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Sample records for dysfunction impairs resolution

  1. Macrophage dysfunction impairs resolution of inflammation in the wounds of diabetic mice.

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    Savita Khanna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic inflammation is a characteristic feature of diabetic cutaneous wounds. We sought to delineate novel mechanisms involved in the impairment of resolution of inflammation in diabetic cutaneous wounds. At the wound-site, efficient dead cell clearance (efferocytosis is a pre-requisite for the timely resolution of inflammation and successful healing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Macrophages isolated from wounds of diabetic mice showed significant impairment in efferocytosis. Impaired efferocytosis was associated with significantly higher burden of apoptotic cells in wound tissue as well as higher expression of pro-inflammatory and lower expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Observations related to apoptotic cell load at the wound site in mice were validated in the wound tissue of diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Forced Fas ligand driven elevation of apoptotic cell burden at the wound site augmented pro-inflammatory and attenuated anti-inflammatory cytokine response. Furthermore, successful efferocytosis switched wound macrophages from pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory mode. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, this study presents first evidence demonstrating that diabetic wounds suffer from dysfunctional macrophage efferocytosis resulting in increased apoptotic cell burden at the wound site. This burden, in turn, prolongs the inflammatory phase and complicates wound healing.

  2. Abnormal white matter tractography of visual pathways detected by high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) corresponds to visual dysfunction in cortical/cerebral visual impairment

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    Bauer, Corinna M.; Heidary, Gena; Koo, Bang-Bon; Killiany, Ronald J.; Bex, Peter; Merabet, Lotfi B.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical (cerebral) visual impairment (CVI) is characterized by visual dysfunction associated with damage to the optic radiations and/or visual cortex. Typically it results from pre- or perinatal hypoxic damage to postchiasmal visual structures and pathways. The neuroanatomical basis of this condition remains poorly understood, particularly with regard to how the resulting maldevelopment of visual processing pathways relates to observations in the clinical setting. We report our investigation...

  3. Impaired glycogen synthase activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2006-01-01

    expression analysis and proteomics have pointed to abnormalities in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and cellular stress in muscle of type 2 diabetic subjects, and recent work suggests that impaired mitochondrial activity is another early defect in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. This review...... will discuss the latest advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes with focus on possible links between impaired glycogen synthase activity and mitochondrial dysfunction....

  4. Autonomic dysfunction and impaired cerebral autoregulation in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjaer, Vibe G; Mehlsen, Jesper; Knudsen, Gitte M;

    2006-01-01

    by norepinephrine infusion (NE). The severity of liver disease was assessed using the Child-Pugh scale (class A, mild; class B, moderate; class C, severe liver dysfunction).NE increased blood pressure similarly in the controls (27 (24-32) mmHg) and patients with the most severe liver cirrhosis (Child-Pugh C, 31 (26.......0+/-2.0 bpm) compared to the controls (21.7+/-2.2 bpm, p=0.001, Tukey' test). Systolic blood pressure fell during head-up tilt only in patients with severe cirrhosis. Our results imply that cerebral autoregulation was impaired in the most severe cases of liver cirrhosis, and that those with impaired cerebral......Cerebral blood flow autoregulation is lost in patients with severe liver cirrhosis. The cause of this is unknown. We determined whether autonomic dysfunction was related to impaired cerebral autoregulation in patients with cirrhosis. Fourteen patients with liver cirrhosis and 11 healthy volunteers...

  5. Association among depression, cognitive impairment and executive dysfunction after stroke

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    Luisa Terroni

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The relationship between depression and cognitive impairment, frequent after stroke, is complex and has not been sufficiently elucidated. Objective: To review the relationship between post-stroke depression and cognitive impairment. Methods: We performed a PubMed database search spanning the last ten years, using the terms post-stroke depression, cognitive dysfunction, cognitive impairment and neuropsychological tests. Our target studies were original quantitative studies that investigated the relationship between post-stroke depression (PSD and cognitive impairment in stroke patients. Articles published in English, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese were considered. Selection criteria were the use of neuropsychological tests to assess cognitive function, and of either instruments to diagnose major depression, or scales to assess depressive symptoms, within the first three months after stroke. Results: Six original quantitative studies fulfilled the criteria. The prevalence of PSD within the first three months after stroke ranged from 22% to 31%. Incidence ranged from 25% to 27% and was evaluated in only two studies. PSD was associated with increased cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment was reported in 35.2% to 87% of the patients. Post-stroke cognitive deficits were reported mostly in executive function, memory, language, and speed of processing. Conclusion: Executive dysfunction and depression occur in stroke survivors, are frequently coexistent, and also associated with worse stroke prognosis. Healthcare professionals need to address and provide adequate treatment for depression and executive dysfunctions in stroke patients early in the first three months after stroke. Future studies should evaluate the efficacy of programs evaluating the early detection and treatment of PSD and executive dysfunction in stroke survivors.

  6. Reality monitoring impairment in schizophrenia reflects specific prefrontal cortex dysfunction

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    Jane R. Garrison

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reality monitoring impairment is often reported in schizophrenia but the neural basis of this deficit is poorly understood. Difficulties with reality monitoring could be attributable to the same pattern of neural dysfunction as other cognitive deficits that characterize schizophrenia, or might instead represent a separable and dissociable impairment. This question was addressed through direct comparison of behavioral performance and neural activity associated with reality monitoring and working memory in patients with schizophrenia and matched healthy controls. Participants performed a word-pair reality monitoring task and a Sternberg working memory task while undergoing fMRI scanning. Distinct behavioral deficits were observed in the patients during performance of each task, which were associated with separable task- and region-specific dysfunction in the medial anterior prefrontal cortex for reality monitoring and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for working memory. The results suggest that reality monitoring impairment is a distinct neurocognitive deficit in schizophrenia. The findings are consistent with the presence of a range of dissociable cognitive deficits in schizophrenia which may be associated with variable functional and structural dysconnectivity in underlying processing networks.

  7. Impaired integration in psychopathy: A unified theory of psychopathic dysfunction.

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    Hamilton, Rachel K B; Hiatt Racer, Kristina; Newman, Joseph P

    2015-10-01

    This article introduces a novel theoretical framework for psychopathy that bridges dominant affective and cognitive models. According to the proposed impaired integration (II) framework of psychopathic dysfunction, topographical irregularities and abnormalities in neural connectivity in psychopathy hinder the complex process of information integration. Central to the II theory is the notion that psychopathic individuals are "'wired up' differently" (Hare, Williamson, & Harpur, 1988, p. 87). Specific theoretical assumptions include decreased functioning of the Salience and Default Mode Networks, normal functioning in executive control networks, and less coordination and flexible switching between networks. Following a review of dominant models of psychopathy, we introduce our II theory as a parsimonious account of behavioral and brain irregularities in psychopathy. The II theory provides a unified theoretical framework for understanding psychopathic dysfunction and integrates principle tenets of affective and cognitive perspectives. Moreover, it accommodates evidence regarding connectivity abnormalities in psychopathy through its network theoretical perspective. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Markers of cardiac dysfunction in cognitive impairment and dementia.

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    Hilal, Saima; Chai, Yuek Ling; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Elangovan, Sakktivel; Yeow, Tan Boon; Xin, Xu; Chong, Jun Yi; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Richards, Arthur Mark; Chong, Jenny P C; Lai, Mitchell Kim Peng; Chen, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Markers of cardiac dysfunction such as amino terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTpro-BNP) and high sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) may be associated with dementia. However, limited data exist on their association with either pre-dementia stages, that is, cognitive impairment no dementia (CIND), or the burden of cerebrovascular diseases (CeVD).We therefore, examined the association of these biomarkers of cardiac dysfunction with CeVD in both CIND and dementia.A case-control study, with cases recruited from memory clinics and controls from memory clinics and community. All subjects underwent collection of blood samples, neuropsychological assessment, and neuroimaging. Subjects were classified as CIND and dementia based on clinical criteria whilst significant CeVD was defined as the presence of cortical infarcts and/or more than 2 lacunes and/or confluent white matter lesions in two regions of brain on Age-Related White Matter Changes Scale.We included a total of 35 controls (mean age: 65.9 years), 78 CIND (mean age: 70.2 years) and 80 cases with dementia (mean age: 75.6 years). Plasma concentrations of hs-cTnT were associated significantly with CeVD in both CIND (odds ratios [OR]: 9.05; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.64-49.79) and dementia (OR: 16.89; 95%CI: 2.02-142.67). In addition, NTpro-BNP was associated with dementia with CeVD (OR: 7.74; 95%CI: 1.23-48.58). These associations were independent of other vascular risk factors.In this study, we showed that plasma NTproBNP and hs-cTnT are associated with dementia and CIND, only when accompanied by presence of CeVD.

  9. Tetrahydrobiopterin restores impaired coronary microvascular dysfunction in hypercholesterolaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyss, Christophe A.; Koepfli, Pascal; Namdar, Mehdi; Siegrist, Patrick T.; Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital, Nuclear Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Luscher, Thomas F. [University Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Camici, Paolo G. [Hammersmith Hospital, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH{sub 4}) is an essential co-factor for the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), and BH{sub 4} deficiency may cause impaired NO synthase (NOS) activity. We studied whether BH{sub 4} deficiency contributes to the coronary microcirculatory dysfunction observed in patients with hypercholesterolaemia. Myocardial blood flow (MBF; ml min{sup -1} g{sup -1}) was measured at rest, during adenosine-induced (140 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1} over 7 min) hyperaemia (mainly non-endothelium dependent) and immediately after supine bicycle exercise (endothelium-dependent) stress in ten healthy volunteers and in nine hypercholesterolaemic subjects using {sup 15}O-labelled water and positron emission tomography. Measurements were repeated 60 min later, after intravenous infusion of BH{sub 4} (10 mg kg{sup -1} body weight over 30 min). Adenosine-induced hyperaemic MBF is considered to represent (near) maximal flow. Flow reserve utilisation was calculated as the ratio of exercise-induced to adenosine-induced hyperaemic MBF and expressed as percent to indicate how much of the maximal (adenosine-induced) hyperaemia can be achieved by bicycle stress. BH{sub 4} increased exercise-induced hyperaemia in controls (2.96{+-}0.58 vs 3.41{+-}0.73 ml min{sup -1} g{sup -1}, p<0.05) and hypercholesterolaemic subjects (2.47{+-}0.78 vs 2.70{+-}0.72 ml min{sup -1} g{sup -1}, p<0.01) but had no influence on MBF at rest or during adenosine-induced hyperaemia in controls (4.52{+-}1.10 vs 4.85{+-}0.45 ml min{sup -1} g{sup -1}, p=NS) or hypercholesterolaemic subjects (4.86{+-}1.18 vs 4.53{+-}0.93 ml min{sup -1} g{sup -1}, p=NS). Flow reserve utilisation remained unchanged in controls (70{+-}17% vs 71{+-}19%, p=NS) but increased significantly in hypercholesterolaemic subjects (53{+-}15% vs 66{+-}14%, p<0.05). BH{sub 4} restores flow reserve utilisation of the coronary microcirculation in hypercholesterolaemic subjects, suggesting that BH{sub 4} deficiency may contribute to coronary

  10. Autonomic dysfunction and impaired cerebral autoregulation in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjaer, Vibe G; Strauss, Gitte I; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    .0+/-2.0 bpm) compared to the controls (21.7+/-2.2 bpm, p=0.001, Tukey' test). Systolic blood pressure fell during head-up tilt only in patients with severe cirrhosis. Our results imply that cerebral autoregulation was impaired in the most severe cases of liver cirrhosis, and that those with impaired cerebral...

  11. Hyperthyroidism causes cardiac dysfunction by mitochondrial impairment and energy depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Sangeeta; Kar, Dipak; De, Kakali; Chander, Vivek; Bandyopadhyay, Arun

    2013-05-01

    This study elucidates the role of metabolic remodeling in cardiac dysfunction induced by hyperthyroidism. Cardiac hypertrophy, structural remodeling, and expression of the genes associated with fatty acid metabolism were examined in rats treated with triiodothyronine (T3) alone (8 μg/100 g body weight (BW), i.p.) for 15 days or along with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist bezafibrate (Bzf; 30 μg/100 g BW, oral) and were found to improve in the Bzf co-treated condition. Ultrastructure of mitochondria was damaged in T3-treated rat heart, which was prevented by Bzf co-administration. Hyperthyroidism-induced oxidative stress, reduction in cytochrome c oxidase activity, and myocardial ATP concentration were also significantly checked by Bzf. Heart function studied at different time points during the course of T3 treatment shows an initial improvement and then a gradual but progressive decline with time, which is prevented by Bzf co-treatment. In summary, the results demonstrate that hyperthyroidism inflicts structural and functional damage to mitochondria, leading to energy depletion and cardiac dysfunction.

  12. Executive Dysfunction Is the Primary Cognitive Impairment in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

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    Gerstenecker, Adam; Mast, Benjamin; Duff, Kevin; Ferman, Tanis J.; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive difficulties appear to be a more prevalent clinical feature in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) than previously thought, and significant cognitive impairment is prevalent in a majority of patients PSP patients not considered clinically demented. The neurocognitive performance of 200 patients with PSP across multiple sites was examined with a variety of commonly used neuropsychological tests. Results indicate primary executive dysfunction (e.g., 74% impaired on the Frontal Assessment Battery, 55% impaired on Initiation/Perseveration subscale of the Dementia Rating Scale), with milder difficulties in memory, construction, and naming. These results have important clinical implications for providers following patients with PSP. PMID:23127882

  13. Chronic renal dysfunction and anaemia are associated with cognitive impairment in older patients with heart failure.

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    Pulignano, Giovanni; Del Sindaco, Donatella; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Tinti, Maria Denitza; Tarantini, Luigi; Cioffi, Giovanni; Tolone, Stefano; Pero, Gaetano; Minardi, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive impairment, anaemia and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are associated with mortality and disability in chronic heart failure patients. We hypothesized that anaemia and CKD are independent predictors of cognitive impairment in older patients with heart failure. One hundred and ninety community-living elderly patients aged at least 70 years, treated with optimized therapy for heart failure in stable clinical conditions, were prospectively studied. They underwent clinical and multidimensional assessment. Cognitive status was assessed by the Mini Mental State Examination. Cognitive impairment was defined as the Mini Mental State Examination score adjusted by age and educational level below 24. CKD was defined as the Cockcroft-Gault glomerular filtration rate below 60  ml/min and anaemia as haemoglobin below 12  g/dl. Cognitive impairment was diagnosed in 38.9% of patients, CKD in 85.7% and anaemia in 42.6%. Age, female sex, BMI, education less than 5 years, depressive symptoms, anaemia, CKD, disability and worse quality of life were significantly associated with cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment involved primarily global cognitive deficit, memory, mental speed, attention, calculation and language. A significant relationship between haemoglobin levels and cognitive impairment was found, with the range of 15-16.5  g/dl having the lower prevalence of cognitive impairment (19.4%). At multivariate analysis, advanced age, low education level, anaemia and CKD were independently associated with cognitive impairment. Cox analysis showed that cognitive impairment was an independent predictor of hospitalization for worsening heart failure alone and combined with all-cause death. Cognitive impairment is common in elderly heart failure patients and is independently associated with anaemia and renal dysfunction. Further studies are needed to assess whether optimal treatment of anaemia and CKD may prevent the development of cognitive impairment in heart failure

  14. Indirect task instructions better reveal theory-of-mind impairment, independent of executive dysfunction, in schizophrenia.

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    Langdon, Robyn; Connors, Michael; Connaughton, Emily

    2017-10-01

    Theory of mind (TOM) impairments associate significantly with executive deficits in schizophrenia, consistent with the proposal that executive abilities can limit TOM task performance, and confounding identification of those patients who would benefit most from targeted mentalising interventions. 50 schizophrenia patients and 30 healthy controls completed an executive battery and four TOM tasks that were alike with regards generating overt measures of causal false-belief reasoning, but differed with regards using indirect (vs. more direct) instructions. Only the TOM tasks that used indirect instructions to elicit spontaneous false-belief inferences revealed impairment, independent of executive dysfunction, in the schizophrenia patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Inhibition of cortisol production with metyrapone prevents mental stress-induced endothelial dysfunction and baroreflex impairment.

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    Broadley, Andrew J M; Korszun, Ania; Abdelaal, Eltigani; Moskvina, Valentina; Jones, Christopher J H; Nash, Gerard B; Ray, Clare; Deanfield, John; Frenneaux, Michael P

    2005-07-19

    This study was designed to investigate the role of cortisol in stress-induced endothelial dysfunction and impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) by blocking cortisol production with metyrapone before subjecting healthy volunteers to mental stress. Mental stress raises cortisol levels and is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality, especially from sudden cardiac death. It also causes endothelial dysfunction and impaired BRS. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of endothelial function, and BRS in 36 subjects without CHD risk factors who were then randomized in a double-blind fashion to oral metyrapone 750 mg x 2 or placebo. Five hours later we subjected subjects to mental stress and then remeasured endothelial function and BRS. Prestress cortisol levels were significantly higher in the placebo group at 270.5 (30.9) nmol/l versus 89.1 (11.8) nmol/l (p = 0.01), and the increase with stress was higher at 57.9 (17.9) nmol/l versus 11.2 (2.2) nmol/l (p Analysis of covariation showed a significant effect of metyrapone on change in both FMD (p = 0.009) and BRS (p = 0.024). Stress-related endothelial dysfunction and BRS impairment can be prevented by blocking cortisol production with metyrapone, demonstrating a direct or facilitative role for cortisol in these phenomena and suggesting mechanisms by which stress contributes to CHD and sudden cardiac death.

  16. Protein energy malnutrition associates with different types of hearing impairments in toddlers: Anemia increases cochlear dysfunction.

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    Kamel, Terez Boshra; Deraz, Tharwat Ezzat; Elkabarity, Rasha H; Ahmed, Rasha K

    2016-06-01

    This work aimed to highlight a challenging asymptomatic problem which is early detection of hearing impairment in toddlers with protein energy malnutrition (PEM) as a neuro-cognitive effect of PEM on developing brain in relation to hemoglobin level. 100 toddlers, aged 6-24 months, fifty with moderate/severe PEM and fifty healthy children, were included in study. Both TEOAEs and ABR testing were used to assess auditory function. Study reported an association between malnutrition and hearing impairment, 26% of cases had conductive deafness secondary to otitis media with effusion using tympanometry; 84.6% showed type B and 15.4% type C which may suggest developing or resolving otitis media. Their ABR showed 46% mild and 53% moderate impairment. 32% of PEM cases had sensory neural hearing loss and with type (A) tympanometry. Those were assessed using ABR; 58% had mild, 34% moderate and 8% profound impairment. 10% of PEM cases had mixed hearing loss with 50% type B and 50% type C tympanometry and their ABR showed moderate to profound impairment. TEOAEs latencies at different frequencies correlate negatively with hemoglobin level. Toddlers with moderate/severe PEM had hearing impairments of different types and degrees. Neuro-physiological methods could be early and safe detectors of auditory disorders especially in high-risk toddlers. Anemia increases risk for auditory dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Significant Resolution of Female Sexual Dysfunction after Bariatric Surgery

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    Bond, Dale S.; Wing, Rena R.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Sax, Harry C.; Roye, G. Dean; Ryder, Beth A.; Pohl, Dieter; Giovanni, Jeannine

    2010-01-01

    Background We previously reported that the majority of women seeking bariatric surgery had female sexual dysfunction (FSD) as defined by the validated Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Objective The current study examined whether FSD resolves after bariatric surgery. Setting The Miriam Hospital, Providence RI, USA. Methods Fifty-four reportedly sexually active women (43.3±9.5 years) completed the FSFI pre- and 6-months post-operatively after a mean excess weight loss (%EWL) of 42.3% [Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) n=38; %EWL=34.6±15.7; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) n=16; %EWL=60.0±21.2). The FSFI assesses sexual function across six domains with higher scores indicating better sexual function. Summing of these scores yields a FSFI-total score (range=2–36 with ≤26.55=FSD). Results Before surgery, 34 women (63%) had scores indicative of FSD. By 6-months after surgery, FSD had resolved in 23 of these 34 (68%) women, and only 1 woman developed FSD. In the entire sample, there were significant (p<0.05) improvements from pre- to post-surgery on all FSFI domains. FSFI-total scores improved after LAGB (24.2±5.9 to 29.1±4.1, p<0.001) and RYGB (23.7±7.7 to 30.0±4.7, p<0.001). In regression analyses, being married, younger age, and worse preoperative sexual function were related to greater sexual function improvements. Postoperatively, participants’ FSFI-total scores were indistinguishable from published normative controls (29.4±4.3 vs. 30.5±5.3, p=0.18). Conclusion FSD resolved in a large percentage of women. Sexual functioning in the entire sample improved to levels consistent with normative controls. This improvement in sexual function did not depend on surgery type or weight loss amount, and appears to be an additional benefit for women undergoing bariatric surgery. PMID:20678969

  18. Mangifera indica Fruit Extract Improves Memory Impairment, Cholinergic Dysfunction, and Oxidative Stress Damage in Animal Model of Mild Cognitive Impairment

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    Jintanaporn Wattanathorn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the effective preventive paradigm against mild cognitive impairment (MCI is required. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether Mangifera indica fruit extract, a substance possessing antioxidant and cognitive enhancing effects, could improve memory impairment, cholinergic dysfunction, and oxidative stress damage in animal model of mild cognitive impairment. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180–200 g, were orally given the extract at doses of 12.5, 50, and 200 mg·kg−1 BW for 2 weeks before and 1 week after the bilateral injection of AF64A (icv. At the end of study, spatial memory, cholinergic neurons density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px enzymes in hippocampus were determined. The results showed that all doses of extract could improve memory together with the decreased MDA level and the increased SOD and GSH-Px enzymes activities. The increased cholinergic neurons density in CA1 and CA3 of hippocampus was also observed in rats treated with the extract at doses of 50 and 200 mg·kg−1 BW. Therefore, our results suggested that M. indica, the potential protective agent against MCI, increased cholinergic function and the decreased oxidative stress which in turn enhanced memory. However, further researches are essential to elucidate the possible active ingredients and detail mechanism.

