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Sample records for dyskinesia drug-induced

  1. Alterations in primary motor cortex neurotransmission and gene expression in hemi-parkinsonian rats with drug-induced dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbach, D; Conti, M M; Ostock, C Y; Dupre, K B; Bishop, C

    2015-12-03

    Treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) with dopamine replacement relieves symptoms of poverty of movement, but often causes drug-induced dyskinesias. Accumulating clinical and pre-clinical evidence suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is involved in the pathophysiology of PD and that modulating cortical activity may be a therapeutic target in PD and dyskinesia. However, surprisingly little is known about how M1 neurotransmitter tone or gene expression is altered in PD, dyskinesia or associated animal models. The present study utilized the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD/dyskinesia to characterize structural and functional changes taking place in M1 monoamine innervation and gene expression. 6-OHDA caused dopamine pathology in M1, although the lesion was less severe than in the striatum. Rats with 6-OHDA lesions showed a PD motor impairment and developed dyskinesia when given L-DOPA or the D1 receptor agonist, SKF81297. M1 expression of two immediate-early genes (c-Fos and ARC) was strongly enhanced by either L-DOPA or SKF81297. At the same time, expression of genes specifically involved in glutamate and GABA signaling were either modestly affected or unchanged by lesion and/or treatment. We conclude that M1 neurotransmission and signal transduction in the rat 6-OHDA model of PD/dyskinesia mirror features of human PD, supporting the utility of the model to study M1 dysfunction in PD and the elucidation of novel pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tardive Dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Tardive dyskinesia is a neurological syndrome caused by the long-term use of neuroleptic drugs. Neuroleptic drugs are generally prescribed for psychiatric disorders, ...

  3. Drug-induced thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Andersen, M; Hansen, P B

    1997-01-01

    induced by non-cytotoxic drugs is characterised by heterogeneous clinical picture and recovery is generally rapid. Although corticosteroids seem inefficient, we still recommend that severe symptomatic cases of drug-induced thrombocytopenia are treated as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura due...

  4. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat and depigmented, but maintains the ...

  5. [Drug induced diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Isabelle; Hadengue, Antoine

    2008-09-03

    Diarrhea is a frequent adverse event involving the most frequently antibiotics, laxatives and NSAI. Drug induced diarrhea may be acute or chronic. It may be due to expected, dose dependant properties of the drug, to immuno-allergic or bio-genomic mechanisms. Several pathophysiological mechanisms have been described resulting in osmotic, secretory or inflammatory diarrhea, shortened transit time, or malabsorption. Histopathological lesions sometimes associated with drug induced diarrhea are usually non specific and include ulcerations, inflammatory or ischemic lesions, fibrous diaphragms, microscopic colitis and apoptosis. The diagnosis of drug induced diarrhea, sometimes difficult to assess, relies on the absence of other obvious causes and on the rapid disappearance of the symptoms after withdrawal of the suspected drug.

  6. Drug induced aseptic meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-09-29

    Sep 29, 2013 ... Abstract. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is a rare but important and often challenging diagnosis for the physician. Intake of antimicrobials, steroids, anal- gesics amongst others has been implicated. Signs and symptoms generally develop within 24-48 hours of drug ingestion. The pa- tient often ...

  7. Tardive Dyskinesia, Oral Parafunction, and Implant-Supported Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumetti, S; Ghiacci, G; Macaluso, G M; Amore, M; Galli, C; Calciolari, E; Manfredi, E

    2016-01-01

    Oral movement disorders may lead to prosthesis and implant failure due to excessive loading. We report on an edentulous patient suffering from drug-induced tardive dyskinesia (TD) and oral parafunction (OP) rehabilitated with implant-supported screw-retained prostheses. The frequency and intensity of the movements were high, and no pharmacological intervention was possible. Moreover, the patient refused night-time splint therapy. A series of implant and prosthetic failures were experienced. Implant failures were all in the maxilla and stopped when a rigid titanium structure was placed to connect implants. Ad hoc designed studies are desirable to elucidate the mutual influence between oral movement disorders and implant-supported rehabilitation.

  8. Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Ritwika; Nandi, Sitansu Sekhar

    2016-04-01

    We present a case of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) in a 21 year old girl, with no family history of similar episodes. The episodes were short (lasting less than a minute), frequent, occurring 5 to 10 times a day, self-limiting dystonia of her right upper limb precipitated by sudden movement. She also had a past history of partial seizures with secondary generalization in her childhood. She responded to phenytoin, with cessation of events after 1 month of treatment. This case impresses upon the hypothesis stating the association between seizure activity and PKD probably due to a common foci of origin. Awareness of this condition is required as it is easily treatable but frequently misdiagnosed. © Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 2011.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... primary ciliary dyskinesia also have year-round nasal congestion and a chronic cough. Chronic respiratory tract infections ... likely due to abnormal cilia in the fallopian tubes. Another feature of primary ciliary dyskinesia is recurrent ...

  10. Drug-induced liver injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mille Bækdal; Ytting, Henriette; Skalshøi Kjær, Mette

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The idiosyncratic subtype of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a rare reaction to medical treatment that in severe cases can lead to acute liver failure and death. The aim of this study was to describe the presentation and outcome of DILI and to identify potential predictive factors...... that DILI may be severe and run a fatal course, and that bilirubin and INR levels may predict poor outcome....

  11. Tardive Dyskinesia, Oral Parafunction, and Implant-Supported Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lumetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral movement disorders may lead to prosthesis and implant failure due to excessive loading. We report on an edentulous patient suffering from drug-induced tardive dyskinesia (TD and oral parafunction (OP rehabilitated with implant-supported screw-retained prostheses. The frequency and intensity of the movements were high, and no pharmacological intervention was possible. Moreover, the patient refused night-time splint therapy. A series of implant and prosthetic failures were experienced. Implant failures were all in the maxilla and stopped when a rigid titanium structure was placed to connect implants. Ad hoc designed studies are desirable to elucidate the mutual influence between oral movement disorders and implant-supported rehabilitation.

  12. Drug-induced hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Hair loss can have major psychological consequences. It can be due to a wide variety of causes, including hormonal disorders, dietary factors, infections, inflammation, trauma, emotional factors, and cancer. Drugs can also induce hair loss, by interacting with the hair growth cycle. Drug-induced hair loss may be immediate or delayed, sudden or gradual, and diffuse or localised. It is usually reversible after drug discontinuation. The drugs most often implicated in hair loss are anticancer agents, interferon, azole antifungals, lithium, immunosuppressants, and many other drugs belonging to a variety of pharmacological classes.

  13. Drug-induced peripheral neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilholm, Ole Jakob; Christensen, Alex Alban; Zedan, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can be caused by medication, and various descriptions have been applied for this condition. In this MiniReview, the term 'drug-induced peripheral neuropathy' (DIPN) is used with the suggested definition: Damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system caused by a chemical...... substance used in the treatment, cure, prevention or diagnosis of a disease. Optic neuropathy is included in this definition. A distinction between DIPN and other aetiologies of peripheral neuropathy is often quite difficult and thus, the aim of this MiniReview is to discuss the major agents associated...

  14. [Tardive dyskinesia--diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazamatsuri, H

    1993-11-01

    Tardive dyskinesia is defined as a syndrome consisting of abnormal, stereotypical involuntary movements usually of choreoathetoid type, principally affected the mouth, face, limbs and trunk, which occurs relatively late in the course of neuroleptic drug treatment and in the etiology of which the drug treatment is a necessary factor. Presently, the prevalence of tardive dyskinesia in the hospitalized patients in psychiatric hospitals in Japan is estimated to be 20-30%. Epidemiology, possible pathophysiology and symptomatology of tardive dyskinesia are briefly described. Differential diagnosis between this syndrome and other involuntary movements such as psychotic mannerism, senile orofacial dyskinesia, rabbit's syndrome, Pisa syndrome or Meige's syndrome is discussed. Several drugs to suppress involuntary movements of tardive dyskinesia are described. However, there appears to be no consistently reliable therapies for patients who develop the tardive dyskinesia. Treatment for this syndrome, other than neuroleptic withdrawal, are still uncertain.

  15. Drug-induced status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cock, Hannah R

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced status epilepticus (SE) is a relatively uncommon phenomenon, probably accounting for less than 5% of all SE cases, although limitations in case ascertainment and establishing causation substantially weaken epidemiological estimates. Some antiepileptic drugs, particularly those with sodium channel or GABA(γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic properties, frequently exacerbate seizures and may lead to SE if used inadvertently in generalized epilepsies or less frequently in other epilepsies. Tiagabine seems to have a particular propensity for triggering nonconvulsive SE sometimes in patients with no prior history of seizures. In therapeutic practice, SE is most commonly seen in association with antibiotics (cephalosporins, quinolones, and some others) and immunotherapies/chemotherapies, the latter often in the context of a reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Status epilepticus following accidental or intentional overdoses, particularly of antidepressants or other psychotropic medications, has also featured prominently in the literature: whilst there are sometimes fatal consequences, this is more commonly because of cardiorespiratory or metabolic complications than as a result of seizure activity. A high index of suspicion is required in identifying those at risk and in recognizing potential clues from the presentation, but even with a careful analysis of patient and drug factors, establishing causation can be difficult. In addition to eliminating the potential trigger, management should be as for SE in any other circumstances, with the exception that phenobarbitone is recommended as a second-line treatment for suspected toxicity-related SE where the risk of cardiovascular complications is higher anyways and may be exacerbated by phenytoin. There are also specific recommendations/antidotes in some situations. The outcome of drug-induced status epilepticus is mostly good when promptly identified and treated, though less so in the context of overdoses. This article is

  16. Antithyroid Drug-induced Agranulocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tsung Sun

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Antithyroid drugs are widely used to treat hyperthyroidism, especially Graves' disease, but they tend to cause agranulocytosis, which increases the mortality rate. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor decreases the duration of recovery from agranulocytosis. We retrospectively studied cases of antithyroid drug-induced agranulocytosis over the past 10 years in a northern Taiwan medical center. A clinical evaluation was conducted, including a review of complete blood cell counts and differential counts. Four cases were included in this analysis. Agranulocytosis persisted in 2 cases despite a change in therapy from propylthiouracil to methimazole. Fever, sore throat, and diarrhea were common symptoms of agranulocytosis. Initial white blood cell counts ranged from 450 to 1,710/μL. Only 1 case had a positive result from a throat swab culture (Staphylococcus aureus. Three of 4 cases received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy, and the recovery time ranged from 3 to 13 days. All of the patients recovered from agranulocytosis. We concluded that: (1 conducting a routine complete blood cell count is beneficial in alerting caregivers to the possibility of agranulocytosis; (2 educating patients about the common symptoms of agranulocytosis may contribute to an early diagnosis; (3 providing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy to patients results in good prognosis; and (4 monitoring for cross-reactions between drugs should be performed to prevent further episodes of agranulocytosis.

  17. Drug-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daba, Mohammad H.; Al-Arifi, Mohammad N; Gubar, Othman A.; El-Tahir, Kamal E.

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the accumulation of excessive connective tissue in the lungs. Its causes include chronic administration of some drugs for example bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, amiodarone, procainamide, penicillamine, gold and nitrofurantoin; exposure to certain environmental factors such as gases, asbestos and silica and bacterial or fungal infections. Some systemic diseases also predispose to the disease for example rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. The disease is associated with release of oxygen radicals and some mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha TNF-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta Tbgf-beta, PDGF, If-I, Et-I and interleukins 1, 4, 8 and 13. The symptoms of the disease include dyspne a, non-productive cough, fever and damage to the lung cells. It is diagnosed with the aid of chest radiography, high resolution computed tomographic scanning and the result of pulmonary function tests. Drug-induced pulmonary fibrosis may involve release of free oxygen radicals and various cytokines for example Il-I beta and TNF-alpha via activation of nuclear transcription factor Nf-beta as in the case of bleomycin and mitomycin or via release of TGF-beta as in case of tamoxifen or via inhibition of macrophages and lymphocytes phospholipases as in the case of amiodarone with the resultant accumulation of phospholipids and reduction of the immune system. (author)

  18. Drug-induced hepatic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Andreasen, P B

    1992-01-01

    The Danish Committee on Adverse Drug Reactions received 1100 reports of suspected drug-induced hepatic injury during the decade 1978-1987. The causal relationship between drug and hepatic injury was classified as definite in 57 (5.2%) reports, probable in 989 (89.9%) reports, possible in 50 (4.......5%) reports and unclassifiable in four (0.4%) reports. Hepatic injuries accounted for 5.9% of all adverse drug reactions reported, and 14.7% of the lethal adverse drug reactions. A total of 47.2% were classified as acute cytotoxic, 16.2% as acute cholestatic and 26.9% as abnormal hepatic function. In 52 (4.......7%) cases the hepatic injury was lethal; only 14 (1.3%) cases were chronic. Halothane accounted for 25% of the cases. The incidence of halothane-induced hepatic injury is decreasing, and only one lethal case has been reported since 1981. Next to halothane, sulfasalazine was the drug most often suspected...

  19. [Drug-induced oral ulcerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madinier, I; Berry, N; Chichmanian, R M

    2000-06-01

    Different side effects of drugs have been described in the oral cavity, including oral ulcerations. Direct contact between drugs and oral mucosa may induce chemical burn or local hypersensitivity. Less frequently, these drug-induced oral ulcerations are part of a complex reaction with cutaneous or systemic manifestations. Sometimes, one or more oral ulcerations appear as the main side-effect of a drug, or exceptionally as solitary lesions. Solitary oral ulcerations usually appear after few weeks of treatment. In most of cases, these lesions resist to conventional treatments, with a rapid healing following the suppression of the responsible drug. This diagnosis is usually difficult, particularly with patients receiving multiple drug therapy. Besides, special attention must be paid to new drugs. Oral ulcerations following symptoms of burning mouth, metallic taste, dysgueusia or agueusia are strongly suggestive of a pharmacological origin. Most of the molecules able to induce solitary oral ulcerations are commonly prescribed in a) rheumatology: NSAI (diclofenac, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, naproxen), long-term rheumatoid arthritis therapy (azathioprine, methotrexate, penicillamine, gold compounds, tiopronin); b) cardiology: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril), angiotensin 2-receptor antagonist (losartan), anti-angorous (nicorandil), c) psychiatry: antidepressants (fluoxetine, lithium), d) AIDS therapy (foscarnet, zalcitabine).

  20. Dysphagia due to tardive dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pookala S Bhat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dyskinesia (TD, neuroleptic-induced delayed onset movement disorder, remains an enigmatic phenomenon and a therapeutic challenge. Only a few cases of dysphagia also have been reported in world literature and to the best knowledge of the authors no case of TD manifesting as isolated dysphagia has been reported so far from India. We report a case of TD consequent to prolonged exposure to typical neuroleptics, manifesting as isolated dysphagia who responded well to a combination of Quetiapine, Donepezil and Vit E.

  1. Drug-induced low blood sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug-induced low blood sugar is low blood glucose that results from taking medicine. ... Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or other medicines to control their diabetes. ...

  2. Parkinson's disease: carbidopa, nausea, and dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted

    2014-01-01

    When l-dopa use began in the early 1960s for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, nausea and reversible dyskinesias were experienced as continuing side effects. Carbidopa or benserazide was added to l-dopa in 1975 solely to control nausea. Subsequent to the increasing use of carbidopa has been the recognition of irreversible dyskinesias, which have automatically been attributed to l-dopa. The research into the etiology of these phenomena has identified the causative agent of the irreversible dyskinesias as carbidopa, not l-dopa. The mechanism of action of the carbidopa and benserazide causes irreversible binding and inactivation of vitamin B6 throughout the body. The consequences of this action are enormous, interfering with over 300 enzyme and protein functions. This has the ability to induce previously undocumented profound antihistamine dyskinesias, which have been wrongly attributed to l-dopa and may be perceived as irreversible if proper corrective action is not taken.

  3. Preliminary Investigation of Risk Factors Causing Dyskinesias in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients on long- term treatment with levodopa experience motor fluctuations and dyskinesias (impaired voluntary movements which result in fragmented movement which only cease during sleep) [5]. Dyskinesias, also termed levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs), are a major limitation in the therapy of Parkinson's disease ...

  4. Mechanistic review of drug-induced steatohepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, Justin D.; Guo, Grace L.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced steatohepatitis is a rare form of liver injury known to be caused by only a handful of compounds. These compounds stimulate the development of steatohepatitis through their toxicity to hepatocyte mitochondria; inhibition of beta-oxidation, mitochondrial respiration, and/or oxidative phosphorylation. Other mechanisms discussed include the disruption of phospholipid metabolism in lysosomes, prevention of lipid egress from hepatocytes, targeting mitochondrial DNA and topoisomerase, decreasing intestinal barrier function, activation of the adenosine pathway, increasing fatty acid synthesis, and sequestration of coenzyme A. It has been found that the majority of compounds that induce steatohepatitis have cationic amphiphilic structures; a lipophilic ring structure with a side chain containing a cationic secondary or tertiary amine. Within the last decade, the ability of many chemotherapeutics to cause steatohepatitis has become more evident coining the term chemotherapy-associated steatohepatitis (CASH). The mechanisms behind drug-induced steatohepatitis are discussed with a focus on cationic amphiphilic drugs and chemotherapeutic agents. - Highlights: • Reviewed the mechanisms underlying drug-induced steatohepatitis for many compounds • Mitochondrial dysfunction is critical in the development of drug-induced steatohepatitis. • Majority of drugs that induce steatohepatitis are cationic amphiphilic drugs. • Chemotherapeutics that induce CASH are cationic amphiphilic drugs. • Majority of drugs that induce steatohepatitis are carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I inhibitors.

  5. Antimalarial drug induced decrease in creatinine clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landewé, R. B.; Vergouwen, M. S.; Goeei The, S. G.; van Rijthoven, A. W.; Breedveld, F. C.; Dijkmans, B. A.

    1995-01-01

    To confirm the antimalarial drug induced increase of creatinine to determine the factors contributing to this effect. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 118) who have used or still use antimalarials (chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine). Serum creatinines prior to antimalarials and serum

  6. Mechanistic review of drug-induced steatohepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Justin D., E-mail: Justin.d.schumacher@rutgers.edu; Guo, Grace L.

    2015-11-15

    Drug-induced steatohepatitis is a rare form of liver injury known to be caused by only a handful of compounds. These compounds stimulate the development of steatohepatitis through their toxicity to hepatocyte mitochondria; inhibition of beta-oxidation, mitochondrial respiration, and/or oxidative phosphorylation. Other mechanisms discussed include the disruption of phospholipid metabolism in lysosomes, prevention of lipid egress from hepatocytes, targeting mitochondrial DNA and topoisomerase, decreasing intestinal barrier function, activation of the adenosine pathway, increasing fatty acid synthesis, and sequestration of coenzyme A. It has been found that the majority of compounds that induce steatohepatitis have cationic amphiphilic structures; a lipophilic ring structure with a side chain containing a cationic secondary or tertiary amine. Within the last decade, the ability of many chemotherapeutics to cause steatohepatitis has become more evident coining the term chemotherapy-associated steatohepatitis (CASH). The mechanisms behind drug-induced steatohepatitis are discussed with a focus on cationic amphiphilic drugs and chemotherapeutic agents. - Highlights: • Reviewed the mechanisms underlying drug-induced steatohepatitis for many compounds • Mitochondrial dysfunction is critical in the development of drug-induced steatohepatitis. • Majority of drugs that induce steatohepatitis are cationic amphiphilic drugs. • Chemotherapeutics that induce CASH are cationic amphiphilic drugs. • Majority of drugs that induce steatohepatitis are carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I inhibitors.

  7. Parkinson's disease: carbidopa, nausea, and dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz,1 Alvin Stein,2 Ted Cole3 1Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics, Cape Coral, FL, 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL, 3Cole Center for Healing, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: When ʟ-dopa use began in the early 1960s for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, nausea and reversible dyskinesias were experienced as continuing side effects. Carbidopa or benserazide was added to ʟ-dopa in 1975 solely to control nausea. Subsequent to the increasing use of carbidopa has been the recognition of irreversible dyskinesias, which have automatically been attributed to ʟ-dopa. The research into the etiology of these phenomena has identified the causative agent of the irreversible dyskinesias as carbidopa, not ʟ-dopa. The mechanism of action of the carbidopa and benserazide causes irreversible binding and inactivation of vitamin B6 throughout the body. The consequences of this action are enormous, interfering with over 300 enzyme and protein functions. This has the ability to induce previously undocumented profound antihistamine dyskinesias, which have been wrongly attributed to ʟ-dopa and may be perceived as irreversible if proper corrective action is not taken. Keywords: vitamin B6, PLP, irreversible, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate

  8. Pharmacogenetics of drug-induced arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, Marie L; van Puijenbroek, Eugene P; Bracke, Madelon

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The bottleneck in pharmacogenetic research on rare adverse drug reactions (ADR) is retrieval of patients. Spontaneous reports of ADRs may form a useful source of patients. We investigated the feasibility of a pharmacogenetic study, in which cases were selected from the database...... of a spontaneous reporting system for ADRs, using drug-induced arrhythmias as an example. METHODS: Reports of drug-induced arrhythmias to proarrhythmic drugs were selected from the database of the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre (1996-2003). Information on the patient's general practitioner (GP) was obtained...... be included in the study, giving an overall participation rate of 9% (4/45). The main reason for GPs not being willing to participate was lack of time. Variants were identified in KCNH2, SCN5A and KCNE1. CONCLUSIONS: Spontaneous reporting systems for ADRs may be used for pharmacogenetic research. The methods...

  9. Thymus function in drug-induced lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, R L; Salomon, D R; Guerrero, R S

    2001-01-01

    Autoimmunity develops when a lupus-inducing drug is introduced into the thymus of normal mice, but the relevance of this model to the human disorder is unclear in part because it is widely assumed that the thymus is non-functional in the adult. We compared thymus function in 10 patients with symptomatic procainamide-induced lupus to that in 13 asymptomatic patients who only developed drug-induced autoantibodies. T cell output from the thymus was quantified using a competitive polymerase chain reaction that detects T cell receptor DNA excision circles in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Despite the advanced age of the patient population under study, newly generated T cells were detected in all subjects. Although there was no overall quantitative difference between the symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, we found a positive correlation between the level of T cell receptor excision circles in peripheral lymphocytes and serum IgG anti-chromatin antibody activity in patients with drug-induced lupus. The association between autoantibodies and nascent peripheral T cells supports the requirement for T cells in autoantibody production. Our observations are consistent with findings in mice in which autoreactive T cells derived from drug-induced abnormalities in T cell development in the thymus.

  10. Recent Advances in Drug-Induced Angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Inomata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioedema is the end result of deep dermal, subcutaneous and/or mucosal swelling, and is potentially a life- threatening condition in cases where the pharynx or larynx is involved. Drug-induced angioedema has been reported to occur in response to a wide range of drugs and vaccines. Drug-induced angioedema, like other cutaneous drug reactions, has been reported to be most frequently elicited by beta-lactam antibiotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, although reliable data from epidemiologic studies are scarce. Recent reports suggested an increasing role of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs in the causation of life- threatening angioedema. ACEI-related angioedema is never accompanied by urticaria and occurs via a kinin- dependent mechanism. ACEI-related angioedema not only can start years after beginning the treatment, but it can then recur irregularly while under that treatment. Furthermore, allergy tests are unreliable for the diagnosis of ACEI-related angioedema, and so the relationship between angioedema and ACEIs is often missed and consequently quite underestimated. Accordingly, better understanding of the kinin-dependent mechanism, which is particular to angioedema, is necessary for the appropriate management of drug-induced angioedema.

  11. A case of paliperidone-palmitate-induced tardive dyskinesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lally, John

    2012-06-13

    OBJECTIVES: This is one of the first cases reported in the literature of paliperidone-palmitate-induced prolonged dyskinesia. METHOD: Case report. RESULTS: We report the case of a 49-year-old woman with paranoid schizophrenia who developed orofacial dyskinesia some 4 months after the commencement of paliperidone long-acting injection. CONCLUSION: This case serves as a clinical reminder that dyskinesia can occur with all antipsychotic medications.

  12. Dyskinesias differentiate autistic disorder from catatonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasic, J R; Barnett, J Y; Will, M V; Nadrich, R H; Sheitman, B B; Ahmad, R; Mendonca, M de F; Kaplan, D; Brathwaite, C

    2000-12-01

    Autistic disorder and catatonia are neuropsychiatric syndromes defined by impairments in social interaction, communication, and restricted, stereotypical motor routines. Assessments of children with these disorders are typically restricted in scope by the patients' limited ability to comprehend directions. The authors performed systematic assessments of dyskinesias on six prepubertal boys with autistic disorder and mental retardation and on one adolescent male with catatonia to determine if this type of information could be routinely obtained. The boys with autistic disorder had more stereotypies and tics, a greater degree of akathisia and hyperactivity, and more compulsions than the adolescent with catatonia. Catatonia was associated with catalepsy and dystonic postures. The authors conclude that the diagnostic accuracy and specificity of neuropsychiatric syndromes may be enhanced by the systematic assessment of the dyskinesias associated with each condition.

  13. Biomarkers of drug-induced vascular injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brott, D.; Gould, S.; Jones, H.; Schofield, J.; Prior, H.; Valentin, J.P; Bjurstrom, S.; Kenne, K.; Schuppe-Koistinen, I.; Katein, A.; Foster-Brown, L.; Betton, G.; Richardson, R.; Evans, G.; Louden, C.

    2005-01-01

    In pre-clinical safety studies, drug-induced vascular injury is an issue of concern because there are no obvious diagnostic markers for pre-clinical or clinical monitoring and there is an intellectual gap in our understanding of the pathogenesis of this lesion. While vasodilatation and increased shear stress appear to play a role, the exact mechanism(s) of injury to the primary targets, smooth muscle and endothelial cells are unknown. However, evaluation of novel markers for potential clinical monitoring with a mechanistic underpinning would add value in risk assessment and management. This mini review focuses on the progress to identify diagnostic markers of drug-induced vascular injury. Von Willebrand factor (vWF), released upon perturbation of endothelial cells, is transiently increased in plasma prior to morphological evidence of damage in dogs or rats treated with vascular toxicants. Therefore, vWF might be a predictive biomarker of vascular injury. However, vWF is not an appropriate biomarker of lesion progression or severity since levels return to baseline values when there is morphological evidence of injury. A potential mechanistically linked biomarker of vascular injury is caveolin-1. Expression of this protein, localized primarily to smooth muscle and endothelial cells, decreases with the onset of vascular damage. Since vascular injury involves multiple mediators and cell types, evaluation of a panel rather than a single biomarker may be more useful in monitoring early and severe progressive vascular injury

  14. The discovery of drug-induced illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jick, H

    1977-03-03

    The increased use of drugs (and the concurrent increased risks of drug-induced illness) require definition of relevant research areas and strategy. For established marketed drugs, research needs depend on the magnitudes of risk of an illness from a drug and the base-line risk. With the drug risk high and the base-line risk low, the problem surfaces in premarketing studies or through the epidemic that develops after marketing. If the drug adds slightly to a high base-line risk, the effect is undetectable. When both risks are low, adverse effects can be discovered by chance, but systematic case-referent studies can speed discovery. If both risks are high, clinical trials and nonexperimental studies may be used. With both risks intermediate, systematic evaluations, especially case-referent studies are needed. Newly marketed drugs should be routinely evaluated through compulsory registration and follow-up study of the earliest users.

  15. Drug-induced regulation of target expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskar, Murat; Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Drug perturbations of human cells lead to complex responses upon target binding. One of the known mechanisms is a (positive or negative) feedback loop that adjusts the expression level of the respective target protein. To quantify this mechanism systems-wide in an unbiased way, drug......-induced differential expression of drug target mRNA was examined in three cell lines using the Connectivity Map. To overcome various biases in this valuable resource, we have developed a computational normalization and scoring procedure that is applicable to gene expression recording upon heterogeneous drug treatments....... In 1290 drug-target relations, corresponding to 466 drugs acting on 167 drug targets studied, 8% of the targets are subject to regulation at the mRNA level. We confirmed systematically that in particular G-protein coupled receptors, when serving as known targets, are regulated upon drug treatment. We...

  16. Nonacetaminophen Drug-Induced Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Arul M; Lewis, James H

    2018-05-01

    Acute liver failure of all causes is diagnosed in between 2000 and 2500 patients annually in the United States. Drug-induced acute liver failure is the leading cause of acute liver failure, accounting for more than 50% of cases. Nonacetaminophen drug injury represents 11% of all cases in the latest registry from the US Acute Liver Failure Study Group. Although rare, acute liver failure is clinically dramatic when it occurs, and requires a multidisciplinary approach to management. In contrast with acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure, non-acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure has a more ominous prognosis with a lower liver transplant-free survival. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Drug-induced cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurinaviciene, Rasa; Holm Sandholdt, Linda; Bygum, Anette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increasing number of drugs have been linked to drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (DI-SCLE). The recognition and management of DI-SCLE can be challenging, as the condition may be triggered by different classes of drugs after variable lengths of time. OBJECTIVES......: To determine the proportion of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) whose drugs are an inducing or aggravating factor. MATERIALS & METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with CLE at a dermatological department over a 21-year period. We registered clinical......, serological, and histological data with a focus on drug intake. RESULTS: Of 775 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of lupus erythematosus (LE) or suspected LE, a diagnosis of CLE could be confirmed in 448 patients. A total of 130 patients had a drug intake that could suggest DI-SCLE. In 88 cases, a drug...

  18. Computerized spirography and roentgenopneumopolygraphy in diagnosis of tracheobroncheal dyskinesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkij, A.V.; Gul'ko, S.I.; Vyalyj, N.P.; Salivon, A.P.; Orlovskaya, I.I.

    1991-01-01

    The results of comprehensive examination of respiratory organs in 103 patients with hypotonic dyskinesia syndrome of trachea and large bronchi were presented. The comprehensive examination included computerized spirography and roentgenopneumopolygraphy with additional tests: exercise and drug. It was shown that the conducted comprehensive examination helped to receive an information about breathh physiology, to diagnose tracheobroncheal dyskinesia and to evaluate the degree of ventilation disorders

  19. Drug-induced cholestasis: mechanisms, models, and markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sagnik; Annaert, Pieter

    2018-04-27

    Drug-induced cholestasis is a risk factor in progression of drug candidates, and poses serious health hazard if not detected before going into human. Intrahepatic accumulation of bile acids (BAs) represents a characteristic phenomenon associated with drug-induced cholestasis. The major challenges in obtaining a complete understanding of drug-induced cholestasis lies in the complexity of BA-mediated toxicity mechanisms and the impact of bile acids at different 'targets' such as transporters, enzymes and nuclear receptors. At the same time, it is not trivial to have a relevant in vitro system that recapitulates these features. In addition, lack of sensitive and early preclinical biomarkers, relevant to the clinical situation, complicates proper detection of drug-induced cholestasis. Significant overlap in biomarker signatures between different mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) precludes identification of specific mechanisms. Over the last decade the knowledge gaps in drug-induced cholestasis are closing due to growing mechanistic understanding of BA-mediated toxicity at (patho)physiologically relevant BA concentrations. Significant progress has been made in the mechanistic understanding of drug-induced cholestasis and associated toxicity, biomarkers and susceptibility factors. In addition, novel in vitro models are evolving which provide a holistic understanding of processes underlying drug-induced cholestasis. This review summarizes the challenges and recent understandings about drug-induced cholestasis with a potential path forward. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. [A case of respiratory dyskinesia due to clebopride malate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, H; Yamamoto, M; Okayasu, H; Wakayama, Y

    1991-08-01

    Clebopride malate is therapeutically used for the treatment of peptic ulcer. This drug has potent antidopaminergic activity that causes acute dystonic reaction, parkinsonism and tardive dyskinesia as adverse effects. Here, we have reported an 86-year-old man who developed abnormal involuntary movement of respiratory muscles and lower limb muscles after this drug had been given for four months. This involuntary movement appeared spontaneously at resting state and disappeared during sleep. Surface EMG demonstrated a synchronous grouping discharge in m. orbicularis oris, m. sternocleidomastoideus and m. interstales which synchronized with diaphragmatic movement on cinefluorography. Involuntary movement of the lower limbs was synchronous bilaterally and had little relationship with diaphragmatic movement. This involuntary movement was irregular not only in rhythm but also in duration. According to this irregular nature, we diagnosed this involuntary movement as respiratory dyskinesia with limb dyskinesia that belongs to tardive dyskinesia. After cessation of clebopride malate limb dyskinesia disappeared rapidly and respiratory dyskinesia markedly decreased. We emphasize that respiratory dyskinesia should be differentiated from psychogenic hyperventilation as easily misdiagnosed on initial examination.

  1. Analyzing clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of Paroxysmal Dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue-qian Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The classification, clinical and electrophysiological characteristics, treatment outcome and pathogenesis of paroxysmal dyskinesia were summarized and analyzed. Paroxysmal dyskinesia was classified into three types. Different types had different incentives in clinical practice. Patients were mostly male adolescents, and the attacks, which were in various forms, manifested as dysmyotonia of choreoathetosis, body torsion and facemaking; no disturbance of consciousness during attacks. Electroencephalogram and other examinations showed no specific abnormalities during both the attacks and interictal period. Paroxysmal dyskinesia was an independent disease and different from epilepsy.

  2. Drug-induced psoriasis: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balak DMW

    2017-12-01

    . Keywords: psoriasis, drug-induced, psoriasiform, cutaneous drug reaction, beta-blocker, lithium, monoclonal antibodies, small molecules

  3. Drug-induced parkinsonism: diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchet PJ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pierre J Blanchet,1–3 Veronika Kivenko1–3 1Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Montreal, 2Andre-Barbeau Movement Disorders Unit, University of Montreal Hospital Center (CHU Montreal, 3Montreal Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: Drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP has been known for >60 years. It is the second leading cause of parkinsonism, but still underdiagnosis is likely to influence reported incidence figures. Since DIP is clinically undistinguishable from Lewy-body Parkinson’s disease, any new case of parkinsonism should prompt the search for an offending antipsychotic, hidden neuroleptic, or nonneuroleptic agent that may produce DIP. DIP is reversible upon drug withdrawal in most cases. There is no consensus regarding the duration of the recovery period to allow motor signs to fully remit in order to confirm the diagnosis of DIP following removal of the causative agent, but a drug-free interval of at least 6 months is generally recommended. Interestingly, up to 30% of DIP cases may show persisting or worsening motor signs beyond 6 months following drug withdrawal or adjustment, due to complex postsynaptic and presynaptic factors that may variably interact to negatively influence nigrostriatal dopamine transmission in a so-called “double-hit” hypothesis. The condition significantly impacts on quality of life and increases the risks of morbidity and mortality. Management is challenging in psychiatric patients and requires a team approach to achieve the best outcome. Keywords: neuroleptic drugs, extrapyramidal side effects, second generation antipsychotics, calcium channel blockers, valproic acid, tetrabenazine 

  4. Melatonin modulates drug-induced acute porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Lelli

    Full Text Available This work investigated the modulation by melatonin (Mel of the effects of the porphyrinogenic drugs 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide (AIA and 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-collidine (DDC on oxidative environment, glucose biosynthesis and heme pathway parameters. Administration of Mel before rat intoxication with AIA/DDC showed a clear beneficial effect in all cases. Mel induced decreases of 42% and 35% in the excretion of the hemeprecursors 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA and porphobilinogen (PBG, respectively, and a 33% decrease in the induction of the heme regulatory enzyme 5-aminolevulinic acid-synthase (ALA-S. The activity of the glucose metabolism enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, which had been diminished by the porphyrinogenic treatment, was restored by 45% when animals were pre-treated with Mel. Mel abolished the modest decrease in glucose 6-phospatase (G6Pase activity caused by AIA/DDC treatment. The oxidative status of lipids was attenuated by Mel treatment in homogenates by 47%, whereas no statistically significant AIA/DDC-induced increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS was observed in microsomes after Mel pre-treatment. We hypothesize that Mel may be scavenging reactive species of oxygen (ROS that could be damaging lipids, PEPCK, G6Pase and ferrochelatase (FQ. Additionally, Mel administration resulted in the repression of the key enzyme ALA-S, and this could be due to an increase in glucose levels, which is known to inhibit ALA-S induction. The consequent decrease in levels of the heme precursors ALA and PBG had a beneficial effect on the drug-induced porphyria. The results obtained open the possibility of further research on the use of melatonin as a co-treatment option in acute porphyria. Keywords: Melatonin, Glucose synthesis, Heme pathway, Acute porphyria, Oxidative stress

  5. Current cannabis use and tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, A; Rector, N A; Seeman, M V; Fornazzari, X

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between substance abuse and tardive dyskinesia (TD) in 51 chronic, neuroleptic-treated, community outpatients with a DSM-III-R diagnosis of schizophrenia. In the presence of a clinical researcher, subjects completed a questionnaire on past and current alcohol and drug use, and provided information pertaining to variables which have, in the past, been implicated in the development of TD: smoking habits, caffeine consumption, and current neuroleptic dose. Subjects were also administered the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) in an interview format with either two or three trained raters present in the room. Consistent with previous reports, our results indicated a trend for females and older patients with a longer duration of illness to show elevated scores on the AIMS. In a hierarchical multiple regression analysis, however, cannabis use was found to correlate best with the presence of TD, out-ranking other putative factors.

  6. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: clinical and genetic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D’Auria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a rare, genetically heterogeneous disease, characterized by ciliary disfunction and impaired mucociliary clearance, resulting in a range of clinical manifestations such as chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, chronic rhino-sinusitis, chronic otitis media, situs viscerum inversus in almost 40-50% of cases and male infertility. The triad situs viscerum inversus, bronchiectasis and sinusitis is known as Kartagener syndrome. Up to now little is known about genetic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of primary motile ciliary diseases in children: for this reason, diagnosis is generally delayed and almost all treatments for PCD are not based on randomized studies but extrapolated from cystic fibrosis guidelines. The aim of this review is to propose to pediatricians a summary of current clinical and diagnostic evidence to obtain better knoledwge of this condition. The earlier diagnosis and the right treatment are both crucial to improve the prognosis of PCD.

  7. An international registry for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Claudius; Lablans, Martin; Ataian, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder leading to chronic upper and lower airway disease. Fundamental data on epidemiology, clinical presentation, course and treatment strategies are lacking in PCD. We have established an international PCD registry to realise...... an unmet need for an international platform to systematically collect data on incidence, clinical presentation, treatment and disease course.The registry was launched in January 2014. We used internet technology to ensure easy online access using a web browser under www.pcdregistry.eu. Data from 201...... methods in addition to classical clinical symptoms. Preliminary analysis of lung function data demonstrated a mean annual decline of percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 0.59% (95% CI 0.98-0.22).Here, we present the development of an international PCD registry as a new promising tool...

  8. Short and long term prognostic importance of regional dyskinesia versus akinesia in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, E; Køber, L; Jørgensen, S

    2002-01-01

    outcome (up to seven years) with respect to mortality. RESULTS: Dyskinesia occurred in 673 patients (10.8%). In multivariate analysis, WMI was an important prognostic factor, with a relative risk of 2.4 (95% confidence interval (CI), 2.2 to 2.7), while dyskinesia had no independent long term prognostic...... information, but the presence of dyskinesia only has prognostic importance for the first 30 days.......BACKGROUND: The prognostic importance of dyskinesia after acute myocardial infarction is unknown, and recommendations have been made that dyskinesia be included in calculations of wall motion index (WMI). OBJECTIVE: To determine whether it is necessary to distinguish between dyskinesia and akinesia...

  9. Understanding and Prevention of “Therapy-” Induced Dyskinesias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iciar Aviles-Olmos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-dopa is the most effective, currently available treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD, but it leads to the development of involuntary movements known as L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID in the majority of patients after long-term use. Both gene and cell therapy approaches are the subject of multiple ongoing studies as potential ways of relieving symptoms of PD without the complication of dyskinesia. However, the spectre of dyskinesia in the absence of L-dopa, the so-called “off-phase” or graft-induced dyskinesia (GID, remains a major obstacle particularly in the further development of cell therapy in PD, but it is also a concern for proponents of gene therapy approaches. LID results from nonphysiological dopamine release, supersensitivity of dopamine receptors, and consequent abnormal signalling through mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Restoration of physiological circuitry within the basal ganglia loops is ultimately the aim of all cell and gene therapy approaches but each using distinctive strategies and accompanied by risks of exacerbation of LID or development of “off-phase”/GID. In this paper we discuss the details of what is understood regarding the development of dyskinesias with relevance to cell and gene therapy and potential strategies to minimize their occurrence.

  10. Dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias: under-recognized movement disorders in domestic animals? A comparison with human dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eRichter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia is defined as a neurological syndrome characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting, often repetitive movements and postures. Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders encompassing dystonia, chorea, athetosis and ballism in conscious individuals. Several decades of research have enhanced the understanding of the etiology of human dystonia and dyskinesias that are associated with dystonia, but the pathophysiology remains largely unknown. The spontaneous occurrence of hereditary dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesia is well documented in rodents used as animal models in basic dystonia research. Several hyperkinetic movement disorders, described in dogs, horses and cattle, show similarities to these human movement disorders. Although dystonia is regarded as the third most common movement disorder in humans, it is often misdiagnosed because of the heterogeneity of etiology and clinical presentation. Since these conditions are poorly known in veterinary practice, their prevalence may be underestimated in veterinary medicine. In order to attract attention to these movement disorders, i.e. dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias associated with dystonia, and to enhance interest in translational research, this review gives a brief overview of the current literature regarding dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesia in humans, and summarizes similar hereditary movement disorders reported in domestic animals.

  11. Paroxysmal Hypnogenic Dyskinesia Responsive to Doxylamine: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Williams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia is a rare clinical entity characterized by intermittent dystonia and choreoathetoid movements that begin exclusively during sleep, often with consciousness preserved once the patient is awakened during the episodes. They occur almost every night and are often misdiagnosed as sleeping disorders. Paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia is currently known to be a form of frontal lobe epilepsy, but not in all cases. We present a 19-year-old male patient with paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia who responded to antihistamines. This supports an alternative theory from 1977 (before the cases had been adequately described that the disorder lies in dysregulation in the basal ganglia. This description now appears similar to acute dystonic reactions such as extrapyramidal symptoms from antipsychotic medications, which also respond to antihistamines.

  12. Asymmetric Drug-Induced Parkinsonism and Psychopathology: A Prospective Naturalistic Study in Long-Stay Psychiatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia E. Pieters

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDrug-induced parkinsonism (DIP is the most common movement disorder induced by antipsychotics. Although DIP is mostly symmetric, asymmetric DIP is reported in a substantial part of the patients. We investigated the frequency of motor asymmetry in DIP and its relationship to the severity of psychopathology in long-stay psychiatric patients.MethodsWe obtained data from a cohort study of 207 long-stay psychiatric patients on the frequency and risk factors of tardive dyskinesia, akathisia, tardive dystonia, and DIP. From July 2003 to May 2007 (mean follow-up, 1.1 year drug-induced movement disorders were assessed at least two times in each patient, with a frequency of persistent DIP of 56.2%. All patients who had at least one time parkinsonism in the upper/lower limb(s were included for analyses (190 patients, 79 women; mean age, 48.0 ± 12.9 years. The Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor scale was used to calculate the frequency of asymmetric parkinsonism. Multilevel mixed models were built to explore the relationship between asymmetry in parkinsonism and the severity of psychopathology, measured on the Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia scale severity index (CGI-SCH SI.ResultsThe frequency of asymmetric parkinsonism was 20.8%. Asymmetry in parkinsonism was associated with symptom severity on all CGI-SCH SI scales (β range, 0.37–3.74 and significantly associated with the positive symptom scale (β, 3.74; 95% CI, 0.35–7.31.ConclusionDIP is asymmetric in a substantial part of patients. Asymmetric presentation of DIP is of clinical relevance as it is related to the severity of psychopathology and may alert the clinician of more severe psychopathology. Future research is recommended to provide insight into the neuropsychopathology and clinical value of asymmetric parkinsonism for psychiatric patients.

  13. Rhabdomyolysis Related to Dyskinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesna Bektaş

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is a life threatening syndrome. It accounts for an estimated 8% to 15% of cases of acute renal failure and is associated with a mortality rate of 5%. In movement disorders, various causes of rhabdomyolysis have been reported including status dystonicus, myoclonus, generalized chorea and parkinsonism-hyperprexia syndrome in Parkinson’s disease (PD. Levodopa-induced dyskinesia leading to rhabdomyolysis is a very rare phenomenon in PD. We report a case of 76 years old PD patient with dyskinesia and rhabdomyolysis.

  14. The use of computerized tomography in patients showing tardive dyskinesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Themelis, I.

    1983-01-01

    29 patients showing moderate to markedly pronounced tardive dyskinesia (TD) and a further 29 control patients (C) under a similar long-term medication with neuroleptics that had been so chosen as to match the age and sex distributions of the former group were subjected to computered tomography, neurological examination and psychological testing. The results did not point to any correlations between the structural changes and duration of treatment and the clinical signs or symptoms of extrapyramidal disorder. This was taken as further evidence in support of the theory that the initial damage in tardive dyskinesia mainly is at the level of the basal ganglia. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Increased Risk of Drug-Induced Hyponatremia during High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K Jönsson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the relationship between outdoor temperature in Sweden and the reporting of drug-induced hyponatremia to the Medical Products Agency (MPA. Methods: All individual adverse drug reactions (ADR reported to MPA from 1 January 2010 to 31 October 2013 of suspected drug-induced hyponatremia and random controls were identified. Reports where the ADR had been assessed as having at least a possible relation to the suspected drug were included. Information on administered drugs, onset date, causality assessment, sodium levels, and the geographical origin of the reports was extracted. A case-crossover design was used to ascertain the association between heat exposure and drug-induced hyponatremia at the individual level, while linear regression was used to study its relationship to sodium concentration in blood. Temperature exposure data were obtained from the nearest observation station to the reported cases. Results: During the study period, 280 reports of hyponatremia were identified. More cases of drug-induced hyponatremia were reported in the warmer season, with a peak in June, while other ADRs showed an opposite annual pattern. The distributed lag non-linear model indicated an increasing odds ratio (OR with increasing temperature in the warm season with a highest odds ratio, with delays of 1–5 days after heat exposure. A cumulative OR for a lag time of 1 to 3 days was estimated at 2.21 at an average daily temperature of 20 °C. The change in sodium per 1 °C increase in temperature was estimated to be −0.37 mmol/L (95% CI: −0.02, −0.72. Conclusions: Warm weather appears to increase the risk of drug-induced hyponatremia

  16. Surgical Treatment of Dyskinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Puppi Munhoz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the main indications for stereotactic surgery in Parkinson’s disease (PD is the control of levodopa induced dyskinesia. This can be achieved by by pallidotomy and globus pallidus internus (GPi deep brain stimulation (DBS or by subthalamotomy and subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS, which usually allow for a cut down in the dosage of levodopa. DBS has assumed a pivotal role in stereotactic surgical treatment of PD and, in fact, ablative procedures are currently considered surrogates, particularly when bilateral procedures are required, as DBS does not produce a brain lesion and the stimulator can be programmed to induce better therapeutic effects while minimizing adverse effects. Interventions in either the STN and the GPi seem to be similar in controlling most of the other motor aspects of PD, nonetheless, GPi surgery seems to induce a more particular and direct effect on dyskinesia, while the antidyskinetic effect of STN interventions is mostly dependent on a reduction of dopaminergic drug dosages. Hence, the si ne qua non condition for a reduction of dyskinesia when STN interventions are intended is their ability to allow for a reduction of levodopa dosage. Pallidal surgery is indicated when dyskinesia is a dose-limiting factor for maintaining or introducing higher adequate levels of dopaminergic therapy. Also medications used for the treatment of PD may be useful for the improvement of several non-motor aspects of the disease, including sleep, psychiatric, and cognitive domains, therefore, dose reduction of medication withdrawal are not always a fruitful objective.

  17. Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia in antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, Marc; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a patient with a mixed movement disorder classifiable as a paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia, occurring as the first manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS). Possible pathophysiology is discussed based on recent literature, and we stress that PAPS must be considered

  18. Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia in antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, M; Tijssen, MAJ

    We report on a patient with a mixed movement disorder classifiable as a paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia, occurring as the first manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS). Possible pathophysiology is discussed based on recent literature, and we stress that PAPS must be considered

  19. Dextromethorphan improves levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen Metman, L.; del Dotto, P.; Natté, R.; van den Munckhof, P.; Chase, T. N.

    1998-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist dextromethorphan (DM) on levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent experimental evidence suggests that increased synaptic efficacy of NMDA receptors expressed on basal ganglia neurons may play a role

  20. Preliminary Investigation of Risk Factors Causing Dyskinesias in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the risk factors involved in the onset of dyskinesias in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease in South Africa. Methods: A questionnaire survey and medical record review were conducted. A total of 43 patients with Parkinson's disease in two metropolitan areas were included in the study. Results: ...

  1. Prolonged drug-induced hypothermia in experimental stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Flemming Fryd; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Reith, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    In experimental and human stroke, hypothermia is strongly related to a favorable outcome. Previous attempts to manipulate the core temperature in focal cerebral ischemia have been based on mechanical cooling. The purpose of the study is to establish a model for long-term drug-induced hypothermia...... in focal ischemia by pharmacological alteration of the central thermoregulatory set-point. We tested the hypothesis that the dopaminergic agonist Talipexole, which induces hypothermia, reduces infarct size. Body temperature was monitored by a radio-pill-implant. Rats had reversible occlusion of the middle...... that the core body temperature was reduced by 1.7 degrees C for 24 hours after MCAO in rats treated with Talipexole. This treatment induced a significant reduction of infarct volume at 7 days after focal ischemia by 47%. We suggest that the reduction in infarct volume is related to drug-induced hypothermia...

  2. Drug-induced Liver Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Iryna, Klyarytskaya; Helen, Maksymova; Elena, Stilidi

    2016-01-01

    The study presented here was accomplished to assess the course of drug-induced liver diseases in patient’s rheumatoid arthritis receiving long-term methotrexate therapy. Diabetes mellitus was revealed as the most significant risk factor. The combination of diabetes mellitus with other risk factors (female sex) resulted in increased hepatic fibrosis, degree of hepatic encephalopathy and reduction of hepatic functions. The effectiveness and safety of ursodeoxycholic acid and cytolytic type-with...

  3. Antituberculosis Drug-Induced Liver Injury with Autoimmune Features: Facing Diagnostic and Treatment Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Adriana Rangel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a case report of antituberculosis drug-induced liver injury that offered diagnostic challenges (namely, the possibility of drug-induced autoimmune hepatitis and treatment difficulties.

  4. Drug Induced Steatohepatitis: An Uncommon Culprit of a Common Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane Rabinowich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a leading cause of liver disease in developed countries. Its frequency is increasing in the general population mostly due to the widespread occurrence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Although drugs and dietary supplements are viewed as a major cause of acute liver injury, drug induced steatosis and steatohepatitis are considered a rare form of drug induced liver injury (DILI. The complex mechanism leading to hepatic steatosis caused by commonly used drugs such as amiodarone, methotrexate, tamoxifen, valproic acid, glucocorticoids, and others is not fully understood. It relates not only to induction of the metabolic syndrome by some drugs but also to their impact on important molecular pathways including increased hepatocytes lipogenesis, decreased secretion of fatty acids, and interruption of mitochondrial β-oxidation as well as altered expression of genes responsible for drug metabolism. Better familiarity with this type of liver injury is important for early recognition of drug hepatotoxicity and crucial for preventing severe forms of liver injury and cirrhosis. Moreover, understanding the mechanisms leading to drug induced hepatic steatosis may provide much needed clues to the mechanism and potential prevention of the more common form of metabolic steatohepatitis.

  5. Clinical phenotype analysis of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia

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    Wo-tu TIAN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD is a disorder characterized by recurrent and brief dystonic or choreoathetoid attacks that are induced by sudden voluntary movement with highly clinical and genetic heterogeneity. We aimed to investigate the clinical features of PKD in a large Chinese population. Methods One hundred and ninety five patients diagnosed as primary PKD were recruited. For all of the participants, neurological examinations were conducted and clinical manifestations were recorded and summarized in self - made uniform registration form for PKD patients. Clinical characteristics were statistically analyzed and compared between familial and sporadic PKD patients.  Results Among all of the 195 PKD patients in the present study, the gender ratio was 4.42∶1 (male∶ female. The average age of onset was (12.32 ± 3.49 years. There were 162 patients (83.08% manifestated with pure form and 33 (16.92% with complicated form of PKD. Among them 16 patients (8.21% had essential tremor (ET, and 144 patients (73.85% had premonitory symptom. The percentage of patients manifested as dystonia, chorea and mixed form during episodic attacks were 68.72% (134/195, 4.10% (8/195 and 27.18% (53/195 repectively. There were 134 cases (68.72% had facial involvement. It was recorded that 115 (58.97%, 54 (27.69% and 26 (13.33% patients had frequency of attack < 10 times/d, 10-20 times/d and > 20-30 times/d respectively. The percentages of patients whose duration of attack <10 s, 10-30 s and > 30-60 s were 60% (117/195, 29.74% (58/195 and 10.26% (20/195 respectively. There were 64 patietns (32.82% with family history of PKD and 131 (67.18% were sporadic PKD patients. Up to 40% (78/195 of patients did not require/take medications, as they had minor clinical manifestations or concerns about the side effects of anticonvulsants. Among 117 patients (60% prescribed with anticonvulsants, 114 patients showed a good response, including complete control (N

  6. Striatal cholinergic interneurons and D2 receptor-expressing GABAergic medium spiny neurons regulate tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordia, Tanuja; Zhang, Danhui; Perez, Xiomara A; Quik, Maryka

    2016-12-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a drug-induced movement disorder that arises with antipsychotics. These drugs are the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and are also prescribed for major depression, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity, obsessive compulsive and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is thus a need for therapies to reduce TD. The present studies and our previous work show that nicotine administration decreases haloperidol-induced vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) in rodent TD models, suggesting a role for the nicotinic cholinergic system. Extensive studies also show that D2 dopamine receptors are critical to TD. However, the precise involvement of striatal cholinergic interneurons and D2 medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in TD is uncertain. To elucidate their role, we used optogenetics with a focus on the striatum because of its close links to TD. Optical stimulation of striatal cholinergic interneurons using cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT)-Cre mice expressing channelrhodopsin2-eYFP decreased haloperidol-induced VCMs (~50%), with no effect in control-eYFP mice. Activation of striatal D2 MSNs using Adora2a-Cre mice expressing channelrhodopsin2-eYFP also diminished antipsychotic-induced VCMs, with no change in control-eYFP mice. In both ChAT-Cre and Adora2a-Cre mice, stimulation or mecamylamine alone similarly decreased VCMs with no further decline with combined treatment, suggesting nAChRs are involved. Striatal D2 MSN activation in haloperidol-treated Adora2a-Cre mice increased c-Fos + D2 MSNs and decreased c-Fos + non-D2 MSNs, suggesting a role for c-Fos. These studies provide the first evidence that optogenetic stimulation of striatal cholinergic interneurons and GABAergic MSNs modulates VCMs, and thus possibly TD. Moreover, they suggest nicotinic receptor drugs may reduce antipsychotic-induced TD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Drug-induced Inhibition and Trafficking Disruption of ion Channels: Pathogenesis of QT Abnormalities and Drug-induced Fatal Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeddu, Luigi X.

    2016-01-01

    Risk of severe and fatal ventricular arrhythmias, presenting as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), is increased in congenital and acquired forms of long QT syndromes (LQTS). Drug-induced inhibition of K+ currents, IKs, IKr, IK1, and/or Ito, delay repolarization, prolong QT, and increase the risk of TdP. Drug-induced interference with IKr is the most common cause of acquired LQTS/TdP. Multiple drugs bind to KNCH2-hERG-K+ channels affecting IKr, including antiarrythmics, antibiotics, antivirals, azole-antifungals, antimalarials, anticancer, antiemetics, prokinetics, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Azithromycin has been recently added to this list. In addition to direct channel inhibition, some drugs interfere with the traffic of channels from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing mature channel membrane density; e.g., pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol. Other drugs, such as ketoconazole, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, citalopram, escitalopram, donepezil, tamoxifen, endoxifen, atazanavir, and roxitromycin, induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Although many drugs prolong the QT interval, TdP is a rare event. The following conditions increase the risk of drug-induced TdP: a) Disease states/electrolyte levels (heart failure, structural cardiac disease, bradycardia, hypokalemia); b) Pharmacogenomic variables (presence of congenital LQTS, subclinical ion-channel mutations, history of or having a relative with history of drug-induced long QT/TdP); c) Pharmacodynamic and kinetic factors (high doses, women, elderly, metabolism inhibitors, combining two or more QT prolonging drugs, drugs that prolong the QT and increase QT dispersion, and drugs with multiple actions on ion channels). Because most of these conditions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drug use associated with repolarization abnormalities are strongly recommended. PMID:26926294

  8. S4. ASYMMETRIC DRUG-INDUCED PARKINSONISM IS RELATED TO PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Lydia; Bakker, P Roberto; Van Harten, Peter N

    2018-01-01

    severity index (CGI-SCH SI). Discussion DIP is asymmetric in 1 of 5 patients. Therefore, the clinical rule that Parkinson’s disease always starts asymmetrically and such may be helpful to differentiate between Parkinson’s disease and DIP is not valid. Asymmetric presentation of DIP is of clinical relevance as it is related to the severity of psychopathology. Asymmetric DIP may alert the clinician of more severe psychopathology. Replication is indicated to examine the robustness of the relationship. References 1. Modestin J, Wehrli MV, Stephan PL, Agarwalla P. Evolution of neuroleptic-induced extrapyramidal syndromes under long-term neuroleptic treatment. Schizophr Res. 2008; 100(1–3): 97–107. 2. Janno S, Holi M, Tuisku K, Wahlbeck K. Prevalence of Neuroleptic-Induced Movement Disorders in Chronic Schizophrenia Inpatients. Am J Psychiatry. 2004; 161(1): 160–163. 3. Harten PN Van, Matroos GE, Hoek HW. The prevalence of tardive dystonia, tardive dyskinesia, parkinsonism and akathisia. The Curaçao Extrapyramidal Syndromes Study I. Schizophr Res. 1996; 19(2): 195–203. 4. Shin H, Chung J. Drug-Induced Parkinsonism. J Clin Neurol. 2012; 8: 15–21. 5. Bakker PR, de Groot IW, van Os J, van Harten PN. Long-Stay Psychiatric Patients: A Prospective Study Revealing Persistent Antipsychotic-Induced Movement Disorder. PLoS One. 2011; 6(10): 1–6.

  9. Findings of cranial computerized tomography in chronic schizophrenics with and without tardive dyskinesias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, N.U.

    1985-11-25

    Findings of cranial computed tomography in 20 chronic schizophrenics with clinical distinct, long-dated hyperkinesias (tardive dyskinesias) are compared with those of a similar group of schizophrenics without hyperkinesias. Both groups had a long-term neuroleptic treatment. The tomograms of those patients with tardive dyskinesias showed only in two cases mild, pathological alterations. Also the tomograms of the comparative group showed no severe atrophies, defects of substance or pathological calcifications. It is concluded that there is no correlation between tardive dyskinesias in long-term neuroleptic treated schizophrenics and gross morphological alterations of the brain. Furthermore the problem of tardive dyskinesia in a general aspect is discussed. (orig.).

  10. Kindling: A Model for the Development of Tardive Dyskinesia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Glenthøj

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dyskinesia (TD from long-term neuroleptic treatment may be irreversible; therefore prevention has become a major concern. A controversial issue with regard to the clinical use of neuroleptic drugs is the possible influence on the development of TD of drug holidays. The major characteristics of kindling, theories of TD and the role of multiplicity in the development of TD are described. Some clinical studies point to interruption of neuroleptic therapy being a risk factor for development of irreversible TD. Induction of dyskinesia in non-human primates has been demonstrated after repeated administration of haloperidol. Rodent studies have not been conclusive. Several experimental results link TD with kindling: both conditions involve repeated stimulations, both seem to involve increased receptor responsiveness and in both conditions does depression in GABA transmission in SNR (substantia nigra; pars reticulata play an important role. It is concluded that the kindling hypothesis is relevant to the investigation of TD.

  11. A case of congenital myopathy masquerading as paroxysmal dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux (GER disease is a significant comorbidity of neuromuscular disorders. It may present as paroxysmal dyskinesia, an entity known as Sandifer syndrome. A 6-week-old neonate presented with very frequent paroxysms of generalized stiffening and opisthotonic posture since day 22 of life. These were initially diagnosed as seizures and he was started on multiple antiepileptics which did not show any response. After a normal video electroencephalogram (VEEG was documented, possibility of dyskinesia was kept. However, when he did not respond to symptomatic therapy, Sandifer syndrome was thought of and GER scan was done, which revealed severe GER. After his symptoms got reduced to some extent, a detailed clinical examination revealed abnormal facies with flaccid quadriparesis. Muscle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of a specific congenital myopathy. On antireflux measures, those episodic paroxysms reduced to some extent. Partial response to therapy in GER should prompt search for an underlying secondary etiology.

  12. Rhabdomyolysis Related to Dyskinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bektaş, Hesna; Deniz, Orhan; Temel, Şadiye; Keklikoğlu, Hava Dönmez; Akyol, Şener

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a life threatening syndrome. It accounts for an estimated 8% to 15% of cases of acute renal failure and is associated with a mortality rate of 5%. In movement disorders, various causes of rhabdomyolysis have been reported including status dystonicus, myoclonus, generalized chorea and parkinsonism-hyperprexia syndrome in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Levodopa-induced dyskinesia leading to rhabdomyolysis is a very rare phenomenon in PD. We report a case of 76 years old PD patient ...

  13. In silico modeling to predict drug-induced phospholipidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sydney S.; Kim, Jae S.; Valerio, Luis G.; Sadrieh, Nakissa

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is a preclinical finding during pharmaceutical drug development that has implications on the course of drug development and regulatory safety review. A principal characteristic of drugs inducing DIPL is known to be a cationic amphiphilic structure. This provides evidence for a structure-based explanation and opportunity to analyze properties and structures of drugs with the histopathologic findings for DIPL. In previous work from the FDA, in silico quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modeling using machine learning approaches has shown promise with a large dataset of drugs but included unconfirmed data as well. In this study, we report the construction and validation of a battery of complementary in silico QSAR models using the FDA's updated database on phospholipidosis, new algorithms and predictive technologies, and in particular, we address high performance with a high-confidence dataset. The results of our modeling for DIPL include rigorous external validation tests showing 80–81% concordance. Furthermore, the predictive performance characteristics include models with high sensitivity and specificity, in most cases above ≥ 80% leading to desired high negative and positive predictivity. These models are intended to be utilized for regulatory toxicology applied science needs in screening new drugs for DIPL. - Highlights: • New in silico models for predicting drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) are described. • The training set data in the models is derived from the FDA's phospholipidosis database. • We find excellent predictivity values of the models based on external validation. • The models can support drug screening and regulatory decision-making on DIPL

  14. MSBIS: A Multi-Step Biomedical Informatics Screening Approach for Identifying Medications that Mitigate the Risks of Metoclopramide-Induced Tardive Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Ham, Alexandrea G; Tivis, Rickey D; Caylor, Matthew L; Tao, Aoxiang; Flynn, Steve T; Economen, Peter J; Dang, Hung K; Johnson, Royal W; Culbertson, Vaughn L

    2017-12-01

    In 2009 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) placed a black box warning on metoclopramide (MCP) due to the increased risks and prevalence of tardive dyskinesia (TD). In this study, we developed a multi-step biomedical informatics screening (MSBIS) approach leveraging publicly available bioactivity and drug safety data to identify concomitant drugs that mitigate the risks of MCP-induced TD. MSBIS includes (1) TargetSearch (http://dxulab.org/software) bioinformatics scoring for drug anticholinergic activity using CHEMBL bioactivity data; (2) unadjusted odds ratio (UOR) scoring for indications of TD-mitigating effects using the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS); (3) adjusted odds ratio (AOR) re-scoring by removing the effect of cofounding factors (age, gender, reporting year); (4) logistic regression (LR) coefficient scoring for confirming the best TD-mitigating drug candidates. Drugs with increasing TD protective potential and statistical significance were obtained at each screening step. Fentanyl is identified as the most promising drug against MCP-induced TD (coefficient: -2.68; p-valueTD after fentanyl-induced general anesthesia. Loperamide is identified as a potent mitigating drug against a broader range of drug-induced movement disorders through pharmacokinetic modifications. Using drug-induced TD as an example, we demonstrated that MSBIS is an efficient in silico tool for unknown drug-drug interaction detection, drug repurposing, and combination therapy design. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Drug induced hypertension--An unappreciated cause of secondary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Alon; Messerli, Franz H; Grossman, Ehud

    2015-09-15

    Most patients with hypertension have essential hypertension or well-known forms of secondary hypertension, such as renal disease, renal artery stenosis, or common endocrine diseases (hyperaldosteronism or pheochromocytoma). Physicians are less aware of drug induced hypertension. A variety of therapeutic agents or chemical substances may increase blood pressure. When a patient with well controlled hypertension is presented with acute blood pressure elevation, use of drug or chemical substance which increases blood pressure should be suspected. Drug-induced blood pressure increases are usually minor and short-lived, although rare hypertensive emergencies associated with use of certain drugs have been reported. Careful evaluation of prescription and non-prescription medications is crucial in the evaluation of the hypertensive individual and may obviate the need for expensive and unnecessary evaluations. Discontinuation of the offending agent will usually achieve adequate blood pressure control. When use of a chemical agent which increases blood pressure is mandatory, anti-hypertensive therapy may facilitate continued use of this agent. We summarize the therapeutic agents or chemical substances that elevate blood pressure and their mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. MDM2 Antagonists Counteract Drug-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Vilgelm

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Antagonists of MDM2-p53 interaction are emerging anti-cancer drugs utilized in clinical trials for malignancies that rarely mutate p53, including melanoma. We discovered that MDM2-p53 antagonists protect DNA from drug-induced damage in melanoma cells and patient-derived xenografts. Among the tested DNA damaging drugs were various inhibitors of Aurora and Polo-like mitotic kinases, as well as traditional chemotherapy. Mitotic kinase inhibition causes mitotic slippage, DNA re-replication, and polyploidy. Here we show that re-replication of the polyploid genome generates replicative stress which leads to DNA damage. MDM2-p53 antagonists relieve replicative stress via the p53-dependent activation of p21 which inhibits DNA replication. Loss of p21 promoted drug-induced DNA damage in melanoma cells and enhanced anti-tumor activity of therapy combining MDM2 antagonist with mitotic kinase inhibitor in mice. In summary, MDM2 antagonists may reduce DNA damaging effects of anti-cancer drugs if they are administered together, while targeting p21 can improve the efficacy of such combinations.

  17. Drug-Induced Anaphylaxis in Latin American Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jares, Edgardo José; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Ensina, Luis Felipe C; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Gómez, Maximiliano; Cuello, Mabel Noemi; Morfin-Maciel, Blanca María; De Falco, Alicia; Barayazarra, Susana; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Serrano, Carlos; Monsell, Silvana; Schuhl, Juan; Cardona-Villa, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Information regarding the clinical features and management of drug-induced anaphylaxis (DIA) in Latin America is lacking. The objective of this study was to assess implicated medications, demographics, and treatments received for DIA in Latin American patients referred to national specialty centers for evaluation. A database previously used to compile information on drug-induced allergic reactions in 11 Latin American countries was used to identify and characterize patients presenting specifically with a clinical diagnosis of DIA. Information regarding clinical presentation, causative agent(s), diagnostic studies performed, treatment, and contributing factors associated with increased reaction severity was analyzed. There were 1005 patients evaluated for possible drug hypersensitivity reactions during the study interval, and 264 (26.3%) met criteria for DIA. DIA was more frequent in adults and in elderly females (N = 129 [76.6%] and N = 30 [75%], respectively) compared with children and/or adolescents (N = 21 [42.9%], P asthma (N = 22 vs 35 [38.6% vs 61.4%], P Latin American patients referred for evaluation of DIA, NSAIDs and antibiotics were implicated in approximately 80% of cases. Most of these reactions were treated in the emergency department. Epinephrine was administered in only 27.6% of all cases, although more frequently for anaphylactic shock. Dissemination of anaphylaxis guidelines among emergency department physicians should be encouraged to improve management of DIA. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impulse control disorders in advanced Parkinson's disease with dyskinesia: The ALTHEA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biundo, Roberta; Weis, Luca; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Cortelli, Pietro; Jori, Maria Cristina; Lopiano, Leonardo; Marconi, Roberto; Matinella, Angela; Morgante, Francesca; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Tamburini, Tiziano; Tinazzi, Michele; Zappia, Mario; Vorovenci, Ruxandra Julia; Antonini, Angelo

    2017-11-01

    Impulse control disorders and dyskinesia are common and disabling complications of dopaminergic treatment in Parkinson's disease. They may coexist and are possibly related. The objectives of this study were to assess the frequency and severity of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease patients with dyskinesia. The ALTHEA study enrolled 251 Parkinson's disease patients with various degrees of dyskinesia severity from 11 movement disorders centers in Italy. Each patient underwent a comprehensive assessment including Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale and the Questionnaire for Impulsive Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson Disease-Rating Scale. There was an overall 55% frequency of impulse control disorder and related behaviors (36% were clinically significant). The positive patients were younger at disease diagnosis and onset and had higher Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale historical and total score (P = 0.001 and P = 0.02, respectively, vs negative). There was an increased frequency of clinically significant impulse control disorders in patients with severe dyskinesia (P = 0.013), a positive correlation between the questionnaire total score and dopamine agonist dose (P = 0.018), and a trend with levodopa dose. More than half of Parkinson's disease patients with dyskinesia have impulse control disorders and related behaviors, which are frequently clinically significant. Dopaminergic therapy total dose is associated with their severity. Clinicians should carefully assess patients with maladaptive behaviors and dyskinesia because they do not properly evaluate their motor and nonmotor status. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Putaminal serotonergic innervation: monitoring dyskinesia risk in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Young; Seo, Seongho; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Jeon, Beom S

    2015-09-08

    To explore serotonergic innervation in the basal ganglia in relation to levodopa-induced dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). A total of 30 patients with PD without dementia or depression were divided into 3 matched groups (dyskinetic, nondyskinetic, and drug-naive) for this study. We acquired 2 PET scans and 3T MRI for each patient using [(11)C]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenylsulfanyl)-benzonitrile ((11)C-DASB) and N-(3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl)-2-carbomethoxy-3-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane ((18)F-FP-CIT). Then we analyzed binding potentials of the 2 radiotracers at basal ganglia structures and correlations with clinical variables. We observed no difference in (18)F-FP-CIT binding between dyskinetic and nondyskinetic patients, whereas there were differences in (11)C-DASB binding for the caudate and putamen. Binding potential ratios ((11)C-DASB/(18)F-FP-CIT) at the putamen, which indicate serotoninergic fiber innervation relative to dopaminergic fiber availability, were highest in the dyskinetic group, followed by the nondyskinetic and drug-naive PD groups. (11)C-DASB/(18)F-FP-CIT ratios at the putamen and pallidum correlated positively with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) total scores and duration of PD, and pallidal binding ratio also correlated with the UPDRS motor scores. Ratios were not dependent on dopaminergic medication dosages for any of the regions studied. Relative serotonergic innervation of the putamen and pallidum increased with clinical PD progression and was highest in patients with established dyskinesia. The serotonin/dopamine transporter ratio might be a potential marker of disease progression and an indicator of risk for levodopa-induced dyskinesia in PD. A prospective evaluation is warranted in the future. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Ventilation inhomogeneity in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Kent; Buchvald, Frederik F; Marthin, June Kehlet

    2012-01-01

    The lung clearance index (LCI) derived from the multiple breath inert gas washout (MBW) test reflects global ventilation distribution inhomogeneity. It is more sensitive than forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) for detecting abnormal airway function and correlates closely with structural lung...... damage in children with cystic fibrosis, which shares features with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Normalised phase III slope indices S(cond) and S(acin) reflect function of the small conducting and acinar airways, respectively. The involvement of the peripheral airways assessed by MBW tests has...

