable situation is expected for neutrons, with a sufficiently large number binding into a stable droplet of neutron matter. Such polyneutron droplets can be viewed as isotopes of an element with nuclear charge Z=0, tentatively denoted neutrium, symbol Nt. Because of the relatively weak binding of neutrons compared with that of a mix of neutrons and protons, the minimum number of neutrons required for stability of a droplet is fairly large. Early estimates of ∼60 may be reduced to a dozen or so by the BCS pairing interaction. The Nt entries with N≥12 are new to the table of isotopes. Because all of them are beta-unstable, none is expected to persist as a free particle. Yet, some may occasionally be produced by means to be described below, and it is of interest to examine their decay chains and their interactions with charged nuclei to ascertain how their presence might be revealed. Although these reactions are interesting, they cannot be taken seriously without identifying a source for the initial Nt isotope that begins the chain. Here, we consider possible interactions between 16 O and A Nt. Although there is no strong interaction between them, we can expect a very weak residual attraction that can form a loosely bound 16 O A Nt nuclear molecule. This is not a compound nucleus in the usual sense because, considered as fluids, the 16 O and A Nt droplets are immiscible. For a droplet with fewer than about 60 neutrons, beta decay of A Nt is prevented by the buildup of Coulomb energy associated with transforming A Nt into A H in close proximity to 16 O. Thus, it is possible that 16 O A Nt molecules can persist indefinitely and that a few of them may be present in ordinary water as supermassive oxygen nuclei. Because the binding of these molecules is weak, the A Nt component can tunnel to an adjacent nucleus, and if the adjacent nucleus is 18 O, a

  13. Measurement of hadron and lepton pair production at 161 GeV < $\\sqrt{s}$ < 172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schultze, K; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We report on measurements of $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ annihilation into hadrons and lepton pairs. The data have been taken with the L3 detector at LEP at centre--of--mass energies between 161~$\\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.12em V}$ and 172~$\\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.12em V}$. In a data sample corresponding to 21.2~pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity 2728 hadronic and 868 lepton--pair events are selected. The measured cross sections and leptonic forward--backward asymmetries agree well with the Standard Model predictions. \\end{abstract}

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $161 \\leq \\sqrt{s} \\leq 172$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed with the L3 detector at LEP. The data sample was collected at three centre-of-mass energies, 161.3, 170.3 and 172.3 GeV with integrated luminosities of 10.8, 1.0 and 9.2 $pb^-1$, respectively. No Higgs signal is observed. In combination with previous data taken at the Z resonance, a lower Higgs mass limit, $M_H > 69.5$ GeV, is obtained at 95\\% confidence level.

  15. Gulf of Mexico Sales 157 and 161: Central and western planning areas final environmental impact statement, Volume I: Sections I through IV.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the proposed 1996 Gulf of Mexico OCS oil and gas lease sales [Central Gulf of Mexico Sale 157 (March 1996) and Western Gulf of Mexico Sale 161 (August 1996)]. This document includes the purpose and background of the proposed actions, the alternatives, the descriptions of the affected environment, and the potential environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives. Proposed mitigating measures and their potential effects are analyzed, in addition to potential cumulative impacts resulting from proposed activities

  16. MicroRNA-15a and -16-1 act via MYB to elevate fetal hemoglobin expression in human trisomy 13

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Menne, Tobias F.; Šćepanović, Danilo; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Ji, Peng; Kim, Jinkuk; Thiru, Prathapan; Orkin, Stuart H.; Lander, Eric S.; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2011-01-01

    Many human aneuploidy syndromes have unique phenotypic consequences, but in most instances it is unclear whether these phenotypes are attributable to alterations in the dosage of specific genes. In human trisomy 13, there is delayed switching and persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) and elevation of embryonic hemoglobin in newborns. Using partial trisomy cases, we mapped this trait to chromosomal band 13q14; by examining the genes in this region, two microRNAs, miR-15a and -16-1, appear as t...

  17. Procedures for Decomposing a Redox Reaction into Half-Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishtik, Ilie; Berka, Ladislav H.

    2005-01-01

    A simple algorithm for a complete enumeration of the possible ways a redox reaction (RR) might be uniquely decomposed into half-reactions (HRs) using the response reactions (RERs) formalism is presented. A complete enumeration of the possible ways a RR may be decomposed into HRs is equivalent to a complete enumeration of stoichiometrically…

  18. Insect bite reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some

  19. Boron atom reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, R.; Tabacco, M.B.; Digiuseppe, T.G.; Davidovits, P.

    1982-01-01

    The reaction rates of atomic boron with various epoxides have been measured in a flow tube apparatus. The bimolecular rate constants, in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , are: 1,2-epoxypropane (8.6 x 10 -11 ), 1,2-epoxybutane (8.8 x 10 -11 ), 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (5.5 x 10 -11 ), 1-chloro-2,3-epoxypropane (5.7 x 10 -11 ), and 1,2-epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane (1.5 x 10 -11 ). (orig.)

  20. Nuclear reactions. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2014-03-01

    Modern, self-contained introduction to the subject matter. Emphasizes the interplay between theory and experiment. Course-tested tutorial style, contains many derivations. Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown - mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos - to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no end in sight for either theoretical or experimental developments as shown e.g. by the recent need to introduce more sophisticated three-body interactions to account for an improved picture of nuclear structure and reactions. Yet, it turns out that the internal structure of the nucleons has comparatively little influence on the behavior of the nucleons in nuclei, and nuclear physics - especially nuclear structure and reactions - is thus a field of science in its own right, without much recourse to subnuclear degrees of freedom. This book collects essential material that was presented in the form of lectures notes in nuclear physics courses for graduate students at the University of Cologne. It follows the course's approach, conveying the subject matter by combining experimental facts and

  1. Comparing chemical reaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardelli, Luca; Tribastone, Mirco; Tschaikowski, Max

    2017-01-01

    We study chemical reaction networks (CRNs) as a kernel model of concurrency provided with semantics based on ordinary differential equations. We investigate the problem of comparing two CRNs, i.e., to decide whether the solutions of a source and of a target CRN can be matched for an appropriate...... choice of initial conditions. Using a categorical framework, we extend and unify model-comparison approaches based on dynamical (semantic) and structural (syntactic) properties of CRNs. Then, we provide an algorithm to compare CRNs, running linearly in time with respect to the cardinality of all possible...... comparisons. Finally, using a prototype implementation, CAGE, we apply our results to biological models from the literature....

  2. Gravitational radiation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takahiro

    2006-01-01

    We give a short personally-biased review on the recent progress in our understanding of gravitational radiation reaction acting on a point particle orbiting a black hole. The main motivation of this study is to obtain sufficiently precise gravitational waveforms from inspiraling binary compact starts with a large mass ratio. For this purpose, various new concepts and techniques have been developed to compute the orbital evolution taking into account the gravitational self-force. Combining these ideas with a few supplementary new ideas, we try to outline a path to our goal here. (author)

  3. Isotopes in oxidation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.

    1976-01-01

    The use of isotopes in the study of organic oxidation mechanisms is discussed. The help provided by tracer studies to demonstrate the two-equivalent path - hydride transfer, is illustrated by the examples of carbonium oxidants and the Wacker reaction. The role of kinetic isotope effects in the study of the scission of carbon-hydrogen bonds is illustrated by hydride abstraction, hydrogen atom abstraction, proton abstraction and quantum mechanical tunnelling. Isotopic studies on the oxidation of alcohols, carbonyl compounds, amines and hydrocarbons are discussed. The role of isotopes in the study of biochemical oxidation is illustrated with a discussion on nicotinamide and flavin coenzymes. (B.R.H.)

  4. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Faccini, R.

    2014-01-01

    After an introduction to the controversial problem of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) catalyzed by neutrons on metallic hydride surfaces we present the results of an experiment, made in collaboration with ENEA Labs in Frascati, to search neutrons from plasma discharges in electrolytic cells. The negative outcome of our experiment goes in the direction of ruling out those theoretical models expecting LENR to occur in condensed matter systems under specific conditions. Our criticism on the theoretical foundations of such models will also be presented.

  5. Nuclear reactions. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Modern, self-contained introduction to the subject matter. Emphasizes the interplay between theory and experiment. Course-tested tutorial style, contains many derivations. Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown - mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos - to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no end in sight for either theoretical or experimental developments as shown e.g. by the recent need to introduce more sophisticated three-body interactions to account for an improved picture of nuclear structure and reactions. Yet, it turns out that the internal structure of the nucleons has comparatively little influence on the behavior of the nucleons in nuclei, and nuclear physics - especially nuclear structure and reactions - is thus a field of science in its own right, without much recourse to subnuclear degrees of freedom. This book collects essential material that was presented in the form of lectures notes in nuclear physics courses for graduate students at the University of Cologne. It follows the course's approach, conveying the subject matter by combining experimental facts and experimental

  6. Polymer reaction engineering, an integrated approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, T.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Meyer, T.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2005-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: Polymer Materials A Short History of Polymer Reaction Engineering The Position of Polymer Reaction Engineering Toward Integrated Polymer Reaction Engineering The Disciplines in Polymer Reaction Engineering The Future: Product-inspired Polymer Reaction

  7. Substitution reactions of technetium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, T.

    1997-01-01

    Substitution reactions of a series of technetium complexes are considered in comparison with corresponding reactions of rhenium. Rhenium and technetium complexes are rather inert in substitution reactions, the latter are characterized by greater rate constants when they proceed according to dissociative mechanism. In rare cases when k Tc /k Re id little it is assumed that the reaction proceeds according to the associative mechanism. (author)

  8. The nuclear reaction matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenciglowa, E.M.; Kung, C.L.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Osnes, E.; and Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794)

    1976-01-01

    Different definitions of the reaction matrix G appropriate to the calculation of nuclear structure are reviewed and discussed. Qualitative physical arguments are presented in support of a two-step calculation of the G-matrix for finite nuclei. In the first step the high-energy excitations are included using orthogonalized plane-wave intermediate states, and in the second step the low-energy excitations are added in, using harmonic oscillator intermediate states. Accurate calculations of G-matrix elements for nuclear structure calculations in the Aapprox. =18 region are performed following this procedure and treating the Pauli exclusion operator Q 2 /sub p/ by the method of Tsai and Kuo. The treatment of Q 2 /sub p/, the effect of the intermediate-state spectrum and the energy dependence of the reaction matrix are investigated in detail. The present matrix elements are compared with various matrix elements given in the literature. In particular, close agreement is obtained with the matrix elements calculated by Kuo and Brown using approximate methods

  9. The redox-Mannich reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Seidel, Daniel

    2014-06-06

    A complement to the classic three-component Mannich reaction, the redox-Mannich reaction, utilizes the same starting materials but incorporates an isomerization step that enables the facile preparation of ring-substituted β-amino ketones. Reactions occur under relatively mild conditions and are facilitated by benzoic acid.