  19. Dysfunctional Relationship Beliefs in Parent-Late Adolescent Relationship and Conflict Resolution Behaviors

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    Hamamci, Zeynep

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of dysfunctional relationships beliefs on both the perceptions of their relationships with the parents and conflict resolution behaviors of late adolescence. The sample was consisted of 372 Turkish university students (248 women and 124 men). Interpersonal Cognitive Distortions Scale,…

  20. Dysfunction of ventrolateral striatal dopamine receptor type 2-expressing medium spiny neurons impairs instrumental motivation

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    Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Takiue, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Keitaro; Xu, Ming; Yano, Ryutaro; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Bouchekioua, Youcef; Okano, Hideyuki; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Takata, Norio; Drew, Michael R.; Sano, Hiromi; Mimura, Masaru; Tanaka, Kenji F.

    2017-01-01

    Impaired motivation is present in a variety of neurological disorders, suggesting that decreased motivation is caused by broad dysfunction of the nervous system across a variety of circuits. Based on evidence that impaired motivation is a major symptom in the early stages of Huntington's disease, when dopamine receptor type 2-expressing striatal medium spiny neurons (D2-MSNs) are particularly affected, we hypothesize that degeneration of these neurons would be a key node regulating motivational status. Using a progressive, time-controllable, diphtheria toxin-mediated cell ablation/dysfunction technique, we find that loss-of-function of D2-MSNs within ventrolateral striatum (VLS) is sufficient to reduce goal-directed behaviours without impairing reward preference or spontaneous behaviour. Moreover, optogenetic inhibition and ablation of VLS D2-MSNs causes, respectively, transient and chronic reductions of goal-directed behaviours. Our data demonstrate that the circuitry containing VLS D2-MSNs control motivated behaviours and that VLS D2-MSN loss-of-function is a possible cause of motivation deficits in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28145402

  1. Impaired Early Attentional Processes in Parkinson's Disease: A High-Resolution Event-Related Potentials Study.

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    Perrine Bocquillon

    Full Text Available The selection of task-relevant information requires both the focalization of attention on the task and resistance to interference from irrelevant stimuli. A previous study using the P3 component of the event-related potentials suggested that a reduced ability to resist interference could be responsible for attention disorders at early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD, with a possible role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC.Our objective was to better determine the origin of this impairment, by studying an earlier ERP component, the N2, and its subcomponents, as they reflect early inhibition processes and as they are known to have sources in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, which is involved together with the DLPFC in inhibition processes. Fifteen early-stage PD patients and 15 healthy controls (HCs performed a three-stimulus visual oddball paradigm, consisting in detecting target inputs amongst standard stimuli, while resisting interference from distracter ones. A 128-channel electroencephalogram was recorded during this task and the generators of the N2 subcomponents were identified using standardized weighted low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (swLORETA.PD patients displayed fewer N2 generators than HCs in both the DLPFC and the ACC, for all types of stimuli. In contrast to controls, PD patients did not show any differences between their generators for different N2 subcomponents.Our data suggest that impaired inhibition in PD results from dysfunction of the DLPFC and the ACC during the early stages of attentional processes.

  2. Impaired endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and dysfunctional bone marrow stroma in diabetes mellitus.

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    Peter E Westerweel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell (EPC levels are reduced in diabetes mellitus. This may be a consequence of impaired mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow. We hypothesized that under diabetic conditions, mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow to the circulation is impaired -at least partly- due to dysfunction of the bone marrow stromal compartment. METHODS: Diabetes was induced in mice by streptozotocin injection. Circulating Sca-1(+Flk-1(+ EPC were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry at baseline and after mobilization with G-CSF/SCF injections. In vivo hemangiogenic recovery was tested by 5-FU challenge. Interaction within the bone marrow environment between CD34(+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC and supporting stroma was assessed by co-cultures. To study progenitor cell-endothelial cell interaction under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions, a co-culture model using E4Orf1-transfected human endothelial cells was employed. RESULTS: In diabetic mice, bone marrow EPC levels were unaffected. However, circulating EPC levels in blood were lower at baseline and mobilization was attenuated. Diabetic mice failed to recover and repopulate from 5-FU injection. In vitro, primary cultured bone marrow stroma from diabetic mice was impaired in its capacity to support human CFU-forming HPC. Finally, hyperglycemia hampered the HPC supportive function of endothelial cells in vitro. CONCLUSION: EPC mobilization is impaired under experimental diabetic conditions and our data suggest that diabetes induces alterations in the progenitor cell supportive capacity of the bone marrow stroma, which could be partially responsible for the attenuated EPC mobilization and reduced EPC levels observed in diabetic patients.

  3. Impaired Endothelial Progenitor Cell Mobilization and Dysfunctional Bone Marrow Stroma in Diabetes Mellitus

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    Rafii, Shahin; Jaspers, Janneke E.; White, Ian A.; Hooper, Andrea T.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Verhaar, Marianne C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell (EPC) levels are reduced in diabetes mellitus. This may be a consequence of impaired mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow. We hypothesized that under diabetic conditions, mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow to the circulation is impaired –at least partly– due to dysfunction of the bone marrow stromal compartment. Methods Diabetes was induced in mice by streptozotocin injection. Circulating Sca-1+Flk-1+ EPC were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry at baseline and after mobilization with G-CSF/SCF injections. In vivo hemangiogenic recovery was tested by 5-FU challenge. Interaction within the bone marrow environment between CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) and supporting stroma was assessed by co-cultures. To study progenitor cell–endothelial cell interaction under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions, a co-culture model using E4Orf1-transfected human endothelial cells was employed. Results In diabetic mice, bone marrow EPC levels were unaffected. However, circulating EPC levels in blood were lower at baseline and mobilization was attenuated. Diabetic mice failed to recover and repopulate from 5-FU injection. In vitro, primary cultured bone marrow stroma from diabetic mice was impaired in its capacity to support human CFU-forming HPC. Finally, hyperglycemia hampered the HPC supportive function of endothelial cells in vitro. Conclusion EPC mobilization is impaired under experimental diabetic conditions and our data suggest that diabetes induces alterations in the progenitor cell supportive capacity of the bone marrow stroma, which could be partially responsible for the attenuated EPC mobilization and reduced EPC levels observed in diabetic patients. PMID:23555959

  4. Elevated 20-HETE Impairs Coronary Collateral Growth in Metabolic Syndrome Via Endothelial Dysfunction.

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    Joseph, Gregory; Soler, Amanda; Hutcheson, Rebecca; Hunter, Ian; Bradford, Chastity; Hutcheson, Brenda; Gotlinger, Katherine H; Jiang, Houli; Falck, John R; Proctor, Spencer; Laniado Schwartzman, Michal; Rocic, Petra

    2016-12-23

    Coronary collateral growth (CCG) is impaired in metabolic syndrome (MetS). microRNA-145 (miR-145-Adv) delivery to our rat model of metabolic syndrome (JCR) completely restored and neutrophil depletion significantly improved CCG. We determined whether low endogenous levels of miR-145 in MetS allowed for elevated production of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), which in turn, resulted in excessive neutrophil accumulation and endothelial dysfunction leading to impaired CCG. Rats underwent 0-9 days of repetitive ischemia (RI). RI-induced cardiac CYP4F (neutrophil-specific 20-HETE synthase) expression and 20-HETE levels were increased (4-fold) in JCR vs. normal rats. miR-145-Adv and 20-HETE antagonists abolished, and neutrophil depletion (blocking antibodies) reduced (~60%) RI-induced increases in CYP4F expression and 20-HETE production in JCR rats. Impaired CCG in JCR rats (collateral-dependent blood flow using microspheres) was completely restored by 20-HETE antagonists ((collateral-dependent zone)CZ/(normal zone)NZ flow ratio was 0.76±0.07 in JCR+20-SOLA, 0.84±0.05 in JCR+20-HEDGE vs. 0.11±0.02 in JCR vs. 0.84±0.03 in normal rats). In JCR rats, elevated 20-HETE was associated with excessive expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and neutrophil infiltration which were reversed by miR-145-Adv. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation of coronary arteries, eNOS Ser1179 phosphorylation, eNOS-dependent NO.- production and endothelial cell survival were compromised in JCR rats. These parameters of endothelial dysfunction were completely reversed by 20-HETE antagonism or miR-145-Adv delivery, whereas neutrophil depletion resulted in partial reversal (~70%). We conclude that low miR-145 in MetS allows for increased 20-HETE, mainly from neutrophils, which compromises endothelial cell survival and function leading to impaired CCG. 20-HETE antagonists could provide viable therapy for restoration of CCG in MetS.

  5. Age-Related Dysfunction in Mechanotransduction Impairs Differentiation of Human Mammary Epithelial Progenitors

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    Fanny A. Pelissier

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunctional progenitor and luminal cells with acquired basal cell properties accumulate during human mammary epithelial aging for reasons not understood. Multipotent progenitors from women aged 55 years is unaffected by physiological stiffness changes. Efficient activation of Hippo pathway transducers YAP and TAZ is required for the modulus-dependent myoepithelial/basal bias in younger progenitors. In older progenitors, YAP and TAZ are activated only when stressed with extraphysiologically stiff matrices, which bias differentiation towards luminal-like phenotypes. In vivo YAP is primarily active in myoepithelia of younger breasts, but localization and activity increases in luminal cells with age. Thus, aging phenotypes of mammary epithelia may arise partly because alterations in Hippo pathway activation impair microenvironment-directed differentiation and lineage specificity.

  6. Effect of impaired glucose tolerance on cardiac dysfunction in a rat model of prediabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Jia-liang; FENG Zhi-kuan; LIU Xiao-ying; LIN Qiu-xiong; FU Yong-heng; SHAN Zhi-xin; ZHU Jie-ning; LIN Shu-guang; YU Xi-yong

    2011-01-01

    Background The effect of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) on cardiac function during the chronic prediabetes state is complicated and plays an important role in clinical outcome. However, the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. This study was designed to observe cardiac dysfunction in prediabetic rats with IGT and to determine whether glucose metabolic abnormalities, inflammation and apoptosis are linked to it.Methods The IGT rat models were induced by streptozocin, and the heart functions were assessed by echocardiography.Myocardial glucose metabolism was analyzed by glycogen periodic acid-Schiff staining, and the pro-apoptotic effect of IGT was evaluated by TUNEL staining. Additionally, caspase-3 activation, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and G-protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) were detected by Western blotting in cardiac tissue lysates.Results Area-under-the-curve of blood glucose in rats injected with streptozotocin was higher than that in controls,increased by 16.28%, 38.60% and 38.61% at 2, 4 and 6 weeks respectively (F=15.370, P=0.003). Abnormal cardiac functions and apoptotic cardiomyocytes were observed in the IGT rats, the ejection fraction (EF) being (68.59±6.62)% in IGT rats vs. (81.07±4.59)% in controls (t=4.020, P=0.002). There was more glucose which was converted to glycogen in the myocardial tissues of IGT rats, especially in cardiac perivascular tissues. Compared to controls, the cleaved caspase-3, MIF and GRK2 were expressed at higher levels in the myocardial tissues of IGT rats.Conclusions IGT in the prediabetes period resulted in cardiac dysfunction linked to abnormal glycogen storage and apoptosis. Additionally, MIF and GRK2 may be involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac dysfunction in prediabetes and their regulation may contribute to the design of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for those who have potential risks for diabetic cardiovascular complications.

  7. Tau oligomers impair memory and induce synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The correlation between neurofibrillary tangles of tau and disease progression in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients remains an area of contention. Innovative data are emerging from biochemical, cell-based and transgenic mouse studies that suggest that tau oligomers, a pre-filament form of tau, may be the most toxic and pathologically significant tau aggregate. Results Here we report that oligomers of recombinant full-length human tau protein are neurotoxic in vivo after subcortical stereotaxic injection into mice. Tau oligomers impaired memory consolidation, whereas tau fibrils and monomers did not. Additionally, tau oligomers induced synaptic dysfunction by reducing the levels of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins synaptophysin and septin-11. Tau oligomers produced mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the levels of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (electron transport chain complex I), and activated caspase-9, which is related to the apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions This study identifies tau oligomers as an acutely toxic tau species in vivo, and suggests that tau oligomers induce neurodegeneration by affecting mitochondrial and synaptic function, both of which are early hallmarks in AD and other tauopathies. These results open new avenues for neuroprotective intervention strategies of tauopathies by targeting tau oligomers. PMID:21645391

  8. Tau oligomers impair memory and induce synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type mice

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    Jackson George R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The correlation between neurofibrillary tangles of tau and disease progression in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients remains an area of contention. Innovative data are emerging from biochemical, cell-based and transgenic mouse studies that suggest that tau oligomers, a pre-filament form of tau, may be the most toxic and pathologically significant tau aggregate. Results Here we report that oligomers of recombinant full-length human tau protein are neurotoxic in vivo after subcortical stereotaxic injection into mice. Tau oligomers impaired memory consolidation, whereas tau fibrils and monomers did not. Additionally, tau oligomers induced synaptic dysfunction by reducing the levels of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins synaptophysin and septin-11. Tau oligomers produced mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the levels of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (electron transport chain complex I, and activated caspase-9, which is related to the apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions This study identifies tau oligomers as an acutely toxic tau species in vivo, and suggests that tau oligomers induce neurodegeneration by affecting mitochondrial and synaptic function, both of which are early hallmarks in AD and other tauopathies. These results open new avenues for neuroprotective intervention strategies of tauopathies by targeting tau oligomers.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of diabetic coronary dysfunction due to large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ru-xing; ZHENG Jie; GUO Su-xia; LI Xiao-rong; LU Tong; SHI Hai-feng; CHAI Qiang; WU Ying; SUN Wei; JI Yuan; YAO Yong; LI Ku-lin; ZHANG Chang-ying

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is associated with coronary dysfunction,contributing to a 2- to 4-fold increase in the risk of coronary heart diseases.The mechanisms by which diabetes induces vasculopathy involve endothelial-dependent and -independent vascular dysfunction in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.The purpose of this study is to determine the role of vascular large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel activities in coronary dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.Methods Using videomicroscopy,immunoblotting,fluorescent assay and patch clamp techniques,we investigated the coronary BK channel activities and BK channel-mediated coronary vasoreactivity in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.Results BK currents (defined as the iberiotoxin-sensitive K+ component) contribute (65±4)% of the total K+ currents in freshly isolated coronary smooth muscle cells and >50% of the contraction of the inner diameter of coronary arteries from normal rats.However,BK current density is remarkably reduced in coronary smooth muscle cells of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats,leading to an increase in coronary artery tension.BK channel activity in response to free Ca2+ is impaired in diabetic rats.Moreover,cytoplasmic application of DHS-1 (a specific BK channel β1 subunit activator) robustly enhanced the open probability of BK channels in coronary smooth muscle cells of normal rats.In diabetic rats,the DHS-1 effect was diminished in the presence of 200 nmol/L Ca2+ and was significantly attenuated in the presence of high free calcium concentration,i.e.,1 μmol/L Ca2+.Immunoblotting experiments confirmed that there was a 2-fold decrease in BK-β1 protein expression in diabetic vessels,without altering the BK channel α-subunit expression.Although the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration of coronary arterial smooth muscle cells was increased from (103±23)nmol/L (n=5) of control rats to (193±22) nmol/L (n=6,P<0.05) of STZ-induced diabetic rats,reduced BK

  10. Absence of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and vagal pancreatic impairment in idiopathic achalasia of the oesophagus.

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    Herreros, B; Ascaso, J F; Mora, F; Costa, A J; Sanchiz, V; Minguez, M; Benages, A

    2007-08-01

    Extra-oesophageal autonomic dysfunction in idiopathic achalasia is not well documented, due to contradictory results reported. We aimed to study the cardiovascular and pancreatic autonomic function in patients with idiopathic achalasia. Thirty patients with idiopathic achalasia (16M/14F; 34.5 +/- 10.8 years) and 30 healthy volunteers (13M/17F; 34.8 +/- 10.7 years) were prospectively studied. Age >60 years and conditions affecting results of autonomic evaluation were excluded. Both groups underwent the sham feeding test and plasmatic levels of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) were determined by radioimmunoassay (basal, at 5, 10, 20 and 30 min). Cardiovascular parasympathetic (deep breathing, standing, Valsalva) and sympathetic function (postural decrease of systolic blood pressure, Handgrip test) were assessed. Statistical comparison of basal and increase levels of PP and parasympathetic/sympathetic cardiovascular parameters was performed between groups. Basal levels of PP were similar in controls and patients and maximum increase of PP during sham feeding test. A similar rate of abnormal cardiovascular tests was found between groups (P > 0.05). E/I ratio was the mostly impaired parameter (patients: 36.7% vs controls: 20%, P = 0.15, chi-squared test). Autonomic cardiovascular tests and pancreatic response to vagal stimulus are not impaired in patients with primary achalasia of the oesophagus.

  11. Cerebral Visual Impairment: Which Perceptive Visual Dysfunctions Can Be Expected in Children with Brain Damage? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, F. H.; Pel, J. J. M.; van der Steen, J.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2010-01-01

    The current definition of Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) includes all visual dysfunctions caused by damage to, or malfunctioning of, the retrochiasmatic visual pathways in the absence of damage to the anterior visual pathways or any major ocular disease. CVI is diagnosed by exclusion and the existence of many different causes and symptoms make…

  12. Cerebral Visual Impairment: Which Perceptive Visual Dysfunctions Can Be Expected in Children with Brain Damage? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, F. H.; Pel, J. J. M.; van der Steen, J.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2010-01-01

    The current definition of Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) includes all visual dysfunctions caused by damage to, or malfunctioning of, the retrochiasmatic visual pathways in the absence of damage to the anterior visual pathways or any major ocular disease. CVI is diagnosed by exclusion and the existence of many different causes and symptoms make…

  13. TIME COURSE OF MYOCARDIAL INTERSTITIAL EDEMA RESOLUTION AND ASSOCIATED LEFT VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M.; Stewart, Randolph H.; Quick, Christopher M.; Uray, Karen L.; Cox, Charles S.; Laine, Glen A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although the causal relationship between acute myocardial edema and cardiac dysfunction has been established, resolution of myocardial edema and subsequent recovery of cardiac function have not. The time to resolve myocardial edema and the degree that cardiac function is depressed after edema resolves are not known. We therefore characterized temporal changes in cardiac function as acute myocardial edema formed and resolved. Methods Acute myocardial edema was induced in the canine model by elevating coronary sinus pressure for three hours. Myocardial water content and cardiac function were determined before and during coronary sinus pressure elevation, and after coronary sinus pressure restoration. Results Although no change in systolic properties was detected, accumulation of water in myocardial interstitium was associated with increased diastolic stiffness. When coronary sinus pressure was relieved, myocardial edema resolved within 180 min. Diastolic stiffness, however, remained significantly elevated compared to baseline values, and cardiac function remained compromised. Conclusions The present work suggests that the cardiac dysfunction caused by the formation of myocardial edema may persist after myocardial edema resolves. With the advent of new imaging techniques to quantify myocardial edema, this insight provides a new avenue for research to detect and treat a significant cause of cardiac dysfunction. PMID:22708850

  14. Frailty, cognitive impairment, and functional disability in older women with female pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erekson, Elisabeth A; Fried, Terri R; Martin, Deanna K; Rutherford, Thomas J; Strohbehn, Kris; Bynum, Julie P W

    2015-06-01

    There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating frailty as an important predictor of surgical outcomes in older adults undergoing major surgeries. The age-related onset of many symptoms of female pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) in women suggests that many women seeking treatment for PFD may also have a high prevalence of frailty, which could potentially impact the risks and benefits of surgical treatment options. Our primary objective was to determine the prevalence of frailty, cognitive impairment, and functional disability in older women seeking treatment for PFD. We conducted a cross-sectional study with prospective recruitment between September 2011 and September 2012. Women, age 65 years and older, were recruited at the conclusion of their new patient consultation for PFD at a tertiary center. A comprehensive geriatric screening including frailty measurements (Fried Frailty Index), cognitive screening (Saint Louis University Mental Status score), and functional status evaluation for activities of daily living (Katz ADL score) was conducted. Sixteen percent (n/N = 25/150) of women were categorized as frail according to the Fried Frailty Index score. After adjusting for education level, 21.3 % of women (n/N = 32/150) screened positive for dementia and 46 (30.7 %) reported functional difficulty or dependence in performing at least one Katz ADL. Sixty-nine women (46.0 %) chose surgical options for treatment of their PFD at the conclusion of their new patient visit with their physician. Frailty, cognitive impairment, and functional disability are common in older women seeking treatment for PFD.