  1. Clinical care of children with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Jane S; Alanin, Mikkel Christian; Collins, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare heterogeneous disorder, usually inherited as an autosomal recessive condition but X-linked inheritance is also described. Abnormal ciliary function in childhood leads to neonatal respiratory distress in term infants, persistent wet cough...... is inappropriate since differences in pathophysiology, morbidity and prognosis risk treatment failure and lack of adherence. Areas covered: Review authors searched PubMed and Cochrane databases for publications relating to management of children with PCD. Because of the paucity of data, we emphasise the need...

  2. Drug-induced gynecomastia in children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ran D.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT QUESTION I frequently see adolescent boys in my practice with transient gynecomastia. My management includes reassuring the boys and their families; however, I also understand that specific medication, alcohol, and drugs can cause gynecomastia. How common is this phenomenon, and what medications can induce gynecomastia? ANSWER While gynecomastia is a physiologic phenomenon in most newborns and adolescents, it is important to consider pathologic conditions and medications that can cause breast enlargement. Antibiotics, antiulcer drugs, growth hormones, and chemotherapy have been reported to induce gynecomastia. Adolescents who use anabolic steroids, or who abuse alcohol, marijuana, heroin, or amphetamines, should be alerted to the fact that gynecomastia might develop. Treatment of drug-induced gynecomastia includes discontinuation of the offending drug. Very rarely is surgical intervention required. PMID:20393092

  3. An Update on Drug-induced Liver Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarbhavi, Harshad

    2012-09-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following drugs taken in therapeutic doses. Hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition in drug development, or withdrawal or restricted use after marketing. No age is exempt although adults and the elderly are at increased risk. DILI spans the entire spectrum ranging from asymptomatic elevation in transaminases to severe disease such as acute hepatitis leading to acute liver failure. The liver specific Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method is the most validated and extensively used for determining the likelihood that an implicated drug caused DILI. Asymptomatic elevation in liver tests must be differentiated from adaptation. Drugs producing DILI have a signature pattern although no single pattern is characteristic. Antimicrobial and central nervous system agents including antiepileptic drugs are the leading causes of DILI worldwide. In the absence of a diagnostic test or a biomarker, the diagnosis rests on the evidence of absence of competing causes such as acute viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis and others. Recent studies show that antituberculosis drugs given for active or latent disease are still a major cause of drug-induced liver injury in India and the West respectively. Presence of jaundice signifies a severe disease and entails a worse outcome. The pathogenesis is unclear and is due to a mix of host, drug metabolite and environmental factors. Research has evolved from incriminating candidate genes to genome wide analysis studies. Immediate cessation of the drug is key to prevent or minimize progressive damage. Treatment is largely supportive. N-acetylcysteine is the antidote for paracetamol toxicity. Carnitine has been tried in valproate injury whereas steroids and ursodeoxycholic acid may be used in DILI associated with hypersensitivity or cholestatic features respectively. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology, the patterns of

  4. PTTG1 attenuates drug-induced cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Tong

    Full Text Available As PTTG1 (pituitary tumor transforming gene abundance correlates with adverse outcomes in cancer treatment, we determined mechanisms underlying this observation by assessing the role of PTTG1 in regulating cell response to anti-neoplastic drugs. HCT116 cells devoid of PTTG1 (PTTG1(-/- exhibited enhanced drug sensitivity as assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation in vitro. Apoptosis, mitosis catastrophe or DNA damage were not detected, but features of senescence were observed using low doses of doxorubicin and TSA. The number of drug-induced PTTG1(-/- senescent cells increased ∼4 fold as compared to WT PTTG1-replete cells (p<0.001. p21, an important regulator of cell senescence, was induced ∼3 fold in HCT116 PTTG1(-/- cells upon doxorubicin or Trichostatin A treatment. Binding of Sp1, p53 and p300 to the p21 promoter was enhanced in PTTG1(-/- cells after treatment, suggesting transcriptional regulation of p21. p21 knock down abrogated the observed senescent effects of these drugs, indicating that PTTG1 likely suppresses p21 to regulate drug-induced senescence. PTTG1 also regulated SW620 colon cancer cells response to doxorubicin and TSA mediated by p21. Subcutaneously xenografted PTTG1(-/- HCT116 cells developed smaller tumors and exhibited enhanced responses to doxorubicin. PTTG1(-/- tumor tissue derived from excised tumors exhibited increased doxorubicin-induced senescence. As senescence is a determinant of cell responses to anti-neoplastic treatments, these findings suggest PTTG1 as a tumor cell marker to predict anti-neoplastic treatment outcomes.

  5. Resting-State Connectivity Predicts Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesias in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Nielsen, Silas H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Levodopa-induced dyskinesias are a common side effect of dopaminergic therapy in PD, but their neural correlates remain poorly understood. Objectives: This study examines whether dyskinesias are associated with abnormal dopaminergic modulation of resting-state cortico-striatal connect......Background: Levodopa-induced dyskinesias are a common side effect of dopaminergic therapy in PD, but their neural correlates remain poorly understood. Objectives: This study examines whether dyskinesias are associated with abnormal dopaminergic modulation of resting-state cortico......-striatal connectivity. Methods: Twelve PD patients with peak-of-dose dyskinesias and 12 patients without dyskinesias were withdrawn from dopaminergic medication. All patients received a single dose of fast-acting soluble levodopa and then underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging before any...... dyskinesias emerged. Levodopa-induced modulation of cortico-striatal resting-state connectivity was assessed between the putamen and the following 3 cortical regions of interest: supplementary motor area, primary sensorimotor cortex, and right inferior frontal gyrus. These functional connectivity measures...

  6. Cannabis in the Treatment of Dystonia, Dyskinesias, and Tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Barbara S

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has been used for many medicinal purposes, including management of spasms, dystonia, and dyskinesias, with variable success. Its use for tetanus was described in the second century BCE, but the literature continues to include more case reports and surveys of its beneficial effects in managing symptoms of hyperkinetic movement disorders than randomized controlled trials, making evidence-based recommendations difficult. This paper reviews clinical research using various formulations of cannabis (botanical products, oral preparations containing ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and/or cannabidiol) and currently available preparations in the USA (nabilone and dronabinol). This has been expanded from a recent systematic review of cannabis use in several neurologic conditions to include case reports and case series and results of anonymous surveys of patients using cannabis outside of medical settings, with the original evidence classifications marked for those papers that followed research protocols. Despite overlap in some patients, dyskinesias will be treated separately from dystonia and chorea; benefit was not established beyond individual patients for these conditions. Tics, usually due to Tourettes, did respond to cannabis preparations. Side effects reported in the trials will be reviewed but those due to recreational use, including the dystonia that can be secondary to synthetic marijuana preparations, are outside the scope of this paper.

  7. Stronger Dopamine D1 Receptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Daniel; Muñoz, Ana; Moreno, Estefanía; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Canet-Pons, Júlia; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G; Rico, Alberto J; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; Navarro, Gemma; Canela, Enric I; Cortés, Antonio; Labandeira-García, José L; Casadó, Vicent; Lanciego, José L; Franco, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Radioligand binding assays to rat striatal dopamine D1 receptors showed that brain lateralization of the dopaminergic system were not due to changes in expression but in agonist affinity. D1 receptor-mediated striatal imbalance resulted from a significantly higher agonist affinity in the left striatum. D1 receptors heteromerize with dopamine D3 receptors, which are considered therapeutic targets for dyskinesia in parkinsonian patients. Expression of both D3 and D1-D3 receptor heteromers were increased in samples from 6-hydroxy-dopamine-hemilesioned rats rendered dyskinetic by treatment with 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA). Similar findings were obtained using striatal samples from primates. Radioligand binding studies in the presence of a D3 agonist led in dyskinetic, but not in lesioned or L-DOPA-treated rats, to a higher dopamine sensitivity. Upon D3-receptor activation, the affinity of agonists for binding to the right striatal D1 receptor increased. Excess dopamine coming from L-DOPA medication likely activates D3 receptors thus making right and left striatal D1 receptors equally responsive to dopamine. These results show that dyskinesia occurs concurrently with a right/left striatal balance in D1 receptor-mediated neurotransmission.

  8. A quantitative measure of handwriting dysfluency for assessing tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiuri, Michael P; Teulings, Hans-Leo; Dean, Charles E; Lohr, James B

    2015-04-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a movement disorder commonly associated with chronic exposure to antidopaminergic medications, which may be in some cases disfiguring and socially disabling. The consensus from a growing body of research on the incidence and prevalence of TD in the modern era of antipsychotics indicates that this disorder has not disappeared continues to challenge the effective management of psychotic symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. A fundamental component in an effective strategy for managing TD is its reliable and accurate assessment. In the present study, we examined the clinical utility of a brief handwriting dysfluency measure for quantifying TD. Digitized samples of handwritten circles and loops were obtained from 62 psychosis patients with or without TD and from 50 healthy subjects. Two measures of dysfluent pen movements were extracted from each vertical pen stroke, including normalized jerk and the number of acceleration peaks. Tardive dyskinesia patients exhibited significantly higher dysfluency scores than non-TD patients and controls. Severity of handwriting movement dysfluency was correlated with Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale severity ratings for some tasks. The procedure yielded high degrees of test-retest reliability. These results suggest that measures of handwriting movement dysfluency may be particularly useful for objectively evaluating the efficacy of pharmacotherapeutic strategies for treating TD.

  9. New and emerging treatments for symptomatic tardive dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana AQ

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abdul Qayyum Rana,1–4 Zishan M Chaudry,5 Pierre J Blanchet6 1Parkinson's Clinic of Eastern Toronto and Movement Disorders Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Scarborough Memory Program, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Journal of Parkinsonism and RLS, Toronto, ON, Canada; 4Bulletin of World Parkinson's Program, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Saba University School of Medicine, The Bottom, Saba, Dutch Caribbean; 6Department of Stomatology, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: The aim of this review is to assess new, emerging, and experimental treatment options for tardive dyskinesia (TD. The methods to obtain relevant studies for review included a MEDLINE search and a review of studies in English, along with checking reference lists of articles. The leading explanatory models of TD development include dopamine receptor supersensitivity, GABA depletion, cholinergic deficiency, neurotoxicity, oxidative stress, changes in synaptic plasticity, and defective neuroadaptive signaling. As such, a wide range of treatment options are available. To provide a complete summary of choices we review atypical antipsychotics along with resveratrol, botulinum toxin, Ginkgo biloba, tetrabenazine, clonazepam, melatonin, essential fatty acids, zonisamide, levetiracetam, branched-chain amino acids, drug combinations, and invasive surgical treatments. There is currently no US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for TD; however, prudent use of atypical antipsychotics with routine monitoring remain the cornerstone of therapy, with experimental treatment options available for further management. Keywords: tardive dyskinesia, first-generation antipsychotics, motor symptoms, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, atypical antipsychotics

  10. The application of hematopoietic growth factors in drug-induced agranulocytosis: a review of 70 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprikkelman, A.; de Wolf, J. T.; Vellenga, E.

    1994-01-01

    Since 1989, granulocyte-macrophage and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSF, G-CSF) have been increasingly applied in the treatment of drug-induced agranulocytosis. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of GM-CSF and G-CSF in the treatment of drug-induced agranulocytosis, we have studied

  11. Drug-induced gingival enlargement: Series of cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Manzur-Villalobos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gingival enlargement (GA is a benign condition of the oral cavity that is characterized by the excessive growth of the gingiva in mass and volume. This lesion is not only caused by hereditary factors or poor oral hygiene, but also by the intake of medications, including antihypertensive, anticonvulsant and immunosuppressive drugs. Objective: To sensitize the prevention or early care in patients with pathologies that merit the use of antihypertensive and anticonvulsants in conjunction with the dentist, to treat or avoid the drug-induced gingival enlargement (DIGE. Materials and methods: A series of clinical cases of patients with gingival enlargement by various drugs are reported, including Phenytoin, Amlodipine and Nifedipine. Periodontal and gingivectomy hygienic phase measures were applied to obtain better effects. Results: Satisfactory results were obtained with a considerable decrease in DIGE. Conclusions: The integral management is important in conjunction with the treating physician to follow up the drug that can be generating gingival enlargement. It is necessary to employ an initial approach with strategies of periodontal hygiene, and in severe cases and, as last resort, the periodontal surgery with gingivectomy and gingivoplasty.

  12. HLA Association with Drug-Induced Adverse Reactions

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    Wen-Lang Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions (ADRs remain a common and major problem in healthcare. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN with mortality rate ranges from 10% to more than 30%, can be life threatening. A number of recent studies demonstrated that ADRs possess strong genetic predisposition. ADRs induced by several drugs have been shown to have significant associations with specific alleles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes. For example, hypersensitivity to abacavir, a drug used for treating of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, has been proposed to be associated with allele 57:01 of HLA-B gene (terms HLA-B∗57:01. The incidences of abacavir hypersensitivity are much higher in Caucasians compared to other populations due to various allele frequencies in different ethnic populations. The antithyroid drug- (ATDs- induced agranulocytosis are strongly associated with two alleles: HLA-B∗38:02 and HLA-DRB1∗08:03. In addition, HLA-B∗15:02 allele was reported to be related to carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN, and HLA-B∗57:01 in abacavir hypersensitivity and flucloxacillin induced drug-induced liver injury (DILI. In this review, we summarized the alleles of HLA genes which have been proposed to have association with ADRs caused by different drugs.

  13. Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases. Often forgotten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poschenrieder, F.; Stroszczynski, C.; Hamer, O.W.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases (DILD) are probably more common than diagnosed. Due to their potential reversibility, increased vigilance towards DILD is appropriate also from the radiologist's point of view, particularly as these diseases regularly exhibit radiological correlates in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the lungs. Based on personal experience typical relatively common manifestations of DILD are diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), eosinophilic pneumonia (EP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), organizing pneumonia (OP), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). These patterns are presented based on case studies, whereby emphasis is placed on the clinical context. This is to highlight the relevance of interdisciplinary communication and discussion in the diagnostic field of DILD as it is a diagnosis of exclusion or of probability in most cases. Helpful differential diagnostic indications for the presence of DILD, such as an accompanying eosinophilia or increased attenuation of pulmonary consolidations in amiodarone-induced pneumopathy are mentioned and the freely available online database http://www.pneumotox.com is presented. (orig.) [de

  14. Cardiovascular drugs inducing QT prolongation: facts and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Carlos A; Opezzo, Javier A W; Mayer, Marcos A; Höcht, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Acquired QT syndrome is mainly caused by the administration of drugs that prolong ventricular repolarization. On the other hand, the risk of drug-induced torsades de pointes is increased by numerous predisposing factors, such as genetic predisposition, female sex, hypokalemia and cardiac dysfunction. This adverse reaction is induced by different chemical compounds used for the treatment of a variety of pathologies, including arrhythmias. As it is known, antiarrhythmic agents and other cardiovascular drugs can prolong the QT interval, causing this adverse reaction. Of the 20 most commonly reported drugs, 10 were cardiovascular agents and these appeared in 348 of the reports (46%). Class Ia antiarrhythmic agents have frequently been linked to inducing arrhythmia, including torsades de pointes. Sotalol and amiodarone, class III antiarrhythmics, are known to prolong the QT interval by blocking I(Kr). Due to the severity of events caused by the therapeutic use of these drugs, in this work of revision the cardiovascular drugs that present this property and the factors and evidence will be mentioned.

  15. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome with human herpesvirus-6 reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeba Riyaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old man, on carbamazepine for the past 3 months, was referred as a case of atypical measles. On examination, he had high-grade fever, generalized itchy rash, cough, vomiting and jaundice. A provisional diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity syndrome to carbamazepine was made with a differential diagnosis of viral exanthema with systemic complications. Laboratory investigations revealed leukocytosis with eosnophilia and elevated liver enzymes. Real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR on throat swab and blood was suggestive of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6. Measles was ruled out by PCR and serology. The diagnosis of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS was confirmed, which could explain all the features manifested by the patient. HHV-6 infects almost all humans by age 2 years. It infects and replicates in CD4 T lymphocytes and establishes latency in human peripheral blood monocytes or macrophages and early bone marrow progenitors. In DIHS, allergic reaction to the causative drug stimulates T cells, which leads to reactivation of the herpesvirus genome. DIHS is treated by withdrawal of the culprit drug and administration of systemic steroids. Our patient responded well to steroids and HHV-6 was negative on repeat real-time multiplex PCR at the end of treatment.

  16. Diphenhydramine as a Cause of Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunseok Namn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced liver injury (DILI is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the Unites States and accounts for 10% of acute hepatitis cases. We report the only known case of diphenhydramine-induced acute liver injury in the absence of concomitant medications. A 28-year-old man with history of 13/14-chromosomal translocation presented with fevers, vomiting, and jaundice. Aspartate-aminotransferase and alanine-aminotransferase levels peaked above 20,000 IU/L and 5,000 IU/L, respectively. He developed coagulopathy but without altered mental status. Patient reported taking up to 400 mg diphenhydramine nightly, without concomitant acetaminophen, for insomnia. He denied taking other medications, supplements, antibiotics, and herbals. A thorough workup of liver injury ruled out viral hepatitis (including A, B, C, and E, autoimmune, toxic, ischemic, and metabolic etiologies including Wilson’s disease. A liver biopsy was consistent with DILI without evidence of iron or copper deposition. Diphenhydramine was determined to be the likely culprit. This is the first reported case of diphenhydramine-induced liver injury without concomitant use of acetaminophen.

  17. Drug-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension: a recent outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérald Simonneau

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a rare disorder characterised by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly to appetite suppressant intake drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used, but are considered possible risk factors, for PAH. Dasatinib, dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, potentially in part reversible after dasatinib withdrawal. Recently, several studies have raised the issue of potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and a few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility, and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drug-induced PAH.

  18. Drug-induced liver injury due to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsson, Einar S

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important differential diagnosis in patients with abnormal liver tests and normal hepatobiliary imaging. Of all known liver diseases, the diagnosis of DILI is probably one of the most difficult one to be established. In all major studies on DILI, antibiotics are the most common type of drugs that have been reported. The clinical phenotype of different types of antibiotics associated with liver injury is highly variable. Some widely used antibiotics such as amoxicillin-clavulanate have been shown to have a delayed onset on liver injury and recently cefazolin has been found to lead to liver injury 1-3 weeks after exposure of a single infusion. The other extreme is the nature of nitrofurantoin-induced liver injury, which can occur after a few years of treatment and lead to acute liver failure (ALF) or autoimmune-like reaction. Most patients with liver injury associated with use of antibiotics have a favorable prognosis. However, patients with jaundice have approximately 10% risk of death from liver failure and/or require liver transplantation. In rare instances, the hepatoxicity can lead to chronic injury and vanishing bile duct syndrome. Given, sometimes very severe consequences of the adverse liver reactions, it cannot be over emphasized that the indication for the different antibiotics should be evidence-based and symptoms and signs of liver injury from the drugs should lead to prompt cessation of therapy.

  19. Drug induced exocytosis of glycogen in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Christopher T; Fuller, Maria; Hopwood, John J; Meikle, Peter J; Brooks, Doug A

    2016-10-28

    Pompe disease is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase, and this leads to glycogen accumulation in the autolysosomes of patient cells. Glycogen storage material is exocytosed at a basal rate in cultured Pompe cells, with one study showing up to 80% is released under specific culture conditions. Critically, exocytosis induction may reduce glycogen storage in Pompe patients, providing the basis for a therapeutic strategy whereby stored glycogen is redirected to an extracellular location and subsequently degraded by circulating amylases. The focus of the current study was to identify compounds capable of inducing rapid glycogen exocytosis in cultured Pompe cells. Here, calcimycin, lysophosphatidylcholine and α-l-iduronidase each significantly increased glycogen exocytosis compared to vehicle-treated controls. The most effective compound, calcimycin, induced exocytosis through a Ca 2+ -dependent mechanism, although was unable to release a pool of vesicular glycogen larger than the calcimycin-induced exocytic pore. There was reduced glycogen release from Pompe compared to unaffected cells, primarily due to increased granule size in Pompe cells. Drug induced exocytosis therefore shows promise as a therapeutic approach for Pompe patients but strategies are required to enhance the release of large molecular weight glycogen granules. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Simultaneous sinus and lung infections in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanin, Mikkel Christian; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Aanaes, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The sinuses should be considered as a bacterial reservoir and a target for surgery and antibiotic treatment in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The observed decrease in serum precipitating antibodies (precipitins) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa may indicate a beneficial...

  1. Changes in kynurenine pathway metabolism in Parkinson patients with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Jesper F; Andersen, Andreas D; Binzer, Michael; Blaabjerg, Morten; Heegaard, Niels H H; Stenager, Egon; Faergeman, Nils J; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert

    2017-09-01

    L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most effective drug in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease, but chronic use is associated with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in more than half the patients after 10 years of treatment. L-DOPA treatment may affect tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway. Altered levels of kynurenine metabolites can affect glutamatergic transmission and may play a role in the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. In this study, we assessed kynurenine metabolites in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson's disease patients and controls. Parkinson patients (n = 26) were clinically assessed for severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS) and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (UDysRS). Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected after overnight fasting and 1-2 h after intake of L-DOPA or other anti-Parkinson medication. Metabolites were analyzed in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of controls (n = 14), Parkinson patients receiving no L-DOPA (n = 8), patients treated with L-DOPA without dyskinesia (n = 8), and patients with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (n = 10) using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We observed approximately fourfold increase in the 3-hydroxykynurenine/kynurenic acid ratio in plasma of Parkinson's patients with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Anthranilic acid levels were decreased in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of this patient group. 5-Hydroxytryptophan levels were twofold increased in all L-DOPA-treated Parkinson's patients. We conclude that a higher 3-hydroxykynurenine/kynurenic acid ratio in plasma may serve as a biomarker for L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Longitudinal studies including larger patients cohorts are needed to verify whether the changes observed here may serve as a prognostic marker for L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. Impulse control disorders and levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Voon, V; Napier, TC; Frank, MJ; Sgambato-Faure, V; Grace, AA; Rodriguez-Oroz, M; Obeso, J; Bezard, E; Fernagut, P-O

    2017-01-01

    Dopaminergic medications used in the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease are associated with motor and non-motor behavioural side-effects, such as dyskinesias and impulse control disorders also known as behavioural addictions. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias occur in up to 80% of patients with Parkinson's after a few years of chronic treatment. Impulse control disorders, including gambling disorder, binge eating disorder, compulsive sexual behaviour, and compulsive shopping occur in a...

  3. Maladaptive synaptic plasticity in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID in patients with Parkinson disease (PD could be due to maladaptive plasticity of corticostriatal synapses in response to L-DOPA treatment. A series of recent studies has revealed that LID is associated with marked morphological plasticity of striatal dendritic spines, particularly cell type-specific structural plasticity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs in the striatum. In addition, evidence demonstrating the occurrence of plastic adaptations, including aberrant morphological and functional features, in multiple components of cortico-basal ganglionic circuitry, such as primary motor cortex (M1 and basal ganglia (BG output nuclei. These adaptations have been implicated in the pathophysiology of LID. Here, we briefly review recent studies that have addressed maladaptive plastic changes within the cortico-BG loop in dyskinetic animal models of PD and patients with PD.

  4. Corticostriatal Plastic Changes in Experimental L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Ghiglieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson’s disease (PD, alteration of dopamine- (DA- dependent striatal functions and pulsatile stimulation of DA receptors caused by the discontinuous administration of levodopa (L-DOPA lead to a complex cascade of events affecting the postsynaptic striatal neurons that might account for the appearance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID. Experimental models of LID have been widely used and extensively characterized in rodents and electrophysiological studies provided remarkable insights into the inner mechanisms underlying L-DOPA-induced corticostriatal plastic changes. Here we provide an overview of recent findings that represent a further step into the comprehension of mechanisms underlying maladaptive changes of basal ganglia functions in response to L-DOPA and associated to development of LID.

  5. Mucuna pruriens attenuates haloperidol-induced orofacial dyskinesia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathan, Amjadkhan A; Mohan, Mahalaxmi; Kasture, Ameya S; Kasture, Sanjay B

    2011-04-01

    Neuroleptic-induced tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a motor disorder of the orofacial region resulting from chronic neuroleptic treatment. The agents improving dopaminergic transmission improve TD. Mucuna pruriens seed contains levodopa and amino acids. The effect of methanolic extract of M. pruriens seeds (MEMP) was studied on haloperidol-induced TD, alongside the changes in lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase levels. The effect of MEMP was also evaluated in terms of the generation of hydroxyl and 1,1-diphenyl,2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. MEMP (100 and 200 mg kg⁻¹) inhibited haloperidol-induced vacuous chewing movements, orofacial bursts and biochemical changes. MEMP also inhibited hydroxyl radical generation and DPPH. The results of the present study suggest that MEMP by virtue of its free radical scavenging activity prevents neuroleptic-induced TD.

  6. Plasma HVA, tardive dyskinesia and psychotic symptoms in long-term drug-free inpatients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscettola, G; Barbato, G; de Bartolomeis, A; Monteleone, P; Pickar, D

    1990-09-01

    Plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) levels were measured in 16 chronically ill patients with schizophrenia who also suffered from tardive dyskinesia, and in a group of 14 chronically ill patients with schizophrenia who did not have tardive dyskinesia. All patients were studied following an extensive drug-free period (mean = 32.9 months). Patients with orofacial dyskinesia had significantly lower levels of pHVA than did controls. In patients without tardive dyskinesia, pHVA levels were significantly correlated with both positive and negative symptomatology. In contrast, pHVA levels from patients with tardive dyskinesia bore neither a significant nor a nearly significant relationship to symptomatology. The implications of these findings for dopaminergic models of tardive dyskinesia are discussed.

  7. A2A Receptor Antagonism and Dyskinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micaela Morelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyskinesia, a major complication of treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD, involves two phases: induction, which is responsible for dyskinesia onset, and expression, which underlies its clinical manifestation. The unique cellular and regional distribution of adenosine A2A receptors in basal ganglia areas that are richly innervated by dopamine, and their antagonistic role towards dopamine receptor stimulation, have positioned A2A receptor antagonists as an attractive nondopaminergic target to improve the motor deficits that characterize PD. In this paper, we describe the biochemical characteristics of A2A receptors and the effects of adenosine A2A antagonists in rodent and primate models of PD on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, together with relevant biomarker studies. We also review clinical trials of A2A antagonists as adjuncts to L-DOPA in PD patients with motor fluctuations. These studies have generally demonstrated that the addition of an A2A antagonist to a stable L-DOPA regimen reduces OFF time and mildly increases dyskinesia. However, limited clinical data suggest that the addition of an A2A antagonist along with a reduction of L-DOPA might maintain anti-Parkinsonian benefit and reduce dyskinesia. Whether A2A antagonists might reduce the development of dyskinesia has not yet been tested clinically.

  8. Drug induced acute kidney injury: an experimental animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.W.A.; Khan, B.T.; Qazi, R.A.; Ashraf, M.; Waqar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the extent of drug induced nephrotoxicity in laboratory animals for determining the role and extent of iatrogenic kidney damage in patients exposed to nephrotoxic drugs in various clinical setups. Study Design: Randomized control trail. Place and Duration of study: Pharmacology department and animal house of Army Medical College from Jan 2011 to Aug 2011. Material and Methods: Thirty six mixed breed rabbits were used in this study. Animals were randomly divided into six groups consisting of six rabbits in each. Groups were named A, B, C, D, E and F. Group A was control group. Group B was given 0.9% normal saline. Group C rabbits were given acute nephrotoxic single dose of amphotericin B deoxycholate. Group D received 0.9% normal saline 10ml/kg followed by amphotericin B infusion. Group E was injected acute nephrotoxic regimen of cyclosporine and amphotericin B infusion. Group F received saline loading along with acute nephrotoxic regimen of cyclosporine and amphotericin B infusion. Results: Biochemical and histopathological analysis showed significant kidney injury in rabbits exposed to acute nephrotoxic doses of amphotericin B and cyclosporine. Toxicity was additive when the two drugs were administered simultaneously. Group of rabbits with saline loading had significantly lesser kidney damage. Conclusion: Iatrogenic acute kidney damage is a major cause of morbidity in experimental animals exposed to such nephrotoxic drugs like amphotericin B and cyclosporine, used either alone or in combination. Clinical studies are recommended to assess the extent of iatrogenic renal damage in patients and its economic burden. Efficient and cost effective protective measure may be adopted in clinical setups against such adverse effects. (author)

  9. Haloperidol-induced striatal Nur77 expression in a non-human primate model of tardive dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Souha; Blanchet, Pierre J.; Lévesque, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a delayed and potentially irreversible motor complication arising in patients chronically exposed to antipsychotic drugs. As several modern (so-called atypical) antipsychotic drugs are common offenders, the widening clinical indications for prescription as well as exposure of vulnerable individuals, TD will remain a significant drug-induced unwanted side effect. In addition, the pathophysiology of TD remains elusive and therapeutics difficult. Based on rodent experiments, we have previously shown that the transcriptional factor Nur77 (also known as NGFI-B or Nr4a1) is induced in the striatum following antipsychotic drug exposure as part of a long-term neuroadaptive process. To confirm this, we exposed adult capuchin (Cebus apella) monkeys to prolonged treatments with haloperidol (median 18.5 months, N=11) or clozapine (median 6 months, N=6). Six untreated animals were used as controls. Six haloperidol-treated animals developed mild TD movements similar to those found in humans. No TD was observed in the clozapine group. Postmortem analysis of Nur77 expression measured by in situ hybridization revealed a stark contrast between the two drugs, as Nur77 mRNA levels in the caudate-putamen were strongly upregulated in animals exposed to haloperidol while spared following clozapine treatment. Interestingly, within the haloperidol-treated group, TD-free animals showed higher Nur77 expression in putamen subterritories compared to dyskinetic animals. This suggests that Nur77 expression might be associated with a reduced risk to TD in this experimental model and could provide a novel target for drug intervention. PMID:23551242

  10. MSBIS: A Multi-Step Biomedical Informatics Screening Approach for Identifying Medications that Mitigate the Risks of Metoclopramide-Induced Tardive Dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2009 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA placed a black box warning on metoclopramide (MCP due to the increased risks and prevalence of tardive dyskinesia (TD. In this study, we developed a multi-step biomedical informatics screening (MSBIS approach leveraging publicly available bioactivity and drug safety data to identify concomitant drugs that mitigate the risks of MCP-induced TD. MSBIS includes (1 TargetSearch (http://dxulab.org/software bioinformatics scoring for drug anticholinergic activity using CHEMBL bioactivity data; (2 unadjusted odds ratio (UOR scoring for indications of TD-mitigating effects using the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS; (3 adjusted odds ratio (AOR re-scoring by removing the effect of cofounding factors (age, gender, reporting year; (4 logistic regression (LR coefficient scoring for confirming the best TD-mitigating drug candidates. Drugs with increasing TD protective potential and statistical significance were obtained at each screening step. Fentanyl is identified as the most promising drug against MCP-induced TD (coefficient: −2.68; p-value < 0.01. The discovery is supported by clinical reports that patients fully recovered from MCP-induced TD after fentanyl-induced general anesthesia. Loperamide is identified as a potent mitigating drug against a broader range of drug-induced movement disorders through pharmacokinetic modifications. Using drug-induced TD as an example, we demonstrated that MSBIS is an efficient in silico tool for unknown drug-drug interaction detection, drug repurposing, and combination therapy design.

  11. Trial of dextromethorphan/quinidine to treat levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Susan H; Metman, Leonard Verhagen; Nutt, John G; Brodsky, Matthew; Factor, Stewart A; Lang, Anthony E; Pope, Laura E; Knowles, Nadine; Siffert, João

    2017-06-01

    Nondopaminergic pathways represent potential targets to treat levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease (PD). This pilot-study (NCT01767129) examined the safety/efficacy of the sigma-1 receptor-agonist and glutamatergic/monoaminergic modulator, dextromethorphan plus quinidine (to inhibit rapid dextromethorphan metabolism), for treating levodopa-induced dyskinesia. PD patients were randomized to dextromethorphan/quinidine (45 mg/10 mg twice daily)/placebo in two 2-week double-blind, crossover treatment periods, with intervening 2-week washout. After 14 days, a 2-hour intravenous levodopa-infusion was administered. Patient examinations were videotaped before infusion ("off" state) and every 30 minutes during and afterwards until patients returned to "off." The primary endpoint was dyskinesia-severity during infusion measured by Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale part 3 area-under-curve scores (blinded expert rated). Additional endpoints included other dyskinesia/motor assessments, global measures of clinical-change, and adverse-events. A total of 13 patients were randomized and completed the study (efficacy-evaluable population). Dyskinesia-severity was nonsignificantly lower with dextromethorphan/quinidine than placebo during infusion (area-under-curve 966.5 vs 1048.8; P = .191 [efficacy-evaluable patients]), and significantly lower in a post-hoc sensitivity analysis of the per-protocol-population (efficacy-evaluable patients with ≥ 80% study-drug-compliance, n = 12) when measured from infusion start to 4-hours post-infusion completion (area-under-curve 1585.0 vs 1911.3; P = .024). Mean peak dyskinesia decreased significantly from infusion-start to return to "off" (13.3 vs 14.9; P = .018 [efficacy-evaluable patients]). A total of 9 patients rated dyskinesia "much/very much improved" on dextromethorphan/quinidine versus 1-patient on placebo. Dextromethorphan/quinidine did not worsen PD-motor scores, was generally well tolerated, and

  12. Untangling cortico-striatal connectivity and cross-frequency coupling in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana eBelic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We simultaneously recorded local field potentials in the primary motor cortex and sensorimotor striatum in awake, freely behaving, 6-OHDA lesioned hemi-parkinsonian rats in order to study the features directly related to pathological states such as parkinsonian state and levodopa-induced dyskinesia. We analysed the spectral characteristics of the obtained signals and observed that during dyskinesia the most prominent feature was a relative power increase in the high gamma frequency range at around 80 Hz, while for the parkinsonian state it was in the beta frequency range. Here we show that during both pathological states effective connectivity in terms of Granger causality is bidirectional with an accent on the striatal influence on the cortex. In the case of dyskinesia, we also found a high increase in effective connectivity at 80 Hz. In order to further understand the 80- Hz phenomenon, we performed cross-frequency analysis and observed characteristic patterns in the case of dyskinesia but not in the case of the parkinsonian state or the healthy state. We noted a large decrease in the modulation of the amplitude at 80 Hz by the phase of low frequency oscillations (up to ~10 Hz across both structures in the case of dyskinesia. This may suggest a lack of coupling between the low frequency activity of the recorded network and the group of neurons active at ~80 Hz.

  13. Hearing loss in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreicher, Kathryn L; Schopper, Heather K; Naik, Akash N; Hatch, Jonathan L; Meyer, Ted A

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the type and severity of hearing impairment in pediatric patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and relate these measures to patient demographics, treatment options, and other otologic factors. A retrospective analysis of children with a diagnosis of PCD, Kartagener's syndrome, or situs inversus in the AudGen Database was conducted. Audiograms were analyzed for type of hearing loss (HL), severity, laterality, and progression. Medical charts were reviewed to identify factors that influence severity and progression of hearing loss. 56 patients met inclusion criteria and 42 patients had HL. 66.6% had bilateral and 33.3% had unilateral loss (70 total ears with HL). Conductive hearing loss (CHL) was the most common type of HL, though 30% of children had some sensorineural component to their hearing loss. 92.9% of children with HL received at least one diagnosis of otitis media, but HL did not improve in the majority (77.8%) of ears in our study regardless of ear tube placement. Slight to mild CHL and all types of otitis media are prevalent among patients with PCD, and some of these children have sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). All patients diagnosed with situs inversus at birth should be evaluated by an otolaryngologist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Increased putamen hypercapnic vasoreactivity in levodopa-induced dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, Vincent A; Schindlbeck, Katharina A; Tang, Chris C; Niethammer, Martin; Choi, Yoon Young; Markowitz, Daniel; Nazem, Amir; Nardi, Dominic; Carras, Nicholas; Feigin, Andrew; Ma, Yilong; Peng, Shichun; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2017-10-19

    In a rodent model of Parkinson's disease (PD), levodopa-induced involuntary movements have been linked to striatal angiogenesis - a process that is difficult to document in living human subjects. Angiogenesis can be accompanied by localized increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses to hypercapnia. We therefore explored the possibility that, in the absence of levodopa, local hypercapnic CBF responses are abnormally increased in PD patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) but not in their nondyskinetic (NLID) counterparts. We used H215O PET to scan 24 unmedicated PD subjects (12 LID and 12 NLID) and 12 matched healthy subjects in the rest state under normocapnic and hypercapnic conditions. Hypercapnic CBF responses were compared to corresponding levodopa responses from the same subjects. Group differences in hypercapnic vasoreactivity were significant only in the posterior putamen, with greater CBF responses in LID subjects compared with the other subjects. Hypercapnic and levodopa-mediated CBF responses measured in this region exhibited distinct associations with disease severity: the former correlated with off-state motor disability ratings but not symptom duration, whereas the latter correlated with symptom duration but not motor disability. These are the first in vivo human findings linking LID to microvascular changes in the basal ganglia.

  15. Continuous drug delivery in early- and late-stage Parkinson's disease as a strategy for avoiding dyskinesia induction and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenner, P.; McCreary, A. C.; Scheller, D. K. A.

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) is dependent on the use of dopamine replacement therapy in the form of l-dopa and dopamine agonist drugs. However, the development of dyskinesia (chorea, dystonia, athetosis) can become treatment limiting. The initiation of dyskinesia

  16. Tardive dyskinesia and DRD3, HTR2A and HTR2C gene polymorphisms in Russian psychiatric inpatients from Siberia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Hadithy, A. F. Y.; Ivanova, S. A.; Pechlivanoglou, P.; Semke, A.; Fedorenko, O.; Kornetova, E.; Ryadovaya, L.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.; Wilffert, B.; Bruggeman, R.; Loonen, A. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Pharmacogenetics of tardive dyskinesia and dopamine D3 (DRD3), serotonin 2A (HTR2A), and 2C (HTR2C) receptors has been examined in various populations, but not in Russians. Purpose: To investigate the association between orofaciolingual (TDof) and limb-truncal dyskinesias (TDlt) and

  17. Comparison of clinical features between primary and drug-induced sleep-related eating disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komada Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yoko Komada,1 Yoshikazu Takaesu,2 Kentaro Matsui,3 Masaki Nakamura,3 Shingo Nishida,3 Meri Kanno,3,† Akira Usui,3 Yuichi Inoue1,3 1Department of Somnology, 2Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, 3Japan Somnology Center, Institute of Neuropsychiatry, Tokyo, Japan †Meri Kanno passed away on March 1, 2016 Purpose: The aim of this study was to ascertain the clinical characteristics of drug-induced sleep-related eating disorder (SRED. Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 30 patients with primary SRED (without any comorbid sleep disorders and who were not taking any possible causative medications, and ten patients with drug-induced SRED (occurrence of SRED episodes after starting nightly medication of sedative drugs, which completely resolved after dose reduction or discontinuation of the sedatives. Results: All patients with drug-induced SRED took multiple types of sedatives, such as benzodiazepines or benzodiazepine receptor agonists. Clinical features of drug-induced SRED compared with primary SRED were as follows: higher mean age of onset (40 years old in drug-induced SRED vs 26 years old in primary SRED, significantly higher rate of patients who had total amnesia during most of their SRED episodes (75.0% vs 31.8%, significantly lower rate of comorbidity of night eating syndrome (0% vs 63.3%, and significantly lower rate of history of sleepwalking (10.0% vs 46.7%. Increased doses of benzodiazepine receptor agonists may be responsible for drug-induced SRED. Conclusion: The clinical features of drug-induced SRED were different from those of primary SRED, possibly reflecting differences in the underlying mechanisms between these two categories of SREDs. Keywords: nocturnal eating syndrome, night eating, eating disorder, hypnotics, amnesia, sleepwalking, benzodiazepine

  18. Changes in kynurenine pathway metabolism in Parkinson patients with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper F; Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Binzer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    L-DOPA is the most effective drug in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease, but chronic use is associated with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in more than half the patients after 10 years of treatment. L-DOPA treatment may affect tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway. Altered...... levels of kynurenine metabolites can affect glutamatergic transmission and may play a role in the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. In this study we assessed kynurenine metabolites in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson's disease patients and controls. Parkinson patients (n=26) were...... clinically assessed for severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS) and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (UDysRS). Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected after overnight fasting and 1-2 hours after intake of L-DOPA or other anti-Parkinson medication. Metabolites were analyzed in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid...

  19. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for biliary dyskinesia in children: frequency increasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacher, Martin; Yannam, Govardhana R; Muensterer, Oliver J; Aprahamian, Charles J; Haricharan, Ramanath N; Perger, Lena; Bartle, Donna; Talathi, Sonia S; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Anderson, Scott A; Chen, Mike K; Harmon, Carroll M

    2013-08-01

    The treatment of children with biliary dyskinesia (BD) is controversial. As we recently observed an increasing frequency of referrals for BD in our institution the aim of the study was to re-evaluate the long-term outcome in children with BD. Children with laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) for suspected BD between 8/2006 and 5/2011 were included. A pathologic ejection fraction (EF) was defined as <35%. The long-term effect of cholecystectomy was assessed via a Likert scale symptom questionnaire. 82 children (median age 13.5 years, mean BMI 25.8) were included. CCK-HIDA scan was pathologic in 74 children (90.2%). Mean EF was 16.4%. Histology revealed chronic cholecystitis in 48 (58.5%) children and was normal in 30 children (36.5%). The frequency of LC for suspected BD increased by a factor of 4.3 in the last 10 years. Long term follow-up showed that only 23/52 children (44.2%) were symptom-free after LC. Patients with chronic inflammation were more likely to have persistent symptoms (p=0.017). An EF<15% was associated with a resolution of symptoms (p=0.031). The frequency of LC for suspected BD in our institution has increased significantly during recent years. The long-term efficacy in our cohort was only 44.2%. We believe that laparoscopic cholecystectomy is likely helpful in patients with an EF<15%. However, in children with an EF of 15%-35%, based upon our data, we would highly recommend an appropriately thorough pre-op testing to exclude other gastrointestinal disorders prior to consideration of operative management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. PRRT2 links infantile convulsions and paroxysmal dyskinesia with migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloarec, Robin; Bruneau, Nadine; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Massacrier, Annick; Salmi, Manal; Bataillard, Marc; Boulay, Clotilde; Caraballo, Roberto; Fejerman, Natalio; Genton, Pierre; Hirsch, Edouard; Hunter, Alasdair; Lesca, Gaetan; Motte, Jacques; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanlaville, Damien; Wong, Sau-Wei; Fu, Ying-Hui; Rochette, Jacques; Ptáček, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Whole genome sequencing and the screening of 103 families recently led us to identify PRRT2 (proline-rich-transmembrane protein) as the gene causing infantile convulsions (IC) with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) (PKD/IC syndrome, formerly ICCA). There is interfamilial and intrafamilial variability and the patients may have IC or PKD. Association of IC with hemiplegic migraine (HM) has also been reported. In order to explore the mutational and clinical spectra, we analyzed 34 additional families with either typical PKD/IC or PKD/IC with migraine. Methods: We performed Sanger sequencing of all PRRT2 coding exons and of exon-intron boundaries in the probands and in their relatives whenever appropriate. Results: Two known and 2 novel PRRT2 mutations were detected in 18 families. The p.R217Pfs*8 recurrent mutation was found in ≈50% of typical PKD/IC, and the unreported p.R145Gfs*31 in one more typical family. PRRT2 mutations were also found in PKD/IC with migraine: p.R217Pfs*8 cosegregated with PKD associated with HM in one family, and was also detected in one IC patient having migraine with aura, in related PKD/IC familial patients having migraine without aura, and in one sporadic migraineur with abnormal MRI. Previously reported p.R240X was found in one patient with PKD with migraine without aura. The novel frameshift p.S248Afs*65 was identified in a PKD/IC family member with IC and migraine with aura. Conclusions: We extend the spectrum of PRRT2 mutations and phenotypes to HM and to other types of migraine in the context of PKD/IC, and emphasize the phenotypic pleiotropy seen in patients with PRRT2 mutations. PMID:23077017

  1. Drug-Induced Vasculitis: New Insights and a Changing Lineup of Suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Rafael G

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of therapeutic agents have been associated with a vasculitic syndrome. This usually involves small vessels, primarily capillaries, venules, and arterioles in leukocytoclastic vasculitis, small-vessel disease similar to an antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related vasculitis, or mid-sized muscular arteries in a polyarteritis-like picture. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are present in many cases of vasculitis regardless of the size of the vessel involved. Monoclonal antibodies used to treat many autoimmune disorders have become the most common agents associated with drug-induced vasculitis. Important advances in epigenetics, genetics, and neutrophil apoptosis are providing new insights into the pathogenesis of both drug-induced vasculitis and idiopathic vasculitis. Although management has not changed significantly in the past few years where withdrawal of the offending agent is the primary intervention, increasing awareness of drug-induced vasculitis can lead to earlier diagnosis and prevention of severe organ damage and fatalities.

  2. Antithyroid drug-induced agranulocytosis complicated by pneumococcal sepsis and upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Naoto; Ohnishi, Hisashi; Nishiuma, Teruaki; Doukuni, Ryota; Umezawa, Kanoko; Oozone, Sachiko; Kuramoto, Emi; Yoshimura, Sho; Kinami, Saori

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a rare pathogen of sepsis in patients with antithyroid drug-induced agranulocytosis. We herein describe a case of antithyroid drug-induced agranulocytosis complicated by pneumococcal sepsis and upper airway obstruction. A 27-year-old woman who was previously prescribed methimazole for nine months presented with a four-day history of a sore throat. She nearly choked and was diagnosed with febrile agranulocytosis. She was successfully treated with intubation, intravenous antibiotics and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Her blood cultures yielded S. pneumoniae. Emergency airway management, treatment of sepsis and the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor can improve the clinical course of antithyroid drug-induced pneumococcal sepsis in patients with airway obstruction.

  3. Spontaneous reports on drug-induced pancreatitis in Denmark from 1968 to 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, V; Sonne, J; Andersen, M

    2001-01-01

    valproate (two cases), clomipramine (one case) and azathioprine (one case). Definite relationship was stated for mesalazine (three cases), azathioprine (two cases) and simvastatin (one case) on the basis of re-challenge. A possible or probable causality was considered for a further 30 drugs including 5...... (measles" mumps/rubella) vaccination. CONCLUSION: Drug-induced pancreatitis is rarely reported. The incidence may be increasing and the course is often serious. This is the first report on definite simvastatin-induced pancreatitis. Further studies on the pancreotoxic potential of drugs are warranted.......OBJECTIVES: To present an update on drug-induced pancreatitis reported to the Danish Committee on Adverse Drug Reactions. DESIGN: Retrospective study of spontaneous case reports to the Danish reporting system on adverse drug reactions. METHODS: All cases of suspected drug-induced pancreatitis...

  4. Hepatocyte-based in vitro model for assessment of drug-induced cholestasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Sagnik; Richert, Lysiane; Augustijns, Patrick; Annaert, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of drug-induced cholestasis remains a challenge during drug development. We have developed and validated a biorelevant sandwich-cultured hepatocytes- (SCH) based model that can identify compounds causing cholestasis by altering bile acid disposition. Human and rat SCH were exposed (24–48 h) to known cholestatic and/or hepatotoxic compounds, in the presence or in the absence of a concentrated mixture of bile acids (BAs). Urea assay was used to assess (compromised) hepatocyte functionality at the end of the incubations. The cholestatic potential of the compounds was expressed by calculating a drug-induced cholestasis index (DICI), reflecting the relative residual urea formation by hepatocytes co-incubated with BAs and test compound as compared to hepatocytes treated with test compound alone. Compounds with clinical reports of cholestasis, including cyclosporin A, troglitazone, chlorpromazine, bosentan, ticlopidine, ritonavir, and midecamycin showed enhanced toxicity in the presence of BAs (DICI ≤ 0.8) for at least one of the tested concentrations. In contrast, the in vitro toxicity of compounds causing hepatotoxicity by other mechanisms (including diclofenac, valproic acid, amiodarone and acetaminophen), remained unchanged in the presence of BAs. A safety margin (SM) for drug-induced cholestasis was calculated as the ratio of lowest in vitro concentration for which was DICI ≤ 0.8, to the reported mean peak therapeutic plasma concentration. SM values obtained in human SCH correlated well with reported % incidence of clinical drug-induced cholestasis, while no correlation was observed in rat SCH. This in vitro model enables early identification of drug candidates causing cholestasis by disturbed BA handling. - Highlights: • Novel in vitro assay to detect drug-induced cholestasis • Rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) as in vitro models • Cholestatic compounds sensitize SCH to toxic effects of accumulating bile acids • Drug-induced

  5. Hepatocyte-based in vitro model for assessment of drug-induced cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sagnik, E-mail: Sagnik.Chatterjee@pharm.kuleuven.be [Drug Delivery and Disposition, KU Leuven Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, O and N2, Herestraat 49 — bus 921, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Richert, Lysiane, E-mail: l.richert@kaly-cell.com [KaLy-Cell, 20A rue du Général Leclerc, 67115 Plobsheim (France); Augustijns, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Augustijns@pharm.kuleuven.be [Drug Delivery and Disposition, KU Leuven Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, O and N2, Herestraat 49 — bus 921, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Annaert, Pieter, E-mail: Pieter.Annaert@pharm.kuleuven.be [Drug Delivery and Disposition, KU Leuven Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, O and N2, Herestraat 49 — bus 921, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of drug-induced cholestasis remains a challenge during drug development. We have developed and validated a biorelevant sandwich-cultured hepatocytes- (SCH) based model that can identify compounds causing cholestasis by altering bile acid disposition. Human and rat SCH were exposed (24–48 h) to known cholestatic and/or hepatotoxic compounds, in the presence or in the absence of a concentrated mixture of bile acids (BAs). Urea assay was used to assess (compromised) hepatocyte functionality at the end of the incubations. The cholestatic potential of the compounds was expressed by calculating a drug-induced cholestasis index (DICI), reflecting the relative residual urea formation by hepatocytes co-incubated with BAs and test compound as compared to hepatocytes treated with test compound alone. Compounds with clinical reports of cholestasis, including cyclosporin A, troglitazone, chlorpromazine, bosentan, ticlopidine, ritonavir, and midecamycin showed enhanced toxicity in the presence of BAs (DICI ≤ 0.8) for at least one of the tested concentrations. In contrast, the in vitro toxicity of compounds causing hepatotoxicity by other mechanisms (including diclofenac, valproic acid, amiodarone and acetaminophen), remained unchanged in the presence of BAs. A safety margin (SM) for drug-induced cholestasis was calculated as the ratio of lowest in vitro concentration for which was DICI ≤ 0.8, to the reported mean peak therapeutic plasma concentration. SM values obtained in human SCH correlated well with reported % incidence of clinical drug-induced cholestasis, while no correlation was observed in rat SCH. This in vitro model enables early identification of drug candidates causing cholestasis by disturbed BA handling. - Highlights: • Novel in vitro assay to detect drug-induced cholestasis • Rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) as in vitro models • Cholestatic compounds sensitize SCH to toxic effects of accumulating bile acids • Drug-induced

  6. Eculizumab for drug-induced de novo posttransplantation thrombotic microangiopathy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safa, Kassem; Logan, Merranda S; Batal, Ibrahim; Gabardi, Steven; Rennke, Helmut G; Abdi, Reza

    2015-02-01

    De novo thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) following renal transplantation is a severe complication associated with high rates of allograft failure. Several immunosuppressive agents are associated with TMA. Conventional approaches to managing this entity, such as withdrawal of the offending agent and/or plasmapheresis, often offer limited help, with high rates of treatment failure and graft loss. We herein report a case of drug induced de novo TMA successfully treated using the C5a inhibitor eculizumab in a renal transplant patient. This report highlights a potentially important role for eculizumab in settings where drug-induced de novo TMA is refractory to conventional therapies.

  7. A water extract of Mucuna pruriens provides long-term amelioration of parkinsonism with reduced risk for dyskinesias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Christopher A; Kunselman, Allen R; Manyam, Bala V; Venkiteswaran, Kala; Subramanian, Thyagarajan

    2010-08-01

    Dopaminergic anti-parkinsonian medications, such as levodopa (LD) cause drug-induced dyskinesias (DID) in majority of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Mucuna pruriens, a legume extensively used in Ayurveda to treat PD, is reputed to provide anti-parkinsonian benefits without inducing DID. We compared the behavioral effects of chronic parenteral administration of a water extract of M. pruriens seed powder (MPE) alone without any additives, MPE combined with the peripheral dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor (DDCI) benserazide (MPE+BZ), LD+BZ and LD alone without BZ in the hemiparkinsonian rat model of PD. A battery of behavioral tests assessed by blinded investigators served as outcome measures in these randomized trials. In experiment 1, animals that received LD+BZ or MPE+BZ at high (6mg/kg) and medium (4mg/kg) equivalent doses demonstrated significant alleviation of parkinsonism, but, developed severe dose-dependent DID. LD+BZ at low doses (2mg/kg) did not provide significant alleviation of parkinsonism. In contrast, MPE+BZ at an equivalent low dose significantly ameliorated parkinsonism. In experiment 2, MPE without any additives (12mg/kg and 20mg/kg LD equivalent dose) alleviated parkinsonism with significantly less DID compared to LD+BZ or MPE+BZ. In experiment 3, MPE without additives administered chronically provided long-term anti-parkinsonian benefits without causing DID. In experiment 4, MPE alone provided significantly more behavioral benefit when compared to the equivalent dose of synthetic LD alone without BZ. In experiment 5, MPE alone reduced the severity of DID in animals initially primed with LD+BZ. These findings suggest that M. pruriens contains water-soluble ingredients that either have an intrinsic DDCI-like activity or mitigate the need for an add-on DDCI to ameliorate parkinsonism. These unique long-term anti-parkinsonian effects of a parenterally administered water extract of M. pruriens seed powder may provide a platform for future drug

  8. The Acute Brain Response to Levodopa Heralds Dyskinesias in Parkinson Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Christensen, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    In Parkinson disease (PD), long‐term treatment with the dopamine precursor levodopa gradually induces involuntary “dyskinesia” movements. The neural mechanisms underlying the emergence of levodopa‐induced dyskinesias in vivo are still poorly understood. Here, we applied functional magnetic...

  9. A longitudinal evaluation of hearing and ventilation tube insertion in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias Nicolai; Alanin, Mikkel Christian; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease, which primarily manifests with oto-sino-pulmonary symptoms. Otitis media with effusion (OME) is common from early childhood. The existing literature on OME management in PCD is conflicting. The goals of the ...

  10. ZMYND10 is mutated in primary ciliary dyskinesia and interacts with LRRC6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zariwala, Maimoona A; Gee, Heon Yung; Kurkowiak, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Defects of motile cilia cause primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), characterized by recurrent respiratory infections and male infertility. Using whole-exome resequencing and high-throughput mutation analysis, we identified recessive biallelic mutations in ZMYND10 in 14 families and mutations in the ...

  11. Dopamine receptors genes polymorphisms in Parkinson patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozhidaev, I.; Alifirova, V.M.; Freidin, M.B.; Zhukova, I.A.; Fedorenko, O.Y.; Osmanova, D.Z.; Mironova, Y.S.; Wilffert, B.; Ivanova, S.A.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Long-term levodopa treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) is frequently complicated by spontaneously occur ring involuntary muscle movements called levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). LID are a substantial barrier to effective symptomatic management of Parkinson's disease (PD), as up to

  12. Beneficial effect of candesartan and lisinopril against haloperidol-induced tardive dyskinesia in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Kuldeep Singh; Prakash, Atish; Bisht, Rohit; Bansal, Puneet Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Tardive dyskinesia is a serious motor disorder of the orofacial region, resulting from chronic neuroleptic treatment of schizophrenia. Candesartan (AT1 antagonist) and lisinopril (ACE inhibitor) has been reported to possess antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. The present study is designed to investigate the effect of candesartan and lisinopril on haloperidol-induced orofacial dyskinesia and oxidative damage in rats. Tardive dyskinesia was induced by administering haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p.) and concomitantly treated with candesartan (3 and 5 mg/kg p.o.) and lisinopril (10 and 15 mg/kg p.o.) for 3 weeks in male Wistar rats. Various behavioral parameters were assessed on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 and biochemical parameters were estimated at day 22. Chronic administration of haloperidol significantly increased stereotypic behaviors in rats, which were significantly improved by administration of candesartan and lisinopril. Chronic administration of haloperidol significantly increased oxidative stress and neuro-inflammation in the striatum region of the rat's brain. Co-administration of candesartan and lisinopril significantly attenuated the oxidative damage and neuro-inflammation in the haloperidol-treated rat. The present study supports the therapeutic use of candesartan and lisinopril in the treatment of typical antipsychotic-induced orofacial dyskinesia and possible antioxidant and neuro-inflammatory mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Predictive genetic model for levodopa-induced dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, S.A.; Alifirova, V.M.; Freidin, M.B.; Pozhidaev, I.V.; Fedorenko, O.Y.; Bokhan, N.A.; Zhukova, I.A.; Zhukova, N.G.; Wilffert, B.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of the dopaminergic input to the basal ganglia, is commonly treated with levodopa (L-DOPA). The use of this drug, however, is severely limited by adverse effects. Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is one of these and

  14. Etiological and therapeutical observations in a case of belly dancer's dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linazasoro, Girutz; Van Blercom, Nadège; Lasa, Asier; Fernández, José Manuel; Aranzábal, Inés

    2005-02-01

    We report on the case of a woman with belly dancer's syndrome. This case presented two peculiarities: (1) the condition was induced by the chronic use of clebopride, and (2) abdominal dyskinesias showed a dramatic response to the application of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Copyright 2004 Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Evidence that lithium protects against tardive dyskinesia : The Curacao Extrapyramidal Syndromes study VI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Harten, Peter N.; Hoek, Hans W.; Matroos, Glenn E.; van Os, Jim

    Lithium may have neuroprotective properties and therefore could affect the occurrence of tardive dyskinesia (TD). We conducted a nine-year follow-up study with one baseline and six follow-up assessments including all psychiatric inpatients in Curacao (N = 194). TD was measured with the Abnormal

  16. Multicenter analysis of body mass index, lung function, and sputum microbiology in primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maglione, Marco; Bush, Andrew; Nielsen, Kim G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No studies longitudinally, simultaneously assessed body mass index (BMI) and spirometry in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). METHODS: We determined BMI and spirometry in 158 PCD children and adolescents from London, UK (n = 75), Naples, Italy (n = 23) and Copenhagen, Denmark (n = 60) ...

  17. Non-Therapeutic Risk Factors for Onset of Tardive Dyskinesia in Schizophrenia : A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tenback, Diederik E.; van Harten, Peter N.; van Os, Jim

    2009-01-01

    A meta-analysis of prospective studies with schizophrenia patients was conducted to examine whether the evidence exists for risk factors for the emergence of Tardive Dyskinesia (TD) in schizophrenia. A computer assisted Medline/PubMed and Embase search was' conducted in January 2008 for the years

  18. Dopamine receptors genes polymorphisms in Parkinson patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozhidaev, Ivan V; Alifirova, V. M.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Zhukova, I.A.; Fedorenko, Olga Yu; Osmanova, Diana Z; Mironova, Y.S.; Wilffert, Berend; Ivanova, Svetlana A.; Loonen, Antonius

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine receptors genes polymorphisms in Parkinson patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesia I. Pozhidaev(1), V.M. Alifirova(2), M.B. Freidin(3), I.A. Zhukova(2), O.Y. Fedorenko(1), D.Z. Osmanova(1), Y.S. Mironova(2), B. Wilffert(4), S.A. Ivanova(1), A.J.M. Loonen(5) (1)Mental Health Research

  19. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of orofacial tardive dyskinesia : A single blind study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotema, Christina W.; van Harten, Peter N.; Bruggeman, Richard; Hoek, Hans W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Orofacial tardive dyskinesia (OTD) is difficult to treat and Botulinium Toxin A (BTA) may be an option. Methods: In a single blind (raters were blind) study (N= 12, duration 33 weeks) OTD was treated with Botulinum Toxin A in three consecutive sessions with increasing dosages. The

  20. Behavioral Relaxation Training for Parkinson's Disease Related Dyskinesia and Comorbid Social Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Pahwa, Rajesh; Lyons, Kelly E.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of brief Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT) on anxiety and dyskinesia of a 57-year-old female, with an 11-year history of Parkinson's disease (PD) and 18-months post-deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, were evaluated. Multiple process and outcome measures were used including the Clinical Anxiety Scale (CAS), Subjective…

  1. Ranitidine reduced levodopa-induced dyskinesia in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui G

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Guiyun Cui,1,* Xinxin Yang,1,* Xiaoying Wang,2,* Zunsheng Zhang,1 Xuanye Yue,1 Hongjuan Shi,1 Xia Shen11Department of Neurology, 2Department of Ultrasound, the Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Chronic administration of levodopa in Parkinson’s disease leads to debilitating involuntary movements, termed levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID. The pathogenesis of LID is poorly understood. Previous research has shown that histamine H2 receptors are highly expressed in the input (striatum and output (globus pallidus, substantia nigra regions of the basal ganglia, particularly in the GABAergic striatopallidal and striatonigral pathways. Therefore, a histamine H2 receptor antagonist could be used to reduce LID. In the present work, we investigated whether ranitidine has the potential to diminish LID in rats with dyskinesia and explored the underlying mechanisms involved.Methods: A rat model of PD was induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. Valid PD rats were then treated with levodopa (25 mg/kg, intraperitoneally and benserazide (12.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally for 21 days to induce a rat model of LID. The acute and chronic effects of administration of ranitidine at different doses (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, and 20 mg/kg on abnormal involuntary movements, levodopa-induced rotations, and the forelimb adjusting steps test were investigated in LID rats. The chronic effect of ranitidine (10 mg/kg on the expression of Arc and proenkephalin was also evaluated.Results: Levodopa elicited increased dyskinesia in PD rats. Acute ranitidine treatment had no effect on LID, but chronic ranitidine administration (10 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg reduced LID in rats with dyskinesia. Importantly, levodopa-induced rotations were not affected by chronic treatment with ranitidine. In addition, chronic ranitidine (10 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg significantly improved stepping of the lesioned forepaw. Real

  2. A selective phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitor reduces l-dopa-induced dyskinesias in parkinsonian monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Goichi; Maehara, Shunsuke; Chang, Phat Ly; Papa, Stella M

    2018-03-06

    Phosphodiesterase 10A is a member of the phosphodiesterase family whose brain expression is restricted to the striatum. Phosphodiesterase 10A regulates cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, which mediate responses to dopamine receptor activation, and the levels of these cyclic nucleotides are decreased in experimental models of l-dopa-induced dyskinesia. The elevation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate/cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels by phosphodiesterase 10A inhibition may thus be targeted to reduce l-dopa-induced dyskinesia. The present study was aimed at determining the potential antidyskinetic effects of phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitors in a primate model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The experiments performed in this model were also intended to provide translational data for the design of future clinical trials. Five MPTP-treated macaques with advanced parkinsonism and reproducible l-dopa-induced dyskinesia were used. MR1916, a selective phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitor, at doses 0.0015 to 0.05 mg/kg, subcutaneously, or its vehicle (control test) was coadministered with l-dopa methyl ester acutely (predetermined optimal and suboptimal subcutaneous doses) and oral l-dopa chronically as daily treatment for 5 weeks. Standardized scales were used to assess motor disability and l-dopa-induced dyskinesia by blinded examiners. Pharmacokinetics was also examined. MR1916 consistently reduced l-dopa-induced dyskinesia in acute tests of l-dopa optimal and suboptimal doses. Significant effects were present with every MR1916 dose tested, but the most effective was 0.015 mg/kg. None of the MR1916 doses tested affected the antiparkinsonian action of l-dopa at the optimal dose. The anti-l-dopa-induced dyskinesia effect of MR1916 (0.015 mg/kg, subcutaneously) was sustained with chronic administration, indicating that tolerance did not develop over the 5-week treatment. No adverse effects were observed after MR1916 administration acutely or

  3. Beneficial effects of lycopene against haloperidol induced orofacial dyskinesia in rats: Possible neurotransmitters and neuroinflammation modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Swati; Jamwal, Sumit; Deshmukh, Rahul; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-01-15

    Tardive Dyskinesia is a severe side effect of chronic neuroleptic treatment consisting of abnormal involuntary movements, characterized by orofacial dyskinesia. The study was designed to investigate the protective effect of lycopene against haloperidol induced orofacial dyskinesia possibly by neurochemical and neuroinflammatory modulation in rats. Rats were administered with haloperidol (1mg/kg, i.p for 21 days) to induce orofacial dyskinesia. Lycopene (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o) was given daily 1hour before haloperidol treatment for 21 days. Behavioral observations (vacuous chewing movements, tongue protrusions, facial jerking, rotarod activity, grip strength, narrow beam walking) were assessed on 0th, 7th(,) 14th(,) 21st day after haloperidol treatment. On 22nd day, animals were killed and striatum was excised for estimation of biochemical parameters (malondialdehyde, nitrite and endogenous enzyme (GSH), pro-inflammatory cytokines [Tumor necrosis factor, Interleukin 1β, Interleukin 6] and neurotransmitters level (dopamine, serotonin, nor epinephrine, 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), Homovanillic acid, 3,4- dihydroxyphenylacetic acid. Haloperidol treatment for 21 days impaired muscle co-ordination, motor activity and grip strength with an increased in orofacial dyskinetic movements. Further free radical generation increases MDA and nitrite levels, decreasing GSH levels in striatum. Neuroinflammatory markers were significantly increased with decrease in neurotransmitters levels. Lycopene (5 and 10mg/kg, p.o) treatment along with haloperidol significantly attenuated impairment in behavioral, biochemical, neurochemical and neuroinflammatory markers. Results of the present study attributed the therapeutic potential of lycopene in the treatment (prevented or delayed) of typical antipsychotic induced orofacial dyskinesia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Drug-induced liver toxicity and prevention by herbal antioxidants: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya eSingh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is the center for drug and xenobiotic metabolism, which is influenced most with medication/xenobiotic-mediated toxic activity. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is common and its actual frequency is hard to determine due to underreporting, difficulties in detection or diagnosis, and incomplete observation of exposure. The death rate is high, up to about 10% for medication instigated liver danger. Endorsed medications (counting acetaminophen represented >50% of instances of intense liver failure in a study from the Acute Liver Failure Study Group (ALFSG of the patients admitted in 17 US healing facilities. Albeit different studies are accessible uncovering the mechanistic aspects of medication prompted hepatotoxicity, we are in the dilemma about the virtual story. The expanding prevalence and effectiveness of Ayurveda and herbal products in the treatment of various disorders led the investigators to look into their potential in countering drug-induced liver toxicity. Several plant products have been reported to date to mitigate the drug-induced toxicity. The dietary nature and less side reactions of the herbs provide them an extra edge over other candidates of supplementary medication. In this paper, we have discussed on the mechanism involved in drug-induced liver toxicity and the potential of herbal antioxidants as supplementary medication.

  5. Incidence of drug-induced torsades de pointes with intravenous amiodarone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakash Shenthar

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: The incidence of drug-induced TdP with IV amiodarone is about 1.5%. Risk factors include female sex, left ventricular dysfunction, electrolyte abnormalities, baseline prolonged QTc, concomitant beta-blocker, and digoxin therapy. Amiodarone induced TdP has favorable prognosis if recognized and treated promptly, and these patients should not receive amiodarone by any route in future.

  6. Drug-induced Hypothermia by 5HT1A Agonists Provide Neuroprotection in Experimental Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Flemming Fryd; Hasseldam, Henrik; Nybro Smith, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug-induced hypothermia reduces brain damage in animal stroke models and is an undiscovered potential in human stroke treatment. We studied hypothermia induced by the serotonergic agonists S14671 (1-[2-(2-thenoylamino)ethyl]-4[1-(7- methoxynaphtyl)]piperazine) and ipsapirone in a rat...... therapeutic hypothermia....

  7. Drug-induced Fanconi syndrome associated with fumaric acid esters treatment for psoriasis: A case series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M.W. Balak (Deepak); J.N.B. Bavinck (Jan Nico Bouwes); De Vries, A.P.J. (Aiko P. J.); Hartman, J. (Jenny); Martino Neumann, H.A. (Hendrik A.); R. Zietse (Bob); H.B. Thio (Bing)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Fumaric acid esters (FAEs), an oral immunomodulating treatment for psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, have been anecdotally associated with proximal renal tubular dysfunction due to a drug-induced Fanconi syndrome. Few data are available on clinical outcomes of FAE-induced

  8. Clinical commentary on "Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia-like phenotype in multiple sclerosis" and "Secondary paroxysmal dyskinesia in multiple sclerosis: Clinical-radiological features and treatment. Case report of seven patients".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareés, Isabel

    2017-11-01

    This clinical commentary discusses the phenomenology and treatment of paroxysmal dyskinesia in patients with multiple sclerosis. It calls for a consensus on the definition as well as for larger studies to better understand this unusual clinical association.