  10. Analyzing power measurements for the (π+,π0) reaction on a polarized 13C target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goergen, J.J.

    1991-05-01

    The analyzing powers A y differential cross sections dσ/dΩ for the reaction 13 C(π + ,π 0 ) 13 N have been measured for forward scattering angles at an incident pion kinetic energy of T pi + = 163 MeV by using a transversely polarized target. Analyzing powers and reaction cross sections impose stringent constrains on nuclear reaction models and can be used to test the present understanding of nuclear structure for 1p-shell nuclei. The resulting A y are compared to the predictions of first-order Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation (DWIA) calculations, which reproduce well the differential cross sections. Although there is qualitative agreement at forward angles, the quantitative agreement is poor, especially at scattering angles larger than 50 degrees. Since the DWIA calculations do not appear to be strongly sensitive to the assumed nuclear structure model, the discrepancy in describing the analyzing powers suggests that the reaction mechanism may not yet be well understood and higher order corrections may be important. Also measured were the analyzing powers for the elementary charge exchange reaction π - bar p → π degrees n over the same angular range and at an incident pion kinetic energy of T pi - = 161 MeV. The results are compared to the most recents phase shift predictions. Within the experimental uncertainties, phase shift calculations agree with the measured A y and no changes in the πN phase shifts near the P 33 resonance are needed to describe the data

  11. Reaction Decoder Tool (RDT): extracting features from chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Torrance, Gilliean; Baldacci, Lorenzo; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Fenninger, Franz; Gopal, Nimish; Choudhary, Saket; May, John W; Holliday, Gemma L; Steinbeck, Christoph; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-07-01

    Extracting chemical features like Atom-Atom Mapping (AAM), Bond Changes (BCs) and Reaction Centres from biochemical reactions helps us understand the chemical composition of enzymatic reactions. Reaction Decoder is a robust command line tool, which performs this task with high accuracy. It supports standard chemical input/output exchange formats i.e. RXN/SMILES, computes AAM, highlights BCs and creates images of the mapped reaction. This aids in the analysis of metabolic pathways and the ability to perform comparative studies of chemical reactions based on these features. This software is implemented in Java, supported on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX, and freely available at https://github.com/asad/ReactionDecoder : asad@ebi.ac.uk or s9asad@gmail.com. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Identification of a recombinant inulin fructotransferase (difructose dianhydride III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 with high specific activity and remarkable thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shuhuai; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2015-04-08

    Difructose dianhydride III (DFA III) is a functional carbohydrate produced from inulin by inulin fructotransferase (IFTase, EC 4.2.2.18). In this work, an IFTase gene from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 was cloned and expressed in Escherachia coli. The recombinant enzyme was purified by metal affinity chromatography. It showed significant inulin hydrolysis activity, and the produced main product from inulin was determined as DFA III by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The molecular mass of the purified protein was calculated to be 43 and 125 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration, respectively, suggesting the native enzyme might be a homotrimer. The recombinant enzyme showed maximal activity as 2391 units/mg at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. It displayed the highest thermostability among previously reported IFTases (DFA III forming) and was stable up to 80 °C for 4 h of incubation. The smallest substrate was determined as nystose. The conversion ratio of inulin to DFA III reached 81% when 100 g/L inulin was catalyzed by 80 nM recombinant enzyme for 20 min at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. All of these data indicated that the IFTase (DFA III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 had great potential for industrial DFA III production.

  13. Search for Acoplanar Lepton Pair Events in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161, 172 and 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    A selection of di-lepton events with significant missing transverse momentum has been performed using a total data sample of 77.0 pb-1 at e+e- centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV, 172 GeV and 183 GeV. The observed numbers of events: four at 161 GeV, nine at 172 GeV, and 78 at 183 GeV, are consistent with the numbers expected from Standard Model processes, which arise predominantly from W+W- production with each W decaying leptonically. This topology is an experimental signature also for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. Further event selection criteria are described that optimise the sensitivity to particular new physics channels. No evidence for new phenomena is apparent and model independent limits on the production cross-section times branching ratio squared for various new physics processes are presented. Assuming a 100% branching ratio for the decay of a right-handed charged slepton to a charged lepton and the lightest neutr...

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using data from e^+e^- collisions collected at center-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172 GeV by the OPAL detector at LEP. The data collected at these energies correspond to integrated luminosities of 10.0, 1.0 and 9.4 pb^-1, respectively. The search is sensitive to the main final states from the process in which the Higgs boson is produced in association with a fermion anti-fermion pair, namely four jets, two jets with missing energy, and two jets produced together with a pair of electron, muon or tau leptons. One candidate event is observed, in agreement with the Standard Model background expectation. In combination with previous OPAL searches at center-of-mass energies close to the Z^0 resonance and the revised previous OPAL searches at 161 GeV, we derive a lower limit of 69.4 GeV for the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% confidence level.

  15. Monoclonal antibody 1.6.1 against human MPL receptor allows HSC enrichment of CB and BM CD34(+)CD38(-) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit Cocault, Laurence; Fleury, Maud; Clay, Denis; Larghero, Jérôme; Vanneaux, Valérie; Souyri, Michèle

    2016-04-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and its receptor Mpl (CD110) play a crucial role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Functional study of Mpl-expressing HSCs has, however, been hampered by the lack of efficient monoclonal antibodies, explaining the very few data available on Mpl(+) HSCs during human embryonic development and after birth. Investigating the main monoclonal antibodies used so far to sort CD110(+) cells from cord blood (CB) and adult bone marrow (BM), we found that only the recent monoclonal antibody 1.6.1 engineered by Immunex Corporation was specific. Using in vitro functional assays, we found that this antibody can be used to sort a CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(+) population enriched in hematopoietic progenitor stem cells, both in CB and in adult BM. In vivo injection into NSG mice further indicated that the CB CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(+) population is highly enriched in HSCs compared with both CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(-) and CD34(+)CD38(-) populations. Together our results validate MAb1.6.1 as an important tool, which has so far been lacking, in the HSC field. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 161Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy of the intermetallic compounds DyNi2Si2, DyNi2Ge2 and DyAg2Si2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Hideya; Murata, Akifumi; Koizuka, Masaaki; Ohashi, Masayoshi; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    1994-01-01

    161 Dy Moessbauer spectroscopic study has been performed on DyNi 2 Si 2 , DyNi 2 Ge 2 and DyAg 2 Si 2 in order to clarify microscopic properties of antiferromagnets with incommensurate and sinusoidally moment-modulated structure. The experiments were done using the standard 161 Tb Moessbauer sources prepared by neutron irradiation at the Japan Material Testing Reactor. The Moessbauer spectra of DyNi 2 Si 2 are analyzed satisfactorily by a single set of hyperfine parameters, and hence the sinusoidal moment-modulation is considered to be realized through a distribution of spin relaxation rate. The broadened spectra of DyNi 2 Ge 2 are fitted tentatively by three subspectra. It seems for DyNi 2 Ge 2 that the incommensurate arrangement of Dy moments differed in magnitude as well as the distribution of spin relaxation rate originates the moment modulation. The fact that the spectrum of DyAg 2 Si 2 at 3 K consists of two distinct subspectra ensures the complicated antiferromagnetic structure where two kinds of Dy moments differed in magnitude are arranged noncollinearly. (author)

  17. Geophysical Multiphase Flow With Interphase Exchanges - Hydrodynamic and Thermodynamic Models, and Numerical Techniques, Version GMFIX-1.61, Design Document Attachment 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dartevelle, S.

    2006-01-01

    Since the multiphase system is made up of a large number of particles, it is impractical to solve the motion of each individual particle; hence GMFIX v1.61 is based upon the Implicit Multi-Field formalism (IMF) which treats all phases in the system as interpenetrating continua. Each instantaneous local point variable (mass, velocity, temperature, pressure, so forth) must be treated to acknowledge the fact that any given arbitrary volume can be shared by different phases at the same time. This treatment may involve, for instance, an averaging or a smoothing process. GMFIX is the geophysical version of MFIX codes developed by NETL and ORNL. MFIX comes after 30 years of continuous developments and improvements from K-FIX codes from LANL. At the time this manuscript was ready for publication (March 2005), some differences exist between the current versions of GMFIX (v. 1.61) and MFIX (v: 1.60) regarding the exact formulation of the energy and momentum equations, the interfacial closures, and the turbulence formulation. Yet both GMFIX and MFIX are being improved, and developed tightly sides by sides

  18. Visual Motion Processing Subserves Faster Visuomotor Reaction in Badminton Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsdünker, Thorben; Strüder, Heiko K; Mierau, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    Athletes participating in ball or racquet sports have to respond to visual stimuli under critical time pressure. Previous studies used visual contrast stimuli to determine visual perception and visuomotor reaction in athletes and nonathletes; however, ball and racquet sports are characterized by motion rather than contrast visual cues. Because visual contrast and motion signals are processed in different cortical regions, this study aimed to determine differences in perception and processing of visual motion between athletes and nonathletes. Twenty-five skilled badminton players and 28 age-matched nonathletic controls participated in this study. Using a 64-channel EEG system, we investigated visual motion perception/processing in the motion-sensitive middle temporal (MT) cortical area in response to radial motion of different velocities. In a simple visuomotor reaction task, visuomotor transformation in Brodmann area 6 (BA6) and BA4 as well as muscular activation (EMG onset) and visuomotor reaction time (VMRT) were investigated. Stimulus- and response-locked potentials were determined to differentiate between perceptual and motor-related processes. As compared with nonathletes, athletes showed earlier EMG onset times (217 vs 178 ms, P < 0.001), accompanied by a faster VMRT (274 vs 243 ms, P < 0.001). Furthermore, athletes showed an earlier stimulus-locked peak activation of MT (200 vs 182 ms, P = 0.002) and BA6 (161 vs 137 ms, P = 0.009). Response-locked peak activation in MT was later in athletes (-7 vs 26 ms, P < 0.001), whereas no group differences were observed in BA6 and BA4. Multiple regression analyses with stimulus- and response-locked cortical potentials predicted EMG onset (r = 0.83) and VMRT (r = 0.77). The athletes' superior visuomotor performance in response to visual motion is primarily related to visual perception and, to a minor degree, to motor-related processes.