  15. Impairment of brain endothelial glucose transporter by methamphetamine causes blood-brain barrier dysfunction

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    Murrin L Charles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methamphetamine (METH, an addictive psycho-stimulant drug with euphoric effect is known to cause neurotoxicity due to oxidative stress, dopamine accumulation and glial cell activation. Here we hypothesized that METH-induced interference of glucose uptake and transport at the endothelium can disrupt the energy requirement of the blood-brain barrier (BBB function and integrity. We undertake this study because there is no report of METH effects on glucose uptake and transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB to date. Results In this study, we demonstrate that METH-induced disruption of glucose uptake by endothelium lead to BBB dysfunction. Our data indicate that a low concentration of METH (20 μM increased the expression of glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1 in primary human brain endothelial cell (hBEC, main component of BBB without affecting the glucose uptake. A high concentration of 200 μM of METH decreased both the glucose uptake and GLUT1 protein levels in hBEC culture. Transcription process appeared to regulate the changes in METH-induced GLUT1 expression. METH-induced decrease in GLUT1 protein level was associated with reduction in BBB tight junction protein occludin and zonula occludens-1. Functional assessment of the trans-endothelial electrical resistance of the cell monolayers and permeability of dye tracers in animal model validated the pharmacokinetics and molecular findings that inhibition of glucose uptake by GLUT1 inhibitor cytochalasin B (CB aggravated the METH-induced disruption of the BBB integrity. Application of acetyl-L-carnitine suppressed the effects of METH on glucose uptake and BBB function. Conclusion Our findings suggest that impairment of GLUT1 at the brain endothelium by METH may contribute to energy-associated disruption of tight junction assembly and loss of BBB integrity.

  16. Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Schizophrenia: Potential Value of Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors in Prefrontal Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duinen, Marlies Van; Reneerkens, Olga A H; Lambrecht, Lena; Sambeth, Anke; Rutten, Bart P F; Os, Jim Van; Blokland, Arjan; Prickaerts, Jos

    2015-01-01

    No pharmacological treatment is available to date that shows satisfactory effects on cognitive symptoms in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE-Is) improve neurotransmitter signaling by interfering in intracellular second messenger cascades. By preventing the breakdown of cAMP and/or cGMP, central neurotransmitter activity is maintained. Different PDE families exist with distinct characteristics among which substrate specificity and regional distribution. Preclinical data is promising especially with regard to inhibition of PDE2, PDE4, PDE5 and PDE10. In addition, cognitive improvement has been reported in both elderly and/or non-impaired young human subjects after PDE1 or PDE4 inhibition. Moreover, some of these studies show effects on cognitive domains relevant to schizophrenia, in particular memory. The current review incorporates an overview of the distinct molecular characteristics of the different PDE families and their relationship to the neurobiological mechanisms related to cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. So far, procognitive effects of only three types of PDE-Is have been assessed in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia inhibiting PDE3, PDE5 and PDE10. However, the limited data available do not allow to draw firm conclusions on the value of PDE-Is as cognitive enhancers in schizophrenia yet. The field is still in its infancy, but nevertheless different PDE-Is seem promising as candidate to optimise neural communication in the prefrontal cortex favouring cognitive functioning in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, in particular dual inhibitors including PDE1-Is, PDE3-Is and PDE10A-Is.

  17. Impaired verbal memory in Parkinson disease: relationship to prefrontal dysfunction and somatosensory discrimination

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    Weniger Dorothea

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To study the neurocognitive profile and its relationship to prefrontal dysfunction in non-demented Parkinson's disease (PD with deficient haptic perception. Methods Twelve right-handed patients with PD and 12 healthy control subjects underwent thorough neuropsychological testing including Rey complex figure, Rey auditory verbal and figural learning test, figural and verbal fluency, and Stroop test. Test scores reflecting significant differences between patients and healthy subjects were correlated with the individual expression coefficients of one principal component, obtained in a principal component analysis of an oxygen-15-labeled water PET study exploring somatosensory discrimination that differentiated between the two groups and involved prefrontal cortices. Results We found significantly decreased total scores for the verbal learning trials and verbal delayed free recall in PD patients compared with normal volunteers. Further analysis of these parameters using Spearman's ranking correlation showed a significantly negative correlation of deficient verbal recall with expression coefficients of the principal component whose image showed a subcortical-cortical network, including right dorsolateral-prefrontal cortex, in PD patients. Conclusion PD patients with disrupted right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex function and associated diminished somatosensory discrimination are impaired also in verbal memory functions. A negative correlation between delayed verbal free recall and PET activation in a network including the prefrontal cortices suggests that verbal cues and accordingly declarative memory processes may be operative in PD during activities that demand sustained attention such as somatosensory discrimination. Verbal cues may be compensatory in nature and help to non-specifically enhance focused attention in the presence of a functionally disrupted prefrontal cortex.

  18. Humour experience in schizophrenia: relationship with executive dysfunction and psychosocial impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, D T-Y; Lee, K-H; Gee, K A; Holden, K L; Parks, R W; Woodruff, P W R

    2008-06-01

    The ability to appreciate humour is essential to successful human interactions. In this study, we hypothesized that individuals with schizophrenia would have diminished ability to recognize and appreciate humour. The relationship between humour experience and clinical symptoms, cognitive and social functioning was examined. Thirty patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia were compared with 30 age-, gender-, IQ- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls. Humour recognition was measured by identification of humorous moments in four silent slapstick comedy film clips and calculated as d-prime (d') according to signal detection theory. Humour appreciation was measured by self-report mood state and funniness ratings. Patients were assessed for clinical symptoms, theory of mind ability, executive function [using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST)] and social functioning [using the Life Skills Profile (LSP)]. Patient and control groups did not differ in the funniness ratings they attributed to the video clips. Patients with schizophrenia had a lower d' (humour) compared to the controls, after controlling for (1) the performance of a baseline recognition task with a non-humorous video clip and (2) severity of depressive symptoms. In patients, d' (humour) had significant negative correlation with delusion and depression scores, the perseverative error score of the WCST and the total scores of the LSP. Compared with controls, patients with schizophrenia were less sensitive at detecting humour but similarly able to appreciate humour. The degree of humour recognition difficulty may be associated with the extent of executive dysfunction and thus contribute to the psychosocial impairment in patients with schizophrenia.

  19. Neurobiology of Anorexia Nervosa: Serotonin Dysfunctions Link Self-Starvation with Body Image Disturbances through an Impaired Body Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of anorexia nervosa (AN) is still unclear, despite that it is a critical and potentially mortal illness. A recent neurobiological model considers AN as the outcome of dysfunctions in the neuronal processes related to appetite and emotionality (Kaye et al., 2009, 2013). However, this model still is not able to answer a critical question: What is behind body image disturbances (BIDs) in AN? The article starts its analysis from reviewing some of the studies exploring the effects of the serotonin systems in memory (episodic, working, and spatial) and its dysfunctions. The review suggests that serotonin disturbances may: (a) facilitate the encoding of third person (allocentric) episodic memories; (b) facilitate the consolidation of emotional episodic memories (e.g., teasing), if preceded by repeated stress; (c) reduce voluntary inhibition of mnestic contents; (d) impair allocentric spatial memory. If we discuss these results within the interpretative frame suggested by the “Allocentric Lock Hypothesis” (Riva, 2012, 2014), we can hypothesize that altered serotoninergic activity in AN patients: (i) improves their ability to store and consolidate negative autobiographical memories, including those of their body, in allocentric perspective; (ii) impairs their ability to trigger voluntary inhibition of the previously stored negative memory of the body; (iii) impairs their capacity to retrieve/update allocentric information. Taken together, these points suggest a possible link between serotonin dysfunctions, memory impairments and BIDs: the impossibility of updating a disturbed body memory using real time experiential data—I'm locked to a wrong body stored in long term memory—pushes AN patients to control body weight and shape even when underweight. PMID:27932968

  20. Cardiac dysfunction in the diabetic rat: quantitative evaluation using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging

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    Alenezy Mohammed D

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In particular, type 1 diabetes compromises the cardiac function of individuals at a relatively early age due to the protracted course of abnormal glucose homeostasis. The functional abnormalities of diabetic myocardium have been attributed to the pathological changes of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Methods In this study, we used high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to evaluate the left ventricular functional characteristics of streptozotocin treated diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats (8 weeks disease duration in comparison with age/sex matched controls. Results Our analyses of EKG gated cardiac MRI scans of the left ventricle showed a 28% decrease in the end-diastolic volume and 10% increase in the end-systolic volume of diabetic hearts compared to controls. Mean stroke volume and ejection fraction in diabetic rats were decreased (48% and 28%, respectively compared to controls. Further, dV/dt changes were suggestive of phase sensitive differences in left ventricular kinetics across the cardiac cycle between diabetic and control rats. Conclusion Thus, the MRI analyses of diabetic left ventricle suggest impairment of diastolic and systolic hemodynamics in this rat model of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Our studies also show that in vivo MRI could be used in the evaluation of cardiac dysfunction in this rat model of type 1 diabetes.

  1. Cardiovascular and respiratory dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated by impaired peripheral oxygenation

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    Chuang ML

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ming-Lung Chuang,1,2 Shih-Feng Huang,1 Chun-Hung Su2,3 1Division of Pulmonary Medicine and Department of Critical Care Medicine, 2School of Medicine, 3Division of Cardiology and Department of Internal Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: Impaired peripheral oxygenation (IPO-related variables readily achieved with cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET represent cardiovascular dysfunction. These variables include peak oxygen uptake (VO2 <85% predicted, anaerobic threshold <40%  VO2max predicted, VO2-work rate slope <8.6 mL/watt, oxygen pulse <80% predicted, and ventilatory equivalents for O2 and CO2 at nadir of >31 and >34, respectively. Some of these six variables may be normal while the others are abnormal in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. This may result in confusion when using the interpretation algorithm for diagnostic purposes. We therefore hypothesized that patients found to have abnormal values for all six variables would have worse cardiovascular function than patients with abnormal values for none or some of these variables.Methods: In this cross-sectional comparative study, 58 COPD patients attending a university teaching hospital underwent symptom-limited CPET with multiple lactate measurements. Patients with abnormal values in all six IPO-related variables were assigned to an IPO group while those who did not meet the requirements for the IPO group were assigned to a non-IPO group. Cardiovascular function was measured by two-dimensional echocardiography and Δlactate/ΔVO2, and respiratory dynamics were compared between the two groups.Results: Fourteen IPO and 43 non-IPO patients were entered into the study. Both groups were similar with regard to left ventricular ejection fraction and right ventricular morphology (P>0.05 for both. At peak exercise, both groups reached a similar heart rate level and Δlactate/ΔVO2. The IPO patients had an

  2. Centella asiatica Attenuates D-Galactose-Induced Cognitive Impairment, Oxidative and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Mice

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    Anil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    l (D-galactose. Centella asiatica also attenuated enhanced acetylcholine esterase enzyme level in D-galactose senescence mice. Present study highlights the protective effect of Centella asiatica against D-galactose induced behavioral, biochemical and mitochondrial dysfunction in mice.

  3. [Respiratory function impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease--a consideration on the possible pathogenetic relation to autonomic dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, H; Murahashi, M; Takahashi, H; Kai, K; Shibuya, S; Jimi, T; Wakayama, Y; Yamada, M

    2000-02-01

    To investigate the characteristics and clinical significance of respiratory function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), we studied 38 patients (male, 19; female, 19: mean age, 65.5 years: mean duration of disease, 6.7 years) who had no history of respiratory disease and smoking. Fifty three non-respiratory disease subjects (male, 26; female, 27: mean age, 67.6 years) were served as age-matched control. We measured spirometry and maximal expiratory flow-volume curve in all patients, and analyzed the relations between respiratory function variables and clinical profiles. The clinical disability of PD was indicated by Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y) scale. The number of PD patients was 15 in H-Y 2, 18 in H-Y 3 and 5 in H-Y 4, respectively. The values of % VC, %FEV 1, FEV 1/FVC, %PEFR, % V50 in H-Y 4 group were significantly smaller than those in H-Y 2 and 3 groups. Small airway dysfunction (SAD) was represented by abnormality of % V25, % V50/V25. The prevalence of impairment in % V25 and % V50/V25 was detected in 13 patients (34.2%) and 15 patients (39.5%), respectively, this was significantly higher than age-matched controls. However, the mean value and prevalence of impairment in % V25, % V50/V25 were not affected by H-Y scale and duration of disease or ideal body weight (%predicted value). Twenty seven patients showed normal ventilatory function based on % VC over 80% and FEV 1/FVC over 70%. The prevalence of impairment in % V25, % V50/V25 was detected in 8 patients (29.6%), 9 patients (33.3%), respectively, among 27 patients with normal ventilatory function. These results suggest that ventilatory dysfunction is concerned with clinical disability but SAD which is independent of clinical disability seen prevalently in patients with PD. It is widely accepted that patients with PD frequently have cardiac or bowel dysfunction based on the visceral autonomic dysfunction. We hypothesize that SAD may also be caused by possible autonomic dysfunction in patients with PD.

  4. Visual scanning and matching dysfunction in brain-damaged patients with drawing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleza, T; Rappaport, M; Hopkins, H K; Hall, K

    1979-03-01

    Visual matching and visual exploration were examined in 7 normal subjects and 20 brain-damaged patients with drawing impairment measured by the Bender Gestalt Visual-Motor Test. Right brain-damaged patients made significantly more errors of rotation and integration than left brain-damaged patients. Selecteded Bender figures were also used as stimuli for both visual matching and visual exploration tests. The ability to match Bender figures was found to be impaired in right but not left brain-damaged patients. All patients showed eye movement and fixation patterns different from those normals. Patients essentially had more fixations and shorter fixation durations. Significant intercorrelations were found between the total Bender Gestalt score and visual matching and visual exploration scores. These findings indicate that visual matching and visual exploration measures can be used to evaluate perceptual impairment in individuals who do not have adequate motor responses or where impaired motor responses may confound interpretations about visual cognitive impairment.

  5. Relation of impaired interorgan communication and parasympathetic activity in chronic heart failure and multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H; Lotze, U; Ghanem, A; Anker, S D; Said, S M; Braun-Dullaeus, R; Oltmanns, G; Rose, S; Buerke, M; Müller-Werdan, U; Werdan, K; Rauchhaus, M

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the relationship of impaired autonomic function and severity of illness in chronic heart failure (CHF) and multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) as an end stage of CHF. Furthermore, we assessed the link of parasympathetic modulation of the heart rate and inflammatory activation in CHF and MODS. Sixty-five patients admitted for worsening of CHF were retrospectively enrolled in this study. In addition, 65 age- and sex-matched patients with pronounced MODS were assigned for comparison of autonomic function and C-reactive protein in patients with CHF or MODS, respectively. Heart rate variability (HRV) parameters of the time and frequency domain as markers of autonomic function were analyzed from 24-hour Holter electrocardiograms. The more pronounced the severity of illness as expressed by the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score, the more the HRV was impaired. This effect was particularly seen for overall variability (SD of RR intervals) and HRV parameters characterizing the parasympathetic modulations of the heart rate (high, very low frequency power). C-reactive protein levels as markers of inflammation were inversely related to high and very low frequencies. Our results allow for speculation that autonomic dysfunction in CHF indicates a beginning of uncoupled interorgan communication potentially leading to MODS as characterized by disruption of communication between the organs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Procalcitonin Impairs Liver Cell Viability and Function In Vitro: A Potential New Mechanism of Liver Dysfunction and Failure during Sepsis?

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    Ehler, Johannes; Wagner, Nana-Maria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Liver dysfunction and failure are severe complications of sepsis and result in poor outcome and increased mortality. The underlying pathologic mechanisms of hepatocyte dysfunction and necrosis during sepsis are only incompletely understood. Here, we investigated whether procalcitonin, a biomarker of sepsis, modulates liver cell function and viability. Materials and Methods. Employing a previously characterized and patented biosensor system evaluating hepatocyte toxicity in vitro, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2/C3A) were exposed to 0.01–50 ng/mL procalcitonin for 2 × 72 h and evaluated for proliferation, necrosis, metabolic activity, cellular integrity, microalbumin synthesis, and detoxification capacity. Acetaminophen served as positive control. For further standardization, procalcitonin effects were confirmed in a cellular toxicology assay panel employing L929 fibroblasts. Data were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey's test. Results. Already at concentrations as low as 0.25 ng/mL, procalcitonin induced HepG2/C3A necrosis (P < 0.05) and reduced metabolic activity, cellular integrity, synthesis, and detoxification capacity (all P < 0.001). Comparable effects were obtained employing L929 fibroblasts. Conclusion. We provide evidence for procalcitonin to directly impair function and viability of human hepatocytes and exert general cytotoxicity in vitro. Therapeutical targeting of procalcitonin could thus display a novel approach to reduce incidence of liver dysfunction and failure during sepsis and lower morbidity and mortality of septic patients. PMID:28255555

  7. Temporal Resolution of the Normal Ear in Listeners with Unilateral Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Dey, Ratul; Davessar, Jai Lal

    2015-12-01

    Unilateral hearing loss (UHL) leads to an imbalanced input to the brain and results in cortical reorganization. In listeners with unilateral impairments, while the perceptual deficits associated with the impaired ear are well documented, less is known regarding the auditory processing in the unimpaired, clinically normal ear. It is commonly accepted that perceptual consequences are unlikely to occur in the normal ear for listeners with UHL. This study investigated whether the temporal resolution in the normal-hearing (NH) ear of listeners with long-standing UHL is similar to those in listeners with NH. Temporal resolution was assayed via measuring gap detection thresholds (GDTs) in within- and between-channel paradigms. GDTs were assessed in the normal ear of adults with long-standing, severe-to-profound UHL (N = 13) and age-matched, NH listeners (N = 22) at two presentation levels (30 and 55 dB sensation level). Analysis indicated that within-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL were not significantly different than those for the NH subject group, but the between-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL were poorer (by greater than a factor of 2) than those for the listeners with NH. The hearing thresholds in the normal or impaired ears were not associated with the elevated between-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL. Contrary to the common assumption that auditory processing capabilities are preserved for the normal ear in listeners with UHL, the current study demonstrated that a long-standing unilateral hearing impairment may adversely affect auditory perception--temporal resolution--in the clinically normal ear. From a translational perspective, these findings imply that the temporal processing deficits in the unimpaired ear of listeners with unilateral hearing impairments may contribute to their overall auditory perceptual difficulties.

  8. Impaired toll like receptor-7 and 9 induced immune activation in chronic spinal cord injured patients contributes to immune dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Bilgi; Kahraman, Tamer; Gursel, Mayda; Yilmaz, Bilge

    2017-01-01

    Reduced immune activation or immunosuppression is seen in patients withneurological diseases. Urinary and respiratory infections mainly manifested as septicemia and pneumonia are the most frequent complications following spinal cord injuries and they account for the majority of deaths. The underlying reason of these losses is believed to arise due to impaired immune responses to pathogens. Here, we hypothesized that susceptibility to infections of chronic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients might be due to impairment in recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns and subsequently declining innate and adaptive immune responses that lead to immune dysfunction. We tested our hypothesis on healthy and chronic SCI patients with a level of injury above T-6. Donor PBMCs were isolated and stimulated with different toll like receptor ligands and T-cell inducers aiming to investigate whether chronic SCI patients display differential immune activation to multiple innate and adaptive immune cell stimulants. We demonstrate that SCI patients' B-cell and plasmacytoid dendritic cells retain their functionality in response to TLR7 and TLR9 ligand stimulation as they secreted similar levels of IL6 and IFNα. The immune dysfunction is not probably due to impaired T-cell function, since neither CD4+ T-cell dependent IFNγ producing cell number nor IL10 producing regulatory T-cells resulted different outcomes in response to PMA-Ionomycin and PHA-LPS stimulation, respectively. We showed that TLR7 dependent IFNγ and IP10 levels and TLR9 mediated APC function reduced substantially in SCI patients compared to healthy subjects. More importantly, IP10 producing monocytes were significantly fewer compared to healthy subjects in response to TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation of SCI PBMCs. When taken together this work implicated that these defects could contribute to persistent complications due to increased susceptibility to infections of chronic SCI patients. PMID:28170444

  9. Direct comparison of high-temporal-resolution CINE MRI with Doppler ultrasound for assessment of diastolic dysfunction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas A; Price, Anthony N; Jackson, Laurence H; Taylor, Valerie; David, Anna L; Lythgoe, Mark F; Stuckey, Daniel J

    2017-10-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is a sensitive early indicator of heart failure and can provide additional data to conventional measures of systolic function. Transmitral Doppler ultrasound, which measures the one-dimensional flow of blood through the mitral valve, is currently the preferred method for the measurement of diastolic function, but the measurement of the left ventricular volume changes using high-temporal-resolution cinematic magnetic resonance imaging (CINE MRI) is an alternative approach which is emerging as a potentially more robust and user-independent technique. Here, we investigated the performance of high-temporal-resolution CINE MRI and compared it with ultrasound for the detection of diastolic dysfunction in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. An in-house, high-temporal-resolution, retrospectively gated CINE sequence was developed with a temporal resolution of 1 ms. Diastolic function in mice was assessed using a custom-made, open-source reconstruction package. Early (E) and late (A) left ventricular filling phases were easily identifiable, and these measurements were compared directly with high-frequency, pulsed-wave, Doppler ultrasound measurements of mitral valve inflow. A repeatability study established that high-temporal-resolution CINE MRI and Doppler ultrasound showed comparable accuracy when measuring E/A in normal control mice. However, when applied in a mouse model of myocardial infarction, high-temporal-resolution CINE MRI indicated diastolic heart failure (E/A = 0.94 ± 0.11), whereas ultrasound falsely detected normal cardiac function (E/A = 1.21 ± 0.11). The addition of high-temporal-resolution CINE MRI to preclinical imaging studies enhances the library of sequences available to cardiac researchers and potentially identifies diastolic heart failure early in disease progression. © 2017 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Right anterior temporal lobe dysfunction underlies theory of mind impairments in semantic dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irish, Muireann; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    Semantic dementia is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the amodal and profound loss of semantic knowledge attributable to the degeneration of the left anterior temporal lobe. Although traditionally conceptualized as a language disorder, patients with semantic dementia display significant alterations in behaviour and socioemotional functioning. Recent evidence points to an impaired capacity for theory of mind in predominantly left-lateralized cases of semantic dementia; however, it remains unclear to what extent semantic impairments contribute to these deficits. Further the neuroanatomical signature of such disturbance remains unknown. Here, we sought to determine the neural correlates of theory of mind performance in patients with left predominant semantic dementia (n=11), in contrast with disease-matched cases with behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia (n=10) and Alzheimer's disease (n=10), and healthy older individuals (n=14) as control participants. Participants completed a simple cartoons task, in which they were required to describe physical and theory of mind scenarios. Irrespective of subscale, patients with semantic dementia exhibited marked impairments relative to control subjects; however, only theory of mind deficits persisted when we covaried for semantic comprehension. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that atrophy in right anterior temporal lobe structures, including the right temporal fusiform cortex, right inferior temporal gyrus, bilateral temporal poles and amygdalae, correlated significantly with theory of mind impairments in the semantic dementia group. Our results point to the marked disruption of cognitive functions beyond the language domain in semantic dementia, not exclusively attributable to semantic processing impairments. The significant involvement of right anterior temporal structures suggests that with disease evolution, the encroachment of pathology into the contralateral hemisphere heralds the