  9. Glucose hypermetabolism in the thalamus of patients with drug-induced blepharospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y; Kiyosawa, M; Wakakura, M; Mochizuki, M; Ishiwata, K; Oda, K; Ishii, K

    2014-03-28

    We examined the difference in cerebral function alterations between drug-induced blepharospasm patients and essential blepharospasm (EB) patients by using positron emission tomography with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Cerebral glucose metabolism was examined in 21 patients with drug-induced blepharospasm (5 men and 16 women; mean age, 53.1 [range, 29-78] years), 21 essential EB patients (5 men and 16 women; mean age, 53.0 [range, 33-72] years) and 24 healthy subjects (6 men and 18 women; mean age, 57.9 [range, 22-78] years) with long-term history of benzodiazepines use (drug healthy subjects). Drug-induced blepharospasm patients developed symptoms while taking benzodiazepines or thienodiazepines. Sixty-three normal volunteers (15 men and 48 women; mean age, 53.6 [range, 20-70] years) were examined as controls. Differences between the patient groups and control group were examined by statistical parametric mapping. Additionally, we defined regions of interests on both sides of the thalamus, caudate nucleus, anterior putamen, posterior putamen and primary somatosensory area. The differences between groups were tested using two-sample t-tests with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Cerebral glucose hypermetabolism on both side of the thalamus was detected in drug-induced blepharospasm, EB patients and drug healthy subjects by statistical parametric mapping. In the analysis of regions of interest, glucose metabolism in both sides of the thalamus in the drug-induced blepharospasm group was significantly lower than that in the EB group. Moreover, we observed glucose hypermetabolism in the anterior and posterior putamen bilaterally in EB group but not in drug-induced blepharospasm group and drug healthy subjects. Long-term regimens of benzodiazepines or thienodiazepines may cause down-regulation of benzodiazepine receptors in the brain. We suggest that the functional brain alteration in drug-induced blepharospasm patients is similar to that in EB patients, and

  10. Effects of a NR2B Selective NMDA Glutamate Antagonist, CP-101,606, on Dyskinesia and Parkinsonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, John G.; Gunzler, Steven A; Kirchhoff, Trish; Hogarth, Penelope; Weaver, Jerry L.; Krams, Michael; Jamerson, Brenda; Menniti, Frank S.; Landen, Jaren W.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate antagonists decrease dyskinesia and augment the antiparkinsonian effects of levodopa in animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial we investigated the acute effects of placebo and two doses of a NR2B subunit selective NMDA glutamate antagonist, CP-101,606, on the response to two-hour levodopa infusions in 12 PD subjects with motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. Both doses of CP-101,606 reduced the maximum severity of levodopa-induced dyskinesia approximately 30% but neither dose improved parkinsonism. CP-101,606 was associated with a dose-related dissociation and amnesia. These results support the hypothesis that glutamate antagonists may be useful antidyskinetic agents. However, future studies will have to determine if the benefits of dyskinesia suppression can be achieved without adverse cognitive effects. PMID:18759356

  11. Drug-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum and Oxidative Stress Responses Independently Sensitize Toward TNF alpha-Mediated Hepatotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fredriksson, Lisa; Wink, Steven; Herpers, Bram; Benedetti, Giulia; Hadi, Mackenzie; de Bont, Hans; Groothuis, Geny; Luijten, Mirjam; Danen, Erik; de Graauw, Marjo; Meerman, John; van de Water, Bob

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important clinical problem. Here, we used a genomics approach to in detail investigate the hypothesis that critical drug-induced toxicity pathways act in synergy with the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) to cause cell death of

  12. Vitamin E for antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Weiser, Karla; Maayan, Nicola; Bergman, Hanna

    2018-01-17

    Antipsychotic (neuroleptic) medication is used extensively to treat people with chronic mental illnesses. Its use, however, is associated with adverse effects, including movement disorders such as tardive dyskinesia (TD) - a problem often seen as repetitive involuntary movements around the mouth and face. Vitamin E has been proposed as a treatment to prevent or decrease TD. The primary objective was to determine the clinical effects of vitamin E in people with schizophrenia or other chronic mental illness who had developed antipsychotic-induced TD.The secondary objectives were:1. to examine whether the effect of vitamin E was maintained as duration of follow-up increased;2. to test the hypothesis that the use of vitamin E is most effective for those with early onset TD (less than five years) SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (July 2015 and April 2017), inspected references of all identified studies for further trials and contacted authors of trials for additional information. We included reports if they were controlled trials dealing with people with antipsychotic-induced TD and schizophrenia who remained on their antipsychotic medication and had been randomly allocated to either vitamin E or to a placebo, no intervention, or any other intervention. We independently extracted data from these trials and we estimated risk ratios (RR) or mean differences (MD), with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We assumed that people who left early had no improvement. We assessed risk of bias and created a 'Summary of findings' table using GRADE. The review now includes 13 poorly reported randomised trials (total 478 people), all participants were adults with chronic psychiatric disorders, mostly schizophrenia, and antipsychotic-induced TD. There was no clear difference between vitamin E and placebo for the outcome of TD: not improved to a clinically important extent (6 RCTs, N = 264, RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.01, low-quality evidence

  13. Longitudinal study of lung function in a cohort of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellerman, A; Bisgaard, H

    1997-01-01

    Patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) have pronounced stasis of their respiratory secretions and therefore recurrent lower airway infections, which raises concerns for the development of lung function. Twenty four patients with PCD have been studied prospectively with a standardized regime...... patients entering as children (forced vital capacity (FVC) 70 versus 85% predicted; forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 59 versus 72% pred). The lung damage did not relate to the type of ciliary dyskinesia. During the subsequent surveillance of the groups for a median of 14 and 7 yrs...... in our clinic for 2-16 yrs with clinic visits, including spirometry 2-4 times per year, daily physiotherapy and monthly sputum cultures with subsequent specific antibiotic treatment. Lung function was significantly lower in the 12 PCD patients entering the cohort as adults when compared to the PCD...

  14. Sequential analysis: manganese, catecholamines, and L-dopa induced dyskinesia. [Cat's brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavasiliou, P S; Miller, S T; Cotzias, G C; Kraner, H W; Hsieh, R S

    1975-01-01

    The paper specifies methodology for the sequential determination of manganese and catecholamines in selfsame brain samples and shows correlations between them. Small samples were obtained from five regions of brain of cats that had received either saline or levodopa. The doses of levodopa were varied so that although all animals reacted, some developed dyskinesia while others did not. Each sample was first analyzed nondestructively for manganese and then destructively for dopa and dopamine; thus errors inherent in analyzing separate samples, due to the structural heterogeneity of the brain, were avoided. Statistically significant correlations were found (1) between levodopa-induced dyskinesia and the concentrations of dopamine and manganese in some of the regions analysed, and (2) between the concentrations of dopamine and of manganese in the caudates of the cats receiving the highest doses of levodopa. (auth)

  15. Acute fulminant drug induced necrotizing pancreatitis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Miramontes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis is a rare adverse event, although it has been reported in association with different drugs, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and analgesic agents commonly used in rheumatology. In different reviews of the pancreotoxicity of drugs, infliximab and etanercept are mentioned among all medications implicated in drug-induced pancreatitis, but clinical cases of acute pancreatitis complicating treatment with these anti-TNF-α agents have been exceptionally reported. We describe a patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with etanercept, who developed an acute fulminant necrotizing pancreatitis that resulted in death. Doctors should pay close attention to patients taking biologic drugs in which a complaint of abdominal pain lasting for several days with no apparent cause may require a prompt referral for medical consultation.

  16. Factors affecting drug-induced liver injury: antithyroid drugs as instances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Heidari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Methimazole and propylthiouracil have been used in the management of hyperthyroidism for more than half a century. However, hepatotoxicity is one of the most deleterious side effects associated with these medications. The mechanism(s of hepatic injury induced by antithyroid agents is not fully recognized yet. Furthermore, there are no specific tools for predicting the occurrence of hepatotoxicity induced by these drugs. The purpose of this article is to give an overview on possible susceptibility factors in liver injury induced by antithyroid agents. Age, gender, metabolism characteristics, alcohol consumption, underlying diseases, immunologic mechanisms, and drug interactions are involved in enhancing antithyroid drugs-induced hepatic damage. An outline on the clinically used treatments for antithyroid drugs-induced hepatotoxicity and the potential therapeutic strategies found to be effective against this complication are also discussed.

  17. Clinical Relevance and Predictive Value of Damage Biomarkers of Drug-Induced Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane-Gill, Sandra L; Smithburger, Pamela L; Kashani, Kianoush; Kellum, John A; Frazee, Erin

    2017-11-01

    Nephrotoxin exposure accounts for up to one-fourth of acute kidney injury episodes in hospitalized patients, and the associated consequences are as severe as acute kidney injury due to other etiologies. As the use of nephrotoxic agents represents one of the few modifiable risk factors for acute kidney injury, clinicians must be able to identify patients at high risk for drug-induced kidney injury rapidly. Recently, significant advancements have been made in the field of biomarker utilization for the prediction and detection of acute kidney injury. Such biomarkers may have a role both for detection of drug-induced kidney disease and implementation of preventative and therapeutic strategies designed to mitigate injury. In this article, basic principles of renal biomarker use in practice are summarized, and the existing evidence for six markers specifically used to detect drug-induced kidney injury are outlined, including liver-type fatty acid binding protein, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 times insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 ([TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7]), kidney injury molecule-1 and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase. The results of the literature search for these six kidney damage biomarkers identified 29 unique articles with none detected for liver-type fatty acid binding protein and [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7]. For three biomarkers, kidney injury molecule-1, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, the majority of the studies suggest utility in clinical practice. While many questions need to be answered to clearly articulate the use of biomarkers to predict drug-induced kidney disease, current data are promising.

  18. Assessment of mitochondrial dysfunction-related, drug-induced hepatotoxicity in primary rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Cong; Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Kousei

    2016-01-01

    Evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in drug-induced liver injury is rapidly accumulating. In contrast to physiological conditions, in which almost all adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in hepatocytes is generated in mitochondria via aerobic respiration, the high glucose content and limited oxygen supply of conventional culture systems force primary hepatocytes to generate most ATP via cytosolic glycolysis. Thus, such anaerobically poised cells are resistant to xenobiotics that impair mitochondrial function, and are not suitable to identify drugs with mitochondrial liabilities. In this study, primary rat hepatocytes were cultured in galactose-based medium, instead of the conventional glucose-based medium, and in hyperoxia to improve the reliance of energy generation on aerobic respiration. Activation of mitochondria was verified by diminished cellular lactate release and increased oxygen consumption. These conditions improved sensitivity to the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone. Since oxidative stress is also a general cause of mitochondrial impairment, cells were exposed to test compounds in the presence of transferrin to increase the generation of reactive oxygen species via increased uptake of iron. Finally, 14 compounds with reported mitochondrial liabilities were tested to validate this new drug-induced mitochondrial toxicity assay. Overall, the culture of primary rat hepatocytes in galactose, hyperoxia and transferrin is a useful model for the identification of mitochondrial dysfunction-related drug-induced hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • Drug-induced mitochondrial toxicity was evaluated using primary rat hepatocytes. • Galactose and hyperoxia could activate OXPHOS in primary rat hepatocytes. • Cells with enhanced OXPHOS exhibit improved sensitivity to mitochondrial toxins. • Transferrin potentiate mitochondrial toxicity via increased ROS production.

  19. Drug-induced Sweet's syndrome secondary to hepatitis C antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Liana; Cotruta, Bogdan; Trifu, Viorel; Cotruta, Cristina; Becheanu, Gabriel; Gheorghe, Cristian

    2008-09-01

    Pegylated interferon-alpha in combination with ribavirin currently represents the therapeutic standard for the hepatitis C virus infection. Interferon based therapy may be responsible for many cutaneous side effects. We report a case of drug-induced Sweet's syndrome secondary to hepatitis C antiviral therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Sweet's syndrome in association with pegylated interferon-alpha therapy.

  20. Drug-Induced Myocardial Infarction Secondary to Coronary Artery Spasm in Teenagers and Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menyar Ayman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no published registry for drug-induced acute myocardial infarction (AMI with subsequent patent coronary angiogram in teenagers. To highlight the mechanism and impact of drug-induced MI with patent coronary arteries among teenagers who have relatively few coronary risk factors in comparison with older patients, we conducted a review of the literature. In this review most of the pertinent published (English and non-English articles through the Medline, Scopus, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and EBSCO Host research databases from 1970 to 2005 have been revised. Teenagers and young adults with AMI and subsequent patent coronary angiogram were included. In those cases drug-induced coronary spasm was highlighted. Among 220 articles (>12000 cases related with AMI with normal coronary angiogram, 50 articles (~100 cases reported the role of drug in AMI secondary to coronary artery spasm (CAS. There is no well-conducted trial for AMI secondary to CAS in young adults but only a series of case reports, and the diagnosis in most of cases was based on the clinical and laboratory findings without provocation. CAS was associated with 12 illicit substances in teenagers (i.e., cocaine, marijuana, alcohol, butane, and amphetamine. Smoking is not only the initiative but also might harbor other illicit substances that increase the risk for CAS. Cocaine-associated AMI is the most frequent in various research papers. CAS was reported with 19 types of medications (i.e., over-the-counter, chemotherapy, antimigraine, and antibiotics without strong relation to age. Despite drug-induced AMI being not a common event, attention to smoking and drugs in teenagers and young adults will have major therapeutic and prognostic implications.

  1. DRUG REACTION WITH HERBAL SUPPLEMENT: A POSSIBLE CASE OF DRUG INDUCED LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZIZ NA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old lady presented with four days history of fever, non-pruritic rash, ankle pain and swelling. She had consumed herbal supplement five days before the onset of symptoms. Examinations revealed erythematous maculo-papular lesions of varying sizes on sun exposed areas. Patient was suspected to have Drug Induced Lupus Erythematosus (DILE and subsequently symptoms subsided rapidly on withholding the herbal medication.

  2. A hidden Markov model to assess drug-induced sleep fragmentation in the telemetered rat

    OpenAIRE

    Diack, C.; Ackaert, O.; Ploeger, B. A.; van der Graaf, P. H.; Gurrell, R.; Ivarsson, M.; Fairman, D.

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced sleep fragmentation can cause sleep disturbances either via their intended pharmacological action or as a side effect. Examples of disturbances include excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia and nightmares. Developing drugs without these side effects requires insight into the mechanisms leading to sleep disturbance. The characterization of the circadian sleep pattern by EEG following drug exposure has improved our understanding of these mechanisms and their translatability across...

  3. Assessment of mitochondrial dysfunction-related, drug-induced hepatotoxicity in primary rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cong; Sekine, Shuichi, E-mail: ssekine@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Ito, Kousei

    2016-07-01

    Evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in drug-induced liver injury is rapidly accumulating. In contrast to physiological conditions, in which almost all adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in hepatocytes is generated in mitochondria via aerobic respiration, the high glucose content and limited oxygen supply of conventional culture systems force primary hepatocytes to generate most ATP via cytosolic glycolysis. Thus, such anaerobically poised cells are resistant to xenobiotics that impair mitochondrial function, and are not suitable to identify drugs with mitochondrial liabilities. In this study, primary rat hepatocytes were cultured in galactose-based medium, instead of the conventional glucose-based medium, and in hyperoxia to improve the reliance of energy generation on aerobic respiration. Activation of mitochondria was verified by diminished cellular lactate release and increased oxygen consumption. These conditions improved sensitivity to the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone. Since oxidative stress is also a general cause of mitochondrial impairment, cells were exposed to test compounds in the presence of transferrin to increase the generation of reactive oxygen species via increased uptake of iron. Finally, 14 compounds with reported mitochondrial liabilities were tested to validate this new drug-induced mitochondrial toxicity assay. Overall, the culture of primary rat hepatocytes in galactose, hyperoxia and transferrin is a useful model for the identification of mitochondrial dysfunction-related drug-induced hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • Drug-induced mitochondrial toxicity was evaluated using primary rat hepatocytes. • Galactose and hyperoxia could activate OXPHOS in primary rat hepatocytes. • Cells with enhanced OXPHOS exhibit improved sensitivity to mitochondrial toxins. • Transferrin potentiate mitochondrial toxicity via increased ROS production.

  4. Prevalence and Complications of Drug-induced Seizures in Baharloo Hospital, Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Behnoush

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Seizure is a frequent and important finding in the field of clinical toxicology. Almost all poisons and drugs can produce seizure. We have evaluated frequency and complications of drug-induced seizure in present study. Methods: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was done on patients who were referred to Baharloo Hospital, Tehran, Iran, that had developed seizure before or after hospitalization following intoxication between 20 March 2010 and 20 March 2011. The exclusion criteria were a positive history of epilepsy, head trauma, or abnormal findings in EEG or brain CT scan. Results: Tramadol and tricyclic antidepressants were the most common causes of drug-induced seizure (31.5% and 14.7% of the cases, respectively. Overall, 6 patients (4.2% had developed persistent vegetative state in consequence of brain hypoxia, 16 patients (11.2% had died due to complications of seizure or the poisoning itself. Tramadol was the leading cause of drug-induced seizure and its morbidity and mortality. Tonic-colonic seizure was the most common type of drug-induced seizure. Seizure had occurred once in 58% of the patients, twice in 37.1% of the patients, and had been revolutionized to status epilepticus in 4.9% of them. Among the 7 patients who had developed status epilepticus, 3 cases had died. Conclusion: Appropriate measures for treatment of seizure and prevention of its complications should be taken when patients with drug poisoning are admitted into hospital, especially when the offending drug(s has a higher likelihood to induce seizure.

  5. Continuous cerebroventricular administration of dopamine: A new treatment for severe dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloux, C; Gouel, F; Lachaud, C; Timmerman, K; Do Van, B; Jonneaux, A; Petrault, M; Garcon, G; Rouaix, N; Moreau, C; Bordet, R; Duce, J A; Devedjian, J C; Devos, D

    2017-07-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) depletion of dopamine in the nigro-striatal pathway is a main pathological hallmark that requires continuous and focal restoration. Current predominant treatment with intermittent oral administration of its precursor, Levodopa (l-dopa), remains the gold standard but pharmacological drawbacks trigger motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. Continuous intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of dopamine previously failed as a therapy because of an inability to resolve the accelerated dopamine oxidation and tachyphylaxia. We aim to overcome prior challenges by demonstrating treatment feasibility and efficacy of continuous i.c.v. of dopamine close to the striatum. Dopamine prepared either anaerobically (A-dopamine) or aerobically (O-dopamine) in the presence or absence of a conservator (sodium metabisulfite, SMBS) was assessed upon acute MPTP and chronic 6-OHDA lesioning and compared to peripheral l-dopa treatment. A-dopamine restored motor function and induced a dose dependent increase of nigro-striatal tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons in mice after 7days of MPTP insult that was not evident with either O-dopamine or l-dopa. In the 6-OHDA rat model, continuous circadian i.c.v. injection of A-dopamine over 30days also improved motor activity without occurrence of tachyphylaxia. This safety profile was highly favorable as A-dopamine did not induce dyskinesia or behavioral sensitization as observed with peripheral l-dopa treatment. Indicative of a new therapeutic strategy for patients suffering from l-dopa related complications with dyskinesia, continuous i.c.v. of A-dopamine has greater efficacy in mediating motor impairment over a large therapeutic index without inducing dyskinesia and tachyphylaxia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Potential biomarkers of tardive dyskinesia: A multiplex analysis of blood serum

    OpenAIRE

    Boiko, Anastasia S; Kornetova, Elena G; Ivanova, Svetlana A.; Loonen, Antonius

    2017-01-01

    Potential biomarkers of tardive dyskinesia: a multiplex analysis of blood serum A.S. Boiko(1), E.G. Kornetova(2), S.A. Ivanova(1), A.J.M. Loonen(3) (1)Mental Health Research Institute, Tomsk National Research Medical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Tomsk, Russia (2)Mental Health Research Institute, Tomsk National Research Medical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Endogenous Disorders, Tomsk, Russia (3)Univers...

  7. Nociceptive Response to L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia in Hemiparkinsonian Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, G C; Bariotto-Dos-Santos, K; Leite-Panissi, C R A; Del-Bel, E A; Bortolanza, M

    2018-04-02

    Non-motor symptoms are increasingly identified to present clinical and diagnostic importance for Parkinson's disease (PD). The multifactorial origin of pain in PD makes this symptom of great complexity. The dopamine precursor, L-DOPA (L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine), the classic therapy for PD, seems to be effective in pain threshold; however, there are no studies correlating L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) and nociception development in experimental Parkinsonism. Here, we first investigated nociceptive responses in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease to a hind paw-induced persistent inflammation. Further, the effect of L-DOPA on nociception behavior at different times of treatment was investigated. Pain threshold was determined using von Frey and Hot Plate/Tail Flick tests. Dyskinesia was measured by abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) induced by L-DOPA administration. This data is consistent to show that 6-OHDA-lesioned rats had reduced nociceptive thresholds compared to non-lesioned rats. Additionally, when these rats were exposed to a persistent inflammatory challenge, we observed increased hypernociceptive responses, namely hyperalgesia. L-DOPA treatment alleviated pain responses on days 1 and 7 of treatment, but not on day 15. During that period, we observed an inverse relationship between LID and nociception threshold in these rats, with a high LID rate corresponding to a reduced nociception threshold. Interestingly, pain responses resulting from CFA-induced inflammation were significantly enhanced during established dyskinesia. These data suggest a pro-algesic effect of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, which is confirmed by the correlation founded here between AIMs and nociceptive indexes. In conclusion, our results are consistent with the notion that central dopaminergic mechanism is directly involved in nociceptive responses in Parkinsonism condition.

  8. hERG trafficking inhibition in drug-induced lethal cardiac arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Hisashi; Kawai, Tomoyuki

    2014-10-15

    Acquired long QT syndrome induced by non-cardiovascular drugs can cause lethal cardiac arrhythmia called torsades de points and is a significant problem in drug development. The prolongation of QT interval and cardiac action potential duration are mainly due to reduced physiological function of the rapidly activating voltage-dependent potassium channels encoded by human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG). Structurally diverse groups of drugs are known to directly inhibit hERG channel conductance. Therefore, the ability of acute hERG inhibition is routinely assessed at the preclinical stages in pharmaceutical testing. Recent findings indicated that chronic treatment with various drugs not only inhibits hERG channels but also decreases hERG channel expression in the plasma membrane of cardiomyocytes, which has become another concern in safety pharmacology. The mechanisms involve the disruption of hERG trafficking to the surface membrane or the acceleration of hERG protein degradation. From this perspective, we present a brief overview of mechanisms of drug-induced trafficking inhibition and pathological regulation. Understanding of drug-induced hERG trafficking inhibition may provide new strategies for predicting drug-induced QT prolongation and lethal cardiac arrhythmia in pharmaceutical drug development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Drug-induced lung disease: High-resolution CT and histological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleverley, Joanne R.; Screaton, Nicholas J.; Hiorns, Melanie P.; Flint, Julia D.A.; Mueller, Nestor L.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To compare the parenchymal high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) appearances with histological findings in patients with drug-induced lung disease and to determine the prognostic value of HRCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Drug history, HRCT features, histological findings and outcome at 3 months in 20 patients with drug induced-lung disease were reviewed retrospectively. The HRCT images were assessed for the pattern and distribution of abnormalities and classified as most suggestive of interstitial pneumonitis/fibrosis, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), organizing pneumonia (OP) reaction, or a hypersensitivity reaction. RESULTS: On histopathological examination there were eight cases of interstitial pneumonitis/fibrosis, five of DAD, five of OP reactions, one of hypersensitivity reaction and one of pulmonary eosinophilia. The most common abnormalities on HRCT were ground-glass opacities (n = 17), consolidation (n = 14), interlobular septal thickening (n = 15) and centrilobular nodules (n 8). HRCT interpretation and histological diagnosis were concordant in only nine (45%) of 20 patients. The pattern, distribution, and extent of HRCT abnormalities were of limited prognostic value: all eight patients with histological findings of OP, hypersensitivity reaction, or eosinophilic infiltrate improved on follow-up compared to only five of 13 patients with interstitial pneumonitis/fibrosis or DAD. CONCLUSION: In many cases of drug-induced lung injury HRCT is of limited value in determining the histological pattern and prognosis. Cleverly, J.R. et al

  10. Immunoexpression of interleukin-6 in drug-induced gingival overgrowth patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P R Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To analyze the role of proinflammatory cytokines in drug-induced gingival enlargement in Indian population. Aim: To evaluate for the presence of interleukin-6 (IL-6 in drug-induced gingival enlargement and to compare it with healthy control in the absence of enlargement. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients selected for the study and divided into control group (10 and study group (25 consisting of phenytoin (10; cyclosporin (10 and nifedipine (5 induced gingival enlargement. Gingival overgrowth index of Seymour was used to assess overgrowth and allot groups. Under LA, incisional biopsy done, tissue sample fixed in 10% formalin and immunohistochemically evaluated for the presence of IL-6 using LAB-SA method, Labeled- Streptavidin-Biotin Method (LAB-SA kit from Zymed- 2nd generation LAB-SA detection system, Zymed Laboratories, CA. The results of immunohistochemistry were statistically analyzed using Kruskaal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney test. Results: The data obtained from immunohistochemistry assessment shows that drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO samples express more IL-6 than control group and cyclosporin expresses more IL-6 followed by phenytoin and nifedipine. Conclusion: Increased IL-6 expression was noticed in all three DIGO groups in comparison with control group. Among the study group, cyclosporin expressed maximum IL-6 expression followed by phenytoin and nifedipine.

  11. An Overview on the Proposed Mechanisms of Antithyroid Drugs-Induced Liver Injury

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    Reza Heidari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced liver injury (DILI is a major problem for pharmaceutical industry and drug development. Mechanisms of DILI are many and varied. Elucidating the mechanisms of DILI will allow clinicians to prevent liver failure, need for liver transplantation, and death induced by drugs. Methimazole and propylthiouracil (PTU are two convenient antithyroid agents which their administration is accompanied by hepatotoxicity as a deleterious side effect. Although several cases of antithyroid drugs-induced liver injury are reported, there is no clear idea about the mechanism(s of hepatotoxicity induced by these medications. Different mechanisms such as reactive metabolites formation, oxidative stress induction, intracellular targets dysfunction, and immune-mediated toxicity are postulated to be involved in antithyroid agents-induced hepatic damage. Due to the idiosyncratic nature of antithyroid drugs-induced hepatotoxicity, it is impossible to draw a specific conclusion about the mechanisms of liver injury. However, it seems that reactive metabolite formation and immune-mediated toxicity have a great role in antithyroids liver toxicity, especially those caused by methimazole. This review attempted to discuss different mechanisms proposed to be involved in the hepatic injury induced by antithyroid drugs.

  12. LRRC6 mutation causes primary ciliary dyskinesia with dynein arm defects.

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    Amjad Horani

    Full Text Available Despite recent progress in defining the ciliome, the genetic basis for many cases of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD remains elusive. We evaluated five children from two unrelated, consanguineous Palestinian families who had PCD with typical clinical features, reduced nasal nitric oxide concentrations, and absent dynein arms. Linkage analyses revealed a single common homozygous region on chromosome 8 and one candidate was conserved in organisms with motile cilia. Sequencing revealed a single novel mutation in LRRC6 (Leucine-rich repeat containing protein 6 that fit the model of autosomal recessive genetic transmission, leading to a change of a highly conserved amino acid from aspartic acid to histidine (Asp146His. LRRC6 was localized to the cytoplasm and was up-regulated during ciliogenesis in human airway epithelial cells in a Foxj1-dependent fashion. Nasal epithelial cells isolated from affected individuals and shRNA-mediated silencing in human airway epithelial cells, showed reduced LRRC6 expression, absent dynein arms, and slowed cilia beat frequency. Dynein arm proteins were either absent or mislocalized to the cytoplasm in airway epithelial cells from a primary ciliary dyskinesia subject. These findings suggest that LRRC6 plays a role in dynein arm assembly or trafficking and when mutated leads to primary ciliary dyskinesia with laterality defects.

  13. Assessment of cervical range of motion, cervical core strength and scapular dyskinesia in violin players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawde, Pooja; Dabadghav, Rachana; Bedekar, Nilima; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2016-12-01

    Playing the violin can lead to asymmetric postures which can affect the cervical range of motion, cervical core strength and scapular stability. The objective of the study was to assess the cervical range of motion, cervical core strength and scapular dyskinesia in violin players and non-players of the same age group. An inclinometer was used to assess the cervical range of motion, pressure biofeedback was used to assess cervical core strength and scapular dyskinesia was also assessed in 30 professional violin players (18-40 years) compared with 30 age-matched non-players. Analysis was done using an unpaired t test. Significant change was seen with respect to extension (p = 0.051), cervical core strength (p = 0.005), right (Rt) superior angle 0° (p = 0.004), Rt superior angle 45° (p = 0.015) and Rt inferior angle 90° (p = 0.013). This study shows a significant difference in extension range of motion and cervical core strength of violin players. Also, there was scapular dyskinesia seen at 0° and 45° right-side superior angle of the scapula and 90° right-side inferior angle of the scapula.

  14. Markers of impaired motor and cognitive volition in Parkinson's disease: Correlates of dopamine dysregulation syndrome, impulse control disorder, and dyskinesias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Jared T; Perepezko, Kate; Rosenthal, Liana S; Mills, Kelly A; Pantelyat, Alexander; Mari, Zoltan; Tochen, Laura; Bang, Jee Yun; Gudavalli, Medha; Yoritomo, Nadine; Butala, Ankur; Bakker, Catherine C; Johnson, Vanessa; Moukheiber, Emile; Dawson, Ted M; Pontone, Gregory M

    2018-02-01

    Dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) can be associated with both motoric (e.g., dyskinesias) and neuropsychiatric adverse effects. Examples of the latter include Dopamine Dysregulation Syndrome (DDS) and impulse control disorder (ICD), which are separate but related behavioral/psychiatric complications of treatment in PD. Dysregulation of volition characterizes both dyskinesias and DDS/ICD; thus, we analyzed potential disease-related correlates in a large PD cohort. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 654 participants collected through the NINDS Parkinson's Disease Biomarkers Program. DDS/ICD symptoms and dyskinesias were assessed using the Movement Disorders Society (revised) Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Potential associated variables were selected from PD-validated or PD-specific scales of neuropsychiatric or motoric status. Multivariable models with DDS/ICD or dyskinesia presence outcomes were produced with backward stepwise regression to identify factors independently associated with DDS/ICD and/or dyskinesias. Fifty-three (8.1%) participants endorsed DDS and/or ICD symptoms and 150 (22.9%) were dyskinetic. In multivariable analysis, psychosis was independently associated with both dyskinesias (p = 0.006) and DDS/ICD (p < 0.001). Unpredictable motor fluctuations (p = 0.026) and depression (p = 0.023) were also associated with DDS/ICD; female sex (p = 0.025), low tremor score (p = 0.001) and high akinesia-rigidity score (p < 0.001) were associated with dyskinesias. Our findings suggest that psychosis may be an important marker of impaired volition across motor and cognitive domains. Unpredictable motor fluctuations, psychosis, and depression may together comprise a phenotypic profile of patients at increased risk for DDS/ICD. Similarly, dyskinetic PD patients should be closely monitored for psychotic symptoms and treated appropriately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of Refractory Orofacial Dyskinesia Caused by Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Encephalitis Using Botulinum Toxin

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    Feixia Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT-A injections for the treatment of orofacial dyskinesia secondary to anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR encephalitis is rarely reported. Here, we report a case of an urgent, successful management of severe orofacial dyskinesia in an 8-year-old girl with anti-NMDAR encephalitis using BoNT-A injection. The patient presented with de novo unilateral paroxysmal movement disorder progressing to generalized dystonia and repetitive orofacial dyskinesia. Diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of NMDAR antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The orofacial dyskinesia worsened despite the aggressive use of first-line immunotherapy and second-line immunotherapy (rituximab, and resulted in a potentially fatal self-inflicted oral injury. We urgently attempted symptomatic management using BoNT-A injections in the masseter, and induced muscle paralysis using vecuronium. The patient’s severe orofacial dyskinesia was controlled. We observed the effects of the BoNT-A injections and a tapering off of the effects of vecuronium 10 days after the treatment. The movement disorder had improved significantly 4 weeks after the first administration of rituximab. The injection of BoNT-A into the masseter may be an effective treatment for medically refractory orofacial dyskinesia in pediatric patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. We propose that the use of BoNT-A injections should be considered early to avoid self-inflicted oral injury due to severe refractory orofacial dyskinesia in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  16. Dyskinesia induced by phenytoin Discinesia induzida por fenitoína

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    M. AUGUSTA MONTENEGRO

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenytoin is an effective antiepileptic drug, although, it can be associated with many side effects, including dyskinesia. OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics of phenytoin induced dyskinesia. METHODS: We investigated the occurrence of involuntary movements in patients followed at our adult and pediatric epilepsy clinics during the period of one year. RESULTS: Three patients presented with phenytoin-induced dyskinesia: one adult with axial and orofacial dyskinesia, and two children with choreoathetosis. They did not have other signs of phenytoin intoxication and had complete recovery after phenytoin withdrawal. CONCLUSION: Phenytoin induced dyskinesia may occur during either chronic or initial treatment and with normal serum phenytoin levels. However, it occurs most often in patients on polytherapy, usually after increasing dosage and with toxic serum levels. Other signs of phenytoin intoxication may be present in these patients, but often the dyskinesia is the only side effect, which may delay the diagnosis and treatment. The clinical characteristics of the involuntary movements vary and may be focal or generalized, most often characterized by choreoathetosis and dyskinesias. These may last for hours, days or even years, but frequently disappear completely after phenytoin withdrawal.Fenitoína é droga anti-epiléptica eficaz, mas pode estar associada a vários efeitos colaterais, inclusive discinesia. OBJETIVO: Descrever as características clínicas da discinesia induzida por fenitoína. MÉTODO: Avaliamos a ocorrência de movimentos involuntários em pacientes seguidos nos ambulatórios de epilepsia durante o período de um ano. RESULTADOS: Três pacientes apresentaram discinesia induzida por fenitoína: um adulto com discinesia orofacial e duas crianças com coreoatetose. Eles não tinham outros sinais de intoxicação por fenitoína e apresentaram recuperação completa após a retirada da fenitoína. CONCLUSÃO: Discinesia

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor is upregulated by l-dopa in the parkinsonian brain: implications for the development of dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francardo, Veronica; Lindgren, Hanna S.; Sillivan, Stephanie E.; O’Sullivan, Sean S.; Luksik, Andrew S.; Vassoler, Fair M.; Lees, Andrew J.; Konradi, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis and increased permeability of the blood–brain barrier have been reported to occur in animal models of Parkinson’s disease and l-dopa-induced dyskinesia, but the significance of these phenomena has remained unclear. Using a validated rat model of l-dopa-induced dyskinesia, this study demonstrates that chronic treatment with l-dopa dose dependently induces the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the basal ganglia nuclei. Vascular endothelial growth factor was abundantly expressed in astrocytes and astrocytic processes in the proximity of blood vessels. When co-administered with l-dopa, a small molecule inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor signalling significantly attenuated the development of dyskinesia and completely blocked the angiogenic response and associated increase in blood–brain barrier permeability induced by the treatment. The occurrence of angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor upregulation was verified in post-mortem basal ganglia tissue from patients with Parkinson’s disease with a history of dyskinesia, who exhibited increased microvascular density, microvascular nestin expression and an upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor messenger ribonucleic acid. These congruent findings in the rat model and human patients indicate that vascular endothelial growth factor is implicated in the pathophysiology of l-dopa-induced dyskinesia and emphasize an involvement of the microvascular compartment in the adverse effects of l-dopa pharmacotherapy in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:21771855

  18. A prediction model of drug-induced ototoxicity developed by an optimal support vector machine (SVM) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shu; Li, Guo-Bo; Huang, Lu-Yi; Xie, Huan-Zhang; Zhao, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yu-Zong; Li, Lin-Li; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2014-08-01

    Drug-induced ototoxicity, as a toxic side effect, is an important issue needed to be considered in drug discovery. Nevertheless, current experimental methods used to evaluate drug-induced ototoxicity are often time-consuming and expensive, indicating that they are not suitable for a large-scale evaluation of drug-induced ototoxicity in the early stage of drug discovery. We thus, in this investigation, established an effective computational prediction model of drug-induced ototoxicity using an optimal support vector machine (SVM) method, GA-CG-SVM. Three GA-CG-SVM models were developed based on three training sets containing agents bearing different risk levels of drug-induced ototoxicity. For comparison, models based on naïve Bayesian (NB) and recursive partitioning (RP) methods were also used on the same training sets. Among all the prediction models, the GA-CG-SVM model II showed the best performance, which offered prediction accuracies of 85.33% and 83.05% for two independent test sets, respectively. Overall, the good performance of the GA-CG-SVM model II indicates that it could be used for the prediction of drug-induced ototoxicity in the early stage of drug discovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Glucosylceramide and Lysophosphatidylcholines as Potential Blood Biomarkers for Drug-Induced Hepatic Phospholipidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kosuke; Maekawa, Keiko; Ishikawa, Masaki; Senoo, Yuya; Urata, Masayo; Murayama, Mayumi; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Saito, Yoshiro

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis is one of the major concerns in drug development and clinical treatment. The present study involved the use of a nontargeting lipidomic analysis with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to explore noninvasive blood biomarkers for hepatic phospholipidosis from rat plasma. We used three tricyclic antidepressants (clomipramine [CPM], imipramine [IMI], and amitriptyline [AMT]) for the model of phospholipidosis in hepatocytes and ketoconazole (KC) for the model of phospholipidosis in cholangiocytes and administered treatment for 3 and 28 days each. Total plasma lipids were extracted and measured. Lipid molecules contributing to the separation of control and drug-treated rat plasma in a multivariate orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis were identified. Four lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) (16:1, 18:1, 18:2, and 20:4) and 42:1 hexosylceramide (HexCer) were identified as molecules separating control and drug-treated rats in all models of phospholipidosis in hepatocytes. In addition, 16:1, 18:2, and 20:4 LPCs and 42:1 HexCer were identified in a model of hepatic phospholipidosis in cholangiocytes, although LPCs were identified only in the case of 3-day treatment with KC. The levels of LPCs were decreased by drug-induced phospholipidosis, whereas those of 42:1 HexCer were increased. The increase in 42:1 HexCer was much higher in the case of IMI and AMT than in the case of CPM; moreover, the increase induced by IMI was dose-dependent. Structural characterization determining long-chain base and hexose delineated that 42:1 HexCer was d18:1/24:0 glucosylceramide (GluCer). In summary, our study demonstrated that d18:1/24:0 GluCer and LPCs are potential novel biomarkers for drug-induced hepatic phospholipidosis. PMID:24980264

  20. Comparison of snoring sounds between natural and drug-induced sleep recorded using a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Soo Kweon; Kwon, Soon Bok; Moon, Ji Seung; Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Ho Byung; Lee, Sang Jun

    2018-08-01

    Snoring is an important clinical feature of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and recent studies suggest that the acoustic quality of snoring sounds is markedly different in drug-induced sleep compared with natural sleep. However, considering differences in sound recording methods and analysis parameters, further studies are required. This study explored whether acoustic analysis of drug-induced sleep is useful as a screening test that reflects the characteristics of natural sleep in snoring patients. The snoring sounds of 30 male subjects (mean age=41.8years) were recorded using a smartphone during natural and induced sleep, with the site of vibration noted during drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE); then, we compared the sound intensity (dB), formant frequencies, and spectrograms of snoring sounds. Regarding the intensity of snoring sounds, there were minor differences within the retrolingual level obstruction group, but there was no significant difference between natural and induced sleep at either obstruction site. There was no significant difference in the F 1 and F 2 formant frequencies of snoring sounds between natural sleep and induced sleep at either obstruction site. Compared with natural sleep, induced sleep was slightly more irregular, with a stronger intensity on the spectrogram, but the spectrograms showed the same pattern at both obstruction sites. Although further studies are required, the spectrograms and formant frequencies of the snoring sounds of induced sleep did not differ significantly from those of natural sleep, and may be used as a screening test that reflects the characteristics of natural sleep according to the obstruction site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as risk factor for drug-induced hepatotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, Julie; Begriche, Karima; Moreau, Caroline; Fromenty, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Background Obesity is often associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which refers to a large spectrum of hepatic lesions including fatty liver, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. Different investigations showed or suggested that obesity and NAFLD are able to increase the risk of hepatotoxicity of different drugs. Some of these drugs could induce more frequently an acute hepatitis in obese individuals whereas others could worsen pre-existing NAFLD. Aim The main objective of the present review was to collect the available information regarding the role of NAFLD as risk factor for drug-induced hepatotoxicity. For this purpose, we performed a data-mining analysis using different queries including drug-induced liver injury (or DILI), drug-induced hepatotoxicity, fatty liver, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (or NAFLD), steatosis and obesity. The main data from the collected articles are reported in this review and when available, some pathophysiological hypotheses are put forward. Relevance for patients Drugs that could pose a potential risk in obese patients include compounds belonging to different pharmacological classes such as acetaminophen, halothane, methotrexate, rosiglitazone, stavudine and tamoxifen. For some of these drugs, experimental investigations in obese rodents confirmed the clinical observations and unveiled different pathophysiological mechanisms which could explain why these pharmaceuticals are particularly hepatotoxic in obesity and NAFLD. Other drugs such as pentoxifylline, phenobarbital and omeprazole might also pose a risk but more investigations are required to determine whether this risk is significant or not. Because obese people often take several drugs for the treatment of different obesity-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia and coronary heart disease, it is urgent to identify the main pharmaceuticals that can cause acute hepatitis on a fatty liver background or induce NAFLD worsening

  2. Drug-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) protocols: cytogenetic approaches in mitotic chromosome and interphase chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Eisuke

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is a fundamental technique which is used in wide areas of cytogenetic study including karyotyping species, hereditary diseases diagnosis, or chromosome biology study. Chromosomes are usually prepared from mitotic cells arrested by colcemid block protocol. However, obtaining mitotic chromosomes is often hampered under several circumstances. As a result, cytogenetic analysis will be sometimes difficult or even impossible in such cases. Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) (see Note 1) is an alternative method that has proved to be a unique and useful way in chromosome analysis. Former, PCC has been achieved following cell fusion method (cell-fusion PCC) mediated either by fusogenic viruses (e.g., Sendai virus) or cell fusion chemicals (e.g., polyethylene glycol), but the cell fusion PCC has several drawbacks. The novel drug-induced PCC using protein phosphatase inhibitors was introduced about 20 years ago. This method is much simpler and easier even than the conventional mitotic chromosome preparation protocol use with colcemid block and furthermore obtained PCC index (equivalent to mitotic index for metaphase chromosome) is usually much higher than colcemid block method. Moreover, this method allows the interphase chromatin to be condensed to visualize like mitotic chromosomes. Therefore drug-induced PCC has opened the way for chromosome analysis not only in metaphase chromosomes but also in interphase chromatin. The drug-induced PCC has thus proven the usefulness in cytogenetics and other cell biology fields. For this second edition version, updated modifications/changes are supplemented in Subheadings 2, 3, and 4, and a new section describing the application of PCC in chromosome science fields is added with citation of updated references.

  3. Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis: A clinicopathological study and comparative trial of steroid regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ramachandran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Steroids are used in the management of drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis (AIN. The present study was undertaken to compare the efficacy of pulse methyl prednisolone with oral prednisolone in the treatment of drug-induced AIN. Patients with biopsy-proven AIN with a history of drug intake were randomized to oral prednisolone (Group 1 1 mg/kg for 3 weeks or a pulse methyl prednisolone (Group II 30 mg/kg for 3 days followed by oral prednisolone 1 mg/kg for 2 weeks, tapered over 3 weeks. Kidney biopsy scoring was done for interstitial edema, infiltration and tubular damage. The response was reported as complete remission (CR (improvement in estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] to ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , partial remission (PR (improvement but eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 or resistance (no CR/PR. A total of 29 patients, Group I: 16 and Group II: 13 were studied. Offending drugs included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, herbal drugs, antibiotics, diuretic, rifampicin and omeprazole. There was no difference in the baseline parameters between the two groups. The biopsy score in Groups I and II was 5.9 ΁ 1.1 and 5.1 ΁ 1.2, respectively. At 3 months in Group I, eight patients each (50% achieved CR and PR. In Group II, 8 (61% achieved CR and 5 (39% PR. This was not significantly different. Percentage fall in serum creatinine at 1 week (56% was higher in CR as compared to (42% those with PR. ( P = 0.14. Patients with neutrophil infiltration had higher CR compared to patients with no neutrophil infiltration ( P = 0.01. Early steroid therapy, both oral and pulse steroid, is equally effective in achieving remission in drug-induced AIN.

  4. Subtoxic Alterations in Hepatocyte-Derived Exosomes: An Early Step in Drug-Induced Liver Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Natalie S; Mosedale, Merrie; Wolf, Kristina K; LeCluyse, Edward L; Watkins, Paul B

    2016-06-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant clinical and economic problem in the United States, yet the mechanisms that underlie DILI remain poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests that signaling molecules released by stressed hepatocytes can trigger immune responses that may be common across DILI mechanisms. Extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes, principally hepatocyte-derived exosomes (HDEs), may constitute one such signal. To examine HDE alterations as a function of drug-induced stress, this work utilized prototypical hepatotoxicant acetaminophen (APAP) in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, SD rat hepatocytes, and primary human hepatocytes. HDE were isolated using ExoQuick precipitation reagent and analyzed by quantification of the liver-specific RNAs albumin and microRNA-122 (miR-122). In vivo, significant elevations in circulating exosomal albumin mRNA were observed at subtoxic APAP exposures. Significant increases in exosomal albumin mRNA were also observed in primary rat hepatocytes at subtoxic APAP concentrations. In primary human hepatocytes, APAP elicited increases in both exosomal albumin mRNA and exosomal miR-122 without overt cytotoxicity. However, the number of HDE produced in vitro in response to APAP did not increase with exosomal RNA quantity. We conclude that significant drug-induced alterations in the liver-specific RNA content of HDE occur at subtoxic APAP exposures in vivo and in vitro, and that these changes appear to reflect selective packaging rather than changes in exosome number. The current findings demonstrate that translationally relevant HDE alterations occur in the absence of overt hepatocellular toxicity, and support the hypothesis that HDE released by stressed hepatocytes may mediate early immune responses in DILI. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Organization and logistics of drug-induced sleep endoscopy in a training hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoist, L B L; de Vries, N

    2015-09-01

    Drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) is a rapidly growing method to evaluate airway collapse in patients receiving non-CPAP therapies for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). The growing number of DISEs has consequences for the organization of clinical protocols. In this paper we present our recent experiences with DISE, performed by an ENT resident, with sedation given by a nurse anesthetist, in an outpatient endoscopy setting, while the staff member/sleep surgeon discusses the findings and the recommended treatment proposal on the same day.

  6. Drug-Induced Liver Injury Associated with Complementary and Alternative Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Koji; Kanda, Tatsuo; Yasui, Shin; Haga, Yuki; Kumagai, Junichiro; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Nakamura, Masato; Arai, Makoto; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old man was admitted due to acute hepatitis with unknown etiology. After his condition and laboratory data gradually improved with conservative therapy, he was discharged 1 month later. Two months after his discharge, however, liver dysfunction reappeared. After his mother accidentally revealed that he took complementary and alternative medicine, discontinuation of the therapy caused his condition to improve. Finally, he was diagnosed with a recurrent drug-induced liver injury associated with Japanese complementary and alternative medicine. It is important to take the medical history in detail and consider complementary and alternative medicine as a cause of liver disease. PMID:28100990

  7. Potential candidate genomic biomarkers of drug induced vascular injury in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmas, Deidre A.; Scicchitano, Marshall S.; Mullins, David; Hughes-Earle, Angela; Tatsuoka, Kay; Magid-Slav, Michal; Frazier, Kendall S.; Thomas, Heath C.

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced vascular injury is frequently observed in rats but the relevance and translation to humans present a hurdle for drug development. Numerous structurally diverse pharmacologic agents have been shown to induce mesenteric arterial medial necrosis in rats, but no consistent biomarkers have been identified. To address this need, a novel strategy was developed in rats to identify genes associated with the development of drug-induced mesenteric arterial medial necrosis. Separate groups (n = 6/group) of male rats were given 28 different toxicants (30 different treatments) for 1 or 4 days with each toxicant given at 3 different doses (low, mid and high) plus corresponding vehicle (912 total rats). Mesentery was collected, frozen and endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells were microdissected from each artery. RNA was isolated, amplified and Affymetrix GeneChip® analysis was performed on selectively enriched samples and a novel panel of genes representing those which showed a dose responsive pattern for all treatments in which mesenteric arterial medial necrosis was histologically observed, was developed and verified in individual endothelial cell- and vascular smooth muscle cell-enriched samples. Data were confirmed in samples containing mesentery using quantitative real-time RT-PCR (TaqMan™) gene expression profiling. In addition, the performance of the panel was also confirmed using similarly collected samples obtained from a timecourse study in rats given a well established vascular toxicant (Fenoldopam). Although further validation is still required, a novel gene panel has been developed that represents a strategic opportunity that can potentially be used to help predict the occurrence of drug-induced mesenteric arterial medial necrosis in rats at an early stage in drug development. -- Highlights: ► A gene panel was developed to help predict rat drug-induced mesenteric MAN. ► A gene panel was identified following treatment of rats with 28

  8. Handwriting Analysis Indicates Spontaneous Dyskinesias in Neuroleptic Naïve Adolescents at High Risk for Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Derek J.; Teulings, Hans-Leo; Caligiuri, Michael; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that movement abnormalities are a core feature of psychosis. One marker of movement abnormality, dyskinesia, is a result of impaired neuromodulation of dopamine in fronto-striatal pathways. The traditional methods for identifying movement abnormalities include observer-based reports and force stability gauges. The drawbacks of these methods are long training times for raters, experimenter bias, large site differences in instrumental apparatus, and suboptimal reliability. Taking these drawbacks into account has guided the development of better standardized and more efficient procedures to examine movement abnormalities through handwriting analysis software and tablet. Individuals at risk for psychosis showed significantly more dysfluent pen movements (a proximal measure for dyskinesia) in a handwriting task. Handwriting kinematics offers a great advance over previous methods of assessing dyskinesia, which could clearly be beneficial for understanding the etiology of psychosis. PMID:24300590

  9. Impulse control disorders and levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Valerie; Napier, T Celeste; Frank, Michael J; Sgambato-Faure, Veronique; Grace, Anthony A; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria; Obeso, Jose; Bezard, Erwan; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier

    2017-03-01

    Dopaminergic medications used in the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease are associated with motor and non-motor behavioural side-effects, such as dyskinesias and impulse control disorders also known as behavioural addictions. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias occur in up to 80% of patients with Parkinson's after a few years of chronic treatment. Impulse control disorders, including gambling disorder, binge eating disorder, compulsive sexual behaviour, and compulsive shopping occur in about 17% of patients with Parkinson's disease on dopamine agonists. These behaviours reflect the interactions of the dopaminergic medications with the individual's susceptibility, and the underlying neurobiology of Parkinson's disease. Parkinsonian rodent models show enhanced reinforcing effects of chronic dopaminergic medication, and a potential role for individual susceptibility. In patients with Parkinson's disease and impulse control disorders, impairments are observed across subtypes of decisional impulsivity, possibly reflecting uncertainty and the relative balance of rewards and losses. Impairments appear to be more specific to decisional than motor impulsivity, which might reflect differences in ventral and dorsal striatal engagement. Emerging evidence suggests impulse control disorder subtypes have dissociable correlates, which indicate that individual susceptibility predisposes towards the expression of different behavioural subtypes and neurobiological substrates. Therapeutic interventions to treat patients with Parkinson's disease and impulse control disorders have shown efficacy in randomised controlled trials. Large-scale studies are warranted to identify individual risk factors and novel therapeutic targets for these diseases. Mechanisms underlying impulse control disorders and dyskinesias could provide crucial insights into other behavioural symptoms in Parkinson's disease and addictions in the general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  10. A Survey of the Tardive Dyskinesia Induced by Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser tabibi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: Tardive Dyskinesia (TD, is one of the important problems of the patients with schizophrenia. The emergence of these side effects depends on so many factors such as the patients' age and the duration of antipsychotic treatment. By discovering new drugs (Atypical, there has been an outstanding decrease in the emergence of these side effects. The present study investigates the symptoms of TD in the Patients with schizophrenia who were under  treatments for more than 6 months. "nMethod: The sample of this study was 200 Patients with schizophrenia of four wards in Razi hospital (two acute and two chronic wards who were hospitalized in the winter of 2006 and were qualified for this study. The subjects were 101 males and 99 females who were younger than 60 and had received antipsychotic drugs for at least 6 months. After psychiatric interview and filling the demographic questionnaire by the patients, the required information about the drugs and the intensity of the symptoms was acquired. Then clinical and physical examinations of tardive dyskinesia were done. Next, the tardive dyskinesia disorders' check list (AIMS was used. Findings of this cross-sectional, descriptive study were analyzed by SPSS. "nResults: There was a high ratio of 95% between TD and the age factor (P=0.05. There was no relationship between symptoms frequency and duration of treatment (P=0.68. Facial muscles and oral zones were mostly involved in T.D disorder (72%. "nConclusion: No significant difference was observed between nine fold symptoms of T.D in patients who were using traditional drugs and those who were using the new ones (typical and atypical. Findings showed that in the intensity of the symptoms, gender does not play a major role.

  11. Characterization of Paroxysmal Gluten‐Sensitive Dyskinesia in Border Terriers Using Serological Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden, O.A.; Hadjivassiliou, M.; Sanders, D.S.; Powell, R.; Garosi, L.

    2018-01-01

    Background Paroxysmal gluten‐sensitive dyskinesia (PGSD) in border terriers (BTs) results from an immunologic response directed against transglutaminase (TG)2 and gliadin. Recent evidence suggests that PGSD is only one aspect of a range of possible manifestations of gluten sensitivity in the breed. Hypothesis/Objectives Gluten sensitivity in BTs is a heterogeneous disease process with a diverse clinical spectrum; to characterize the phenotype of PGSD using TG2 and gliadin autoantibodies as diagnostic markers. Animals One hundred twenty‐eight client‐owned BTs with various disorders. Methods Prospective study. BTs with paroxysmal episodes and a normal interictal examination were phenotyped using footage of a representative episode and assigned to 3 groups: idiopathic epilepsy (IE), paroxysmal dyskinesia (PD), or other. Owners of each dog completed a questionnaire to obtain information regarding clinical signs. Healthy BTs formed a control group. Serum antibodies against TG2 and AGA were measured in all dogs. Results One hundred twenty‐eight BTs were enrolled; 45 with PD, 28 with IE, 35 with other conditions, and 20 controls. Three overlapping phenotypes were identified; PD, signs suggestive of gastrointestinal disease, and dermatopathy. AGA‐IgG concentrations were increased in PD, compared with IE (P = 0.012), controls (P < 0.0001) and other (P = 0.018) conditions. Anti‐canine TG2‐IgA concentrations were increased in PD, compared with IE (P < 0.0001), controls (P < 0.0001) and other (P = 0.012) conditions. Serological markers are highly specific for PGSD but lack sensitivity. Conclusions PGSD appears part of a syndrome of gluten intolerance consisting of episodes of transient dyskinesia, signs suggestive of gastrointestinal disease, and dermatological hypersensitivity. PMID:29424456

  12. Idiosyncratic Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Is Drug-Cytokine Interaction the Linchpin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Robert A; Maiuri, Ashley R; Ganey, Patricia E

    2017-02-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury continues to be a human health problem in part because drugs that cause these reactions are not identified in current preclinical testing and because progress in prevention is hampered by incomplete knowledge of mechanisms that underlie these adverse responses. Several hypotheses involving adaptive immune responses, inflammatory stress, inability to adapt to stress, and multiple, concurrent factors have been proposed. Yet much remains unknown about how drugs interact with the liver to effect death of hepatocytes. Evidence supporting hypotheses implicating adaptive or innate immune responses in afflicted patients has begun to emerge and is bolstered by results obtained in experimental animal models and in vitro systems. A commonality in adaptive and innate immunity is the production of cytokines, including interferon-γ (IFNγ). IFNγ initiates cell signaling pathways that culminate in cell death or inhibition of proliferative repair. Tumor necrosis factor-α, another cytokine prominent in immune responses, can also promote cell death. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-α interacts with IFNγ, leading to enhanced cellular responses to each cytokine. In this short review, we propose that the interaction of drugs with these cytokines contributes to idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury, and mechanisms by which this could occur are discussed. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Tremor pattern differentiates drug-induced resting tremor from Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, R; Fratto, A; Vescio, B; Arabia, G; Sciacca, G; Morelli, M; Labate, A; Salsone, M; Novellino, F; Nicoletti, A; Petralia, A; Gambardella, A; Zappia, M; Quattrone, A

    2016-04-01

    DAT-SPECT, is a well-established procedure for distinguishing drug-induced parkinsonism from Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the usefulness of blink reflex recovery cycle (BRrc) and of electromyographic parameters of resting tremor for the differentiation of patients with drug-induced parkinsonism with resting tremor (rDIP) from those with resting tremor due to PD. This was a cross-sectional study. In 16 patients with rDIP and 18 patients with PD we analysed electrophysiological parameters (amplitude, duration, burst and pattern) of resting tremor. BRrc at interstimulus intervals (ISI) of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 750 msec was also analysed in patients with rDIP, patients with PD and healthy controls. All patients and controls underwent DAT-SPECT. Rest tremor amplitude was higher in PD patients than in rDIP patients (p tremor showed a synchronous pattern in all patients with rDIP, whereas it had an alternating pattern in all PD patients (p tremor can be considered a useful investigation for differentiating rDIP from PD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Serotonergic hyperactivity as a potential factor in developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogaard, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any) among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions.

  15. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Calderon, Tina M.; Coley, Jacqueline S.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70% of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers. PMID:23456305

  16. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, V; Mahe, E; Houhou, N; Abramowitz, L; Rozenberg, F; Ranger-Rogez, S; Crickx, B

    2003-05-01

    Association of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome with viral infection is debated. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) reactivation has been the most frequently reported infection associated with this syndrome. However, a case of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection was recently described associated with anticonvulsant-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. We report a case of severe allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity syndrome with pancreatitis associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Active EBV infection was demonstrated in two consecutive serum samples by the presence of anti-EBV early antigen (EA) IgM antibodies and an increase in anti-EBV EA IgG antibodies, whereas no anti-EBV nuclear antigen IgG antibodies were detected. EBV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Reactivation of HHV-6 was suggested only by the presence of anti-HHV-6 IgM antibodies, but HHV-6 DNA was not detected by PCR in the serum. Other viral investigations showed previous infection (CMV, rubella, measles, parvovirus B19), immunization after vaccination (hepatitis B virus), or absence of previous infection (hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus). We suggest that EBV infection may participate in some cases, as do the other herpesviruses HHV-6 or CMV, in the development of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

  17. Usefulness of zebrafish larvae to evaluate drug-induced functional and morphological renal tubular alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgulho, Rita; Jacinto, Raquel; Lopes, Susana S; Pereira, Sofia A; Tranfield, Erin M; Martins, Gabriel G; Gualda, Emilio J; Derks, Rico J E; Correia, Ana C; Steenvoorden, Evelyne; Pintado, Petra; Mayboroda, Oleg A; Monteiro, Emilia C; Morello, Judit

    2018-01-01

    Prediction and management of drug-induced renal injury (DIRI) rely on the knowledge of the mechanisms of drug insult and on the availability of appropriate animal models to explore it. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) offers unique advantages for assessing DIRI because the larval pronephric kidney has a high homology with its human counterpart and it is fully mature at 3.5 days post-fertilization. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the usefulness of zebrafish larvae as a model of renal tubular toxicity through a comprehensive analysis of the renal alterations induced by the lethal concentrations for 10% of the larvae for gentamicin, paracetamol and tenofovir. We evaluated drug metabolic profile by mass spectrometry, renal function with the inulin clearance assay, the 3D morphology of the proximal convoluted tubule by two-photon microscopy and the ultrastructure of proximal convoluted tubule mitochondria by transmission electron microscopy. Paracetamol was metabolized by conjugation and oxidation with further detoxification with glutathione. Renal clearance was reduced with gentamicin and paracetamol. Proximal tubules were enlarged with paracetamol and tenofovir. All drugs induced mitochondrial alterations including dysmorphic shapes ("donuts", "pancakes" and "rods"), mitochondrial swelling, cristae disruption and/or loss of matrix granules. These results are in agreement with the tubular effects of gentamicin, paracetamol and tenofovir in man and demonstrate that zebrafish larvae might be a good model to assess functional and structural damage associated with DIRI.

  18. Abnormal dopaminergic modulation of striato-cortical networks underlies levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Christensen, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Twenty-six patients with Parkinson's disease (age range: 51–84 years; 11 females) received a single dose of levodopa and then performed a task in which they had to produce or suppress a movement in response to visual cues. Task-related activity was continuously mapped...... with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic causal modelling was applied to assess levodopa-induced modulation of effective connectivity between the pre-supplementary motor area, primary motor cortex and putamen when patients suppressed a motor response. Bayesian model selection revealed that patients who...

  19. Side effects in preventive maintenance therapy with neuroleptics with special emphasis on tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logothetis, J; Paraschos, A; Frangos, E

    1981-01-01

    Neuroleptics induce hypersensitivity reactions, and toxic, systemic and extrapyramidal manifestations. The latter mainly include acute dystonic reactions, other early dyskinesias, akathisia, parkinsonism and TD. These drugs have been implicated for DA antagonism exerted by an adenylate cyclase inhibition. Prolonged blockade of DA receptors is considered as the motivation for a counterbalancing mechanism inducing the DA supersensitivity from which TD results. Recent reports suggest cholinergic and GABA ergic insufficiency as secondary participants. The increasing frequency of TD calls for prevention by modifying treatment practices and searching for effective measures to combat the symptoms.

  20. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cros, C., E-mail: caroline.cros@hotmail.co.uk [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Skinner, M., E-mail: Matthew.Skinner@astrazeneca.com [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Moors, J. [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Lainee, P. [Sanofi-Aventis R and D, 371, rue du Pr Joseph Blayac, 34184 Montpellier Cedex 04 (France); Valentin, J.P. [Safety Pharmacology, Global Safety Assessment, Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-01

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (I{sub Na}) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of I{sub Na}, this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (E{sub max} 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ► We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ► We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ► At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ► At high heart rate the effects of two

  1. Epidemiology of symptomatic drug-induced long QT syndrome and Torsade de Pointes in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarganas, Giselle; Garbe, Edeltraut; Klimpel, Andreas; Hering, Rolf C; Bronder, Elisabeth; Haverkamp, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced long QT syndrome (diLQTS) leading to Torsade de Pointes (TdP) is a potentially lethal condition, which has led to several post-marketing drug withdrawals in the past decade. The true incidence of diLQTS/TdP is largely unknown. One explanation is under-reporting of this potentially life-threatening adverse event by physicians and other medical staff to pharmacovigilance agencies. To gain more insight into the incidence of diLQTS and TdP, the Berlin Pharmacovigilance Center (PVZ-FAKOS) has actively and prospectively identified patients who developed this particular type of drug-induced adverse event. Here, the basic characteristics of the affected patients are summarized and suspected drugs are discussed. Furthermore, an extrapolation of the Berlin incidence rates to the German Standard Population is presented. Using a Berlin-wide network of 51 collaborating hospitals (>180 clinical departments), adult patients presenting with long QT syndrome (LQTS/TdP) between 2008 and 2011 were identified by active surveillance of these hospitals. Drug exposures as well as other possible risk factors were obtained from the patient's files and in a face-to-face interview with the patient. One-hundred and seventy patients of possible LQTS/TdP were reported to the Pharmacovigilance Center of whom 58 cases were confirmed in a thorough validation process. The majority (66%) of these cases were female and 60% had developed LQTS/TdP in the outpatient setting. Thirty-five (60%) of 58 confirmed cases were assessed as drug-related based on a standardized causality assessment applying the criteria of the World Health Organization. Drugs assessed as related in more than two cases were metoclopramide, amiodarone, melperone, citalopram, and levomethadone. The age-standardized incidence of diLQTS/TdP in Berlin was estimated to be 2.5 per million per year for males and 4.0 per million per year for females. While European annual reporting rates based on spontaneous reports suggest an

  2. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cros, C.; Skinner, M.; Moors, J.; Lainee, P.; Valentin, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (I Na ) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of I Na , this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (E max 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ► We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ► We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ► At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ► At high heart rate the effects of two out of three

  3. Presynaptic mechanisms of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: the findings, the debate, the therapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Angela eCenci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dopamine precursor L-DOPA has been the most effective treatment for Parkinson´s disease (PD for over 40 years. However, the response to this treatment changes during the progression of PD, and most patients develop dyskinesias (abnormal involuntary movements and motor fluctuations within a few years of L-DOPA therapy. There is wide consensus that these motor complications depend on both pre- and post-synaptic disturbances of nigrostriatal dopamine transmission. Several presynaptic mechanisms converge to generate large dopamine swings in the brain concomitant with the peaks-and-troughs of plasma L-DOPA levels, while post-synaptic changes engender abnormal functional responses in dopaminoceptive neurons. While this general picture is well-accepted, the relative contribution of different factors remains a matter of debate. A particularly animated debate has been growing around putative players on the presynaptic side of the cascade. To what extent do presynaptic disturbances in dopamine transmission depend on deficiency/dysfunction of the dopamine transporter, aberrant release of dopamine from serotonin neurons, or gliovascular mechanisms? And does noradrenaline (which is synthetized from dopamine play a role? This review article will summarize key findings, controversies, and pending questions regarding the presynaptic mechanisms of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Intriguingly, the debate around these mechanisms has spurred research into previously unexplored facets of brain plasticity that have far-reaching implications to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disease.

  4. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for biliary dyskinesia in children provides durable symptom relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Ramanath N; Proklova, Lyudmila V; Aprahamian, Charles J; Morgan, Traci L; Harmon, Carroll M; Barnhart, Douglas C; Saeed, Shehzad A

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in children with biliary dyskinesia. Reports of children with an abnormal cholecystokinin (CCK)-stimulated HIDA scan between January 2001 and July 2006 who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy were reviewed. Postoperatively, a 23-item Likert scale, symptom questionnaire was administered to parents. Sixty-four children with chronic abdominal pain and no gallstones on ultrasound had an abnormal CCK-HIDA scan. Twenty-three children (median age, 14 years; 16 girls), with mean (SD) ejection fraction of 17% (8), underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and were further analyzed. Preoperatively, these children had right upper quadrant/epigastric pain (78%), nausea (52%), vomiting (43%), and generalized abdominal pain (22%) lasting for a median of 3 months (range, 1 month to 2.5 years). Median postoperative follow-up was 2.7 years. Sixteen (70%) parents completed the questionnaire. Of those who responded, 63% indicated that their children had no abdominal pain, 87% had no vomiting, and 69% had no nausea in the month preceding the questionnaire. Overall, 67% of parents indicated that their children's symptoms were completely relieved after cholecystectomy, whereas 7% indicated that the symptoms were not relieved. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is effective in providing both short-term and long-term improvement of symptoms in children with biliary dyskinesia.

  5. VMAT2 Inhibitors: New Drugs for the Treatment of Tardive Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Anne P; Baker, Danial E; Levien, Terri L

    2018-04-01

    To provide a review of tardive dyskinesia (TD) symptoms, etiology, pathophysiology, and treatments. PubMed, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials. gov, and Google Scholar were searched for relevant literature using a combination of the following terms: tardive dyskinesia, treatment, management, guidelines, tetrabenazine, deutetrabenazine, and valbenazine. Sources were limited to human data. Articles were reviewed for relevance to TD therapy. Reference lists were manually searched for other relevant articles. Selected literature was published between 1968 and 2017. This article reviews treatment options available for patients with TD. Many agents have been tried off-label to manage symptoms, with limited evidence of benefit. The Food and Drug Administration approved the first drug to treat TD valbenazine on April 11, 2017. TD is largely iatrogenic. Valbenazine's approval by the Food and Drug Administration was followed by the approval of deutetrabenazine, a drug with similar mechanism of action. Further data from postmarketing studies will be needed to verify that valbenazine's adverse effect profile is different from the profiles of tetrabenazine and deutetrabenazine.

  6. CCDC103 mutations cause primary ciliary dyskinesia by disrupting assembly of ciliary dynein arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizzi, Jennifer R.; Becker-Heck, Anita; Castleman, Victoria H.; Al-Mutairi, Dalal; Liu, Yan; Loges, Niki T.; Pathak, Narendra; Austin-Tse, Christina; Sheridan, Eamonn; Schmidts, Miriam; Olbrich, Heike; Werner, Claudius; Häffner, Karsten; Hellman, Nathan; Chodhari, Rahul; Gupta, Amar; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Olale, Felix; Burdine, Rebecca D.; Schier, Alexander F.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Chung, Eddie MK; Reinhardt, Richard; Mitchison, Hannah M.; King, Stephen M.; Omran, Heymut; Drummond, Iain A.

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are essential for fertilization, respiratory clearance, cerebrospinal fluid circulation, and to establish laterality1. Cilia motility defects cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, MIM 242650), a disorder affecting 1:15-30,000 births. Cilia motility requires the assembly of multisubunit dynein arms that drive cilia bending2. Despite progress in understanding the genetic basis of PCD, mutations remain to be identified for several PCD linked loci3. Here we show that the zebrafish cilia paralysis mutant schmalhanstn222 (smh) mutant encodes the coiled-coil domain containing 103 protein (Ccdc103), a foxj1a regulated gene. Screening 146 unrelated PCD families identified patients in six families with reduced outer dynein arms, carrying mutations in CCDC103. Dynein arm assembly in smh mutant zebrafish was rescued by wild-type but not mutant human CCDC103. Chlamydomonas Ccdc103 functions as a tightly bound, axoneme-associated protein. The results identify Ccdc103 as a novel dynein arm attachment factor that when mutated causes Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. PMID:22581229

  7. Presynaptic Mechanisms of l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia: The Findings, the Debate, and the Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) precursor l-DOPA has been the most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) for over 40 years. However, the response to this treatment changes with disease progression, and most patients develop dyskinesias (abnormal involuntary movements) and motor fluctuations within a few years of l-DOPA therapy. There is wide consensus that these motor complications depend on both pre- and post-synaptic disturbances of nigrostriatal DA transmission. Several presynaptic mechanisms converge to generate large DA swings in the brain concomitant with the peaks-and-troughs of plasma l-DOPA levels, while post-synaptic changes engender abnormal functional responses in dopaminoceptive neurons. While this general picture is well-accepted, the relative contribution of different factors remains a matter of debate. A particularly animated debate has been growing around putative players on the presynaptic side of the cascade. To what extent do presynaptic disturbances in DA transmission depend on deficiency/dysfunction of the DA transporter, aberrant release of DA from serotonin neurons, or gliovascular mechanisms? And does noradrenaline (which is synthetized from DA) play a role? This review article will summarize key findings, controversies, and pending questions regarding the presynaptic mechanisms of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Intriguingly, the debate around these mechanisms has spurred research into previously unexplored facets of brain plasticity that have far-reaching implications to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disease.

  8. Rapid diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia: cell culture and soft computing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Massimo; Bush, Andrew; Montemurro, Francesca; Pioggia, Giovanni; Piras, Martina; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Di Cicco, Maria; Chinellato, Iolanda; Cangiotti, Angela M; Boner, Attilio L

    2013-04-01

    Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) sometimes requires repeated nasal brushing to exclude secondary ciliary alterations. Our aim was to evaluate whether the use of a new method of nasal epithelial cell culture can speed PCD diagnosis in doubtful cases and to identify which are the most informative parameters by means of a multilayer artificial neural network (ANN). A cross-sectional study was performed in patients with suspected PCD. All patients underwent nasal brushing for ciliary motion analysis, ultrastructural assessment and evaluation of ciliary function after ciliogenesis in culture by ANN. 151 subjects were studied. A diagnostic suspension cell culture was obtained in 117 nasal brushings. A diagnosis of PCD was made in 36 subjects (29 of whom were children). In nine out of the 36 patients the diagnosis was made only after a second brushing, because of equivocal results of both tests at first examination. In each of these subjects diagnosis of PCD was confirmed by cell culture results. Cell culture in suspension evaluated by means of ANN allows the separation of PCD from secondary ciliary dyskinesia patients after only 5 days of culture and allows diagnosis to be reached in doubtful cases, thus avoiding the necessity of a second sample.