  19. Nuclear reactions an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown – mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos – to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction.   The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no ...

  20. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10 19 W/cm 2 . In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that μCi of 62 Cu can be generated via the (γ,n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10 19 Wcm -2

  1. Nuclear reactions in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnould, M.; Rayet, M.

    1990-01-01

    At all times and at all astrophysical scales, nuclear reactions have played and continue to play a key role. This concerns the energetics as well as the production of nuclides (nucleosynthesis). After a brief review of the observed composition of various objects in the universe, and especially of the solar system, the basic ingredients that are required in order to build up models for the chemical evolution of galaxies are sketched. Special attention is paid to the evaluation of the stellar yields through an overview of the important burning episodes and nucleosynthetic processes that can develop in non-exploding or exploding stars. Emphasis is put on the remaining astrophysical and nuclear physics uncertainties that hamper a clear understanding of the observed characteristics, and especially compositions, of a large variety of astrophysical objects

  2. Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wester, Roland

    2017-05-05

    We review the recent advances in the investigation of the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. During the past decade, the combination of single-collision experiments in crossed ion and neutral beams with the velocity map ion imaging detection technique has enabled a wealth of studies on ion-molecule reactions. These methods, in combination with chemical dynamics simulations, have uncovered new and unexpected reaction mechanisms, such as the roundabout mechanism and the subtle influence of the leaving group in anion-molecule nucleophilic substitution reactions. For this important class of reactions, as well as for many fundamental cation-molecule reactions, the information obtained with crossed-beam imaging is discussed. The first steps toward understanding micro-solvation of ion-molecule reaction dynamics are presented. We conclude with the presentation of several interesting directions for future research.

  3. Reaction mechanisms of metal complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Hay, R W

    2000-01-01

    This text provides a general background as a course module in the area of inorganic reaction mechanisms, suitable for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate study and/or research. The topic has important research applications in the metallurgical industry and is of interest in the science of biochemistry, biology, organic, inorganic and bioinorganic chemistry. In addition to coverage of substitution reactions in four-, five- and six-coordinate complexes, the book contains further chapters devoted to isomerization and racemization reactions, to the general field of redox reactions, and to the reactions of coordinated ligands. It is relevant in other fields such as organic, bioinorganic and biological chemistry, providing a bridge to organic reaction mechanisms. The book also contains a chapter on the kinetic background to the subject with many illustrative examples which should prove useful to those beginning research. Provides a general background as a course module in the area of inorganic reaction mechanis...

  4. Homozygosity mapping reveals new nonsense mutation in the FAM161A gene causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in a Palestinian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobor, Ditta; Balousha, Ghassan; Baumann, Britta; Wissinger, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogenous group of inherited retinal degenerations caused by mutations in at least 45 genes. Recently, the FAM161A gene was identified as the causative gene for RP28, an autosomal recessive form of RP. We performed a clinical and molecular genetic study of a consanguineous Palestinian family with two three siblings affected with retinitis pigmentosa. DNA samples were collected from the index patient, his father, his affected sister, and two non-affected brothers. DNA sample from the index was subjected to high resolution genome-wide SNP array. Assuming identity-by-descent in this consanguineous family we applied homozygosity mapping to identify disease causing genes. The index patient reported night blindness since the age of 20 years, followed by moderate disease progression with decrease of peripheral vision, the development of photophobia and later on reduced central vision. At the age of 40 his visual acuity was counting fingers (CF) for both eyes, color discrimination was not possible and his visual fields were severely constricted. Funduscopic examination revealed a typical appearance of advanced RP with optic disc pallor, narrowed retinal vessels, bone-spicule like pigmentary changes in the mid-periphery and atrophic changes in the macula. His younger affected brother (37 years) was reported with overall milder symptoms, while the youngest sister (21 years) reported problems only with night vision. Applying high-density SNP arrays we identified several homozygous genomic regions one of which included the recently identified FAM161A gene mutated in RP28-linked autosomal recessive RP. Sequencing analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous nonsense mutation, c.1003C>T/p.R335X in the index patient and the affected sister. We identified an RP28-linked RP family in the Palestinian population caused by a novel nonsense mutation in FAM161A. RP in this family shows a typical disease onset with moderate to rapid progression

  5. Extent of reaction in open systems with multiple heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The familiar batch concept of extent of reaction is reexamined for systems of reactions occurring in open systems. Because species concentrations change as a result of transport processes as well as reactions in open systems, the extent of reaction has been less useful in practice in these applications. It is shown that by defining the extent of the equivalent batch reaction and a second contribution to the extent of reaction due to the transport processes, it is possible to treat the description of the dynamics of flow through porous media accompanied by many chemical reactions in a uniform, concise manner. This approach tends to isolate the reaction terms among themselves and away from the model partial differential equations, thereby enabling treatment of large problems involving both equilibrium and kinetically controlled reactions. Implications on the number of coupled partial differential equations necessary to be solved and on numerical algorithms for solving such problems are discussed. Examples provided illustrate the theory applied to solute transport in groundwater flow.

  6. Nuclear reactions as structure probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Bernard; Cugnon, Joseph; Roussel-Chomaz, Patricia; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Oliveira Santos, Francois de; Bauge, Eric; Poves, Alfredo; Keeley, Nicholas; Simenel, Cedric; Avez, Benoit; Lacroix, Denis; Baye, Daniel; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Pons, Alexandre

    2007-09-01

    This publication gathers courses which aim at giving a view on new experiments which are performed by using radioactive beams, notably low intensity beams, in different accelerators, and allow the structure of very exotic nuclei to be characterized. Experimental as well as theoretical aspects are thus addressed. The contributions propose: a brief history of nuclear reactions and of instruments used to study them from the discovery of nucleus to the DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation); an overview of nuclear reactions; experimental techniques; the theory of collisions at low energy; resonant elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and astrophysical reactions; to probe nuclear structure with nucleons; shell model and spectroscopic factors; analysis of transfer reactions and determination of spectroscopic factors; microscopic approaches of nuclear dynamics; theoretical aspects of dissociation reactions; experimental aspects of knockout reactions; research in oenology with the chemical characterisation of defective ageing of dry white wines

  7. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Melike Dönertaş

    Full Text Available The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG. Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution.

  8. The Glaser–Hay reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Mie Højer; Jensen, Jonas; Tortzen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative Glaser–Hay coupling of two terminal alkynes to furnish a butadiyne is a key reaction for acetylenic scaffolding. Although the reaction is performed under rather simple conditions [CuCl/TMEDA/O2 (air)], the mechanism is still under debate. Herein we present detailed studies...... on the scope of this reaction by using both 13C NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopic methods. The former method was used to study the kinetics of the coupling of aryl-substituted alkynes as the aryl carbon resonances of the reactants and products have similar NOEs and relaxation times. The reaction was found...... to be zero-order with respect to the terminal alkyne reactant under standard preparative conditions. Moreover, as the reaction proceeded, a clear change to slower reaction kinetics was observed, but it was still apparently zero-order. The onset of this change was found to depend on the catalyst loading...

  9. The Paterno-Buchi reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Yding; Schalk, Oliver; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.

    2012-01-01

    The Paternò-Büchi (PB) reaction between an excited carbonyl compound and an alkene has been widely studied, but so far little is known about the excited-state dynamics of the reaction. In this investigation, we used a compound in which a formyl and a vinyl group are attached to a [2.......2]paracyclophane in order to obtain a model system in pre-reactive conformation for the PB reaction. We studied the excited-state dynamics of the isolated molecule in a molecular beam using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The results show that inter-system crossing...... within two picoseconds competes efficiently with the reaction in the singlet manifold. Thus, the PB reaction in this model system takes place in the triplet state on a time scale of nanoseconds. This result stresses the importance of triplet states in the excited-state pathway of the PB reaction...

  10. Limits for Stochastic Reaction Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappelletti, Daniele

    Reaction systems have been introduced in the 70s to model biochemical systems. Nowadays their range of applications has increased and they are fruitfully used in dierent elds. The concept is simple: some chemical species react, the set of chemical reactions form a graph and a rate function...... is associated with each reaction. Such functions describe the speed of the dierent reactions, or their propensities. Two modelling regimes are then available: the evolution of the dierent species concentrations can be deterministically modelled through a system of ODE, while the counts of the dierent species...... at a certain time are stochastically modelled by means of a continuous-time Markov chain. Our work concerns primarily stochastic reaction systems, and their asymptotic properties. In Paper I, we consider a reaction system with intermediate species, i.e. species that are produced and fast degraded along a path...

  11. Metal-free bioconjugation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkel, Sander S; van Delft, Floris L

    2013-01-01

    The recent strategy to apply chemical reactions to address fundamental biological questions has led to the emergence of entirely new conjugation reactions that are fast and irreversible, yet so mild and selective that they can be performed even in living cells or organisms. These so-called bioorthogonal reactions open novel avenues, not only in chemical biology research, but also in many other life sciences applications, including the modulation of biopharmaceuticals by site-specific modification approaches.

  12. Searches for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J.M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I.C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J.A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A.O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D.E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S.J.; Halley, A.W.; Knowles, I.G.; Lynch, J.G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R.M.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A.M.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E.P.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lutjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Richter, Robert, 1; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, Ph.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Nikolic, Irina; Schune, M.H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Bryant, L.M.; Chambers, J.T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Wright, A.E.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C.A.J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W.M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J.M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-01-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 \\pb\\ at $\\sqrt{s} = 161 ~\\, \\rm GeV$, 1.1 \\pb\\ at 170 \\gev\\ and 9.5 \\pb\\ at 172 GeV. The \\eenunu\\ cross se ction is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 \\gevsq\\ at 95\\% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralin o ($\\tau_{\\chi_{1}^{0}} \\leq $ 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models.