  11. A Drosophila Melanogaster Model of Diastolic Dysfunction and Cardiomyopathy Based on Impaired Troponin-T Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Meera Cozhimuttam; Kaushik, Gaurav; Engler, Adam J.; Lehman, William; Cammarato, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Regulation of striated muscle contraction is achieved by Ca2+-dependent steric modulation of myosin cross-bridge cycling on actin by the thin filament troponin-tropomyosin complex. Alterations in the complex can induce contractile dysregulation and disease. For example, mutations between or near residues 112–136 of cardiac troponin-T, the crucial N-terminal TnT1 tropomyosin-binding region, cause cardiomyopathy. The Drosophila up101 Glu/Lys amino acid substitution lies C-terminally adjacent to this phylogenetically conserved sequence. Objective Using a highly integrative approach, we sought to determine the molecular trigger of up101 myofibrillar degeneration, to evaluate contractile performance in the mutant cardiomyocytes, and to examine the effects of the mutation on the entire Drosophila heart to elucidate regulatory roles for conserved TnT1 regions and provide possible mechanistic insight into cardiac dysfunction. Methods and Results Live video imaging of Drosophila cardiac tubes revealed the troponin-T mutation prolongs systole and restricts diastolic dimensions of the heart, due to increased numbers of actively cycling myosin cross-bridges. Elevated resting myocardial stiffness, consistent with up101 diastolic dysfunction, was confirmed by an atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation approach. Direct visualization of mutant thin filaments via electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction resolved destabilized tropomyosin positioning and aberrantly exposed myosin binding sites under low Ca2+ conditions. Conclusions As a result of troponin-tropomyosin dysinhibition, up101 hearts exhibit cardiac dysfunction and remodeling comparable to that observed during human restrictive cardiomyopathy. Thus, reversal of charged residues about the conserved tropomyosin-binding region of TnT1 may perturb critical intermolecular associations required for proper steric regulation, which likely elicits myopathy in our Drosophila model. PMID:24221941

  12. Paradoxical Sleep Deprivation Causes Cardiac Dysfunction and the Impairment Is Attenuated by Resistance Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampá, Sara Quaglia de Campos; Mônico-Neto, Marcos; de Mello, Marco Tulio; Souza, Helton de Sá; Tufik, Sergio; Lee, Kil Sun; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; dos Santos, Alexandra Alberta; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Background Paradoxical sleep deprivation activates the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, subsequently interfering with the cardiovascular system. The beneficial effects of resistance training are related to hemodynamic, metabolic and hormonal homeostasis. We hypothesized that resistance training can prevent the cardiac remodeling and dysfunction caused by paradoxical sleep deprivation. Methods Male Wistar rats were distributed into four groups: control (C), resistance training (RT), paradoxical sleep deprivation for 96 hours (PSD96) and both resistance training and sleep deprivation (RT/PSD96). Doppler echocardiograms, hemodynamics measurements, cardiac histomorphometry, hormonal profile and molecular analysis were evaluated. Results Compared to the C group, PSD96 group had a higher left ventricular systolic pressure, heart rate and left atrium index. In contrast, the left ventricle systolic area and the left ventricle cavity diameter were reduced in the PSD96 group. Hypertrophy and fibrosis were also observed. Along with these alterations, reduced levels of serum testosterone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), as well as increased corticosterone and angiotensin II, were observed in the PSD96 group. Prophylactic resistance training attenuated most of these changes, except angiotensin II, fibrosis, heart rate and concentric remodeling of left ventricle, confirmed by the increased of NFATc3 and GATA-4, proteins involved in the pathologic cardiac hypertrophy pathway. Conclusions Resistance training effectively attenuates cardiac dysfunction and hormonal imbalance induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation. PMID:27880816

  13. Paradoxical Sleep Deprivation Causes Cardiac Dysfunction and the Impairment Is Attenuated by Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampá, Sara Quaglia de Campos; Mônico-Neto, Marcos; de Mello, Marco Tulio; Souza, Helton de Sá; Tufik, Sergio; Lee, Kil Sun; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; Dos Santos, Alexandra Alberta; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira

    2016-01-01

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation activates the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, subsequently interfering with the cardiovascular system. The beneficial effects of resistance training are related to hemodynamic, metabolic and hormonal homeostasis. We hypothesized that resistance training can prevent the cardiac remodeling and dysfunction caused by paradoxical sleep deprivation. Male Wistar rats were distributed into four groups: control (C), resistance training (RT), paradoxical sleep deprivation for 96 hours (PSD96) and both resistance training and sleep deprivation (RT/PSD96). Doppler echocardiograms, hemodynamics measurements, cardiac histomorphometry, hormonal profile and molecular analysis were evaluated. Compared to the C group, PSD96 group had a higher left ventricular systolic pressure, heart rate and left atrium index. In contrast, the left ventricle systolic area and the left ventricle cavity diameter were reduced in the PSD96 group. Hypertrophy and fibrosis were also observed. Along with these alterations, reduced levels of serum testosterone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), as well as increased corticosterone and angiotensin II, were observed in the PSD96 group. Prophylactic resistance training attenuated most of these changes, except angiotensin II, fibrosis, heart rate and concentric remodeling of left ventricle, confirmed by the increased of NFATc3 and GATA-4, proteins involved in the pathologic cardiac hypertrophy pathway. Resistance training effectively attenuates cardiac dysfunction and hormonal imbalance induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation.

  14. The contribution of executive dysfunction to memory impairment and confabulation in schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Nathaniel-James, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    Study 1. Using a cognitive-process approach, 25 schizophrenic patients were matched with 25 healthy volunteers and compared on tests of memory and executive function. The schizophrenia group was found to have a significant impairment in immediate memory with relatively spared long-delay and recognition memory. Memory deficits were irrespective of the encoding strategies used and were unrelated to chronicity. In addition, the schizophrenic patients performed worse than controls on tests of ...

  15. Impaired recognition of faces and objects in dyslexia: Evidence for ventral stream dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdardottir, Heida Maria; Ívarsson, Eysteinn; Kristinsdóttir, Kristjana; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to establish whether or not dyslexics are impaired at the recognition of faces and other complex nonword visual objects. This would be expected based on a meta-analysis revealing that children and adult dyslexics show functional abnormalities within the left fusiform gyrus, a brain region high up in the ventral visual stream, which is thought to support the recognition of words, faces, and other objects. 20 adult dyslexics (M = 29 years) and 20 matched typical readers (M = 29 years) participated in the study. One dyslexic-typical reader pair was excluded based on Adult Reading History Questionnaire scores and IS-FORM reading scores. Performance was measured on 3 high-level visual processing tasks: the Cambridge Face Memory Test, the Vanderbilt Holistic Face Processing Test, and the Vanderbilt Expertise Test. People with dyslexia are impaired in their recognition of faces and other visually complex objects. Their holistic processing of faces appears to be intact, suggesting that dyslexics may instead be specifically impaired at part-based processing of visual objects. The difficulty that people with dyslexia experience with reading might be the most salient manifestation of a more general high-level visual deficit. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Executive dysfunction and gray matter atrophy in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dongming; Sun, Hongzan; Dong, Xiaoyu; Liu, Baiwei; Xu, Yongchuan; Chen, Sipan; Song, Lichun; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that impairment in executive function (EF) is common in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). However, the neuroanatomic basis of executive impairment in patients with aMCI remains unclear. In this study, multiple regression voxel-based morphometry analyses were used to examine the relationship between regional gray matter volumes and EF performance in 50 patients with aMCI and 48 healthy age-matched controls. The core EF components (response inhibition, working memory and task switching, based on the EF model of Miyake et al) were accessed with computerized tasks. Atrophic brain areas related to decreases in the three EF components in patients with aMCI were located in the frontal and temporal cortices. Within the frontal cortex, the brain region related to response inhibition was identified in the right inferior frontal gyrus. Brain regions related to working memory were located in the left anterior cingulate gyrus, left premotor cortex, and right inferior frontal gyrus, and brain regions related to task shifting were distributed in the bilateral frontal cortex. Atrophy in the right inferior frontal gyrus was most closely associated with a decrease in all three EF components in patients with aMCI. Our data, from the perspective of brain morphology, contribute to a better understanding of the role of these brain areas in the neural network of EF.

  17. Impaired TrkB receptor signaling underlies corticostriatal dysfunction in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Joshua L; Day, Michelle; Peterson, Jayms D; Xie, Zhong; Kress, Geraldine J; Rafalovich, Igor; Kondapalli, Jyothisri; Gertler, Tracy S; Flajolet, Marc; Greengard, Paul; Stavarache, Mihaela; Kaplitt, Michael G; Rosinski, Jim; Chan, C Savio; Surmeier, D James

    2014-07-02

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder. The debilitating choreic movements that plague HD patients have been attributed to striatal degeneration induced by the loss of cortically supplied brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Here, we show that in mouse models of early symptomatic HD, BDNF delivery to the striatum and its activation of tyrosine-related kinase B (TrkB) receptors were normal. However, in striatal neurons responsible for movement suppression, TrkB receptors failed to properly engage postsynaptic signaling mechanisms controlling the induction of potentiation at corticostriatal synapses. Plasticity was rescued by inhibiting p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) signaling or its downstream target phosphatase-and-tensin-homolog-deleted-on-chromosome-10 (PTEN). Thus, corticostriatal synaptic dysfunction early in HD is attributable to a correctable defect in the response to BDNF, not its delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

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    Brandi D Freeman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum infection causes a wide spectrum of diseases, including cerebral malaria, a potentially life-threatening encephalopathy. Vasculopathy is thought to contribute to cerebral malaria pathogenesis. The vasoactive compound endothelin-1, a key participant in many inflammatory processes, likely mediates vascular and cognitive dysfunctions in cerebral malaria. We previously demonstrated that C57BL6 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA, our fatal experimental cerebral malaria model, sustained memory loss. Herein, we demonstrate that an endothelin type A receptor (ETA antagonist prevented experimental cerebral malaria-induced neurocognitive impairments and improved survival. ETA antagonism prevented blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral vasoconstriction during experimental cerebral malaria, and reduced brain endothelial activation, diminishing brain microvascular congestion. Furthermore, exogenous endothelin-1 administration to P. berghei NK65-infected mice, a model generally regarded as a non-cerebral malaria negative control for P. berghei ANKA infection, led to experimental cerebral malaria-like memory deficits. Our data indicate that endothelin-1 is critical in the development of cerebrovascular and cognitive impairments with experimental cerebral malaria. This vasoactive peptide may thus serve as a potential target for adjunctive therapy in the management of cerebral malaria.

  19. Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi D Freeman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum infection causes a wide spectrum of diseases, including cerebral malaria, a potentially life-threatening encephalopathy. Vasculopathy is thought to contribute to cerebral malaria pathogenesis. The vasoactive compound endothelin-1, a key participant in many inflammatory processes, likely mediates vascular and cognitive dysfunctions in cerebral malaria. We previously demonstrated that C57BL6 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA, our fatal experimental cerebral malaria model, sustained memory loss. Herein, we demonstrate that an endothelin type A receptor (ETA antagonist prevented experimental cerebral malaria-induced neurocognitive impairments and improved survival. ETA antagonism prevented blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral vasoconstriction during experimental cerebral malaria, and reduced brain endothelial activation, diminishing brain microvascular congestion. Furthermore, exogenous endothelin-1 administration to P. berghei NK65-infected mice, a model generally regarded as a non-cerebral malaria negative control for P. berghei ANKA infection, led to experimental cerebral malaria-like memory deficits. Our data indicate that endothelin-1 is critical in the development of cerebrovascular and cognitive impairments with experimental cerebral malaria. This vasoactive peptide may thus serve as a potential target for adjunctive therapy in the management of cerebral malaria.

  20. Myo1e impairment results in actin reorganization, podocyte dysfunction, and proteinuria in zebrafish and cultured podocytes.

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    Jianhua Mao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Podocytes serve as an important constituent of the glomerular filtration barrier. Recently, we and others identified Myo1e as a key molecular component of the podocyte cytoskeleton. RESULTS: Myo1e mRNA and protein was expressed in human and mouse kidney sections as determined by Northern blot and reverse transcriptase PCR, and its expression was more evident in podocytes by immunofluorescence. By specific knock-down of MYO1E in zebrafish, the injected larvae exhibited pericardial edema and pronephric cysts, consistent with the appearance of protein in condensed incubation supernate. Furthermore, specific inhibition of Myo1e expression in a conditionally immortalized podocyte cell line induced morphological changes, actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, and dysfunction in cell proliferation, migration, endocytosis, and adhesion with the glomerular basement membrane. CONCLUSIONS: Our results revealed that Myo1e is a key component contributing to the functional integrity of podocytes. Its impairment may cause actin cytoskeleton re-organization, alteration of cell shape, and membrane transport, and podocyte drop-out from the glomerular basement membrane, which might eventually lead to an impaired glomerular filtration barrier and proteinuria.

  1. Correlation between myocardial dysfunction and perfusion impairment in diabetic rats with velocity vector imaging and myocardial contrast echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhangrui; Zhang, Haibin; Su, Haili; Zhu, Ting; Zhu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether myocardial systolic dysfunction and perfusion impairment occur in diabetic rats, and to assess their relationship using velocity vector imaging (VVI) and myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). Forty-six rats were randomly divided into either control or the diabetes mellitus (DM) groups. DM was induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. Twelve weeks later, 39 survival rats underwent VVI and MCE in short-axis view at the middle level of the left ventricle, both at rest and after dipyridamole stress. VVI-derived contractile parameters included peak systolic velocity (Vs ), circumferential strain (εc ), strain rate (SRc ), and their reserves. MCE-derived perfusion parameters consisted of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR). At rest, SRc in the DM group was significantly lower than in the control group, Vs , εc , and MBF did not differ significantly between groups. After dipyridamole stress, all VVI parameters and their reserves in the DM group were significantly lower than those in the control group, MBF and MFR were substantially lower than those in the control group, too. Meanwhile, significant correlations between VVI parameter reserves and MFR were observed in the DM group. Both myocardial systolic function and perfusion were impaired in DM rats. Decreased MFR could be an important contributor to the reduction in myocardial contractile reserve.

  2. TNF Drives Monocyte Dysfunction with Age and Results in Impaired Anti-pneumococcal Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchta, Alicja; Naidoo, Avee; Verschoor, Chris P; Loukov, Dessi; Thevaranjan, Netusha; Mandur, Talveer S; Nguyen, Phuong-Son; Jordana, Manel; Loeb, Mark; Xing, Zhou; Kobzik, Lester; Larché, Maggie J; Bowdish, Dawn M E

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte phenotype and output changes with age, but why this occurs and how it impacts anti-bacterial immunity are not clear. We found that, in both humans and mice, circulating monocyte phenotype and function was altered with age due to increasing levels of TNF in the circulation that occur as part of the aging process. Ly6C+ monocytes from old (18-22 mo) mice and CD14+CD16+ intermediate/inflammatory monocytes from older adults also contributed to this "age-associated inflammation" as they produced more of the inflammatory cytokines IL6 and TNF in the steady state and when stimulated with bacterial products. Using an aged mouse model of pneumococcal colonization we found that chronic exposure to TNF with age altered the maturity of circulating monocytes, as measured by F4/80 expression, and this decrease in monocyte maturation was directly linked to susceptibility to infection. Ly6C+ monocytes from old mice had higher levels of CCR2 expression, which promoted premature egress from the bone marrow when challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although Ly6C+ monocyte recruitment and TNF levels in the blood and nasopharnyx were higher in old mice during S. pneumoniae colonization, bacterial clearance was impaired. Counterintuitively, elevated TNF and excessive monocyte recruitment in old mice contributed to impaired anti-pneumococcal immunity since bacterial clearance was improved upon pharmacological reduction of TNF or Ly6C+ monocytes, which were the major producers of TNF. Thus, with age TNF impairs inflammatory monocyte development, function and promotes premature egress, which contribute to systemic inflammation and is ultimately detrimental to anti-pneumococcal immunity.

  3. TNF Drives Monocyte Dysfunction with Age and Results in Impaired Anti-pneumococcal Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Puchta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte phenotype and output changes with age, but why this occurs and how it impacts anti-bacterial immunity are not clear. We found that, in both humans and mice, circulating monocyte phenotype and function was altered with age due to increasing levels of TNF in the circulation that occur as part of the aging process. Ly6C+ monocytes from old (18-22 mo mice and CD14+CD16+ intermediate/inflammatory monocytes from older adults also contributed to this "age-associated inflammation" as they produced more of the inflammatory cytokines IL6 and TNF in the steady state and when stimulated with bacterial products. Using an aged mouse model of pneumococcal colonization we found that chronic exposure to TNF with age altered the maturity of circulating monocytes, as measured by F4/80 expression, and this decrease in monocyte maturation was directly linked to susceptibility to infection. Ly6C+ monocytes from old mice had higher levels of CCR2 expression, which promoted premature egress from the bone marrow when challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although Ly6C+ monocyte recruitment and TNF levels in the blood and nasopharnyx were higher in old mice during S. pneumoniae colonization, bacterial clearance was impaired. Counterintuitively, elevated TNF and excessive monocyte recruitment in old mice contributed to impaired anti-pneumococcal immunity since bacterial clearance was improved upon pharmacological reduction of TNF or Ly6C+ monocytes, which were the major producers of TNF. Thus, with age TNF impairs inflammatory monocyte development, function and promotes premature egress, which contribute to systemic inflammation and is ultimately detrimental to anti-pneumococcal immunity.

  4. Dysfunction of the RAR/RXR signaling pathway in the forebrain impairs hippocampal memory and synaptic plasticity

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    Nomoto Masanori

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinoid signaling pathways mediated by retinoic acid receptor (RAR/retinoid × receptor (RXR-mediated transcription play critical roles in hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that treatment with retinoic acid alleviates age-related deficits in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP and memory performance and, furthermore, memory deficits in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. However, the roles of the RAR/RXR signaling pathway in learning and memory at the behavioral level have still not been well characterized in the adult brain. We here show essential roles for RAR/RXR in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. In the current study, we generated transgenic mice in which the expression of dominant-negative RAR (dnRAR could be induced in the mature brain using a tetracycline-dependent transcription factor and examined the effects of RAR/RXR loss. Results The expression of dnRAR in the forebrain down-regulated the expression of RARβ, a target gene of RAR/RXR, indicating that dnRAR mice exhibit dysfunction of the RAR/RXR signaling pathway. Similar with previous findings, dnRAR mice displayed impaired LTP and AMPA-mediated synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. More importantly, these mutant mice displayed impaired hippocampus-dependent social recognition and spatial memory. However, these deficits of LTP and memory performance were rescued by stronger conditioning stimulation and spaced training, respectively. Finally, we found that pharmacological blockade of RARα in the hippocampus impairs social recognition memory. Conclusions From these observations, we concluded that the RAR/RXR signaling pathway greatly contributes to learning and memory, and LTP in the hippocampus in the adult brain.

  5. Synaptic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus type-1-positive subjects: inflammation or impaired neuronal plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdoshina, Valeriya; Bachis, Alessia; Mocchetti, Italo

    2013-01-01

    Many people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) exhibit mild or severe neurological problems, termed HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), even when receiving antiretroviral therapy. Thus, novel adjunctive therapies must be developed to overcome the neurotoxic effect of HIV. New therapies require a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of HIV-induced neurotoxicity and the risk factors that, besides inflammation and T cell depletion and drugs of abuse, render the central nervous system (CNS) a target of HIV-induced neurotoxicity. HIV appears to impair neuronal plasticity, which refers to the innate ability of the CNS to respond to injury and promote recovery of function. The availability of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a potent neurotrophic factor that is present in abundance in the adult brain, is essential for neuronal plasticity. BDNF acts through a receptor system composed of Trk and p75NTR. Here we present experimental evidence that some of the clinical features of HIV-mediated neurological impairment could result from altered BDNF/TrkB/p75NTR regulation and function. PMID:23600400

  6. Protective Effect of Thunbergia laurifolia (Linn. on Lead Induced Acetylcholinesterase Dysfunction and Cognitive Impairment in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moe Pwint Phyu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thunbergia laurifolia (linn., TL, a natural phenolic compound, has been reported to have many benefits and medicinal properties. The current study ascertains the total phenolic content present in TL aqueous leaf extract and also examines the antioxidant ability of the extract in preserving acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity of mice exposed to lead in vivo and in vitro model. Mice were given lead acetate (Pb in drinking water (1 g/L together with TL 100 and 200 mg/kg/day. The result showed that Pb induced AChE dysfunction in both in vitro and in vivo studies. TL significantly prevented Pb induced neurotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner which was indicated by comparatively better performance of TL treated mice in Morris Water Maze Swimming Test and increased AChE activity in the tissue sample collected from the brains of these mice. TL also exhibited the greatest amount of phenolic content, which has a significant positive correlation with its antioxidant capacity (P<0.05. Taken together, these data suggested that the total phenolic compounds in TL could exhibit antioxidant and in part neuroprotective properties. It may play a potential treatment strategy for Pb contamination.