  9. Beat-to-beat variability of QT intervals is increased in patients with drug-induced long-QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinterseer, Martin; Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Beckmann, Britt-Maria

    2008-01-01

    Torsades de pointes arrhythmias (TdP) occur by definition in the setting of prolonged QT intervals. Animal models of drug induced Long-QT syndrome (dLQTS) have shown higher predictive value for proarrhythmia with beat-to-beat variability of repolarization duration (BVR) when compared with QT inte...... intervals. Here, we evaluate variability of QT intervals in patients with a history of drug-induced long QT syndrome (dLQTS) and TdP in absence of a mutation in any of the major LQTS genes.......Torsades de pointes arrhythmias (TdP) occur by definition in the setting of prolonged QT intervals. Animal models of drug induced Long-QT syndrome (dLQTS) have shown higher predictive value for proarrhythmia with beat-to-beat variability of repolarization duration (BVR) when compared with QT...

  10. Dynamically observing the value of the changes of serum sex hormone levels of early pregnancy after drug-induced abortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Honggang; Dong Hua; Gu Yan; Zhang Zuncheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To observe the value of the changes of serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG), estradiol (E), progesterone (P) Levels of early pregnancy after drug-induced abortion dynamically. Methods: Assessing 55 women proved pregnant by urine or blood HCG retrospecticly, who had terminated their pregnancy by mifepristonr and misoprostol. Meanwhile the serum levels of β-HCG, E, P were monitored dynamically. Results: Among the 55 patients, the levels of β-HCG, E and P had significant decreased (t β-HCG =4.845, t E =7.655, t P =11.390, P E =9.089, P P =2.910, P<0.05). Conclusion: Detectint the serum hormone's levels after drug-induced abortion by chemiluminescent immunoassay, we can assess indirectly the value of administration of mifepristone and misoprostol, predict the prolonged vaginal bleeding after drug-induced abortion, and the outcome of the treatment, which determine wether need another curestage. (authors)

  11. CYP2D6 and catechol-O-methyltransferase gene polymorphisms in Parkinson patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, S.A.; Alifirova, V.M.; Pozhidaev, I.V.; Fedorenko, O.Y.; Osmanova, D.Z.; Tiguntsev, V.V.; Bokhan, N.A.; Zhukova, I.A.; Wilffert, B.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of the dopaminergic input to the basal ganglia, is commonly treated with levodopa (L-DOPA). Use of this drug, however, is severely limited by the development of side effect. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) are

  12. Dissimilar mechanistic background of peripheral and orofacial hyperkinesia in patients with Parkinson’s disease and levodopa-induced dyskinesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, Svetlana A.; Fedorenko, Olga Yu.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Alifirova, Valentina M.; Zhukova, Natalia G.; Zhukova, Irina A.; Al Hadithy, Asmar F. Y.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Bokhan, Nikolay A.; Wilffert, Bob; Loonen, Anton J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Long-term levodopa treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is frequently complicated by spontaneously occurring involuntary muscle movements called dyskinesia. The exact pathological mechanism of this complication has not yet been elucidated. We have previously demonstrated that in PD

  13. X-linked primary ciliary dyskinesia due to mutations in the cytoplasmic axonemal dynein assembly factor PIH1D3.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olcese, C.; Patel, M.P.; Shoemark, A.; Kiviluoto, S.; Legendre, M.; Williams, H.J.; Vaughan, C.K.; Hayward, J.; Goldenberg, A.; Emes, R.D.; Munye, M.M.; Dyer, L.; Cahill, T.; Bevillard, J.; Gehrig, C.; Guipponi, M.; Chantot, S.; Duquesnoy, P.; Thomas, L.; Jeanson, L.; Copin, B.; Tamalet, A.; Thauvin-Robinet, C.; Papon, J.F.; Garin, A.; Pin, I.; Vera, G.; Aurora, P.; Fassad, M.R.; Jenkins, L.; Boustred, C.; Cullup, T.; Dixon, M.; Onoufriadis, A.; Bush, A.; Chung, E.M.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Loebinger, M.R.; Wilson, R.; Armengot, M.; Escudier, E.; Hogg, C.; Amselem, S.; Sun, Z.; Bartoloni, L.; Blouin, J.L.; Mitchison, H.M.; Schmidts, M.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    By moving essential body fluids and molecules, motile cilia and flagella govern respiratory mucociliary clearance, laterality determination and the transport of gametes and cerebrospinal fluid. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder frequently caused by non-assembly of

  14. Coenzyme Q10 does not prevent oral dyskinesias induced by long-term haloperidol treatment of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    OA, Andreassen; Weber, Christine; HA, Jorgensen

    1999-01-01

    dyskinesias in rats, a putative analogue to human TD, could be prevented by the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Rats received 16 weeks of treatment with haloperidol decanoate (HAL) IM alone or together with orally administered CoQ10, and the behavior was recorded during and after treatment. HAL...

  15. Bacteriology and treatment of infections in the upper and lower airways in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanin, Mikkel Christian

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is lined with motile cilia that transport respiratory mucus. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a chronic genetic disease caused by mutations in genes responsible for ciliary structure and function. Non-functional airway cilia impair the mucociliary clearance (MCC), causing...

  16. Hibiscus vitifolius (Linn.) root extracts shows potent protective action against anti-tubercular drug induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Anbu Jeba Sunilson John; Mohan, Syam; Chellappan, Dinesh Kumar; Kalusalingam, Anandarajagopal; Ariamuthu, Saraswathi

    2012-05-07

    The roots of Hibiscus vitifolius Linn. (Malvaceae) is used for the treatment of jaundice in the folklore system of medicine in India. This study is an attempt to evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of the roots of Hibiscus vitifolius against anti-tubercular drug induced hepatotoxicity. Hepatotoxicity was induced in albino rats of either sex by oral administration of a combination of three anti-tubercular drugs. Petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts of roots of Hibiscus vitifolius (400mg/kg/day) were evaluated for their possible hepatoprotective potential. All the extracts were found to be safe up to a dose of 2000mg/kg. Among the four extracts studied, oral administration of methanol extract of Hibiscus vitifolius at 400mg/kg showed significant difference in all the parameters when compared to control. There was a significant (PHibiscus vitifolius have potent hepatoprotective activity, thereby justifying its ethnopharmacological claim. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modulating sensitivity to drug-induced apoptosis: the future for chemotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makin, Guy; Dive, Caroline

    2001-01-01

    Drug resistance is a fundamental problem in the treatment of most common human cancers. Our understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying death and survival has allowed the development of rational approaches to overcoming drug resistance. The mitogen activated protein kinase family of protein serine/threonine kinases has been implicated in this complex web of signalling, with some members acting to enhance death and other members to prevent it. A recent publication by MacKeigan et al is the first to demonstrate an enhancement of drug-induced cell death by simultaneous blockade of MEK-mediated survival signalling, and offers the potential for targeted adjuvant therapy as a means of overcoming drug resistance

  18. Radiation- and drug-induced DNA repair in mammalian oocytes and embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, R.A.; Brandriff, B.

    1979-01-01

    A review of studies showing ultraviolet- or drug-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in mammalian oocytes and embryos suggests that the female gamete has an excision repair capacity from the earliest stages of oocyte growth. The oocyte's demonstrable excision repair capacity decreases at the time of meiotic maturation for unknown reasons, but the fully mature oocyte maintans a repair capacity, in contrast to the mature sperm, and contributes this to the zygote. Early embryo cells maintain relatively constant levels of excision repair until late fetal stages, when they lose their capacity for excision repair. These apparent changes in excision repair capacity do not have a simple relationship to known differences in radiation sensitivity of germ cells and embryos

  19. Okadaic acid for radiation dose estimation using drug-induced premature chromosome condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunyan; Zhang Wei; Su Xu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish simple biological method for high irradiation dose estimation using drug-induced prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) aberrations. Methods: Peripheral blood was taken from healthy adults and irradiated by 0, 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 Gy 60 Co γ-rays. Then the blood samples were cultured for 48 hrs. One hr before the end of culture , okadaic acid was added into culture medium to induce PCC rings, which were counted for each dose point. Results: The yield of PCC rings was increased with the dose of radiation until 20 Gy. Within the range of 1 to 20 Gy, there was a good dose-response relationship between the yield of PCC rings and radiation dose. Conclusion: Compared with the analysis of frequency of dicentrics, the yield of PCC rings could be a good biodosimetry indicator for estimation of high dose irradiation. (authors)

  20. Anti-HERG activity and the risk of drug-induced arrhythmias and sudden death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, M L; Pettersson, M; Meyboom, R H B

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: Drug-induced QTc-prolongation, resulting from inhibition of HERG potassium channels may lead to serious ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. We studied the quantitative anti-HERG activity of pro-arrhythmic drugs as a risk factor for this outcome in day-to-day practice. METHODS...... defined as reports of cardiac arrest, sudden death, torsade de pointes, ventricular fibrillation, and ventricular tachycardia (n = 5591), and compared with non-cases regarding the anti-HERG activity, defined as the effective therapeutic plasma concentration (ETCPunbound) divided by the HERG IC50 value......, of suspected drugs. We identified a significant association of 1.93 (95% CI: 1.89-1.98) between the anti-HERG activity of drugs, measured as log10 (ETCPunbound/IC50), and reporting of serious ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death to the WHO-UMC database. CONCLUSION: Anti-HERG activity is associated...

  1. Drug-Induced Hypothermia as Beneficial Treatment before and after Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Flemming F; Hasseldam, Henrik; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Hypothermia is still unproven as beneficial treatment in human stroke, although in animal models, conditioning the brain with hypothermia has induced tolerance to insults. Here, we delineate the feasibility of drug-induced mild hypothermia in reducing ischemic brain damage when...... conditioning before (preconditioning) and after (postconditioning) experimental stroke. Methods: Hypothermia was induced in rats with a bolus of 6 mg/kg talipexole followed by 20 h continuous talipexole infusion of 6 mg/kg in total. Controls received similar treatment with saline. The core body temperature...... was continuously monitored. In preconditioning, hypothermia was terminated before either reversible occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) for 60 min or global ischemia for 10 min with 2-vessel occlusion and hypotension. In postconditioning, rats experienced 60 min of MCAO before hypothermia was induced...

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans as a Model System for Studying Drug Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard de Boer

    Full Text Available Today HIV-1 infection is recognized as a chronic disease with obligatory lifelong treatment to keep viral titers below detectable levels. The continuous intake of antiretroviral drugs however, leads to severe and even life-threatening side effects, supposedly by the deleterious impact of nucleoside-analogue type compounds on the functioning of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase. For detailed investigation of the yet partially understood underlying mechanisms, the availability of a versatile model system is crucial. We therefore set out to develop the use of Caenorhabditis elegans to study drug induced mitochondrial toxicity. Using a combination of molecular-biological and functional assays, combined with a quantitative analysis of mitochondrial network morphology, we conclude that anti-retroviral drugs with similar working mechanisms can be classified into distinct groups based on their effects on mitochondrial morphology and biochemistry. Additionally we show that mitochondrial toxicity of antiretroviral drugs cannot be exclusively attributed to interference with the mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

  3. Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network Causality Assessment: Criteria and Experience in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H. Hayashi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatotoxicity due to drugs, herbal or dietary supplements remains largely a clinical diagnosis based on meticulous history taking and exclusion of other causes of liver injury. In 2004, the U.S. Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network (DILIN was created under the auspices of the U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases with the aims of establishing a large registry of cases for clinical, epidemiological and mechanistic study. From inception, the DILIN has used an expert opinion process that incorporates consensus amongst three different DILIN hepatologists assigned to each case. It is the most well-established, well-described and vigorous expert opinion process for DILI to date, and yet it is an imperfect standard. This review will discuss the DILIN expert opinion process, its strengths and weaknesses, psychometric performance and future.

  4. Elevated thyroid stimulating hormone in a neonate: Drug induced or disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyshormonogenesis is an uncommon cause of congenital hypothyroidism. The most common abnormality is absent or insufficient thyroid peroxidase enzyme. Maternal intake of antithyroid drug can also lead to elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH in a neonate, albeit the scenario is temporary. We report one such interesting case where a clinically euthyroid neonate borne to a mother on antithyroid drug presents on 12 th day of life with reports of elevated TSH and increased tracer uptake in 99mTc thyroid scan. Disproportionately high TSH in comparison to low maternal antithyroid drug dosage and further elevation of TSH after stopping mother′s antithyroid drugs ruled out maternal antithyroid drug-induced congenital hypothyroidism in the baby. Early institution of therapy in these patients can prevent mental retardation and other features of hypothyroidism.

  5. Radiation retinopathy caused by low dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced systemic vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Koh-hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2005-01-01

    We report on a patient with Graves' disease with radiation retinopathy caused by low-dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis. A 38-year-old woman with Graves' disease presented with bilateral blurred vision, micro-aneurysms, telangiectasia, and macular edema. The patient was examined by ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography, and radiation retinopathy was diagnosed. The patient had been treated with low-dose irradiation for her Graves' ophthalmopathy a few years earlier. She also had ANCA-positive vasculitis induced by the antithyroid drug (propylthiouracil, PTU) that had been prescribed for her at that time. Because of multiple avascular areas on both retinas, she was treated by intensive retinal photocoagulation to control progressive retinopathy. The radiation doses used to treat Graves' disease ophthalmopathy are low. Nevertheless, there is still a risk of radiation retinopathy developing in patients with PTU-induced ANCA-positive vasculitis. (author)

  6. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Fontan Patients With and Without Isomerism (Heterotaxy) as Compared to Patients With Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Subjects With Structurally Normal Hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loomba, Rohit S; Danduran, Michael; Nielsen, Kim G

    2017-01-01

    with and without isomerism. We have now compared these finding with those from patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia, as many patients with isomerism have ciliary dyskinesia. We identified patients having the Fontan circulation with and without isomerism who had undergone cardiopulmonary exercise testing......, comparing the findings from healthy individuals undergoing exercise, and a comparable number of individuals with primary ciliary dyskinesia but no congenital heart disease. We were able to include a total of 68 patients in our study, with 17 in each of the four groups. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing...

  7. The Role of Primary Motor Cortex (M1) Glutamate and GABA Signaling in l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia in Parkinsonian Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbach, David; Conti, Melissa M; Ostock, Corinne Y; George, Jessica A; Goldenberg, Adam A; Melikhov-Sosin, Mitchell; Nuss, Emily E; Bishop, Christopher

    2016-09-21

    Long-term treatment of Parkinson's disease with l-DOPA almost always leads to the development of involuntary movements termed l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Whereas hyperdopaminergic signaling in the basal ganglia is thought to cause dyskinesia, alterations in primary motor cortex (M1) activity are also prominent during dyskinesia, suggesting that the cortex may represent a therapeutic target. The present study used the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model of Parkinson's disease to characterize in vivo changes in GABA and glutamate neurotransmission within M1 and determine their contribution to behavioral output. 6-Hydroxydopamine lesion led to parkinsonian motor impairment that was partially reversed by l-DOPA. Among sham-lesioned rats, l-DOPA did not change glutamate or GABA efflux. Likewise, 6-hydroxydopamine lesion did not impact GABA or glutamate among rats chronically treated with saline. However, we observed an interaction of lesion and treatment whereby, among lesioned rats, l-DOPA given acutely (1 d) or chronically (14-16 d) reduced glutamate efflux and enhanced GABA efflux. Site-specific microinjections into M1 demonstrated that l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia was reduced by M1 infusion of a D1 antagonist, an AMPA antagonist, or a GABAA agonist. Overall, the present study demonstrates that l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is associated with increased M1 inhibition and that exogenously enhancing M1 inhibition may attenuate dyskinesia, findings that are in agreement with functional imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies in human Parkinson's disease patients. Together, our study suggests that increasing M1 inhibitory tone is an endogenous compensatory response designed to limit dyskinesia severity and that potentiating this response is a viable therapeutic strategy. Most Parkinson's disease patients will receive l-DOPA and eventually develop hyperkinetic involuntary movements termed dyskinesia. Such symptoms can be as debilitating as the disease

  8. Interrogation of transcriptomic changes associated with drug-induced hepatic sinusoidal dilatation in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzabek, Monika A; Proctor, William R; Vogt, Jennifer; Desai, Rupal; Dicker, Patrick; Cain, Gary; Raja, Rajiv; Brodbeck, Jens; Stevens, Dale; van der Stok, Eric P; Martens, John W M; Verhoef, Cornelis; Hegde, Priti S; Byrne, Annette T; Tarrant, Jacqueline M

    2018-01-01

    Drug-related sinusoidal dilatation (SD) is a common form of hepatotoxicity associated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy used prior to resection of colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). Recently, hepatic SD has also been associated with anti-delta like 4 (DLL4) cancer therapies targeting the NOTCH pathway. To investigate the hypothesis that NOTCH signaling plays an important role in drug-induced SD, gene expression changes were examined in livers from anti-DLL4 and oxaliplatin-induced SD in non-human primate (NHP) and patients, respectively. Putative mechanistic biomarkers of bevacizumab (bev)-mediated protection against oxaliplatin-induced SD were also investigated. RNA was extracted from whole liver sections or centrilobular regions by laser-capture microdissection (LCM) obtained from NHP administered anti-DLL4 fragment antigen-binding (F(ab')2 or patients with CRLM receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy with or without bev. mRNA expression was quantified using high-throughput real-time quantitative PCR. Significance analysis was used to identify genes with differential expression patterns (false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05). Eleven (CCL2, CCND1, EFNB2, ERG, ICAM1, IL16, LFNG, NOTCH1, NOTCH4, PRDX1, and TGFB1) and six (CDH5, EFNB2, HES1, IL16, MIK67, HES1 and VWF) candidate genes were differentially expressed in the liver of anti-DLL4- and oxaliplatin-induced SD, respectively. Addition of bev to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy resulted in differential changes in hepatic CDH5, HEY1, IL16, JAG1, MMP9, NOTCH4 and TIMP1 expression. This work implicates NOTCH and IL16 pathways in the pathogenesis of drug-induced SD and further explains the hepato-protective effect of bev in oxaliplatin-induced SD observed in CRLM patients.

  9. Serotonergic Hyperactivity as a Potential Factor in Developmental, Acquired and Drug-Induced Synesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit eBrogaard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions.

  10. Human Precision-Cut Liver Slices as an ex Vivo Model to Study Idiosyncratic Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadi, Mackenzie; Westra, Inge M.; Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Dragovic, Sanja; Merema, M.T.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) is a major problem during drug development and has caused drug withdrawal and black-box warnings. Because of the low concordance of the hepatotoxicity of drugs in animals and humans, robust screening methods using human tissue are needed to predict

  11. Mouse Precision-Cut Liver Slices as an ex Vivo Model To Study Idiosyncratic Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadi, Mackenzie; Chen, Yixi; Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Merema, M.T.

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) has been the top reason for withdrawing drugs from the market or for black box warnings. IDILI may arise from the interaction of a drug's reactive metabolite with a mild inflammation that renders the liver more sensitive to injury resulting in

  12. Nephron segment specific microRNA biomarkers of pre-clinical drug-induced renal toxicity: Opportunities and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassirpour, Rounak, E-mail: Rounak.nassirpour@pfizer.com [Drug Safety, Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, 1 Burtt Rd, Andover, MA 01810 (United States); Ramaiah, Shashi K. [Drug Safety, Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, 610 Main Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Whiteley, Laurence O. [Drug Safety, Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, 1 Burtt Rd, Andover, MA 01810 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Drug-induced nephrotoxicity is a common drug development complication for pharmaceutical companies. Sensitive, specific, translatable and non-invasive biomarkers of renal toxicity are urgently needed to diagnose nephron segment specific injury. The currently available gold standard biomarkers for nephrotoxicity are not kidney-specific, lack sensitivity for early detection, and are not suitable for renal damage localization (glomerular vs tubulointerstitial injury). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are increasingly gaining momentum as promising biomarkers of various organ toxicities, including drug induced renal injury. This is mostly due to their stability in easily accessible biofluids, ease of developing nucleic acids detection compared to protein detection assays, as well as their interspecies translatability. Increasing concordance of miRNA findings by standardizing methodology most suitable for their detection and quantitation, as well as characterization of their expression pattern in a cell type specific manner, will accelerate progress toward validation of these miRNAs as biomarkers in pre-clinical, and clinical settings. This review aims to highlight the current pre-clinical findings surrounding miRNAs as biomarkers in two important segments of the nephron, the glomerulus and tubules. - Highlights: • miRNAs are promising biomarkers of drug-induced kidney injury. • Summarized pre-clinical miRNA biomarkers of drug-induced nephrotoxicity. • Described the strengths and challenges associated with miRNAs as biomarkers.

  13. Human precision-cut liver slices as an ex vivo model to study idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadi, Mackenzie; Westra, Inge; Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Dragovic, Sanja; Merema, Maja; Groothuis, Genoveva

    2013-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) is a major problem during drug development and has caused drug withdrawal and black-box warnings. Due to the low concordance of the hepatotoxicity of drugs in animals and humans, robust screening methods using human tissue are needed to predict and to

  14. Drug-induced chest pain and myocardial infarction. Reports to a national centre and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Ottervanger (Jan Paul); J.H.P. Wilson (Paul); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To analyse reports of drug-induced myocardial infarction and chest pain sent to a national reporting centre. To review which drugs were suspected of exhibiting these adverse events and what mechanisms were involved. Methods: During the 20-year period 1975 through 1994, a

  15. Test systems in drug discovery for hazard identification and risk assessment of human drug-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Richard J; Betts, Catherine; Blomme, Eric A G; Gerets, Helga H J; Gjervig Jensen, Klaus; Hewitt, Philip G; Juhila, Satu; Labbe, Gilles; Liguori, Michael J; Mesens, Natalie; Ogese, Monday O; Persson, Mikael; Snoeys, Jan; Stevens, James L; Walker, Tracy; Park, B Kevin

    2017-07-01

    The liver is an important target for drug-induced toxicities. Early detection of hepatotoxic drugs requires use of well-characterized test systems, yet current knowledge, gaps and limitations of tests employed remains an important issue for drug development. Areas Covered: The current state of the science, understanding and application of test systems in use for the detection of drug-induced cytotoxicity, mitochondrial toxicity, cholestasis and inflammation is summarized. The test systems highlighted herein cover mostly in vitro and some in vivo models and endpoint measurements used in the assessment of small molecule toxic liabilities. Opportunities for research efforts in areas necessitating the development of specific tests and improved mechanistic understanding are highlighted. Expert Opinion: Use of in vitro test systems for safety optimization will remain a core activity in drug discovery. Substantial inroads have been made with a number of assays established for human Drug-induced Liver Injury. There nevertheless remain significant gaps with a need for improved in vitro tools and novel tests to address specific mechanisms of human Drug-Induced Liver Injury. Progress in these areas will necessitate not only models fit for application, but also mechanistic understanding of how chemical insult on the liver occurs in order to identify translational and quantifiable readouts for decision-making.

  16. Common Variation in the NOS1AP Gene Is Associated With Drug-Induced QT Prolongation and Ventricular Arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamshidi, Yalda; Nolte, Ilja M.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Zheng, Dongling; Johnson, Toby; Bastiaenen, Rachel; Ruddy, Suzanne; Talbott, Daniel; Norris, Kris J.; Snieder, Harold; George, Alfred L.; Marshall, Vanessa; Shakir, Saad; Kannankeril, Prince J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Camm, A. John; Jeffery, Steve; Roden, Dan M.; Behr, Elijah R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine whether variations in NOS1AP affect drug-induced long QT syndrome (LQTS). Background Use of antiarrhythmic drugs is limited by the high incidence of serious adverse events including QT prolongation and torsades de pointes. NOS1AP gene variants play a role in

  17. Aerobic fitness in children and young adults with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Astrid Hellerup; Green, Kent; Buchvald, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although aerobic fitness is regarded as an overall prognostic measure of morbidity and mortality, its evaluation in the chronic progressive sinopulmonary disease primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) has been infrequently and inconsistently reported. Here we assessed peak oxygen uptake (VO2...... multiple breath inert gas washout (N2 MBW) were assessed in a cross-sectional, single-occasion study of clinically stable children and young adults with PCD. We used a questionnaire including self-reported physical limitations in everyday life or in vigorous activities, and estimation of weekly hours...... patients. CONCLUSION: One-third of PCD patients exhibited substantially lower aerobic fitness than healthy subjects. Aerobic fitness correlated with FEV1, DLCO/VA and self-reported complaints of limitations in vigorous physical activity. These findings are most likely explained by PCD pulmonary disease...

  18. Oromandibular Dyskinesia as the Initial Manifestation of Late-Onset Huntington Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Seok Oh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a triad of choreoathetosis, dementia and dominant inheritance. The cause of HD is an expansion of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the HD gene. Typical age at onset of symptoms is in the 40s, but the disorder can manifest at any time. Late-onset (≥ 60 years HD is clinically different from other adult or juvenile onset HD and characterized by mild motor problem as the initial symptoms, shorter disease duration, frequent lack of family history, and relatively low CAG repeats expansion. We report a case of an 80-year-old female with oromandibular dyskinesia as an initial manifestation of HD and 40 CAG repeats.

  19. Mutations in the Gene PRRT2 Cause Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia with Infantile Convulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Yang Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia with infantile convulsions (PKD/IC is an episodic movement disorder with autosomal-dominant inheritance and high penetrance, but the causative genetic mutation is unknown. We have now identified four truncating mutations involving the gene PRRT2 in the vast majority (24/25 of well-characterized families with PKD/IC. PRRT2 truncating mutations were also detected in 28 of 78 additional families. PRRT2 encodes a proline-rich transmembrane protein of unknown function that has been reported to interact with the t-SNARE, SNAP25. PRRT2 localizes to axons but not to dendritic processes in primary neuronal culture, and mutants associated with PKD/IC lead to dramatically reduced PRRT2 levels, leading ultimately to neuronal hyperexcitability that manifests in vivo as PKD/IC.

  20. Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Caused by 16p11.2 Microdeletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichet Termsarasab

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Four cases of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD have been reported in individuals with proximal 16p11.2 microdeletions that include PRRT2. Case Report: We describe a fifth patient with PKD, features of Asperger’s syndrome, and mild language delays. Sanger sequencing of the PRRT2 gene did not identify any mutations implicated in PKD. However, microarray‐based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH detected a 533.9‐kb deletion on chromosome 16, encompassing over 20 genes and transcripts. Discussion: This case underscores the importance of aCGH testing for individuals with PKD who do not have PRRT2 mutations, particularly when developmental delays, speech problems, intellectual disability, and/or autism spectrum disorder are present.

  1. Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases. Often forgotten; Medikamenteninduzierte interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen. Haeufig vergessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poschenrieder, F.; Stroszczynski, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Regensburg (Germany); Hamer, O.W. [Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Regensburg (Germany); Lungenfachklinik Donaustauf, Donaustauf (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases (DILD) are probably more common than diagnosed. Due to their potential reversibility, increased vigilance towards DILD is appropriate also from the radiologist's point of view, particularly as these diseases regularly exhibit radiological correlates in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the lungs. Based on personal experience typical relatively common manifestations of DILD are diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), eosinophilic pneumonia (EP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), organizing pneumonia (OP), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). These patterns are presented based on case studies, whereby emphasis is placed on the clinical context. This is to highlight the relevance of interdisciplinary communication and discussion in the diagnostic field of DILD as it is a diagnosis of exclusion or of probability in most cases. Helpful differential diagnostic indications for the presence of DILD, such as an accompanying eosinophilia or increased attenuation of pulmonary consolidations in amiodarone-induced pneumopathy are mentioned and the freely available online database http://www.pneumotox.com is presented. (orig.) [German] Medikamenteninduzierte interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen (engl. ''drug-induced interstitial lung diseases'', DILD) sind wahrscheinlich haeufiger, als sie diagnostiziert werden. Aufgrund ihrer potenziellen Reversibilitaet ist eine erhoehte Vigilanz gegenueber DILD auch seitens der Radiologie angebracht, da diese regelmaessig ein radiomorphologisches Korrelat in der hochaufloesenden Computertomographie (''high-resolution CT'', HRCT) der Lunge aufweisen. Typische, nach eigener Erfahrung relativ haeufige Manifestationsformen von DILD sind der diffuse Alveolarschaden (engl. ''diffuse alveolar damage'', DAD), die eosinophile Pneumonie (EP), die Hypersensitivitaetspneumonitis (HP), die organisierende

  2. MicroRNA changes in rat mesentery and serum associated with drug-induced vascular injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Roberta A.; Scicchitano, Marshall S.; Mirabile, Rosanna C.; Chau, Nancy T.; Frazier, Kendall S.; Thomas, Heath C.

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory miRNAs play a role in vascular biology and are involved in biochemical and molecular pathways dysregulated during vascular injury. Collection and integration of functional miRNA data into these pathways can provide insight into pathogenesis at the site of injury; the same technologies applied to biofluids may provide diagnostic or surrogate biomarkers. miRNA was analyzed from mesentery and serum from rats given vasculotoxic compounds for 4 days. Fenoldopam, dopamine and midodrine each alter hemodynamics and are associated with histologic evidence of vascular injury, while yohimbine is vasoactive but does not cause histologic evidence of vascular injury in rat. There were 38 and 35 miRNAs altered in a statistically significant manner with a fold change of 2 or greater in mesenteries of fenoldopam- and dopamine-dosed rats, respectively, with 9 of these miRNAs shared. 10 miRNAs were altered in rats given midodrine; 6 were shared with either fenoldopam or dopamine. In situ hybridization demonstrated strong expression and co-localization of miR-134 in affected but not in adjacent unaffected vessels. Mesenteric miRNA expression may provide clarity or avenues of research into mechanisms involved in vascular injury once the functional role of specific miRNAs becomes better characterized. 102 miRNAs were altered in serum from rats with drug-induced vascular injury. 10 miRNAs were commonly altered in serum from dopamine and either fenoldopam or midodrine dosed rats; 18 of these 102 were also altered in mesenteries from rats with drug-induced vascular injury, suggesting their possible utility as peripheral biomarkers. -- Highlights: ► Mesentery and serum were examined from rats given vasoactive compounds for 4 days. ► 72 miRNAs were altered in mesenteries from rats with vascular injury. ► miR-134 was localized to affected but not adjacent unaffected vessels. ► 102 miRNAs were changed in serum from rats with vascular injury. ► 18 miRNAs changed in both

  3. Advantageous use of HepaRG cells for the screening and mechanistic study of drug-induced steatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolosa, Laia [Unidad de Hepatología Experimental, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Fe, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Gómez-Lechón, M. José [Unidad de Hepatología Experimental, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Fe, Valencia 46026 (Spain); CIBERehd, FIS, Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Jiménez, Nuria [Unidad de Hepatología Experimental, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Fe, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Hervás, David [Biostatistics Unit, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Fe, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Jover, Ramiro [Unidad de Hepatología Experimental, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Fe, Valencia 46026 (Spain); CIBERehd, FIS, Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Valencia, Valencia 46010 (Spain); Donato, M. Teresa, E-mail: donato_mte@gva.es [Unidad de Hepatología Experimental, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Fe, Valencia 46026 (Spain); CIBERehd, FIS, Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Valencia, Valencia 46010 (Spain)

    2016-07-01

    Only a few in vitro assays have been proposed to evaluate the steatotic potential of new drugs. The present study examines the utility of HepaRG cells as a cell-based assay system for screening drug-induced liver steatosis. A high-content screening assay was run to evaluate multiple toxicity-related cell parameters in HepaRG cells exposed to 28 compounds, including drugs reported to cause steatosis through different mechanisms and non-steatotic compounds. Lipid content was the most sensitive parameter for all the steatotic drugs, whereas no effects on lipid levels were produced by non-steatotic compounds. Apart from fat accumulation, increased ROS production and altered mitochondrial membrane potential were also found in the cells exposed to steatotic drugs, which indicates that all these cellular events contributed to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. These findings are of clinical relevance as most effects were observed at drug concentrations under 100-fold of the therapeutic peak plasmatic concentration. HepaRG cells showed increased lipid overaccumulation vs. HepG2 cells, which suggests greater sensitivity to drug-induced steatosis. An altered expression profile of transcription factors and the genes that code key proteins in lipid metabolism was also found in the cells exposed to drugs capable of inducing liver steatosis. Our results generally indicate the value of HepaRG cells for assessing the risk of liver damage associated with steatogenic compounds and for investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in drug-induced steatosis. - Highlights: • HepaRG cells were explored as an in vitro model to detect steatogenic potential. • Multiple toxicity-related endpoints were analysed by HCS. • HepaRG showed a greater sensitivity to drug-induced steatosis than HepG2 cells. • Changes in the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism were revealed. • HepaRG allow mechanistic understanding of liver damage induced by steatogenic drugs.

  4. AMPK Activation Prevents and Reverses Drug-Induced Mitochondrial and Hepatocyte Injury by Promoting Mitochondrial Fusion and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Woo Sophie Kang

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial damage is the major factor underlying drug-induced liver disease but whether conditions that thwart mitochondrial injury can prevent or reverse drug-induced liver damage is unclear. A key molecule regulating mitochondria quality control is AMP activated kinase (AMPK. When activated, AMPK causes mitochondria to elongate/fuse and proliferate, with mitochondria now producing more ATP and less reactive oxygen species. Autophagy is also triggered, a process capable of removing damaged/defective mitochondria. To explore whether AMPK activation could potentially prevent or reverse the effects of drug-induced mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage, we added an AMPK activator to collagen sandwich cultures of rat and human hepatocytes exposed to the hepatotoxic drugs, acetaminophen or diclofenac. In the absence of AMPK activation, the drugs caused hepatocytes to lose polarized morphology and have significantly decreased ATP levels and viability. At the subcellular level, mitochondria underwent fragmentation and had decreased membrane potential due to decreased expression of the mitochondrial fusion proteins Mfn1, 2 and/or Opa1. Adding AICAR, a specific AMPK activator, at the time of drug exposure prevented and reversed these effects. The mitochondria became highly fused and ATP production increased, and hepatocytes maintained polarized morphology. In exploring the mechanism responsible for this preventive and reversal effect, we found that AMPK activation prevented drug-mediated decreases in Mfn1, 2 and Opa1. AMPK activation also stimulated autophagy/mitophagy, most significantly in acetaminophen-treated cells. These results suggest that activation of AMPK prevents/reverses drug-induced mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage through regulation of mitochondrial fusion and autophagy, making it a potentially valuable approach for treatment of drug-induced liver injury.

  5. AMPK Activation Prevents and Reverses Drug-Induced Mitochondrial and Hepatocyte Injury by Promoting Mitochondrial Fusion and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniane, Caitlin; Farrell, Geoffrey; Arias, Irwin M.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Fu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial damage is the major factor underlying drug-induced liver disease but whether conditions that thwart mitochondrial injury can prevent or reverse drug-induced liver damage is unclear. A key molecule regulating mitochondria quality control is AMP activated kinase (AMPK). When activated, AMPK causes mitochondria to elongate/fuse and proliferate, with mitochondria now producing more ATP and less reactive oxygen species. Autophagy is also triggered, a process capable of removing damaged/defective mitochondria. To explore whether AMPK activation could potentially prevent or reverse the effects of drug-induced mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage, we added an AMPK activator to collagen sandwich cultures of rat and human hepatocytes exposed to the hepatotoxic drugs, acetaminophen or diclofenac. In the absence of AMPK activation, the drugs caused hepatocytes to lose polarized morphology and have significantly decreased ATP levels and viability. At the subcellular level, mitochondria underwent fragmentation and had decreased membrane potential due to decreased expression of the mitochondrial fusion proteins Mfn1, 2 and/or Opa1. Adding AICAR, a specific AMPK activator, at the time of drug exposure prevented and reversed these effects. The mitochondria became highly fused and ATP production increased, and hepatocytes maintained polarized morphology. In exploring the mechanism responsible for this preventive and reversal effect, we found that AMPK activation prevented drug-mediated decreases in Mfn1, 2 and Opa1. AMPK activation also stimulated autophagy/mitophagy, most significantly in acetaminophen-treated cells. These results suggest that activation of AMPK prevents/reverses drug-induced mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage through regulation of mitochondrial fusion and autophagy, making it a potentially valuable approach for treatment of drug-induced liver injury. PMID:27792760

  6. Primary psychosis with comorbid drug abuse and drug-induced psychosis: Diagnostic and clinical evolution at follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, M C; Di Pace, C; Reggiori, A; Paletta, S; Colasanti, A

    2017-10-01

    The study reports a follow-up assessment of 48 patients with concomitant drug abuse at the first admission for psychosis. We focused on the diagnostic distinction between primary psychosis with concomitant drug abuse and drug induced psychosis, to observe whether the diagnoses are stable over time and whether the clinical course significantly differs. The study examined 25 primary psychotic disorder with comorbid drug abuse and 23 drug-induced psychotic disorder patients. Diagnostic and psychopathological assessments were made at baseline and at follow-up. Mean follow-up period was 4.96 years. Patients with comorbid Drug Abuse exhibited higher scores in the item Unusual Content of Thought at baseline than drug-induced psychotic disorder patients: 5.48 vs 4.39 while the two patients groups did not differ in any of the BPRS items evaluated at follow-up. The primary psychosis with comorbid drug abuse and the substance induced psychosis groups were similar regarding diagnostic stability, and a diagnosis of schizophrenia at follow-up occurred similarly. There was no evidence that Drug Induced psychotic patients' symptoms tend to improve more after cessation of drug abuse. An earlier age of onset was found in primary psychotic patients, particularly for patients diagnosed as affected by schizophrenia at follow up. These results might reflect the uncertainty of the distinction between Primary and Drug Induced Psychosis and the difficulties in applying the DSM IV-TR criteria for diagnosing comorbid drug use disorders and psychotic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Advantageous use of HepaRG cells for the screening and mechanistic study of drug-induced steatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolosa, Laia; Gómez-Lechón, M. José; Jiménez, Nuria; Hervás, David; Jover, Ramiro; Donato, M. Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Only a few in vitro assays have been proposed to evaluate the steatotic potential of new drugs. The present study examines the utility of HepaRG cells as a cell-based assay system for screening drug-induced liver steatosis. A high-content screening assay was run to evaluate multiple toxicity-related cell parameters in HepaRG cells exposed to 28 compounds, including drugs reported to cause steatosis through different mechanisms and non-steatotic compounds. Lipid content was the most sensitive parameter for all the steatotic drugs, whereas no effects on lipid levels were produced by non-steatotic compounds. Apart from fat accumulation, increased ROS production and altered mitochondrial membrane potential were also found in the cells exposed to steatotic drugs, which indicates that all these cellular events contributed to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. These findings are of clinical relevance as most effects were observed at drug concentrations under 100-fold of the therapeutic peak plasmatic concentration. HepaRG cells showed increased lipid overaccumulation vs. HepG2 cells, which suggests greater sensitivity to drug-induced steatosis. An altered expression profile of transcription factors and the genes that code key proteins in lipid metabolism was also found in the cells exposed to drugs capable of inducing liver steatosis. Our results generally indicate the value of HepaRG cells for assessing the risk of liver damage associated with steatogenic compounds and for investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in drug-induced steatosis. - Highlights: • HepaRG cells were explored as an in vitro model to detect steatogenic potential. • Multiple toxicity-related endpoints were analysed by HCS. • HepaRG showed a greater sensitivity to drug-induced steatosis than HepG2 cells. • Changes in the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism were revealed. • HepaRG allow mechanistic understanding of liver damage induced by steatogenic drugs.

  8. Tardive dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GS, Sullivan KL, Zesiewicz TA; American Academy of Neurology. Evidence-based guideline: treatment of tardive syndromes: report ... Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology . 2013;81(5):463-469. PMID: 23897874 ...

  9. Tardive Dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library Public Policy Research Find Support Free Support 24/7 Text NAMI to 741741 Find Help Living with ... 6264 Press & Media In A Crisis? Stay Connected facebook twitter Instagram tumblr youtube Discussion Groups Terms of ...

  10. Periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges can survive anesthesia and result in asymmetric drug-induced burst suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Mader Jr.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced burst suppression (DIBS is bihemispheric and bisymmetric in adults and older children. However, asymmetric DIBS may occur if a pathological process is affecting one hemisphere only or both hemispheres disproportionately. The usual suspect is a destructive lesion; an irritative or epileptogenic lesion is usually not invoked to explain DIBS asymmetry. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman with new-onset seizures who was found to have a hemorrhagic cavernoma and periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs in the right temporal region. After levetiracetam and before anesthetic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs were administered, the electroencephalogram (EEG showed continuous PLEDs over the right hemisphere with maximum voltage in the posterior temporal region. Focal electrographic seizures also occurred occasionally in the same location. Propofol resulted in bihemispheric, but not in bisymmetric, DIBS. Remnants or fragments of PLEDs that survived anesthesia increased the amplitude and complexity of the bursts in the right hemisphere leading to asymmetric DIBS. Phenytoin, lacosamide, ketamine, midazolam, and topiramate were administered at various times in the course of EEG monitoring, resulting in suppression of seizures but not of PLEDs. Ketamine and midazolam reduced the rate, amplitude, and complexity of PLEDs but only after producing substantial attenuation of all burst components. When all anesthetics were discontinued, the EEG reverted to the original preanesthesia pattern with continuous non-fragmented PLEDs. The fact that PLEDs can survive anesthesia and affect DIBS symmetry is a testament to the robustness of the neurodynamic processes underlying PLEDs.

  11. Successful management of drug-induced hypercapnic acidosis with naloxone and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrafiotis, Michalis; Tryfon, Stavros; Siopi, Demetra; Chassapidou, Georgia; Galanou, Artemis; Tsara, Venetia

    2015-02-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to deteriorating level of consciousness and desaturation. His Glasgow Coma Scale was 6, and his pupils were constricted but responded to light. Chest radiograph was negative for significant findings. Arterial blood gas evaluation on supplemental oxygen revealed severe acute on chronic respiratory acidosis: pH 7.15; PCO2, 133 mm Hg; PO2,64 mm Hg; and HCO3, 31 mmol/L. He regained full consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale, 15) after receiving a 0.4 mg dose of naloxone, but because of persistent severe respiratory acidosis (pH 7.21; PCO2, 105 mm Hg), he was immediately commenced on noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV) displaying a remarkable improvement in arterial blood gas values within the next few hours. However, in the days that followed, he remained dependent on NIV, and he was finally discharged on a home mechanical ventilation prescription. In cases of drug-induced respiratory depression, NIV should be regarded as an acceptable treatment, as it can provide ventilatory support without the increased risks associated with invasive mechanical ventilation.

  12. Traditional Chinese Medicine and Herb-induced Liver Injury: Comparison with Drug-induced Liver Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jing; Teschke, Rolf

    2018-03-28

    Cases of suspected herb-induced liver injury (HILI) caused by herbal Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs) and of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) are commonly published in the scientific literature worldwide. As opposed to the multiplicity of botanical chemicals in herbal TCM products, which are often mixtures of several herbs, conventional Western drugs contain only a single synthetic chemical. It is therefore of interest to study how HILI by TCM and DILI compare with each other, and to what extent results from each liver injury type can be transferred to the other. China is among the few countries with a large population using synthetic Western drugs as well as herbal TCM. Therefore, China is well suited to studies of liver injury comparing drugs with TCM herbs. Despite some concordance, recent analyses of liver injury cases with verified causality, using the Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method, revealed major differences in HILI caused by TCMs as compared to DILI with respect to the following features: HILI cases are less frequently observed as compared to DILI, have a smaller proportion of females and less unintentional rechallenge events, and present a higher rate of hepatocellular injury features. Since many results were obtained among Chinese residents who had access to and had used Western drugs and TCM herbs, such ethnic homogeneity supports the contention that the observed differences of HILI and DILI in the assessed population are well founded.

  13. Persistent Drug-Induced Parkinsonism in Patients with Normal Dopamine Transporter Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yong Hong

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging for the dopamine transporter (DAT is used to distinguish drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP from subclinical Parkinson's disease (PD. Although DIP patients who show a normal DAT image are expected to recover completely, some do not. We investigated whether these patients showed changes in striatal DAT activity using semi-quantitative analysis of 18F-FP-CIT PET data. DIP patients with visually normal DAT images were selected from medical records. The subjects were classified as patients who recovered partially (PR or completely within 12 months (CR. The 18F-FP-CIT uptake in each striatal subregion was compared between the CR and the PR groups. In total, 41 and 9 patients of the CR and PR groups were assessed, respectively. The two patient groups were comparable in terms of clinical characteristics including age, sex, and severity of parkinsonism. From semi-quantitative analysis of the PET image, the PR patients showed a relatively lower ligand uptake in the ventral striatum, the anterior putamen and the posterior putamen compared with the CR patients. This result suggests that persistent DIP in patients with visually normal DAT imaging may be associated with subtle decrement of DAT activity.

  14. Metabolomics approaches for discovering biomarkers of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beger, Richard D.; Sun, Jinchun; Schnackenberg, Laura K.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity are two major reasons that drugs are withdrawn post-market, and hence it is of major concern to both the FDA and pharmaceutical companies. The number of cases of serious adverse effects (SAEs) in marketed drugs has climbed faster than the number of total drug prescriptions issued. In some cases, preclinical animal studies fail to identify the potential toxicity of a new chemical entity (NCE) under development. The current clinical chemistry biomarkers of liver and kidney injury are inadequate in terms of sensitivity and/or specificity, prompting the need to discover new translational specific biomarkers of organ injury. Metabolomics along with genomics and proteomics technologies have the capability of providing translational diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers specific for early stages of liver and kidney injury. Metabolomics has several advantages over the other omics platforms such as ease of sample preparation, data acquisition and use of biofluids collected through minimally invasive procedures in preclinical and clinical studies. The metabolomics platform is reviewed with particular emphasis on applications involving drug-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Analytical platforms for metabolomics, chemometrics for mining metabolomics data and the applications of the metabolomics technologies are covered in detail with emphasis on recent work in the field.

  15. [Hydroxyurea (hydroxycarbamide)-induced hepatic dysfunction confirmed by drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takayuki; Mori, Takehiko; Karigane, Daiki; Kikuchi, Taku; Koda, Yuya; Toyama, Takaaki; Nakajima, Hideaki; Okamoto, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man with refractory leukemia transformed from myelodysplastic syndrome was placed on hydroxyurea (hydroxycarbamide) at a daily dose of 500 mg. Because of insufficient cytoreductive efficacy, the dose was increased to 1,500 mg five days later. Eight days after the initiation of hydroxyurea, the patient started complaining of chills, fever, and vomiting. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were markedly elevated to 5,098 and 3,880 IU/l from 44 and 59 IU/l in one day, respectively. Tests for hepatitis viruses were all negative. With the discontinuation of hydroxyurea, AST and ALT returned to their former levels within two weeks. A drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test for hydroxyurea was positive with a stimulating index of 2.0. Hepatic dysfunction has been recognized as one of the side effects of hydroxyurea. However, there have been only a limited number of reports demonstrating drug allergy to have a role in hepatic dysfunction accompanied by fever and gastrointestinal symptoms. The findings of our case strongly suggest that all presentations could be explained by drug allergy. Physicians should be mindful of the potential for acute and severe hepatic dysfunction due to allergic reaction against hydroxyurea.

  16. Multimode drug inducible CRISPR/Cas9 devices for transcriptional activation and genome editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jia; Zhao, Chen; Zhao, Yingze; Zhang, Jingfang; Zhang, Yue; Chen, Li; Han, Qiyuan; Ying, Yue; Peng, Shuai; Ai, Runna; Wang, Yu

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Precise investigation and manipulation of dynamic biological processes often requires molecular modulation in a controlled inducible manner. The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) has emerged as a versatile tool for targeted gene editing and transcriptional programming. Here, we designed and vigorously optimized a series of Hybrid drug Inducible CRISPR/Cas9 Technologies (HIT) for transcriptional activation by grafting a mutated human estrogen receptor (ERT2) to multiple CRISPR/Cas9 systems, which renders them 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) inducible for the access of genome. Further, extra functionality of simultaneous genome editing was achieved with one device we named HIT2. Optimized terminal devices herein delivered advantageous performances in comparison with several existing designs. They exerted selective, titratable, rapid and reversible response to drug induction. In addition, these designs were successfully adapted to an orthogonal Cas9. HIT systems developed in this study can be applied for controlled modulation of potentially any genomic loci in multiple modes. PMID:29237052

  17. Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Cascade of Events Leading to Cell Death, Apoptosis or Necrosis

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    Andrea Iorga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced liver injury (DILI can broadly be divided into predictable and dose dependent such as acetaminophen (APAP and unpredictable or idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI. Liver injury from drug hepatotoxicity (whether idiosyncratic or predictable results in hepatocyte cell death and inflammation. The cascade of events leading to DILI and the cell death subroutine (apoptosis or necrosis of the cell depend largely on the culprit drug. Direct toxins to hepatocytes likely induce oxidative organelle stress (such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondrial stress leading to necrosis or apoptosis, while cell death in idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI is usually the result of engagement of the innate and adaptive immune system (likely apoptotic, involving death receptors (DR. Here, we review the hepatocyte cell death pathways both in direct hepatotoxicity such as in APAP DILI as well as in IDILI. We examine the known signaling pathways in APAP toxicity, a model of necrotic liver cell death. We also explore what is known about the genetic basis of IDILI and the molecular pathways leading to immune activation and how these events can trigger hepatotoxicity and cell death.

  18. Prophylaxis and management of antineoplastic drug induced nausea and vomiting in children with cancer

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    Sidharth Totadri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Antineoplastic drug induced nausea and vomiting (AINV is a major adverse event which deeply impacts the quality of life of children with cancer. It additionally causes distress to parents and negatively impacts compliance to therapy. A robust AINV prophylaxis regimen is essential to achieve complete control; and prevent anticipatory, breakthrough and refractory AINV. With a wide array of available anti-emetics, standard guidelines for their use are crucial to ensure uniform and optimum prophylaxis. Chemotherapeutic agents are classified as having high, moderate, low or minimal emetic risk based on their potential to cause emesis in the absence of prophylaxis. Three drug regimen with aprepitant, ondansetron/granisetron and dexamethasone is recommended for protocols with high emetic risk. Although approved in children ≥12 years, there is mounting evidence for the use of aprepitant in younger children too. In protocols with moderate and low emetic risk, combination of ondansetron/granisetron and dexamethasone; and single agent ondansetron/granisetron are recommended, respectively. Metoclopramide is an alternative when steroids are contraindicated. Olanzapine and lorazepam are useful drugs for breakthrough AINV and anticipatory AINV. Knowledge of pediatric dosage, salient adverse events, drug interactions as well as cost of drugs is essential to prescribe anti-emetics accurately and safely in resource constrained settings. Non pharmacological interventions such as hypnosis, acupressure and psychological interventions can benefit a sub-group of patients without significant risk of adverse events.

  19. Clinical Features Indicating Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Degeneration in Drug-Induced Parkinsonism

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    Seung Ha Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Patients with drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP may have nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration. We studied the clinical features that may indicate nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration in patients with DIP. Methods Forty-one DIP patients were classified into normal and abnormal [18F] FP-CIT scan groups. Differences in 32 clinical features and drug withdrawal effects were studied. Results Twenty-eight patients had normal (Group I and 13 patients had abnormal (Group II scans. Eight patients of Group I, but none of Group II, had taken calcium channel blockers (p = 0.040. Three patients of Group I and six of Group II had hyposmia (p = 0.018. After drug withdrawal, Group I showed greater improvement in Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale total motor scores and subscores for bradykinesia and tremors than Group II. Only hyposmia was an independent factor associated with abnormal scans, but it had suboptimal sensitivity. Conclusion None of the clinical features were practical indicators of nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration in patients with DIP.

  20. The predictive value of drug-induced sleep endoscopy for CPAP titration in OSA patients.

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    Lan, Ming-Chin; Hsu, Yen-Bin; Lan, Ming-Ying; Huang, Yun-Chen; Kao, Ming-Chang; Huang, Tung-Tsun; Chiu, Tsan-Jen; Yang, Mei-Chen

    2017-12-15

    The aim of this study was to identify possible upper airway obstructions causing a higher continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration level, utilizing drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE). A total of 76 patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) underwent CPAP titration and DISE. DISE findings were recorded using the VOTE classification system. Polysomnographic (PSG) data, anthropometric variables, and patterns of airway collapse during DISE were analyzed with CPAP titration levels. A significant association was found between the CPAP titration level and BMI, oxygen desaturation index (ODI), apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and neck circumference (NC) (P CPAP titration level (P CPAP titration level and any other collapse at the tongue base or epiglottis. By analyzing PSG data, anthropometric variables, and DISE results with CPAP titration levels, we can better understand possible mechanisms resulting in a higher CPAP titration level. We believe that the role of DISE can be expanded as a tool to identify the possible anatomical structures that may be corrected by oral appliance therapy or surgical intervention to improve CPAP compliance.

  1. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy Changes the Treatment Concept in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

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    Jaroslava Hybášková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated whether drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE helps identify the site of obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA. A total of 51 consecutive patients with polysomnography-confirmed OSA were enrolled in this prospective study. The presumed site of obstruction was determined according to history, otorhinolaryngologic examination, and polysomnography and a therapeutic plan designed before DISE. In 11 patients with severe OSA and/or previously failed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP treatment, DISE with simultaneous CPAP was performed. Multilevel collapse was noted in 49 patients (96.1%. The most frequent multilevel collapse was palatal, oropharyngeal, and tongue base collapse (n=17, 33.3%, followed by palatal and oropharyngeal collapse (n=12, 23.5%. Pathology of the larynx (epiglottis was observed in 16 patients (31.4%. The laryngeal obstruction as a reason for intolerance of CPAP was observed in 3/11 (27.3% patients. After DISE, the surgical plan was changed in 31 patients (60.8%. The results indicate that DISE helps identify the site of obstruction in the upper airways in patients with OSA more accurately and that the larynx plays an important role in OSA.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms of N-acetyltransferase 2 & susceptibility to antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity

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    Surendra K Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 gene encodes an enzyme which both activates and deactivates arylamine and other drugs and carcinogens. This study was aimed to investigate the role of NAT2 gene polymorphism in anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity (DIH. Methods: In this prospective study, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism results for NAT2 gene were compared between 185 tuberculosis patients who did not develop DIH and 105 tuberculosis patients who developed DIH while on anti-tuberculosis drugs. Results: Frequency of slow-acetylator genotype was commonly encountered and was not significantly different between DIH (82.8% and non-DIH (77.2% patients. However, the genotypic distribution of variant NAT2FNx015/FNx017 amongst slow-acetylator genotypes was significantly higher in DIH (56% group as compared to non-DIH (39% group (odds ratio 2.02; P=0.006. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study demonstrated no association between NAT2 genotype and DIH in the north Indian patients with tuberculosis.

  3. Influence of dietary iodine on drug-induced hypothyrodism in the rat.

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    Beyssen, M L; Lagorce, J F; Cledat, D; Buxeraud, J

    1999-06-01

    Several compounds of pharmaceutical importance from a variety of chemical families, for example chlorpromazine and clomipramine, have been found to form charge-transfer complexes with iodine. We have investigated the influence of dietary iodine on thyroid-gland dysfunction induced by clomipramine, chlorpromazine or 2-thiazoline-2-thiol. We suggest that iodine is partly diverted from its metabolic pathway by complexation with drugs, and so the urinary concentration of iodide is increased. Both chlorpromazine and clomipramine, at doses which do not inhibit thyroperoxidase, enhanced urinary iodine excretion when dietary iodine was restricted (3.944+/-0.96 microg/day for chlorpromazine-tested rats, 3.43+/-1.33 microg/day for clomipramine-tested rats, compared with 2.34+/-0.11 microg/day in control rats). Concurrently, these pharmaceutical compounds increased the level of free thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in comparison with controls and induced histological modifications in, and enlargement of, the thyroid gland. We have demonstrated that drug-induced loss of iodine in the urine was associated with antithyroid action when iodine intake was limited.

  4. Drug-induced diseases (DIDs: An experience of a tertiary care teaching hospital from India

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    Vishal R Tandon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Drug-induced diseases (DIDs are well known but least studied. Data on DIDs from India are not available. Hence, this retrospective cross-sectional study was undertaken using suspected adverse drug reaction (ADR data collected form Pharmacovigilance Programme of India (PvPI to evaluate profile of DIDs over two years, in a tertiary care teaching hospital from north India. Methods: The suspected ADRs in the form of DID were evaluated for drug and disease related variables and were classified in terms of causality. Results: DID rate was 38.80 per cent. Mean duration of developing DIDs was 26.05 ± 9.6 days; 25.16 per cent had more than one co-morbid condition. Geriatric population (53.99% accounted for maximum DIDs followed by adult (37.79% and paediatric (8.21%. Maximum events were probable (93.98% followed by possible (6.04%. All DIDs required intervention. Gastritis (7.43%, diarrhoea (5.92%, anaemia (4.79%, hypotension (2.77%, hepatic dysfunction (2.69%, hypertension (1.51%, myalgia (1.05%, and renal dysfunction (1.01% were some of the DIDs. Anti-tubercular treatment (ATT, anti- retroviral treatment (ART, ceftriaxone injection, steroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antimicrobials and anticancer drugs were found as commonly offending drugs. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings show that DIDs are a significant health problem in our country, which need more attention.

  5. Hiponatremia in the practice of a psychiatrist. Part 1: SIADH syndrome and drug-induced hyponatremia.

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    Stelmach Ewa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hyponatremia is an important part of psychiatric practice. In order to analyze its causes and symptoms, the literature on hyponatremia in psychiatric patients has been reviewed. The work has been divided into two separate manuscripts. In the first one the authors discuss the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH and hyponatremia occurring with the use of psychotropic drugs (antidepressants, antipsychotics, normotimics, while the second paper discusses research on psychogenic polydipsia. The causes of hyponatremia in patients treated in psychiatric wards include: water intoxication associated with polydipsia, somatic comorbidities, side effect of internal medicine and psychiatric drugs. The most common mechanism leading in these cases to hyponatremia is the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of vasopressin (SIADH. The SIADH syndrome is a group of symptoms, first described in 1967 by Schwartz and Bartter in The American Journal of Medicine, which results from the hypersecretion of antidiuretic hormone, also called vasopressin, which causes patients to develop normovolemic hyponatremia. The phenomenon of drug-induced hyponatremia in psychiatric practice is generally observed with the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics and anti-epileptic drugs (used in psychiatry as normotimic drugs.

  6. Case Characterization, Clinical Features and Risk Factors in Drug-Induced Liver Injury

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    Aida Ortega-Alonso

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI caused by xenobiotics (drugs, herbals and dietary supplements presents with a range of both phenotypes and severity, from acute hepatitis indistinguishable of viral hepatitis to autoimmune syndromes, steatosis or rare chronic vascular syndromes, and from asymptomatic liver test abnormalities to acute liver failure. DILI pathogenesis is complex, depending on the interaction of drug physicochemical properties and host factors. The awareness of risk factors for DILI is arising from the analysis of large databases of DILI cases included in Registries and Consortia networks around the world. These networks are also enabling in-depth phenotyping with the identification of predictors for severe outcome, including acute liver failure and mortality/liver transplantation. Genome wide association studies taking advantage of these large cohorts have identified several alleles from the major histocompatibility complex system indicating a fundamental role of the adaptive immune system in DILI pathogenesis. Correct case definition and characterization is crucial for appropriate phenotyping, which in turn will strengthen sample collection for genotypic and future biomarkers studies.

  7. Toxicoproteomics: serum proteomic pattern diagnostics for early detection of drug induced cardiac toxicities and cardioprotection.

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    Petricoin, Emanuel F; Rajapaske, Vinodh; Herman, Eugene H; Arekani, Ali M; Ross, Sally; Johann, Donald; Knapton, Alan; Zhang, J; Hitt, Ben A; Conrads, Thomas P; Veenstra, Timothy D; Liotta, Lance A; Sistare, Frank D

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics is more than just generating lists of proteins that increase or decrease in expression as a cause or consequence of pathology. The goal should be to characterize the information flow through the intercellular protein circuitry which communicates with the extracellular microenvironment and then ultimately to the serum/plasma macroenvironment. The nature of this information can be a cause, or a consequence, of disease and toxicity based processes as cascades of reinforcing information percolate through the system and become reflected in changing proteomic information content of the circulation. Serum Proteomic Pattern Diagnostics is a new type of proteomic platform in which patterns of proteomic signatures from high dimensional mass spectrometry data are used as a diagnostic classifier. While this approach has shown tremendous promise in early detection of cancers, detection of drug-induced toxicity may also be possible with this same technology. Analysis of serum from rat models of anthracycline and anthracenedione induced cardiotoxicity indicate the potential clinical utility of diagnostic proteomic patterns where low molecular weight peptides and protein fragments may have higher accuracy than traditional biomarkers of cardiotoxicity such as troponins. These fragments may one day be harvested by circulating nanoparticles designed to absorb, enrich and amplify the diagnostic biomarker repertoire generated even at the critical initial stages of toxicity.

  8. Sedative choice in drug-induced sleep endoscopy: A neuropharmacology-based review.

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    Shteamer, Jack W; Dedhia, Raj C

    2017-01-01

    To examine the suitability of commonly used agents for drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) based on agent-specific neuropharmacology. PubMed. A literature search of the PubMed database was performed on January 1, 2016. A two-layered search strategy was performed to identify relevant pharmacologic agents and articles related to neuropharmacology for these agents. The first search identified relevant pharmacologic agents; the second search examined agents with greater than five results from search 1, along with medical subject headings "respiration," "sleep," "pharmacology," and/or "[respective agent] (e.g., propofol)." Articles not in English were excluded. Bibliographies of pertinent articles were hand-searched for additional articles. Three agents were commonly identified from search 1: propofol, midazolam, and dexmedetomidine with 44, 13, and 6 results, respectively. Of note, 11 results utilized coinduction with midazolam and propofol. Search 2 for propofol, midazolam, and dexmedetomidine retrieved 219, 220, and 26 results, respectively. Eleven results for propofol, 4 for midazolam, and 9 for dexmedetomidine were found to be related to their neuropharmacology. The current review demonstrates relatively few investigations seeking to characterize the neuropharmacologic suitability of DISE agents. Compared to propofol and midazolam, dexmedetomidine's mechanism of action appears most likely to induce natural sleep pathways. Further study of its effect on upper airway collapsibility (critical closing pressure) and pharyngeal muscle tone (genioglossus electrode electromyography) are needed. Laryngoscope, 2016 Laryngoscope, 127:273-279, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Liver injury from Herbals and Dietary Supplements in the US Drug Induced Liver Injury Network

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    Navarro, Victor J.; Barnhart, Huiman; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Davern, Timothy; Fontana, Robert J.; Grant, Lafaine; Reddy, K. Rajender; Seeff, Leonard B.; Serrano, Jose; Sherker, Averell H.; Stolz, Andrew; Talwalkar, Jayant; Vega, Maricruz; Vuppalanchi, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network (DILIN) studies hepatotoxicity due to conventional medications as well as herbals and dietary supplements (HDS). Rationale To characterize hepatotoxicity and its outcomes from HDS versus medications, patients with hepatotoxicity attributed to medications or HDS were enrolled prospectively between 2004 and 2013. The study took place among eight US referral centers that are part of the DILIN. Consecutive patients with liver injury referred to a DILIN center were eligible. The final sample comprised 130 (15.5%) of all subjects enrolled (839) who were judged to have experienced liver injury due to HDS. Hepatotoxicity due to HDS was evaluated by expert opinion. Demographic and clinical characteristics and outcome assessments including death and liver transplantation were ascertained. Cases were stratified and compared according to the type of agent implicated in liver injury; 45 had injury due to bodybuilding HDS, 85 due to non-bodybuilding HDS, and 709 due to medications. Main Results Liver injury due to HDS increased from 7% to 20% (p Bodybuilding HDS caused prolonged jaundice (median 91 days) in young men but did not result in any fatalities or liver transplantation. The remaining HDS cases presented as hepatocellular injury, predominantly in middle-aged women and more frequently led to death or transplantation compared to injury from medications (13% vs. 3%, p bodybuilding HDS is more severe than from bodybuilding HDS or medications, as evidenced by differences in unfavorable outcomes; death and transplantation. PMID:25043597

  10. Nonclinical safety biomarkers of drug-induced vascular injury: current status and blueprint for the future.

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    Mikaelian, Igor; Cameron, Mark; Dalmas, Deidre A; Enerson, Bradley E; Gonzalez, Raymond J; Guionaud, Silvia; Hoffmann, Peter K; King, Nicholas M P; Lawton, Michael P; Scicchitano, Marshall S; Smith, Holly W; Thomas, Roberta A; Weaver, James L; Zabka, Tanja S

    2014-06-01

    Better biomarkers are needed to identify, characterize, and/or monitor drug-induced vascular injury (DIVI) in nonclinical species and patients. The Predictive Safety Testing Consortium (PSTC), a precompetitive collaboration of pharmaceutical companies and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), formed the Vascular Injury Working Group (VIWG) to develop and qualify translatable biomarkers of DIVI. The VIWG focused its research on acute DIVI because early detection for clinical and nonclinical safety monitoring is desirable. The VIWG developed a strategy based on the premise that biomarkers of DIVI in rat would be translatable to humans due to the morphologic similarity of vascular injury between species regardless of mechanism. The histomorphologic lexicon for DIVI in rat defines degenerative and adaptive findings of the vascular endothelium and smooth muscles, and characterizes inflammatory components. We describe the mechanisms of these changes and their associations with candidate biomarkers for which advanced analytical method validation was completed. Further development is recommended for circulating microRNAs, endothelial microparticles, and imaging techniques. Recommendations for sample collection and processing, analytical methods, and confirmation of target localization using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization are described. The methods described are anticipated to aid in the identification and qualification of translational biomarkers for DIVI. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  11. Drug-induced hepatitis superimposed on the presence of anti-SLA antibody: a case report.

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    Etxagibel, Aitziber; Julià, M Rosa; Brotons, Alvaro; Company, M Margarita; Dolz, Carlos

    2008-01-28

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a necroinflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by the presence of circulating antibodies, hypergammaglobulinemia, and response to immunosuppression. It has the histological features of chronic hepatitis. The onset is usually insidious, but in some patients the presentation may be acute and occasionally severe. Certain drugs can induce chronic hepatitis mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Different autoantibodies have been associated with this process but they are not detectable after drug withdrawal and clinical resolution. We describe a case of drug-induced acute hepatitis associated with antinuclear, antisoluble liver-pancreas and anti-smooth muscle autoantibodies in a 66-year-old woman. Abnormal clinical and biochemical parameters resolved after drug withdrawal, but six months later anti-soluble liver-pancreas antibodies remained positive and liver biopsy showed chronic hepatitis and septal fibrosis. Furthermore, our patient has a HLA genotype associated with autoimmune hepatitis. Patient follow-up will disclose whether our patient suffers from an autoimmune disease and if the presence of anti-soluble liver antigens could precede the development of an autoimmune hepatitis, as the presence of antimitochondrial antibodies can precede primary biliary cirrhosis.

  12. Drug-induced hepatitis superimposed on the presence of anti-SLA antibody: a case report

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    Etxagibel Aitziber

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Autoimmune hepatitis is a necroinflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by the presence of circulating antibodies, hypergammaglobulinemia, and response to immunosuppression. It has the histological features of chronic hepatitis. The onset is usually insidious, but in some patients the presentation may be acute and occasionally severe. Certain drugs can induce chronic hepatitis mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Different autoantibodies have been associated with this process but they are not detectable after drug withdrawal and clinical resolution. Case presentation We describe a case of drug-induced acute hepatitis associated with antinuclear, antisoluble liver-pancreas and anti-smooth muscle autoantibodies in a 66-year-old woman. Abnormal clinical and biochemical parameters resolved after drug withdrawal, but six months later anti-soluble liver-pancreas antibodies remained positive and liver biopsy showed chronic hepatitis and septal fibrosis. Furthermore, our patient has a HLA genotype associated with autoimmune hepatitis. Conclusion Patient follow-up will disclose whether our patient suffers from an autoimmune disease and if the presence of anti-soluble liver antigens could precede the development of an autoimmune hepatitis, as the presence of antimitochondrial antibodies can precede primary biliary cirrhosis.

  13. Drug-induced sedation endoscopy (DISE) classification systems: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Dijemeni, Esuabom; D'Amone, Gabriele; Gbati, Israel

    2017-12-01

    Drug-induced sedation endoscopy (DISE) classification systems have been used to assess anatomical findings on upper airway obstruction, and decide and plan surgical treatments and act as a predictor for surgical treatment outcome for obstructive sleep apnoea management. The first objective is to identify if there is a universally accepted DISE grading and classification system for analysing DISE findings. The second objective is to identify if there is one DISE grading and classification treatment planning framework for deciding appropriate surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The third objective is to identify if there is one DISE grading and classification treatment outcome framework for determining the likelihood of success for a given OSA surgical intervention. A systematic review was performed to identify new and significantly modified DISE classification systems: concept, advantages and disadvantages. Fourteen studies proposing a new DISE classification system and three studies proposing a significantly modified DISE classification were identified. None of the studies were based on randomised control trials. DISE is an objective method for visualising upper airway obstruction. The classification and assessment of clinical findings based on DISE is highly subjective due to the increasing number of DISE classification systems. Hence, this creates a growing divergence in surgical treatment planning and treatment outcome. Further research on a universally accepted objective DISE assessment is critically needed.

  14. A hidden Markov model to assess drug-induced sleep fragmentation in the telemetered rat.

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    Diack, C; Ackaert, O; Ploeger, B A; van der Graaf, P H; Gurrell, R; Ivarsson, M; Fairman, D

    2011-12-01

    Drug-induced sleep fragmentation can cause sleep disturbances either via their intended pharmacological action or as a side effect. Examples of disturbances include excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia and nightmares. Developing drugs without these side effects requires insight into the mechanisms leading to sleep disturbance. The characterization of the circadian sleep pattern by EEG following drug exposure has improved our understanding of these mechanisms and their translatability across species. The EEG shows frequent transitions between specific sleep states leading to multiple correlated sojourns in these states. We have developed a Markov model to consider the high correlation in the data and quantitatively compared sleep disturbance in telemetered rats induced by methylphenidate, which is known to disturb sleep, and of a new chemical entity (NCE). It was assumed that these drugs could either accelerate or decelerate the transitions between the sleep states. The difference in sleep disturbance of methylphenidate and the NCE were quantitated and different mechanisms of action on rebound sleep were identified. The estimated effect showed that both compounds induce sleep fragmentation with methylphenidate being fivefold more potent compared to the NCE.