  13. Missing mass spectra in hadronic events from $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=161-172 GeV and limits on invisible Higgs decays

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; Alessandro, R D; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1998-01-01

    Events characterised by large hadronic energy and transverse momentum are selected from the data collected by the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 161 and 172 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 21 $\\rm pb^{-1}$. The visible mass and the missing mass distributions of the selected events are consistent with those expected from Standard Model processes. This result is combined with that from data taken at the Z resonance to set an upper limit on the production rate and decay into invisible final states of a non-minimal Higgs boson, as a function of the Higgs mass. Assuming the non-minimal Higgs production cross section to be the same as for the Standard Model Higgs boson and the decay branching fraction into invisible final states to be 100\\%, a Higgs mass lower limit of 69.6 GeV is derived at 95\\% confidence level.

  14. QCD Studies and Determination of $\\alpha_s$ in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We present a study of the structure of hadronic events recorded by the L3 detector at LEP at the center of mass energies of 161 and 172 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 21.25 pb-1 collected during the high energy runs of 1996. The distributions of event shape variables and the energy dependence of their mean values are well reproduced by QCD models. From a comparison of the data with resummed second order QCD calculations, we determine the strong coupling constant at the two energies. Combining with our earlier measurements we find that the strong coupling constant decreases with increasing energy as expected in QCD.

  15. Search for the Higgs boson at center-of-mass energies between 161 and 184 GeV in the 4-jet channel with OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerne, E. von

    1998-07-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using data from e + e - collisions collected at center-of-mass energies from 161 to 184 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP is presented. The search is applied to events in the four-jet-channel, in which the Higgs boson decays into a bb pair and the associated Z 0 decays into quark and anti-quark. The data analyzed corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 75.0 pb -1 . Five candidate events are observed, in agreement with the Standard Model background expectation of 6.61±0.42 (stat.) ±1.72 (syst.) events. A lower limit of 74.0 GeV is derived for the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% confidence level. In combination with OPAL searches in other channels a limit of 86.9 GeV is obtained. (orig.)

  16. Multistep processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    The theories of nuclear reactions are reviewed with particular attention to the recent work on multistep processes. The evidence for compound nucleus and direct interaction reactions is described together with the results of comparisons between theories and experimental data. These theories have now proved inadequate, and there is evidence for multistep processes that take place after the initial direct stage but long before the attainment of the statistical equilibrium characteristic of compound nucleus processes. The theories of these reactions are described and it is shown how they can account for the experimental data and thus give a comprehensive understanding of nuclear reactions. (author)

  17. Progress in microscopic direct reaction modeling of nucleon induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.; Hilaire, S.; Lechaftois, F.; Peru, S.; Pillet, N.; Robin, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France)

    2015-12-15

    A microscopic nuclear reaction model is applied to neutron elastic and direct inelastic scatterings, and pre-equilibrium reaction. The JLM folding model is used with nuclear structure information calculated within the quasi-particle random phase approximation implemented with the Gogny D1S interaction. The folding model for direct inelastic scattering is extended to include rearrangement corrections stemming from both isoscalar and isovector density variations occurring during a transition. The quality of the predicted (n,n), (n,n{sup '}), (n,xn) and (n,n{sup '}γ) cross sections, as well as the generality of the present microscopic approach, shows that it is a powerful tool that can help improving nuclear reactions data quality. Short- and long-term perspectives are drawn to extend the present approach to more systems, to include missing reactions mechanisms, and to consistently treat both structure and reaction problems. (orig.)

  18. Reaction mechanisms in zeolite catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozanska, X.; Santen, van R.A.; Auerbach, S.C.; Carrado, K.A.; Dutta, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    A review; described are the most basic mechanistic reaction steps that are induced by zeolite catalysts. Details on the zeolitic properties that are relevant to mol. reactivity are also provided. The theor. methods and models at hand to allow the investigation of these reaction steps and that have

  19. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is ...

  20. Sodium concrete reaction - Structural considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferskakis, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the sodium concrete reaction phenomenon, with emphasis on structural considerations, is presented. Available test results for limestone, basalt, and magnetite concrete with various test article configurations are reviewed. Generally, tests indicate reaction is self limiting before all sodium is used. Uncertainties, however, concerning the mechanism for penetration of sodium into concrete have resulted in different theories about a reaction model. Structural behavior may be significant in the progression of the reaction due to thermal-structuralchemical interactions involving tensile cracking, compressive crushing, or general deterioration of concrete and the exposure of fresh concrete surfaces to react with sodium. Structural behavior of test articles and potential factors that could enhance the progression of the reaction are discussed

  1. Analysis of chemical reaction kinetics of depredating organic pollutants from secondary effluent of wastewater treatment plant in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Jiang, Dengling; Yang, Yong; Cao, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Four subsurface constructed wetlands were built to treat the secondary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant in Tangshan, China. The chemical pollutant indexes of chemical oxygen demand (COD) were analyzed to evaluate the removal efficiency of organic pollutants from the secondary effluent of the wastewater treatment plant. In all cases, the subsurface constructed wetlands were efficient in treating organic pollutants. Under the same hydraulic loading condition, the horizontal flow wetlands exhibited better efficiency of COD removal than vertical flow wetlands: the removal rates in horizontal flow wetlands could be maintained at 68.4 ± 2.42% to 92.2 ± 1.61%, compared with 63.8 ± 1.19% to 85.0 ± 1.25% in the vertical flow wetlands. Meanwhile, the chemical reaction kinetics of organic pollutants was analyzed, and the results showed that the degradation courses of the four subsurface wetlands all corresponded with the first order reaction kinetics to a large extent.

  2. STUDIES ON ENDOTHELIAL REACTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Nathan Chandler

    1923-01-01

    operative. On the other hand, there may be an increase in the phagocytic activity of the endothelium of the sinusoids which might take up more bacteria under these changed conditions. Several investigators have claimed, recently, that there is an increased activity of the liver endothelium following splenectomy, their experiments being directed chiefly toward determining the fate of the erythrocytes. Pearce (1918) in reporting the effects of experimental splenectomy in dogs, states that there are definite compensatory changes in the lymph nodes, in the form of an increased proliferation of endothelial phagocytes, and that the stellate cells of the liver sinusoids often show a similar compensatory increase in number. In both cases the cells are, apparently, formed in situ rather than transported to the organs. He says: ‘Such findings suggest the development of a compensatory function on the part of the lymph-nodes and possibly the liver,’ and suggests that, in times of stress ‘the stellate cells of the liver thus assume, in part at least, the function of destroying red blood-corpuscles by phagocytosis.’ Incidentally, he presents an excellent discussion of the history and subject of splenectomy. Motohashi (1922) reports a great increase in the hemophagic power of the hepatic endothelium and an increase in the number of endothelial elements, after some 45 days following splenectomy in rabbits. Nishikawa and Takagi (1922) have observed similar phenomena with white rats, the Kupffer cells taking up erythrocytes in large numbers in splenectomized animals, whereas controls never show similar propensities on the part of these cells. It may be that different substances cause different reactions on the part of the hepatic endothelium. Contributory Experiment.—A side experiment was performed with five rabbits, two splenectomized and three controls, into which uniform doses of pneumococci were injected intravenously. They all died of septicemia after a few days. The results

  3. Dechlorinating reaction of organic chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahata, Taneaki; Kihara, Shinji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Ohuchi, Misao

    1996-06-01

    Dechlorination has been examined by the reaction between iron, aluminum powder or CaO and organic chlorides such as C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Progress of the reaction was analyzed with mass spectrometer. The reaction between iron and organic chloride was rapidly occurred at the temperature between 350 and 440degC in an atmosphere of argon. Above 380degC, more than 99.5% of C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} was decomposed within approximately 100 minutes. At 440degC, approximately 60% of C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} was decomposed by the reaction with aluminium powder within approximately 100 minutes. At 440degC, reaction between C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} and CaO powder were occurred rapidly in an atmosphere of argon to form CaCl{sub 2} and free carbon. Also in an atmosphere of air, nearly the same result was obtained. In this reaction, CaCl{sub 2}, CO and CO{sub 2} were formed. CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} was also decomposed by the reaction with iron at the temperature between 380 and 440degC. In the reaction, FeCl{sub 2}, carbon and hydrogen were formed. CH{sub 3}{sup +} and CH{sub 4} were observed during the dechlorinating reaction of CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Variation in particle size of iron powder such as 100, 150 and 250 mesh did not affect the reaction rate. (author)

  4. Fusion chain reaction - a chain reaction with charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, A.; Shvarts, D.

    1975-01-01

    When a DT-plasma is compressed to very high density, the particles resulting from nuclear reactions give their energy mostly to D and T ions, by nuclear collisions, rather than to electrons as usual. Fusion can thus proceed as a chain reaction, without the need of thermonuclear temperatures. In this paper, we derive relations for the suprathermal ion population created by a fusion reaction. Numerical integration of these equations shows that a chain reaction can proceed in a cold infinite DT-plasma at densities above 8.4x10 27 ions.cm -3 . Seeding the plasma with a small amount of 6 Li reduces the critical density to 7.2x10 27 ions.cm -3 (140000times the normal solid density). (author)

  5. Reaction path analysis of sodium-water reaction phenomena in support of chemical reaction model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2011-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule to the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. The results are used as the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by JAEA toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  6. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaneuf, Christopher R; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D Curtis; Holst, Gregory L; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R

    2015-07-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously-each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel.