  7. Abnormal tau induces cognitive impairment through two different mechanisms: synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, J; Cohen, L S; Corbo, C P; Phillips, G R; El Idrissi, A; Alonso, A D

    2016-02-18

    The hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau is present in several neurodegenerative diseases, although the causal relationship remains elusive. Few mouse models used to study Alzheimer-like dementia target tau phosphorylation. We created an inducible pseudophosphorylated tau (Pathological Human Tau, PH-Tau) mouse model to study the effect of conformationally modified tau in vivo. Leaky expression resulted in two levels of PH-Tau: low basal level and higher upon induction (4% and 14% of the endogenous tau, respectively). Unexpectedly, low PH-Tau resulted in significant cognitive deficits, decrease in the number of synapses (seen by EM in the CA1 region), reduction of synaptic proteins, and localization to the nucleus. Induction of PH-Tau triggered neuronal death (60% in CA3), astrocytosis, and loss of the processes in CA1. These findings suggest, that phosphorylated tau is sufficient to induce neurodegeneration and that two different mechanisms can induce cognitive impairment depending on the levels of PH-Tau expression.

  8. N-acetylcysteine impairs survival of luteal cells through mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhrke, Berthold; Xu, Jinxian; Weitzel, Joachim M; Krüger, Burkhard; Goldammer, Tom; Viergutz, Torsten

    2010-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is known as an antioxidant and used for mucus viscosity reduction. However, this drug prevents or induces cell death depending on the cell type. The response of steroidogenic luteal cells to NAC is unknown. Our data shows that NAC can behave as an antioxidant or prooxidant in dependency on the concentration and mitochondrial energization. NAC elevated the flowcytometric-measured portion of hypodiploid (dying) cells. This rise was completely abolished by aurintricarboxylic acid, an inhibitor of topoisomerase II. NAC increased the secretion of nitric oxide and cellular nitrotyrosine. An image analysis indicated that cells pretreated with NAC and loaded with DHR showed a fluorescent structure probably elicited by the oxidative product of DHR, rhodamine 123 that sequesters mitochondrially. Pretreating luteal cells with NAC or adding NAC directly to mitochondrial fractions followed by assessing the mitochondrial transmembrane potential difference (Deltapsi) by the JC-1 technique demonstrated a marked decrease in Deltapsi. A protonophore restored Deltapsi and rotenone (an inhibitor of respiratory chain complex I) inhibited mitochondrial recovering. Thus, in steroidogenic luteal cells from healthy mature corpus luteum, NAC impairs cellular survival by interfering with mitochondrial metabolism. The protonophore-induced recovering of NAC-provoked decrease in Deltapsi indicates that an ATP synthase-favored route of H(+) re-entry to the matrix is essentially switched off by NAC while other respiratory chain complexes remain intact. These data may be important for therapeutic timing of treatments with NAC. (c) 2010 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  9. Memory impairment in aged primates is associated with region-specific network dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomé, Alexander; Gray, Daniel T.; Erickson, Cynthia A.; Lipa, Peter; Barnes, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related deficits in episodic memory result, in part, from declines in the integrity of medial temporal lobe structures, such as the hippocampus, but are not thought to be due to widespread loss of principal neurons. Studies in rodents suggest, however, that inhibitory interneurons may be particularly vulnerable in advanced age. Optimal encoding and retrieval of information depend on a balance of excitatory and inhibitory transmission. It is not known whether a disruption of this balance is observed in aging nonhuman primates, and whether such changes affect network function and behavior. To examine this question we combine large scale electrophysiological recordings with cell type-specific imaging in the medial temporal lobe of cognitively-assessed, aged rhesus macaques. We found that neuron excitability in hippocampal region CA3 is negatively correlated with the density of the somatostatin-expressing inhibitory interneurons in the vicinity of the recording electrodes in stratum oriens. By contrast, no hyperexcitability or interneuron loss was observed in the perirhinal cortex of these aged, memory-impaired monkeys. These data provide a link, for the first time, between selective increases in principal cell excitability and declines in a molecularly-defined population of interneurons that regulate network inhibition. PMID:26503764

  10. Mycobacterium ulcerans infections cause progressive muscle atrophy and dysfunction, and mycolactone impairs satellite cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houngbédji, Germain Mabèrou; Bouchard, Patrice; Frenette, Jérôme

    2011-03-01

    Clinical observations from Buruli ulcer (BU) patients in West Africa suggest that severe Mycobacterium ulcerans infections can cause skeletal muscle contracture and atrophy leading to significant impairment in function. In the present study, male mice C57BL/6 were subcutaneously injected with M. ulcerans in proximity to the right biceps muscle, avoiding direct physical contact between the infectious agent and the skeletal muscle. The histological, morphological, and functional properties of the muscles were assessed at different times after the injection. On day 42 postinjection, the isometric tetanic force and the cross-sectional area of the myofibers were reduced by 31% and 29%, respectively, in the proximate-infected muscles relative to the control muscles. The necrotic areas of the proximate-infected muscles had spread to 7% of the total area by day 42 postinjection. However, the number of central nucleated fibers and myogenic regulatory factors (MyoD and myogenin) remained stable and low. Furthermore, Pax-7 expression did not increase significantly in mycolactone-injected muscles, indicating that the satellite cell proliferation is abrogated by the toxin. In addition, the fibrotic area increased progressively during the infection. Lastly, muscle-specific RING finger protein 1 (MuRF-1) and atrogin-1/muscle atrophy F-box protein (atrogin-1/MAFbx), two muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases, were upregulated in the presence of M. ulcerans. These findings confirmed that skeletal muscle is affected in our model of subcutaneous infection with M. ulcerans and that a better understanding of muscle contractures and weakness is essential to develop a therapy to minimize loss of function and promote the autonomy of BU patients.

  11. Impaired wound healing results from the dysfunction of the Akt/mTOR pathway in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong; Cui, Wenhui; Qiu, Wei; Zhu, Ming; Zhao, Rongshen; Zeng, Dengfen; Dong, Chenhui; Wang, Xiaohui; Guo, Wei; Xing, Wei; Li, Xiangyun; Li, Lei; Tan, Yan; Wu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Lizhao; Fu, Xiaobing; Luo, Donglin; Xu, Xiang

    2015-09-01

    Wound healing is impaired in diabetes mellitus. The underlying mechanism involved in this process is still unknown. The Akt/mTOR signaling pathway plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diabetes. we investigated the role of the Akt/mTOR pathway in diabetic wounds and the mechanisms that growth factors activate this pathway to promote diabetic wound healing. Full-thickness skin excisional wounds were created on the backs of normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The expression of key proteins in the Akt/mTOR pathway was assayed using western blotting; topical effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on diabetic wounds and activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway were subsequently investigated. Activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway by GM-SCF in vitro was examined in rat primary fibroblasts. The results indicate that the Akt/mTOR pathway was activated in the wound tissue of both non-diabetic and diabetic rats, as indicated by a remarkable increase in expression of total and phosphorylated key proteins in this pathway. However, the expression level of these proteins was dramatically attenuated in diabetic wounds compared with non-diabetic wounds. Upon topical application of GM-CSF, the diabetic wound healing was remarkably improved concomitantly with increased expression and phosphorylation of key proteins in the Akt/mTOR pathway. In addition, rat fibroblast proliferation induced by GM-CSF depended on the Akt/mTOR pathway activation. Impaired wound healing results from the dysfunction of the Akt/mTOR pathway in diabetic rats. The pharmacologic elevation of this pathway may represent an attractive intervention strategy to improve prognosis of diabetic wounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Vasoreparative dysfunction of CD34+ cells in diabetic individuals involves hypoxic desensitization and impaired autocrine/paracrine mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagna P R Jarajapu

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cells derived from individuals with diabetes would exhibit functional defects including inability to respond to hypoxia and altered paracrine/autocrine function that would impair the angiogenic potential of these cells. Circulating mononuclear cells isolated from diabetic (n = 69 and nondiabetic (n = 46 individuals were used to grow endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC, early endothelial progenitor cells (eEPCs and isolate CD34+ cells. ECFCs and eEPCs were established from only 15% of the diabetic individuals tested thus directing our main effort toward examination of CD34+ cells. CD34+ cells were plated in basal medium to obtain cell-free conditioned medium (CM. In CM derived from CD34+ cells of diabetic individuals (diabetic-CM, the levels of stem cell factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and thrombopoietin were lower, and IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα levels were higher than CM derived from nondiabetic individuals (nondiabetic-CM. Hypoxia did not upregulate HIF1α in CD34+ cells of diabetic origin. Migration and proliferation of nondiabetic CD34+ cells toward diabetic-CM were lower compared to nondiabetic-CM. Attenuation of pressure-induced constriction, potentiation of bradykinin relaxation, and generation of cGMP and cAMP in arterioles were observed with nondiabetic-CM, but not with diabetic-CM. Diabetic-CM failed to induce endothelial tube formation from vascular tissue. These results suggest that diabetic subjects with microvascular complications exhibit severely limited capacity to generate ex-vivo expanded endothelial progenitor populations and that the vasoreparative dysfunction observed in diabetic CD34+ cells is due to impaired autocrine/paracrine function and reduced sensitivity to hypoxia.

  13. Vasoreparative dysfunction of CD34+ cells in diabetic individuals involves hypoxic desensitization and impaired autocrine/paracrine mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarajapu, Yagna P R; Hazra, Sugata; Segal, Mark; Li Calzi, Sergio; LiCalzi, Sergio; Jadhao, Chandra; Jhadao, Chandra; Qian, Kevin; Mitter, Sayak K; Raizada, Mohan K; Boulton, Michael E; Grant, Maria B

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cells derived from individuals with diabetes would exhibit functional defects including inability to respond to hypoxia and altered paracrine/autocrine function that would impair the angiogenic potential of these cells. Circulating mononuclear cells isolated from diabetic (n = 69) and nondiabetic (n = 46) individuals were used to grow endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC), early endothelial progenitor cells (eEPCs) and isolate CD34+ cells. ECFCs and eEPCs were established from only 15% of the diabetic individuals tested thus directing our main effort toward examination of CD34+ cells. CD34+ cells were plated in basal medium to obtain cell-free conditioned medium (CM). In CM derived from CD34+ cells of diabetic individuals (diabetic-CM), the levels of stem cell factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and thrombopoietin were lower, and IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) levels were higher than CM derived from nondiabetic individuals (nondiabetic-CM). Hypoxia did not upregulate HIF1α in CD34+ cells of diabetic origin. Migration and proliferation of nondiabetic CD34+ cells toward diabetic-CM were lower compared to nondiabetic-CM. Attenuation of pressure-induced constriction, potentiation of bradykinin relaxation, and generation of cGMP and cAMP in arterioles were observed with nondiabetic-CM, but not with diabetic-CM. Diabetic-CM failed to induce endothelial tube formation from vascular tissue. These results suggest that diabetic subjects with microvascular complications exhibit severely limited capacity to generate ex-vivo expanded endothelial progenitor populations and that the vasoreparative dysfunction observed in diabetic CD34+ cells is due to impaired autocrine/paracrine function and reduced sensitivity to hypoxia.

  14. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, impaired fasting glucose, and microvascular dysfunction: a principal component analysis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panazzolo Diogo G

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to evaluate the multivariate association between functional microvascular variables and clinical-laboratorial-anthropometrical measurements. Methods Data from 189 female subjects (34.0±15.5 years, 30.5±7.1 kg/m2, who were non-smokers, non-regular drug users, without a history of diabetes and/or hypertension, were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA. PCA is a classical multivariate exploratory tool because it highlights common variation between variables allowing inferences about possible biological meaning of associations between them, without pre-establishing cause-effect relationships. In total, 15 variables were used for PCA: body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP, fasting plasma glucose, levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c, triglycerides (TG, insulin, C-reactive protein (CRP, and functional microvascular variables measured by nailfold videocapillaroscopy. Nailfold videocapillaroscopy was used for direct visualization of nutritive capillaries, assessing functional capillary density, red blood cell velocity (RBCV at rest and peak after 1 min of arterial occlusion (RBCVmax, and the time taken to reach RBCVmax (TRBCVmax. Results A total of 35% of subjects had metabolic syndrome, 77% were overweight/obese, and 9.5% had impaired fasting glucose. PCA was able to recognize that functional microvascular variables and clinical-laboratorial-anthropometrical measurements had a similar variation. The first five principal components explained most of the intrinsic variation of the data. For example, principal component 1 was associated with BMI, waist circumference, systolic BP, diastolic BP, insulin, TG, CRP, and TRBCVmax varying in the same way. Principal component 1 also showed a strong association among HDL-c, RBCV, and RBCVmax, but in the opposite way. Principal component 3 was

  15. Indoxyl Sulfate Impairs Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Might Contribute to Vascular Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Jui Lin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Indoxyl sulfate (IS is a protein-bound uremic toxin that accumulates in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. We explored the effect of IS on human early endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and analyzed the correlation between serum IS levels and parameters of vascular function, including endothelial function in a CKD-based cohort. Methods: A cross-sectional study with 128 stable CKD patients was conducted. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD, pulse wave velocity (PWV, ankle brachial index, serum IS and other biochemical parameters were measured and analyzed. In parallel, the activity of early EPCs was also evaluated after exposure to IS. Results: In human EPCs, a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect of IS on chemotactic motility and colony formation was observed. Additionally, serum IS levels were significantly correlated with CKD stages. The total IS (T-IS and free IS (F-IS were strongly associated with age, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, blood pressure, PWV, blood urea nitrogen, creatine and phosphate but negatively correlated with FMD, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and calcium. A multivariate linear regression analysis also showed that FMD was significantly associated with IS after adjusting for other confounding factors. Conclusions: In humans, IS impairs early EPCs and was strongly correlated with vascular dysfunction. Thus, we speculate that this adverse effect of IS may partly result from the inhibition of early EPCs.

  16. Talk it out: a conflict resolution program for preschool children with speech and language impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Barbara; Gray, Shelley

    2013-05-01

    Talk It Out was developed by speech-language pathologists to teach young children, especially those with speech and language impairments, to recognize problems, use words to solve them, and verbally negotiate solutions. One of the very successful by-products is that these same strategies help children avoid harming their voice. Across a school year, Talk It Out provides teaching and practice in predictable contexts so that children become competent problem solvers. It is especially powerful when implemented as part of the tier 1 preschool curriculum. The purpose of this article is to help school-based speech-language pathologists (1) articulate the need and rationale for early implementation of conflict resolution programs, (2) develop practical skills to implement Talk It Out strategies in their programs, and (3) transfer this knowledge to classroom teachers who can use and reinforce these strategies on a daily basis with the children they serve.

  17. Impaired Arterial Elasticity Identified by Pulse Waveform Analysis is a Non- invasive Measure for Early Detection of Endothelial Dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Jun; Wang Yan; Yang Zhen; Tu Chang; Xu Mingguo; Wang Jiemei

    2004-01-01

    Objectives Endothelial dysfunction is the earliest marker for atherosclerosis and plays key role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. The present study was performed to evaluate effect of aging on arterial elasticity by using pulse waveform analysis and investigate whether the changes in arterial elasticity can be used as a non - invasive measure for early detection of endothelial dysfunction.Methods Using modified Windkessel model of the circulation and pulse waveform analysis, C1 large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices of 204 normal healthy subjects ( age 15 -80 years) were measured.Among them twenty - four male healthy subjects were divided into both the young (age 20 -30 years, n =12) and elderly (age 60 - 70 years, n = 12) groups.We delivered acethycholine (Ach), an endotheliumdependent vasodilator, and sodium nitroprusside(SNP), an endothelium- independent vasodilator, to dermal vessels of the forearm using iontophoresis, respectively, and measured basal and peak blood flow using laser doppler fluximetry. Results C1 large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices were reduced with advancing age. C 1 large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices were negatively correlated with age (r= -0.628, p<0.001; r= -0.595, p <0.001).Basal blood flow was similar between the young and elderly groups ( 14.58 ± 3.4 vs 13.52 ± 3.41 PU, p =NS). Peak blood flow induced by Ach was significantly reduced in the elderly group compared with the young group (83.4 ± 11.9 vs 93.75 ± 10. 87 PU, p < 0. 05 ).However, peak blood flow induced by SNP was similar in the two groups ( 119. 17 ± 16.76 vs 128.33 ± 21.29 PU,p = NS). Ach - induced peak blood flow correlated positively with C1 large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices( r=0.56, p <0.01; r =0.53, p <0.01).Conclusions Advancing age leads to impaired artery elasticity and endothelial dysfun ction. Reduced arterial elasticity is, in parallel, associated with diminished

  18. Cardiac autonomic nervous dysfunction detected by both heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence in prediabetic patients with isolated impaired fasting glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Balc?o?lu, Akif Serhat; Ak?nc?, Sinan; ?i?ek, Davran; Oner, Ali; Bal, U?ur Abbas; M?derriso?lu, ?brahim Haldun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cardiac autonomic nervous dysfunction (CAND), a severe complication of diabetes, has also been shown to affect prediabetic patients. The role of isolated impaired fasting plasma glucose (IFG), a subtype of prediabetes, is not clear in the pathogenesis of CAND. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between isolated IFG and cardiac autonomic function using heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence (HRT) indices derived from 24-h Holter?electrocardiogram r...

  19. Chronic cigarette smoking causes hypertension, increased oxidative stress, impaired NO bioavailability, endothelial dysfunction, and cardiac remodeling in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, M. A. Hassan; Johnson, Wesley M.; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Lian, Jiarui; Kearns, Patrick N.; El-Mahdy, Mohamed A.; Liu, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. While the association between chronic smoking and cardiovascular disease is well established, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood, partly due to the lack of adequate in vivo animal models. Here, we report a mouse model of chronic smoking-induced cardiovascular pathology. Male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to whole body mainstream cigarette smoke (CS) using a SCIREQ “InExpose” smoking system (48 min/day, 5 days/wk) for 16 or 32 wk. Age-matched, air-exposed mice served as nonsmoking controls. Blood pressure was measured, and cardiac MRI was performed. In vitro vascular ring and isolated heart experiments were performed to measure vascular reactivity and cardiac function. Blood from control and smoking mice was studied for the nitric oxide (NO) decay rate and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. With 32 wk of CS exposure, mice had significantly less body weight gain and markedly higher blood pressure. At 32 wk of CS exposure, ACh-induced vasorelaxation was significantly shifted to the right and downward, left ventricular mass was significantly larger along with an increased heart-to-body weight ratio, in vitro cardiac function tended to be impaired with high afterload, white blood cells had significantly higher ROS generation, and the blood NO decay rate was significantly faster. Thus, smoking led to blunted weight gain, hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, leukocyte activation with ROS generation, decreased NO bioavailability, and mild cardiac hypertrophy in mice that were not otherwise predisposed to disease. This mouse model is a useful tool to enable further elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of smoking-induced cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21057039

  20. The role of NLRP3-CASP1 in inflammasome-mediated neuroinflammation and autophagy dysfunction in manganese-induced, hippocampal-dependent impairment of learning and memory ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Diya; Zhang, Jianbin; Jiang, Wenkai; Cao, Zipeng; Zhao, Fang; Cai, Tongjian; Aschner, Michael; Luo, Wenjing

    2017-02-27

    Central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and autophagy dysfunction are known to be involved in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Manganese (Mn), a neurotoxic metal, has the potential to induce microglia-mediated neuroinflammation as well as autophagy dysfunction. NLRP3 (NLR family, pyrin domain containing 3)- CASP1 (caspase 1) inflammasome-mediated neuroinflammation in microglia has specific relevance to neurological diseases. However, the mechanism driving these phenomena remains poorly understood. We demonstrate that Mn activates the NLRP3-CASP1 inflammasome pathway in the hippocampus of mice and BV2 cells by triggering autophagy-lysosomal dysfunction. The autophagy-lysosomal dysfunction is induced by lysosomal damage caused by excessive Mn accumulation, damaging the structure and normal function of these organelles. Additionally, we show that the release of lysosomal CTSB (cathepsin B) plays an important role in Mn-induced NLRP3-CASP1 inflammasome activation, and that the increased autophagosomes in the cytoplasm are not the main cause of NLRP3-CASP1 inflammasome activation. The accumulation of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL1B (interleukin 1 β) and IL18 (interleukin 18), as well as the dysfunctional autophagy pathway may damage hippocampal neuronal cells, thus leading to hippocampal-dependent impairment in learning and memory, which is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD).