  15. Pharmacy Students' Learning and Satisfaction With High-Fidelity Simulation to Teach Drug-Induced Dyspepsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess second-year pharmacy students’ acquisition of pharmacotherapy knowledge and clinical competence from participation in a high-fidelity simulation, and to determine the impact on the simulation experience of implementing feedback from previous students. Design. A high-fidelity simulation was used to present a patient case scenario of drug-induced dyspepsia with gastrointestinal bleeding. The simulation was revised based on feedback from a previous class of students to include a smaller group size, provision of session material to students in advance, and an improved learning environment. Assessment. Student performance on pre- and post-simulation knowledge and clinical competence tests documented significant improvements in students' knowledge of dyspepsia and associated symptoms, with the greatest improvement on questions relating to the hemodynamic effects of gastrointestinal bleeding. Students were more satisfied with the simulation experience compared to students in the earlier study. Conclusion. Participation in a high-fidelity simulation allowed pharmacy students to apply knowledge and skills learned in the classroom. Improved student satisfaction with the simulation suggests that implementing feedback obtained through student course evaluations can be an effective means of improving the curriculum. PMID:23519773

  16. Variations of Aripiprazole-Induced Dyskinesia Existing with Concurrent Use of Amantadine and an Anticholinergic Agent in an Elderly Patient

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    I-Wen Sun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elderly patients are vulnerable to the adverse neurological effects of antipsychotics, particularly Parkinsonian symptoms and tardive dyskinesia. This vulnerability in the elderly becomes complex and unpredictable when aripiprazole is prescribed to replace other second-generation or first-generation antipsychotics. This report describes a 69-year-old female schizophrenic patient, who received aripiprazole after using a few antipsychotics, including the first- and second-generation ones. The tardive dyskinesia developed 6 weeks after switching to aripiprazole but subsided 4 weeks later when stopping the concurrent amantadine and decreasing the dosage of trihexyphenidyl. However, Parkinsonian symptoms developed insidiously thereafter, which remitted after the dosage of trihexyphenidyl was increased again. The possible mechanisms of the alternated adverse neurological events after a switch to aripiprazole in the chronic elderly psychosis are discussed.

  17. Correlation between dopamine receptor D2 expression and presence of abnormal involuntary movements in Wistar rats with hemiparkinsonism and dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro Aponte, P A; Otálora, C A; Guzmán, J C; Turner, L F; Alcázar, J P; Mayorga, E L

    2018-03-07

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by motor alterations, which are commonly treated with L-DOPA. However, long-term L-DOPA use may cause dyskinesia. Although the pathogenic mechanism of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is unclear, the condition has been associated with alterations in dopamine receptors, among which D2 receptors (D2R) have received little attention. This study aims to: (i)develop and standardise an experimental model of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rats with hemiparkinsonism; and (ii)evaluate the correlation between D2R expression and presence of abnormal involuntary movements (AIM). We allocated 21 male Wistar rats into 3 groups: intact controls, lesioned rats (with neurotoxin 6-OHDA), and dyskinetic rats (injected with L-DOPA for 19 days). Sensorimotor impairment was assessed with behavioural tests. Dyskinetic rats gradually developed AIMs during the treatment period; front leg AIMs were more severe and locomotor AIMs less severe (Pde Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of Serotonin Neurons in L-DOPA- and Graft-Induced Dyskinesia in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

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    Eunju Shin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-DOPA, the most effective drug to treat motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, causes abnormal involuntary movements, limiting its use in advanced stages of the disease. An increasing body of evidence points to the serotonin system as a key player in the appearance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID. In fact, exogenously administered L-DOPA can be taken up by serotonin neurons, converted to dopamine and released as a false transmitter, contributing to pulsatile stimulation of striatal dopamine receptors. Accordingly, destruction of serotonin fibers or silencing serotonin neurons by serotonin agonists could counteract LID in animal models. Recent clinical work has also shown that serotonin neurons are present in the caudate/putamen of patients grafted with embryonic ventral mesencephalic cells, producing intense serotonin hyperinnervation. These patients experience graft-induced dyskinesia (GID, a type of dyskinesia phenotypically similar to the one induced by L-DOPA but independent from its administration. Interestingly, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone has been shown to suppress GID in these patients, suggesting that serotonin neurons might be involved in the etiology of GID as for LID. In this paper we will discuss the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the involvement of the serotonin system in both LID and GID.

  19. Weight gain after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease is influenced by dyskinesias' reduction and electrodes' position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrino, Roberta; Baroncini, Damiano; Fichera, Mario; Donofrio, Carmine Antonio; Franzin, Alberto; Mortini, Pietro; Comi, Giancarlo; Volontè, Maria Antonietta

    2017-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disease that can be treated with pharmacological or surgical therapy. Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation is a commonly used surgical option. A reported side effect of STN-DBS is weight gain: the aim of our study was to find those factors that determine weight gain, through one year-long observation of 32 patients that underwent surgery in our centre. During the follow-up, we considered: anthropometric features, hormonal levels, motor outcome, neuropsychological and quality of life outcomes, therapeutic parameters and electrodes position. The majority (84%) of our patients gained weight (6.7 kg in 12 months); more than a half of the cohort became overweight. At 12th month, weight gain showed a correlation with dyskinesias reduction, electrodes voltage and distance on the lateral axis. In the multivariate regression analysis, the determinants of weight gain were dyskinesias reduction and electrodes position. In this study, we identified dyskinesias reduction and distance between the active electrodes and the third ventricle as determining factors of weight gain after STN-DBS implantation in PD patients. The first finding could be linked to a decrease in energy consumption, while the second one could be due to a lower stimulation of the lateral hypothalamic area, known for its important role in metabolism and body weight control. Weight gain is a common finding after STN-DBS implantation, and it should be carefully monitored given the potential harmful consequences of overweight.

  20. Successful Fitting of a Complete Maxillary Denture in a Patient with Severe Alzheimer’s Disease Complicated by Oral Dyskinesia

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    Hiromitsu Morita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing population of elderly patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most common form of dementia. In dentistry, a critical problem associated with these patients is the use of a new denture, as AD patients often refuse dental management and are disturbed by minor changes in their oral environment. Some AD patients have further complications associated with oral dyskinesia, a movement disorder that can make dental management difficult, including the stability of a complete denture. In this case, we successfully fitted a complete maxillary denture using modified bilateral balanced occlusion after multiple tooth extractions under intravenous sedation in a 66-year-old woman with severe AD complicated by oral dyskinesia. Following treatment, her appetite and food intake greatly improved. Providing a well-fitting complete denture applied by modified bilateral balanced occlusion, which removes lateral interference using zero-degree artificial teeth for movement disorder of the jaw in patients with severe AD complicated by oral dyskinesia, helps improve oral function.

  1. Is periodontal health a predictor of drug-induced gingival overgrowth? A cross-sectional study

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    Ruchi Banthia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gingival overgrowth is a common side-effect of amlodipine regimen on the oral cavity. There is controversy regarding the cause and effect relationship of periodontal health and drug induced gingival overgrowth. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate and to assess the relationship between the periodontal health and the onset and severity of gingival overgrowth in hypertensive patients receiving amlodipine. Materials and Methods: A total of 99 known hypertensive patients on amlodipine regimen were included in this study. Probing pocket depth (PPD and clinical attachment loss (CAL were noted on four sites of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth. Gingival enlargement scores were assessed for each patient by employing the hyperplastic index. Oral hygiene status was evaluated using the calculus index (CI. Patients were divided into H, E and L groups based on their periodontal status and responders and non-responders based on their hyperplastic index scores. Differences in means of different periodontal variables in different groups were tested for significance by using ANOVA and unpaired Student t-test. Pearson′s correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the correlation between different variables. For all analyses, P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: All the periodontal parameters were statistically highly significant (P = 0.00 amongst H, E and L groups and between responders and non-responders. Statistically highly significant Pearson correlation coefficients were found between mean PPD and mean hyperplastic score, mean CAL and mean hyperplastic score and mean calculus and mean hyperplastic score. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated a definite association between periodontal health and development and severity of amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth

  2. Drug induced mortality: a multiple cause approach on Italian causes of death Register

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    Francesco Grippo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-related mortality is a complex phenomenon that has several health, social and economic effects. In this paper trends of drug-induced mortality in Italy are analysed. Two approaches have been followed: the traditional analysis of the underlying cause of death (UC (data refers to the Istat mortality database from 1980 to 2011, and the multiple cause (MCanalysis, that is the analysis of all conditions reported on the death certificate (data for 2003-2011 period.Methods: Data presented in this paper are based on the Italian mortality register. The selection of Icd codes used for the analysis follows the definition of the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction. Using different indicators (crude and standardized rates, ratio multiple to underlying, the results obtained from the two approaches (UC and MC have been compared. Moreover, as a measure of association between drug-related causes and specific conditions on the death certificate, an estimation of the age-standardized relative risk (RR has been used.Results: In the years 2009-2011, the total number of certificates whit mention of drug use was 1,293, 60% higher than the number UC based. The groups of conditions more strongly associated with drug-related causes are the mental and behavioral disorders (especially alcohol consumption, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis and fibrosis of liver, AIDS and endocarditis.Conclusions : The analysis based on multiple cause approach shows, for the first time, a more detailed picture of the drug related death; it allows to better describe the mortality profiles and to re-evaluate  the contribution of a specific cause to death.

  3. [Case reports of drug-induced liver injury in a reference hospital of Zulia state, Venezuela].

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    Mengual-Moreno, Edgardo; Lizarzábal-García, Maribel; Ruiz-Soler, María; Silva-Suarez, Niniveth; Andrade-Bellido, Raúl; Lucena-González, Maribel; Bessone, Fernando; Hernández, Nelia; Sánchez, Adriana; Medina-Cáliz, Inmaculada

    2015-03-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with varied geographical differences. The aim of this prospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study was to identify and characterize cases of DILI in a hospital of Zulia state, Venezuela. Thirteen patients with a presumptive diagnosis of DILI attended by the Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Universitario, Zulia state, Venezuela, from December-2012 to December-2013 were studied. Ibuprofen (n = 3; 23.1%), acetaminophen (n = 3; 23.1), isoniazid (n = 2; 15.4%) and Herbalife products (n = 2; 15.4%) were the main drugs involved with DILI. Acetaminophen and ibuprofen showed a mixed pattern of liver injury (n = 3; 23.1%) and isoniazid presented a hepatocellular pattern (n = 2; 15.4%). The CIOMS/RUCAMS allowed the identification of possible (n = 7; 53.9%), probable (n = 4; 30.8%) and highly-probable cases (n = 2; 15.4%) of DILI. Amoxicillin/clavulanate, isoniazid, isotretinoin, methotrexate and Herbalife nutritional products were implicated as highly-probable and probable agents. The highest percentage of DILI corresponded to mild cases that recovered after the discontinuation of the agent involved (n = 9; 69.3%). The consumption of Herbalife botanical products is associated with probable causality and fatality (n = 1; 7.7%). In conclusion, the frequency of DILI cases controlled by the Department of Gastroenterology of the Hospital Universitario of Maracaibo was low, being ibuprofen, acetaminophen, isoniazid and products Herbalife the products most commonly involved. It is recommended to continue with the prospective registration of cases, with an extended follow up monitoring period and to facilitate the incorporation of other hospitals in the Zulia State and Venezuela.

  4. Exploring BSEP Inhibition-Mediated Toxicity with a Mechanistic Model of Drug-Induced Liver Injury

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    Jeffrey L Woodhead

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of the bile salt export pump (BSEP has been linked to incidence of drug-induced liver injury (DILI, presumably by the accumulation of toxic bile acids in the liver. We have previously constructed and validated a model of bile acid disposition within DILIsym®, a mechanistic model of DILI. In this paper, we use DILIsym® to simulate the DILI response of the hepatotoxic BSEP inhibitors bosentan and CP-724,714 and the non-hepatotoxic BSEP inhibitor telmisartan in humans in order to explore whether we can predict that hepatotoxic BSEP inhibitors can cause bile acid accumulation to reach toxic levels. We also simulate bosentan in rats in order to illuminate potential reasons behind the lack of toxicity in rats compared to the toxicity observed in humans. DILIsym® predicts that bosentan, but not telmisartan, will cause mild hepatocellular ATP decline and serum ALT elevation in a simulated population of humans. The difference in hepatotoxic potential between bosentan and telmisartan is consistent with clinical observations. However, DILIsym® underpredicts the incidence of bosentan toxicity. DILIsym® also predicts that bosentan will not cause toxicity in a simulated population of rats, and that the difference between the response to bosentan in rats and in humans is primarily due to the less toxic bile acid pool in rats. Our simulations also suggest a potential synergistic role for bile acid accumulation and mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibition in producing the observed toxicity in CP-724,714, and suggest that CP-724,714 metabolites may also play a role in the observed toxicity. Our work also compares the impact of competitive and noncompetitive BSEP inhibition for CP-724,714 and demonstrates that noncompetitive inhibition leads to much greater bile acid accumulation and potential toxicity. Our research demonstrates the potential for mechanistic modeling to contribute to the understanding of how bile acid transport inhibitors

  5. temporomandibular joint cartilage in rabbits affected by drug-induced osteoarthritis

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    Krzysztof Kałużyński

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aims of this study were to assess the anti-degenerative effects of pioglitazone and to compare these effects with those of methylprednisolone and hyaluronic acid on drug-induced osteoarthritis in rabbits’ temporomandibular joint cartilage.Material and Methods: The experiment was conducted on 40 Californian white rabbits. Degenerative changes were induced by intra-articular injections of papain. Subsequently, all of the animals were randomly assigned to one of four groups:1 a control group that received no medications;2 a group treated with 4 intra-articular injections of 2 mg (0.2 ml of hyaluronic acid at weekly intervals;3 a group treated with 4 intra-articular injections of 2 mg (0.1 ml of methylprednisolone at weekly intervals;4 a group administered pioglitazone orally in daily doses of 2 mg/kg of body weight. Four weeks after the beginning of drug administration, the rabbits were sacrificed. Sagittal sections of the intra-articular cartilage (discs and mandibular condyles were stained with hematoxylin and eosin by the PAS technique and with van Gieson’s solution. Histologic examinations, as well as cartilage thickness and number of cell layers measurements, were performed.Results: Histologic assessment in cases of arthritis-associated pathologies revealed that changes occurred most frequently in the control group and least frequently in the pioglitazone group. There were no differences in the histological structures of the intra-articular discs. Cartilage thickness measurements demonstrated the thinnest cartilage in group 2 and the thickest in group 3. Analysis of cell layer numbers showed the most numerous layers in the pioglitazone group and the least in the control group.Conclusion: Pioglitazone and hyaluronic acid showed anti-degenerative properties compared to methylprednisolone in an animal model.

  6. Effectiveness of hepatoprotective drugs for anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity: a retrospective analysis

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    Zenya Saito

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effectiveness of hepatoprotective drugs for DIH (drug induced hepatotoxicity during tuberculosis treatment is not clear. We evaluated the effectiveness of hepatoprotective drugs by comparing the period until the normalization of hepatic enzymes between patients who were prescribed with the hepatoprotective drugs after DIH was occurred and patients who were not prescribed with the hepatoprotective drugs. Methods During 2006–2010, 389 patients with active tuberculosis were included in this study. DIH was defined as elevation of peak serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST and/or alanine aminotransferase (ALT of more than twice the upper limit of normal (ULN. We divided the patients into the severe (peak serum AST and/or ALT elevation of >5 times the ULN, moderate (peak serum AST and/or ALT elevation of >3 to ≤5 times the ULN, and mild DIH groups (peak serum AST and/or ALT elevation of >2 to ≤3 times the ULN. We compared the average period until the normalization of hepatic enzymes between patient subgroups with and without hepatoprotective drugs (ursodeoxycholic acid: UDCA, stronger neo-minophagen C: SNMC, and glycyrrhizin. Results In the severe group, there was no significant difference in the average period until the normalization between subgroups with and without hepatoprotective drugs (21.4 ± 10.8 vs 21.5 ± 11.1 days, P = 0.97. In the mild group, the period was longer in the subgroup with hepatoprotective drugs than that without hepatoprotective drugs (15.7 ± 6.2 vs 12.4 ± 7.9 days, P = 0.046. Conclusion Regardless of the severity, hepatoprotective drugs did not shorten the period until the normalization of hepatic enzymes.

  7. Assessment of time interval between tramadol intake and seizure and second drug-induced attack

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    Bahareh Abbasi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tramadol is a synthetic drug which is prescribed in moderate and severe pain. Tramadol overdose can induce severe complications such as consciousness impairment and convulsions. This study was done to determine the convulsions incidence after tramadol use until one week after hospital discharge. Methods: This prospective study was done in tramadol overdose patients without uncontrolled epilepsy and head injury history. All cases admitted in Loghman and Rasol Akram Hospitals, Tehran, Iran from 1, April 2011 to 1, April 2012 were included and observed for at least 12 hours. Time interval between tramadol intake and first seizure were record. Then, patients with second drug-induced seizure were recognized and log time between the first and second seizure was analyzed. The patients were transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU if clinical worsening status observed. One week after hospital discharge, telephone follow-up was conducted. Results: A total of 150 patients with a history of tramadol induced seizures (141 men, 9 women, age: 23.23±5.94 years were enrolled in this study. Convulsion was seen in 104 patients (69.3%. In 8 out of 104 patients (7.6% two or more convulsion was seen. Time interval between tramadol use and the onset of the first and second seizure were 0.93±0.17 and 2.5±0.75 hours, respectively. Tramadol induced seizures are more likely to occur in males and patients with a history of drug abuse. Finally, one hundred forty nine patients (99.3% were discharged with good condition and the only one patient died from tramadol overdose. Conclusion: The results of the study showed tramadol induced seizure most frequently occurred within the first 4 hours of tramadol intake. The chance of experiencing a second seizure exists in the susceptible population. Thus, 4 hours after drug intake is the best time for patients to be hospital discharged.

  8. A predictive ligand-based Bayesian model for human drug-induced liver injury.

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    Ekins, Sean; Williams, Antony J; Xu, Jinghai J

    2010-12-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is one of the most important reasons for drug development failure at both preapproval and postapproval stages. There has been increased interest in developing predictive in vivo, in vitro, and in silico models to identify compounds that cause idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. In the current study, we applied machine learning, a Bayesian modeling method with extended connectivity fingerprints and other interpretable descriptors. The model that was developed and internally validated (using a training set of 295 compounds) was then applied to a large test set relative to the training set (237 compounds) for external validation. The resulting concordance of 60%, sensitivity of 56%, and specificity of 67% were comparable to results for internal validation. The Bayesian model with extended connectivity functional class fingerprints of maximum diameter 6 (ECFC_6) and interpretable descriptors suggested several substructures that are chemically reactive and may also be important for DILI-causing compounds, e.g., ketones, diols, and α-methyl styrene type structures. Using Smiles Arbitrary Target Specification (SMARTS) filters published by several pharmaceutical companies, we evaluated whether such reactive substructures could be readily detected by any of the published filters. It was apparent that the most stringent filters used in this study, such as the Abbott alerts, which captures thiol traps and other compounds, may be of use in identifying DILI-causing compounds (sensitivity 67%). A significant outcome of the present study is that we provide predictions for many compounds that cause DILI by using the knowledge we have available from previous studies. These computational models may represent cost-effective selection criteria before in vitro or in vivo experimental studies.

  9. Diagnostic performance of traditional hepatobiliary biomarkers of drug-induced liver injury in the rat.

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    Ennulat, Daniela; Magid-Slav, Michal; Rehm, Sabine; Tatsuoka, Kay S

    2010-08-01

    Nonclinical studies provide the opportunity to anchor biochemical with morphologic findings; however, liver injury is often complex and heterogeneous, confounding the ability to relate biochemical changes with specific patterns of injury. The aim of the current study was to compare diagnostic performance of hepatobiliary markers for specific manifestations of drug-induced liver injury in rat using data collected in a recent hepatic toxicogenomics initiative in which rats (n = 3205) were given 182 different treatments for 4 or 14 days. Diagnostic accuracy of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin (Tbili), serum bile acids (SBA), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), total cholesterol (Chol), and triglycerides (Trig) was evaluated for specific types of liver histopathology by Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. To assess the relationship between biochemical and morphologic changes in the absence of hepatocellular necrosis, a second ROC analysis was performed on a subset of rats (n = 2504) given treatments (n = 152) that did not cause hepatocellular necrosis. In the initial analysis, ALT, AST, Tbili, and SBA had the greatest diagnostic utility for manifestations of hepatocellular necrosis and biliary injury, with comparable magnitude of area under the ROC curve and serum hepatobiliary marker changes for both. In the absence of hepatocellular necrosis, ALT increases were observed with biochemical or morphologic evidence of cholestasis. In both analyses, diagnostic utility of ALP and GGT for biliary injury was limited; however, ALP had modest diagnostic value for peroxisome proliferation, and ALT, AST, and total Chol had moderate diagnostic utility for phospholipidosis. None of the eight markers evaluated had diagnostic value for manifestations of hypertrophy, cytoplasmic rarefaction, inflammation, or lipidosis.

  10. A high content screening assay to predict human drug-induced liver injury during drug discovery.

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    Persson, Mikael; Løye, Anni F; Mow, Tomas; Hornberg, Jorrit J

    2013-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a major cause for failures of drug development programs, drug withdrawals and use restrictions. Early hazard identification and diligent risk avoidance strategies are therefore essential. For drug-induced liver injury (DILI), this is difficult using conventional safety testing. To reduce the risk for DILI, drug candidates with a high risk need to be identified and deselected. And, to produce drug candidates without that risk associated, risk factors need to be assessed early during drug discovery, such that lead series can be optimized on safety parameters. This requires methods that allow for medium-to-high throughput compound profiling and that generate quantitative results suitable to establish structure-activity-relationships during lead optimization programs. We present the validation of such a method, a novel high content screening assay based on six parameters (nuclei counts, nuclear area, plasma membrane integrity, lysosomal activity, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and mitochondrial area) using ~100 drugs of which the clinical hepatotoxicity profile is known. We find that a 100-fold TI between the lowest toxic concentration and the therapeutic Cmax is optimal to classify compounds as hepatotoxic or non-hepatotoxic, based on the individual parameters. Most parameters have ~50% sensitivity and ~90% specificity. Drugs hitting ≥2 parameters at a concentration below 100-fold their Cmax are typically hepatotoxic, whereas non-hepatotoxic drugs typically hit based on nuclei count, MMP and human Cmax, we identified an area without a single false positive, while maintaining 45% sensitivity. Hierarchical clustering using the multi-parametric dataset roughly separates toxic from non-toxic compounds. We employ the assay in discovery projects to prioritize novel compound series during hit-to-lead, to steer away from a DILI risk during lead optimization, for risk assessment towards candidate selection and to provide guidance of safe

  11. Strategies to reduce the risk of drug-induced QT interval prolongation: a pharmaceutical company perspective.

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    Pollard, C E; Valentin, J-P; Hammond, T G

    2008-08-01

    Drug-induced prolongation of the QT interval is having a significant impact on the ability of the pharmaceutical industry to develop new drugs. The development implications for a compound causing a significant effect in the 'Thorough QT/QTc Study' -- as defined in the clinical regulatory guidance (ICH E14) -- are substantial. In view of this, and the fact that QT interval prolongation is linked to direct inhibition of the hERG channel, in the early stages of drug discovery the focus is on testing for and screening out hERG activity. This has led to understanding of how to produce low potency hERG blockers whilst retaining desirable properties. Despite this, a number of factors mean that when an integrated risk assessment is generated towards the end of the discovery phase (by conducting at least an in vivo QT assessment) a QT interval prolongation risk is still often apparent; inhibition of hERG channel trafficking and partitioning into cardiac tissue are just two confounding factors. However, emerging information suggests that hERG safety margins have high predictive value and that when hERG and in vivo non-clinical data are combined, their predictive value to man, whilst not perfect, is >80%. Although understanding the anomalies is important and is being addressed, of greater importance is developing a better understanding of TdP, with the aim of being able to predict TdP rather than using an imperfect surrogate marker (QT interval prolongation). Without an understanding of how to predict TdP risk, high-benefit drugs for serious indications may never be marketed.

  12. Hospitalized pediatric antituberculosis drug induced hepatotoxicity: Experience of an Indonesian referral hospital

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    Heda Melinda Nataprawira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the characteristics and risk factors of pediatric antituberculosis drug induced hepatotoxicity (ADIH in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, a referral hospital in West Java, Indonesia. Methods: Medical records of hospitalized pediatric ADIH from October 2010 to October 2015 were reviewed retrospectively through computer-based search. Descriptive data were presented as percentage. Analytical case-control study on characteristics of ADIH was conducted using Chi-square and Mann Whitney test. Results: Fifty (3.5% out of 1 424 pediatric TB patients developed ADIH; 20 (40% were boys and 30 (60% girls. More than half were under 5 years old and 33 (66% were malnourished. ADIH occured in 29 (58% cases treated for pulmonary TB, 15 (30% for extrapulmonary TB and 6 (12% for both; 34 cases (68% occured during the intensive phase. We identified hepatic comorbidities including CMV infection [1 (2%] and typhoid [1 (2%], and other diseases treated by hepatotoxic drugs such as chemotherapeutic drugs, antiepileptics, and antiretroviral drugs [9 (18%]. Case-control analysis of 50 ADIH cases and 100 TB controls without ADIH showed that the correlation between gender, age, type of TB, nutritional status and comorbidities to occurence of ADIH was statistically insignificant (P = 0.26, 0.765, 0.495, 0.534 9 and 0.336, respectively. Pediatric ADIH was treated using modified British Thoracic Society guidelines. Conclusions: Pediatric ADIH in our hospital is quite frequent, thus identifying risk factors and development of pediatric guideline is mandatory. Further study is needed to identify other risk factors such as genetic acetylator status.

  13. Associations of Drug Lipophilicity and Extent of Metabolism with Drug-Induced Liver Injury.

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    McEuen, Kristin; Borlak, Jürgen; Tong, Weida; Chen, Minjun

    2017-06-22

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI), although rare, is a frequent cause of adverse drug reactions resulting in warnings and withdrawals of numerous medications. Despite the research community's best efforts, current testing strategies aimed at identifying hepatotoxic drugs prior to human trials are not sufficiently powered to predict the complex mechanisms leading to DILI. In our previous studies, we demonstrated lipophilicity and dose to be associated with increased DILI risk and, and in our latest work, we factored reactive metabolites into the algorithm to predict DILI. Given the inconsistency in determining the potential for drugs to cause DILI, the present study comprehensively assesses the relationship between DILI risk and lipophilicity and the extent of metabolism using a large published dataset of 1036 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs by considering five independent DILI annotations. We found that lipophilicity and the extent of metabolism alone were associated with increased risk for DILI. Moreover, when analyzed in combination with high daily dose (≥100 mg), lipophilicity was statistically significantly associated with the risk of DILI across all datasets ( p < 0.05). Similarly, the combination of extensive hepatic metabolism (≥50%) and high daily dose (≥100 mg) was also strongly associated with an increased risk of DILI among all datasets analyzed ( p < 0.05). Our results suggest that both lipophilicity and the extent of hepatic metabolism can be considered important risk factors for DILI in humans, and that this relationship to DILI risk is much stronger when considered in combination with dose. The proposed paradigm allows the convergence of different published annotations to a more uniform assessment.

  14. Drug-induced lupus: simvastatin or amiodarone? A case report in elderly

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    Mauro Turrin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Reports of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE seen during treatment with amiodarone are rare in the literature. SLE or immunological abnormalities induced by treatment with statins are more frequent. In this issue we report a case of a 81-year-old male who, after a 2-year therapy with amiodarone, developed a clinical and serologic picture of drug-induced SLE (DILE. He was admitted for congestive heart failure in mechanical aortic valve prosthesis, permanent atrial fibrillation (anticoagulation with warfarin, hypercholesterolaemia, and hypothyroidism. Amiodarone was started two years earlier for polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, statin and L-thyroxine the following year. At admission he presented pleuro-pericardical effusion detected by CT-scan (also indicative of interstitial lung involvement and echocardiography. Serological main indicative findings were: elevation of inflammatory markers, ANA (Anti-Nuclear Antibodies titers = 1:320 (indirect immune-fluorescence – IIF – assay on HEp-2, homogeneous/fine speckled pattern, anti-dsDNA titers = 1:80 (IIF on Crithidia luciliae, negative ENA (Extractable Nuclear Antigens and antibodies anti-citrulline, rheumatoid factor = 253 KU/l, normal C3-C4, negative HbsAg and anti-HCV, negative anticardiolipin antibodies IgG and IgM, negative anti-beta2GPI IgG and IgM. Amiodarone was discontinued and methylprednisolone was started, since the patient was severely ill. At discharge, after a month, the patient was better and pleuro-pericardical effusion was reduced. Readmitted few weeks later for bradyarithmia and worsening of dyspnoea, pericardial effusion was further reduced but he died for refractory congestive heart failure and pneumonia. Clinical picture (sierositis, neither skin nor kidney involvement, other typical side effects of amiodarone (hypothyroidism and lung interstitial pathology and serological findings are suggestive of amiodarone-induced SLE.

  15. [Correction of bronchial obstructive syndrome and antituberculous drugs-induced eosinophilia in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis by using plasmapheresis].

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    Shmelev, E I; Stepanian, I E

    1996-01-01

    The paper provides the results of a follow-up of 70 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis in whom the administration of antituberculous drugs induced eosinophilia and bronchial obstructive syndrome. To eliminate the side effects of antituberculous therapy, a plasmapheresis regimen was performed in 44 patients, the remaining patients were given only bronchodilators and antihistamine drugs. Plasmapheresis as a means for correcting drug-induced eosinophilia and bronchial obstructive syndrome was found to be more effective than drug therapy and, in some cases, enabled antituberculous therapy to be continued, without changing a combination of drugs. It is recommended that plasmapheresis should be used in cases of inadequate efficiency of conventional methods for correcting drug intolerance.

  16. A rare cause of drug-induced hepatitis in an immunocompromised patient and the role of glutathione.

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    Senadhi, Viplove; Arora, Deepika; Arora, Manish; Marsh, Franklin

    2012-08-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning on numerous herbal drugs, including many popular products at General Nutrition Centers (GNC), regarding unstudied hepatotoxicity. There have been recent reports of GNC products such as hydroxycut and herbalife, causing drug-induced hepatitis. Herbal medications are over-the-counter products and are not investigated thoroughly by the FDA. Given that the most common outpatient laboratory abnormality is elevated liver transaminases, a sign of hepatocellular toxicity; it is not surprising that some of these products end up causing hepatic dysfunction, especially when taken in large volume. There are numerous herbal supplements that are hepatotoxic, however, these medications have a much more significant effect in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients, which is secondary to depleted glutathione. We present a rare case of drug induced hepatitis secondary to herbal medications used to treat HIV and elucidate the role of glutathione depletion in immunocompromised patients.

  17. Differences between Drug-Induced and Contrast Media-Induced Adverse Reactions Based on Spontaneously Reported Adverse Drug Reactions.

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    Ryu, JiHyeon; Lee, HeeYoung; Suh, JinUk; Yang, MyungSuk; Kang, WonKu; Kim, EunYoung

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed differences between spontaneously reported drug-induced (not including contrast media) and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Adverse drug reactions reported by an in-hospital pharmacovigilance center (St. Mary's teaching hospital, Daejeon, Korea) from 2010-2012 were classified as drug-induced or contrast media-induced. Clinical patterns, frequency, causality, severity, Schumock and Thornton's preventability, and type A/B reactions were recorded. The trends among causality tools measuring drug and contrast-induced adverse reactions were analyzed. Of 1,335 reports, 636 drug-induced and contrast media-induced adverse reactions were identified. The prevalence of spontaneously reported adverse drug reaction-related admissions revealed a suspected adverse drug reaction-reporting rate of 20.9/100,000 (inpatient, 0.021%) and 3.9/100,000 (outpatients, 0.004%). The most common adverse drug reaction-associated drug classes included nervous system agents and anti-infectives. Dermatological and gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions were most frequently and similarly reported between drug and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Compared to contrast media-induced adverse reactions, drug-induced adverse reactions were milder, more likely to be preventable (9.8% vs. 1.1%, p contrast media-induced adverse reactions (56.6%, p = 0.066). Causality patterns differed between the two adverse reaction classes. The World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality evaluation and Naranjo algorithm results significantly differed from those of the Korean algorithm version II (p contrast media-induced adverse reactions. The World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre and Naranjo algorithm causality evaluation afforded similar results.

  18. [Trends in drug-induced liver injury based on reports of adverse reactions to PMDA in Japan].

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    Sudo, Chie; Maekawa, Keiko; Segawa, Katsunori; Hanatani, Tadaaki; Sai, Kimie; Saito, Yoshiro

    2012-01-01

    Reports on drug-related adverse reactions from manufacturing/distributing pharmaceutical companies or medical institutions/pharmacies are regulated under the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law of Japan, and this system is important for post-marketing safety measures. Although association between the medicine and the adverse event has not been clearly evaluated, and an incidence may be redundantly reported, this information would be useful to roughly grasp the current status of drug-related adverse reactions. In the present study, we analyzed the incidence of drug-induced liver injury by screening the open-source data publicized by the homepage of Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency from 2005 to 2011 fiscal years. Major drug-classes suspected to cause general drug-induced liver injury were antineoplastics, anti-inflammatory agents/common cold drugs, chemotherapeutics including antituberculous drugs, antidiabetics, antiulcers and antiepileptics. In addition, reported cases for fulminant hepatitis were also summarized. We found that antituberculous isoniazid and antineoplastic tegafur-uracil were the top two suspected drugs. These results might deepen understanding of current situations for the drug-induced liver injury in Japan.

  19. Prevention and Treatment of Vaginal Bleeding after Drug-induced Abortion by Yaoliuan Capsule and Its Effects on Menses Recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Zhichun; HUANG Guangying

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore the effect of Yaoliuan capsule in the prevention and treatment of vaginal bleeding after drug-induced abortion and menses recovery after drug-induced abortion, 323 cases of gestation period ≤ 49 days and without contraindication, were divided randomly into study group (168 cases, taking Yaoliuan capsule) and control group (155 cases, taking placebo capsule). The results showed that in the study group, there were 161 cases (95.8 %) of complete abortion, 7 cases (4.2 %) of incomplete abortion; In the control group, there were 146 cases (94.2 %) of complete abortion, 6 cases (3.9 %) of incomplete abortion, 3 cases (1.9 %) of abortion failure. The vaginal bleeding time was 5-25 days (mean 10.8 days) in study group, while that was 6-62 days (mean 19.1 days) in control group. The menstrual cycle was 30.5±5.2 days and 33.8 d±8.6 days respectively in study and control groups. The menstrual period was 6.1±3.5 days and 9.9±5.1 days respectively in study and control groups. Yaoliuan capsule is an effective drug to prevent and treat vaginal bleeding following drug-induced abortion, promote menstruation recovery and prevent pelvic infection.

  20. Polymorphisms in CTLA4 influence incidence of drug-induced liver injury after renal transplantation in Chinese recipients.

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    Yifeng Guo

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphisms in cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4 play an influential role in graft rejection and the long-term clinical outcome of organ transplantation. We investigated the association of 5 CTLA4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (rs733618 C/T, rs4553808 A/G, rs5742909 C/T, rs231775 A/G, and rs3087243 G/A with drug-induced liver injury (DILI in Chinese renal transplantation (RT recipients. Each recipient underwent a 24-month follow-up observation for drug-induced liver damage. The CTLA4 SNPs were genotyped in 864 renal transplantation recipients. A significant association was found between the rs231775 genotype and an early onset of DILI in the recipients. Multivariate analyses revealed that a risk factor, recipient rs231775 genotype (p = 0.040, was associated with DILI. Five haplotypes were estimated for 4 SNPs (excluding rs733618; the frequency of haplotype ACGG was significantly higher in the DILI group (68.9% than in the non-DILI group (61.1% (p = 0.041. In conclusion, CTLA4 haplotype ACGG was partially associated with the development of DILI in Chinese kidney transplant recipients. The rs231775 GG genotype may be a risk factor for immunosuppressive drug-induced liver damage.

  1. Enkephalin and dynorphin neuropeptides are differently correlated with locomotor hypersensitivity and levodopa-induced dyskinesia in parkinsonian rats.

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    Sgroi, Stefania; Capper-Loup, Christine; Paganetti, Paolo; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2016-06-01

    The opioidergic neuropeptides dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (ENK) and the D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptors (D1R, D2R) are involved in the striatal control of motor and behavioral function. In Parkinson's disease, motor disturbances such as "on-off" motor fluctuations and involuntary movements (dyskinesia) are severe complications that often arise after chronic l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) treatment. Changes in the striatal expression of preproENK (PPENK), proDYN (PDYN), D1R, and D2R mRNA have been observed in parkinsonian animals treated with l-DOPA. Enhanced opioidergic transmission has been found in association with l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia, but the connection of PPENK, PDYN, D1R, and D2R mRNA expression with locomotor activity remains unclear. In this study, we measured PPENK, PDYN, D1R and D2R mRNA levels by in situ hybridization in the striatum of 6-OHDA hemi-parkinsonian rats treated with l-DOPA (PD+l-DOPA group), along with two control groups (PD+saline and naive+l-DOPA). We found different levels of expression of PPENK, PDYN, D1R and D2R mRNA across the experimental groups and correlated the changes in mRNA expression with dyskinesia and locomotor variables assessed by open field test during several phases of l-DOPA treatment. Both PDYN and PPENK mRNA levels were correlated with the severity of dyskinesia, while PPENK mRNA levels were also correlated with the frequency of contralateral rotational movements and with locomotor variables. Moreover, a strong correlation was found between D1R mRNA expression and D2R mRNA expression in the PD+l-DOPA group. These findings suggest that, in parkinsonian animals treated with l-DOPA, high levels of PPENK are a prerequisite for a locomotor sensitization to l-DOPA treatment, while PDYN overexpression is responsible only for the development of dyskinesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of levodopa-induced dyskinesias on manual tracking in patients with Parkinson's disease.

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    Lemieux, Sarah; Ghassemi, Mehrdad; Jog, Mandar; Edwards, Roderick; Duval, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The influence of peak-dose, levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) on manual tracking (MT) was examined in 10 dyskinetic patients with Parkinson's disease (DPD), and compared to 10 age/gender-matched non-dyskinetic patients with Parkinson's disease (NDPD) and 10 healthy controls. Whole-body movement (WBM) and MT performance were recorded simultaneously with a 6-degrees-of-freedom magnetic motion tracker and forearm rotation sensors, respectively. Subjects were asked to match the length of a computer-generated line with a line they controlled via wrist rotation. Results show that DPD patients had greater WBM magnitude at rest and during the motor task, both in displacement and in velocity. All groups displayed some increase in WBM displacement from rest to MT, but only the DPD group had a significant increase in WBM velocity during movement. As for MT performance (determined by assessing the positional mismatch between subjects' and target lines), ERROR in displacement was statistically similar between groups. There was no correlation between ERROR and the magnitude of WBM within the DPD group. The DPD group showed significant increased ERROR when the velocity of the subject's line was compared with that of the velocity of the target line. When two distinct target pace segments were examined (FAST/SLOW), no significant differences were found in ERROR for displacement for either group, but both the NDPD and DPD group showed increased ERROR from SLOW to FAST for velocity. This was accompanied with an increase in WBM velocity only in the DPD group. The lack of increased ERROR during the SLOW tracking portion in the DPD group supports the notion that the dyskinesias themselves were not primarily responsible for the ERROR seen in the patients. When examining the positive or negative values of ERROR (i.e., faster or slower than the target), we found that the increased ERROR in velocity observed in the DPD group was the result of excess velocity rather than bradykinesia

  3. A case of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia which exhibited the phenotype of anxiety disorder

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    Kunii Y

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Yasuto Kunii,1,2 Nozomu Matsuda,3 Hirooki Yabe1 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima, Japan; 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Aizu Medical Center, School of Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima, Japan; 3Department of Neurology, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima, Japan Background: Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD is a rare heritable neurologic disorder characterized by attacks of involuntary movement induced by sudden voluntary movements. No previous reports have described cases showing comorbidity with psychiatric disease or symptoms. In this case, we showed a patient with PKD who exhibited several manifestations of anxiety disorder.Case: A 35-year-old Japanese man with PKD had been maintained on carbamazepine since he was 16 years of age without any attacks. However, 10 years before this referral, he became aware of a feeling of breakdown in his overall physical functions. He had then avoided becoming familiar with people out of concern that his physical dysfunctions might be perceived in a negative light. One day he was referred by the neurologic department at our hospital to the Department of Psychiatry because of severe anxiety and hyperventilation triggered by carbamazepine. We treated with escitalopram, aripiprazole, and ethyl loflazepate. Both his subjective physical condition and objective expressions subsequently showed gradual improvement. At last, the feelings of chest compression and anxiety entirely disappeared. Accordingly, increases in plasma monoamine metabolite levels were observed, and the c.649dupC mutation, which has been found in most Japanese PKD families, was detected in his proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 gene.Conclusion: This is the first report to describe psychiatric comorbidities or symptoms in a PKD case. The efficacy of psychotropic medication used in this case, the resulting changes in plasma monoamine metabolite

  4. Depression, anxiety, and quality of life in paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia patients.

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    Tian, Wo-Tu; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Xiao-Li; Shen, Jun-Yi; Liang, Gui-Ling; Zhu, Chen-Xi; Tang, Wei-Guo; Chen, Sheng-Di; Song, Yan-Yan; Cao, Li

    2017-09-05

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is a rare movement disorder characterized by recurrent dystonic or choreoathetoid attacks triggered by sudden voluntary movements. Under the condition of psychological burden, some patients' attacks may get worsened with longer duration and higher frequency. This study aimed to assess nonmotor symptoms and quality of life of patients with PKD in a large population. We performed a cross-sectional survey in 165 primary PKD patients from August 2008 to October 2016 in Rui Jin Hospital, using Symptom Check List-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), World Health Organization Quality of Life-100 (WHOQoL-100), Self-Rating Depression Scale, and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. We evaluated the differences of SCL-90-R and WHOQOL-100 scores in patients and Chinese normative data (taken from literature) by using the unpaired Student's t-test. We applied multivariate linear regression to analyze the relationships between motor manifestations, mental health, and quality of life among PKD patients. Compared with Chinese normative data taken from literature, patients with PKD exhibited significantly higher (worse) scores across all SCL-90-R subscales (somatization, obsessive-compulsive, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism; P= 0.000 for all) and significantly lower (worse) scores of five domains in WHOQoL-100 (physical domain, psychological domain, independence domain, social relationship domain, and general quality of life; P= 0.000 for all). Nonremission of dyskinesia episodes (P = 0.011) and higher depression score (P = 0.000) were significantly associated with lower levels of quality of life. The rates of depression and anxiety in patients with PKD were 41.2% (68/165) and 26.7% (44/165), respectively. Depression, anxiety, and low levels of quality of life were prevalent in patients with PKD. Co-occurrence of depression and anxiety was common among these patients. Regular mental health

  5. ABC gene-ranking for prediction of drug-induced cholestasis in rats

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    Yauheniya Cherkas

    Full Text Available As legacy toxicogenomics databases have become available, improved data mining approaches are now key to extracting and visualizing subtle relationships between toxicants and gene expression. In the present study, a novel “aggregating bundles of clusters” (ABC procedure was applied to separate cholestatic from non-cholestatic drugs and model toxicants in the Johnson & Johnson (Janssen rat liver toxicogenomics database [3]. Drug-induced cholestasis is an important issue, particularly when a new compound enters the market with this liability, with standard preclinical models often mispredicting this toxicity. Three well-characterized cholestasis-responsive genes (Cyp7a1, Mrp3 and Bsep were chosen from a previous in-house Janssen gene expression signature; these three genes show differing, non-redundant responses across the 90+ paradigm compounds in our database. Using the ABC procedure, extraneous contributions were minimized in comparisons of compound gene responses. All genes were assigned weights proportional to their correlations with Cyp7a1, Mrp3 and Bsep, and a resampling technique was used to derive a stable measure of compound similarity. The compounds that were known to be associated with rat cholestasis generally had small values of this measure relative to each other but also had large values of this measure relative to non-cholestatic compounds. Visualization of the data with the ABC-derived signature showed a very tight, essentially identically behaving cluster of robust human cholestatic drugs and experimental cholestatic toxicants (ethinyl estradiol, LPS, ANIT and methylene dianiline, disulfiram, naltrexone, methapyrilene, phenacetin, alpha-methyl dopa, flutamide, the NSAIDs–—indomethacin, flurbiprofen, diclofenac, flufenamic acid, sulindac, and nimesulide, butylated hydroxytoluene, piperonyl butoxide, and bromobenzene, some slightly less active compounds (3′-acetamidofluorene, amsacrine, hydralazine, tannic acid, some

  6. Looking for the Self: Phenomenology, Neurophysiology and Philosophical Significance of Drug-induced Ego Dissolution

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    Raphaël Millière

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is converging evidence that high doses of hallucinogenic drugs can produce significant alterations of self-experience, described as the dissolution of the sense of self and the loss of boundaries between self and world. This article discusses the relevance of this phenomenon, known as “drug-induced ego dissolution (DIED”, for cognitive neuroscience, psychology and philosophy of mind. Data from self-report questionnaires suggest that three neuropharmacological classes of drugs can induce ego dissolution: classical psychedelics, dissociative anesthetics and agonists of the kappa opioid receptor (KOR. While these substances act on different neurotransmitter receptors, they all produce strong subjective effects that can be compared to the symptoms of acute psychosis, including ego dissolution. It has been suggested that neuroimaging of DIED can indirectly shed light on the neural correlates of the self. While this line of inquiry is promising, its results must be interpreted with caution. First, neural correlates of ego dissolution might reveal the necessary neurophysiological conditions for the maintenance of the sense of self, but it is more doubtful that this method can reveal its minimally sufficient conditions. Second, it is necessary to define the relevant notion of self at play in the phenomenon of DIED. This article suggests that DIED consists in the disruption of subpersonal processes underlying the “minimal” or “embodied” self, i.e., the basic experience of being a self rooted in multimodal integration of self-related stimuli. This hypothesis is consistent with Bayesian models of phenomenal selfhood, according to which the subjective structure of conscious experience ultimately results from the optimization of predictions in perception and action. Finally, it is argued that DIED is also of particular interest for philosophy of mind. On the one hand, it challenges theories according to which consciousness always involves

  7. Looking for the Self: Phenomenology, Neurophysiology and Philosophical Significance of Drug-induced Ego Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millière, Raphaël

    2017-01-01

    There is converging evidence that high doses of hallucinogenic drugs can produce significant alterations of self-experience, described as the dissolution of the sense of self and the loss of boundaries between self and world. This article discusses the relevance of this phenomenon, known as “drug-induced ego dissolution (DIED)”, for cognitive neuroscience, psychology and philosophy of mind. Data from self-report questionnaires suggest that three neuropharmacological classes of drugs can induce ego dissolution: classical psychedelics, dissociative anesthetics and agonists of the kappa opioid receptor (KOR). While these substances act on different neurotransmitter receptors, they all produce strong subjective effects that can be compared to the symptoms of acute psychosis, including ego dissolution. It has been suggested that neuroimaging of DIED can indirectly shed light on the neural correlates of the self. While this line of inquiry is promising, its results must be interpreted with caution. First, neural correlates of ego dissolution might reveal the necessary neurophysiological conditions for the maintenance of the sense of self, but it is more doubtful that this method can reveal its minimally sufficient conditions. Second, it is necessary to define the relevant notion of self at play in the phenomenon of DIED. This article suggests that DIED consists in the disruption of subpersonal processes underlying the “minimal” or “embodied” self, i.e., the basic experience of being a self rooted in multimodal integration of self-related stimuli. This hypothesis is consistent with Bayesian models of phenomenal selfhood, according to which the subjective structure of conscious experience ultimately results from the optimization of predictions in perception and action. Finally, it is argued that DIED is also of particular interest for philosophy of mind. On the one hand, it challenges theories according to which consciousness always involves self-awareness. On

  8. Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia: potential options for resource-limited countries

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    Nisreen Rumman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia is a genetic disease of ciliary function leading to chronic upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms. The diagnosis is frequently overlooked because the symptoms are nonspecific and the knowledge about the disease in the primary care setting is poor. Additionally, none of the available tests is accurate enough to be used in isolation. These tests are expensive, and need sophisticated equipment and expertise to analyse and interpret results; diagnosis is therefore only available at highly specialised centres. The diagnosis is particularly challenging in countries with limited resources due to the lack of such costly equipment and expertise. In this review, we discuss the importance of early and accurate diagnosis especially for countries where the disease is clinically prevalent but diagnostic tests are lacking. We review the diagnostic tests available in specialised centres (nasal nitric oxide, high-speed video microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence and genetics. We then consider modifications that might be considered in less well-resourced countries whilst maintaining acceptable accuracy.

  9. Primary ciliary dyskinesia-causing mutations in Amish and Mennonite communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkol, Thomas W; Puffenberger, Erik G; Lie, Hauw; Helms, Cynthia; Strauss, Kevin A; Bowcock, Anne; Carson, John L; Hazucha, Milan; Morton, D Holmes; Patel, Anand C; Leigh, Margaret W; Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona A

    2013-08-01

    To determine whether individuals with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) from unrelated Amish and Mennonite families harbor a single and unique founder mutation. Subjects from Amish and Mennonite communities in several states were enrolled in the study. All subjects were clinically characterized, and nasal nitric oxide levels were measured. Nasal epithelial scrapings were collected from several subjects for ciliary ultrastructural analyses. DNA was isolated from patients with PCD and their unaffected first- and second-degree relatives. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping, linkage analyses, targeted mutation analyses, and exome sequencing were performed. All subjects from Old-Order Amish communities from Pennsylvania were homozygous for a nonsense mutant DNAH5 allele, c.4348C>T (p.Q1450X). Two affected siblings from an unrelated Mennonite family in Arkansas were homozygous for the same nonsense DNAH5 mutation. Children with PCD from an Amish family from Wisconsin had biallelic DNAH5 mutations, c.4348C>T (p.Q1450X) and c.10815delT (p.P3606HfsX23), and mutations in other genes associated with PCD were also identified in this community. The Amish and Mennonite subjects from geographically dispersed and socially isolated communities had the same founder DNAH5 mutation, owing to the common heritage of these populations. However, disease-causing mutations in other PCD-associated genes were also found in affected individuals in these communities, illustrating the genetic heterogeneity in this consanguineous population. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduced anaerobic and aerobic performance in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Senem; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Cakmak, Aslihan; Emiralioglu, Nagehan; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Ozcelik, Hayriye Ugur; Sonbahar-Ulu, Hazal; Bozdemir-Ozel, Cemile; Kiper, Nural; Arikan, Hulya

    2018-05-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) restricts lifestyle and increases morbidity. The aim of the study was to investigate anaerobic and aerobic performance in children with PCD and their healthy counterparts. Thirty-one children with PCD and 29 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were studied. Pulmonary function, hand grip strength (HGS), quadriceps strength (QMS), physical activity, anaerobic capacity (muscle power sprint test), and aerobic performance (modified shuttle walk test (MSWT)) were determined. Pulmonary function, HGS, QMS, mean anaerobic power (MAP), and MSWT distance in PCD were significantly lower than those of healthy subjects (p aerobic performance is impaired in PCD from the early stages. Age determines anaerobic performance. Gender is the determinant of aerobic performance. Whether skeletal muscle characteristics and sex-related changes in body composition affect anaerobic and aerobic capacity in PCD children warrants further study. What is Known: • Exercise performance is determined by anaerobic and aerobic power. • Few studies have shown that PCD patients have lower aerobic performance which is associated with impaired lung function. What is New: • The present research indicated that both anaerobic and aerobic exercise capacity determined using field testing is impaired in PCD from the early stages. • Anaerobic capacity was found to be independently associated with age in PCD. Higher aerobic performance is independently associated with male gender.

  11. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: a report from ATS 2001, May 18–23, San Francisco

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    Noone Peadar G

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a genetic disorder of abnormal ciliary structure and function that leads to defective mucociliary clearance, resulting in oto-sino-pulmonary disease, and infertility. The disease is currently under intense investigation by a number of research groups worldwide. At the recent American Thoracic Society meeting in San Francisco in May 2001, two sessions focused on PCD; a symposium session on May 21 with several featured expert speakers was followed by a mini-symposium on Tuesday May 22, with one featured speaker and presentation of nine abstracts covering a range of research topics. Mattias Salathe (University of Miami, USA and Stephen Brody (Washington University, St Louis, USA chaired the symposium session. Presentations focused on the clinical spectrum of PCD, the genetics of PCD, a proteomics approach to detail the structure of cilia, the role of cilia in the embryology of situs laterality, and airway epithelial cell biology. The mini-symposium was chaired by Peadar Noone (University of North Carolina, USA and Malcolm King (University of Alberta, USA and included presentations on the use of PCD as a human disease model, accurate definition of the phenotype using clinical and cell biologic markers, and molecular studies. The latter reports ranged from isolation of a protein involved in ciliary structure and function to genetic studies using linkage analysis and the candidate gene approach. Clinicians and scientists alike displayed considerable interest at both sessions, and there were several lively question–answer sessions.

  12. Apparent X-linked primary ciliary dyskinesia associated with retinitis pigmentosa and a hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyński, Maciej R; Dmeńska, Hanna; Witt, Michał

    2004-01-01

    Three brothers, one 10-year-old and a pair of 14-year-old dizygotic twins--expressed the classical, early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with typical ophthalmoscopic findings, night blindness, visual field constricted to 10 degrees and flat ERG response. All three brothers were also diagnosed with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and had recurrent respiratory infections, chronic sinusitis and bronchiectasis. In all of them, resection of the middle lobe of the right lung was performed. A similar clinical picture of coexisting RP and PCD was noted in the brother of the probands' mother. All probands displayed situs solitus. Consistent with the X-linked mode of RP inheritance, there were also three obligatory female carriers of the disorder in this family: the mother of the affected boys, her mother and a daughter of her brother. In all of them, retinitis pigmentosa "sine pigmento" was found with milder but clinically significant symptoms (mild night blindness, visual field constricted to 30 degrees, and scotopic and photopic ERG responses reduced to 30-60%). No extraocular symptoms were detected in any of the heterozygous female carriers. This family presents an example of two rare phenomena: X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa (with milder expression in females) and a rare combination of RP with recurrent respiratory infections due to PCD.

  13. Lingual dyskinesia and tics: a novel presentation of copper-metabolism disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goez, Helly R; Jacob, Francois D; Yager, Jerome Y

    2011-02-01

    Copper is a trace element that is required for cellular respiration, neurotransmitter biosynthesis, pigment formation, antioxidant defense, peptide amidation, and formation of connective tissue. Abnormalities of copper metabolism have been linked with neurologic disorders that affect movement, such as Wilson disease and Menkes disease; however, the diagnosis of non-Wilson, non-Menkes-type copper-metabolism disorders has been more elusive, especially in cases with atypical characteristics. We present here the case of an adolescent with a novel presentation of copper-metabolism disorder who exhibited acute severe hemilingual dyskinesia and prominent tics, with ballismus of the upper limbs, but had normal brain and spinal MRI results and did not show any signs of dysarthria or dysphagia. His serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels were low, but his urinary copper level was elevated after penicillamine challenge. We conclude that copper-metabolism disorders should be included in the differential diagnosis for movement disorders, even in cases with highly unusual presentations, because many of them are treatable. Moreover, a connection between copper-metabolism disorders and tics is presented, to our knowledge, for the first time in humans; further investigation is needed to better establish this connection and understand its underlying pathophysiology.

  14. Prevalence of extrapyramidal syndromes in psychiatric inpatients and the relationship of clozapine treatment to tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modestin, J; Stephan, P L; Erni, T; Umari, T

    2000-05-05

    In 200 inpatients on regular neuroleptics, point prevalence of extrapyramidal syndromes, including Parkinson syndrome, akathisia and tardive dyskinesia (TD), was studied and found to be 20, 11 and 22%, respectively. A total of 46 patients have currently, and for a longer time, (average about 3years, median over 1year) been treated with clozapine, and 127 with typical neuroleptics (NLs). Comparing both groups, higher TD scores were found in the clozapine sample. Investigating the influence of a set of seven clinical variables on the TD score with the help of multiple regression analysis, the influence of the treatment modality disappeared, whereas the age proved to be the only significant variable. Studying the role of past clozapine therapy in patients currently on typical NLs and comparing 10 matched pairs of chronic patients with and without TD in whom a complete life-time cumulative dose of NLs was identified, a relationship between TD and length of current typical NL therapy and life-time typical NL dosage could be demonstrated. On the whole, long-term relatively extensive use of clozapine has not markedly reduced the prevalence of extrapyramidal syndromes in our psychiatric inpatient population. In particular, we failed to demonstrate a beneficial effect of clozapine on prevalence of TD. There are certainly patients who suffer from TD in spite of a long-term intensive clozapine treatment.

  15. Prevalence and risk factors associated with tardive dyskinesia among Indian patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achalia, Rashmin M; Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Desai, Geetha; Rao, Girish N; Prakash, Om

    2014-06-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is one of the most distressing side effects of antipsychotic treatment. As prevalence studies of TD in Asian population are scarce, a cross-sectional study was performed to assess the frequency of TD in Indian patients with schizophrenia and risk factors of TD. Cross-sectional study of 160 Indian patients fulfilling the DSM-IV TR criteria for schizophrenia and who received antipsychotics for at least one year, were examined with two validated scales for TD. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between TD and clinical risk factors. The frequency of probable TD in the total sample was 26.4%. The logistic regression yielded significant odds ratios between TD and age, intermittent treatment, and total cumulative antipsychotic dose. The difference of TD between SGA and FGA disappeared after adjusting for important co-variables in regression analysis. Indian patients with schizophrenia and long-term antipsychotic treatment have a high risk of TD, and TD is associated with older age, intermittent antipsychotic treatment, and a high total cumulative antipsychotic dose. Our study findings suggest that there is no significant difference between SGAs with regards to the risk of causing TD as compared to FGAs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Late onset of atypical paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia with remote history of Graves′ disease

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    Abdul Qayyum Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD is a rare hyperkinetic movement disorder and falls under the category of paroxysmal movement disorders. In this condition, episodes are spontaneous, involuntary, and involve dystonic posturing with choreic and ballistic movements. Attacks last for minutes to hours and rarely occur more than once per day. Attacks are not typically triggered by sudden movement, but may be brought on by alcohol, caffeine, stress, fatigue, or chocolate. We report a patient with multiple atypical features of PNKD. She had a 7-year history of this condition with onset at the age of 59, and a remote history of Graves′ disease requiring total thyroidectomy. The frequency of attacks in our case ranged from five to six times a day to a minimum of twice per week, and the duration of episode was short, lasting not more than 2 min. Typically, PNKDs occur at a much younger age and have longer attack durations with low frequency. Administering clonazepam worked to reduce her symptoms, although majority of previous research suggests that pharmacological interventions have poor outcomes.

  17. Late onset of atypical paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia with remote history of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Nadeem, Ambreen; Yousuf, Muhammad Saad; Kachhvi, Zakerabibi M

    2013-10-01

    Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD) is a rare hyperkinetic movement disorder and falls under the category of paroxysmal movement disorders. In this condition, episodes are spontaneous, involuntary, and involve dystonic posturing with choreic and ballistic movements. Attacks last for minutes to hours and rarely occur more than once per day. Attacks are not typically triggered by sudden movement, but may be brought on by alcohol, caffeine, stress, fatigue, or chocolate. We report a patient with multiple atypical features of PNKD. She had a 7-year history of this condition with onset at the age of 59, and a remote history of Graves' disease requiring total thyroidectomy. The frequency of attacks in our case ranged from five to six times a day to a minimum of twice per week, and the duration of episode was short, lasting not more than 2 min. Typically, PNKDs occur at a much younger age and have longer attack durations with low frequency. Administering clonazepam worked to reduce her symptoms, although majority of previous research suggests that pharmacological interventions have poor outcomes.

  18. Practice Parameter: treatment of Parkinson disease with motor fluctuations and dyskinesia (an evidence-based review): report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, R; Factor, S A; Lyons, K E; Ondo, W G; Gronseth, G; Bronte-Stewart, H; Hallett, M; Miyasaki, J; Stevens, J; Weiner, W J

    2006-04-11

    To make evidence-based treatment recommendations for the medical and surgical treatment of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) with levodopa-induced motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. To that end, five questions were addressed. 1. Which medications reduce off time? 2. What is the relative efficacy of medications in reducing off time? 3. Which medications reduce dyskinesia? 4. Does deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), globus pallidus interna (GPi), or ventral intermediate (VIM) nucleus of the thalamus reduce off time, dyskinesia, and antiparkinsonian medication usage and improve motor function? 5. Which factors predict improvement after DBS? A 10-member committee including movement disorder specialists and general neurologists evaluated the available evidence based on a structured literature review including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Ovid databases from 1965 through June 2004. 1. Entacapone and rasagiline should be offered to reduce off time (Level A). Pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, and tolcapone should be considered to reduce off time (Level B). Apomorphine, cabergoline, and selegiline may be considered to reduce off time (Level C). 2. The available evidence does not establish superiority of one medicine over another in reducing off time (Level B). Sustained release carbidopa/levodopa and bromocriptine may be disregarded to reduce off time (Level C). 3. Amantadine may be considered to reduce dyskinesia (Level C). 4. Deep brain stimulation of the STN may be considered to improve motor function and reduce off time, dyskinesia, and medication usage (Level C). There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the efficacy of DBS of the GPi or VIM nucleus of the thalamus in reducing off time, dyskinesia, or medication usage, or to improve motor function. 5. Preoperative response to levodopa predicts better outcome after DBS of the STN (Level B).

  19. Efficacy of piracetam in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia in schizophrenic patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libov, Igor; Miodownik, Chanoch; Bersudsky, Yuly; Dwolatzky, Tzvi; Lerner, Vladimir

    2007-07-01

    Piracetam is a potent antioxidant, a cerebral neuroprotector, a neuronal metabolic enhancer, and a brain integrative agent. More than 20 years ago, an intravenous preparation of piracetam demonstrated an improvement in the symptoms of tardive dyskinesia. The aim of our study was to reexamine the efficacy of piracetam in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia using an oral preparation. The study was conducted at the Be'er Sheva Mental Health Center from May 2003 to December 2004 and involved a 9-week, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial assessing 40 DSM-IV schizophrenic and schizo-affective patients with DSM-IV-TR tardive dyskinesia. All study subjects received their usual antipsychotic treatment. Initially, subjects were randomly assigned to receive 4 weeks of treatment with either piracetam (4800 mg/day) or placebo. Thereafter, following a washout period of 1 week, they entered the crossover phase of the study for a further 4 weeks. The change in score of the Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale from baseline to the study endpoint was the primary outcome measure. The mean decrease in score from baseline to endpoint in the clinical global impression subscale in patients treated with piracetam was 1.1 points compared to 0.1 points in the placebo group (p = .004). The mean decrease in the tardive parkinsonism subscale was 8.7 points in patients treated with piracetam and 0.6 points in those on placebo (p = .001). The mean decrease in the tardive dyskinesia subscale was 3.0 points in the piracetam group in contrast to deterioration of condition in the placebo group by -0.2 points (p = .003). Piracetam appears to be effective in reducing symptoms of tardive dyskinesia. The specific mechanism by which piracetam may attenuate symptoms of tardive dyskinesia needs to be further evaluated. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00190008.

  20. The monoamine reuptake inhibitor BTS 74 398 fails to evoke established dyskinesia but does not synergise with levodopa in MPTP-treated primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansard, Matthew J; Smith, Lance A; Jackson, Michael J; Cheetham, Sharon C; Jenner, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Long-term treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) with levodopa (L-dopa) induces dyskinesia that, once established, is provoked by each dose of L-dopa or a dopamine (DA) agonist. In contrast, monoamine reuptake inhibitors may reverse motor deficits in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated primates without provoking established involuntary movements. We now examine whether the potent monoamine reuptake blocker BTS 74 398 induces established dyskinesia in MPTP-treated common marmosets primed previously with L-dopa and whether co-administration of BTS 74 398 with L-dopa potentiates motor behaviour and dyskinesia induced by acute L-dopa treatment. Administration of BTS 74 398 (2.5, 5.0, or 10.0 mg/kg, p.o.) in MPTP-treated common marmosets increased locomotor activity and reduced motor disability in a dose-related manner but did not provoke involuntary movements. BTS 74 398 (2.5, 5.0, or 10.0 mg/kg p.o.) co-administered with a threshold dose of L-dopa (2.5 mg/kg p.o.) did not evoke a motor response or induce dyskinesia. Similarly, concomitant administration of BTS 74 398 (5.0 mg/kg p.o.) with a submaximal L-dopa dose (12.5 mg/kg p.o.) did not potentiate the motor response produced by L-dopa alone and there was no alteration in the dyskinesia provoked by L-dopa challenge. BTS 74 398 reverses motor abnormalities in MPTP-treated marmosets without evoking established dyskinesia but no additive improvement occurs when administered in combination with L-dopa. The lack of synergy with L-dopa may suggest different sites of drug action. Copyright 2003 Movement Disorder Society

  1. Evaluation of the usefulness of novel biomarkers for drug-induced acute kidney injury in beagle dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiaobing [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, A8 Hongda Middle Street, Beijing Economic-Technological Development Area, Beijing 100176 (China); Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730 (China); Ma, Ben; Lin, Zhi; Qu, Zhe; Huo, Yan; Wang, Jufeng [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, A8 Hongda Middle Street, Beijing Economic-Technological Development Area, Beijing 100176 (China); Li, Bo, E-mail: libo@nifdc.org.cn [National Center for Safety Evaluation of Drugs, National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, A8 Hongda Middle Street, Beijing Economic-Technological Development Area, Beijing 100176 (China); Graduate School of Peking Union Medical College, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730 (China)

    2014-10-01

    As kidney is a major target organ affected by drug toxicity, early detection of renal injury is critical in preclinical drug development. In past decades, a series of novel biomarkers of drug-induced nephrotoxicity were discovered and verified in rats. However, limited data regarding the performance of novel biomarkers in non-rodent species are publicly available. To increase the applicability of these biomarkers, we evaluated the performance of 4 urinary biomarkers including neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), clusterin, total protein, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), relative to histopathology and traditional clinical chemistry in beagle dogs with acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by gentamicin. The results showed that urinary NGAL and clusterin levels were significantly elevated in dogs on days 1 and 3 after administration of gentamicin, respectively. Gene expression analysis further provided mechanistic evidence to support that NGAL and clusterin are potential biomarkers for the early assessment of drug-induced renal damage. Furthermore, the high area (both AUCs = 1.000) under receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve also indicated that NGAL and clusterin were the most sensitive biomarkers for detection of gentamicin-induced renal proximal tubular toxicity. Our results also suggested that NAG may be used in routine toxicity testing due to its sensitivity and robustness for detection of tissue injury. The present data will provide insights into the preclinical use of these biomarkers for detection of drug-induced AKI in non-rodent species. - Highlights: • Urinary NGAL, clusterin and NAG levels were significantly elevated in canine AKI. • NGAL and clusterin gene expression were increased following treatment with gentamicin. • NGAL and clusterin have high specificity and sensitivity for detection of AKI.

  2. MDMA, Methylone, and MDPV: Drug-Induced Brain Hyperthermia and Its Modulation by Activity State and Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn E

    2017-01-01

    Psychomotor stimulants are frequently used by humans to intensify the subjective experience of different types of social interactions. Since psychomotor stimulants enhance metabolism and increase body temperatures, their use under conditions of physiological activation and in warm humid environments could result in pathological hyperthermia, a life-threatening symptom of acute drug intoxication. Here, we will describe the brain hyperthermic effects of MDMA, MDPV, and methylone, three structurally related recreational drugs commonly used by young adults during raves and other forms of social gatherings. After a short introduction on brain temperature and basic mechanisms underlying its physiological fluctuations, we will consider how MDMA, MDPV, and methylone affect brain and body temperatures in awake freely moving rats. Here, we will discuss the role of drug-induced heat production in the brain due to metabolic brain activation and diminished heat dissipation due to peripheral vasoconstriction as two primary contributors to the hyperthermic effects of these drugs. Then, we will consider how the hyperthermic effects of these drugs are modulated under conditions that model human drug use (social interaction and warm ambient temperature). Since social interaction results in brain and body heat production, coupled with skin vasoconstriction that impairs heat loss to the external environment, these physiological changes interact with drug-induced changes in heat production and loss, resulting in distinct changes in the hyperthermic effects of each tested drug. Finally, we present our recent data, in which we compared the efficacy of different pharmacological strategies for reversing MDMA-induced hyperthermia in both the brain and body. Specifically, we demonstrate increased efficacy of the centrally acting atypical neuroleptic compound clozapine over the peripherally acting vasodilator drug, carvedilol. These data could be important for understanding the potential

  3. Overexpression of IL-38 protein in anticancer drug-induced lung injury and acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Masaki; Okamoto, Masaki; Kawayama, Tomotaka; Matsuoka, Masanobu; Kaieda, Shinjiro; Sakazaki, Yuki; Kinoshita, Takashi; Mori, Daisuke; Inoue, Akira; Hoshino, Tomoaki

    2017-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-38, a member of the IL-1 family, shows high homology to IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra). Its function in interstitial lung disease (ILD) is still unknown. To determine the expression pattern of IL-38 mRNA, a panel of cDNAs derived from various tissues was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Immunohistochemical reactivity with anti-human IL-38 monoclonal antibody (clone H127C) was evaluated semi-quantitatively in lung tissue samples from 12 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia (IPF/UIP), 5 with acute exacerbation of IPF, and 10 with anticancer drug-induced ILD (bleomycin in 5 and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor in 5). Control lung tissues were obtained from areas of normal lung in 22 lung cancer patients who underwent extirpation surgery. IL-38 transcripts were strongly expressed in the lung, spleen, synoviocytes, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and at a lower level in pancreas and muscle. IL-38 protein was not strongly expressed in normal pulmonary alveolar tissues in all 22 control lungs. In contrast, IL-38 was overexpressed in the lungs of 4 of 5 (80%) patients with acute IPF exacerbation and 100% (10/10) of the patients with drug-induced ILD. IL-38 overexpression was limited to hyperplastic type II pneumocytes, which are considered to reflect regenerative change following diffuse alveolar damage in ILD. IL-38 may play an important role in acute and/or chronic inflammation in anticancer drug-induced lung injury and acute exacerbation of IPF. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is associated with increased thyrotropin releasing hormone in the dorsal striatum of hemi-parkinsonian rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ippolita Cantuti-Castelvetri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Dyskinesias associated with involuntary movements and painful muscle contractions are a common and severe complication of standard levodopa (L-DOPA, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine therapy for Parkinson's disease. Pathologic neuroplasticity leading to hyper-responsive dopamine receptor signaling in the sensorimotor striatum is thought to underlie this currently untreatable condition.Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR was employed to evaluate the molecular changes associated with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease. With this technique, we determined that thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH was greatly increased in the dopamine-depleted striatum of hemi-parkinsonian rats that developed abnormal movements in response to L-DOPA therapy, relative to the levels measured in the contralateral non-dopamine-depleted striatum, and in the striatum of non-dyskinetic control rats. ProTRH immunostaining suggested that TRH peptide levels were almost absent in the dopamine-depleted striatum of control rats that did not develop dyskinesias, but in the dyskinetic rats, proTRH immunostaining was dramatically up-regulated in the striatum, particularly in the sensorimotor striatum. This up-regulation of TRH peptide affected striatal medium spiny neurons of both the direct and indirect pathways, as well as neurons in striosomes.TRH is not known to be a key striatal neuromodulator, but intrastriatal injection of TRH in experimental animals can induce abnormal movements, apparently through increasing dopamine release. Our finding of a dramatic and selective up-regulation of TRH expression in the sensorimotor striatum of dyskinetic rat models suggests a TRH-mediated regulatory mechanism that may underlie the pathologic neuroplasticity driving dopamine hyper-responsivity in Parkinson's disease.