  7. The analysis of stress reactions ana coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Dong Han; Kim, Jin Su; Park, Gil Yong; Son, Mi Suk

    2001-01-01

    This study is performed to encourage cancer patients to identify, relieve and effectively overcome the stress caused by radiotherapy, by analyzing stress reactions and coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress due to radiotherapy. The study group was composed of 85 cancer patients of the age 20 or higher who were undergoing radiotherapy in four hospitals located in Seoul and Kyonggi-do. The survey questionnaire was used, which had 161 questions inquiring respondents of general status, perceived stress, stress reactions and coping patterns. The surveyed data were analyzed by a SAS program, which employed descriptive statistics. Pearson Correlation Coefficient, t-test, ANOVA and Stepwised Multiple Regression. The stress perception and reaction rates were low in cancer patients comparing to patients of the other study. In the coping patterns. the problem-focused coping patterns were significantly higher than emotion-focused coping patterns. The statistically meaningful differences were observed in the stress perception and reactions depending on the time of diagnosis and perceived health level. As for the problem-focused coping patterns, significant differences were found depending on age, marital status, education, income and the number of family members as well as perceived health level of patients. The level of perceived stress and that of stress reactions was found to have positively significant correlation(r=.764, p<.001) while the perceived stress and the problem-focused coping patterns was correlated negatively (r=-.288, p<.01). The stress reactions and the problem-focused coping patterns was found to have negatively significant correlation(r=-.289, p<.01). The problem-focused coping behavior, which cooperated with doctors, technologists, nurses and families of cancer patients, is advisable for the cancer patients to overcome uncertainty and uneasiness by effectively release the stress.

  8. The analysis of stress reactions ana coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Dong Han; Kim, Jin Su; Park, Gil Yong; Son, Mi Suk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Bundang CHA General Hospital, College of Medicine, Pochon CHA University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    This study is performed to encourage cancer patients to identify, relieve and effectively overcome the stress caused by radiotherapy, by analyzing stress reactions and coping patterns of cancer patients who perceived stress due to radiotherapy. The study group was composed of 85 cancer patients of the age 20 or higher who were undergoing radiotherapy in four hospitals located in Seoul and Kyonggi-do. The survey questionnaire was used, which had 161 questions inquiring respondents of general status, perceived stress, stress reactions and coping patterns. The surveyed data were analyzed by a SAS program, which employed descriptive statistics. Pearson Correlation Coefficient, t-test, ANOVA and Stepwised Multiple Regression. The stress perception and reaction rates were low in cancer patients comparing to patients of the other study. In the coping patterns. the problem-focused coping patterns were significantly higher than emotion-focused coping patterns. The statistically meaningful differences were observed in the stress perception and reactions depending on the time of diagnosis and perceived health level. As for the problem-focused coping patterns, significant differences were found depending on age, marital status, education, income and the number of family members as well as perceived health level of patients. The level of perceived stress and that of stress reactions was found to have positively significant correlation(r=.764, p<.001) while the perceived stress and the problem-focused coping patterns was correlated negatively (r=-.288, p<.01). The stress reactions and the problem-focused coping patterns was found to have negatively significant correlation(r=-.289, p<.01). The problem-focused coping behavior, which cooperated with doctors, technologists, nurses and families of cancer patients, is advisable for the cancer patients to overcome uncertainty and uneasiness by effectively release the stress.

  9. Palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Molnár, Árpád

    2013-01-01

    This handbook and ready reference brings together all significant issues of practical importance for interested readers in one single volume. While covering homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, the text is unique in focusing on such important aspects as using different reaction media, microwave techniques or catalyst recycling. It also provides a comprehensive treatment of modern-day coupling reactions and emphasizes those topics that show potential for future development, such as continuous flow systems, water as a reaction medium, and catalyst immobilization, among others. With i

  10. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  11. Basic reactions induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesby, A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the basic reactions resulting from exposure to high energy radiation. In the initial stages energy is absorbed, but not necessarily at random, giving radical and ion species which may then react to promote the final chemical change. However, it is possible to intervene at intermediate stages to modify or reduce the radiation effect. Under certain conditions enhanced reactions are also possible. Several expressions are given to calculate radiation yield in terms of energy absorbed. Some analogies between radiation-induced reactions in polymers, and those studied in radiobiology are outlined. (author)

  12. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Wind-tunnel calibration of a combined pitot-static tube and vane-type flow-angularity indicator at Mach numbers of 1.61 and 2.01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Archibald R; Mace, William D

    1956-01-01

    A limited calibration of a combined pitot-static tube and vane-type flow-angularity indicator has been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.61 and 2.01. The results indicated that the angle-of-yaw indications were affected by unsymmetric shock effects at low angles of attack.

  14. Interpretation of bathymetric and magnetic data from the easternmost segment of Australian-Antarctic Ridge, 156°-161°E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H.; Kim, S.; Park, S.

    2013-12-01

    From 2011 to 2013, Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) conducted a series of geophysical and geochemical expeditions on the longest and easternmost segment of Australian-Antarctic Ridge, located at 61°-63°S, and 156°-161°E. This ridge segment plays an important role in constraining the tectonics of the Antarctic plate. Using IBRV ARAON, the detailed bathymetric data and eleven total magnetic profiles were collected. The studied ridge has spread NNW-SSE direction and tends to be shallower to the west and deeper to the east. The western side of the ridge (156°-157.50°E) shows a broad axial high and a plenty of seamounts as an indicative of massive volcanism. Near the center of the ridge (158°-159°E), a seamount chain is formed stretching toward the south from the ridge. Also, the symmetric seafloor fabric is clearly observed at the eastern portion (158.50°-160°E) of the seamount chain. From the topographic change along the ridge axis, the western part of the ridge appears to have a sufficient magma supply. On the contrary, the eastern side of the ridge (160°-161°E) is characterized by axial valley and relatively deeper depth. Nevertheless, the observed total magnetic field anomalies exhibit symmetric patterns across the ridge axis. Although there have not been enough magnetic survey lines, the spreading rates of the ridge are estimated as the half-spreading rate of 37.7 mm/y and 35.3 mm/y for the western portion of the ridge and 42.3 mm/y for the eastern portion. The studied ridge can be categorized as an intermediate spreading ridge, confirming previous studies based on the spreading rate of global ridge system. Here we will present the preliminary results on bathymetric changes along the ridge axis and its relationship with melt supply distribution, and detailed magnetic properties of the ridge constrained by the observed total field anomalies.

  15. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  16. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-01-05

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  17. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  18. Reaction of PFCs in water stabilized plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mastný, L.; Horníček, J.; Živný, Oldřich; Brožek, Vlastimil; Sember, Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2017), s. 161 ISSN 1336-7242. [Zjazd chemikov /69./. 11.09.2017-15.09.2017, Horný Smokovec] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC17-10246J Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Water stabilized plasma * tetrafluoromethane * corrosion resistance * boron nitride * titanium nitride Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics)

  19. Milder clinical and biochemical phenotypes associated with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant in cobalamin C disease: Implications for management and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almannai, Mohammed; Marom, Ronit; Divin, Kristian; Scaglia, Fernando; Sutton, V Reid; Craigen, William J; Lee, Brendan; Burrage, Lindsay C; Graham, Brett H

    2017-09-01

    Cobalamin C disease is a multisystemic disease with variable manifestations and age of onset. Genotype-phenotype correlations are well-recognized in this disorder. Here, we present a large cohort of individuals with cobalamin C disease, several of whom are heterozygous for the c.482G>A pathogenic variant (p.Arg161Gln). We compared clinical characteristics of individuals with this pathogenic variant to those who do not have this variant. To our knowledge, this study represents the largest single cohort of individuals with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant. A retrospective chart review of 27 individuals from 21 families with cobalamin C disease who are followed at our facility was conducted. 13 individuals (48%) are compound heterozygous with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) on one allele and a second pathogenic variant on the other allele. Individuals with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant had later onset of symptoms and easier metabolic control. Moreover, they had milder biochemical abnormalities at presentation which likely contributed to the observation that 4 individuals (31%) in this group were missed by newborn screening. The c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant is associated with milder disease. These individuals may not receive a timely diagnosis as they may not be identified on newborn screening or because of unrecognized, late onset symptoms. Despite the milder presentation, significant complications can occur, especially if treatment is delayed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Drug Reactions in Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Derviş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Both immunologic and nonimmunologic drug reactions can be seen in oral mucosa. Since considerable number of these reactions heals spontaneously without being noticed by the patients, exact frequency of the lesions is unknown. Most common lesions are xerostomia, taste disorders, mucosal ulcerations and edema. In this article, oral lesions resulting from drug intake similar to those from oral lesions of local and systemic diseases, and diagnostic problems caused by these similarities, have been reviewed.

  1. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Fischer

    Full Text Available Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks.

  2. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jakob; Kleidon, Axel; Dittrich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha) and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks.

  3. 'Sum rules' for preequilibrium reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1981-03-01

    Evidence that suggests a correct relationship between the optical transmission matrix, P, and the several correlation widths, gamma sub(n), found in nsmission matrix, P, and the several correlation widths, n, found in multistep compound (preequilibrium) nuclear reactions, is presented. A second sum rule is also derived within the shell model approach to nuclear reactions. Indications of the potential usefulness of the sum rules in preequilibrium studies are given. (Author) [pt

  4. Medium effects in direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakoc, M; Bertulani, C

    2013-01-01

    We discuss medium corrections of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections and their influence on direct reactions at intermediate energies ≳50 MeV/nucleon. The results obtained with free NN cross sections are compared with those obtained with a geometrical treatment of Pauli-blocking and Dirac-Bruecker methods. We show that medium corrections may lead to sizable modifications for collisions at intermediate energies and that they are more pronounced in reactions involving weakly bound nuclei.