  1. The endorsement of dysfunctional attitudes is associated with an impaired retrieval of specific autobiographical memories in response to matching cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, Philip; Bockting, Claudi L H; Kremers, Ismay P; Schene, Aart H; Mark, J; Williams, G

    2007-01-01

    Two studies investigated a hypothesis of Dalgleish et al. (2003) that overgeneral memory may arise from matching between task cues and dysfunctional attitudes or schemas. In the first study, 111 euthymic patients with at least two previous major depressive episodes completed the Dysfunctional Attitu

  2. p53 deletion impairs clearance of chromosomal-instable stem cells in aging telomere-dysfunctional mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begus-Nahrmann, Y.; Lechel, A.; Obenauf, A.C.; Nalapareddy, K.; Peit, E.; Hoffmann, E.; Schlaudraff, F.; Liss, B.; Schirmacher, P.; Kestler, H.; Danenberg, E.M.; Barker, N.; Clevers, H.; Speicher, M.R.; Rudolph, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction limits the proliferative capacity of human cells and induces organismal aging by activation of p53 and p21. Although deletion of p21 elongates the lifespan of telomere-dysfunctional mice, a direct analysis of p53 in telomere-related aging has been hampered by early tumor formati

  3. Impaired prefrontal-amygdala effective connectivity is responsible for the dysfunction of emotion process in major depressive disorder: a dynamic causal modeling study on MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Li, Haoran; Luo, Guoping; Wang, Yi; Tang, Hao; Han, Li; Yao, Zhijian

    2012-08-15

    Depression is proved to be associated with the dysfunction of prefrontal-limbic neural circuit, especially during emotion processing procedure. Related explorations have been undertaken from the aspects of abnormal activation and functional connectivity. However, the mechanism of the dysfunction of coordinated interactions remains unknown and is still a matter of debate. The present study gave direct evidence of this issue from the aspect of effective connectivity via dynamic causal modeling (DCM). 20 major depressive disorder (MDD) patients and 20 healthy controls were recruited to attend facial emotional stimulus during MEG recording. Bayesian model selection (BMS) was applied to choose the best model. Results under the optimal model showed that top-down endogenous effective connectivity from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to the amygdala was greatly impaired in patients relative to health controls; while bottom-up endogenous effective connectivity from the amygdala to the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) as well as modulatory effective connectivity from ACC to DLPFC was significantly increased. We inferred the incapable DLPFC failed to exert influence on amygdala, and finally lead to enhanced amygdala-ACC and ACC-DLPFC bottom-up effects. Such impaired prefrontal-amygdala connectivity was supposed to be responsible for the dysfunction in MDD when dealing with emotional stimuli.

  4. Intermittent hypoxia from obstructive sleep apnea may cause neuronal impairment and dysfunction in central nervous system: the potential roles played by microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Q

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Qingchan Yang,1,* Yan Wang,2,* Jing Feng,2 Jie Cao,2 Baoyuan Chen2 1Graduate School of Tianjin Medical University, 2Respiratory Department, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common condition characterized by repetitive episodes of complete (apnea or partial (hypopnea obstruction of the upper airway during sleep, resulting in oxygen desaturation and arousal from sleep. Intermittent hypoxia (IH resulting from OSA may cause structural neuron damage and dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS. Clinically, it manifests as neurocognitive and behavioral deficits with oxidative stress and inflammatory impairment as its pathophysiological basis, which are mediated by microglia at the cellular level. Microglia are dominant proinflammatory cells in the CNS. They induce CNS oxidative stress and inflammation, mainly through mitochondria, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and the release of excitatory toxic neurotransmitters. The balance between neurotoxic versus protective and anti- versus proinflammatory microglial factors might determine the final roles of microglia after IH exposure from OSA. Microglia inflammatory impairments will continue and cascade persistently upon activation, ultimately resulting in clinically significant neuron damage and dysfunction in the CNS. In this review article, we summarize the mechanisms of structural neuron damage in the CNS and its concomitant dysfunction due to IH from OSA, and the potential roles played by microglia in this process. Keywords: intermittent hypoxia, obstructive sleep apnea, microglia, inflammation, apoptosis

  5. Glyoxalase-1 overexpression reduces endothelial dysfunction and attenuates early renal impairment in a rat model of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Olaf; Niessen, Petra M G; Miyata, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In diabetes, advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and the AGE precursor methylglyoxal (MGO) are associated with endothelial dysfunction and the development of microvascular complications. In this study we used a rat model of diabetes, in which rats transgenically overexpressed...... and endothelium dysfunction markers. In fully differentiated cultured podocytes incubation with MGO resulted in apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: This study shows that effective regulation of the GLO-I enzyme is important in the prevention of vascular intracellular glycation, endothelial dysfunction...

  6. Visual short-term memory for high resolution associations is impaired in patients with medial temporal lobe damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, Joshua D; Borders, Alyssa A; Petzold, Michael T; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2017-02-01

    The medial temporal lobe (MTL) plays a critical role in episodic long-term memory, but whether the MTL is necessary for visual short-term memory is controversial. Some studies have indicated that MTL damage disrupts visual short-term memory performance whereas other studies have failed to find such evidence. To account for these mixed results, it has been proposed that the hippocampus is critical in supporting short-term memory for high resolution complex bindings, while the cortex is sufficient to support simple, low resolution bindings. This hypothesis was tested in the current study by assessing visual short-term memory in patients with damage to the MTL and controls for high resolution and low resolution object-location and object-color associations. In the location tests, participants encoded sets of two or four objects in different locations on the screen. After each set, participants performed a two-alternative forced-choice task in which they were required to discriminate the object in the target location from the object in a high or low resolution lure location (i.e., the object locations were very close or far away from the target location, respectively). Similarly, in the color tests, participants were presented with sets of two or four objects in a different color and, after each set, were required to discriminate the object in the target color from the object in a high or low resolution lure color (i.e., the lure color was very similar or very different, respectively, to the studied color). The patients were significantly impaired in visual short-term memory, but importantly, they were more impaired for high resolution object-location and object-color bindings. The results are consistent with the proposal that the hippocampus plays a critical role in forming and maintaining complex, high resolution bindings. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The Influence of Cochlear Mechanical Dysfunction, Temporal Processing Deficits, and Age on the Intelligibility of Audible Speech in Noise for Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T. Johannesen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the relative importance of cochlear mechanical dysfunction, temporal processing deficits, and age on the ability of hearing-impaired listeners to understand speech in noisy backgrounds. Sixty-eight listeners took part in the study. They were provided with linear, frequency-specific amplification to compensate for their audiometric losses, and intelligibility was assessed for speech-shaped noise (SSN and a time-reversed two-talker masker (R2TM. Behavioral estimates of cochlear gain loss and residual compression were available from a previous study and were used as indicators of cochlear mechanical dysfunction. Temporal processing abilities were assessed using frequency modulation detection thresholds. Age, audiometric thresholds, and the difference between audiometric threshold and cochlear gain loss were also included in the analyses. Stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to assess the relative importance of the various factors for intelligibility. Results showed that (a cochlear gain loss was unrelated to intelligibility, (b residual cochlear compression was related to intelligibility in SSN but not in a R2TM, (c temporal processing was strongly related to intelligibility in a R2TM and much less so in SSN, and (d age per se impaired intelligibility. In summary, all factors affected intelligibility, but their relative importance varied across maskers.

  8. The Influence of Cochlear Mechanical Dysfunction, Temporal Processing Deficits, and Age on the Intelligibility of Audible Speech in Noise for Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesen, Peter T.; Pérez-González, Patricia; Kalluri, Sridhar; Blanco, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relative importance of cochlear mechanical dysfunction, temporal processing deficits, and age on the ability of hearing-impaired listeners to understand speech in noisy backgrounds. Sixty-eight listeners took part in the study. They were provided with linear, frequency-specific amplification to compensate for their audiometric losses, and intelligibility was assessed for speech-shaped noise (SSN) and a time-reversed two-talker masker (R2TM). Behavioral estimates of cochlear gain loss and residual compression were available from a previous study and were used as indicators of cochlear mechanical dysfunction. Temporal processing abilities were assessed using frequency modulation detection thresholds. Age, audiometric thresholds, and the difference between audiometric threshold and cochlear gain loss were also included in the analyses. Stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to assess the relative importance of the various factors for intelligibility. Results showed that (a) cochlear gain loss was unrelated to intelligibility, (b) residual cochlear compression was related to intelligibility in SSN but not in a R2TM, (c) temporal processing was strongly related to intelligibility in a R2TM and much less so in SSN, and (d) age per se impaired intelligibility. In summary, all factors affected intelligibility, but their relative importance varied across maskers. PMID:27604779

  9. Structural and Genetic Studies Demonstrate Neurologic Dysfunction in Triosephosphate Isomerase Deficiency Is Associated with Impaired Synaptic Vesicle Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Zeccola, Alison M.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Talsma, Aaron D.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Heroux, Annie; Levitan, Edwin S.; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.; Pallanck, Leo J.

    2016-03-31

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) deficiency is a poorly understood disease characterized by hemolytic anemia, cardiomyopathy, neurologic dysfunction, and early death. TPI deficiency is one of a group of diseases known as glycolytic enzymopathies, but is unique for its severe patient neuropathology and early mortality. The disease is caused by missense mutations and dysfunction in the glycolytic enzyme, TPI. Previous studies have detailed structural and catalytic changes elicited by disease-associated TPI substitutions, and samples of patient erythrocytes have yielded insight into patient hemolytic anemia; however, the neuropathophysiology of this disease remains a mystery. This study combines structural, biochemical, and genetic approaches to demonstrate that perturbations of the TPI dimer interface are sufficient to elicit TPI deficiency neuropathogenesis. The present study demonstrates that neurologic dysfunction resulting from TPI deficiency is characterized by synaptic vesicle dysfunction, and can be attenuated with catalytically inactive TPI. Collectively, our findings are the first to identify, to our knowledge, a functional synaptic defect in TPI deficiency derived from molecular changes in the TPI dimer interface.

  10. Protection from palmitate-induced mitochondrial DNA damage prevents from mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and impaired insulin signaling in rat L6 skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzefovych, Larysa V; Solodushko, Viktoriya A; Wilson, Glenn L; Rachek, Lyudmila I

    2012-01-01

    Saturated free fatty acids have been implicated in the increase of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and insulin resistance seen in type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether palmitate-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage contributed to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, impaired insulin signaling, and reduced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells. Adenoviral vectors were used to deliver the DNA repair enzyme human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase/(apurinic/apyrimidinic) lyase (hOGG1) to mitochondria in L6 myotubes. After palmitate exposure, we evaluated mtDNA damage, mitochondrial function, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, insulin signaling pathways, and glucose uptake. Protection of mtDNA from palmitate-induced damage by overexpression of hOGG1 targeted to mitochondria significantly diminished palmitate-induced mitochondrial superoxide production, restored the decline in ATP levels, reduced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) kinase, prevented cells from entering apoptosis, increased insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of serine-threonine kinase (Akt) (Ser473) and tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1, and thereby enhanced glucose transporter 4 translocation to plasma membrane, and restored insulin signaling. Addition of a specific inhibitor of JNK mimicked the effect of mitochondrial overexpression of hOGG1 and partially restored insulin sensitivity, thus confirming the involvement of mtDNA damage and subsequent increase of oxidative stress and JNK activation in insulin signaling in L6 myotubes. Our results are the first to report that mtDNA damage is the proximal cause in palmitate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired insulin signaling and provide strong evidence that targeting DNA repair enzymes into mitochondria in skeletal muscles could be a potential therapeutic treatment for insulin resistance.

  11. Methylglyoxal Impairs Insulin Secretion of Pancreatic β-Cells through Increased Production of ROS and Mitochondrial Dysfunction Mediated by Upregulation of UCP2 and MAPKs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Jinshuang; Xie, Shiya; Guo, Yi; Zhang, Chunli; Guan, Yanming; Li, Chunmei; Lu, Jianxin; Meng, Qing H

    2016-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a highly reactive glucose metabolic intermediate and a major precursor of advanced glycation end products. MG level is elevated in hyperglycemic disorders such as diabetes mellitus. Substantial evidence has shown that MG is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes and diabetic complications. We investigated the impact of MG on insulin secretion by MIN6 and INS-1 cells and the potential mechanisms of this effect. Our study demonstrates that MG impaired insulin secretion by MIN6 or ISN-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. It increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis rate in MIN6 or ISN-1 cells and inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP production. Furthermore, the expression of UCP2, JNK, and P38 as well as the phosphorylation JNK and P38 was increased by MG. These effects of MG were attenuated by MG scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. Collectively, these data indicate that MG impairs insulin secretion of pancreatic β-cells through increasing ROS production. High levels of ROS can damage β-cells directly via JNK/P38 upregulation and through activation of UCP2 resulting in reduced MMP and ATP production, leading to β-cell dysfunction and impairment of insulin production.

  12. Autonomic dysfunction in mild cognitive impairment: evidence from power spectral analysis of heart rate variability in a cross-sectional case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Nicolini

    Full Text Available Mild cognitive impairment (MCI is set to become a major health problem with the exponential ageing of the world's population. The association between MCI and autonomic dysfunction, supported by indirect evidence and rich with clinical implications in terms of progression to dementia and increased risk of mortality and falls, has never been specifically demonstrated.To conduct a comprehensive assessment of autonomic function in subjects with MCI by means of power spectral analysis (PSA of heart rate variability (HRV at rest and during provocative manoeuvres.This cross-sectional study involved 80 older outpatients (aged ≥ 65 consecutively referred to a geriatric unit and diagnosed with MCI or normal cognition (controls based on neuropsychological testing. PSA was performed on 5-minute electrocardiographic recordings under three conditions--supine rest with free breathing (baseline, supine rest with paced breathing at 12 breaths/minute (parasympathetic stimulation, and active standing (orthosympathetic stimulation--with particular focus on the changes from baseline to stimulation of indices of sympathovagal balance: normalized low frequency (LFn and high frequency (HFn powers and the LF/HF ratio. Blood pressure (BP was measured at baseline and during standing. Given its exploratory nature in a clinical population the study included subjects on medications with a potential to affect HRV.There were no significant differences in HRV indices between the two groups at baseline. MCI subjects exhibited smaller physiological changes in all three HRV indices during active standing, consistently with a dysfunction of the orthosympathetic system. Systolic BP after 10 minutes of standing was lower in MCI subjects, suggesting dysautonomia-related orthostatic BP dysregulation.Our study is novel in providing evidence of autonomic dysfunction in MCI. This is associated with orthostatic BP dysregulation and the ongoing follow-up of the study population will

  13. Aerobic interval training partly reverse contractile dysfunction and impaired Ca2+ handling in atrial myocytes from rats with post infarction heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Berit Johnsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is limited knowledge about atrial myocyte Ca(2+ handling in the failing hearts. The aim of this study was to examine atrial myocyte contractile function and Ca(2+ handling in rats with post-infarction heart failure (HF and to examine whether aerobic interval training could reverse a potential dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Post-infarction HF was induced in Sprague Dawley rats by ligation of the left descending coronary artery. Atrial myocyte shortening was depressed (p<0.01 and time to relaxation was prolonged (p<0.01 in sedentary HF-rats compared to healthy controls. This was associated with decreased Ca(2+ amplitude, decreased SR Ca(2+ content, and slower Ca(2+ transient decay. Atrial myocytes from HF-rats had reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ ATPase activity, increased Na(+/Ca(2+-exchanger activity and increased diastolic Ca(2+ leak through ryanodine receptors. High intensity aerobic interval training in HF-rats restored atrial myocyte contractile function and reversed changes in atrial Ca(2+ handling in HF. CONCLUSION: Post infarction HF in rats causes profound impairment in atrial myocyte contractile function and Ca(2+ handling. The observed dysfunction in atrial myocytes was partly reversed after aerobic interval training.

  14. Dopaminergic neurotransmission dysfunction induced by amyloid-β transforms cortical long-term potentiation into long-term depression and produces memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Castilla, Perla; Rodriguez-Duran, Luis F; Guzman-Ramos, Kioko; Barcenas-Femat, Alejandro; Escobar, Martha L; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition manifested by synaptic dysfunction and memory loss, but the mechanisms underlying synaptic failure are not entirely understood. Although dopamine is a key modulator of synaptic plasticity, dopaminergic neurotransmission dysfunction in AD has mostly been associated to noncognitive symptoms. Thus, we aimed to study the relationship between dopaminergic neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity in AD models. We used a transgenic model of AD (triple-transgenic mouse model of AD) and the administration of exogenous amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers into wild type mice. We found that Aβ decreased cortical dopamine levels and converted in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) into long-term depression (LTD) after high-frequency stimulation delivered at basolateral amygdaloid nucleus-insular cortex projection, which led to impaired recognition memory. Remarkably, increasing cortical dopamine and norepinephrine levels rescued both high-frequency stimulation -induced LTP and memory, whereas depletion of catecholaminergic levels mimicked the Aβ-induced shift from LTP to LTD. Our results suggest that Aβ-induced dopamine depletion is a core mechanism underlying the early synaptopathy and memory alterations observed in AD models and acts by modifying the threshold for the induction of cortical LTP and/or LTD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hippocampal dysfunction and cognitive impairments provoked by chronic early-life stress involve excessive activation of CRH receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ivy, Autumn S.; Rex, Christopher S.; Chen, Yuncai; Dubé, Céline; Maras, Pamela M.; Grigoriadis, Dimitri E.; Christine M Gall; Lynch, Gary; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic stress impairs learning and memory in humans and rodents and disrupts long-term potentiation (LTP) in animal models. These effects are associated with structural changes in hippocampal neurons, including reduced dendritic arborization. Unlike the generally reversible effects of chronic stress on adult rat hippocampus, we have previously found that the effects of early-life stress endure and worsen during adulthood, yet the mechanisms for these clinically important sequelae are poorly ...

  16. Impaired pancreatic polypeptide response to a meal in type 1 diabetic patients: vagal neuropathy or islet cell dysfunction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Carstensen, H; List, S;

    1993-01-01

    The pancreatic polypeptide (PP) response to a mixed meal was investigated in seven insulin-dependent diabetics without measurable signs of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, and in seven healthy subjects. Since acute changes in metabolic regulation might influence the meal-induced PP response...... is independent of short-term changes in metabolic control. Since the response was attenuated in the insulin-dependent diabetic patients, who had no otherwise measurable signs of neuropathy, the PP response to a meal could be a sensitive indicator of dysfunction of the reflex arc controlling PP secretion......, the insulin-dependent diabetic patients were studied during normo- and hyperglycemic experimental conditions at blood glucose levels of 5 and 15 mmol/l, respectively. The PP response was identical on the two occasions, the response being significantly smaller than in the healthy subjects. Thus, PP response...

  17. Erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Kevan

    2008-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common problem affecting sexual function in men. Approximately one in 10 men over the age of 40 is affected by this condition and the incidence is age related. Erectile dysfunction is a sentinel marker for several reversible conditions including peripheral and coronary vascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Endothelial dysfunction is a common factor between the disease states. Concurrent conditions such as depression, late-onset hypogonadism, Peyronie's disease and lower urinary tract symptoms may significantly worsen erectile function, other sexual and relationship issues and penis dysmorphophobia. A focused physical examination and baseline laboratory investigations are mandatory. Management consists of initiating modifiable lifestyle changes, psychological and psychosexual/couples interventions and pharmacological and other interventions. In combination and with treatment of concurrent comorbid states, these interventions will often bring about successful resolution of symptoms and avoid the need for surgical interventions.

  18. Low thyroid function leads to cardiac atrophy with chamber dilatation, impaired myocardial blood flow, loss of arterioles, and severe systolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi-Da; Kuzman, James A; Said, Suleman; Anderson, Brent E; Wang, Xuejun; Gerdes, A Martin

    2005-11-15

    Although thyroid dysfunction has been linked to heart failure, it is not clear whether hypothyroidism alone can cause heart failure. Hypothyroidism was induced in adult rats by treatment with 0.025% propylthiouracil (PTU) for 6 weeks (PTU-S) and 1 year (PTU-L). Echocardiographic measurements, left ventricular (LV) hemodynamics, isolated myocyte length (KOH method), myocardial blood flow (fluorescent microspheres), arteriolar morphometry, and gene expression (Western blot) were determined. Heart weight, heart rate, LV systolic blood pressure, LV ejection fraction, LV fractional shortening, and systolic wall thickness were reduced in PTU-S and PTU-L rats. LV internal diameter in systole increased by 40% in PTU-S and 86% in PTU-L. LV internal dimension in diastole was increased in PTU-S and PTU-L rats, but only PTU-L rats showed a significant increase in myocyte length due to series sarcomere addition. Resting and maximum (adenosine) myocardial blood flow were reduced in both PTU-S and PTU-L rats. Impaired blood flow was due to a large reduction in arteriolar length density and small arterioles in PTU-S and PTU-L (Pcardiac mass. Chamber dilatation in PTU-L rats was due to series sarcomere addition, typical of heart failure. Hypothyroidism resulted in impaired myocardial blood flow due to a dramatic loss of arterioles. Thus, we have identified 2 important new mechanisms by which low thyroid function may lead to heart failure.

  19. A multicenter study of the early detection of synaptic dysfunction in Mild Cognitive Impairment using Magnetoencephalography-derived functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestú, Fernando; Peña, Jose-Maria; Garcés, Pilar; González, Santiago; Bajo, Ricardo; Bagic, Anto; Cuesta, Pablo; Funke, Michael; Mäkelä, Jyrki P; Menasalvas, Ernestina; Nakamura, Akinori; Parkkonen, Lauri; López, Maria E; Del Pozo, Francisco; Sudre, Gustavo; Zamrini, Edward; Pekkonen, Eero; Henson, Richard N; Becker, James T

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic disruption is an early pathological sign of the neurodegeneration of Dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT). The changes in network synchronization are evident in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) at the group level, but there are very few Magnetoencephalography (MEG) studies regarding discrimination at the individual level. In an international multicenter study, we used MEG and functional connectivity metrics to discriminate MCI from normal aging at the individual person level. A labeled sample of features (links) that distinguished MCI patients from controls in a training dataset was used to classify MCI subjects in two testing datasets from four other MEG centers. We identified a pattern of neuronal hypersynchronization in MCI, in which the features that best discriminated MCI were fronto-parietal and interhemispheric links. The hypersynchronization pattern found in the MCI patients was stable across the five different centers, and may be considered an early sign of synaptic disruption and a possible preclinical biomarker for MCI/DAT.