  5. Discinesias induzidas por levodopa em 176 pacientes com doença de Parkinson Levodopa-induced dyskinesias in 176 parkisonian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sheila G. Rocha

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available A ocorrência de discinesias dificulta consideravelmente o manuseio terapêutico dos pacientes parkinsonianos tratados com levodopa. Estudamos as características clínicas das discinesias em 176 pacientes com diagnóstico de doença de Parkinson e tratados com levodopa. As discinesias ocorreram, em média, após 6,2 anos de duração da doença e após 4,2 anos de tratamento com levodopa. A maioria dos pacientes (90% achava-se nos estágios II e III de Hoehn & Yahr por ocasião do início das discinesias. As discinesias mais frequentes foram as de "pico de dose" e "contínua". Movimento do tipo distônico ocorreu em 40% dos casos e predominou nas discinesias de "fim de dose" e "bifásica". Distonia matinal correspondeu a 35% dos casos de distonia. Movimentos coreiformes se manifestaram de forma generalizada em 43,2% dos casos. Movimentos distônicos predominaram nos membros inferiores. A discinesia, quando unilateral, ocorreu mais frequüentemente no hemicorpo mais comprometido pela doença de Parkinson. A discinesia orofacial, quando isolada, foi mais frequente nos pacientes mais idosos.Dyskinesias are frequently observed in parkinsonian patients during levodopa treatment. The occurrence of these movement disorders usually makes the therapeutic management of the patients very difficult. The clinical characteristics of 176 patients with dyskinesias were retrospectively studied. Dyskinesias occurred, on average, after 6,2 years of duration of Parkinson's disease and after 4.2 years on treatment with levodopa. Patients were more likely to have dyskinesias during more advanced stages (measured by Hoehn and Yahr scale. Peak of dose and square wave were the types of dyskinesia more frequently described and were associated with choreic movements in most cases. Dystonia occurred in 40% of the cases and was predominant in end of dose and diphasic dyskinesias. Thirty-five percent of dystonia cases presented as "early morning dystonia". Chorea was the

  6. Application of a drug-induced apoptosis assay to identify treatment strategies in recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Bosserman

    Full Text Available A drug-induced apoptosis assay has been developed to determine which chemotherapy drugs or regimens can produce higher cell killing in vitro. This study was done to determine if this assay could be performed in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer patients, to characterize the patterns of drug-induced apoptosis, and to evaluate the clinical utility of the assay. A secondary goal was to correlate assay use with clinical outcomes.In a prospective, non-blinded, multi institutional controlled trial, 30 evaluable patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer who were treated with chemotherapy had tumor samples submitted for the MiCK drug-induced apoptosis assay. After receiving results within 72 hours after biopsy, physicians could use the test to determine therapy (users, or elect to not use the test (non-users.The assay was able to characterize drug-induced apoptosis in tumor specimens from breast cancer patients and identified which drugs or combinations gave highest levels of apoptosis. Patterns of drug activity were also analyzed in triple negative breast cancer. Different drugs from a single class of agents often produced significantly different amounts of apoptosis. Physician frequently (73% used the assay to help select chemotherapy treatments in patients, Patients whose physicians were users had a higher response (CR+PR rate compared to non-users (38.1% vs 0%, p = 0.04 and a higher disease control (CR+PR+Stable rate (81% vs 25%, p<0.01. Time to relapse was longer in users 7.4 mo compared to non-users 2.2 mo (p<0.01.The MiCK assay can be performed in breast cancer specimens, and results are often used by physicians in breast cancer patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. These results from a good laboratory phase II study can be the basis for a future larger prospective multicenter study to more definitively establish the value of the assay.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00901264.

  7. A diagnostic dilemma: drug-induced aseptic meningitis in a 45-year-old HIV-positive man.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowley, D

    2014-03-01

    We describe a case of aseptic meningitis following the administration of moxifloxacin in a 45-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). At presentation he was receiving tuberculosis treatment on a modified regimen following severe hepatotoxicity; this included moxifloxacin, started 8 days previously. Initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was grossly abnormal. Anti-viral and -bacterial treatments were started. All microbiological tests proved negative and his moxifloxacin was withheld resulting in a complete normalisation of CSF. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis is a diagnosis of exclusion and presents a serious diagnostic dilemma. The decision to withhold medication cannot be taken lightly.

  8. Attenuation of radiation- and drug-induced conditioned taste aversions following area postrema lesions in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of lesions of the area postrema on the acquisition of radiation- and drug-induced (histamine and lithium chloride) conditioned taste aversions were investigated. The results indicated that area postrema lesions caused a significant attenuation of the aversion produced by pairing a novel sucrose solution with radiation (100 rad) or drug injection. Further, the area postrema lesions produced a similar level of attenuation of the taste aversion in all three treatment conditions. The results are discussed in terms of the implications of this finding for defining the mechanisms by which exposure to ionizing radiation can lead to the acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion

  9. Evaluation of pulmonary disease using static lung volumes in primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Massimo; Bush, Andrew; Pioggia, Giovanni; Caramella, Davide; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Di Cicco, Maria; Zangani, Marta; Chinellato, Iolanda; Maggi, Fabrizio; Tezza, Giovanna; Macchia, Pierantonio; Boner, Attilio

    2012-11-01

    In primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) lung damage is usually evaluated by high-resolution CT (HRCT). To evaluate whether HRCT abnormalities and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection were better predicted by spirometry or plethysmography. A cross-sectional study performed in consecutive patients with PCD who underwent sputum culture, spirometry, plethysmography and HRCT within 48 h. Principal component analysis and soft computing were used for data evaluation. Fifty patients (26 children) were studied. P aeruginosa infection was found in 40% of the patients and bronchiectasis in 88%. There was a correlation between infection with P aeruginosa and extent of bronchiectasis (p=0.009; r =0.367) and air-trapping (p=0.03; r =0.315). Moreover, there was an association between infection with P aeruginosa and residual volume (RV) values >150% (p=0.04) and RV/total lung capacity (TLC) ratio >140% (p=0.001), but not between infection with P aeruginosa and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1))<80%, or forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of forced vital capacity (FVC) (FEF(25-75%))<70% or FEV(1)/FVC<70% (<80% in children). Severity of the total lung impairment on chest HRCT directly correlated with RV when expressed as per cent predicted (p=0.003; r =0.423), and RV/TLC (p<0.001; r =0.513) or when expressed as z scores (p=0.002, r =0.451 and p<0.001, r =0.536 respectively). Principal component analysis on plethysmographic but not on spirometry data allowed recognition of different severities of focal air trapping, atelectasis and extent of bronchiectasis. Plethysmography better predicts HRCT abnormalities than spirometry. Whether it might be a useful test to define populations of patients with PCD who should or should not have HRCT scans requires further longitudinal studies.

  10. No evidence of cholesteatoma in untreated otitis media with effusion in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghedia, Reshma; Ahmed, Jahangir; Navaratnam, Annakan; Harcourt, Jonny

    2018-02-01

    Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) describes a group of inherited disorders that result in abnormal ciliary motion leading to mucous stasis. Clinical features include almost universally otitis media with effusion (OME), particularly in infants. PCD patients provide us with a cohort of patients with OME that is not treated with ventilatory tube (VT) insertion as these have been shown to result in frequent complications including chronic otorrhoea, early extrusion and persistent perforation without significant improvement to hearing in the long term. This cohort was used to investigate whether children with PCD and OME not treated with VT were predisposed to cholesteatoma formation in the setting of a paediatric quaternary referral centre. A retrospective chart review was performed of all the children attending a multi-disciplinary PCD clinic at a national quaternary referral centre with a diagnosis of OME. We reviewed otoscopic findings, and audiometry and tympanometry results. We assessed the children in four groups: Watchful waiting, hearing aids, VT, and VT and hearing aids. One-hundred-and-one of 107 patients included in the study had a diagnosis of otitis media with effusion. No child with OME and PCD was diagnosed with a cholesteatoma during the follow up period. The only children who had insertion of a ventilatory tube were those who had the procedure prior to the formal diagnosis of PCD. We found a significant complication rate in the children with VT insertion. Hearing improved over time. The prevalence of retraction pockets in untreated OME was 1.72% (3 out of 174 ears). In children with PCD, OME is an almost universal finding in younger children, but not in adolescents. The study supports the current preference to avoid VT insertion in children with PCD as it confers a significantly higher rate of complications. No cases of cholesteatoma were found in this cohort of PCD children with OME managed without VTs. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B

  11. Regulation of Pleiotrophin and Fyn in the striatum of rats undergoing L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Gimena; Saborido, Mariano D; Bernardi, M Alejandra; Gershanik, Oscar S; Taravini, Irene R; Ferrario, Juan E

    2018-02-14

    L-DOPA is the gold standard pharmacological therapy for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), however, its long-term use is associated with the emergence of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of LID is crucial for the development of newer and more effective therapeutic approaches. In previous publications, we have shown that Pleiotrophin (PTN), a developmentally regulated trophic factor, is up-regulated by L-DOPA in the striatum of dopamine denervated rats. We have also shown that both mRNA and protein levels of RPTPζ/β, a PTN receptor, were upregulated in the same experimental condition and expressed in striatal medium spiny neurons. The PTN-RPTPζ/β intracellular pathway has not been fully explored and it might be implicated in the striatal plastic changes triggered by L-DOPA treatment. RPTPζ/β is part of the postsynaptic density zone and modulates Fyn, a Src tyrosine kinase that regulates the NR2A and NR2B subunits of the NMDA receptor and has been singled out as a key molecule in the development of LID. In this study, we evaluated the changes in PTN and Fyn protein levels and Fyn phosphorylation status in the 6-OHDA rat model of PD rendered dyskinetic with L-DOPA. We found an increase in the number of PTN immunoreactive neurons, no changes in the amount of total Fyn but a significant increase in Fyn phosphorylation in the dorsolateral striatum of dyskinetic rats. Our results support the idea that both PTN and Fyn may be involved in the development of LID, further contributing to the understanding of its molecular mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cerebellum in levodopa-induced dyskinesias: the unusual suspect in the motor network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha eKishore

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The exact mechanisms that generate levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID during chronic levodopa therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD are not yet fully established. The most widely accepted theories incriminate the non-physiological synthesis, release and reuptake of dopamine generated by exogenously administered levodopa in the striatum, and the aberrant plasticity in the corticostriatal loops. However, normal motor performance requires the correct recruitment of motor maps. This depends on a high level of synergy within the primary motor cortex (M1 as well as between M1 and other cortical and subcortical areas, for which dopamine is necessary. The plastic mechanisms within M1 which are crucial for the maintenance of this synergy are disrupted both during OFF and dyskinetic states in PD. When tested without levodopa, dyskinetic patients show loss of treatment benefits on long-term potentiation and long-term depression-like plasticity of the intracortical circuits. When tested with the regular pulsatile levodopa doses, they show further impairment of the M1 plasticity, such as inability to depotentiate an already facilitated synapse and paradoxical facilitation in response to afferent input aimed at synaptic inhibition. Dyskinetic patients have also severe impairment of the associative, sensorimotor plasticity of M1 attributed to deficient cerebellar modulation of sensory afferents to M1. Here we review the anatomical and functional studies, including the recently described bidirectional connections between the cerebellum and the basal ganglia that support a key role of the cerebellum in the generation of LID. This model stipulates that aberrant neuronal synchrony in PD with LID may propagate from the sub thalamic nucleus to the cerebellum and lock the cerebellar cortex in a hyperactive state. This could affect critical cerebellar functions such as the dynamic and discrete modulation of M1 plasticity and the matching of motor commands with sensory

  13. Early detection of drug-induced pneumonitis by gallium-67 lung scan in six patients with normal chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, H; Sawa, H; Takashima, S [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    1981-06-01

    Increased pulmonary accumulation of Gallium-67-citrate was observed in 6 patients (4 with malignant lymphoma, 1 with uterine cancer and 1 with acute myelocytic leukemia) preceding the appearance of any abnormal findings in both chest X-ray and blood gas data. All of them had received multiple courses of chemotherapy. In these patients, the anticancer drugs were administered for 13 to 22 weeks (mean 15 weeks). One patient with malignant lymphoma showed abnormal /sup 67/Ga lung uptake greater than hepatic activity, 3 patients (malignant lymphoma, 2 and uterine cancer, 1) visualized abnormal /sup 67/Ga lung uptake equal to hepatic activity and 2 cases (malignant lymphoma, 1 and acute myelocytic leukemia, 1) demonstrated abnormal accumulation of /sup 67/Ga in the lung greater than background activity. In 4 patients (3 with malignant lymphoma and 1 with uterine cancer) out of 6, transbronchial lung biopsy obtained after the /sup 67/Ga scans showed non-specific interstitial pneumonitis with infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages compatible with drug-induced pneumonitis. In the other 2 patients, cytology and cultures were negative and follow up /sup 67/Ga lung scans revealed a reduction in intensity of uptake after treatment with corticosteroid. Therefore, we considered that the /sup 67/Ga lung scan was useful for early detection of drug-induced pneumonitis.

  14. Ischemic or toxic injury: A challenging diagnosis and treatment of drug-induced stenosis of the sigmoid colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zong-Ming; Lin, Xiang-Chun; Ma, Li; Jin, An-Qin; Lin, Fang-Cai; Liu, Zhuo; Liu, Li-Min; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Na; Huo, Li-Juan; Jiang, Xue-Liang; Kang, Feng; Qin, Hong-Jun; Li, Qiu-Yang; Yu, Hong-Wei; Deng, Hai; Zhu, Ming-Wen; Liu, Zi-Xu; Wan, Bai-Jiang; Yang, Hai-Yan; Liao, Jia-Hong; Luo, Xu; Li, You-Wei; Wei, Wen-Ping; Song, Meng-Meng; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Xue-Ying; Lu, Zhao-Hui

    2017-06-07

    A 48-year-old woman was admitted with 15-mo history of abdominal pain, diarrhea and hematochezia, and 5-mo history of defecation difficulty. She had been successively admitted to nine hospitals, with an initial diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease with stenotic sigmoid colon. Findings from computed tomography virtual colonoscopy, radiography with meglumine diatrizoate, endoscopic balloon dilatation, metallic stent implantation and later overall colonoscopy, coupled with the newfound knowledge of compound Qingdai pill-taking, led to a subsequent diagnosis of ischemic or toxic bowel disease with sigmoid colon stenosis. The patient was successfully treated by laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy, and postoperative pathological examination revealed ischemic or toxic injury of the sigmoid colon, providing a final diagnosis of drug-induced sigmoid colon stenosis. This case highlights that adequate awareness of drug-induced colon stenosis has a decisive role in avoiding misdiagnosis and mistreatment. The diagnostic and therapeutic experiences learnt from this case suggest that endoscopic balloon expansion and colonic metallic stent implantation as bridge treatments were demonstrated as crucial for the differential diagnosis of benign colonic stenosis. Skillful surgical technique and appropriate perioperative management helped to ensure the safety of our patient in subsequent surgery after long-term use of glucocorticoids.

  15. Global Optimization of Ventricular Myocyte Model to Multi-Variable Objective Improves Predictions of Drug-Induced Torsades de Pointes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine Krogh-Madsen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In silico cardiac myocyte models present powerful tools for drug safety testing and for predicting phenotypical consequences of ion channel mutations, but their accuracy is sometimes limited. For example, several models describing human ventricular electrophysiology perform poorly when simulating effects of long QT mutations. Model optimization represents one way of obtaining models with stronger predictive power. Using a recent human ventricular myocyte model, we demonstrate that model optimization to clinical long QT data, in conjunction with physiologically-based bounds on intracellular calcium and sodium concentrations, better constrains model parameters. To determine if the model optimized to congenital long QT data better predicts risk of drug-induced long QT arrhythmogenesis, in particular Torsades de Pointes risk, we tested the optimized model against a database of known arrhythmogenic and non-arrhythmogenic ion channel blockers. When doing so, the optimized model provided an improved risk assessment. In particular, we demonstrate an elimination of false-positive outcomes generated by the baseline model, in which simulations of non-torsadogenic drugs, in particular verapamil, predict action potential prolongation. Our results underscore the importance of currents beyond those directly impacted by a drug block in determining torsadogenic risk. Our study also highlights the need for rich data in cardiac myocyte model optimization and substantiates such optimization as a method to generate models with higher accuracy of predictions of drug-induced cardiotoxicity.

  16. Drug-Induced QTc Interval Prolongation: A Multicenter Study to Detect Drugs and Clinical Factors Involved in Every Day Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Guillermo A; Alvarez, Paulino A; Ponte, Marcelo L; Belloso, Waldo H; Bagnes, Claudia; Sparanochia, Cecilia; Gonzalez, Claudio D; Villa Etchegoyen, M Cecilia; Diez, Roberto A; Di Girolamo, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The actual prevalence of drug induced QTc prolongation in clinical practice is unknown. Our objective was to determine the occurrence and characteristics of drug-induced QT prolongation in several common clinical practices. Additionally, a subgroup of patients treated with dextropropoxyphene of particular interest for the regulatory authority was analysed. Medical history and comorbidities predisposing to QT interval prolongation were registered for 1270 patient requiring medical assistance that involved drug administration. Three ionograms and ECGs were performed: baseline, intra- and after treatment; QT interval was corrected with Bazzet formula. Among patients, 9.9% presented QTc >450/470 ms, 3% QTc > 500 ms, 12.7% ΔQTc >30 ms and 5.2% ΔQTc >60 ms. QTc prolongation associated with congestive heart failure, ischemic cardiopathy, diabetes, renal failure, arrhythmias, hypothyroidism, and bradycardia. At univariate analysis, clarithromycin, haloperidol, tramadol, amiodarone, glyceryl trinitrate, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, amoxicillin + sulbactam, ampicillin + sulbactam, fentanyl, piperacillin + tazobactam, and diazepam prolonged QTc. Prolongation remained significantly associated with furosemide, clarithromycin, glyceryl trinitrate and betalactamase inhibitors after multivariate analysis. QT interval prolongation in everyday practice is frequent, in association to clinical factors and drugs that can be easily identified for monitoring and prevention strategies.

  17. Drug-induced liver injury due to antimicrobials, central nervous system agents, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarbhavi, Harshad; Andrade, Raúl J

    2014-05-01

    Antimicrobial agents including antituberculosis (anti-TB) agents are the most common cause of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and drug-induced liver failure across the world. Better molecular and genetic biomarkers are acutely needed to help identify those at risk of liver injury particularly for those needing antituberculosis therapy. Some antibiotics such as amoxicillin-clavulanate and isoniazid consistently top the lists of agents in retrospective and prospective DILI databases. Central nervous system agents, particularly antiepileptics, account for the second most common class of agents implicated in DILI registries. Hepatotoxicity from older antiepileptics such as carbamazepine, phenytoin, and phenobarbital are often associated with hypersensitivity features, whereas newer antiepileptic drugs have a more favorable safety profile. Antidepressants and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs carry very low risk of significant liver injury, but their prolific use make them important causes of DILI. Early diagnosis and withdrawal of the offending agent remain the mainstays of minimizing hepatotoxicity. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Recapitulation of Clinical Individual Susceptibility to Drug-Induced QT Prolongation in Healthy Subjects Using iPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Shinozawa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To predict drug-induced serious adverse events (SAE in clinical trials, a model using a panel of cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs of individuals with different susceptibilities could facilitate major advancements in translational research in terms of safety and pharmaco-economics. However, it is unclear whether hiPSC-derived cells can recapitulate interindividual differences in drug-induced SAE susceptibility in populations not having genetic disorders such as healthy subjects. Here, we evaluated individual differences in SAE susceptibility based on an in vitro model using hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs as a pilot study. hiPSCs were generated from blood samples of ten healthy volunteers with different susceptibilities to moxifloxacin (Mox-induced QT prolongation. Different Mox-induced field potential duration (FPD prolongation values were observed in the hiPSC-CMs from each individual. Interestingly, the QT interval was significantly positively correlated with FPD at clinically relevant concentrations (r > 0.66 in multiple analyses including concentration-QT analysis. Genomic analysis showed no interindividual significant differences in known target-binding sites for Mox and other drugs such as the hERG channel subunit, and baseline QT ranges were normal. The results suggest that hiPSC-CMs from healthy subjects recapitulate susceptibility to Mox-induced QT prolongation and provide proof of concept for in vitro preclinical trials.

  19. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  20. Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesia Is Related to Indirect Pathway Medium Spiny Neuron Excitotoxicity: A Hypothesis Based on an Unexpected Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana A. Ivanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A serendipitous pharmacogenetic finding links the vulnerability to developing levodopa-induced dyskinesia to the age of onset of Huntington’s disease. Huntington’s disease is caused by a polyglutamate expansion of the protein huntingtin. Aberrant huntingtin is less capable of binding to a member of membrane-associated guanylate kinase family (MAGUKs: postsynaptic density- (PSD- 95. This leaves more PSD-95 available to stabilize NR2B subunit carrying NMDA receptors in the synaptic membrane. This results in increased excitotoxicity for which particularly striatal medium spiny neurons from the indirect extrapyramidal pathway are sensitive. In Parkinson’s disease the sensitivity for excitotoxicity is related to increased oxidative stress due to genetically determined abnormal metabolism of dopamine or related products. This probably also increases the sensitivity of medium spiny neurons for exogenous levodopa. Particularly the combination of increased oxidative stress due to aberrant dopamine metabolism, increased vulnerability to NMDA induced excitotoxicity, and the particular sensitivity of indirect pathway medium spiny neurons for this excitotoxicity may explain the observed increased prevalence of levodopa-induced dyskinesia.

  1. Focal status epilepticus and progressive dyskinesia: A novel phenotype for glycine receptor antibody-mediated neurological disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, D W S; Thomas, T; Lim, M; Ling, S; Woodhall, M; Vincent, A

    2017-03-01

    Antibody-associated disorders of the central nervous system are increasingly recognised in adults and children. Some are known to be paraneoplastic, whereas in others an infective trigger is postulated. They include disorders associated with antibodies to N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), voltage-gated potassium channel-complexes (VGKC-complex), GABA B receptor or glycine receptor (GlyR). With antibodies to NMDAR or VGKC-complexes, distinct clinical patterns are well characterised, but as more antibodies are discovered, the spectra of associated disorders are evolving. GlyR antibodies have been detected in patients with progressive encephalopathy with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), or stiff man syndrome, both rare but disabling conditions. We report a case of a young child with focal seizures and progressive dyskinesia in whom GlyR antibodies were detected. Anticonvulsants and immunotherapy were effective in treating both the seizures and movement disorder with good neurological outcome and with a decline in the patient's serum GlyR-Ab titres. Glycine receptor antibodies are associated with focal status epilepticus and seizures, encephalopathy and progressive dyskinesia and should be evaluated in autoimmune encephalitis. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Handwriting Movement Analyses for Monitoring Drug-Induced Motor Side Effects in Schizophrenia Patients Treated with Risperidone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiuri, Michael P.; Teulings, Hans-Leo; Dean, Charles E.; Niculescu, Alexander B.; Lohr, James

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that nearly 60% of schizophrenia (SZ) patients treated with conventional antipsychotic drugs develop extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) such as parkinsonism and tardive dyskinesia. Although the prevalence of EPS has decreased due to the newer antipsychotics, EPS continue to limit the effectiveness of these medicines. Ongoing monitoring of EPS is likely to improve treatment outcome or compliance and reduce the frequency of re-hospitalization. A quantitative analysis of handwriting kinematics was used to evaluate effects of antipsychotic medication type and dose in schizophrenia patients. Twenty-seven schizophrenia patients treated with risperidone, six schizophrenia patients who received no antipsychotic medication and 46 healthy comparison participants were enrolled. Participants performed a 20-minute handwriting task consisting of loops of various sizes and a sentence. Data were captured and analyzed using MovAlyzeR software. Results indicated that risperidone-treated participants exhibited significantly more dysfluent handwriting movements than either healthy or untreated SZ participants. Risperidone-treated participants exhibited lower movement velocities during production of simple loops compared to unmedicated patients. Handwriting dysfluency during sentence writing increased with dose. A 3-factor model consisting of kinematic variables derived from sentence writing accounted for 83% (r = .91) of the variability in medication dose. In contrast, we found no association between observer-based EPS severity ratings and medication dose. These findings support the importance of handwriting-based measures to monitor EPS in medicated schizophrenia patients. PMID:19692133

  3. Mutations in ZMYND10, a gene essential for proper axonemal assembly of inner and outer dynein arms in humans and flies, cause primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Daniel J; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Shoemark, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a ciliopathy characterized by airway disease, infertility, and laterality defects, often caused by dual loss of the inner dynein arms (IDAs) and outer dynein arms (ODAs), which power cilia and flagella beating. Using whole-exome and candidate-gene Sanger resequ...

  4. The blood-brain barrier is intact after levodopa-induced dyskinesias in parkinsonian primates--evidence from in vivo neuroimaging studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Jenkins, Bruce G; Choi, Ji-Kyung

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested, based on rodent studies, that levodopa (L-dopa) induced dyskinesia is associated with a disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB). We have investigated BBB integrity with in vivo neuroimaging techniques in six 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) lesioned primates...

  5. Polymorphisms of DRD2, DRD3, DRD4 and HTR2C genes in levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, S.A.; Alifirova, V.M.; Fedorenko, O.Y.; Freidin, M.B.; Bokhan, N.A.; Zhukova, I.; Al Hadithy, A.F.Y.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.; Wilffert, B.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID) are involuntary muscle movements that occur as a consequence of chronic levodopa (L-DOPA) treatment. LID are a substantial barrier to effective symptomatic management of Parkinson's disease (PD), up to 45% of L-DOPA users develop LID within 5 years [1]. Clinical

  6. Imaging mass spectrometry reveals elevated nigral levels of dynorphin neuropeptides in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ljungdahl

    Full Text Available L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is a troublesome complication of L-DOPA pharmacotherapy of Parkinson's disease and has been associated with disturbed brain opioid transmission. However, so far the results of clinical and preclinical studies on the effects of opioids agonists and antagonists have been contradictory at best. Prodynorphin mRNA levels correlate well with the severity of dyskinesia in animal models of Parkinson's disease; however the identities of the actual neuroactive opioid effectors in their target basal ganglia output structures have not yet been determined. For the first time MALDI-TOF imaging mass spectrometry (IMS was used for unbiased assessment and topographical elucidation of prodynorphin-derived peptides in the substantia nigra of a unilateral rat model of Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA induced dyskinesia. Nigral levels of dynorphin B and alpha-neoendorphin strongly correlated with the severity of dyskinesia. Even if dynorphin peptide levels were elevated in both the medial and lateral part of the substantia nigra, MALDI IMS analysis revealed that the most prominent changes were localized to the lateral part of the substantia nigra. MALDI IMS is advantageous compared with traditional molecular methods, such as radioimmunoassay, in that neither the molecular identity analyzed, nor the specific localization needs to be predetermined. Indeed, MALDI IMS revealed that the bioconverted metabolite leu-enkephalin-arg also correlated positively with severity of dyskinesia. Multiplexing DynB and leu-enkephalin-arg ion images revealed small (0.25 by 0.5 mm nigral subregions with complementing ion intensities, indicating localized peptide release followed by bioconversion. The nigral dynorphins associated with L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia were not those with high affinity to kappa opioid receptors, but consisted of shorter peptides, mainly dynorphin B and alpha-neoendorphin that are known to bind and activate mu and delta opioid receptors

  7. Lung structure and function similarities between primary ciliary dyskinesia and mild cystic fibrosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Marco; Montella, Silvia; Mollica, Carmine; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Iacotucci, Paola; De Gregorio, Fabiola; Tosco, Antonella; Cervasio, Mariarosaria; Raia, Valeria; Santamaria, Francesca

    2017-04-12

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and cystic fibrosis (CF) are increasingly compared. There are no chest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) comparative studies of PCD and CF. We assessed clinical, functional, microbiological and MRI findings in PCD and mild CF patients in order to evaluate different expression of lung disease. Twenty PCD (15.1 years) and 20 CF subjects with mild respiratory impairment (16 years, 70% with pancreatic insufficiency) underwent MRI, spirometry, and sputum cultures when clinically stable. MRI was scored using the modified Helbich system. PCD was diagnosed later than CF (9.9 versus 0.6 years, p = 0.03), despite earlier symptoms (0.1 versus 0.6 years, p = 0.02). In the year preceding the study, patients from both groups underwent two systemic antibiotic courses (p = 0.48). MRI total scores were 11.6 ± 0.7 and 9.1 ± 1 in PCD and CF, respectively. FEV 1 and FVC Z-scores were -1.75 (range, -4.6-0.7) and -0.6 (-3.9-1.8) in PCD, and -0.9 (range, -5.4-2.3) and -0.3 (-3.4-2.5) in CF, respectively. No difference was found between lung function or structure, despite a higher MRI subscore of collapse/consolidation in PCD versus CF (1.6 ± 0.1 and 0.6 ± 0.2, p < 0.001). These findings were confirmed after data-control for diagnostic delay. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were more frequent in CF than in PCD (p = 0.05 and p = 0.003, respectively). MRI is a valuable radiation-free tool for comparative PCD and CF lung disease assessment. Patients with PCD may exhibit similar MRI and lung function changes as CF subjects with mild pulmonary disease. Delay in PCD diagnosis is unlikely the only determinant of similarities.

  8. Mechanisms of the hepatoprotective effects of tamoxifen against drug-induced and chemical-induced acute liver injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Yukitaka; Miyashita, Taishi; Higuchi, Satonori [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Tsuneyama, Koichi [Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Science for Research, University of Toyama, Sugitani, Toyama 930‐0194 (Japan); Endo, Shinya [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Tsukui, Tohru [Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Yamane, Hidaka 350‐1241 (Japan); Toyoda, Yasuyuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Yokoi, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tyokoi@p.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan)

    2012-10-01

    Although estrogen receptor (ER)α agonists, such as estradiol and ethinylestradiol (EE2), cause cholestasis in mice, they also reduce the degree of liver injury caused by hepatotoxicants as well as ischemia–reperfusion. The functional mechanisms of ERα have yet to be elucidated in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. The present study investigated the effects of an ERα agonist, selective ER modulators (SERMs) and an ER antagonist on drug-induced and chemical-induced liver injuries caused by acetaminophen, bromobenzene, diclofenac, and thioacetamide (TA). We observed hepatoprotective effects of EE2, tamoxifen (TAM) and raloxifene pretreatment in female mice that were exposed to a variety of hepatotoxic compounds. In contrast, the ER antagonist did not show any hepatoprotective effects. DNA microarray analyses suggested that monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated 2 (Mmd2) protein, which has an unknown function, is commonly increased by TAM and RAL pretreatment, but not by pretreatment with the ER antagonist. In ERα-knockout mice, the hepatoprotective effects of TAM and the increased expression of Mmd2 mRNA were not observed in TA-induced liver injury. To investigate the function of Mmd2, the expression level of Mmd2 mRNA was significantly knocked down to approximately 30% in mice by injection of siRNA for Mmd2 (siMmd2). Mmd2 knockdown resulted in a reduction of the protective effects of TAM on TA-induced liver injury in mice. This is the first report of the involvement of ERα in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. Upregulation of Mmd2 protein in the liver was suggested as the mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of EE2 and SERMs. -- Highlights: ► Liver injury induced by drugs or chemicals was investigated in mice. ► Liver injury was suppressed by pretreatment with tamoxifen in female mice. ► Mmd2, whose function was unknown, could be a candidate gene for liver protection. ► Tamoxifen up-regulated Mmd2 mRNA expression

  9. Mechanisms of the hepatoprotective effects of tamoxifen against drug-induced and chemical-induced acute liver injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Yukitaka; Miyashita, Taishi; Higuchi, Satonori; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Endo, Shinya; Tsukui, Tohru; Toyoda, Yasuyuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Although estrogen receptor (ER)α agonists, such as estradiol and ethinylestradiol (EE2), cause cholestasis in mice, they also reduce the degree of liver injury caused by hepatotoxicants as well as ischemia–reperfusion. The functional mechanisms of ERα have yet to be elucidated in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. The present study investigated the effects of an ERα agonist, selective ER modulators (SERMs) and an ER antagonist on drug-induced and chemical-induced liver injuries caused by acetaminophen, bromobenzene, diclofenac, and thioacetamide (TA). We observed hepatoprotective effects of EE2, tamoxifen (TAM) and raloxifene pretreatment in female mice that were exposed to a variety of hepatotoxic compounds. In contrast, the ER antagonist did not show any hepatoprotective effects. DNA microarray analyses suggested that monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated 2 (Mmd2) protein, which has an unknown function, is commonly increased by TAM and RAL pretreatment, but not by pretreatment with the ER antagonist. In ERα-knockout mice, the hepatoprotective effects of TAM and the increased expression of Mmd2 mRNA were not observed in TA-induced liver injury. To investigate the function of Mmd2, the expression level of Mmd2 mRNA was significantly knocked down to approximately 30% in mice by injection of siRNA for Mmd2 (siMmd2). Mmd2 knockdown resulted in a reduction of the protective effects of TAM on TA-induced liver injury in mice. This is the first report of the involvement of ERα in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. Upregulation of Mmd2 protein in the liver was suggested as the mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of EE2 and SERMs. -- Highlights: ► Liver injury induced by drugs or chemicals was investigated in mice. ► Liver injury was suppressed by pretreatment with tamoxifen in female mice. ► Mmd2, whose function was unknown, could be a candidate gene for liver protection. ► Tamoxifen up-regulated Mmd2 mRNA expression

  10. Excessive sensitivity to uncertain visual input in L-dopa induced dyskinesias in Parkinson’s disease: further implications for cerebellar involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eStevenson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available When faced with visual uncertainty during motor performance, humans rely more on predictive forward models and proprioception and attribute lesser importance to the ambiguous visual feedback. Though disrupted predictive control is typical of patients with cerebellar disease, sensorimotor deficits associated with the involuntary and often unconscious nature of L-dopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson’s disease (PD suggests dyskinetic subjects may also demonstrate impaired predictive motor control. Methods: We investigated the motor performance of 9 dyskinetic and 10 non-dyskinetic PD subjects on and off L-dopa, and of 10 age-matched control subjects, during a large-amplitude, overlearned, visually-guided tracking task. Ambiguous visual feedback was introduced by adding ‘jitter’ to a moving target that followed a Lissajous pattern. Root mean square (RMS tracking error was calculated, and ANOVA, robust multivariate linear regression and linear dynamical system analyses were used to determine the contribution of speed and ambiguity to tracking performance. Results: Increasing target ambiguity and speed contributed significantly more to the RMS error of dyskinetic subjects off medication. L-dopa improved the RMS tracking performance of both PD groups. At higher speeds, controls and PDs without dyskinesia were able to effectively de-weight ambiguous visual information. Conclusions: PDs’ visually-guided motor performance degrades with visual jitter and speed of movement to a greater degree compared to age-matched controls. However, there are fundamental differences in PDs with and without dyskinesia: subjects without dyskinesia are generally slow, and less responsive to dynamic changes in motor task requirements but, PDs with dyskinesia there was a trade-off between overall performance and inappropriate reliance on ambiguous visual feedback. This is likely associated with functional changes in posterior parietal-ponto-cerebellar pathways.

  11. Clinical features and 123I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in drug-induced parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J.; Escobar-Delgado, Teresa; Sanz-Viedma, Salome; Garcia-Solis, David; Mir, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    To determine clinical predictors and accuracy of 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in the differentiation of drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Several clinical features and 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT images in 32 patients with DIP, 25 patients with PD unmasked by antidopaminergic drugs (PDu) and 22 patients with PD without a previous history of antidopaminergic treatment (PDc) were retrospectively evaluated. DIP and PD shared all clinical features except symmetry of parkinsonian signs which was more frequently observed in patients with DIP (46.9%) than in patients with PDu (16.0%, p 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT images were normal in 29 patients with DIP (90.6%) and abnormal in all patients with PD, and this imaging technique showed high levels of accuracy. DIP and PD are difficult to differentiate based on clinical signs. The precision of clinical diagnosis could be reliably enhanced by 123 I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging. (orig.)

  12. Odour identification test and its relation to cardiac 123I‐metaiodobenzylguanidine in patients with drug induced parkinsonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Phil Hyu; Yeo, Seung Hyeon; Yong, Seok Woo; Kim, Yun Joong

    2007-01-01

    We investigated olfactory function and its relation to cardiac 123I‐metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake in 15 patients with drug induced parkinsonism (DIP). The mean Cross Cultural Smell Identification (CCSI) score was significantly greater in patients with DIP than in those with Parkinson's disease (PD: 6.9 (1.6) vs 4.4 (2.2); p<0.001); however, the mean CCSI score in patients with DIP was not significantly different from controls. One patient with DIP, whose CCSI score was significantly reduced, also exhibited decreased cardiac MIBG uptake. DIP patients with CCSI scores within the normal range had normal cardiac MIBG uptake. Our study suggests that an olfactory function test may be a useful tool for detecting DIP unrelated to PD and for identifying patients with DIP who have subclinical PD. PMID:17557797

  13. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy in the identification of obstruction sites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Alonço da Cunha; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos; Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena de

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome has multifactorial causes. Although indications for surgery are evaluated by well-known diagnostic tests in the awake state, these do not always correlate with satisfactory surgical results. To undertake a systematic review on endoscopy during sleep, as one element of the diagnosis routine, aiming to identify upper airway obstruction sites in adult patients with OSAS. By means of electronic databases, a systematic review was performed of studies using drug-induced sleep endoscopy to identify obstruction sites in patients with OSAS. Ten articles were selected that demonstrated the importance of identifying multilevel obstruction, especially in relation to retrolingual and laryngeal collapse in OSAS. DISE is an additional method to reveal obstruction sites that have not been detected in awake patients. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Consensus statement: Management of drug-induced liver injury in HIV-positive patients treated for TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Jong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced liver injury (DILI in HIV/tuberculosis (TB co-infected patients is a common problem in the South African setting, and re-introduction of anti-TB drugs can be challenging for the healthcare worker. Although international guidelines on the re-introduction of TB treatment are available, the definition of DILI is not uniform, management of antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV co-infection is not mentioned, and the guidance on management is not uniform and lacks a practical approach. In this consensus statement, we summarise important aspects of DILI and provide practical guidance for healthcare workers for different patient groups and healthcare settings on the re-introduction of anti-TB drugs and ART in HIV/TB co-infected individuals presenting with DILI.

  15. Multiple cavities with halo sign in a case of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis during therapy for drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoo Ikari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis and asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome was admitted for drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS caused by salazosulfapyridine. Human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6 variant B was strongly positive on peripheral blood. Multiple cavities with ground grass opacities rapidly emerged predominantly in the upper and middle lobes. She was diagnosed with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA, and was treated successfully with antifungal agents. Therapeutic systemic corticosteroids, emphysematous change in the lungs, and the worsening of the patient's general condition due to DIHS were considered major contributing factor leading to IPA. HHV-6 reactivation could have an effect on clinical course of IPA. Cavities with halo sign would provide an early clue to IPA in non-neutropenic and immunosuppressive patients.

  16. Integration of genome-scale metabolic networks into whole-body PBPK models shows phenotype-specific cases of drug-induced metabolic perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Henrik; Thiel, Christoph; Baier, Vanessa; Blank, Lars M; Kuepfer, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Drug-induced perturbations of the endogenous metabolic network are a potential root cause of cellular toxicity. A mechanistic understanding of such unwanted side effects during drug therapy is therefore vital for patient safety. The comprehensive assessment of such drug-induced injuries requires the simultaneous consideration of both drug exposure at the whole-body and resulting biochemical responses at the cellular level. We here present a computational multi-scale workflow that combines whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models and organ-specific genome-scale metabolic network (GSMN) models through shared reactions of the xenobiotic metabolism. The applicability of the proposed workflow is illustrated for isoniazid, a first-line antibacterial agent against Mycobacterium tuberculosis , which is known to cause idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injuries (DILI). We combined GSMN models of a human liver with N-acetyl transferase 2 (NAT2)-phenotype-specific PBPK models of isoniazid. The combined PBPK-GSMN models quantitatively describe isoniazid pharmacokinetics, as well as intracellular responses, and changes in the exometabolome in a human liver following isoniazid administration. Notably, intracellular and extracellular responses identified with the PBPK-GSMN models are in line with experimental and clinical findings. Moreover, the drug-induced metabolic perturbations are distributed and attenuated in the metabolic network in a phenotype-dependent manner. Our simulation results show that a simultaneous consideration of both drug pharmacokinetics at the whole-body and metabolism at the cellular level is mandatory to explain drug-induced injuries at the patient level. The proposed workflow extends our mechanistic understanding of the biochemistry underlying adverse events and may be used to prevent drug-induced injuries in the future.

  17. Drug-induced MR urography: the effects of furosemide and intravenous saline injection on MR urography of obstructed and non-obstructed urinary tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Ha; Lee, Myung Jun; Lee, Chang Joon [National Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    To determine the usefulness of MR urography technique for the evaluation of urinary systems in patients with obstructed urinary tract and normal volunteers with non-obstructed urinary tract after intravenous normal saline and diuretic injection. Three normal volunteers and 12 patients with urinary tract obstruction [ureteral calculi (n=8), extraurinary mass (n=1), ureteral tumor invasion (n=3)] underwent MR urography using a 1.0T scanner and a 2D non-breath-hold heavily T2-weighted fast spin-cho sequence. These acquisition were post-processed with a maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm. Two acquisitions were performed, the first prior to saline solution infusion following standard MR urography procedures, and the second, within 2-3 minutes of the infusion of 250 ml saline solution followed by 20 mg of Lasix administered intravenously. For this latter, drug-induced MR urography procedures were followed. In healthy volunteer (n=3) and those experiencing partial obstruction (n=4) by a urinary stone, drug-induced MR urography provided better images of the urinary tract than did standard MR urography. In those in whom a urinary stone or tumor had caused complete obstruction (n=8), standard MR urography provided good images, as did drug-induced MR urography. In patients with a partially or non-obstructed urinary tract, drug-induced MR urography provided better anatomic and functional details of the kidney and urinary tract than did standard MR urography. In those experiencing complete obstruction of the urinary tract, however, standard or drug-induced MR urography permitted very adequate evaluation of the tract, and drug-induced MR urography was unnecessary.

  18. Drug-induced acute myocardial infarction: identifying 'prime suspects' from electronic healthcare records-based surveillance system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preciosa M Coloma

    Full Text Available Drug-related adverse events remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality and impose huge burden on healthcare costs. Routinely collected electronic healthcare data give a good snapshot of how drugs are being used in 'real-world' settings.To describe a strategy that identifies potentially drug-induced acute myocardial infarction (AMI from a large international healthcare data network.Post-marketing safety surveillance was conducted in seven population-based healthcare databases in three countries (Denmark, Italy, and the Netherlands using anonymised demographic, clinical, and prescription/dispensing data representing 21,171,291 individuals with 154,474,063 person-years of follow-up in the period 1996-2010. Primary care physicians' medical records and administrative claims containing reimbursements for filled prescriptions, laboratory tests, and hospitalisations were evaluated using a three-tier triage system of detection, filtering, and substantiation that generated a list of drugs potentially associated with AMI. Outcome of interest was statistically significant increased risk of AMI during drug exposure that has not been previously described in current literature and is biologically plausible.Overall, 163 drugs were identified to be associated with increased risk of AMI during preliminary screening. Of these, 124 drugs were eliminated after adjustment for possible bias and confounding. With subsequent application of criteria for novelty and biological plausibility, association with AMI remained for nine drugs ('prime suspects': azithromycin; erythromycin; roxithromycin; metoclopramide; cisapride; domperidone; betamethasone; fluconazole; and megestrol acetate.Although global health status, co-morbidities, and time-invariant factors were adjusted for, residual confounding cannot be ruled out.A strategy to identify potentially drug-induced AMI from electronic healthcare data has been proposed that takes into account not only statistical

  19. Genome wide analysis of drug-induced torsades de pointes: lack of common variants with large effect sizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah R Behr

    Full Text Available Marked prolongation of the QT interval on the electrocardiogram associated with the polymorphic ventricular tachycardia Torsades de Pointes is a serious adverse event during treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs and other culprit medications, and is a common cause for drug relabeling and withdrawal. Although clinical risk factors have been identified, the syndrome remains unpredictable in an individual patient. Here we used genome-wide association analysis to search for common predisposing genetic variants. Cases of drug-induced Torsades de Pointes (diTdP, treatment tolerant controls, and general population controls were ascertained across multiple sites using common definitions, and genotyped on the Illumina 610k or 1M-Duo BeadChips. Principal Components Analysis was used to select 216 Northwestern European diTdP cases and 771 ancestry-matched controls, including treatment-tolerant and general population subjects. With these sample sizes, there is 80% power to detect a variant at genome-wide significance with minor allele frequency of 10% and conferring an odds ratio of ≥2.7. Tests of association were carried out for each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP by logistic regression adjusting for gender and population structure. No SNP reached genome wide-significance; the variant with the lowest P value was rs2276314, a non-synonymous coding variant in C18orf21 (p  =  3×10(-7, odds ratio = 2, 95% confidence intervals: 1.5-2.6. The haplotype formed by rs2276314 and a second SNP, rs767531, was significantly more frequent in controls than cases (p  =  3×10(-9. Expanding the number of controls and a gene-based analysis did not yield significant associations. This study argues that common genomic variants do not contribute importantly to risk for drug-induced Torsades de Pointes across multiple drugs.

  20. Drug-induced lung injury associated with sorafenib: analysis of all-patient post-marketing surveillance in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi-Yamamoto, Yuka; Gemma, Akihiko; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Sakai, Fumikazu; Johkoh, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Kudoh, Shoji

    2013-08-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor currently approved in Japan for unresectable and/or metastatic renal cell carcinoma and unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Although drug-induced lung injury has recently been the focus of interest in Japanese patients treated with molecular targeting agents, the clinical features of patients receiving sorafenib remain to be completely investigated. All-patient post-marketing surveillance data was obtained within the frame of Special Drug Use Investigation; between April 2008 and March 2011, we summarized the clinical information of 62 cases with drug-induced lung injury among approximately 13,600 sorafenib-treated patients in Japan. In addition, we summarized the results of evaluation by a safety board of Japanese experts in 34 patients in whom pulmonary images were available. For the calculation of reporting frequency, interim results of Special Drug Use Investigation were used. In the sets of completed reports (2,407 in renal cell carcinoma and 647 in hepatocellular carcinoma), the reporting frequency was 0.33 % (8 patients; fatal, 4/8) and 0.62 % (4 patients; fatal, 2/4), respectively. Major clinical symptoms included dyspnea, cough, and fever. Evaluation of the images showed that 18 cases out of 34 patients had a pattern of diffuse alveolar damage. The patients with hepatocellular carcinoma showed a greater incidence and earlier onset of lung injury than those with renal cell carcinoma. Although the overall reporting frequency of sorafenib-induced lung injury is not considered high, the radiological diffuse alveolar damage pattern led to a fatal outcome. Therefore, early recognition of sorafenib-induced lung injury is crucial for physicians and patients.

  1. Bioprinted 3D Primary Liver Tissues Allow Assessment of Organ-Level Response to Clinical Drug Induced Toxicity In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah G Nguyen

    Full Text Available Modeling clinically relevant tissue responses using cell models poses a significant challenge for drug development, in particular for drug induced liver injury (DILI. This is mainly because existing liver models lack longevity and tissue-level complexity which limits their utility in predictive toxicology. In this study, we established and characterized novel bioprinted human liver tissue mimetics comprised of patient-derived hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells in a defined architecture. Scaffold-free assembly of different cell types in an in vivo-relevant architecture allowed for histologic analysis that revealed distinct intercellular hepatocyte junctions, CD31+ endothelial networks, and desmin positive, smooth muscle actin negative quiescent stellates. Unlike what was seen in 2D hepatocyte cultures, the tissues maintained levels of ATP, Albumin as well as expression and drug-induced enzyme activity of Cytochrome P450s over 4 weeks in culture. To assess the ability of the 3D liver cultures to model tissue-level DILI, dose responses of Trovafloxacin, a drug whose hepatotoxic potential could not be assessed by standard pre-clinical models, were compared to the structurally related non-toxic drug Levofloxacin. Trovafloxacin induced significant, dose-dependent toxicity at clinically relevant doses (≤ 4uM. Interestingly, Trovafloxacin toxicity was observed without lipopolysaccharide stimulation and in the absence of resident macrophages in contrast to earlier reports. Together, these results demonstrate that 3D bioprinted liver tissues can both effectively model DILI and distinguish between highly related compounds with differential profile. Thus, the combination of patient-derived primary cells with bioprinting technology here for the first time demonstrates superior performance in terms of mimicking human drug response in a known target organ at the tissue level.

  2. Design of the Anti-tuberculosis Drugs induced Adverse Reactions in China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme Study (ADACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ping

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 1 million tuberculosis (TB patients are receiving the standard anti-TB treatment provided by China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme (CNTS in China every year. Adverse reactions (ADRs induced by anti-TB drugs could both do harm to patients and lead to anti-TB treatment failure. The ADACS aimed to explore ADRs' incidences, prognoses, economical and public health impacts for TB patients and TB control, and build a DNA bank of TB patients. Methods/Design Multiple study designs were adopted. Firstly, a prospective cohort with 4488 sputum smears positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients was established. Patients were followed up for 6-9 months in 52 counties of four regions. Those suspected ADRs should be checked and confirmed by Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA. Secondly, if the suspected ADR was anti-TB drug induced liver injury (ATLI, a nested case-control study would be performed which comprised choosing a matched control and doing a plus questionnaire inquiry. Thirdly, health economical data of ADRs would be collected to analyze financial burdens brought by ADRs and cost-effectiveness of ADRs' treatments. Fourthly, a drop of intravenous blood for each patient was taken and saved in FTA card for DNA banking and genotyping. Finally, the demographic, clinical, environmental, administrative and genetic data would be merged for the comprehensive analysis. Discussion ADACS will give an overview of anti-TB drugs induced ADRs' incidences, risk factors, treatments, prognoses, and clinical, economical and public health impacts for TB patients applying CNTS regimen in China, and provide suggestions for individualized health care and TB control policy.

  3. Evaluation of drug-induced hematotoxicity using novel in vitro monkey CFU-GM and BFU-E colony assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Koichi; Goto, Mayumi; Ando-Imaoka, Masako; Kai, Kiyonori; Mori, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    In order to evaluate drug-induced hematotoxicity in monkey cells in vitro, colony-forming unit-granulocyte, macrophage (CFU-GM), and burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) colony assays were established using mononuclear cells in the bone marrow collected from male cynomolgus monkeys. Furthermore, the effects of doxorubicin, chloramphenicol, and linezolid on CFU-GM and BFU-E colony formation were investigated using established monkey CFU-GM and BFU-E colony assays in comparison with those on human CFU-GM and BFU-E colonies acquired from human umbilical cord blood cells. Bone marrow mononuclear cells were collected from the ischial or iliac bone of male cynomolgus monkeys. The cells were subsequently processed by density gradient separation at 1.067, 1.070, or 1.077 g/mL for CFU-GM or 1.077 g/mL for BFU-E, and then cultured in methylcellulose medium for 9 or 13 days, respectively. A sufficient number of CFU-GM colonies were formed from mononuclear cells processed at a density of 1.070 g/mL. Moreover, the number of BFU-E colonies from the cells processed at a density of 1.077 g/mL was sufficient for the colony assay. The number of CFU-GM or BFU-E colonies decreased after treatment with the drugs of interest in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared with human CFU-GM, monkey CFU-GM were more sensitive to chloramphenicol and resistant to doxorubicin, whereas monkey BFU-E were more sensitive to all compounds in comparison to the sensitivity of human BFU-E. In conclusion, monkey CFU-GM and BFU-E colony assays were established and considered useful tools to evaluate the differences in drug-induced hematotoxicity between species.

  4. Design of the Anti-tuberculosis Drugs induced Adverse Reactions in China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme Study (ADACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background More than 1 million tuberculosis (TB) patients are receiving the standard anti-TB treatment provided by China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme (CNTS) in China every year. Adverse reactions (ADRs) induced by anti-TB drugs could both do harm to patients and lead to anti-TB treatment failure. The ADACS aimed to explore ADRs' incidences, prognoses, economical and public health impacts for TB patients and TB control, and build a DNA bank of TB patients. Methods/Design Multiple study designs were adopted. Firstly, a prospective cohort with 4488 sputum smears positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients was established. Patients were followed up for 6-9 months in 52 counties of four regions. Those suspected ADRs should be checked and confirmed by Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA). Secondly, if the suspected ADR was anti-TB drug induced liver injury (ATLI), a nested case-control study would be performed which comprised choosing a matched control and doing a plus questionnaire inquiry. Thirdly, health economical data of ADRs would be collected to analyze financial burdens brought by ADRs and cost-effectiveness of ADRs' treatments. Fourthly, a drop of intravenous blood for each patient was taken and saved in FTA card for DNA banking and genotyping. Finally, the demographic, clinical, environmental, administrative and genetic data would be merged for the comprehensive analysis. Discussion ADACS will give an overview of anti-TB drugs induced ADRs' incidences, risk factors, treatments, prognoses, and clinical, economical and public health impacts for TB patients applying CNTS regimen in China, and provide suggestions for individualized health care and TB control policy. PMID:20492672

  5. Chemosensitivity of human small cell carcinoma of the lung detected by flow cytometric DNA analysis of drug-induced cell cycle perturbations in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, S A; Spang-Thomsen, M; Vindeløv, L L

    1986-01-01

    A method based on detection of drug-induced cell cycle perturbation by flow cytometric DNA analysis has previously been described in Ehrlich ascites tumors as a way to estimate chemosensitivity. The method is extended to test human small-cell carcinoma of the lung. Three tumors with different...... sensitivities to melphalan in nude mice were used. Tumors were disaggregated by a combined mechanical and enzymatic method and thereafter have incubated with different doses of melphalan. After incubation the cells were plated in vitro on agar, and drug induced cell cycle changes were monitored by flow...

  6. Agmatine attenuates reserpine-induced oral dyskinesia in mice: Role of oxidative stress, nitric oxide and glutamate NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Andréia S; Matheus, Filipe C; Moretti, Morgana; Sampaio, Tuane B; Poli, Anicleto; Santos, Danúbia B; Colle, Dirleise; Cunha, Mauricio P; Blum-Silva, Carlos H; Sandjo, Louis P; Reginatto, Flávio H; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Farina, Marcelo; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-10-01

    Dyskinesia consists in a series of trunk, limbs and orofacial involuntary movements that can be observed following long-term pharmacological treatment in some psychotic and neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease, respectively. Agmatine is an endogenous arginine metabolite that emerges as neuromodulator and a promising agent to manage diverse central nervous system disorders by modulating nitric oxide (NO) pathway, glutamate NMDA receptors and oxidative stress. Herein, we investigated the effects of a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of different agmatine doses (10, 30 or 100mg/kg) against the orofacial dyskinesia induced by reserpine (1mg/kg,s.c.) in mice by measuring the vacuous chewing movements and tongue protusion frequencies, and the duration of facial twitching. The results showed an orofacial antidyskinetic effect of agmatine (30mg/kg, i.p.) or the combined administration of sub-effective doses of agmatine (10mg/kg, i.p.) with the NMDA receptor antagonists amantadine (1mg/kg, i.p.) and MK801 (0.01mg/kg, i.p.) or the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI; 0.1mg/kg, i.p.). Reserpine-treated mice displayed locomotor activity deficits in the open field and agmatine had no effect on this response. Reserpine increased nitrite and nitrate levels in cerebral cortex, but agmatine did not reverse it. Remarkably, agmatine reversed the decrease of dopamine and non-protein thiols (NPSH) levels caused by reserpine in the striatum. However, no changes were observed in striatal immunocontent of proteins related to the dopaminergic system including tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, pDARPP-32[Thr75], dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. These results indicate that the blockade of NO pathway, NMDAR and oxidative stress are possible mechanisms associated with the protective effects of agmatine against the orofacial dyskinesia induced by reserpine in mice

  7. Exhaled breath analysis using electronic nose in cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia patients with chronic pulmonary infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Odin; Paff, Tamara; Haarman, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    The current diagnostic work-up and monitoring of pulmonary infections may be perceived as invasive, is time consuming and expensive. In this explorative study, we investigated whether or not a non-invasive exhaled breath analysis using an electronic nose would discriminate between cystic fibrosis...... (CF) and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) with or without various well characterized chronic pulmonary infections. We recruited 64 patients with CF and 21 with PCD based on known chronic infection status. 21 healthy volunteers served as controls. An electronic nose was employed to analyze exhaled......, this method significantly discriminates CF patients suffering from a chronic pulmonary P. aeruginosa (PA) infection from CF patients without a chronic pulmonary infection. Further studies are needed for verification and to investigate the role of electronic nose technology in the very early diagnostic workup...

  8. [Application of a mathematical algorithm for the detection of electroneuromyographic results in the pathogenesis study of facial dyskinesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribova, N P; Iudel'son, Ia B; Golubev, V L; Abramenkova, I V

    2003-01-01

    To carry out a differential diagnosis of two facial dyskinesia (FD) models--facial hemispasm (FH) and facial paraspasm (FP), a combined program of electroneuromyographic (ENMG) examination has been created, using statistical analyses, including that for objects identification based on hybrid neural network with the application of adaptive fuzzy logic method and standard statistics programs (Wilcoxon, Student statistics). In FH, a lesion of peripheral facial neuromotor apparatus with augmentation of functions of inter-neurons in segmental and upper segmental stem levels predominated. In FP, primary afferent strengthening in mimic muscles was accompanied by increased motor neurons activity and reciprocal augmentation of inter-neurons, inhibiting motor portion of V pair. Mathematical algorithm for ENMG results recognition worked out in the study provides a precise differentiation of two FD models and opens possibilities for differential diagnosis of other facial motor disorders.

  9. Co-treatment with imipramine averted haloperidol-instigated tardive dyskinesia: Association with serotonin in brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Noreen; Yasmin, Farzana; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2016-11-01

    Outcome of imipramine (IMI) treatment was scrutinized on progression of haloperidol instigated tardive dyskinesia (TD). 0.2 mg/kg/rat dosage of haloperidol provided orally to rats for 2 weeks enhanced vacuous chewing movements that escalated when the process proceeded for 5 weeks. Following 2 weeks co-injection 5 mg/kg dosage of IMI was diminished haloperidol-instigated VCMs and fully averted following five weeks. The potency of 8-OH-DPAT-instigated locomotor activity exhibited higher in saline+haloperidol treated rats while not observed in IMI+ haloperidol treated rats. 8-OH-DPAT-instigated low 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) metabolism was higher in saline+ haloperidol treated rats when compare to IMI+ haloperidol treated rats in both regions of brain (striatum and midbrain). It is recommended that IMI possibly competent in averting TD, in cases receiving treatment to antipsychotics.

  10. Clinical value of measurement of pulmonary radioaerosol mucociliary clearance in the work up of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Mathias; Nielsen, Kim Gjerum; Mortensen, Jann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to evaluate and define the general clinical applicability and impact of pulmonary radioaerosol mucociliary clearance (PRMC) on the work up of patients suspected of having primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). In addition, we wanted to evaluate the accuracy of the reference values...... primarily to results from nasal ciliary function testing, to electron microscopic (EM) examination of the ultrastructure of the cilia, and to the final clinical diagnosis. RESULTS: Of the 239 patients, 27 ended up with a final clinical diagnosis of definitive PCD. No patients with a PRMC test...... of the entire lung. Its greatest strength is its ability to reject a suspected PCD diagnosis with great certainty. In our material, this accounted for 2/3 of referred patients. In addition, the test has a high rate of conclusive results. According to our analyses, reference equations on children would benefit...

  11. Controlled-release levodopa methyl ester/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles ameliorate levodopa-induced dyskinesia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Xinxin Yang1*, Ruiyuan Zheng2*, Yunpeng Cai2, Meiling Liao2, Weien Yuan1,2, Zhenguo Liu11Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital (affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China*Xinxin Yang and Ruiyuan Zheng contributed equally to this workBackground: Levodopa remains the most effective drug in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, long-term administration of levodopa induces motor complications, such as levodopa-induced dyskinesia. The mechanisms underlying levodopa-induced dyskinesia are not fully understood.Methods: In this study, we prepared levodopa methyl ester (LDME/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles, which can release LDME and benserazide in a sustained manner. Dyskinesia was induced in rats by repeated administration of levodopa then treated with LDME plus benserazide or the same dose of LDME/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles. Apomorphine-induced rotations and abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs were measured on treatment days 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20. In addition, the levels of phosphorylated dopamine- and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2, and ΔfosB were determined by Western blot. Tau levels were determined by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Dynorphin levels in the striatum and cortex of rats were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: Over the course of levodopa treatment, the rats developed abnormal AIMs, classified as locomotive, axial, orolingual, and forelimb dyskinesia. The degree of reduction of apomorphine-induced rotations was comparable in dyskinetic rats treated with LDME plus benserazide or LDME/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles. The axial, limb, and orolingual (ALO AIMs of dyskinetic rats treated with LDME/benserazide-loaded nanoparticles were 14 ± 2.5, 9 ± 2.0, and 10 ± 2.1 on treatment days 10, 15, and 20

  12. Proteomic profiling in incubation medium of mouse, rat and human precision-cut liver slices for biomarker detection regarding acute drug-induced liver injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Hadi, Mackenzie; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Masereeuw, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/155644033; Groothuis, Geny M M; Russel, Frans G M

    Drug-induced liver injury is one of the leading causes of drug withdrawal from the market. In this study, we investigated the applicability of protein profiling of the incubation medium of human, mouse and rat precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) exposed to liver injury-inducing drugs for biomarker

  13. A Large Candidate Gene Survey Identifies the KCNE1 D85N Polymorphism as a Possible Modulator of Drug-Induced Torsades de Pointes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaeaeb, Stefan; Crawford, Dana C.; Sinner, Moritz F.; Behr, Elijah R.; Kannankeril, Prince J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Guicheney, Pascale; Bishopric, Nanette H.; Myerburg, Robert J.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Pfeufer, Arne; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Martens, Eimo; Zhang, Taifang; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Zumhagen, Sven; Denjoy, Isabelle; Bardai, Abdennasser; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Marshall, Vanessa; Jeffery, Steve; Shakir, Saad; Camm, A. John; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Perz, Siegfried; Lichtner, Peter; Meitinger, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Ingram, Christiana; Bradford, Yuki; Carter, Shannon; Norris, Kris; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; George, Alfred L.; Roden, Dan M.

    Background-Drug-induced long-QT syndrome (diLQTS) is an adverse drug effect that has an important impact on drug use, development, and regulation. We tested the hypothesis that common variants in key genes controlling cardiac electric properties modify the risk of diLQTS. Methods and Results-In a

  14. A Large Candidate Gene Survey Identifies the KCNE1 D85N Polymorphism as a Possible Modulator of Drug-Induced Torsades de Pointes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kääb, Stefan; Crawford, Dana C.; Sinner, Moritz F.; Behr, Elijah R.; Kannankeril, Prince J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Guicheney, Pascale; Bishopric, Nanette H.; Myerburg, Robert J.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Pfeufer, Arne; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Martens, Eimo; Zhang, Taifang; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Zumhagen, Sven; Denjoy, Isabelle; Bardai, Abdennasser; van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Marshall, Vanessa; Jeffery, Steve; Shakir, Saad; Camm, A. John; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Perz, Siegfried; Lichtner, Peter; Meitinger, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Ingram, Christiana; Bradford, Yuki; Carter, Shannon; Norris, Kris; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; George, Alfred L.; Roden, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background-Drug-induced long-QT syndrome (diLQTS) is an adverse drug effect that has an important impact on drug use, development, and regulation. We tested the hypothesis that common variants in key genes controlling cardiac electric properties modify the risk of diLQTS. Methods and Results-In a

  15. A Case of Sublingual Ranula That Responded Successfully to Localized Injection Treatment with OK-432 after Healing from Drug Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Yoshizawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A ranula is a mucus retention cyst or pseudocyst caused by leakage of mucus from the sublingual gland and generally occurs in the oral floor. In addition, drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS is a rare but well-recognized serious adverse effect characterized by fever, skin rashes, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatitis, and hepatosplenomegaly and oral stomatitis. This paper presents the first case of successfully treated sublingual ranula with localized injection of OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome, which has previously been unreported in the literature. We present the case of a 38-year-old Japanese woman with sublingual ranula that responded successfully to localized injection treatment with OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome. She was affected with cutaneous myositis and interstitial lung disease when she was 26 years old. At the age 34 years, she received additional oral treatment of diaminodiphenyl-sulfone due to deterioration of the cutaneous myositis, which resulted in drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS with severe oral stomatitis. Local injection of OK-432 to the ranula may be a very safe and useful treatment method even if the patient has a history of drug allergy and has connective tissue disease such as cutaneous myositis.

  16. Precision-cut mouse liver slices as an ex vivo model to study the mechanism of inflammatory stress-related idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadi, Mackenzie; Chen, Y.; Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Merema, Maja; Groothuis, Genoveva

    2012-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions (IDRs) can be defined as adverse drug reactions that occur in a small minority of the patients taking clinically-relevant doses and do not involve the known pharmacological effects of the drug. IDR related to hepatotoxicity or idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury

  17. Reference intervals for putative biomarkers of drug-induced liver injury and liver regeneration in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Ben; Clarke, Joanna I; Walker, Lauren E; Brillant, Nathalie; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Park, B Kevin; Pirmohamed, Munir; Antoine, Daniel J

    2018-05-02

    The potential of mechanistic biomarkers to improve the prediction of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and hepatic regeneration is widely acknowledged. We sought to determine reference intervals for new biomarkers of DILI and regeneration as well as to characterize their natural variability and impact of diurnal variation. Serum samples from 200 healthy volunteers were recruited as part of a cross sectional study; of these, 50 subjects had weekly serial sampling over 3 weeks, while 24 had intensive blood sampling over a 24h period. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), MicroRNA-122 (miR-122), high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), total keratin-18 (FL-K18), caspase cleaved keratin-18 (cc-K18), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) were assessed by validated assays. Reference intervals were established for each biomarker based on the 97.5% quantile (90% CI) following the assessment of fixed effects in univariate and multivariable models (ALT 50 (41-50) U/l, miR-122 3548 (2912-4321) copies/µl, HMGB1 2.3 (2.2-2.4) ng/ml, FL-K18 475 (456-488) U/l, cc-K18 272 (256-291) U/l, GLDH 27 (26-30) U/l and CSF-1 2.4 (2.3-2.9) ng/ml). There was a small but significant intra-individual time random effect detected but no significant impact of diurnal variation was observed, with the exception of GLDH. Reference intervals for novel DILI biomarkers have been described for the first time. An upper limit of a reference range might represent the most appropriate method to utilize these data. Regulatory authorities have published letters of support encouraging further qualification of leading candidate biomarkers. These data can now be used to interpret data from exploratory clinical DILI studies and to assist their further qualification. Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) has a big impact on patient health and the development of new medicines. Unfortunately, currently used blood-based tests to assess liver injury and recovery suffer from insufficiencies. Newer blood

  18. Perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early pathogenesis event of drug induced liver injury in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Makoto; Miyake, Manami; Sato, Hiroko; Masutomi, Naoya; Tsutsui, Naohisa [Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0818 (Japan); Adam, Klaus-Peter; Alexander, Danny C.; Lawton, Kay A.; Milburn, Michael V.; Ryals, John A.; Wulff, Jacob E. [Metabolon Inc., 617 Davis Drive, Suite 400, Durham, NC 27713 (United States); Guo, Lining, E-mail: lguo@metabolon.com [Metabolon Inc., 617 Davis Drive, Suite 400, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant consideration for drug development. Current preclinical DILI assessment relying on histopathology and clinical chemistry has limitations in sensitivity and discordance with human. To gain insights on DILI pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers for improved DILI detection, we performed untargeted metabolomic analyses on rats treated with thirteen known hepatotoxins causing various types of DILI: necrosis (acetaminophen, bendazac, cyclosporine A, carbon tetrachloride, ethionine), cholestasis (methapyrilene and naphthylisothiocyanate), steatosis (tetracycline and ticlopidine), and idiosyncratic (carbamazepine, chlorzoxasone, flutamide, and nimesulide) at two doses and two time points. Statistical analysis and pathway mapping of the nearly 1900 metabolites profiled in the plasma, urine, and liver revealed diverse time and dose dependent metabolic cascades leading to DILI by the hepatotoxins. The most consistent change induced by the hepatotoxins, detectable even at the early time point/low dose, was the significant elevations of a panel of bile acids in the plasma and urine, suggesting that DILI impaired hepatic bile acid uptake from the circulation. Furthermore, bile acid amidation in the hepatocytes was altered depending on the severity of the hepatotoxin-induced oxidative stress. The alteration of the bile acids was most evident by the necrosis and cholestasis hepatotoxins, with more subtle effects by the steatosis and idiosyncratic hepatotoxins. Taking together, our data suggest that the perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early event of DILI. Upon further validation, selected bile acids in the circulation could be potentially used as sensitive and early DILI preclinical biomarkers. - Highlights: ► We used metabolomics to gain insights on drug induced liver injury (DILI) in rats. ► We profiled rats treated with thirteen hepatotoxins at two doses and two time points. ► The toxins decreased the

  19. Protective effect of Curcumin, the active principle of turmeric (Curcuma longa) in haloperidol-induced orofacial dyskinesia and associated behavioural, biochemical and neurochemical changes in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Mahendra; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2008-02-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a motor disorder of the orofacial region resulting from chronic neuroleptic treatment. A high incidence and irreversibility of this hyperkinetic disorder has been considered a major clinical issue in the treatment of schizophrenia. The molecular mechanism related to the pathophysiology of tardive dyskinesia is not completely known. Various animal studies have demonstrated an enhanced oxidative stress and increased glutamatergic transmission as well as inhibition in the glutamate uptake after the chronic administration of haloperidol. The present study investigated the effect of curcumin, an antioxidant, in haloperidol-induced tardive dyskinesia by using different behavioural (orofacial dyskinetic movements, stereotypy, locomotor activity, % retention), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione levels, antioxidant enzyme levels (SOD and catalase) and neurochemical (neurotransmitter levels) parameters. Chronic administration of haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p. for 21 days) significantly increased vacuous chewing movements (VCM's), tongue protrusions, facial jerking in rats which was dose-dependently inhibited by curcumin. Chronic administration of haloperidol also resulted in increased dopamine receptor sensitivity as evident by increased locomotor activity and stereotypy and also decreased % retention time on elevated plus maze paradigm. Pretreatment with curcumin reversed these behavioral changes. Besides, haloperidol also induced oxidative damage in all major regions of brain which was attenuated by curcumin, especially in the subcortical region containing striatum. On chronic administration of haloperidol, there was a decrease in turnover of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine in both cortical and subcortical regions which was again dose-dependently reversed by treatment with curcumin. The findings of the present study suggested for the involvement of free radicals in the development of neuroleptic-induced tardive dyskinesia and

  20. MSBIS: A Multi-Step Biomedical Informatics Screening Approach for Identifying Medications that Mitigate the Risks of Metoclopramide-Induced Tardive Dyskinesia

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Xu; Alexandrea G. Ham; Rickey D. Tivis; Matthew L. Caylor; Aoxiang Tao; Steve T. Flynn; Peter J. Economen; Hung K. Dang; Royal W. Johnson; Vaughn L. Culbertson

    2017-01-01

    In 2009 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) placed a black box warning on metoclopramide (MCP) due to the increased risks and prevalence of tardive dyskinesia (TD). In this study, we developed a multi-step biomedical informatics screening (MSBIS) approach leveraging publicly available bioactivity and drug safety data to identify concomitant drugs that mitigate the risks of MCP-induced TD. MSBIS includes (1) TargetSearch (http://dxulab.org/software) bioinformatics scoring for drug anti...