  5. Reciprocity theory of homogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbormbai, Adolf A.

    1990-03-01

    The reciprocity formalism is applied to the homogeneous gaseous reactions in which the structure of the participating molecules changes upon collision with one another, resulting in a change in the composition of the gas. The approach is applied to various classes of dissociation, recombination, rearrangement, ionizing, and photochemical reactions. It is shown that for the principle of reciprocity to be satisfied it is necessary that all chemical reactions exist in complementary pairs which consist of the forward and backward reactions. The backward reaction may be described by either the reverse or inverse process. The forward and backward processes must satisfy the same reciprocity equation. Because the number of dynamical variables is usually unbalanced on both sides of a chemical equation, it is necessary that this balance be established by including as many of the dynamical variables as needed before the reciprocity equation can be formulated. Statistical transformation models of the reactions are formulated. The models are classified under the titles free exchange, restricted exchange and simplified restricted exchange. The special equations for the forward and backward processes are obtained. The models are consistent with the H theorem and Le Chatelier's principle. The models are also formulated in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  6. Reactions of stabilized Criegee Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Luc; Harder, Hartwig; Novelli, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl oxides (Criegee intermediates) were proposed as key intermediates in the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes in 1975 by Rudolf Criegee. Despite the importance of ozonolysis in atmospheric chemistry, direct observation of these intermediates remained elusive, with only indirect experimental evidence for their role in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, e.g. through scavenging experiments. Direct experimental observation of stabilized CI has only been achieved since 2008. Since then, a concerted effort using experimental and theoretical means is in motion to characterize the chemistry and kinetics of these reactive intermediates. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the chemistry of Criegee intermediates with a series of coreactants which may be of importance in the atmosphere, in experimental setups, or both. This includes the CI+CI cross-reaction, which proceeds with a rate coefficient near the collision limit and can be important in experimental conditions. The CI + alkene reactions show strong dependence of the rate coefficient depending on the coreactants, but is generally found to be rather slow. The CI + ozone reaction is sufficiently fast to occur both in experiment and the free troposphere, and acts as a sink for CI. The reaction of CI with hydroperoxides, ROOH, is complex, and leads both to the formation of oligomers, as to the formation of reactive etheroxides, with a moderately fast rate coefficient. The importance of these reactions is placed in the context of the reaction conditions in different atmospheric environments ranging from unpolluted to highly polluted.

  7. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  8. Search for heavy neutral and charged leptons in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for unstable neutral and charged heavy leptons as well as for stable charged heavy leptons has been made at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV with the L3 detector at LEP. No evidence for their existence was found. We exclude unstable neutral leptons of Dirac (Majorana) type for masses below 78.0 (66.7), 78.0 (66.7) and 72.2 (58.2) GeV, if the heavy neutrino couples to the electron, muon or tau family, respectively. We exclude unstable charged heavy leptons for masses below 81.0 GeV for a wide mass range of the associated neutral heavy lepton. The production of stable charged heavy leptons with a mass less than 84.2 GeV is also excluded. If the unstable charged heavy lepton decays via mixing into a massless neutrino, we exclude masses below 78.7 GeV.

  9. Search for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at sqrt(s)=161 GeV and 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-02-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 pb-1 at sqrt(s)=161 GeV, 1.1 pb-1 at 170 GeV and 9.5 pb-1 at 172 GeV. The e+e--->νν¯γ(γ) cross section is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 GeV/c2 at 95% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralino (τχ10<= 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models. © 1998

  10. Prognostic value of CT findings to predict survival outcomes in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single institutional study of 161 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Kim, Kyung Won; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon; Song, Ki Byung; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Hong, Seung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of CT to predict recurrence-free and overall survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). Between January 2004 and December 2012, 161 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative triphasic CT and surgical resection with curative intent for PanNENs were identified. The tumour consistency, margin, presence of calcification, pancreatic duct dilatation, bile duct dilatation, vascular invasion, and hepatic metastases were evaluated. The tumour size, arterial enhancement ratio, and portal enhancement ratio were measured. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the association between CT features and recurrence-free survival and overall survival. By multivariate analysis, tumour size (>3 cm) (hazard ratio, 3.314; p = 0.006), portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 2.718; p = 0.006), and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.374; p = 0.003) were independent significant variables for worse recurrence-free survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 5.951; p = 0.001) and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.122; p = 0.021) were independent significant variables for worse overall survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) and hepatic metastases assessed on CT were common independent prognostic factors for worse recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with PanNENs. (orig.)

  11. Prognostic value of CT findings to predict survival outcomes in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single institutional study of 161 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Kim, Kyung Won; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ki Byung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha [Harvard Medical School, Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hong, Seung-Mo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of CT to predict recurrence-free and overall survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). Between January 2004 and December 2012, 161 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative triphasic CT and surgical resection with curative intent for PanNENs were identified. The tumour consistency, margin, presence of calcification, pancreatic duct dilatation, bile duct dilatation, vascular invasion, and hepatic metastases were evaluated. The tumour size, arterial enhancement ratio, and portal enhancement ratio were measured. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the association between CT features and recurrence-free survival and overall survival. By multivariate analysis, tumour size (>3 cm) (hazard ratio, 3.314; p = 0.006), portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 2.718; p = 0.006), and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.374; p = 0.003) were independent significant variables for worse recurrence-free survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 5.951; p = 0.001) and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.122; p = 0.021) were independent significant variables for worse overall survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) and hepatic metastases assessed on CT were common independent prognostic factors for worse recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with PanNENs. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of the Mass and Width of the W Boson in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 - 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, Sandra F.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, Sofia; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, Pierre; Apel, W-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, Jean-Eudes; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, Antonio; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, Eli; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, Mikael; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, Marc; Besson, N.; Bloch, Daniel; Blom, M.; Bluj, Michal; Bonesini, Maurizio; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, PSL; Borisov, G.; Botner, Olga; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, Marko; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, Tiziano; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, Paolo; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, Roberto; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, Fabio; Costa, M.J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, Javier; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Alessandro; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, Barbara; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Duperrin, A.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, Tord; Ellert, Mattias; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, Maria Catarina; Fanourakis, George K.; Feindt, Michael; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, Miriam; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Philippe; Gazis, Evangelos; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, Vincent; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S-O.; Holt, P.J.; Houlden, M.A.; Jackson, John Neil; Jarlskog, Goran; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, Gabrijel; Kerzel, U.; King, B.T.; Kjaer, N.J.; Kluit, Peter; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, Jacques; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, Pierre; Lyons, Louis; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R.Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Muller, Ulrich; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim Filho, Luiz Martins; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, Henryk; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, Andrea; Petrolini, Alessandro; Piedra, Jonatan; Pieri, L.; Pierre, Francois; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, Peter; Richard, F.; Ridky, Jan; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, Paolo; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann, Vanina; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, Martin; Simard, L.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, Andrei Valerevich; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, Petr; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, Clara; Turluer, M-L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, Giovanni; Van Dam, P.; Van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, Filipe; Venus, W.; Verdier, Patrice; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, Lorenzo; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, Danilo; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of the W boson mass and width has been performed by the DELPHI collaboration using the data collected during the full LEP2 programme (1996-2000). The data sample has an integrated luminosity of 660 pb^-1 and was collected over a range of centre-of-mass energies from 161 to 209 GeV. Results are obtained by applying the method of direct reconstruction of the mass of the W from its decay products in both the W+W- -> lvqq and W+W- -> qqqq channels. The W mass result for the combined data set is M_W = 80.336 +/- 0.055 (Stat.) +/- 0.028 (Syst.) +/- 0.025 (FSI) +/- 0.009 (LEP) GeV/c^2, where FSI represents the uncertainty due to final state interaction effects in the qqqq channel, and LEP represents that arising from the knowledge of the collision energy of the accelerator. The combined value for the W width is Gamma_W = 2.404 +/- 0.140 (Stat.) +/- 0.077 (Syst.) +/- 0.065 (FSI) GeV/c^2. These results supersede all values previously published by the DELPHI collaboration. This paper is dedicated to the m...

  13. Cell growth and resistance of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161 following freezing, drying and freeze-dried storage are differentially affected by fermentation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velly, H; Fonseca, F; Passot, S; Delacroix-Buchet, A; Bouix, M

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effects of fermentation parameters on the cell growth and on the resistance to each step of the freeze-drying process of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, a natural cheese isolate, using a response surface methodology. Cells were cultivated at different temperatures (22, 30 and 38°C) and pH (5·6, 6·2 and 6·8) and were harvested at different growth phases (0, 3 and 6 h of stationary phase). Cultivability and acidification activity losses of Lc. lactis were quantified after freezing, drying, 1 and 3 months of storage at 4 and 25°C. Lactococcus lactis was not damaged by freezing but was sensitive to drying and to ambient temperature storage. Moreover, the fermentation temperature and the harvesting time influenced the drying resistance of Lc. lactis. Lactococcus lactis cells grown in a whey-based medium at 32°C, pH 6·2 and harvested at late stationary phase exhibited both an optimal growth and the highest resistance to freeze-drying and storage. A better insight on the individual and interaction effects of fermentation parameters made it possible the freeze-drying and storage preservation of a sensitive strain of technological interest. Evidence on the particularly damaging effect of the drying step and the high-temperature storage is presented. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Search for Stable Heavy Charged Particles in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-136, 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djama, F; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chernyaev, E; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    A search for stable or long-lived heavy charged particles in $e^+e^-$ interactions at energies of 130-136, 161 and 172 GeV has been performed using the data taken by the DELPHI experiment at LEP. The search is based on particle identification provided by the Time Projection Chamber and the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. Upper limits at 95\\% confidence level are derived on the cross-section for heavy long-lived pair-produced charge $\\pm e$ and $\\pm 2/3e$ particles in the range of 0.4-2.3 pb for masses from 45 to 84 GeV/$c^2$. Within supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, long-lived charginos with masses from 45 to 84 (80)~GeV/$c^2$ for high (low) sneutrino masses can be excluded at 95\\% confidence level. %Mass limits for long-lived sleptons are obtained. %For selectrons no general mass limits can be given. Left-handed (right-handed) long-lived or stable smuons and staus with masses between 45 and 68 (65)~GeV/$c^2$ can be excluded at 95\\% confidence level.

  15. Evaluation of Neutron Induced Reactions for 32 Fission Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeong Il

    2007-02-15

    sections for almost all reaction channels including photon production, energy spectra of emitted particles and their angular distributions, as well as recoils. The evaluated data were converted into ENDF-6 formatted files, checked by a set of the CSEWG checking codes, processed with the code NJOY-99.161, and subject to test runs with the code MCNP5 to ensure that the files can be used in transport calculations. All evaluations were adopted by the new U.S. evaluated library, ENDF/B-VII.0, released in December 2006.