  20. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein degradation in Parkinson's disease: how neurons are lost in the Bermuda triangle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkus Kristen A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, the theory of oxidative stress has received considerable support. Although many correlations have been established and encouraging evidence has been obtained, conclusive proof of causation for the oxidative stress hypothesis is lacking and potential cures have not emerged. Therefore it is likely that other factors, possibly in coordination with oxidative stress, contribute to neuron death. Using Parkinson's disease (PD as the paradigm, this review explores the hypothesis that oxidative modifications, mitochondrial functional disruption, and impairment of protein degradation constitute three interrelated molecular pathways that execute neuron death. These intertwined events are the consequence of environmental exposure, genetic factors, and endogenous risks and constitute a "Bermuda triangle" that may be considered the underlying cause of neurodegenerative pathogenesis.

  1. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein degradation in Parkinson's disease: how neurons are lost in the Bermuda triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkus, Kristen A; Tsika, Elpida; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2009-06-05

    While numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, the theory of oxidative stress has received considerable support. Although many correlations have been established and encouraging evidence has been obtained, conclusive proof of causation for the oxidative stress hypothesis is lacking and potential cures have not emerged. Therefore it is likely that other factors, possibly in coordination with oxidative stress, contribute to neuron death. Using Parkinson's disease (PD) as the paradigm, this review explores the hypothesis that oxidative modifications, mitochondrial functional disruption, and impairment of protein degradation constitute three interrelated molecular pathways that execute neuron death. These intertwined events are the consequence of environmental exposure, genetic factors, and endogenous risks and constitute a "Bermuda triangle" that may be considered the underlying cause of neurodegenerative pathogenesis.

  2. Roles of calcium and IP3 in impaired colon contractility of rats following multiple organ dysfunction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zheyu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to explore changes in rat colon motility, and determine the roles of calcium and inositol (1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 in colon dysmotility induced by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS caused by bacteria peritonitis. The number of stools, the contractility of the muscle strips and the length of smooth muscle cells (SMC in the colon, the concentration of calcium and IP3 in SMC, and serum nitric oxide were measured. Number of stools, fecal weight, IP3 concentration in SMC and serum nitric oxide concentration were 0.77 ± 0.52 pellets, 2.51 ± 0.39 g, 4.14 ± 2.07 pmol/tube, and 113.95 ± 37.89 µmol/L, respectively, for the MODS group (N = 11 vs 1.54 ± 0.64 pellets, 4.32 ± 0.57 g, 8.19 ± 3.11 pmol/tube, and 37.42 ± 19.56 µmol/L for the control group (N = 20; P < 0.05. After treatment with 0.1 mM acetylcholine and 0.1 M potassium chloride, the maximum contraction stress of smooth muscle strips, the length of SMC and the changes of calcium concentration were 593 ± 81 and 458 ± 69 g/cm³, 48.1 ± 11.8 and 69.2 ± 15.7 µM, 250 ± 70 and 167 ± 48%, respectively, for the control group vs 321 ± 53 and 284 ± 56 g/cm³, 65.1 ± 18.5 and 87.2 ± 23.7 µM, 127 ± 35 and 112 ± 35% for the MODS group (P < 0.05. Thus, colon contractility was decreased in MODS, a result possibly related to reduced calcium concentration and IP3 in SMC.

  3. Choroid plexus dysfunction impairs beta-amyloid clearance in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim eGonzález Marrero

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Compromised secretory function of choroid plexus (CP and defective cerebrospinal fluid (CSF production, along with accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ peptides at the blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB, likely contribute to complications of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The AD triple transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD at 16 month-old mimics several critical hallmarks of the human disease. In brain, the 3xTg-AD progressively develops β-amyloid (Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles with a temporal- and regional- specific profile resembling their development in human AD. Currently, little is known about transport and metabolic responses by CP to the disrupted homeostasis of CNS Aβ in AD. This study analyzed the effects of highly-expressed AD-linked human transgenes (APP, PS1 and tau on lateral ventricle CP function. Confocal imaging and immunohistochemistry revealed an increase in Aβ42 (but not Aβ40 in epithelial cytosol and in stroma surrounding choroidal capillaries; the buildup in insoluble Aβ42 may reflect insufficient clearance transport from CSF to blood. Still, there was increased expression, presumably compensatory, of the choroidal Aβ transporters: the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE. A thickening of the epithelial basal membrane and greater collagen IV deposition occurred around capillaries in CP of 3xTg-AD mice, probably curtailing solute exchanges. Moreover, there was attenuated expression of epithelial aquaporin-1 and transthyretin protein compared to non-Tg controls. Collectively these findings indicate CP dysfunction (hypothetically linked to increasing Aβ burden resulting in less efficient ion transport, concurrently with reduced production of cerebrospinal fluid (less sink action on brain Aβ and diminished secretion of transthyretin (less neuroprotection against cortical Aβ toxicity. The putative effects of a disabled CP-CSF system on CNS f

  4. Choroid plexus dysfunction impairs beta-amyloid clearance in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Marrero, Ibrahim; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Johanson, Conrad E.; Carmona-Calero, Emilia María; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Leandro; Brito-Armas, José Miguel; Castañeyra-Perdomo, Agustín; Castro-Fuentes, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Compromised secretory function of choroid plexus (CP) and defective cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production, along with accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides at the blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB), contribute to complications of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The AD triple transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD) at 16 month-old mimics critical hallmarks of the human disease: β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) with a temporal- and regional- specific profile. Currently, little is known about transport and metabolic responses by CP to the disrupted homeostasis of CNS Aβ in AD. This study analyzed the effects of highly-expressed AD-linked human transgenes (APP, PS1 and tau) on lateral ventricle CP function. Confocal imaging and immunohistochemistry revealed an increase only of Aβ42 isoform in epithelial cytosol and in stroma surrounding choroidal capillaries; this buildup may reflect insufficient clearance transport from CSF to blood. Still, there was increased expression, presumably compensatory, of the choroidal Aβ transporters: the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) and the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE). A thickening of the epithelial basal membrane and greater collagen-IV deposition occurred around capillaries in CP, probably curtailing solute exchanges. Moreover, there was attenuated expression of epithelial aquaporin-1 and transthyretin (TTR) protein compared to Non-Tg mice. Collectively these findings indicate CP dysfunction hypothetically linked to increasing Aβ burden resulting in less efficient ion transport, concurrently with reduced production of CSF (less sink action on brain Aβ) and diminished secretion of TTR (less neuroprotection against cortical Aβ toxicity). The putative effects of a disabled CP-CSF system on CNS functions are discussed in the context of AD. PMID:25705176

  5. A multicenter study of the early detection of synaptic dysfunction in Mild Cognitive Impairment using Magnetoencephalography-derived functional connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Maestú, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic disruption is an early pathological sign of the neurodegeneration of Dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT. The changes in network synchronization are evident in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI at the group level, but there are very few Magnetoencephalography (MEG studies regarding discrimination at the individual level. In an international multicenter study, we used MEG and functional connectivity metrics to discriminate MCI from normal aging at the individual person level. A labeled sample of features (links that distinguished MCI patients from controls in a training dataset was used to classify MCI subjects in two testing datasets from four other MEG centers. We identified a pattern of neuronal hypersynchronization in MCI, in which the features that best discriminated MCI were fronto-parietal and interhemispheric links. The hypersynchronization pattern found in the MCI patients was stable across the five different centers, and may be considered an early sign of synaptic disruption and a possible preclinical biomarker for MCI/DAT.

  6. Prevalence of pituitary hormone dysfunction, metabolic syndrome, and impaired quality of life in retired professional football players: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Daniel F; Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C J; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    S. Although the cause of HD is unclear, these results suggest that GHD and hypogonadism may contribute to poor QoL, erectile dysfunction, and MetS in this population. Further study of pituitary function is warranted in athletes sustaining repetitive mTBI.

  7. Distinct laterality alterations distinguish mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease from healthy aging: statistical parametric mapping with high resolution MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lijuan; Liao, Weiqi; Jiang, Chunxiang; Qiu, Bensheng

    2013-12-01

    Laterality of human brain varies under healthy aging and diseased conditions. The alterations in hemispheric asymmetry may embed distinct biomarkers linked to the disease dynamics. Statistical parametric mapping based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and image processing techniques have allowed automated characterization of morphological features across the entire brain. In this study, 149 subjects grouped in healthy young, healthy elderly, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) were investigated using multivariate analysis for regional cerebral laterality indexed by surface area, curvature index, cortical thickness, and subjacent white matter volume measured on high-resolution MR images. Asymmetry alteration of MCI and AD were characterized by marked region-specific reduction, while healthy elderly featured a distinct laterality shift in the limbic system in addition to regional asymmetry loss. Lack of the laterality shift in limbic system and early loss of asymmetry in entorhinal cortex may be biomarkers to identify preclinical AD among other dementia. Multivariate analysis of hemispheric asymmetry may provide information helpful for monitoring the disease progress and improving the management of MCI and AD.

  8. Impaired Resolution of Inflammation in the Endoglin Heterozygous Mouse Model of Chronic Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madonna R. Peter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoglin is a coreceptor of the TGF-β superfamily predominantly expressed on the vascular endothelium and selective subsets of immune cells. We previously demonstrated that Endoglin heterozygous (Eng+/− mice subjected to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS developed persistent gut inflammation and pathological angiogenesis. We now report that colitic Eng+/− mice have low colonic levels of active TGF-β1, which was associated with reduced expression of thrombospondin-1, an angiostatic factor known to activate TGF-β1. We also demonstrate dysregulated expression of BMPER and follistatin, which are extracellular regulators of the TGF-β superfamily that modulate angiogenesis and inflammation. Heightened colonic levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant and proangiogenic factor, CXCL1, were also observed in DSS-treated Eng+/− mice. Interestingly, despite increased macrophage and neutrophil infiltration, a gut-specific reduction in expression of the key phagocytic respiratory burst enzymes, NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox-2 and myeloperoxidase, was seen in Eng+/− mice undergoing persistent inflammation. Taken together, these findings suggest that endoglin is required for TGF-β superfamily mediated resolution of inflammation and fully functional myeloid cells.

  9. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease.

  10. Peripheral insulin resistance rather than beta cell dysfunction accounts for geographical differences in impaired fasting blood glucose among sub-Saharan African individuals: findings from the RODAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Karlijn A C; Stronks, Karien; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Addo, Juliet; Bahendeka, Silver; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Osei, Kwame; Schulze, Matthias B; Spranger, Joachim; Smeeth, Liam; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction account for differences in impaired fasting blood glucose (IFBG) levels in sub-Saharan African individuals living in different locations in Europe and Africa. We also aimed to identify determinants associated with insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction among this population. Data from the cross-sectional multicentre Research on Obesity and Diabetes among African Migrants (RODAM) study were analysed. Participants included Ghanaian individuals without diabetes, aged 18-96 years old, who were residing in Amsterdam (n = 1337), Berlin (n = 502), London (n = 961), urban Ghana (n = 1309) and rural Ghana (n = 970). Glucose and insulin were measured in fasting venous blood samples. Anthropometrics were assessed during a physical examination. Questionnaires were used to assess demographics, physical activity, smoking status, alcohol consumption and energy intake. Insulin resistance and beta cell function were determined using homeostatic modelling (HOMA-IR and HOMA-B, respectively). Logistic regression analysis was used to study the contribution of HOMA-IR and inverse HOMA-B (beta cell dysfunction) to geographical differences in IFBG (fasting glucose 5.6-6.9 mmol/l). Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify determinants associated with HOMA-IR and inverse HOMA-B. IFBG was more common in individuals residing in urban Ghana (OR 1.41 [95% CI 1.08, 1.84]), Amsterdam (OR 3.44 [95% CI 2.69, 4.39]) and London (OR 1.58 [95% CI 1.20 2.08), but similar in individuals living in Berlin (OR 1.00 [95% CI 0.70, 1.45]), compared with those in rural Ghana (reference population). The attributable risk of IFBG per 1 SD increase in HOMA-IR was 69.3% and in inverse HOMA-B was 11.1%. After adjustment for HOMA-IR, the odds for IFBG reduced to 0.96 (95% CI 0.72, 1.27), 2.52 (95%CI 1.94, 3.26) and 1.02 (95% CI 0.78, 1.38) for individuals in Urban Ghana

  11. Impaired resolution of inflammatory response in the lungs of JF1/Msf mice following carbon nanoparticle instillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Angelis Martin

    2011-07-01

    activation. Conclusion This explorative study indicates that JF1 mice with impaired pulmonary function also exhibits delayed resolution of particle mediated lung inflammation as evident from elevated PMN and accumulation of macrophages and lymphocytes on day7. It is plausible that elevated levels of IL1B, IL4, TNF, CCL22/MDC, FVII and vWF counteract defense and homeostatic pathways thereby driving this phenomenon.

  12. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome impairs erectile function through increased endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and corporal fibrosis in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y; Niu, X; Wang, G; Huang, J; Liu, M; Peng, B

    2016-11-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is an independent risk factor for the development of erectile dysfunction (ED). But the molecular mechanisms underlying the relationship between CP/CPPS and ED are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CP/CPPS on erectile function in a rat model and the possible mechanisms. A rat model of experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) was established to mimic human CP⁄CPPS. Then twenty 2-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into EAP group and control group. Intracavernosal pressure (ICP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured during cavernous nerve electrostimulation, the ratio of max ICP/MAP was calculated. Blood was collected to measure the levels of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and testosterone, respectively. The expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in corpus cavernosum were detected. We also evaluated the smooth muscle/collagen ratio and apoptotic index (AI). The ratio of max ICP/MAP in EAP group were significantly lower than that in control group. The levels of serum CRP, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in EAP group were all significantly higher than these in control group. The expression of eNOS and cGMP levels in corpus cavernosum of EAP rats were significantly downregulated. Furthermore, decreased SOD activity and smooth muscle/collagen ratio, increased MDA levels and AI were found in corpus cavernosum of EAP rats. In conclusion, CP/CPPS impaired penile erectile function in a rat model. The declines of eNOS expression and cGMP levels in corpus cavernosum may be an important mechanism of CP/CPPS-induced ED. CP/CPPS also increased oxidative stress, cell apoptosis and decreased smooth muscle/collagen ratio in corpus cavernosum of rats, which were

  13. Myosin heavy chain and cardiac troponin T damage is associated with impaired myofibrillar ATPase activity contributing to sarcomeric dysfunction in Ca(2+)-paradox rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Árpád; Kalász, Judit; Pásztor, Enikő T; Tóth, Attila; Papp, Zoltán; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Barta, Judit

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential contribution of myofibrils to contractile dysfunction in Ca(2+)-paradox hearts. Isolated rat hearts were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution (Control), followed by Ca(2+)-depletion, and then Ca(2+)-repletion after Ca(2+)-depletion (Ca(2+)-paradox) by Langendorff method. During heart perfusion left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), rate of pressure development (+ dP/dt), and pressure decay (-dP/dt) were registered. Control LVDP (127.4 ± 6.1 mmHg) was reduced during Ca(2+)-depletion (9.8 ± 1.3 mmHg) and Ca(2+)-paradox (12.9 ± 1.3 mmHg) with similar decline in +dP/dt and -dP/dt. LVEDP was increased in both Ca(2+)-depletion and Ca(2+)-paradox. Compared to Control, myofibrillar Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase activity was decreased in the Ca(2+)-depletion group (12.08 ± 0.57 vs. 8.13 ± 0.19 µmol Pi/mg protein/h), besides unvarying Mg(2+) ATPase activity, while upon Ca(2+)-paradox myofibrillar Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase activity was decreased (12.08 ± 0.57 vs. 8.40 ± 0.22 µmol Pi/mg protein/h), but Mg(2+) ATPase activity was increased (3.20 ± 0.25 vs. 7.21 ± 0.36 µmol Pi/mg protein/h). In force measurements of isolated cardiomyocytes at saturating [Ca(2+)], Ca(2+)-depleted cells had lower rate constant of force redevelopment (k tr,max, 3.85 ± 0.21) and unchanged active tension, while those in Ca(2+)-paradox produced lower active tension (12.12 ± 3.19 kN/m(2)) and k tr,max (3.21 ± 23) than cells of Control group (25.07 ± 3.51 and 4.61 ± 22 kN/m(2), respectively). In biochemical assays, α-myosin heavy chain and cardiac troponin T presented progressive degradation during Ca(2+)-depletion and Ca(2+)-paradox. Our results suggest that contractile impairment in Ca(2+)-paradox partially resides in deranged sarcomeric function and compromised myofibrillar ATPase activity as a result of myofilament protein degradation, such

  14. Mechanism of blood-brain barrier impairment after mild traumatic brain injury caused by blast shock waves and its relationship with delayed nerve dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-xi XU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI caused by blast shock waves (BSWs is one of the most common injuries among soldiers in the war. Such mTBI can also happen in civilians if exposed to shock waves of accidental explosion disasters, bomb attacks by terrorists and so on. This injury often results in cognitive problems, memory dysfunction and emotional disorder, and these neurological deficits are closely related to the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The present paper discusses mainly the relationship between dysfunction or disruption of BBB and inflammatory reaction in mild brain injury associated with explosive shock wave and effects of early intervention of oxidative stress injury, repairing the BBB and blocking inflammation on relieving delayed neurological deficits. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.05.15

  15. Bladder Dysfunction and Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Sillén

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this overview the influence of functional bladder disturbances and of its treatment on the resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in children is discussed. Historically both bladder dysfunction entities, the overactive bladder (OAB and the dysfunctional voiding (DV, have been described in conjunction with VUR. Treatment of the dysfunction was also considered to influence spontaneous resolution in a positive way. During the last decades, however, papers have been published which could not support these results. Regarding the OAB, a prospective study with treatment of the bladder overactivity with anticholinergics, did not influence spontaneous resolution rate in children with a dysfunction including also the voiding phase, DV and DES (dysfunctional elimination syndrome, most studies indicate a negative influence on the resolution rate of VUR in children, both before and after the age for bladder control, both with and without treatment. However, a couple of uncontrolled studies indicate that there is a high short-term resolution rate after treatment with flow biofeedback. It should be emphasized that the voiding phase dysfunctions (DV and DES are more severe than the genuine filling phase dysfunction (OAB, with an increased frequency of UTI and renal damage in the former groups. To be able to answer the question if treatment of bladder dysfunction influence the resolution rate of VUR in children, randomized controlled studies must be performed.

  16. Impaired oxidative metabolism and calcium mishandling underlie cardiac dysfunction in a rat model of post-acute isoproterenol-induced cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, B Cicero; Salazar-Cantú, Ayleen; Silva-Platas, Christian; Fernández-Sada, Evaristo; Villegas, César A; Rios-Argaiz, Eduardo; González-Serrano, Pilar; Sánchez, Luis A; Guerrero-Beltrán, Carlos E; García, Noemí; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; García-Rivas, Gerardo J; Altamirano, Julio

    2015-03-01

    Stress-induced cardiomyopathy, triggered by acute catecholamine discharge, is a syndrome characterized by transient, apical ballooning linked to acute heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias. Rats receiving an acute isoproterenol (ISO) overdose (OV) suffer cardiac apex ischemia-reperfusion damage and arrhythmia, and then undergo cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. Nevertheless, the subcellular mechanisms underlying cardiac dysfunction after acute damage subsides are not thoroughly understood. To address this question, Wistar rats received a single ISO injection (67 mg/kg). We found in vivo moderate systolic and diastolic dysfunction at 2 wk post-ISO-OV; however, systolic dysfunction recovered after 4 wk, while diastolic dysfunction worsened. At 2 wk post-ISO-OV, cardiac function was assessed ex vivo, while mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and stress were assessed in vitro, and Ca(2+) handling in ventricular myocytes. These were complemented with sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), phospholamban (PLB), and RyR2 expression studies. Ex vivo, basal mechanical performance index (MPI) and oxygen consumption rate (MVO2) were unchanged. Nevertheless, upon increase of metabolic demand, by β-adrenergic stimulation (1-100 nM ISO), the MPI versus MVO2 relation decreased and shifted to the right, suggesting MPI and mitochondrial energy production uncoupling. Mitochondria showed decreased oxidative metabolism, membrane fragility, and enhanced oxidative stress. Myocytes presented systolic and diastolic Ca(2+) mishandling, and blunted response to ISO (100 nM), and all these without apparent changes in SERCA, PLB, or RyR2 expression. We suggest that post-ISO-OV mitochondrial dysfunction may underlie decreased cardiac contractility, mainly by depletion of ATP needed for myofilaments and Ca(2+) transport by SERCA, while exacerbated oxidative stress may enhance diastolic RyR2 activity.

  17. Myostatin dysfunction impairs force generation in extensor digitorum longus muscle and increases exercise-induced protein efflux from extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltusnikas, Juozas; Kilikevicius, Audrius; Venckunas, Tomas; Fokin, Andrej; Bünger, Lutz; Lionikas, Arimantas; Ratkevicius, Aivaras

    2015-08-01

    Myostatin dysfunction promotes muscle hypertrophy, which can complicate assessment of muscle properties. We examined force generating capacity and creatine kinase (CK) efflux from skeletal muscles of young mice before they reach adult body and muscle size. Isolated soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of Berlin high (BEH) mice with dysfunctional myostatin, i.e., homozygous for inactivating myostatin mutation, and with a wild-type myostatin (BEH+/+) were studied. The muscles of BEH mice showed faster (P contraction times compared with BEH+/+ mice, but only EDL displayed lower (P muscle force generating capacity in EDL and increases susceptibility of SOL and EDL to protein loss after exercise.