  1. Management of gallbladder dyskinesia: patient outcomes following positive 99mtechnetium (Tc)-labelled hepatic iminodiacetic acid (HIDA) scintigraphy with cholecystokinin (CCK) provocation and laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, R.V.; Pathak, S.; Cockbain, A.J.; Lodge, J.P.; Smith, A.M.; Chowdhury, F.U.; Toogood, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate clinical outcomes in patients with typical biliary pain, normal ultrasonic findings, and a positive 99m technetium (Tc)-labelled hepatic iminodiacetic acid analogue (HIDA) scintigraphy with cholecystokinin (CCK) provocation indicating gallbladder dyskinesia, as per Rome III criteria, undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Methods and materials: Consecutive patients undergoing LC for gallbladder dyskinesia were identified retrospectively. They were followed up by telephone interview and review of the electronic case records to assess symptom resolution. Results: One hundred consecutive patients (median age 44; 80% female) with abnormal gallbladder ejection fraction (GB-EF <35%) were followed up for a median of 12 months (range 2–80 months). Following LC, 84% reported symptomatic improvement and 52% had no residual pain. Twelve percent had persisting preoperative-type pain of either unchanged or worsening severity. Neither pathological features of chronic cholecystitis (87% of 92 incidences when histology available) nor reproduction of pain on CCK injection were significantly predictive of symptom outcome or pain relief post-LC. Conclusion: In one of the largest outcome series of gallbladder dyskinesia patients in the UK with a positive provocation HIDA scintigraphy examination and LC, the present study shows that the test is a useful functional diagnostic tool in the management of patients with typical biliary pain and normal ultrasound, with favourable outcomes following surgery. - Highlights: • Gallbladder dyskinesia (GD) is a challenging condition to diagnose and treat. • This study evaluated clinical outcomes following laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). • There was sustained symptomatic benefit in >80% following surgery. • Pre-operative counselling before LC is important

  2. IN VITRO MODELS TO EVALUATE DRUG-INDUCED HYPERSENSITIVITY: POTENTIAL TEST BASED ON ACTIVATION OF DENDRITIC CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Galbiati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated ('allergic' and non immune-mediated ('pseudo allergic' reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon.We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells.

  3. The contribution of oxidative stress to drug-induced organ toxicity and its detection in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Claudia V; Nadanaciva, Sashi; Oliveira, Paulo J; Will, Yvonne

    2012-02-01

    Nowadays the 'redox hypothesis' is based on the fact that thiol/disulfide couples such as glutathione (GSH/GSSG), cysteine (Cys/CySS) and thioredoxin ((Trx-(SH)2/Trx-SS)) are functionally organized in redox circuits controlled by glutathione pools, thioredoxins and other control nodes, and they are not in equilibrium relative to each other. Although ROS can be important intermediates of cellular signaling pathways, disturbances in the normal cellular redox can result in widespread damage to several cell components. Moreover, oxidative stress has been linked to a variety of age-related diseases. In recent years, oxidative stress has also been identified to contribute to drug-induced liver, heart, renal and brain toxicity. This review provides an overview of current in vitro and in vivo methods that can be deployed throughout the drug discovery process. In addition, animal models and noninvasive biomarkers are described. Reducing post-market drug withdrawals is essential for all pharmaceutical companies in a time of increased patient welfare and tight budgets. Predictive screens positioned early in the drug discovery process will help to reduce such liabilities. Although new and more efficient assays and models are being developed, the hunt for biomarkers and noninvasive techniques is still in progress.

  4. An Automated Platform for Assessment of Congenital and Drug-Induced Arrhythmia with hiPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley L. McKeithan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to produce unlimited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs harboring disease and patient-specific gene variants creates a new paradigm for modeling congenital heart diseases (CHDs and predicting proarrhythmic liabilities of drug candidates. However, a major roadblock to implementing hiPSC-CM technology in drug discovery is that conventional methods for monitoring action potential (AP kinetics and arrhythmia phenotypes in vitro have been too costly or technically challenging to execute in high throughput. Herein, we describe the first large-scale, fully automated and statistically robust analysis of AP kinetics and drug-induced proarrhythmia in hiPSC-CMs. The platform combines the optical recording of a small molecule fluorescent voltage sensing probe (VoltageFluor2.1.Cl, an automated high throughput microscope and automated image analysis to rapidly generate physiological measurements of cardiomyocytes (CMs. The technique can be readily adapted on any high content imager to study hiPSC-CM physiology and predict the proarrhythmic effects of drug candidates.

  5. Double-contrast barium enteroclysis as a patency tool for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takayuki; Esaki, Motohiro; Kurahara, Koichi; Hirai, Fumihito; Fuchigami, Tadahiko; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iida, Mitsuo

    2011-11-01

    Evaluating small bowel patency is recommended for capsule endoscopy in patients suspected of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced (NSAID) enteropathy. The aim of this investigation was to examine whether radiography is a candidate of patency tool in NSAID enteropathy. We reviewed double-contrast barium enteroclysis in 21 patients with NSAID enteropathy diagnosed either by capsule endoscopy or balloon-assisted endoscopy. The endoscopic findings were classified into circular ulcers, linear ulcers and small mucosal defects. The radiographic signs of the corresponding endoscopic findings were retrieved and the depiction rate was calculated. Of the 21 patients, endoscopy detected circular ulcers, linear ulcers, and small ulcers in 12, 3 and 12 patients, respectively. Small bowel radiography depicted circular narrowing as pseudo-folds in 10 patients (83%) and linear ulcers as eccentric rigidity in 2 patients (67%). However, radiography was able to depict small mucosal defects in only 3 patients (17%). Two of 5 patients with pseudo-folds experienced retention of the capsule. "Pseudo-folds" is a sign corresponding to circular ulcer in NSAID enteropathy, which may be predictive of capsule retention.

  6. Waveform analysis of tremor may help to differentiate Parkinson's disease from drug-induced parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, W; Han, J; Kim, I Y; Park, J; Kim, J-S; Cho, J W; Koh, S-B; Chung, S J; Kim, H-T

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the waveform characteristics of resting tremor by accelerometer recordings in patients with drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). We prospectively recruited 12 patients with tremulous PD and 12 patients with DIP presenting with resting tremor. Tremor was recorded from the more affected side and was recorded twice for a 60 s period in each patient. Peak frequency, amplitude and all harmonic peaks were obtained, and the asymmetry of the decay of the autocorrelation function, third momentum and time-reversal invariance were also computed using a mathematical algorithm. Among the parameters used in the waveform analysis, the harmonic ratio, time-reversal invariance and asymmetric decay of the autocorrelation function were different between PD and DIP at a statistically significant level (all p < 0.01). The total harmonic peak power and third momentum in the time series were not significantly different. The clinical characteristics of DIP patients may be similar to those of PD patients in some cases, which makes the clinical differentiation between DIP and PD challenging. Our study shows that the identification of parameters reflecting waveform asymmetry might be helpful in differentiating between DIP and PD. (note)

  7. Drug-induced mild therapeutic hypothermia obtained by administration of a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Keld; Weber, Uno J; Gotfredsen, Jacob W

    2010-01-01

    Background  The use of mechanical/physical devices for applying mild therapeutic hypothermia is the only proven neuroprotective treatment for survivors of out of hospital cardiac arrest. However, this type of therapy is cumbersome and associated with several side-effects. We investigated the feas......Background  The use of mechanical/physical devices for applying mild therapeutic hypothermia is the only proven neuroprotective treatment for survivors of out of hospital cardiac arrest. However, this type of therapy is cumbersome and associated with several side-effects. We investigated...... the feasibility of using a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) agonist for obtaining drug-induced sustainable mild hypothermia. Methods First, we screened a heterogeneous group of TRPV1 agonists and secondly we tested the hypothermic properties of a selected candidate by dose-response studies...... was stopped. Finally, in calves the intravenous infusion of DHC was able to maintain mild hypothermia with ΔT > -3°C for more than 12 hours. Conclusions Our data support the hypothesis that infusion of dihydrocapsaicin is a candidate for testing as a primary or adjunct method of inducing and maintaining...

  8. Mechanism-based risk assessment strategy for drug-induced cholestasis using the transcriptional benchmark dose derived by toxicogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Taisuke; Ito, Yuichi; Morita, Osamu; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Cholestasis is one of the major causes of drug-induced liver injury (DILI), which can result in withdrawal of approved drugs from the market. Early identification of cholestatic drugs is difficult due to the complex mechanisms involved. In order to develop a strategy for mechanism-based risk assessment of cholestatic drugs, we analyzed gene expression data obtained from the livers of rats that had been orally administered with 12 known cholestatic compounds repeatedly for 28 days at three dose levels. Qualitative analyses were performed using two statistical approaches (hierarchical clustering and principle component analysis), in addition to pathway analysis. The transcriptional benchmark dose (tBMD) and tBMD 95% lower limit (tBMDL) were used for quantitative analyses, which revealed three compound sub-groups that produced different types of differential gene expression; these groups of genes were mainly involved in inflammation, cholesterol biosynthesis, and oxidative stress. Furthermore, the tBMDL values for each test compound were in good agreement with the relevant no observed adverse effect level. These results indicate that our novel strategy for drug safety evaluation using mechanism-based classification and tBMDL would facilitate the application of toxicogenomics for risk assessment of cholestatic DILI.

  9. Kidney-on-a-Chip: a New Technology for Predicting Drug Efficacy, Interactions, and Drug-induced Nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeonghwan; Kim, Sejoong

    2018-03-08

    The kidneys play a pivotal role in most drug-removal processes and are important when evaluating drug safety. Kidney dysfunction resulting from various drugs is an important issue in clinical practice and during the drug development process. Traditional in vivo animal experiments are limited with respect to evaluating drug efficacy and nephrotoxicity due to discrepancies in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics between humans and animals, and static cell culture experiments cannot fully reflect the actual microphysiological environment in humans. A kidney-on-a-chip is a microfluidic device that allows the culture of living renal cells in 3-dimensional channels and mimics the human microphysiological environment, thus simulating the actual drug filtering, absorption, and secretion process.. In this review, we discuss recent developments in microfluidic culturing technique and describe current and future kidney-on-a-chip applications. We focus on pharmacological interactions and drug-induced nephrotoxicity, and additionally discuss the development of multi-organ chips and their possible applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Establishment of a drug-induced rhabdomyolysis mouse model by co-administration of ciprofloxacin and atorvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Akiko; Oda, Shingo; Akai, Sho; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2018-07-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is one of the serious side effects of ciprofloxacin (CPFX), a widely used antibacterial drug; and occasionally, acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs. Often, rhabdomyolysis has occurred in patients taking CPFX co-administered with statins. The purpose of this study is to establish a mouse model of drug-induced rhabdomyolysis by co-administration of CPFX and atorvastatin (ATV) and to clarify the mechanisms of its pathogenesis. C57BL/6J mice treated with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a glutathione synthesis inhibitor, were orally administered with CPFX and ATV for 4 days. Plasma levels of creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were significantly increased in the CPFX and ATV-co-administered group. Histopathological examination of skeletal muscle observed degeneration in gastrocnemius muscle and an increased number of the satellite cells. Expressions of skeletal muscle-specific microRNA and mRNA in plasma and skeletal muscle, respectively, were significantly increased. The area under the curve (AUC) of plasma CPFX was significantly increased in the CPFX and ATV-co-administered group. Furthermore, cytoplasmic vacuolization and a positively myoglobin-stained region in kidney tissue and high content of myoglobin in urine were observed. These results indicated that AKI was induced by myoglobin that leaked from skeletal muscle. The established mouse model in the present study would be useful for predicting potential rhabdomyolysis risks in preclinical drug development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Liver injury from herbals and dietary supplements in the U.S. Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Victor J; Barnhart, Huiman; Bonkovsky, Herbert L; Davern, Timothy; Fontana, Robert J; Grant, Lafaine; Reddy, K Rajender; Seeff, Leonard B; Serrano, Jose; Sherker, Averell H; Stolz, Andrew; Talwalkar, Jayant; Vega, Maricruz; Vuppalanchi, Raj

    2014-10-01

    The Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network (DILIN) studies hepatotoxicity caused by conventional medications as well as herbals and dietary supplements (HDS). To characterize hepatotoxicity and its outcomes from HDS versus medications, patients with hepatotoxicity attributed to medications or HDS were enrolled prospectively between 2004 and 2013. The study took place among eight U.S. referral centers that are part of the DILIN. Consecutive patients with liver injury referred to a DILIN center were eligible. The final sample comprised 130 (15.5%) of all subjects enrolled (839) who were judged to have experienced liver injury caused by HDS. Hepatotoxicity caused by HDS was evaluated by expert opinion. Demographic and clinical characteristics and outcome assessments, including death and liver transplantation (LT), were ascertained. Cases were stratified and compared according to the type of agent implicated in liver injury; 45 had injury caused by bodybuilding HDS, 85 by nonbodybuilding HDS, and 709 by medications. Liver injury caused by HDS increased from 7% to 20% (P Bodybuilding HDS caused prolonged jaundice (median, 91 days) in young men, but did not result in any fatalities or LT. The remaining HDS cases presented as hepatocellular injury, predominantly in middle-aged women, and, more frequently, led to death or transplantation, compared to injury from medications (13% vs. 3%; P bodybuilding HDS or medications, as evidenced by differences in unfavorable outcomes (death and transplantation). (Hepatology 2014;60:1399-1408). © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  12. Endothelial Proliferation and Increased Blood - Brain Barrier Permeability in the Basal Ganglia in a Rat Model of 3,4-Dihydrozyphenyl-L-Alanine-Induced Dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westin, Jenny E.; Lindgren, Hanna S.; Gardi, Jonathan Eyal

    2006-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia is associated with molecular and synaptic plasticity in the basal ganglia, but the occurrence of structural remodeling through cell genesis has not been explored. In this study, rats with 6-hydroxydopamine lesions received injections of th...... of angiogenesis and blood-brain barrier dysfunction in an experimental model of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. These microvascular changes are likely to affect the kinetics of L-DOPA entry into the brain, favoring the occurrence of motor complications....... dyskinesia. The vast majority (60-80%) of the newborn cells stained positively for endothelial markers. This endothelial proliferation was associated with an upregulation of immature endothelial markers (nestin) and a downregulation of endothelial barrier antigen on blood vessel walls. In addition......, dyskinetic rats exhibited a significant increase in total blood vessel length and a visible extravasation of serum albumin in the two structures in which endothelial proliferation was most pronounced (substantia nigra pars reticulata and entopeduncular nucleus). The present study provides the first evidence...

  13. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of alpha lipoic acid associated with omega-3 in tardive dyskinesia induced by chronic haloperidol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Dayane Pessoa; Camboim, Thaisa Gracielle Martins; Silva, Ana Patrícia Magalhães; Silva, Caio da Fonseca; de Sousa, Rebeca Canuto; Barbosa, Mabson Delâno Alves; Oliveira, Lucidio Clebeson; Cavalcanti, José Rodolfo Lopes de Paiva; Lucena, Eudes Euler de Souza; Guzen, Fausto Pierdoná

    2017-07-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is characterized by involuntary movements of the lower portion of the face being related to typical antipsychotic therapy. TD is associated with the oxidative imbalance in the basal ganglia. Lipoic acid (LA) and omega-3 (ω-3) are antioxidants acting as enzyme cofactors, regenerating antioxidant enzymes. This study aimed to investigate behavioral and neurochemical effects of supplementation with LA (100 mg/kg) and ω-3 (1 g/kg) in the treatment of TD induced by chronic use of haloperidol (HAL) (1 mg/kg) in rats. Wistar male rats were used, weighing between 180-200 g. The animals were treated chronically (31 days) with LA alone or associated with HAL or ω-3. Motor behavior was assessed by open-field test, the catalepsy test, and evaluation of orofacial dyskinesia. Oxidative stress was accessed by determination of lipid peroxidation and concentration of nitrite. LA and ω-3 alone or associated caused an improvement in motor performance by increasing locomotor activity in the open-field test and decreased the permanence time on the bar in the catalepsy test and decreased the orofacial dyskinesia. LA and ω-3 showed antioxidant effects, decreasing lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels. Thus, the use of LA associated with ω-3 reduced the extrapyramidal effects produced by chronic use of HAL.

  14. Beneficial effects of vitamin C and vitamin E on reserpine-induced oral dyskinesia in rats: critical role of striatal catalase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Rulian Ricardo; Abílio, Vanessa Costhek; Grassl, Christian; Chinen, Cibele Cristina; Negrão, Luciana Takahashi Ribeiro; de Castro, Juliana Pedroso Moraes Vilela; Fukushiro, Daniela Fukue; Rodrigues, Marcelo Scarpari Dutra; Gomes, Patricia Helena Zanier; Registro, Sibele; de Carvalho, Rita de Cassia; D'Almeida, Vania; Silva, Regina Helena; Ribeiro, Rosana de Alencar; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Oral dyskinesias are implicated in a series of neuropathologies and have been associated to an increase in oxidative stress. Several antioxidants, including vitamin E, decrease reserpine-induced oral dyskinesia (OD) in rodents and we have described a protective role of striatal catalase against the development of OD. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of vitamin C alone or in combination with vitamin E on reserpine-induced OD as well as to determine a possible role of catalase in the antidyskinetic property of these vitamins. Different doses of vitamin C attenuated reserpine-induced increase in OD. A similar treatment with an effective dose of vitamin C concomitant to an effective dose of vitamin E potentiated the antidyskinetic effect of both vitamins when administered alone. The administration of these vitamins alone produced an increase in striatal catalase activity that likewise was potentiated by their combined administration. In addition, the antidyskinetic property of vitamin E and vitamin C was abolished by a concomitant treatment with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole. These results indicate a beneficial effect of these vitamins and reinforce the critical role of striatal catalase against the development of oral dyskinesias.

  15. Gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists for antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabed, Samer; Latifeh, Youssef; Mohammad, Husam Aldeen; Bergman, Hanna

    2018-04-17

    Chronic antipsychotic drug treatment may cause tardive dyskinesia (TD), a long-term movement disorder. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist drugs, which have intense sedative properties and may exacerbate psychotic symptoms, have been used to treat TD. 1. Primary objectiveThe primary objective was to determine whether using non-benzodiazepine GABA agonist drugs for at least six weeks was clinically effective for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced TD in people with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or other chronic mental illnesses.2. Secondary objectivesThe secondary objectives were as follows.To examine whether any improvement occurred with short periods of intervention (less than six weeks) and, if this did occur, whether this effect was maintained at longer periods of follow-up.To examine whether there was a differential effect between the various compounds.To test the hypothesis that GABA agonist drugs are most effective for a younger age group (less than 40 years old). We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (last searched April 2017), inspected references of all identified studies for further trials, and, when necessary, contacted authors of trials for additional information. We included randomised controlled trials of non-benzodiazepine GABA agonist drugs in people with antipsychotic-induced TD and schizophrenia or other chronic mental illness. Two review authors independently selected and critically appraised studies, extracted and analysed data on an intention-to-treat basis. Where possible and appropriate we calculated risk ratios (RRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). For continuous data we calculated mean differences (MD). We assumed that people who left early had no improvement. We contacted investigators to obtain missing information. We assessed risk of bias for included studies and created a 'Summary of findings' table using GRADE. We included 11 studies that randomised 343 people. Overall, the risk of bias

  16. Drug-induced apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutroy, M J

    1994-01-01

    Drugs have been in the past and will in the future still be liable to induce apnea in neonates, infants and older children. At these different stages of development, the child may be abnormally vulnerable to respiratory disorders and apnea, and doses of drugs, without any abnormal side effects in adult patients, can be harmful in younger subjects. Drugs responsible for apnea during development are numerous, but more than half of the problems are induced by sedatives and hypnotics, among which phenothiazines, barbiturates, benzodiazepines (included transplacentally acquired) and general anesthetics are a few. Other pharmacological families are apnea inducers in the neonatal period and childhood: analgesics and opioid narcotics, agents acting at the levels of neuromuscular function and autonomic ganglia, and cardiovascular agents. The pathogenesis of these apneas depends on the disturbance of any mechanism responsible for the respiratory activity: medullary centers and brain stem structures, afferent influx to CNS, sleep stages, upper airways, lungs and respiratory muscles. At key stages such as birth and infancy, drugs may emphasize the particular sensitivity of the mechanisms responsible for inducing apnea. This might explain unexpected respiratory disorders during development.

  17. Drug induced rhabdomyolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenegger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical condition of potential life threatening destruction of skeletal muscle caused by diverse mechanisms including drugs and toxins. Given the fact that structurally not related compounds cause an identical phenotype pinpoints to common targets or pathways, responsible for executing rhabdomyolysis. A drop in myoplasmic ATP paralleled with sustained elevations in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration represents a common signature of rhabdomyolysis. Interestingly, cardiac tissue is hardly affected or only secondary, as a consequence of imbalance in electrolytes or acid–base equilibrium. This dogma is now impaired by compounds, which show up with combined toxicity in heart and skeletal muscle. In this review, cases of rhabdomyolysis with novel recently approved drugs will be explored for new target mechanisms in the light of previously described pathomechanisms. PMID:22560920

  18. Drug induced lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Eisenhuber, Edith

    2010-01-01

    There is an ever increasing number of drugs that can cause lung disease. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, since the clinical symptoms are mostly nonspecific. Various HRCT patterns can be correlated - though with overlaps - to lung changes caused by certain groups of drugs. Alternative diagnosis such as infection, edema or underlying lung disease has to be excluded by clinical-radiological means. Herefore is profound knowledge of the correlations of drug effects and imaging findings essential. History of drug exposure, suitable radiological findings and response to treatment (corticosteroids and stop of medication) mostly provide the base for the diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Drug-induced tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include: Alcohol withdrawal Cigarette smoking Overactive thyroid ( hyperthyroidism ) Parkinson disease Adrenal gland tumor ( pheochromocytoma ) Too much ... your activity or is accompanied by other symptoms. Prevention Always tell your provider about the medicines you ...

  20. Drug-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Maertin, Sandrina; Scheiber, Jonas; Ritter, Christoph A; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia

    2012-04-01

    Drugs are thought to be a rare cause for acute pancreatitis; however 525 different drugs are listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) database suspected to cause acute pancreatitis as a side effect. Many of them are widely used to treat highly prevalent diseases. The true incidence is not entirely clear since only few systematic population based studies exist. The majority of the available data are derived from case reports or case control studies. Furthermore, the causality for many of these drugs remains elusive and for only 31 of these 525 dugs a definite causality was established. Definite proof for causality is defined by the WHO classification if symptoms reoccur upon rechallenge.In the actual algorithm the diagnosis is confirmed if no other cause of acute pancreatitis can be detected, and the patient is taking one of the suspected drugs.

  1. Drug-induced diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain and arthritis, such as ibuprofen and naproxen. Metformin used to treat diabetes. Some herbal teas contain senna or other "natural" laxatives that can cause diarrhea. Other vitamins, minerals, or supplements may also cause diarrhea.

  2. Intrastriatal injections of KN-93 ameliorates levodopa-induced dyskinesia in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Xinxin Yang, Na Wu, Lu Song, Zhenguo Liu Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital affiliated with Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Levodopa remains the most effective drug for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, long-term levodopa treatment is associated with the emergence of levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID, which has hampered its use for PD treatment. The mechanisms of LID are only partially understood. A previous study showed that KN-93, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII inhibitor, could be used to ameliorate LID in rats. However, the precise mechanisms by which KN-93 acts as an antidyskinetic are not fully understood. Methods: In the present study, a rat model of PD was induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (OHDA injections. Then, the successfully lesioned rats were intrastriatally administered with a different dose of KN-93 (1 µg, 2 µg, or 5 µg prior to levodopa treatment. Abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs scores and apomorphine-induced rotations were measured in PD rats. Phosphorylated levels of GluR1 at Serine-845 (pGluR1S845 levels were determined by western blot. Arc and Penk levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: We found that both 2 µg and 5 µg KN-93 treatment lowered AIMs scores in levodopa priming PD rats without affecting the antiparkinsonian effect of levodopa. In agreement with behavioral analysis, KN-93 treatment (2 µg reduced pGluR1S845 levels in PD rats. Moreover, KN-93 treatment (2 µg reduced the expression of Gad1 and Nur77 in PD rats. Conclusion: These data indicated that intrastriatal injections of KN-93 were beneficial in reducing the expression of LID by lowering the expression of pGluR1S845 via suppressing the activation of CaMKII in PD rats. Decreased expression of pGluR1S845 further reduced the expression of Gad1 and Nur77 in PD rats. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, levodopa

  3. Non-genetic risk factors and predicting efficacy for docetaxel--drug-induced liver injury among metastatic breast cancer patients.

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    Wang, Zheng; Liang, Xu; Yu, Jing; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zhu, Yulin; Yan, Ying; Dong, Ningning; Di, Lijun; Song, Guohong; Zhou, Xinna; Wang, Xiaoli; Yang, Huabing; Ren, Jun; Lyerly, Herbert Kim

    2012-08-01

    Docetaxel has been chosen as one of the most popular anticancer drugs in the treatment of breast cancer for more than a decade. There is increasingly awareness for the occurrence of docetaxel and/or docetaxel-drug-induced liver injury (DILI), although the underlying mechanism of occurrence and its risk factors remain unclear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to identify non-genetic risk factors for docetaxel-DILI among 647 metastasis breast cancer patients treated with docetaxel-containing regimens. Sixty-seven (10.36%) patients were diagnosed as docetaxel-DILI. By logistic regression analysis, premenopausal status (odds ratio [OR][95% confidence interval {CI}] = 2.24 [1.30-3.87]), past hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections (OR [95% CI] = 4.23 [1.57-11.42]), liver metastasis (OR [95% CI] = 3.70 [2.16-6.34]). The predominant occurrence of DILI was seen in groups with docetaxel combination regimens. (OR [95% CI] = 2.66 [1.59-4.55]). The potential increasing occurrence of docetaxel-DILI was associated with multiple risk factors in an exposure-response manner (P < 0.001), and patients with more than three risk factors would be exposed to a 36.61-fold risk of DILI (95% CI = 10.18-131.62). Further analysis by the risk score and area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUC) showed that those four factors contributed to an AUC of 0.7536 (95% CI = 0.70-0.81), with a predictive sensitivity of 74.63% and specificity of 65.17%. Docetaxel-DILI with a relatively higher incidence should be addressed among metastatic breast cancer patients. Four predominant risk factors, including premenopausal status, past HBV infection, liver metastasis, and docetaxel combination regimens, were potential predicators for DILI. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Role of cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism and involvement of reactive metabolite formations on antiepileptic drug-induced liver injuries.

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    Sasaki, Eita; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2018-01-01

    Several drugs have been withdrawn from the market or restricted to avoid unexpected adverse outcomes. Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a serious issue for drug development. Among DILIs, idiosyncratic DILIs have been a serious problem in drug development and clinical uses. Idiosyncratic DILI is most often unrelated to pharmacological effects or the dosing amount of a drug. The number of drugs that cause idiosyncratic DILI continue to grow in part because no practical preclinical tests have emerged that can identify drug candidates with the potential for developing idiosyncratic DILIs. Nevertheless, the implications of drug metabolism-related factors and immune-related factors on idiosyncratic DILIs has not been fully clarified because this toxicity can not be reproduced in animals. Therefore, accumulated evidence for the mechanisms of the idiosyncratic toxicity has been limited to only in vitro studies. This review describes current knowledge of the effects of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated metabolism and its detoxification abilities based on studies of idiosyncratic DILI animal models developed recently. This review also focused on antiepileptic drugs, phenytoin (diphenyl hydantoin, DPH) and carbamazepine (CBZ), which have rarely caused severe adverse reactions, such as fulminant hepatitis, and have been recognized as sources of idiosyncratic DILI. The studies of animal models of idiosyncratic DILIs have produced new knowledge of chronic administration, CYP inductions/inhibitions, glutathione contents, and immune-related factors for the initiation of idiosyncratic DILIs. Considering changes in the drug metabolic profile and detoxification abilities, idiosyncratic DILIs caused by antiepileptic drugs will lead to understanding the mechanisms of these DILIs.

  5. Noninvasive cardiac activation imaging of ventricular arrhythmias during drug-induced QT prolongation in the rabbit heart.

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    Han, Chengzong; Pogwizd, Steven M; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; Zhou, Zhaoye; He, Bin

    2013-10-01

    Imaging myocardial activation from noninvasive body surface potentials promises to aid in both cardiovascular research and clinical medicine. To investigate the ability of a noninvasive 3-dimensional cardiac electrical imaging technique for characterizing the activation patterns of dynamically changing ventricular arrhythmias during drug-induced QT prolongation in rabbits. Simultaneous body surface potential mapping and 3-dimensional intracardiac mapping were performed in a closed-chest condition in 8 rabbits. Data analysis was performed on premature ventricular complexes, couplets, and torsades de pointes (TdP) induced during intravenous administration of clofilium and phenylephrine with combinations of various infusion rates. The drug infusion led to a significant increase in the QT interval (from 175 ± 7 to 274 ± 31 ms) and rate-corrected QT interval (from 183 ± 5 to 262 ± 21 ms) during the first dose cycle. All the ectopic beats initiated by a focal activation pattern. The initial beat of TdPs arose at the focal site, whereas the subsequent beats were due to focal activity from different sites or 2 competing focal sites. The imaged results captured the dynamic shift of activation patterns and were in good correlation with the simultaneous measurements, with a correlation coefficient of 0.65 ± 0.02 averaged over 111 ectopic beats. Sites of initial activation were localized to be ~5 mm from the directly measured initiation sites. The 3-dimensional cardiac electrical imaging technique could localize the origin of activation and image activation sequence of TdP during QT prolongation induced by clofilium and phenylephrine in rabbits. It offers the potential to noninvasively investigate the proarrhythmic effects of drug infusion and assess the mechanisms of arrhythmias on a beat-to-beat basis. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrophysiological Characteristics of Human iPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes for the Assessment of Drug-Induced Proarrhythmic Potential.

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    Wataru Yamamoto

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to (1 characterize basic electrophysiological elements of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs that correspond to clinical properties such as QT-RR relationship, (2 determine the applicability of QT correction and analysis methods, and (3 determine if and how these in-vitro parameters could be used in risk assessment for adverse drug-induced effects such as Torsades de pointes (TdP. Field potential recordings were obtained from commercially available hiPSC-CMs using multi-electrode array (MEA platform with and without ion channel antagonists in the recording solution. Under control conditions, MEA-measured interspike interval and field potential duration (FPD ranged widely from 1049 to 1635 ms and from 334 to 527 ms, respectively and provided positive linear regression coefficients similar to native QT-RR plots obtained from human electrocardiogram (ECG analyses in the ongoing cardiovascular-based Framingham Heart Study. Similar to minimizing the effect of heart rate on the QT interval, Fridericia's and Bazett's corrections reduced the influence of beat rate on hiPSC-CM FPD. In the presence of E-4031 and cisapride, inhibitors of the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current, hiPSC-CMs showed reverse use-dependent FPD prolongation. Categorical analysis, which is usually applied to clinical QT studies, was applicable to hiPSC-CMs for evaluating torsadogenic risks with FPD and/or corrected FPD. Together, this results of this study links hiPSC-CM electrophysiological endpoints to native ECG endpoints, demonstrates the appropriateness of clinical analytical practices as applied to hiPSC-CMs, and suggests that hiPSC-CMs are a reliable models for assessing the arrhythmogenic potential of drug candidates in human.

  7. Candidate biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of drug-induced liver injury: An international collaborative effort.

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    Church, Rachel J; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Aubrecht, Jiri; Bonkovsky, Herbert L; Chalasani, Naga; Fontana, Robert J; Goepfert, Jens C; Hackman, Frances; King, Nicholas M P; Kirby, Simon; Kirby, Patrick; Marcinak, John; Ormarsdottir, Sif; Schomaker, Shelli J; Schuppe-Koistinen, Ina; Wolenski, Francis; Arber, Nadir; Merz, Michael; Sauer, John-Michael; Andrade, Raul J; van Bömmel, Florian; Poynard, Thierry; Watkins, Paul B

    2018-01-22

    Current blood biomarkers are suboptimal in detecting drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and predicting its outcome. We sought to characterize the natural variabilty and performance characteristics of fourteen promising DILI biomarker candidates. Serum or plasma from multiple cohorts of healthy volunteers (n=192 and =81), subjects who safely took potentially hepatotoxic drugs without adverse effects (n=55 and =92) and DILI patients (n=98, =28, and =143) were assayed for microRNA-122 (miR-122), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), total keratin 18 (K18), caspase cleaved K18 (ccK18), glutathione S-transferase alpha (GSTα), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), arginase-1 (ARG1), osteopontin (OPN), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), fatty acid binding protein (FABP1), cadherin-5 (CDH5), macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor (MCSFR), paraoxonase 1 (PON1, normalized to prothrombin protein), and leucocyte cell-derived chemotaxin-2 (LECT2). Most candidate biomarkers were significantly altered in DILI cases compared to healthy volunteers. GLDH correlated more closely with gold standard alanine aminotransferase (ALT) than miR-122 and there was a surprisingly wide inter- and intra-individual variability of miR-122 levels among the healthy volunteers. Serum K18, OPN, and MCSFR levels were most strongly associated with liver-related death or transplant within 6 months of DILI-onset. Prediction of prognosis among DILI patients using Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) was improved by incorporation of K18 and MCSFR levels. GLDH appears to be more useful than miR-122 in identifying DILI patients. K18, OPN and MCSFR are promising candidates for prediction of prognosis during an acute DILI event. Serial assessment of these biomarkers in large prospective studies will help further delineate their role in DILI diagnosis and management. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  8. Whole genome transcript profiling of drug induced steatosis in rats reveals a gene signature predictive of outcome.

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    Nishika Sahini

    Full Text Available Drug induced steatosis (DIS is characterised by excess triglyceride accumulation in the form of lipid droplets (LD in liver cells. To explore mechanisms underlying DIS we interrogated the publically available microarray data from the Japanese Toxicogenomics Project (TGP to study comprehensively whole genome gene expression changes in the liver of treated rats. For this purpose a total of 17 and 12 drugs which are diverse in molecular structure and mode of action were considered based on their ability to cause either steatosis or phospholipidosis, respectively, while 7 drugs served as negative controls. In our efforts we focused on 200 genes which are considered to be mechanistically relevant in the process of lipid droplet biogenesis in hepatocytes as recently published (Sahini and Borlak, 2014. Based on mechanistic considerations we identified 19 genes which displayed dose dependent responses while 10 genes showed time dependency. Importantly, the present study defined 9 genes (ANGPTL4, FABP7, FADS1, FGF21, GOT1, LDLR, GK, STAT3, and PKLR as signature genes to predict DIS. Moreover, cross tabulation revealed 9 genes to be regulated ≥10 times amongst the various conditions and included genes linked to glucose metabolism, lipid transport and lipogenesis as well as signalling events. Additionally, a comparison between drugs causing phospholipidosis and/or steatosis revealed 26 genes to be regulated in common including 4 signature genes to predict DIS (PKLR, GK, FABP7 and FADS1. Furthermore, a comparison between in vivo single dose (3, 6, 9 and 24 h and findings from rat hepatocyte studies (2 h, 8 h, 24 h identified 10 genes which are regulated in common and contained 2 DIS signature genes (FABP7, FGF21. Altogether, our studies provide comprehensive information on mechanistically linked gene expression changes of a range of drugs causing steatosis and phospholipidosis and encourage the screening of DIS signature genes at the preclinical stage.

  9. Reversal of drug-induced gingival overgrowth by UV-mediated apoptosis of gingival fibroblasts - an in vitro study.

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    Ritchhart, Casey; Joy, Anita

    2018-05-01

    Gingival overgrowth (GO) is an undesirable result of certain drugs like Cyclosporine A (CsA). Histopathology of GO shows hyperplasia of gingival epithelium, expansion of connective tissue with increased collagen, or a combination. Factors such as age, gender, oral hygiene, duration, and dosage also influence onset and severity of GO. One of the mechanisms behind uncontrolled cell proliferation in drug-induced GO is inhibition of apoptotic pathways, with a consequent effect on normal cell turnover. Our objective was to determine if UV photo-treatment would activate apoptosis in the gingival fibroblast component. Human gingival fibroblast cells (HGF-1) were exposed to 200ng/ml or 400ng/ml CsA and maintained for 3, 6, and 9 days, followed by UV radiation for 2, 5, or 10min (N=6). Naïve (no CsA or UV), negative (UV, no CsA), and positive controls (CsA, no UV) were designated. Prior to UV treatment, growth media was replaced with 1M PBS to prevent absorption of UV radiation by serum proteins, and cells were incubated in growth media for 24h post-UV before processing for TUNEL assay, cell proliferation assays, or immunofluorescence. Data showed a temporal increase in proliferation of HGF-1 cells under the influence of CsA. The 200ng/ml dose was more effective in causing over-proliferation. UV treatment for 10min resulted in significant reduction in cell numbers, as evidenced by counts and proliferation assays. Our study is a first step to further evaluate UV-mediated apoptosis as a mechanism to control certain forms of GO. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Multi-scale model of drug induced adaptive resistance of Gram-negative bacteria to polymyxin B.

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    Wojciech Krzyzanski

    Full Text Available The purpose of this report is to apply multi-scale modeling using the theory of physiologically structured populations (PSP to develop a mathematical model for antimicrobial resistance based on a heterogeneous distribution of receptors and affinities among bacterial cells. The theory has been tested on data obtained from an in vitro static time-kill infection model analyzing the pharmacodynamics of polymyxin B against Gram-negative bacteria. The drug binding parameter KD (dissociation equilibrium constant is assumed to vary between the bacterial cells. The PSP model describes the time course of the density distribution of KD upon exposure to cytotoxic drug concentrations. The drug increases the hazard of cell death as a function of receptor occupancy. The initial distribution of KD is described by the Weibull function. Time-kill data were used for model qualification. In vitro static time-kill experiments to evaluate the rate and extent of killing due to polymyxin B against two Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates with differing susceptibilities to polymyxin B were performed over 48 h. The time-kill kinetics data of bacterial load cfu (colony forming units/mL was used for model qualification. The resistant bacterial population is determined by the balance between growth rate and hazard of cell death controlled by polymyxin B concentrations. There exists a critical KD value below which cells continue to grow. Estimates of shape parameters for distributions of KD yielded unimodal distributions with the modes at 0 nM and the right tails containing approximately 25% of the bacteria. Our findings support a hypothesis that resistance of Klebsiella pneumoniae to polymyxin B can be at least partially attributed to a drug-induced selection of a subpopulation due to heterogeneity of polymyxin B receptor binding in the bacterial population.

  11. Serum apolipoprotein A1 and haptoglobin, in patients with suspected drug-induced liver injury (DILI as biomarkers of recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Peta

    Full Text Available There is a clear need for better biomarkers of drug-induced-liver-injury (DILI.We aimed to evaluate the possible prognostic value of ActiTest and FibroTest proteins apoliprotein-A1, haptoglobin and alpha-2-macroglobulin, in patients with DILI.We analyzed cases and controls included in the IMI-SAFE-T-DILI European project, from which serum samples had been stored in a dedicated biobank. The analyses of ActiTest and FibroTest had been prospectively scheduled. The primary objective was to analyze the performance (AUROC of ActiTest components as predictors of recovery outcome defined as an ALT <2x the upper limit of normal (ULN, and BILI <2x ULN.After adjudication, 154 patients were considered to have DILI and 22 were considered to have acute liver injury without DILI. A multivariate regression analysis (ActiTest-DILI patent pending combining the ActiTest components without BILI and ALT (used as references, apolipoprotein-A1, haptoglobin, alpha-2-macroglobulin and GGT, age and gender, resulted in a significant prediction of recovery with 67.0% accuracy (77/115 and an AUROC of 0.724 (P<0.001 vs. no prediction 0.500. Repeated apolipoprotein-A1 and haptoglobin remained significantly higher in the DILI cases that recovered (n = 65 versus those that did not (n = 16, at inclusion, at 4-8 weeks and at 8-12 weeks. The same results were observed after stratification on APAP cases and non-APAP cases.We identified that apolipoprotein-A1 and haptoglobin had significant predictive values for the prediction of recovery at 12 weeks in DILI, enabling the construction of a new prognostic panel, the DILI-ActiTest, which needs to be independently validated.

  12. An integrated perspective on diabetic, alcoholic, and drug-induced neuropathy, etiology, and treatment in the US

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    Zeng L

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lily Zeng,1 Doungkamol Alongkronrusmee,2 Richard M van Rijn2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA Abstract: Neuropathic pain (NeuP is a syndrome that results from damaged nerves and/or aberrant regeneration. Common etiologies of neuropathy include chronic illnesses and medication use. Chronic disorders, such as diabetes and alcoholism, can cause neuronal injury and consequently NeuP. Certain medications with antineoplastic effects also carry an exquisitely high risk for neuropathy. These culprits are a few of many that are fueling the NeuP epidemic, which currently affects 7%–10% of the population. It has been estimated that approximately 10% and 7% of US adults carry a diagnosis of diabetes and alcohol disorder, respectively. Despite its pervasiveness, many physicians are unfamiliar with adequate treatment of NeuP, partly due to the few reviews that are available that have integrated basic science and clinical practice. In light of the recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines that advise against the routine use of μ-opioid receptor-selective opioids for chronic pain management, such a review is timely. Here, we provide a succinct overview of the etiology and treatment options of diabetic and alcohol- and drug-induced neuropathy, three different and prevalent neuropathies fusing the combined clinical and preclinical pharmacological expertise in NeuP of the authors. We discuss the anatomy of pain and pain transmission, with special attention to key ion channels, receptors, and neurotransmitters. An understanding of pain neurophysiology will lead to a better understanding of the rationale for the effectiveness of current treatment options, and may lead to better diagnostic tools to help distinguish types of neuropathy. We close with a discussion of ongoing research

  13. Incidence of antituberculosis-drug-induced hepatotoxicity and associated risk factors among tuberculosis patients in Dawro Zone, South Ethiopia: A cohort study

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    Wondwossen Abera,; Waqtola Cheneke,; Gemeda Abebe,

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antituberculosis drugs cause hepatotoxicity in some individuals leading to acute liver failure, which results in death. Such phenomena limit the clinical use of drugs, contributing to treatment failure that possibly causes drug resistance. Furthermore, associated risk factors for the development of antituberculosis-drug-induced hepatotoxicity (anti-TB-DIH) are found to be controversial among different study findings. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted from May 20...

  14. The Hepatoprotection Provided by Taurine and Glycine against Antineoplastic Drugs Induced Liver Injury in an Ex Vivo Model of Normothermic Recirculating Isolated Perfused Rat Liver

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    Reza Heidari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Taurine (2-aminoethane sulfonic acid is a non-protein amino acid found in high concentration in different tissues. Glycine (Amino acetic acid is the simplest amino acid incorporated in the structure of proteins. Several investigations indicate the hepatoprotective properties of these amino acids. On the other hand, antineoplastic agents-induced serum transaminase elevation and liver injury is a clinical complication. The current investigation was designed to screen the possible hepatoprotective properties of taurine and glycine against antineoplastic drugs-induced hepatic injury in an ex vivo model of isolated perfused rat liver. Rat liver was perfused with different concentration (10 μM, 100 μM and 1000 μM of antineoplastic drugs (Mitoxantrone, Cyclophosphamide, Cisplatin, 5 Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin and Dacarbazine via portal vein. Taurine and glycine were administered to drug-treated livers and liver perfusate samples were collected for biochemical measurements (ALT, LDH, AST, and K+. Markers of oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species formation, lipid peroxidation, total antioxidant capacity and glutathione were also assessed in liver tissue. Antineoplastic drugs caused significant pathological changes in perfusate biochemistry. Furthermore, markers of oxidative stress were significantly elevated in drug treated livers. It was found that taurine (5 and 10 mM and glycine (5 and 10 mM administration significantly mitigated the biomarkers of liver injury and attenuated drug induced oxidative stress. Our data indicate that taurine and glycine supplementation might help as potential therapeutic options to encounter anticancer drugs-induced liver injury.

  15. Association of a neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism with levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease.

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    Santos-Lobato, Bruno Lopes; Borges, Vanderci; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Mata, Ignacio Fernandez; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Tumas, Vitor

    2018-04-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is a common complication of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). PD physiopathology is associated with dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic pathways, including the nitric oxide system. The present study aims to examine the association of a neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS1) single nucleotide polymorphism (rs2682826) with LID in PD patients. We studied 186 PD patients using levodopa. The presence of LID was defined as a MDS-UPDRS Part IV score ≥1 on item 4.1. We tested for association between NOS1 rs2682826 and the presence, daily frequency, and functional impact of LID using regression models, adjusting for important covariates. There was no significant association between genotype and any of the LID-related variables examined. Our results suggest that this NOS1 polymorphism does not contribute to LID susceptibility or severity. However, additional studies that include a comprehensive set of NOS1 variants will be needed to fully define the role of this gene in LID. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Case Reports Showing a Long-Term Effect of Subanesthetic Ketamine Infusion in Reducing L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesias

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    Scott J. Sherman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is an FDA-approved drug with a known safety profile. Low-dose subanesthetic intravenous ketamine infusion treatment has led to long-term reduction of treatment-resistant depression and of chronic pain states. We report on low-dose subanesthetic intravenous ketamine infusion treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD patients by 5 case studies and show a long-lasting therapeutic benefit to reduce L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID, improve on time, and reduce depression. Based on the literature we hypothesize that low-dose ketamine may act as a ‘chemical deep brain stimulation', by desynchronizing hypersynchronous oscillatory brain activity, including in the basal ganglia and the motor cortex. The presented PD case reports indicate tolerability, safety and long-term beneficial effects of low-dose ketamine infusion that should be further investigated in a properly controlled prospective clinical trial for treatment of LID, as well as the prevalent nonmotor features pain and depression in PD patients.

  17. Report: Protective effects of rice bran oil in haloperidol-induced tardive dyskinesia and serotonergic responses in rats.

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    Samad, Noreen; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2016-07-01

    Effect of administration of Rice bran oil (RBO) was evaluated on haloperidol elicited tardive dyskinesia in rats. Albino Wistar rats treated with haloperidol in drinking water at a dose of 0.2mg/kg/day and RBO by oral tubes at a dose of 0.4 mL/day for 5 weeks. Motor coordination, VCMs and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetraline)[8-OH-DPAT] _syndrome were monitored. Striatal serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-EC). Rats treated with haloperidol orally at a dose of for a period of 5 weeks developed VCMs, which increased progressively as the treatment continued for 5 weeks. Motor coordination impairment started after the 1st week and was maximally impaired after 3 weeks and gradually returned to the 1st week value. Co-administration of RBO prevented haloperidol_induced VCMs as well impairment of motor coordination. The intensity of 8-OH-DPAT_induced syndrome and decreased 5-HT metabolism were greater in water + haloperidol treated animals than RBO + haloperidol treated animals. The present study suggested that involvement of free radical in the development of TD and point to RBO as a possible therapeutic option to treat this hyperkinetic motor disorder.

  18. Polymorphisms of Dopamine Receptor Genes and Risk of L-Dopa–Induced Dyskinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

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    Cristoforo Comi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available L-dopa–induced dyskinesia (LID is a frequent motor complication of Parkinson’s disease (PD, associated with a negative prognosis. Previous studies showed an association between dopamine receptor (DR gene (DR variants and LID, the results of which have not been confirmed. The present study is aimed to determine whether genetic differences of DR are associated with LID in a small but well-characterized cohort of PD patients. To this end we enrolled 100 PD subjects, 50 with and 50 without LID, matched for age, gender, disease duration and dopaminergic medication in a case-control study. We conducted polymerase chain reaction for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in both D1-like (DRD1A48G; DRD1C62T and DRD5T798C and D2-like DR (DRD2G2137A, DRD2C957T, DRD3G25A, DRD3G712C, DRD4C616G and DRD4nR VNTR 48bp analyzed genomic DNA. Our results showed that PD patients carrying allele A at DRD3G3127A had an increased risk of LID (OR 4.9; 95% CI 1.7–13.9; p = 0.004. The present findings may provide valuable information for personalizing pharmacological therapy in PD patients.

  19. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identified a Novel Compound Heterozygous Mutation of LRRC6 in a Chinese Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Patient

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    Lv Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a clinical rare peculiar disorder, mainly featured by respiratory infection, tympanitis, nasosinusitis, and male infertility. Previous study demonstrated it is an autosomal recessive disease and by 2017 almost 40 pathologic genes have been identified. Among them are the leucine-rich repeat- (LRR- containing 6 (LRRC6 codes for a 463-amino-acid cytoplasmic protein, expressed distinctively in motile cilia cells, including the testis cells and the respiratory epithelial cells. In this study, we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with PCD-known genes filtering to explore the genetic lesion of a PCD patient. A novel compound heterozygous mutation in LRRC6 (c.183T>G/p.N61K; c.179-1G>A was identified and coseparated in this family. The missense mutation (c.183T>G/p.N61K may lead to a substitution of asparagine by lysine at position 61 in exon 3 of LRRC6. The splice site mutation (c.179-1G>A may cause a premature stop codon in exon 4 and decrease the mRNA levels of LRRC6. Both mutations were not present in our 200 local controls, dbSNP, and 1000 genomes. Three bioinformatics programs also predicted that both mutations are deleterious. Our study not only further supported the importance of LRRC6 in PCD, but also expanded the spectrum of LRRC6 mutations and will contribute to the genetic diagnosis and counseling of PCD patients.

  20. The innovative use of a large-scale industry biomedical consortium to research the genetic basis of drug induced serious adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Arthur L

    2007-01-01

    The International Serious Adverse Event Consortium (SAEC) is a pharmaceutical industry and FDA led international (501 c3 non-profit) consortium, focused on identifying and validating DNA-variants useful in predicting the risk of drug induced, rare serious adverse events (SAEs). As such, it functions with the explicit purpose of enhancing the 'public good'. Its members are (i) organizations engaged principally in the business of discovering, developing and marketing pharmaceutical products, or (ii) a charitable, governmental, or other non-profit organization with an interest in researching the molecular basis of drug response.Drug-induced, rare SAEs present significant health issues for patients; and pose challenges for the safe use of approved drugs and the development of new drugs. Examples of drug-induced, rare SAEs include hepatotoxicity, QT prolongation, rhabdomyolosis, serious skin rashes (e.g. SJS), edema, acute renal failure, acute hypersensitivity, anemias/neutropenias, excessive weigh gain, retinopathy, vasculitis, among others. The rarity of such drug induced SAEs and the absence of effective government surveillance/research networks, makes it extremely difficult for any one company or research entity to accrue enough SAE cases and controls to conduct effective whole genome studies. Central to the notion of the SAEC is industry, government and health care providers can join forces to make use of a variety of sample and data resources in researching the genetic basis of these events.The purpose of the SAEC is threefold:•To carry out research directed toward the discovery of DNA-variants clinically useful in understanding and predicting the risk of drug induced serious adverse events and similar scientific research.•To ensure the widespread availability of the results of such research to the scientific research community and the public at large for no charge through publication and web-based methods; and•To educate the scientific research and medical

  1. Mouse precision-cut liver slices as an ex vivo model to study idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury.

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    Hadi, Mackenzie; Chen, Yixi; Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Merema, Marjolijn T; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2012-09-17

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) has been the top reason for withdrawing drugs from the market or for black box warnings. IDILI may arise from the interaction of a drug's reactive metabolite with a mild inflammation that renders the liver more sensitive to injury resulting in increased toxicity (inflammatory stress hypothesis). Aiming to develop a robust ex vivo screening method to study inflammatory stress-related IDILI mechanisms and to find biomarkers that can detect or predict IDILI, mouse precision-cut liver slices (mPCLS) were coincubated for 24 h with IDILI-related drugs and lipopolysaccharide. Lipopolysaccharide exacerbated ketoconazole (15 μM) and clozapine (45 μM) toxicity but not their non-IDILI-related comparators, voriconazole (1500 μM) and olanzapine (45 μM). However, the other IDILI-related drugs tested [diclofenac (200 μM), carbamazepine (400 μM), and troglitazone (30 μM)] did not cause synergistic toxicity with lipopolysaccharide after 24 h of incubation. Lipopolysaccharide further decreased the reduced glutathione levels caused by ketoconazole or clozapine in mPCLS after 24 h of incubation, which was not the case for the other drugs. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased nitric oxide (NO), cytokine, and chemokine release into the mPCLS media, while the treatment with the drugs alone did not cause any substantial change. All seven drugs drastically reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production. Interestingly, only ketoconazole and clozapine increased the lipopolysaccharide-induced granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) release. Pilot experiments showed that diclofenac and troglitazone, but not carbamazepine, demonstrated synergistic toxicity with lipopolysaccharide after a longer incubation of 48 h in mPCLS. In conclusion, we have developed an ex vivo model to detect inflammatory stress-related liver toxicity and identified ketoconazole, clozapine

  2. A cellular model to study drug-induced liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Application to acetaminophen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaut, Anaïs; Le Guillou, Dounia [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Moreau, Caroline [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Service de Biochimie et Toxicologie, CHU Pontchaillou, Rennes (France); Bucher, Simon [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); McGill, Mitchell R. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Martinais, Sophie [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Gicquel, Thomas; Morel, Isabelle [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Service de Biochimie et Toxicologie, CHU Pontchaillou, Rennes (France); Robin, Marie-Anne [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Jaeschke, Hartmut [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fromenty, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.fromenty@inserm.fr [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France)

    2016-02-01

    Obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can increase susceptibility to hepatotoxicity induced by some xenobiotics including drugs, but the involved mechanisms are poorly understood. For acetaminophen (APAP), a role of hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is suspected since the activity of this enzyme is consistently enhanced during NAFLD. The first aim of our study was to set up a cellular model of NAFLD characterized not only by triglyceride accumulation but also by higher CYP2E1 activity. To this end, human HepaRG cells were incubated for one week with stearic acid or oleic acid, in the presence of different concentrations of insulin. Although cellular triglycerides and the expression of lipid-responsive genes were similar with both fatty acids, CYP2E1 activity was significantly increased only by stearic acid. CYP2E1 activity was reduced by insulin and this effect was reproduced in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Next, APAP cytotoxicity was assessed in HepaRG cells with or without lipid accretion and CYP2E1 induction. Experiments with a large range of APAP concentrations showed that the loss of ATP and glutathione was almost always greater in the presence of stearic acid. In cells pretreated with the CYP2E1 inhibitor chlormethiazole, recovery of ATP was significantly higher in the presence of stearate with low (2.5 mM) or high (20 mM) concentrations of APAP. Levels of APAP-glucuronide were significantly enhanced by insulin. Hence, HepaRG cells can be used as a valuable model of NAFLD to unveil important metabolic and hormonal factors which can increase susceptibility to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is frequent in obese individuals. • NAFLD can favor hepatotoxicity induced by some drugs including acetaminophen (APAP). • A model of NAFLD was set up by using HepaRG cells incubated with stearate or oleate. • Stearate-loaded HepaRG cells presented higher cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1

  3. A case-control study of Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy (DISE) in pediatric population: A proposal for indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collu, Maria Antonietta; Esteller, Eduard; Lipari, Fiorella; Haspert, Raul; Mulas, Demetrio; Diaz, Miguel Angel; Dwivedi, Raghav C

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate whether and when Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy (DISE) changes diagnosis and treatment plan in pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome (OSAS) with the aim to identify specific subgroups of patients for whom DISE should be especially considered. A case-control study of DISE in 150 children with OSAS. Pre-operative OSA were assessed through detailed history, Chervin questionnaire, physical examination and overnight polysomnography. The group of study was divided into three subgroups according to clinical and polysomnographyc criteria: conventional OSAS, disproportional OSAS and persistent OSAS. Endoscopic evaluation of the upper airway during DISE was scored using Chan classification. Surgical treatment was tailored individually upon the basis of sleep endoscopy findings: performance of any surgery other than tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T&A) was considered as a change of the treatment plan. Cases and controls were compared considering presence and absence of DISE-directed extra surgery, respectively. 150 patients with mean age (SD) 56.09 (23.94) months and mean apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 5.79 (6.52) underwent DISE. The conventional subgroup represented the 58.67% of the sample (n = 88), while the disproportional one counted for the 26.67% (n = 40), and the persistent one for 14.66% (n = 22) of the population. Sleep endoscopy changed the surgical plan in 4.5% of conventional OSAS, 17.5% of disproportional OSAS and 72.7% of persistent OSAS (p < 0.005). Overall, a change of the treatment plan operated by DISE was associated with a non-conventional OSAS status (OR = 6; 95% CI = 1.6-26.4). DISE is a safe procedure in children suffering from OSAS, and, despite being unnecessary in conventional cases of OSA, DISE should be considered not only in syndromic children, as previously demonstrated, but also in the general non-syndromic pediatric population, in the case of non-conventional OSA patients, and in children with persistent

  4. Spatial correlation of action potential duration and diastolic dysfunction in transgenic and drug-induced LQT2 rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odening, Katja E; Jung, Bernd A; Lang, Corinna N; Cabrera Lozoya, Rocio; Ziupa, David; Menza, Marius; Relan, Jatin; Franke, Gerlind; Perez Feliz, Stefanie; Koren, Gideon; Zehender, Manfred; Bode, Christoph; Brunner, Michael; Sermesant, Maxime; Föll, Daniela

    2013-10-01

    Enhanced dispersion of action potential duration (APD) is a major contributor to long QT syndrome (LQTS)-related arrhythmias. To investigate spatial correlations of regional heterogeneities in cardiac repolarization and mechanical function in LQTS. Female transgenic LQTS type 2 (LQT2; n = 11) and wild-type littermate control (LMC) rabbits (n = 9 without E4031 and n = 10 with E4031) were subjected to phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging to assess regional myocardial velocities. In the same rabbits' hearts, monophasic APDs were assessed in corresponding segments. In LQT2 and E4031-treated rabbits, APD was longer in all left ventricular segments (P < .01) and APD dispersion was greater than that in LMC rabbits (P < .01). In diastole, peak radial velocities (Vr) were reduced in LQT2 and E4031-treated compared to LMC rabbits in LV base and mid (LQT2: -3.36 ± 0.4 cm/s, P < .01; E4031-treated: -3.24 ± 0.6 cm/s, P < .0001; LMC: -4.42 ± 0.5 cm/s), indicating an impaired diastolic function. Regionally heterogeneous diastolic Vr correlated with APD (LQT2: correlation coefficient [CC] 0.38, P = .01; E4031-treated: CC 0.42, P < .05). Time-to-diastolic peak Vr were prolonged in LQT2 rabbits (LQT2: 196.8 ± 2.9 ms, P < .001; E4031-treated: 199.5 ± 2.2 ms, P < .0001, LMC 183.1 ± 1.5), indicating a prolonged contraction duration. Moreover, in transgenic LQT2 rabbits, diastolic time-to-diastolic peak Vr correlated with APD (CC 0.47, P = .001). In systole, peak Vr were reduced in LQT2 and E4031-treated rabbits (P < .01) but longitudinal velocities or ejection fraction did not differ. Finally, random forest machine learning algorithms enabled a differentiation between LQT2, E4031-treated, and LMC rabbits solely based on "mechanical" magnetic resonance imaging data. The prolongation of APD led to impaired diastolic and systolic function in transgenic and drug-induced LQT2 rabbits. APD correlated with regional diastolic dysfunction, indicating that LQTS is not purely an

  5. Ibuprofen or piroxicam protects nigral neurons and delays the development of l-dopa induced dyskinesia in rats with experimental Parkinsonism: Influence on angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teema, Asmaa M; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2016-08-01

    Neuroinflammation and angiogenesis have been involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study investigated the effect of ibuprofen or piroxicam on the motor response to l-dopa and development of dyskinesia in Parkinsonian rats focusing on the anti-angiogenic role of the two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Rats were divided into nine groups as follows: Group I: the vehicle group, Group II: rotenone group, rats were injected with nine doses of rotenone (1 mg/kg/48 h), group III&IV: rats received rotenone + ibuprofen (10 or 30 mg/kg), Group V-VI: rats received rotenone + piroxicam (1 or 3 mg/kg), Group VII: rats received rotenone + l-dopa/carbidopa (100/10 mg/kg), Group VIII-IX: rats received rotenone + l-dopa/carbidopa + ibuprofen (30 mg/kg) or piroxicam (3 mg/kg). In general, drugs were administered daily for ten weeks. Rotenone-treated rats showed motor dysfunction, lower striatal dopamine, lower staining for nigral tyrosine hydroxylase but higher level of striatal cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) compared to vehicle-treated rats (P piroxicam in combination with l-dopa preserved the effect of l-dopa at the end of week 10, delayed the development of dyskinesia and decreased striatal COX-2 and VEGF levels. In conclusion, the current study suggests that ibuprofen and piroxicam are promising candidates for neuroprotection in PD and may have utility in conjunction with l-dopa in order to ensure the longevity of its action and to delay the development of dyskinesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeting the D1-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor complex reduces L-dopa-induced dyskinesia in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned Parkinson’s rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song L

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lu Song,1,* Zhanzhao Zhang,2,* Rongguo Hu,1 Jie Cheng,1 Lin Li,1 Qinyi Fan,1 Na Wu,1 Jing Gan,1 Mingzhu Zhou,1 Zhenguo Liu11Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital, 2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shanghai 9th People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa remains the most effective therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD, but its long-term administration is associated with the development of debilitating motor complications known as L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID. Enhanced function of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR is believed to participate in the pathogenesis of LID. Given the existence of physical and functional interactions between D1R and NMDAR, we explored the effects of uncoupling D1R and NMDA GluN1 (GluN1 interaction on LID by using the Tat-conjugated interfering peptide (Tat-D1-t2. In this study, we demonstrated in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-lesioned PD rat model that intrastriatal injection of Tat-D1-t2 alleviated dyskinetic behaviors and downregulated the phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Thr34 induced by levodopa. Moreover, we also showed intrastriatal administration of Tat-D1-t2 elicited alterations in membranous GluN1 and D1R expression. These findings indicate that D1R/GluN1 complexes may be a molecular target with therapeutic potential for the treatment of dyskinesia in Parkinson’s patients.Keywords: 6-hydroxydopamine, Parkinson’s disease, dyskinesia, L-dopa, D1 receptor, NMDA, protein–protein interaction

  7. A case report of primary ciliary dyskinesia, laterality defects and developmental delay caused by the co-existence of a single gene and chromosome disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Jillian P

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by abnormal ciliary motion and impaired mucociliary clearance, leading to recurrent respiratory infections, sinusitis, otitis media and male infertility. Some patients also have laterality defects. We recently reported the identification of three disease-causing PCD genes in the Irish Traveller population; RSPH4A, DYX1C1 and CCNO. We have since assessed an additional Irish Traveller family with a complex phenotype involving PCD who did not have any of the previously identified PCD mutations.

  8. Presynaptic dopamine depletion determines the timing of levodopa-induced dyskinesia onset in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Han Soo; Chung, Seok Jong; Chung, Su Jin; Ye, Byoung Seok; Sohn, Young Ho; Lee, Phil Hyu; Moon, Hyojeong; Oh, Jung Su; Kim, Jae Seung; Hong, Jin Yong

    2018-01-01

    Reduced presynaptic dopaminergic activity plays an important role in the development of levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we investigated whether dopaminergic function in the nigrostriatal system is associated with the timing of LID onset. From among 412 drug-naive PD patients who underwent a dopamine transporter (DAT) PET scan during their baseline evaluation, we enrolled 65 patients who developed LID during a follow-up period of >2 years. Based on the time from PD onset, LID was classified as early, intermediate or late onset. We then compared DAT availability in the striatal subregions of the patients in the three groups. The demographic characteristics did not differ among the three patient groups except for earlier intervention of levodopa therapy in the early LID onset group (p = 0.001). After adjusting for age at PD onset, gender, timing of levodopa therapy from PD onset, and the severity of PD motor symptoms, DAT activity in the posterior putamen was found to be significantly lower in the early LID onset group than in the late LID onset group (p = 0.017). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that low DAT activity in the posterior putamen was significantly associated with the early appearance of LID in the early LID onset group (β = 16.039, p = 0.033). This study demonstrated that low DAT activity in the posterior putamen at baseline is a major risk factor for the early onset of LID in patients with PD, suggesting that the degree of presynaptic dopaminergic denervation plays an important role in determining the timing of LID onset. (orig.)

  9. Aberrant transcriptional networks in step-wise neurogenesis of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia-induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Ma, Yu; Zhang, Kunshan; Gu, Junjie; Tang, Fan; Chen, Shengdi; Cao, Li; Li, Siguang; Jin, Ying

    2016-08-16

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is an episodic movement disorder with autosomal-dominant inheritance and marked variability in clinical manifestations.Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) has been identified as a causative gene of PKD, but the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of PKD still remains a mystery. The phenotypes and transcriptional patterns of the PKD disease need further clarification. Here, we report the generation and neural differentiation of iPSC lines from two familial PKD patients with c.487C>T (p. Gln163X) and c.573dupT (p. Gly192Trpfs*8) PRRT2 mutations, respectively. Notably, an extremely lower efficiency in neural conversion from PKD-iPSCs than control-iPSCs is observed by a step-wise neural differentiation method of dual inhibition of SMAD signaling. Moreover, we show the high expression level of PRRT2 throughout the human brain and the expression pattern of PRRT2 in other human tissues for the first time. To gain molecular insight into the development of the disease, we conduct global gene expression profiling of PKD cells at four different stages of neural induction and identify altered gene expression patterns, which peculiarly reflect dysregulated neural transcriptome signatures and a differentiation tendency to mesodermal development, in comparison to control-iPSCs. Additionally, functional and signaling pathway analyses indicate significantly different cell fate determination between PKD-iPSCs and control-iPSCs. Together, the establishment of PKD-specific in vitro models and the illustration of transcriptome features in PKD cells would certainly help us with better understanding of the defects in neural conversion as well as further investigations in the pathogenesis of the PKD disease.

  10. Gypenosides attenuate the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Keon Sung; Zhao, Ting Ting; Park, Keun Hong; Park, Hyun Jin; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Chong Kil; Lee, Myung Koo

    2015-04-21

    Gypenosides (GPS) and ethanol extract of Gynostemma pentaphyllum (GP-EX) show anxiolytic effects on affective disorders in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-lesioned mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Long-term administration of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) leads to the development of severe motor side effects such as L-DOPA-induced-dyskinesia (LID) in PD. The present study investigated the effects of GPS and GP-EX on LID in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of PD. Daily administration of L-DOPA (25 mg/kg) in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD for 22 days induced expression of LID, which was determined by the body and locomotive AIMs scores and contralateral rotational behaviors. However, co-treatments of GPS (25 and 50 mg/kg) or GP-EX (50 mg/kg) with L-DOPA significantly attenuated the development of LID without compromising the anti-parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA. In addition, the increases in ∆FosB expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats induced by L-DOPA administration were significantly reduced by co-treatment with GPS (25 and 50 mg/kg) or GP-EX (50 mg/kg). These results suggest that GPS (25 and 50 mg/kg) and GP-EX (50 mg/kg) effectively attenuate the development of LID by modulating the biomarker activities of ∆FosB expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD. GPS and GP-EX will be useful adjuvant therapeutics for LID in PD.

  11. Presynaptic dopamine depletion determines the timing of levodopa-induced dyskinesia onset in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Han Soo; Chung, Seok Jong; Chung, Su Jin; Ye, Byoung Seok; Sohn, Young Ho; Lee, Phil Hyu [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hyojeong; Oh, Jung Su; Kim, Jae Seung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jin Yong [Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-03-15

    Reduced presynaptic dopaminergic activity plays an important role in the development of levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we investigated whether dopaminergic function in the nigrostriatal system is associated with the timing of LID onset. From among 412 drug-naive PD patients who underwent a dopamine transporter (DAT) PET scan during their baseline evaluation, we enrolled 65 patients who developed LID during a follow-up period of >2 years. Based on the time from PD onset, LID was classified as early, intermediate or late onset. We then compared DAT availability in the striatal subregions of the patients in the three groups. The demographic characteristics did not differ among the three patient groups except for earlier intervention of levodopa therapy in the early LID onset group (p = 0.001). After adjusting for age at PD onset, gender, timing of levodopa therapy from PD onset, and the severity of PD motor symptoms, DAT activity in the posterior putamen was found to be significantly lower in the early LID onset group than in the late LID onset group (p = 0.017). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that low DAT activity in the posterior putamen was significantly associated with the early appearance of LID in the early LID onset group (β = 16.039, p = 0.033). This study demonstrated that low DAT activity in the posterior putamen at baseline is a major risk factor for the early onset of LID in patients with PD, suggesting that the degree of presynaptic dopaminergic denervation plays an important role in determining the timing of LID onset. (orig.)

  12. Preventing Unnecessary Costs of Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulin, Mathieu; Diaby, Vakaramoko; Tannenbaum, Cara

    2016-01-01

    The costs of drug-induced hypoglycemia are a critical but often neglected component of value-based arguments to reduce tight glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes. An economic (decision-tree) analysis compared rates, costs, quality-adjusted life-years, and incremental costs per quality-adjusted life-year gained associated with mild, moderate and severe hypoglycemic events for 6 glucose-lowering medication classes in type 2 diabetic adults aged 65-79 versus those 80 years and older. The national U.S. (Center for Medicare Services) and Canadian public health payer perspectives were adopted. Incidence rates of drug-induced hypoglycemia were the highest for basal insulin and sulfonylureas: 8.64 and 4.32 events per person-year in 65-79 year olds, and 12.06 and 6.03 events per person-year for 80 years and older. In both the U.S. and Canada, metformin dominated sulfonylureas, basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide1 receptor agonists. Relative to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones had the lowest incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in the U.S. and dominated sulfonylureas in Canada for adults 80 years and older. Relative to sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl peptidase4 inhibitors were cost-effective for adults 80 years and older in both countries, and for 65-79 year olds in Canada. Annual costs of hypoglycemia for older adults attaining very tight glycemic control with the use of insulin or sulfonylureas were estimated at U.S.$509,214,473 in the U.S. and CAN$65,497,849 in Canada. Optimizing drug therapy for older type 2 diabetic adults through the avoidance of drug-induced hypoglycemia will dramatically improve patient health while also generating millions of dollars by saving unnecessary medical costs.