  16. Evaluation of Neutron Induced Reactions for 32 Fission Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeong Il

    2007-02-01

    Neutron cross sections for 32 fission products were evaluated in the neutron-incident energy range from 10 -5 eV to 20 MeV. The list of fission products consists of the priority materials for several applications, extended to cover complete isotopic chains for three elements. The full list includes 8 individual isotopes, 95 Mo, 101 Ru, 103 Rh, 105 Pd, 109 Ag, 131 Xe, 133 Cs, 141 Pr, and 24 isotopes in complete isotopic chains for Nd (8), Sm (9) and Dy (7). Our evaluation methodology covers both the low energy region and the fast neutron region.In the low energy region, our evaluations are based on the latest data published in the Atlas of Neutron Resonances. This resource was used to infer both the thermal values and the resolved resonance parameters that were validated against the capture resonance integrals. In the unresolved resonance region we performed the additional evaluation by using the averages of the resolved resonances and adjusting them to the experimental data.In the fast neutron region our evaluations are based on the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE-2.19 validated against the experimental data. EMPIRE is the modular system of codes consisting of many nuclear reaction models, including the spherical and deformed Optical Model, Hauser-Feshbach theory with the width fluctuation correction and complete gamma-ray emission cascade, DWBA, Multi-step Direct and Multi-step Compound models, and several versions of the phenomenological preequilibrium models. The code is equipped with a power full GUI, allowing an easy access to support libraries such as RIPL and CSISRS, the graphical package, as well the utility codes for formatting and checking. In general, in our calculations we used the Reference Input Parameter Library, RIPL, for the initial set model parameters. These parameters were properly adjusted to reproduce the available experimental data taken from the CSISRS library. Our evaluations cover cross sections for almost all reaction channels

  17. Reaction time for trimolecular reactions in compartment-based reaction-diffusion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Chen, Minghan; Erban, Radek; Cao, Yang

    2018-05-01

    Trimolecular reaction models are investigated in the compartment-based (lattice-based) framework for stochastic reaction-diffusion modeling. The formulae for the first collision time and the mean reaction time are derived for the case where three molecules are present in the solution under periodic boundary conditions. For the case of reflecting boundary conditions, similar formulae are obtained using a computer-assisted approach. The accuracy of these formulae is further verified through comparison with numerical results. The presented derivation is based on the first passage time analysis of Montroll [J. Math. Phys. 10, 753 (1969)]. Montroll's results for two-dimensional lattice-based random walks are adapted and applied to compartment-based models of trimolecular reactions, which are studied in one-dimensional or pseudo one-dimensional domains.

  18. Exchange Reactions. Proceedings of the Symposium on Exchange Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The mechanisms and kinetics of chemical reactions are of great interest to chemists. The study of exchange reactions in particular helps to shed light on the dynamics of chemical change, providing an insight into the structures and the reactivities of the chemical species involved. The main theme of this meeting was the subject of oxidation-reduction reactions in which the net result is the transfer of one or more electrons between the different oxidation states of the same element. Other studies reported included the transfer of protons, atoms, complex ligands or organic radicals between molecules. Heterogeneous exchange, which is of importance in many cases of catalytic action, was also considered. For a long time isotopic tracers have formed the most convenient means of studying exchange reactions and today a considerable amount of work continues to be done with their aid. Consequently, several papers presented at this Symposium reported on work carried out by purely radiochemical tracer methods. In recognition, however, of the important role which nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance play in this field, in particular in the study of fast reactions, a number of reports on investigations in which these techniques had been used was included in the programme. By kind invitation of the United States Government the Symposium on Exchange Reactions was held from 31 May to 4 June at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, Long Island, N.Y., USA. It was attended by 46 participants from nine countries and one inter-governmental organization. The publication of these Proceedings makes the contents of the papers and the discussion available to a wider audience

  19. A comprehensive survey of nuclear reactions; Panorama des reactions nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugnon, J. [Liege Univ., IFPA, AGO Dept. (Belgium)

    2007-07-01

    The various mechanisms of nuclear reactions are surveyed and classified in different regimes, based on the notions of coherent mechanisms and hard versus soft processes. The emphasis is put on the concepts at the basis of the understanding of these regimes and on the elements of nuclear structure which are involved in these different regimes, as well as the on the possibility of extracting this information. Due to lack of space and for pedagogical reasons, the discussion is limited to nucleon-induced and light-ion-induced reactions. However, a few remarks are given concerning some specific probes, such as weakly bound projectiles or neutron-rich nuclei. (author)

  20. SOLVENTLESS MIGRATORY-INSERTION REACTIONS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    The product formed by reaction of an alkyl or aryl cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyl .... (as also observed from the NMR tube experiments) that the solventless reaction between ... As can be seen from Figure 3, the reaction rate in the melt.

  1. Biomarkers of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Daniel F; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2018-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions can be caused by a wide range of therapeutics. Adverse drug reactions affect many bodily organ systems and vary widely in severity. Milder adverse drug reactions often resolve quickly following withdrawal of the casual drug or sometimes after dose reduction. Some adverse drug reactions are severe and lead to significant organ/tissue injury which can be fatal. Adverse drug reactions also represent a financial burden to both healthcare providers and the pharmaceutical industry. Thus, a number of stakeholders would benefit from development of new, robust biomarkers for the prediction, diagnosis, and prognostication of adverse drug reactions. There has been significant recent progress in identifying predictive genomic biomarkers with the potential to be used in clinical settings to reduce the burden of adverse drug reactions. These have included biomarkers that can be used to alter drug dose (for example, Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) and azathioprine dose) and drug choice. The latter have in particular included human leukocyte antigen (HLA) biomarkers which identify susceptibility to immune-mediated injuries to major organs such as skin, liver, and bone marrow from a variety of drugs. This review covers both the current state of the art with regard to genomic adverse drug reaction biomarkers. We also review circulating biomarkers that have the potential to be used for both diagnosis and prognosis, and have the added advantage of providing mechanistic information. In the future, we will not be relying on single biomarkers (genomic/non-genomic), but on multiple biomarker panels, integrated through the application of different omics technologies, which will provide information on predisposition, early diagnosis, prognosis, and mechanisms. Impact statement • Genetic and circulating biomarkers present significant opportunities to personalize patient therapy to minimize the risk of adverse drug reactions. ADRs are a significant heath issue

  2. Spallation reactions - physics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelic, A.; Ricciardi, M.; Schmidt, K-H.

    2009-01-01

    Spallation reactions have become an ideal tool for studying the equation of state and thermal instabilities of nuclear matter. In astrophysics, the interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium have to be understood in detail for deducing their original composition and their production mechanisms. Renewed interest in spallation reactions with protons around 1 GeV came up recently with the developments of spallation neutron sources. The project of an accelerator-driven system (ADS) as a technological solution for incinerating the radioactive waste even intensified the efforts for better understanding the physics involved in the spallation process. Experiments on spallation reactions were performed for determining the production cross sections and properties of particles, fragments and heavy residues. Traditional experiments on heavy residues, performed in direct kinematics, were limited to the direct observation of long-lived radioactive nuclides and did not provide detailed information on the kinematics of the reaction. Therefore, an innovative experimental method has been developed, based on inverse kinematics, which allowed to identify all reaction residues in-flight, using the high resolution magnetic spectrometer FRS of GSL Darmstadt. It also gives direct access to the reaction kinematics. An experimental campaign has been carried out in a Europe-wide collaboration, investigating the spallation of several nuclei ranging from 56 Fe to 238 U Complementary experiments were performed with a full-acceptance detection system, yielding total fission cross sections. Recently, another detection system using the large acceptance ALADIN dipole and the LAND neutron detector was introduced to measure light particles in coincidence with the heavy residues. Another intense activity was dedicated to developing codes, which cover nuclear reactions occurring in an ADS. The first phase of the reaction is successfully described by a sequence of quasi-free nucleon

  3. Modeling of fluctuating reaction networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipshtat, A.; Biham, O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text:Various dynamical systems are organized as reaction networks, where the population size of one component affects the populations of all its neighbors. Such networks can be found in interstellar surface chemistry, cell biology, thin film growth and other systems. I cases where the populations of reactive species are large, the network can be modeled by rate equations which provide all reaction rates within mean field approximation. However, in small systems that are partitioned into sub-micron size, these populations strongly fluctuate. Under these conditions rate equations fail and the master equation is needed for modeling these reactions. However, the number of equations in the master equation grows exponentially with the number of reactive species, severely limiting its feasibility for complex networks. Here we present a method which dramatically reduces the number of equations, thus enabling the incorporation of the master equation in complex reaction networks. The method is examplified in the context of reaction network on dust grains. Its applicability for genetic networks will be discussed. 1. Efficient simulations of gas-grain chemistry in interstellar clouds. Azi Lipshtat and Ofer Biham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004), 170601. 2. Modeling of negative autoregulated genetic networks in single cells. Azi Lipshtat, Hagai B. Perets, Nathalie Q. Balaban and Ofer Biham, Gene: evolutionary genomics (2004), In press

  4. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  5. Dynamic effects in fragmentation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G. F.; Esbensen, H.

    2002-01-01

    Fragmentation reactions offer a useful tool to study the spectroscopy of halo nuclei, but the large extent of the halo wave function makes the reaction theory more difficult. The simple reaction models based on the eikonal approximation for the nuclear interaction or first-order perturbation theory for the Coulomb interaction have systematic errors that they investigate here, comparing to the predictions of complete dynamical calculations. They find that stripping probabilities are underpredicted by the eikonal model, leading to extracted spectroscopy strengths that are two large. In contrast, the Coulomb excitation is overpredicted by the simple theory. They attribute this to a screening effect, as is well known in the Barkas effect on stopping powers. The errors decrease with beam energy as E(sub beam)(sup -1), and are not significant at beam energies above 50 MeV/u. At lower beam energies, the effects should be taken into account when extracting quantitative spectroscopic strengths

  6. Fragmentation processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrain, R.

    1984-08-01

    Projectile and nuclear fragmentation are defined and processes referred to are recalled. The two different aspects of fragmentation are considered but the emphasis is also put on heavy ion induced reactions. The preliminary results of an experiment performed at GANIL to study peripheral heavy ions induced reactions at intermediate energy are presented. The results of this experiment will illustrate the characteristics of projectile fragmentation and this will also give the opportunity to study projectile fragmentation in the transition region. Then nuclear fragmentation is considered which is associated with more central collisions in the case of heavy ion induced reactions. This aspect of fragmentation is also ilustrated with two heavy ion experiments in which fragments emitted at large angle have been observed

  7. Effects of reaction channels in subbarrier fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasso, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    In this lecture we consider some aspects of fusion reactions between heavy ions at bombarding energies which are below or close to that of the Coulomb barrier. This problem has been traditionally confronted with simple barrier penetration calculations. So we start with a very brief review of what we can call the ''conventional'' procedure. (orig.)

  8. Effective dynamics along given reaction coordinates, and reaction rate theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Hartmann, Carsten; Schütte, Christof

    2016-12-22

    In molecular dynamics and related fields one considers dynamical descriptions of complex systems in full (atomic) detail. In order to reduce the overwhelming complexity of realistic systems (high dimension, large timescale spread, limited computational resources) the projection of the full dynamics onto some reaction coordinates is examined in order to extract statistical information like free energies or reaction rates. In this context, the effective dynamics that is induced by the full dynamics on the reaction coordinate space has attracted considerable attention in the literature. In this article, we contribute to this discussion: we first show that if we start with an ergodic diffusion process whose invariant measure is unique then these properties are inherited by the effective dynamics. Then, we give equations for the effective dynamics, discuss whether the dominant timescales and reaction rates inferred from the effective dynamics are accurate approximations of such quantities for the full dynamics, and compare our findings to results from approaches like Mori-Zwanzig, averaging, or homogenization. Finally, by discussing the algorithmic realization of the effective dynamics, we demonstrate that recent algorithmic techniques like the "equation-free" approach and the "heterogeneous multiscale method" can be seen as special cases of our approach.

  9. Estimation of the reaction efficiency in polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalam, N.

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is largely used in molecular biology for increasing the copy number of a specific DNA fragment. The succession of 20 replication cycles makes it possible to multiply the quantity of the fragment of interest by a factor of 1 million. The PCR technique has

  10. Reaction rate of propene pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peipei; Su, Kehe; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Xin; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2011-10-01

    The reaction rate of propene pyrolysis was investigated based on the elementary reactions proposed in Qu et al., J Comput Chem 2009, 31, 1421. The overall reaction rate was developed with the steady-state approximation and the rate constants of the elementary reactions were determined with the variational transition state theory. For the elementary reaction having transition state, the vibrational frequencies of the selected points along the minimum energy path were calculated with density functional theory at B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level and the energies were improved with the accurate model chemistry method G3(MP2). For the elementary reaction without transition state, the frequencies were calculated with CASSCF/6-311G(d,p) and the energies were refined with the multireference configuration interaction method MRCISD/6-311G(d,p). The rate constants were evaluated within 200-2000 K and the fitted three-parameter expressions were obtained. The results are consistent with those in the literatures in most cases. For the overall rate, it was found that the logarithm of the rate and the reciprocal temperature have excellent linear relationship above 400 K, predicting that the rate follows a typical first-order law at high temperatures of 800-2000 K, which is also consistent with the experiments. The apparent activation energy in 800-2000 K is 317.3 kJ/mol from the potential energy surface of zero Kelvin. This value is comparable with the energy barriers, 365.4 and 403.7 kJ/mol, of the rate control steps. However, the apparent activation energy, 215.7 kJ/mol, developed with the Gibbs free energy surface at 1200 K is consistent with the most recent experimental result 201.9 ± 0.6 kJ/mol. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Clozapine-associated extrapyramidal reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, E S; Marken, P A; Ruehter, V L

    2000-05-01

    To report a case of extrapyramidal reaction associated with a dosage increase of clozapine. A 44-year-old white man with a 20-year history of chronic paranoid schizophrenia was admitted to an inpatient psychiatric facility. His prior medications restarted on admission were clozapine 650 mg at bedtime, haloperidol 10 mg at bedtime, clonazepam 2 mg/d, and aspirin 325 mg/d. Two days after admission (hospital day 3), clozapine and clonazepam were discontinued, and he was prescribed haloperidol 5 mg every morning and 10 mg every evening. Stabilization occurred over the following 24 days, with progressively lower dosages of haloperidol and increasing dosages of clozapine. Haloperidol was discontinued on day 24. On day 47, the patient was agitated and making bizarre statements; thus, the morning dose of clozapine was increased by 50 mg (total 450 mg/d). On day 48 at 2200, a dystonic reaction was diagnosed; he received intramuscular diphenhydramine 50 mg, which caused the reaction to subside. At the time of the adverse reaction, he was prescribed clozapine 450 mg/d, vitamin E 400 IU three times daily, aspirin 325 mg/d, and acetaminophen, milk of magnesia, and Maalox as needed. Although the risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) is significantly lower with clozapine than with conventional agents, elevated clozapine blood concentrations have been reported to cause EPS; other reports have cited severe dystonias and dyskinesias on abrupt clozapine withdrawal. Considering the medications prescribed at the time and the discontinuation of haloperidol 24 days before the event, clozapine was the most likely cause of the extrapyramidal reaction. Regardless of anticipated safety associated with novel antipsychotics such as clozapine, reports of dystonic reactions must be taken into account and patients monitored appropriately.

  12. Redox reactions in food fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Egon Bech

    2018-01-01

    involves oxidative steps in the early part of the pathways whereas a multitude of different reactions are used as compensating reductions. Much of the diversity seen between food fermentations arise from the different routes and the different electron acceptors used by microorganisms to counterbalance...... and this contributes to the diversity in flavor, color, texture, and shelf life. The review concludes that these reactions are still only incompletely understood and that they represent an interesting area for fundamental research and also represent a fertile field for product development through a more conscious use...... of the redox properties of strains used to compose food cultures....

  13. Learning to Predict Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayala, Matthew A.; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles respectively are not high-throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, or lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry dataset consisting of 1630 full multi-step reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval, problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of non-productive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  14. Vision 2020. Reaction Engineering Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klipstein, David H. [Reaction Design, San Diego, CA (United States); Robinson, Sharon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Reaction Engineering Roadmap is a part of an industry- wide effort to create a blueprint of the research and technology milestones that are necessary to achieve longterm industry goals. This report documents the results of a workshop focused on the research needs, technology barriers, and priorities of the chemical industry as they relate to reaction engineering viewed first by industrial use (basic chemicals; specialty chemicals; pharmaceuticals; and polymers) and then by technology segment (reactor system selection, design, and scale-up; chemical mechanism development and property estimation; dealing with catalysis; and new, nonstandard reactor types).

  15. Learning to predict chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayala, Matthew A; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-09-26

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles, respectively, are not high throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, and lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry data set consisting of 1630 full multistep reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top-ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of nonproductive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  16. Dynamics of traveling reaction pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovzhenko, A. Yu.; Rumanov, E. N.

    2007-01-01

    The growth of activator losses is accompanied by the decay of a traveling reaction pulse. In a ring reactor, this propagation threshold is present simultaneously with a threshold related to the ring diameter. The results of numerical experiments with pulses of an exothermal reaction reveal the transition from pulse propagation to a homogeneous hot regime, established regimes with periodic variations of the pulse velocity, and oscillatory decay of the pulse. When the medium becomes 'bistable' as a result of the variation in parameters, this factor does not prevent the propagation of pulses, but leads to changes in the pulse structure

  17. Theory of inclusive pionic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Salcedo, L.L.; Strottman, D.

    1985-01-01

    A theory is developed for all the inclusive pion nuclear reactions, quasielastic, single charge exchange, double charge exchange and absorption, around the resonance region. The theory is based on the isobar hole model and makes an expansion in the number of particle-hole excitations. Up to 3p3h for pion absorption and 2p2h for quasielastic or charge exchange, where good convergence is found, are considered. The results obtained with this theory agree remarkably well with experiment for the different reactions and different nuclei in a wide region of energies around resonance

  18. Adverse reactions associated with acetylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandilands, E A; Bateman, D N

    2009-02-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is one of the most common agents deliberately ingested in self-poisoning episodes and a leading cause of acute liver failure in the western world. Acetylcysteine is widely acknowledged as the antidote of choice for paracetamol poisoning, but its use is not without risk. Adverse reactions, often leading to treatment delay, are frequently associated with both intravenous and oral acetylcysteine and are a common source of concern among treating physicians. A systematic literature review investigating the incidence, clinical features, and mechanisms of adverse effects associated with acetylcysteine. A variety of adverse reactions to acetylcysteine have been described ranging from nausea to death, most of the latter due to incorrect dosing. The pattern of reactions differs with oral and intravenous dosing, but reported frequency is at least as high with oral as intravenous. The reactions to the intravenous preparation result in similar clinical features to true anaphylaxis, including rash, pruritus, angioedema, bronchospasm, and rarely hypotension, but are caused by nonimmunological mechanisms. The precise nature of this reaction remains unclear. Histamine now seems to be an important mediator of the response, and there is evidence of variability in patient susceptibility, with females, and those with a history of asthma or atopy are particularly susceptible. Quantity of paracetamol ingestion, measured through serum paracetamol concentration, is also important as higher paracetamol concentrations protect patients against anaphylactoid effects. Most anaphylactoid reactions occur at the start of acetylcysteine treatment when concentrations are highest. Acetylcysteine also affects clotting factor activity, and this affects the interpretation of minor disturbances in the International Normalized Ratio in the context of paracetamol overdose. This review discusses the incidence, clinical features, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, and

  19. Photonuclear reactions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The dominant feature of photonuclear reactions at intermediate energies is the excitation of the δ resonance and one can therefore use such reactions to study the dynamics of δ propagation in a nucleus. Following an introductory section the author comments on photoabsorption on a single nucleon in Section II. A review of the δ-n Greens function and of the photonuclear amplitude is given in Section III. Results for photoabsorption on 4 He are shown in Section IV and compared with the data. Coherent π 0 photoproduction is discussed in Section V and calculations for 12 C are compared to recent measurements. (Auth.)

  20. Hot wire radicals and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wengang; Gallagher, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Threshold ionization mass spectroscopy is used to measure radical (and stable gas) densities at the substrate of a tungsten hot wire (HW) reactor. We report measurements of the silane reaction probability on the HW and the probability of Si and H release from the HW. We describe a model for the atomic H release, based on the H 2 dissociation model. We note major variations in silicon-release, with dependence on prior silane exposure. Measured radical densities versus silane pressure yield silicon-silane and H-silane reaction rate coefficients, and the dominant radical fluxes to the substrate