  13. Preventing Unnecessary Costs of Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes in the United States and Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Boulin

    Full Text Available The costs of drug-induced hypoglycemia are a critical but often neglected component of value-based arguments to reduce tight glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes.An economic (decision-tree analysis compared rates, costs, quality-adjusted life-years, and incremental costs per quality-adjusted life-year gained associated with mild, moderate and severe hypoglycemic events for 6 glucose-lowering medication classes in type 2 diabetic adults aged 65-79 versus those 80 years and older. The national U.S. (Center for Medicare Services and Canadian public health payer perspectives were adopted.Incidence rates of drug-induced hypoglycemia were the highest for basal insulin and sulfonylureas: 8.64 and 4.32 events per person-year in 65-79 year olds, and 12.06 and 6.03 events per person-year for 80 years and older. In both the U.S. and Canada, metformin dominated sulfonylureas, basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide1 receptor agonists. Relative to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones had the lowest incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in the U.S. and dominated sulfonylureas in Canada for adults 80 years and older. Relative to sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl peptidase4 inhibitors were cost-effective for adults 80 years and older in both countries, and for 65-79 year olds in Canada. Annual costs of hypoglycemia for older adults attaining very tight glycemic control with the use of insulin or sulfonylureas were estimated at U.S.$509,214,473 in the U.S. and CAN$65,497,849 in Canada.Optimizing drug therapy for older type 2 diabetic adults through the avoidance of drug-induced hypoglycemia will dramatically improve patient health while also generating millions of dollars by saving unnecessary medical costs.

  14. The abdominal skin of female Sprague-Dawley rats is more sensitive than the back skin to drug-induced phototoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Kazuhiro; Yasuno, Hironobu; Sakai, Yumi; Harada, Yumiko; Shimizu, Fumi; Miyamoto, Yumiko; Takamatsu, Yuki; Miyamoto, Makoto; Sato, Keiichiro

    2017-11-01

    In vivo phototoxicity studies are important to predict drug-induced phototoxicity in humans; however, a standard methodology has not established. To determine differences in sensitivity to drug-induced phototoxicity among various skin sites, we evaluated phototoxic reactions in the back and abdominal skin of female Sprague-Dawley rats orally dosed with phototoxic drugs (pirfenidone, 8-methoxysoraren, doxycycline, and lomefloxacin) or a non-phototoxic drug (gatifloxacin) followed by solar-simulated light irradiation comprising 18J/cm 2 ultraviolet A. Tissue reactions were evaluated by macroscopic and microscopic examination and immunohistochemistry for γ-H2AX, and tissue concentrations of pirfenidone, doxycycline, and lomefloxacin were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, the thicknesses of the skin layers at both sites were measured in drug-naïve rats. The abdominal skin showed more severe reactions to all phototoxic drugs than the back skin, whereas the minimal erythema dose in drug-naïve rats and skin concentrations of each drug were comparable between the sites. Furthermore, histopathological lesions and γ-H2AX-positive cells in the abdominal skin were detected in deeper layers than in the back skin. The stratum corneum and dermis in the abdominal skin were significantly thinner than in the back skin, indicating a difference in the depth of light penetration and potentially contributing to the site differences observed in sensitivity to phototoxicity. Gatifloxacin did not induce any phototoxic reactions at either site. In conclusion, the abdominal skin is more sensitive to drug-induced phototoxicity than the back skin and may represent a preferable site for irradiation in this rat phototoxicity model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Drug-induced Defibrinogenation as New Treatment Approach of Acute Hearing Loss in an Animal Model for Inner Ear Vascular Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Bernhard G; Bertlich, Mattis; Bettag, Stephan A; Desinger, Hendrik; Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Disturbance of cochlear microcirculation is considered to be the final common pathway of various inner ear diseases. Hyperfibrinogenemia causing increased plasma viscosity is a known risk factor for sudden sensorineural hearing loss and may lead to a critical reduction of cochlear blood flow. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a substantial reduction of plasma fibrinogen levels by drug-induced defibrinogenation for the treatment of acute hearing loss in vivo. Acute hearing loss was induced by hyperfibrinogenemia (i.v. injection of 330 mg/kg BW fibrinogen), using a guinea pig animal model. Parameters of cochlear microcirculation and hearing thresholds were quantified by intravital microscopy and evoked response audiometry. After obtaining baseline values, the course of hearing loss and disturbances of microcirculation were investigated under influence of intravenous defibrinogenation therapy (ancrod), corticosteroid, or placebo treatment, using 5 animals/group. Acute hyperfibrinogenemia caused hearing loss from 10 ± 7 to 26 ± 10 dB SPL at baseline. Drug-induced reduction of fibrinogen levels showed a significant increase of cochlear microcirculation (1.6-fold) and recovered hearing threshold (11 ± 6 dB SPL). Placebo or corticosteroid treatment had no effect on hearing loss (35 ± 7 dB SPL and 32 ± 18 dB SPL, respectively). Acute hyperfibrinogenemia resulted in hearing loss. Drug-induced reduction of elevated fibrinogen levels caused an increase in cochlear blood flow and a decrease in hearing thresholds. Placebo or corticosteroid treatment had no effect. Reduction of plasma fibrinogen levels could serve as a clinical treatment option for acute hearing loss.

  16. A Transcriptional Regulatory Network Containing Nuclear Receptors and Long Noncoding RNAs Controls Basal and Drug-Induced Expression of Cytochrome P450s in HepaRG Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Bao, Yifan; Piekos, Stephanie C; Zhu, Kexin; Zhang, Lirong; Zhong, Xiao-Bo

    2018-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes are responsible for metabolizing drugs. Expression of P450s can directly affect drug metabolism, resulting in various outcomes in therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects. Several nuclear receptors are transcription factors that can regulate expression of P450s at both basal and drug-induced levels. Some long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) near a transcription factor are found to participate in the regulatory functions of the transcription factors. The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a transcriptional regulatory network containing nuclear receptors and lncRNAs controlling both basal and drug-induced expression of P450s in HepaRG cells. Small interfering RNAs or small hairpin RNAs were applied to knock down four nuclear receptors [hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 α (HNF1 α ), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4 α ), pregnane X receptor (PXR), and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)] as well as two lncRNAs [HNF1 α antisense RNA 1 (HNF1 α -AS1) and HNF4 α antisense RNA 1 (HNF4 α -AS1)] in HepaRG cells with or without treatment of phenobarbital or rifampicin. Expression of eight P450 enzymes was examined in both basal and drug-induced levels. CAR and PXR mainly regulated expression of specific P450s. HNF1 α and HNF4 α affected expression of a wide range of P450s as well as other transcription factors. HNF1 α and HNF4 α controlled the expression of their neighborhood lncRNAs, HNF1 α -AS1 and HNF4 α -AS1, respectively. HNF1 α -AS1 and HNF4 α -AS1 was also involved in the regulation of P450s and transcription factors in diverse manners. Altogether, our study concludes that a transcription regulatory network containing the nuclear receptors and lncRNAs controls both basal and drug-induced expression of P450s in HepaRG cells. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. A long-term three dimensional liver co-culture system for improved prediction of clinically relevant drug-induced hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinova, Radina; Boess, Franziska; Applegate, Dawn; Suter, Laura; Weiser, Thomas; Singer, Thomas; Naughton, Brian; Roth, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the major cause for liver failure and post-marketing drug withdrawals. Due to species-specific differences in hepatocellular function, animal experiments to assess potential liabilities of drug candidates can predict hepatotoxicity in humans only to a certain extent. In addition to animal experimentation, primary hepatocytes from rat or human are widely used for pre-clinical safety assessment. However, as many toxic responses in vivo are mediated by a complex interplay among different cell types and often require chronic drug exposures, the predictive performance of hepatocytes is very limited. Here, we established and characterized human and rat in vitro three-dimensional (3D) liver co-culture systems containing primary parenchymal and non-parenchymal hepatic cells. Our data demonstrate that cells cultured on a 3D scaffold have a preserved composition of hepatocytes, stellate, Kupffer and endothelial cells and maintain liver function for up to 3 months, as measured by the production of albumin, fibrinogen, transferrin and urea. Additionally, 3D liver co-cultures maintain cytochrome P450 inducibility, form bile canaliculi-like structures and respond to inflammatory stimuli. Upon incubation with selected hepatotoxicants including drugs which have been shown to induce idiosyncratic toxicity, we demonstrated that this model better detected in vivo drug-induced toxicity, including species-specific drug effects, when compared to monolayer hepatocyte cultures. In conclusion, our results underline the importance of more complex and long lasting in vitro cell culture models that contain all liver cell types and allow repeated drug-treatments for detection of in vivo-relevant adverse drug effects. - Highlights: ► 3D liver co-cultures maintain liver specific functions for up to three months. ► Activities of Cytochrome P450s remain drug- inducible accross three months. ► 3D liver co-cultures recapitulate drug-induced liver toxicity

  18. A long-term three dimensional liver co-culture system for improved prediction of clinically relevant drug-induced hepatotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostadinova, Radina; Boess, Franziska [Non-Clinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Grenzacherstrasse 124, Building 73 / Room 117b, 4070 Basel (Switzerland); Applegate, Dawn [RegeneMed, 9855 Towne Centre Drive Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Suter, Laura; Weiser, Thomas; Singer, Thomas [Non-Clinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Grenzacherstrasse 124, Building 73 / Room 117b, 4070 Basel (Switzerland); Naughton, Brian [RegeneMed, 9855 Towne Centre Drive Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Roth, Adrian, E-mail: adrian_b.roth@roche.com [Non-Clinical Safety, Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Grenzacherstrasse 124, Building 73 / Room 117b, 4070 Basel (Switzerland)

    2013-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the major cause for liver failure and post-marketing drug withdrawals. Due to species-specific differences in hepatocellular function, animal experiments to assess potential liabilities of drug candidates can predict hepatotoxicity in humans only to a certain extent. In addition to animal experimentation, primary hepatocytes from rat or human are widely used for pre-clinical safety assessment. However, as many toxic responses in vivo are mediated by a complex interplay among different cell types and often require chronic drug exposures, the predictive performance of hepatocytes is very limited. Here, we established and characterized human and rat in vitro three-dimensional (3D) liver co-culture systems containing primary parenchymal and non-parenchymal hepatic cells. Our data demonstrate that cells cultured on a 3D scaffold have a preserved composition of hepatocytes, stellate, Kupffer and endothelial cells and maintain liver function for up to 3 months, as measured by the production of albumin, fibrinogen, transferrin and urea. Additionally, 3D liver co-cultures maintain cytochrome P450 inducibility, form bile canaliculi-like structures and respond to inflammatory stimuli. Upon incubation with selected hepatotoxicants including drugs which have been shown to induce idiosyncratic toxicity, we demonstrated that this model better detected in vivo drug-induced toxicity, including species-specific drug effects, when compared to monolayer hepatocyte cultures. In conclusion, our results underline the importance of more complex and long lasting in vitro cell culture models that contain all liver cell types and allow repeated drug-treatments for detection of in vivo-relevant adverse drug effects. - Highlights: ► 3D liver co-cultures maintain liver specific functions for up to three months. ► Activities of Cytochrome P450s remain drug- inducible accross three months. ► 3D liver co-cultures recapitulate drug-induced liver toxicity

  19. Cytochrome P450 2E1 gene polymorphisms/haplotypes and anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatitis in a Chinese cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowen Tang

    Full Text Available The pathogenic mechanism of anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB drug-induced hepatitis is associated with drug metabolizing enzymes. No tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs of cytochrome P450 2E1(CYP2E1 in the risk of anti-TB drug-induced hepatitis have been reported. The present study was aimed at exploring the role of tSNPs in CYP2E1 gene in a population-based anti-TB treatment cohort.A nested case-control study was designed. Each hepatitis case was 14 matched with controls by age, gender, treatment history, disease severity and drug dosage. The tSNPs were selected by using Haploview 4.2 based on the HapMap database of Han Chinese in Beijing, and detected by using TaqMan allelic discrimination technology.Eighty-nine anti-TB drug-induced hepatitis cases and 356 controls were included in this study. 6 tSNPs (rs2031920, rs2070672, rs915908, rs8192775, rs2515641, rs2515644 were genotyped and minor allele frequencies of these tSNPs were 21.9%, 23.0%, 19.1%, 23.6%, 20.8% and 44.4% in the cases and 20.9%, 22.7%, 18.9%, 23.2%, 18.2% and 43.2% in the controls, respectively. No significant difference was observed in genotypes or allele frequencies of the 6 tSNPs between case group and control group, and neither of haplotypes in block 1 nor in block 2 was significantly associated with the development of hepatitis.Based on the Chinese anti-TB treatment cohort, we did not find a statistically significant association between genetic polymorphisms of CYP2E1 and the risk of anti-TB drug-induced hepatitis. None of the haplotypes showed a significant association with the development of hepatitis in Chinese TB population.

  20. Selected ABCB1, ABCB4 and ABCC2 Polymorphisms Do Not Enhance the Risk of Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity in a Spanish Cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Ulzurrun, Eugenia; Stephens, Camilla; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Robles-Diaz, Mercedes; Saenz-López, Pablo; Hallal, Hacibe; Soriano, German; Roman, Eva; Fernandez, M. Carmen; Lucena, M. Isabel; Andrade, Raúl J.

    2014-01-01

    [Background and Aims] Flawed ABC transporter functions may contribute to increased risk of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). We aimed to analyse the influence of genetic variations in ABC transporters on the risk of DILI development and clinical presentations in a large Spanish DILI cohort. [Methods] A total of ten polymorphisms in ABCB1 (1236T>C, 2677G>T,A, 3435T>C), ABCB4 (1954A>G) and ABCC2 (???1774G>del, ???1549A>G, ???24C>T, 1249G>A, 3972C>T and 4544G>A) were genotyped using T...

  1. Culture of primary ciliary dyskinesia epithelial cells at air-liquid interface can alter ciliary phenotype but remains a robust and informative diagnostic aid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Hirst

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD requires the analysis of ciliary function and ultrastructure. Diagnosis can be complicated by secondary effects on cilia such as damage during sampling, local inflammation or recent infection. To differentiate primary from secondary abnormalities, re-analysis of cilia following culture and re-differentiation of epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface (ALI aids the diagnosis of PCD. However changes in ciliary beat pattern of cilia following epithelial cell culture has previously been described, which has brought the robustness of this method into question. This is the first systematic study to evaluate ALI culture as an aid to diagnosis of PCD in the light of these concerns.We retrospectively studied changes associated with ALI-culture in 158 subjects referred for diagnostic testing at two PCD centres. Ciliated nasal epithelium (PCD n = 54; non-PCD n  111 was analysed by high-speed digital video microscopy and transmission electron microscopy before and after culture.Ciliary function was abnormal before and after culture in all subjects with PCD; 21 PCD subjects had a combination of static and uncoordinated twitching cilia, which became completely static following culture, a further 9 demonstrated a decreased ciliary beat frequency after culture. In subjects without PCD, secondary ciliary dyskinesia was reduced.The change to ciliary phenotype in PCD samples following cell culture does not affect the diagnosis, and in certain cases can assist the ability to identify PCD cilia.

  2. Brain morphometry and the neurobiology of levodopa-induced dyskinesias: current knowledge and future potential for translational pre-clinical neuroimaging studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare eFinlay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine replacement therapy in the form of levodopa results in a significant proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD developing debilitating dyskinesia. This significantly complicates further treatment and negatively impacts patient quality of life. A greater understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID is therefore crucial to develop new treatments to prevent or mitigate LID. Such investigations in humans are largely confined to assessment of neurochemical and cerebrovascular blood flow changes using positron emission tomography (PET and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. However, recent evidence suggests that LID is associated with specific morphological changes in the frontal cortex and midbrain, detectable by structural MRI and voxel-based morphometry (VBM. Current human neuroimaging methods however lack sufficient resolution to reveal the biological mechanism driving these morphological changes at the cellular level. In contrast, there is a wealth of literature from well-established rodent models of LID documenting detailed post-mortem cellular and molecular measurements. The combination therefore of advanced neuroimaging methods and rodent LID models offers an exciting opportunity to bridge these currently disparate areas of research. To highlight this opportunity, in this mini-review, we provide an overview of the current clinical evidence for morphological changes in the brain associated with LID and identify potential cellular mechanisms as suggested from human and animal studies. We then suggest a framework for combining small animal MRI imaging with rodent models of LID, which may provide important mechanistic insights into the neurobiology of LID.

  3. Effects of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor agonism and antagonism on SKF81297-induced dyskinesia and haloperidol-induced dystonia in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten V; Peacock, Linda P; Werge, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    81297 (SKF) and acute dystonia induced by the dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist haloperidol in Cebus apella monkeys. The monkeys were sensitised to EPS by prior exposure to D(2) receptor antagonists. SKF (0.3 mg/kg) was administered alone and in combination with the CB(1) agonist CP55,940 (0.......0025-0.01 mg/kg) or the CB(1) antagonist SR141716A (0.25-0.75 mg/kg). Haloperidol (individual doses at 0.01-0.02 mg/kg) was administered alone and in combination with CP55,940 (0.005 or 0.01 mg/kg) or SR141716A (0.5 or 0.75 mg/kg). Subsequently, the monkeys were videotaped, and the recordings were rated...... for oral dyskinesia or dystonia. SKF-induced oral dyskinesia was dose-dependently reduced by CP55,940, with no effect of SR141716A. Haloperidol-induced dystonia was not affected by either CP55,940 or SR141716A....

  4. Correlation of the microculture-kinetic drug-induced apoptosis assay with patient outcomes in initial treatment of adult acute myelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Stephen A; Raptis, Anastasios; Hallquist, Allan; Rutledge, James; Chernick, Michael; Perree, Mathieu; Talbott, Mahsa S; Presant, Cary A

    2013-03-01

    Overall survival (OS) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains poor. Determining prognostic factors will help in selecting patients for appropriate treatments. Our aim was to determine whether the level of drug-induced apoptosis (chemosensitivity) demonstrated by the microculture-kinetic drug-induced apoptosis (MiCK) assay significantly predicted outcomes after standard AML induction therapy. A total of 109 patients with untreated AML had blood and/or bone marrow aspirate samples analyzed for anthracycline-induced apoptosis using the MiCK assay. The amount of apoptosis observed over 48 h was determined and expressed as kinetic units of apoptosis (KU). Complete remission (CR) was significantly higher (72%) in patients with high idarubicin-induced apoptosis >3 KU compared to patients with apoptosis ≤ 3 KU (p = 0.01). Multivariate analysis showed the only significant variables to be idarubicin-induced apoptosis and karyotype. Median overall survival of patients with idarubicin-induced apoptosis >3 KU was 16.1 months compared to 4.5 months in patients with apoptosis ≤ 3 KU (p = 0.004). Multivariate analysis showed the only significant variable to be idarubicin-induced apoptosis. Chemotherapy-induced apoptosis measured by the MiCK assay demonstrated significant correlation with outcomes and appears predictive of complete remission and overall survival for patients receiving standard induction chemotherapy.

  5. Drug-induced hypotension SEP test and acetazolamide test using sup 133 Xe SPECT in patients with occlusive carotid disease; Selection of candidates for extracranial-intracranial bypass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Satoshi; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Abe, Hiroshi; Takigawa, Shugo [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine; Mitsumori, Kenji; Nomura, Mikio; Saitoh, Hisatoshi

    1991-01-01

    The correlation between the drug-induced hypotension somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) test and regional cerebral blood flow changes after acetazolamide administration was studied. Fourteen patients presenting with transient ischemic attack, reversible ischemic neurological deficits, or minor completed stroke were evaluated. All patients had no or only localized low-density areas on computed tomographic scans, and unilateral occlusion or severe stenosis of the internal carotid or middle cerebral artery on cerebral angiograms. The Diamox asymmetry enhancement (DAE) was studied to detect reduced cerebral perfusion reserve in the affected hemispheres. The DAE was 7.9+-5.8% in seven patients positive in the SEP test, significantly higher than -1.5+-2.9% in patients negative in the SEP test. Postoperative SEP tests were negative in all five patients who underwent extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery, suggesting that the EC-IC bypass improved the cerebral perfusion reserve in the affected hemispheres. The DAE decreased significantly in four of these patients. This study disclosed a significant correlation between the drug-induced hypotension SEP test and DAE. These parameters are considered important for evaluating patients with hemodynamic compromise and/or suitable candidates for EC-IC bypass. (author).

  6. Identifying drug-induced repolarization abnormalities from distinct ECG patterns in congenital long QT syndrome: a study of sotalol effects on T-wave morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Claus; Andersen, Mads P; Xue, Joel Q

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal repolariz......BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal...... are typical ECG patterns in LQT2. Blinded to labels, the new morphology measures were tested in a third group of 39 healthy subjects receiving sotalol. Over 3 days the sotalol group received 0, 160 and 320 mg doses, respectively, and a 12-lead Holter ECG was recorded for 22.5 hours each day. Drug...... with QTcF, p ECG patterns in LQT2 carriers effectively quantified repolarization changes induced by sotalol. Further studies are needed to validate whether this measure has...

  7. Regulatory Forum Review*: Utility of in Vitro Secondary Pharmacology Data to Assess Risk of Drug-induced Valvular Heart Disease in Humans: Regulatory Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoian, Thomas; Jagadeesh, Gowraganahalli; Saulnier, Muriel; Simpson, Natalie; Ravindran, Arippa; Yang, Baichun; Laniyonu, Adebayo A; Khan, Imran; Szarfman, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (VHD) is a serious side effect linked to long-term treatment with 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2B (5-HT 2B ) agonists. Safety assessment for off-target pharmacodynamic activity is a common approach used to screen drugs for this undesired property. Such studies include in vitro assays to determine whether the drug is a 5-HT 2B agonist, a necessary pharmacological property for development of VHD. Measures of in vitro binding affinity (IC 50 , K i ) or cellular functional activity (EC 50 ) are often compared to maximum therapeutic free plasma drug levels ( fC max ) from which safety margins (SMs) can be derived. However, there is no clear consensus on what constitutes an appropriate SM under various therapeutic conditions of use. The strengths and limitations of SM determinations and current risk assessment methodology are reviewed and evaluated. It is concluded that the use of SMs based on K i values, or those relative to serotonin (5-HT), appears to be a better predictor than the use of EC 50 or EC 50 /human fC max values for determining whether known 5-HT 2B agonists have resulted in VHD. It is hoped that such a discussion will improve efforts to reduce this preventable serious drug-induced toxicity from occurring and lead to more informed risk assessment strategies.

  8. DMH1 (4-[6-(4-isopropoxyphenylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]quinoline inhibits chemotherapeutic drug-induced autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Our previous work found that DMH1 (4-[6-(4-isopropoxyphenylpyrazolo [1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]quinoline was a novel autophagy inhibitor. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of DMH1 on chemotherapeutic drug-induced autophagy as well as the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs in different cancer cells. We found that DMH1 inhibited tamoxifen- and cispcis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II (CDDP-induced autophagy responses in MCF-7 and HeLa cells, and potentiated the anti-tumor activity of tamoxifen and CDDP for both cells. DMH1 inhibited 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-induced autophagy responses in MCF-7 and HeLa cells, but did not affect the anti-tumor activity of 5-FU for these two cell lines. DMH1 itself did not induce cell death in MCF-7 and HeLa cells, but inhibited the proliferation of these cells. In conclusion, DMH1 inhibits chemotherapeutic drug-induced autophagy response and the enhancement of efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs by DMH1 is dependent on the cell sensitivity to drugs.

  9. Validation of a health-related quality of life instrument for primary ciliary dyskinesia (QOL-PCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, Laura; Leigh, Margaret W; Dell, Sharon D; Dunn Galvin, Audrey; Quittner, Alexandra L; Lucas, Jane S

    2017-09-01

    Quality of life (QOL)-primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is the first disease-specific, health-related QOL instrument for PCD. Psychometric validation of QOL-PCD assesses the performance of this measure in adults, including its reliability, validity and responsiveness to change. Seventy-two adults (mean (range) age: 33 years (18-79 years); mean (range) FEV 1 % predicted: 68 (26-115)) with PCD completed the 49-item QOL-PCD and generic QOL measures: Short-Form 36 Health Survey, Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 20 (SNOT-20) and St George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ)-C. Thirty-five participants repeated QOL-PCD 10-14 days later to measure stability or reproducibility of the measure. Multitrait analysis was used to evaluate how the items loaded on 10 hypothesised scales: physical, emotional, role and social functioning, treatment burden, vitality, health perceptions, upper respiratory symptoms, lower respiratory symptoms and ears and hearing symptoms. This analysis of item-to-total correlations led to 9 items being dropped; the validated measure now comprises 40 items. Each scale had excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's α: 0.74 to 0.94). Two-week test-retest demonstrated stability for all scales (intraclass coefficients 0.73 to 0.96). Significant correlations were obtained between QOL-PCD scores and age and FEV 1 . Strong relationships were also found between QOL-PCD scales and similar constructs on generic questionnaires, for example, lower respiratory symptoms and SGRQ-C (r=0.72, pmeasures of different constructs. QOL-PCD has demonstrated good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent and divergent validity. QOL-PCD offers a promising tool for evaluating new therapies and for measuring symptoms, functioning and QOL during routine care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Drug-induced trafficking of p-glycoprotein in human brain capillary endothelial cells as demonstrated by exposure to mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Hoffmann, Andrea; Maalouf, Katia; Buettner, Manuela; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Alms, Dana; Römermann, Kerstin; Naim, Hassan Y; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1/MDR1) is a major efflux transporter at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), restricting the penetration of various compounds. In other tissues, trafficking of Pgp from subcellular stores to the cell surface has been demonstrated and may constitute a rapid way of the cell to respond to toxic compounds by functional membrane insertion of the transporter. It is not known whether drug-induced Pgp trafficking also occurs in brain capillary endothelial cells that form the BBB. In this study, trafficking of Pgp was investigated in human brain capillary endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) that were stably transfected with a doxycycline-inducible MDR1-EGFP fusion plasmid. In the presence of doxycycline, these cells exhibited a 15-fold increase in Pgp-EGFP fusion protein expression, which was associated with an increased efflux of the Pgp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123). The chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C (MMC) was used to study drug-induced trafficking of Pgp. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of single hCMEC/D3-MDR1-EGFP cells revealed that Pgp redistribution from intracellular pools to the cell surface occurred within 2 h of MMC exposure. Pgp-EGFP exhibited a punctuate pattern at the cell surface compatible with concentrated regions of the fusion protein in membrane microdomains, i.e., lipid rafts, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis of biotinylated cell surface proteins in Lubrol-resistant membranes. MMC exposure also increased the functionality of Pgp as assessed in three functional assays with Pgp substrates (Rho123, eFluxx-ID Gold, calcein-AM). However, this increase occurred with some delay after the increased Pgp expression and coincided with the release of Pgp from the Lubrol-resistant membrane complexes. Disrupting rafts by depleting the membrane of cholesterol increased the functionality of Pgp. Our data present the first direct evidence of drug-induced Pgp trafficking at the human BBB and indicate that Pgp has to be released from lipid

  11. The susceptibility of anti-tuberculosis drug-induced liver injury and chronic hepatitis C infection: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tien-En; Huang, Yi-Shin; Chang, Chih-Hao; Perng, Chin-Lin; Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Hou, Ming-Chih

    2018-02-01

    Anti-tuberculosis drug-induced liver injury (ATDILI) is a major safety concern in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). The impact of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection on the risk of ATDILI is still controversial. We aimed to assess the influence of CHC infection on ATDILI through a systematic review and meta-analysis. We systemically reviewed all English-language literature in the major medical databases with the subject search terms "anti-tuberculosis drug-induced liver injury" and "anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity". We then performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the papers relevant to hepatitis C in qualified publications. A total of 14 studies were eligible for analysis, which included 516 cases with ATDILI and 4301 controls without ATDILI. The pooled odds ratio (OR) of all studies for CHC infection to ATDILI was 3.21 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.30-4.49). Subgroup analysis revealed that the CHC carriers had a higher risk of ATDILI than those without CHC both in Asians (OR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.79-4.90) and Caucasians (OR = 4.07, 95% CI: 2.70-6.14), in those receiving standard four combination anti-TB therapy (OR = 2.94, 95% CI: 1.95-4.41) and isoniazid monotherapy (OR = 4.18, 95% CI: 2.36-7.40), in those with a strict definition of DILI (serum alanine aminotransferase [ALT] > 5 upper limit of normal value [ULN], OR = 2.59, 95% CI: 1.58-4.25) and a loose definition of DILI (ALT > 2 or 3 ULN, OR = 4.34, 95% CI: 2.96-6.37), and in prospective studies (OR = 4.16, 95% CI: 2.93-5.90) and case-control studies (OR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.29-4.58). This meta-analysis suggests that CHC infection may increase the risk of ATDILI. Regular liver tests are mandatory for CHC carriers under anti-TB therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  12. Drug-Induced Trafficking of P-Glycoprotein in Human Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells as Demonstrated by Exposure to Mitomycin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Hoffmann, Andrea; Maalouf, Katia; Buettner, Manuela; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A.; Weksler, Babette; Alms, Dana; Römermann, Kerstin; Naim, Hassan Y.; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1/MDR1) is a major efflux transporter at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), restricting the penetration of various compounds. In other tissues, trafficking of Pgp from subcellular stores to the cell surface has been demonstrated and may constitute a rapid way of the cell to respond to toxic compounds by functional membrane insertion of the transporter. It is not known whether drug-induced Pgp trafficking also occurs in brain capillary endothelial cells that form the BBB. In this study, trafficking of Pgp was investigated in human brain capillary endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) that were stably transfected with a doxycycline-inducible MDR1-EGFP fusion plasmid. In the presence of doxycycline, these cells exhibited a 15-fold increase in Pgp-EGFP fusion protein expression, which was associated with an increased efflux of the Pgp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123). The chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C (MMC) was used to study drug-induced trafficking of Pgp. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of single hCMEC/D3-MDR1-EGFP cells revealed that Pgp redistribution from intracellular pools to the cell surface occurred within 2 h of MMC exposure. Pgp-EGFP exhibited a punctuate pattern at the cell surface compatible with concentrated regions of the fusion protein in membrane microdomains, i.e., lipid rafts, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis of biotinylated cell surface proteins in Lubrol-resistant membranes. MMC exposure also increased the functionality of Pgp as assessed in three functional assays with Pgp substrates (Rho123, eFluxx-ID Gold, calcein-AM). However, this increase occurred with some delay after the increased Pgp expression and coincided with the release of Pgp from the Lubrol-resistant membrane complexes. Disrupting rafts by depleting the membrane of cholesterol increased the functionality of Pgp. Our data present the first direct evidence of drug-induced Pgp trafficking at the human BBB and indicate that Pgp has to be released from lipid

  13. Clinical evaluation of drug-induced hepatitis Evaluación clínica de las hepatitis producidas por fármacos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Martí

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to ascertain the epidemiological characteristics, clinical symptoms, and evolution of drug-induced hepatitis over the last 22 years. Experimental design and subjects: an observational, retrospective study between 1982 and 1993, and prospective study between 1994 and 2003. All patients in our department diagnosed with having drug-induced hepatitis were studied analyzing epidemiological (age, sex, cases per year, hospitalization and clinical features (previous liver disease, hepatic symptoms, laboratory results, and follow-up (complete recovery or chronicity. Results: a total of 61 patients were diagnosed as having drug-induced hepatitis, 26 men and 35 women (57%, mean age 52.4 years ± 17 years, of which 72.2% were older than 40 years. A total of 43% were admitted to hospital. In 87% of cases, two or more drugs were involved, the most frequent being antituberculosis (19 cases, psychotropic (26 cases, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (45 cases. Evolution showed that 94% of patients recovered after the withdrawal of suspected causal drugs. Conclusions: the incidence of drug-induced hepatitis is higher in patients over 40 years of age, it being more common in females. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, psychotropic, and anti-tuberculosis agents were the main drugs involved. Most patients made a complete recovery after withdrawal of the suspected causal drug.Objetivo: conocer las características epidemiológicas, manifestaciones clínicas y la evolución de las hepatitis producidas por fármacos en los últimos 22 años. Diseño experimental y pacientes: estudio observacional, retrospectivo entre 1982 y 1993 y prospectivo entre 1994 y 2003, donde incluimos todos los pacientes atendidos en nuestro Servicio que fueron diagnosticados de hepatitis por fármacos. Analizamos los factores epidemiológicos -edad, sexo, número de casos por año, ingresos hospitalarios-, clínicos -antecedentes de enfermedad hepática, manifestaciones cl

  14. Drug-Induced QT Prolongation as a Result of an Escitalopram Overdose in a Patient with Previously Undiagnosed Congenital Long QT Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of drug-induced QT prolongation caused by an escitalopram overdose in a patient with previously undiagnosed congenital LQTS. A 15-year-old Caucasian female presented following a suicide attempt via an escitalopram overdose. The patient was found to have a prolonged QT interval with episodes of torsades de pointes. The patient was admitted to the telemetry unit and treated. Despite the resolution of the torsades de pointes, she continued to demonstrate a persistently prolonged QT interval. She was seen by the cardiology service and diagnosed with congenital long QT syndrome. This case illustrates the potential for an escitalopram overdose to cause an acute QT prolongation in a patient with congenital LQTS and suggests the importance of a screening electrocardiogram prior to the initiation of SSRIs, especially in patients at high risk for QT prolongation.

  15. Early-Life Experience Decreases Drug-Induced Reinstatement of Morphine CPP in Adulthood via Microglial-Specific Epigenetic Programming of Anti-Inflammatory IL-10 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jaclyn M.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Bilbo, Staci D.

    2012-01-01

    A critical component of drug addiction research involves identifying novel biological mechanisms and environmental predictors of risk or resilience to drug addiction and associated relapse. Increasing evidence suggests microglia and astrocytes can profoundly affect the physiological and addictive properties of drugs of abuse, including morphine. We report that glia within the rat Nucleus Accumbens (NAcc) respond to morphine with an increase in cytokine/chemokine expression, which predicts future reinstatement of morphine conditioned place preference (CPP) following a priming dose of morphine. This glial response to morphine is influenced by early-life experience. A neonatal handling paradigm that increases the quantity and quality of maternal care significantly increases baseline expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 within the NAcc, attenuates morphine-induced glial activation, and prevents the subsequent reinstatement of morphine CPP in adulthood. IL-10 expression within the NAcc and reinstatement of CPP are negatively correlated, suggesting a protective role for this specific cytokine against morphine-induced glial reactivity and drug-induced reinstatement of morphine CPP. Neonatal handling programs the expression of IL-10 within the NAcc early in development, and this is maintained into adulthood via decreased methylation of the IL-10 gene specifically within microglia. The effect of neonatal handling is mimicked by pharmacological modulation of glia in adulthood with Ibudilast, which increases IL-10 expression, inhibits morphine-induced glial activation within the NAcc, and prevents reinstatement of morphine CPP. Taken together, we have identified a novel gene X early-life environment interaction on morphine-induced glial activation, and a specific role for glial activation in drug-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. PMID:22159099

  16. Application of optical action potentials in human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiomyocytes to predict drug-induced cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H R; Hortigon-Vinagre, M P; Zamora, V; Kopljar, I; De Bondt, A; Gallacher, D J; Smith, G

    2017-09-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs) are emerging as new and human-relevant source in vitro model for cardiac safety assessment that allow us to investigate a set of 20 reference drugs for predicting cardiac arrhythmogenic liability using optical action potential (oAP) assay. Here, we describe our examination of the oAP measurement using a voltage sensitive dye (Di-4-ANEPPS) to predict adverse compound effects using hiPS-CMs and 20 cardioactive reference compounds. Fluorescence signals were digitized at 10kHz and the records subsequently analyzed off-line. Cells were exposed to 30min incubation to vehicle or compound (n=5/dose, 4 doses/compound) that were blinded to the investigating laboratory. Action potential parameters were measured, including rise time (T rise ) of the optical action potential duration (oAPD). Significant effects on oAPD were sensitively detected with 11 QT-prolonging drugs, while oAPD shortening was observed with I Ca -antagonists, I Kr -activator or ATP-sensitive K + channel (K ATP )-opener. Additionally, the assay detected varied effects induced by 6 different sodium channel blockers. The detection threshold for these drug effects was at or below the published values of free effective therapeutic plasma levels or effective concentrations by other studies. The results of this blinded study indicate that OAP is a sensitive method to accurately detect drug-induced effects (i.e., duration/QT-prolongation, shortening, beat rate, and incidence of early after depolarizations) in hiPS-CMs; therefore, this technique will potentially be useful in predicting drug-induced arrhythmogenic liabilities in early de-risking within the drug discovery phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Is the drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS due to human herpesvirus 6 infection or to allergy-mediated viral reactivation? Report of a case and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borgia Guglielmo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS is a severe and rare systemic reaction triggered by a drug (usually an antiepileptic drug. We present a case of DISH and we review studies on the clinical features and treatment of DIHS, and on its pathogenesis in which two elements (Herpesvirus infection and the drug interact with the immune system to trigger such a syndrome that can lead to death in about 20% of cases. Case presentation We report the case of a 26-year old woman with fever, systemic maculopapular rash, lymphadenopathy, hepatitis and eosinophilic leukocytosis. She had been treated with antibiotics that gave no benefit. She was taking escitalopram and lamotrigine for a bipolar disease 30 days before fever onset. Because the patient's general condition deteriorated, betamethasone and acyclovir were started. This treatment resulted in a mild improvement of symptoms. Steroids were rapidly tapered and this was followed with a relapse of fever and a worsening of laboratory parameters. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 DNA was positive as shown by PCR. Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS was diagnosed. Symptoms regressed on prednisone (at a dose of 50 mg/die that was tapered very slowly. The patient recovered completely. Conclusions The search for rare causes of fever led to complete resolution of a very difficult case. As DIHS is a rare disease the most relevant issue is to suspect and include it in differential diagnosis of fevers of unknown origin. Once diagnosed, the therapy is easy (steroidal administration and often successful. However our case strongly confirms that attention should be paid on the steroidal tapering that should be very slow to avoid a relapse.

  18. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy with target-controlled infusion using propofol and monitored depth of sedation to determine treatment strategies in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Clemens; Fthenakis, Phillippe; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Berger, Sebastian; Hofauer, Benedikt; Hohenhorst, Winfried; Kochs, Eberhard F; Wagner, Klaus J; Edenharter, Guenther M

    2017-09-01

    Drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) has become an important diagnostic examination tool in the treatment decision process for surgical therapies in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Currently, there is a variety of regimes for the performance of DISE, which renders comparison and assessment across results difficult. It remains unclear how the different regimes influence the findings of the examination and the resulting conclusions and treatment recommendations. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between increasing levels of sedation (i.e., light, medium, and deep) induced by propofol using a target-controlled infusion (TCI) pump, with the obstruction patterns at the levels of the velum, oropharynx, tongue base, and epiglottis (i.e., VOTE classification). A second goal was the establishment of a sufficient sedation level to enable a reliable decision regarding treatment recommendations. Forty-three patients with OSA underwent a DISE procedure using propofol TCI. Three levels of sedation were defined, depending on entropy levels and assessment of sedation: light sedation, medium sedation, and deep sedation. The evaluation of the upper airway at each level, with increasing sedation, was documented using the VOTE classification. The elapsed time at which each assessment was performed was recorded. Upper airway changes occurred and were measured throughout the DISE procedure. Clinically useful determinations of airway closure occurred at medium sedation; this level of sedation was most probably achieved with a blood propofol concentration of 3.2 μg/ml. In all 43 patients, definite treatment decisions could be made at medium sedation level. Increasing sedation did not result in changes in the treatment decision. Changes in upper airway collapse during DISE with propofol TCI occur at levels of medium sedation. Decisions regarding surgical treatment could be made at this level of sedation. Upper Airway Collapse in Patients with Obstructive

  19. Hand-held tidal breathing nasal nitric oxide measurement--a promising targeted case-finding tool for the diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthin, June Kehlet; Nielsen, Kim Gjerum

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nasal nitric oxide (nNO) measurement is an established first line test in the work-up for primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Tidal breathing nNO (TB-nNO) measurements require minimal cooperation and are potentially useful even in young children. Hand-held NO devices are becoming...... increasingly widespread for asthma management. Therefore, we chose to assess whether hand-held TB-nNO measurements reliably discriminate between PCD, and Healthy Subjects (HS) and included Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients as a disease control group known to have intermediate nNO levels. METHODS: In this cross...... sectional, single centre, single occasion, proof-of-concept study in children and adults with PCD and CF, and in HS we compared feasibility, success rates, discriminatory capacity, repeatability and agreement between a hand-held electrochemical device equipped with a nNO software application sampling...

  20. A study on the action of two calcium channel blockers (verapamil and flunarizine upon an experimental model of tardive dyskinesia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João S. Pereira

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dyskinesia (TD, a serious complications of neuroleptic chronic use, has no effective therapy yet. We performed an experiment to study the action on TD, of the calcium channel blockers (CCB drugs, verapamil and flunarizine. We obtained the TD model in rats, administering haloperidol for a 21-day period. After this, the stereotyped movement induced by apomorphyne was rated. The CCB drugs were administered in acute (in the 28th. day and chronic (for 8 days, after the 25th day experiments. Acutely, verapamil increased the stereotyped behaviour, and promoted a reduction of it in the chronic experiment. The results suggest that CCB drugs should be tested in clinical trials of TD.

  1. A Role for Mitogen- and Stress-Activated Kinase 1 in L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia and ∆FosB Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feyder, Michael; Södersten, Erik; Santini, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 has been implicated in 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID), a motor complication affecting Parkinson's disease patients subjected to standard pharmacotherapy. We examined the involvement...... of mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1), a downstream target of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, and an important regulator of transcription in LID. METHODS: 6-Hydroxydopamine was used to produce a model of Parkinson's disease in MSK1 knockout mice and in ∆FosB- or ∆c......Jun-overexpressing transgenic mice, which were assessed for LID following long-term L-DOPA administration. Biochemical processes were evaluated by Western blotting or immunofluorescence. Histone H3 phosphorylation was analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by promotor-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction...

  2. Um caso raro de discinesia ciliar primária associada a heterotaxia A rare case of primary ciliary dyskinesia with heterotaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Quintela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A discinesia ciliar primária é uma doença autossómica recessiva caracterizada pela história de infecções de repetição do aparelho respiratório superior e inferior, rinossinusite e bronquite associada a situs inversus completo ou parcial. Os autores apresentam um doente de 78 anos, eurocaucasiano, com rinossinusites, bronquite crónica e dispneia, otite média com défices auditivos, infertilidade, seguido em consulta de gastrenterologia por dispepsia e obstipação há vários anos. Realizou vários exames que mostraram: agenesia frontal direita, espessamento brônquico, bronquiectasias, cego e cólon ascendente localizados na fossa ilíaca esquerda. Excluiu-se imunodeficiência, alergias, fibrose quística e outros. No decurso da investigação concluímos que se tratava de um caso de discinesia ciliar primária. Pela raridade deste caso, decidimos apresentá-lo.Primary ciliary dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive disease with a clinical history of upper and lowers respiratory infections, rhinosinusitis and bronquitis associated with complete or partial situs inversus. The authors present a 78-year-old male caucasian patient with rhinosinusitis, lower respiratory tract infection and dyspnea, chronic otitis with hearing deficit and infertility followed in Gastroenterology for dyspepsia and constipation. The radiological studies revealed agenesis of right frontal sinus; bronchial wall thickening; bronchiectasis; cecum and ascending colon located on the left and small bowel occupies right side of abdomen. He had no immunodeficiency, allergies, cystic fibrosis and others. We concluded primary ciliary dyskinesia with heterotaxy. For the rarity of this case we decided to present it.

  3. Coherence of neuronal firing of the entopeduncular nucleus with motor cortex oscillatory activity in the 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease with levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xingxing; Schwabe, Kerstin; Krauss, Joachim K; Alam, Mesbah

    2016-04-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms leading to dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease (PD) after long-term treatment with levodopa remain unclear. This study investigates the neuronal firing characteristics of the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), the rat equivalent of the human globus pallidus internus and output nucleus of the basal ganglia, and its coherence with the motor cortex (MCx) field potentials in the unilateral 6-OHDA rat model of PD with and without levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID). 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned hemiparkinsonian (HP) rats, 6-OHDA-lesioned HP rats with LID (HP-LID) rats, and naïve controls were used for recording of single-unit activity under urethane (1.4 g/kg, i.p) anesthesia in the EPN "on" and "off" levodopa. Over the MCx, the electrocorticogram output was recorded. Analysis of single-unit activity in the EPN showed enhanced firing rates, burst activity, and irregularity compared to naïve controls, which did not differ between drug-naïve HP and HP-LID rats. Analysis of EPN spike coherence and phase-locked ratio with MCx field potentials showed a shift of low (12-19 Hz) and high (19-30 Hz) beta oscillatory activity between HP and HP-LID groups. EPN theta phase-locked ratio was only enhanced in HP-LID compared to HP rats. Overall, levodopa injection had no stronger effect in HP-LID rats than in HP rats. Altered coherence and changes in the phase lock ratio of spike and local field potentials in the beta range may play a role for the development of LID.

  4. Association between monoamine oxidase A gene promoter 30 bp repeat polymorphism and tardive dyskinesia in Chinese schizophrenics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changhe Fan; Lihua Li; Yan Fu; Hehuang Deng; Xiangjiao Liao; Youcai Zhou

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathophysiology of tardive dyskinesia (TD) is not yet fully understood. With the hypothesis of altered dopaminergic neurotransmission, altered activities of dopamine degrading enzymes such as monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and their coding genes are supposed to be related to the pathophysiology of TD.OBJECTIVE: To investigate possible association between 30 bp variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the promoter of MAOA gene and susceptibility, severity of neuroleptic induced TD in Chinese Han people in Guandong Province.DESIGN: Non-randomization-synchronization controlled study. SETTING: Guangdong Mental Health Institute, Guangdong Provincial People's Hospital; Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital; Affiliated Psychiatric Hospital of Guangzhou Municipal Bureau of Civil Administration. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 179 subjects were enrolled in the study. All subjects were sporadic and genetically unrelated Chinese schizophrenic patients who were hospitalizing in Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital or Affiliated Psychiatric Hospital of Guangzhou Municipal Bureau of Civil Administration during January to April 2005. The diagnosis of schizophrenia was made according to the criteria of Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorder-the third edition-revised (DSM-Ⅲ-R). Among all patients, 88 were diagnosed as with TD and 91 without TD according to the research diagnostic criteria described by Schooler-Kane. Informed consent was obtained from all subjects or their relatives.METHODS: ① TD severity was assessed with the AIMS which was a 5-degree rating scale from 0 to 4 (corresponding to none, minimal, mild, moderate and severe, respectively). The study was approved by the Ethics Committees of the two hospitals and informed consent was obtained from all subjects or their relatives. ② The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) techniques were used to detect MAOA gene 30 bp VNTR polymorphism in schizophrenic patients

  5. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made to help with CPT, such as: An electric chest clapper, known as a mechanical percussor. An ... your child spends time, including the home and car. Encourage your child to never start smoking. For ...

  6. Di-22:6-bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate: A clinical biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis for drug development and safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Nanjun; Tengstrand, Elizabeth A.; Chourb, Lisa; Hsieh, Frank Y.

    2014-01-01

    The inability to routinely monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) presents a challenge in pharmaceutical drug development and in the clinic. Several nonclinical studies have shown di-docosahexaenoyl (22:6) bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (di-22:6-BMP) to be a reliable biomarker of tissue DIPL that can be monitored in the plasma/serum and urine. The aim of this study was to show the relevance of di-22:6-BMP as a DIPL biomarker for drug development and safety assessment in humans. DIPL shares many similarities with the inherited lysosomal storage disorder Niemann–Pick type C (NPC) disease. DIPL and NPC result in similar changes in lysosomal function and cholesterol status that lead to the accumulation of multi-lamellar bodies (myeloid bodies) in cells and tissues. To validate di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for clinical studies, NPC patients and healthy donors were classified by receiver operator curve analysis based on urinary di-22:6-BMP concentrations. By showing 96.7-specificity and 100-sensitivity to identify NPC disease, di-22:6-BMP can be used to assess DIPL in human studies. The mean concentration of di-22:6-BMP in the urine of NPC patients was 51.4-fold (p ≤ 0.05) above the healthy baseline range. Additionally, baseline levels of di-22:6-BMP were assessed in healthy non-medicated laboratory animals (rats, mice, dogs, and monkeys) and human subjects to define normal reference ranges for nonclinical/clinical studies. The baseline ranges of di-22:6-BMP in the plasma, serum, and urine of humans and laboratory animals were species dependent. The results of this study support the role of di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for pharmaceutical drug development and health care settings. - Highlights: • A reliable biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is needed for humans. • Di-22:6-BMP is specific/sensitive for DIPL in animals as published in literatures. • The di-22:6-BMP biomarker can be validated for humans via NPC patients. • DIPL

  7. Di-22:6-bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate: A clinical biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis for drug development and safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Nanjun; Tengstrand, Elizabeth A.; Chourb, Lisa; Hsieh, Frank Y., E-mail: frank.hsieh@nextcea.com

    2014-09-15

    The inability to routinely monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) presents a challenge in pharmaceutical drug development and in the clinic. Several nonclinical studies have shown di-docosahexaenoyl (22:6) bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (di-22:6-BMP) to be a reliable biomarker of tissue DIPL that can be monitored in the plasma/serum and urine. The aim of this study was to show the relevance of di-22:6-BMP as a DIPL biomarker for drug development and safety assessment in humans. DIPL shares many similarities with the inherited lysosomal storage disorder Niemann–Pick type C (NPC) disease. DIPL and NPC result in similar changes in lysosomal function and cholesterol status that lead to the accumulation of multi-lamellar bodies (myeloid bodies) in cells and tissues. To validate di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for clinical studies, NPC patients and healthy donors were classified by receiver operator curve analysis based on urinary di-22:6-BMP concentrations. By showing 96.7-specificity and 100-sensitivity to identify NPC disease, di-22:6-BMP can be used to assess DIPL in human studies. The mean concentration of di-22:6-BMP in the urine of NPC patients was 51.4-fold (p ≤ 0.05) above the healthy baseline range. Additionally, baseline levels of di-22:6-BMP were assessed in healthy non-medicated laboratory animals (rats, mice, dogs, and monkeys) and human subjects to define normal reference ranges for nonclinical/clinical studies. The baseline ranges of di-22:6-BMP in the plasma, serum, and urine of humans and laboratory animals were species dependent. The results of this study support the role of di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for pharmaceutical drug development and health care settings. - Highlights: • A reliable biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is needed for humans. • Di-22:6-BMP is specific/sensitive for DIPL in animals as published in literatures. • The di-22:6-BMP biomarker can be validated for humans via NPC patients. • DIPL

  8. Is drug-induced toxicity a good predictor of response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer? -A prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintamani; Singhal, Vinay; Singh, JP; Lyall, Ashima; Saxena, Sunita; Bansal, Anju

    2004-01-01

    Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy is an integral part of multi-modality approach in the management of locally advanced breast cancer and it is vital to predict the response in order to tailor the regime for a patient. The common final pathway in the tumor cell death is believed to be apoptosis or programmed cell death and chemotherapeutic drugs like other DNA-damaging agents act on rapidly multiplying cells including both the tumor and the normal cells by following the same common final pathway. This could account for both the toxic effects and the response. Absence or decreased apoptosis has been found to be associated with chemo resistance. The change in expression of apoptotic markers (Bcl-2 and Bax proteins) brought about by various chemotherapeutic regimens is being used to identify drug resistance in the tumor cells. A prospective clinical study was conducted to assess whether chemotherapy induced toxic effects could serve as reliable predictors of apoptosis or response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. 50 cases of locally advanced breast cancer after complete routine and metastatic work up were subjected to trucut biopsy and the tissue evaluated immunohistochemically for apoptotic markers (bcl-2/bax ratio). Three cycles of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy using FAC regime (5-fluorouracil, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide) were given at three weekly intervals and patients assessed for clinical response as well as toxicity after each cycle. Modified radical mastectomy was performed in all patients three weeks after the last cycle and the specimen were re-evaluated for any change in the bcl-2/bax ratio. The clinical response, immunohistochemical response and the drug-induced toxicity were correlated and compared. Descriptive studies were performed with SPSS version 10 and the significance of response was assessed using paired t-test. Significance of correlation between various variables was assessed using chi-square test and coefficient

  9. Is drug-induced toxicity a good predictor of response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer? -A prospective clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh JP

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy is an integral part of multi-modality approach in the management of locally advanced breast cancer and it is vital to predict the response in order to tailor the regime for a patient. The common final pathway in the tumor cell death is believed to be apoptosis or programmed cell death and chemotherapeutic drugs like other DNA-damaging agents act on rapidly multiplying cells including both the tumor and the normal cells by following the same common final pathway. This could account for both the toxic effects and the response. Absence or decreased apoptosis has been found to be associated with chemo resistance. The change in expression of apoptotic markers (Bcl-2 and Bax proteins brought about by various chemotherapeutic regimens is being used to identify drug resistance in the tumor cells. A prospective clinical study was conducted to assess whether chemotherapy induced toxic effects could serve as reliable predictors of apoptosis or response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Methods 50 cases of locally advanced breast cancer after complete routine and metastatic work up were subjected to trucut biopsy and the tissue evaluated immunohistochemically for apoptotic markers (bcl-2/bax ratio. Three cycles of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy using FAC regime (5-fluorouracil, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide were given at three weekly intervals and patients assessed for clinical response as well as toxicity after each cycle. Modified radical mastectomy was performed in all patients three weeks after the last cycle and the specimen were re-evaluated for any change in the bcl-2/bax ratio. The clinical response, immunohistochemical response and the drug-induced toxicity were correlated and compared. Descriptive studies were performed with SPSS version 10 and the significance of response was assessed using paired t-test. Significance of correlation between various variables was

  10. Pharmacogenetic & pharmacokinetic biomarker for efavirenz based ARV and rifampicin based anti-TB drug induced liver injury in TB-HIV infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getnet Yimer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Implication of pharmacogenetic variations and efavirenz pharmacokinetics in concomitant efavirenz based antiviral therapy and anti-tubercular drug induced liver injury (DILI has not been yet studied. We performed a prospective case-control association study to identify the incidence, pharmacogenetic, pharmacokinetic and biochemical predictors for anti-tubercular and antiretroviral drugs induced liver injury (DILI in HIV and tuberculosis (TB co-infected patients. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Newly diagnosed treatment naïve TB-HIV co-infected patients (n = 353 were enrolled to receive efavirenz based ART and rifampicin based anti-TB therapy, and assessed clinically and biochemically for DILI up to 56 weeks. Quantification of plasma efavirenz and 8-hydroxyefaviernz levels and genotyping for NAT2, CYP2B6, CYP3A5, ABCB1, UGT2B7 and SLCO1B1 genes were done. The incidence of DILI and identification of predictors was evaluated using survival analysis and the Cox Proportional Hazards Model. The incidence of DILI was 30.0%, or 14.5 per 1000 person-week, and that of severe was 18.4%, or 7.49 per 1000 person-week. A statistically significant association of DILI with being of the female sex (p = 0.001, higher plasma efavirenz level (p = 0.009, efavirenz/8-hydroxyefavirenz ratio (p = 0.036, baseline AST (p = 0.022, ALT (p = 0.014, lower hemoglobin (p = 0.008, and serum albumin (p = 0.007, NAT2 slow-acetylator genotype (p = 0.039 and ABCB1 3435TT genotype (p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: We report high incidence of anti-tubercular and antiretroviral DILI in Ethiopian patients. Between patient variability in systemic efavirenz exposure and pharmacogenetic variations in NAT2, CYP2B6 and ABCB1 genes determines susceptibility to DILI in TB-HIV co-infected patients. Close monitoring of plasma efavirenz level and liver enzymes during early therapy and/or genotyping practice in HIV clinics is recommended for early identification

  11. Action potential-based MEA platform for in vitro screening of drug-induced cardiotoxicity using human iPSCs and rat neonatal myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Danny; Callewaert, Geert; Krylychkina, Olga; Hoffman, Luis; Gullo, Francesco; Prodanov, Dimiter; Braeken, Dries

    2017-09-01

    Drug-induced cardiotoxicity poses a negative impact on public health and drug development. Cardiac safety pharmacology issues urged for the preclinical assessment of drug-induced ventricular arrhythmia leading to the design of several in vitro electrophysiological screening assays. In general, patch clamp systems allow for intracellular recordings, while multi-electrode array (MEA) technology detect extracellular activity. Here, we demonstrate a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based MEA system as a reliable platform for non-invasive, long-term intracellular recording of cardiac action potentials at high resolution. Quinidine (8 concentrations from 10 -7 to 2.10 -5 M) and verapamil (7 concentrations from 10 -11 to 10 -5 M) were tested for dose-dependent responses in a network of cardiomyocytes. Electrophysiological parameters, such as the action potential duration (APD), rates of depolarization and repolarization and beating frequency were assessed. In hiPSC, quinidine prolonged APD with EC 50 of 2.2·10 -6 M. Further analysis indicated a multifactorial action potential prolongation by quinidine: (1) decreasing fast repolarization with IC 50 of 1.1·10 -6 M; (2) reducing maximum upstroke velocity with IC 50 of 2.6·10 -6 M; and (3) suppressing spontaneous activity with EC 50 of 3.8·10 -6 M. In rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, verapamil blocked spontaneous activity with EC 50 of 5.3·10 -8 M and prolonged the APD with EC 50 of 2.5·10 -8 M. Verapamil reduced rates of fast depolarization and repolarization with IC 50 s of 1.8 and 2.2·10 -7 M, respectively. In conclusion, the proposed action potential-based MEA platform offers high quality and stable long-term recordings with high information content allowing to characterize multi-ion channel blocking drugs. We anticipate application of the system as a screening platform to efficiently and cost-effectively test drugs for cardiac safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical features and {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in drug-induced parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J.; Escobar-Delgado, Teresa [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio/CSIC/Universidad de Sevilla, Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Servicio de Neurologia, Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla, Seville (Spain); Sanz-Viedma, Salome [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Unidad Diagnostica de Medicina Nuclear, Seville (Spain); Garcia-Solis, David [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Unidad Diagnostica de Medicina Nuclear, Seville (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Seville (Spain); Mir, Pablo [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio/CSIC/Universidad de Sevilla, Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento, Servicio de Neurologia, Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla, Seville (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Seville (Spain); Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Unidad de Trastornos del Movimiento. Servicio de Neurologia, Seville (Spain)

    2010-03-15

    To determine clinical predictors and accuracy of {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in the differentiation of drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Several clinical features and {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT images in 32 patients with DIP, 25 patients with PD unmasked by antidopaminergic drugs (PDu) and 22 patients with PD without a previous history of antidopaminergic treatment (PDc) were retrospectively evaluated. DIP and PD shared all clinical features except symmetry of parkinsonian signs which was more frequently observed in patients with DIP (46.9%) than in patients with PDu (16.0%, p<0.05) or PDc (4.5%, p<0.01). Qualitatively {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT images were normal in 29 patients with DIP (90.6%) and abnormal in all patients with PD, and this imaging technique showed high levels of accuracy. DIP and PD are difficult to differentiate based on clinical signs. The precision of clinical diagnosis could be reliably enhanced by {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging. (orig.)

  13. Species differences in drug glucuronidation: Humanized UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1 mice and their application for predicting drug glucuronidation and drug-induced toxicity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ryoichi; Yoda, Emiko; Tukey, Robert H

    2018-02-01

    More than 20% of clinically used drugs are glucuronidated by a microsomal enzyme UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT). Inhibition or induction of UGT can result in an increase or decrease in blood drug concentration. To avoid drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in individuals, therefore, it is important to understand whether UGTs are involved in metabolism of drugs and drug candidates. While most of glucuronides are inactive metabolites, acyl-glucuronides that are formed from compounds with a carboxylic acid group can be highly toxic. Animals such as mice and rats are widely used to predict drug metabolism and drug-induced toxicity in humans. However, there are marked species differences in the expression and function of drug-metabolizing enzymes including UGTs. To overcome the species differences, mice in which certain drug-metabolizing enzymes are humanized have been recently developed. Humanized UGT1 (hUGT1) mice were created in 2010 by crossing Ugt1-null mice with human UGT1 transgenic mice in a C57BL/6 background. hUGT1 mice can be promising tools to predict human drug glucuronidation and acyl-glucuronide-associated toxicity. In this review article, studies of drug metabolism and toxicity in the hUGT1 mice are summarized. We further discuss research and strategic directions to advance the understanding of drug glucuronidation in humans. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Changes in the regional cerebral blood flow after drug-induced blood-pressure reduction in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwata, Noriyuki; Kuroda, Kiyoshi; Sato, Naoya; Konno, Hiromu; Iwabuchi, Takashi; Ogawa, Akira; Kanaya, Haruyuki.

    1993-01-01

    In patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhages, changes in the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) after drug-induced blood-pressure reduction were examined by means of subtraction SPECT. The subjects were 38 patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhages; 22 were putaminal hemorrhages (mean age, 56.8 years; mean hematoma volume, 18.4 cc), while 16 were thalamic hemorrhages (mean age, 61.9 years; mean hematoma volume, 7.8 cc). The rCBF was measured by means of SPECT (Tomomatic 64) with 133 Xe inhalation. Trimethaphan (an autonomic ganglion blocker) and diltiazem hydrochloride (a calcium antagonist) were used for the reduction of the blood pressure. The results were as follows: In the acute stage, the mean CBF was reduced when the blood pressure fell by more than 20% in both the putaminal hemorrhages and the thalamic hemorrhages. A similar tendency was observed in the subacute stage, except that a greater reduction in the blood pressure was needed to induce mean CBF reduction. The subtraction of rCBF maps before and after hypotension treatment shows a reduction of the rCBF in the lateral region of hematoma and the contralateral hemisphere. (author)

  15. The microculture-kinetic (MiCK) assay: the role of a drug-induced apoptosis assay in drug development and clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosserman, Linda; Prendergast, Franklyn; Herbst, Roy; Fleisher, Martin; Salom, Emery; Strickland, Steven; Raptis, Anastasios; Hallquist, Allan; Perree, Mathieu; Rajurkar, Swapnil; Karimi, Misagh; Rogers, Karl; Davidson, Dirk; Willis, Carl; Penalver, Manuel; Homesley, Howard; Burrell, Matthew; Garrett, Audrey; Rutledge, James; Chernick, Michael; Presant, Cary A

    2012-08-15

    A drug-induced apoptosis assay, termed the microculture-kinetic (MiCK) assay, has been developed. Blinded clinical trials have shown higher response rates and longer survival in groups of patients with acute myelocytic leukemia and epithelial ovarian cancer who have been treated with drugs that show high apoptosis in the MiCK assay. Unblinded clinical trials in multiple tumor types have shown that the assay will be used frequently by clinicians to determine treatment, and when used, results in higher response rates, longer times to relapse, and longer survivals. Model economic analyses suggest possible cost savings in clinical use based on increased generic drug use and single-agent substitution for combination therapies. Two initial studies with drugs in development are promising. The assay may help reduce costs and speed time to drug approval. Correlative studies with molecular biomarkers are planned. This assay may have a role both in personalized clinical therapy and in more efficient drug development. ©2012 AACR.

  16. Keratin-18 and microRNA-122 complement alanine aminotransferase as novel safety biomarkers for drug-induced liver injury in two human cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulin, Petra; Nordahl, Gunnar; Gry, Marcus; Yimer, Getnet; Aklillu, Eleni; Makonnen, Eyasu; Aderaye, Getachew; Lindquist, Lars; Mattsson, C Mikael; Ekblom, Björn; Antoine, Daniel J; Park, B Kevin; Linder, Stig; Harrill, Alison H; Watkins, Paul B; Glinghammar, Björn; Schuppe-Koistinen, Ina

    2014-03-01

    There is a demand for more sensitive, specific and predictive biomarkers for drug-induced liver injury (DILI) than the gold standard used today, alanine aminotransferase (ALT). The aim of this study was to qualify novel DILI biomarkers (keratin-18 markers M65/M30, microRNA-122, glutamate dehydrogenase and alpha-foetoprotein) in human DILI. Levels of the novel biomarkers were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) in two human DILI cohorts: a human volunteer study with acetaminophen and a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/tuberculosis (TB) study. In the acetaminophen study, serum M65 and microRNA-122 levels were significantly increased at an earlier time point than ALT. Furthermore, the maximal elevation of M65 and microRNA-122 exceeded the increase in ALT. In the HIV/TB study, all the analysed novel biomarkers increased after 1 week of treatment. In contrast to ALT, the novel biomarkers remained stable in a human cohort with exercise-induced muscular injury. M65 and microRNA-122 are potential biomarkers of DILI superior to ALT with respect to sensitivity and specificity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Alterations in endo-lysosomal function induce similar hepatic lipid profiles in rodent models of drug-induced phospholipidosis and Sandhoff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecommandeur, Emmanuelle; Baker, David; Cox, Timothy M; Nicholls, Andrew W; Griffin, Julian L

    2017-07-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is characterized by an increase in the phospholipid content of the cell and the accumulation of drugs and lipids inside the lysosomes of affected tissues, including in the liver. Although of uncertain pathological significance for patients, the condition remains a major impediment for the clinical development of new drugs. Human Sandhoff disease (SD) is caused by inherited defects of the β subunit of lysosomal β-hexosaminidases (Hex) A and B, leading to a large array of symptoms, including neurodegeneration and ultimately death by the age of 4 in its most common form. The substrates of Hex A and B, gangliosides GM2 and GA2, accumulate inside the lysosomes of the CNS and in peripheral organs. Given that both DIPL and SD are associated with lysosomes and lipid metabolism in general, we measured the hepatic lipid profiles in rodent models of these two conditions using untargeted LC/MS to examine potential commonalities. Both model systems shared a number of perturbed lipid pathways, notably those involving metabolism of cholesteryl esters, lysophosphatidylcholines, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphates, and ceramides. We report here profound alterations in lipid metabolism in the SD liver. In addition, DIPL induced a wide range of lipid changes not previously observed in the liver, highlighting similarities with those detected in the model of SD and raising concerns that these lipid changes may be associated with underlying pathology associated with lysosomal storage disorders. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee Points-to-consider Paper*: Drug-induced Vascular Injury Associated with Nonsmall Molecule Therapeutics in Preclinical Development: Part 2. Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Jeffery A; Fant, Pierluigi; Guionaud, Silvia; Henry, Scott P; Leach, Michael W; Louden, Calvert; Scicchitano, Marshall S; Weaver, James L; Zabka, Tanja S; Frazier, Kendall S

    2015-10-01

    Drug-induced vascular injury (DIVI) is a recurrent challenge in the development of novel pharmaceutical agents. In recent years, DIVI has been occasionally observed in nonhuman primates given RNA-targeting therapeutics such as antisense oligonucleotide therapies (ASOs) during chronic toxicity studies. While DIVI in laboratory animal species has been well characterized for vasoactive small molecules, and immune-mediated responses against large molecule biotherapeutics have been well described, there is little published information regarding DIVI induced by ASOs to date. Preclinical DIVI findings in monkeys have caused considerable delays in development of promising new ASO therapies, because of the uncertainty about whether DIVI in preclinical studies is predictive of effects in humans, and the lack of robust biomarkers of DIVI. This review of DIVI discusses clinical and microscopic features of vasculitis in monkeys, their pathogenic mechanisms, and points to consider for the toxicologist and pathologist when confronted with ASO-related DIVI. Relevant examples of regulatory feedback are included to provide insight into risk assessment of ASO therapies. © 2015 by The Author(s).

  19. Assessment of 99mTc-DMSA renoscintigraphy and uptake compared with creatinine clearance in rats with drug-induced nephrotoxicity, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masafumi

    1991-01-01

    For evaluation of technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid ( 99m Tc-DMSA) renal uptake as an absolute renal function, 99m Tc-DMSA uptake was compared with endogenous creatinine clearance (Ccr) in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Gentamicin (40 mg/kg/day) was given subcutaneously to male Wistar rats for periods of 3, 6, 9 and 12 days. On the next day, the renoscintigraphy was performed 2 hours following intravenous injection of 99m Tc-DMSA and Ccr was measured. On the 7th day, 99m Tc-DMSA uptake was significantly lower in the treated rats than that in control (32.27±0.92 vs 39.84±2.24%; p 99m Tc-DMSA uptake was measured and the histological examination was done. On the 4th day, 99m Tc-DMSA uptake was significantly lower than that on the 1st day (32.32±3.00 vs 38.91±1.95%; p 99m Tc-DMSA uptake reduces earlier than Ccr in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and 99m Tc-DMSA uptake is a reliable indicator in the evaluation of a renal function in drug-induced nephrotoxicity. (author)

  20. Analysis of changes in gingival contour from three-dimensional co-ordinate data in subjects with drug-induced gingival overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, J M; Ellis, J S; Jovanovski, V; Corson, M; Lynch, E; Seymour, R A

    2005-10-01

    This aim of this study was to develop and assess a technique that could be used to assess accurately the gingival volume changes seen in drug-induced gingival overgrowth by the analysis of data obtained from an entire gingival surface by means of three-dimensional imaging. Stone dental models of patients before and after gingivectomy procedures were digitized with a laser scanner and then regenerated as computer models constructed from the acquired three-dimensional co-ordinate data. A comparison of superposed "before" and "after" surfaces was undertaken to assess and accurately quantify changes in gingival contour. The mean vertical tissue reduction varied from 1.58 to 2.56 mm in the four study subjects and individual differences are shown. The maximum thickness of removed buccal gingival overgrowth was found to range between 1.20 and 3.40 mm. The volume of tissue removed from each inter-dental papilla ranged from 4.2 to 46.1 mm3 and the mean volume of the papilla removed from each subject+/-SD values was 24.8+/-13.1 mm3. This method will measure changes in gingival tissues to within 60 microm in one plane, making it ideal for the assessment of longitudinal changes in gingival contour as seen in the development of gingival overgrowth, its recurrence after surgery or the changes in volume brought about by surgery.

  1. In Silico Identification of Proteins Associated with Drug-induced Liver Injury Based on the Prediction of Drug-target Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Sergey; Semin, Maxim; Lagunin, Alexey; Filimonov, Dmitry; Poroikov, Vladimir

    2017-07-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the leading cause of acute liver failure as well as one of the major reasons for drug withdrawal from clinical trials and the market. Elucidation of molecular interactions associated with DILI may help to detect potentially hazardous pharmacological agents at the early stages of drug development. The purpose of our study is to investigate which interactions with specific human protein targets may cause DILI. Prediction of interactions with 1534 human proteins was performed for the dataset with information about 699 drugs, which were divided into three categories of DILI: severe (178 drugs), moderate (310 drugs) and without DILI (211 drugs). Based on the comparison of drug-target interactions predicted for different drugs' categories and interpretation of those results using clustering, Gene Ontology, pathway and gene expression analysis, we identified 61 protein targets associated with DILI. Most of the revealed proteins were linked with hepatocytes' death caused by disruption of vital cellular processes, as well as the emergence of inflammation in the liver. It was found that interaction of a drug with the identified targets is the essential molecular mechanism of the severe DILI for the most of the considered pharmaceuticals. Thus, pharmaceutical agents interacting with many of the identified targets may be considered as candidates for filtering out at the early stages of drug research. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Drug-induced renal injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kidney receives a rich blood flow of 25% of resting cardiac output ... Drugs can cause acute renal failure by causing pre-renal, intrinsic or .... tubular epithelial cells causing cell swelling ... the dose as required or prescribe alternative drugs.

  3. Drug-induced liver injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-02

    Jun 2, 2011 ... liver failure in the developed world and a prominent aetiological factor ... most drugs is not known and several epidemiological studies have had major ... eosinophilia, are also pointers towards the cause of the injury and are.