  18. Sexual dysfunction with antihypertensive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisant, L M; Carr, A A; Bottini, P B; Solursh, D S; Solursh, L P

    1994-04-11

    The relationship of antihypertensive drugs have a long history of association with sexual dysfunction; however, this relationship is poorly documented. There appears to be a higher rate of sexual dysfunction in untreated hypertensive men compared with normotensive men. Sexual dysfunction increases with age and is associated with physical and emotional symptoms. There are few studies assessing sexual dysfunction with female and African-American hypertensive patients. Sexual dysfunction is associated with impairment of quality of life and noncompliance. Since group data may hide individual drug effects, baseline data should be collected on all patients before initiating therapy with any antihypertensive agent. Although questionnaires may not provide objective information on sexual dysfunction, the response rate to direct questioning may be less than the response rate on a questionnaire and may be affected by the gender or race of the interviewer. Research protocols using a double-blind, placebo-controlled design should assess sexual dysfunction in men and women in a standardized fashion.

  19. Rescue of Impaired Fear Extinction and Normalization of Cortico-Amygdala Circuit Dysfunction in a Genetic Mouse Model by Dietary Zinc Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Whittle, Nigel; Hauschild, Markus; Lubec, Gert; Holmes, Andrew; Singewald, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Fear extinction is impaired in neuropsychiatric disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder. Identifying drugs that facilitate fear extinction in animal models provides leads for novel pharmacological treatments for these disorders. Zinc (Zn) is expressed in neurons in a cortico-amygdala circuit mediating fear extinction, and modulates neurotransmitter systems regulating extinction. We previously found that the 129S1/SvImJ mouse strain (S1) exhibited a profound impairment in fear extin...

  20. Impairment-Factor-Based Audiovisual Quality Model for IPTV: Influence of Video Resolution, Degradation Type, and Content Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia MN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an audiovisual quality model for IPTV services. The model estimates the audiovisual quality of standard and high definition video as perceived by the user. The model is developed for applications such as network planning and packet-layer quality monitoring. It mainly covers audio and video compression artifacts and impairments due to packet loss. The quality tests conducted for model development demonstrate a mutual influence of the perceived audio and video quality, and the predominance of the video quality for the overall audiovisual quality. The balance between audio quality and video quality, however, depends on the content, the video format, and the audio degradation type. The proposed model is based on impairment factors which quantify the quality-impact of the different degradations. The impairment factors are computed from parameters extracted from the bitstream or packet headers. For high definition video, the model predictions show a correlation with unknown subjective ratings of 95%. For comparison, we have developed a more classical audiovisual quality model which is based on the audio and video qualities and their interaction. Both quality- and impairment-factor-based models are further refined by taking the content-type into account. At last, the different model variants are compared with modeling approaches described in the literature.

  1. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment via inhibition of isoflurane-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in ATP levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Hou, Lengchen; Chen, Dan; Lin, Fuqing; Chang, Tao; Li, Mengzhu; Zhang, Lingling; Niu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Huiying; Fu, Shukun; Zheng, Junhua

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The inhaled general anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce caspase-3 activation in vitro and in vivo. The underlying mechanisms and functional consequences of this activity remain unclear. Isoflurane can induce caspase-3 activation by causing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of hydrogen, a novel antioxidant, against isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment. Methods: H4 human neuroglioma cells overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein were treated with saline or hydrogen-rich saline (HS, 300 μM), with or without 2% isoflurane, for 6 h or 3 h. Western blot analysis, fluorescence assays, and a mitochondrial swelling assay were used to evaluate caspase-3 activation, levels of ROS and ATP, and mitochondrial function. The effect of the interaction of isoflurane (1.4% for 2 h) and HS (5 mL/kg) on cognitive function in mice was also evaluated using a fear conditioning test. Results: We found that HS attenuated isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation. Moreover, HS treatment mitigated isoflurane-induced ROS accumulation, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores, reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduction in cellular ATP levels. Finally, HS significantly alleviated isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in mice. Conclusions: Our results suggest that HS attenuates isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and cognitive impairment via inhibition of isoflurane-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and reduction in ATP levels. These findings warrant further research into the underlying mechanisms of this activity, and indicate that HS has the potential to attenuate anesthesia neurotoxicity.

  2. Cardiac diastolic dysfunction in high-fat diet fed mice is associated with lipotoxicity without impairment of cardiac energetics in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdurrachim, Desiree; Ciapaite, Jolita; Wessels, Bart; Nabben, Miranda; Luiken, Joost J. F. P.; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is often associated with abnormalities in cardiac morphology and function. This study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related cardiomyopathy is caused by impaired cardiac energetics. In a mouse model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, we applied in vivo cardiac P-31 magnetic resonanc

  3. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Constantin; Popa, Florian; Grigorean, Valentin Titus; Onose, Gelu; Sandu, Aurelia Mihaela; Popescu, Mihai; Burnei, Gheorghe; Strambu, Victor; Sinescu, Crina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1-L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life-threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5-T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha-adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as deep vein

  4. Xanthoceraside Ameliorates Mitochondrial Dysfunction Contributing to the Improvement of Learning and Memory Impairment in Mice with Intracerebroventricular Injection of Aβ1-42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Fei Ji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of xanthoceraside on learning and memory impairment were investigated and the possible mechanism associated with the protection of mitochondria was also preliminarily explored in Alzheimer’s disease (AD mice model induced by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. injection of Aβ1-42. The results indicated that xanthoceraside (0.08–0.32 mg/kg significantly improved learning and memory impairment in Morris water maze test and Y-maze test. Xanthoceraside significantly reversed the aberrant decrease of ATP levels and attenuated the abnormal increase of ROS levels both in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus in mice injected with Aβ1-42. Moreover, xanthoceraside dose dependently reversed the decrease of COX, PDHC, and KGDHC activity in isolated cerebral cortex mitochondria of the mice compared with Aβ1-42 injected model mice. In conclusion, xanthoceraside could improve learning and memory impairment, promote the function of mitochondria, decrease the production of ROS, and inhibit oxidative stress. The improvement effects on mitochondria may be through withstanding the damage of Aβ to mitochondrial respiratory chain and the key enzymes in Kreb’s cycle. Therefore, the results from present study and previous study indicate that xanthoceraside could be a competitive candidate for the treatment of AD.

  5. Hypothalamic dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common causes of hypothalamic dysfunction are surgery, traumatic brain injury, tumors, and radiation. Other causes include: Anorexia nervosa or bulimia Bleeding Genetic disorders that cause iron ...

  6. Impairment of insulin-stimulated Akt/GLUT4 signaling is associated with cardiac contractile dysfunction and aggravates I/R injury in STZ-diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Jen-Ying

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, we established systemic in-vivo evidence from molecular to organism level to explain how diabetes can aggravate myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury and revealed the role of insulin signaling (with specific focus on Akt/GLUT4 signaling molecules. The myocardial I/R injury was induced by the left main coronary artery occlusion for 1 hr and then 3 hr reperfusion in control, streptozotocin (STZ-induced insulinopenic diabetes, and insulin-treated diabetic rats. The diabetic rats showed a significant decrease in heart rate, and a prolonged isovolumic relaxation (tau which lead to decrease in cardiac output (CO without changing total peripheral resistance (TPR. The phosphorylated Akt and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT 4 protein levels were dramatically reduced in both I/R and non-I/R diabetic rat hearts. Insulin treatment in diabetes showed improvement of contractile function as well as partially increased Akt phosphorylation and GLUT 4 protein levels. In the animals subjected to I/R, the mortality rates were 25%, 65%, and 33% in the control, diabetic, and insulin-treated diabetic group respectively. The I/R-induced arrhythmias and myocardial infarction did not differ significantly between the control and the diabetic groups. Consistent with its anti-hyperglycemic effects, insulin significantly reduced I/R-induced arrhythmias but had no effect on I/R-induced infarctions. Diabetic rat with I/R exhibited the worse hemodynamic outcome, which included systolic and diastolic dysfunctions. Insulin treatment only partially improved diastolic functions and elevated P-Akt and GLUT 4 protein levels. Our results indicate that cardiac contractile dysfunction caused by a defect in insulin-stimulated Akt/GLUT4 may be a major reason for the high mortality rate in I/R injured diabetic rats.

  7. The combined effect of hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus on aortic stiffness and endothelial dysfunction: an integrated study with high-resolution MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yan; Lin, Jiang; Xu, Pengju; Zeng, Mengsu; Lin, Huandong; Yan, Hongmei

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined effect of hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) on aortic stiffness and endothelial dysfunction by using an integrated MRI approach. A total of 31 non-hypertensive DM2 patients and 31 hypertensive DM2 patients underwent 3.0-T MRI. Aortic distensibility (AD), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were assessed. Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, chi-squared test, Pearson correlation analysis, and univariable and multiple linear regression analyses were used for statistical analyses. The hypertensive patients showed lower AD at multiple levels (ascending aorta [AA]: 2.07±0.98×10(-3)mm Hg(-1) vs. 3.21±1.70×10(-3)mm Hg(-1), pHypertension has a contributive effect on aortic stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in DM2 patients. © 2013.

  8. Impaired Insulin Signaling is Associated with Hepatic Mitochondrial Dysfunction in IR+/−-IRS-1+/− Double Heterozygous (IR-IRS1dh Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Franko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a pivotal role in energy metabolism, but whether insulin signaling per se could regulate mitochondrial function has not been identified yet. To investigate whether mitochondrial function is regulated by insulin signaling, we analyzed muscle and liver of insulin receptor (IR+/−-insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1+/− double heterozygous (IR-IRS1dh mice, a well described model for insulin resistance. IR-IRS1dh mice were studied at the age of 6 and 12 months and glucose metabolism was determined by glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Mitochondrial enzyme activities, oxygen consumption, and membrane potential were assessed using spectrophotometric, respirometric, and proton motive force analysis, respectively. IR-IRS1dh mice showed elevated serum insulin levels. Hepatic mitochondrial oxygen consumption was reduced in IR-IRS1dh animals at 12 months of age. Furthermore, 6-month-old IR-IRS1dh mice demonstrated enhanced mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle, but a tendency of impaired glucose tolerance. On the other hand, 12-month-old IR-IRS1dh mice showed improved glucose tolerance, but normal muscle mitochondrial function. Our data revealed that deficiency in IR/IRS-1 resulted in normal or even elevated skeletal muscle, but impaired hepatic mitochondrial function, suggesting a direct cross-talk between insulin signaling and mitochondria in the liver.

  9. Differentiation of the ILO boundary chest roentgenograph (0/1 to 1/0) in asbestosis by high-resolution computed tomography scan, alveolitis, and respiratory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkin, T J; McGuinness, G; Goldring, R; Cohen, H; Parker, J E; Crane, M; Naidich, D P; Rom, W N

    1996-01-01

    High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans have been advocated as providing greater sensitivity in detecting parenchymal opacities in asbestos-exposed individuals, especially in the presence of pleural fibrosis, and having excellent inter- and intraobserver reader interpretation. We compared the 1980 International Labor Organization (ILO) International Classification of the Radiographs of the Pneumoconioses for asbestosis with the high-resolution CT scan using a grid scoring system to better differentiate normal versus abnormal in the ILO boundary 0/1 to 1/0 chest roentgenograph. We studied 37 asbestos-exposed individuals using the ILO classification, HRCT grid scores, respiratory symptom questionnaires, pulmonary function tests, and bronchoalveolar lavage. We used Pearson correlation coefficients to evaluate the linear relationship between outcome variables and each roentgenographic method. The normal HRCT scan proved to be an excellent predictor of "normality," with pulmonary function values close to 100% for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), total lung capacity (TLC), and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) and no increase in BAL inflammatory cells. Concordant HRCT/ILO abnormalities were associated with reduced FEV1/FVC ratio, reduced diffusing capacity, and alveolitis consistent with a definition of asbestosis. In our study, the ILO classification and HRCT grid scores were both excellent modalities for the assessment of asbestosis and its association with impaired physiology and alveolitis, with their combined use providing statistical associations with alveolitis and reduced diffusing capacity.

  10. Tau-driven 26S proteasome impairment and cognitive dysfunction can be prevented early in disease by activating cAMP-PKA signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myeku, Natura; Clelland, Catherine L; Emrani, Sheina; Kukushkin, Nikolay V; Yu, Wai Haung; Goldberg, Alfred L; Duff, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) degrades misfolded proteins including those implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the effects of tau accumulation on proteasome function in a mouse model of tauopathy and in a cross to a UPS reporter mouse (line Ub-G76V-GFP). Accumulation of insoluble tau was associated with a decrease in the peptidase activity of brain 26S proteasomes, higher levels of ubiquitinated proteins and undegraded Ub-G76V-GFP. 26S proteasomes from mice with tauopathy were physically associated with tau and were less active in hydrolyzing ubiquitinated proteins, small peptides and ATP. 26S proteasomes from normal mice incubated with recombinant oligomers or fibrils also showed lower hydrolyzing capacity in the same assays, implicating tau as a proteotoxin. Administration of an agent that activates cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling led to attenuation of proteasome dysfunction, probably through proteasome subunit phosphorylation. In vivo, this led to lower levels of aggregated tau and improvements in cognitive performance.

  11. Short-Term Memory Impairment and Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Dysfunction in the Orthostatic Position: A Single Case Study of Sinking Skin Flap Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Sebastianelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a patient who underwent craniectomy for hemorrhage of the left parietal lobe. Three weeks later, orthostatic memory impairment was detected as initial symptom of sinking skin flap syndrome (SSFS. This deficit was examined by neuropsychological testing and associated with a posture-dependent increase in the delta/alpha ratio at the F3 electrode, an electroencephalographic (EEG index related to brain hypoperfusion. This EEG spectral alteration was detected in a brain region that includes the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, an area known to be involved in memory processing; therefore we hypothesize that SSFS induced reversible hypoperfusion of this otherwise undamaged cortical region. Neither of these findings was present after cranioplasty. This case suggests that SSFS may induce neuropsychological deficits potentially influencing outcome in the postacute phase and is further evidence supporting the clinical benefits of early cranioplasty.

  12. Endothelial Dysfunction in Renal Failure: Current Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radenkovic, Miroslav; Stojanovic, Marko; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is principally characterized by impaired endothelium- dependent transduction mechanisms related to vascular relaxation, as an outcome of decreased release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors, mainly nitric oxide, as well as augmented oxidative stress, increased inflammation and predominance of vascular action produced by endothelium-derived contracting factors. Current data strongly suggest that pathological development of different types of kidney impairment with further progression to renal failure includes notable vascular changes associated with endothelial dysfunction. In accordance, this scientific field represents an advancing area of investigation, involving different biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction linked to renal impairment, as well as clinical findings with new information that can provide a more comprehensive understanding of the role of endothelial dysfunction in kidney disease. With regards to quoted facts, the aim of this article was to review the latest data related to endothelial dysfunction and renal failure by selection of relevant articles released from 2010 to 2015.

  13. Erectile dysfunction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that increase blood flow to the penis. The blood ... The pressure of the blood in the chambers makes the ... What are the risk factors for erectile dysfunction? The most .... losing excessive weight and increasing physical activity, may improve the ...

  14. Etiology and Management of Sexual Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kumar Muthugaduru Shivarudrappa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dysfunction is the impairment or disruption of any of the three phases of normal sexual functioning, including loss of libido, impairment of physiological arousal and loss, delay or alteration of orgasm. Each one of these can be affected by an orchestra of factors like senility, medical and surgical illnesses, medications and drugs of abuse. Non-pharmacological therapy is the main stay in the treatment of sexual dysfunction and drugs are used as adjuncts for a quicker and better result. Management in many of the cases depends on the primary cause. Here is a review of the major etiological factors of sexual dysfunction and its management

  15. Understanding taste dysfunction in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Laura; Mahon, Suzanne M

    2012-04-01

    Taste dysfunction is a significant but underestimated issue for patients with cancer. Impaired taste results in changes in diet and appetite, early satiety, and impaired social interactions. Nurses can play a key role in educating patients and families on the pathophysiology of taste dysfunction by suggesting interventions to treat the consequences of taste dysfunction, when available, and offering psychosocial support as patients cope with this often devastating consequence of treatment. Taste recognition helps humans identify the nutritional quality of food and signals the digestive tract to begin secreting enzymes. Spoiled or tainted foods typically are recognized by their bad taste. Along with the other sensory systems, taste is crucial for helping patients treated for cancer feel normal. This article will review the anatomy and physiology of taste; define the different types of taste dysfunction, including the underlying pathophysiologic basis related to cancer treatment; and discuss potential nursing interventions to manage the consequences of taste dysfunction.

  16. Oral Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 規子; スズキ, ノリコ; Noriko, SUZUKI

    2004-01-01

    The major oral functions can be categorized as mastication, swallowing, speech and respiratory functions. Dysfunction of these results in dysphagia, speech disorders and abnormal respiration (such as Sleep Apnea). These functions relate to dentistry in the occurrence of : (1) oral preparatory and oral phases, (2) articulation disorders and velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI), and (3) mouth breathing, respiratory and blowing disorders. These disorders are related to oral and maxillofacial diseas...

  17. Immune Dysfunction in Uremia—An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Cohen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kidney dysfunction leads to disturbed renal metabolic activities and to impaired glomerular filtration, resulting in the retention of toxic solutes affecting all organs of the body. Cardiovascular disease (CVD and infections are the main causes for the increased occurrence of morbidity and mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Both complications are directly or indirectly linked to a compromised immune defense. The specific coordinated roles of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, monocytes/macrophages, lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells (APCs in maintaining an efficient immune response are affected. Their normal response can be impaired, giving rise to infectious diseases or pre-activated/primed, leading to inflammation and consequently to CVD. Whereas the coordinated removal via apoptosis of activated immune cells is crucial for the resolution of inflammation, inappropriately high apoptotic rates lead to a diminished immune response. In uremia, the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory and between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors is disturbed. This review summarizes the interrelated parameters interfering with the immune response in uremia, with a special focus on the non-specific immune response and the role of uremic toxins.

  18. Immune dysfunction in uremia—an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Gerald; Hörl, Walter H

    2012-10-24

    Kidney dysfunction leads to disturbed renal metabolic activities and to impaired glomerular filtration, resulting in the retention of toxic solutes affecting all organs of the body. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections are the main causes for the increased occurrence of morbidity and mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Both complications are directly or indirectly linked to a compromised immune defense. The specific coordinated roles of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs), monocytes/macrophages, lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in maintaining an efficient immune response are affected. Their normal response can be impaired, giving rise to infectious diseases or pre-activated/primed, leading to inflammation and consequently to CVD. Whereas the coordinated removal via apoptosis of activated immune cells is crucial for the resolution of inflammation, inappropriately high apoptotic rates lead to a diminished immune response. In uremia, the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory and between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors is disturbed. This review summarizes the interrelated parameters interfering with the immune response in uremia, with a special focus on the non-specific immune response and the role of uremic toxins.

  19. Persistent activation of microglia and NADPH oxidase [corrected] drive hippocampal dysfunction in experimental multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Filippo, Massimiliano; de Iure, Antonio; Giampà, Carmela; Chiasserini, Davide; Tozzi, Alessandro; Orvietani, Pier Luigi; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Tantucci, Michela; Durante, Valentina; Quiroga-Varela, Ana; Mancini, Andrea; Costa, Cinzia; Sarchielli, Paola; Fusco, Francesca Romana; Calabresi, Paolo

    2016-02-18

    Cognitive impairment is common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Unfortunately, the synaptic and molecular mechanisms underlying MS-associated cognitive dysfunction are largely unknown. We explored the presence and the underlying mechanism of cognitive and synaptic hippocampal dysfunction during the remission phase of experimental MS. Experiments were performed in a chronic-relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS, after the resolution of motor deficits. Immunohistochemistry and patch-clamp recordings were performed in the CA1 hippocampal area. The hole-board was utilized as cognitive/behavioural test. In the remission phase of experimental MS, hippocampal microglial cells showed signs of activation, CA1 hippocampal synapses presented an impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and an alteration of spatial tests became evident. The activation of hippocampal microglia mediated synaptic and cognitive/behavioural alterations during EAE. Specifically, LTP blockade was found to be caused by the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. We suggest that in the remission phase of experimental MS microglia remains activated, causing synaptic dysfunctions mediated by NADPH oxidase. Inhibition of microglial activation and NADPH oxidase may represent a promising strategy to prevent neuroplasticity impairment associated with active neuro-inflammation, with the aim to improve cognition and counteract MS disease progression.

  20. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal and ventral (occipito-temporal pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction, complete Balint's syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right . Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD.

  1. Early Myocardial Dysfunction is Not Caused by Mitochondrial Abnormalities in a Rat Model of Peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeding, Lonneke; van der Laarse, Willem J.; van Veelen, Toke A.; Lamberts, Regis R.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan; Plotz, Frans B.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections are prone to develop multiple organ failure, including myocardial dysfunction. We hypothesized that early dysfunction during sepsis is associated with inflammation, mitochondrial injury, impaired mitochondrial function, and activation

  2. Modeling Cognitive Dysfunction in Neurofibromatosis-1

    OpenAIRE

    Diggs-Andrews, Kelly A.; David H Gutmann

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction, including significant impairments in learning, behavior, and attention, is found in over 10% of children in the general population. However, in the common inherited cancer predisposition syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the prevalence of these cognitive deficits approaches 70%. As a monogenic disorder, NF1 provides a unique genetic tool to identify and mechanistically dissect the molecular and cellular bases underlying cognitive dysfunction. In this review, we ...

  3. Cerebral energy metabolism during induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Bindslev, TT; Pedersen, S M

    2013-01-01

    In patients with traumatic brain injury as well as stroke, impaired cerebral oxidative energy metabolism may be an important factor contributing to the ultimate degree of tissue damage. We hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction can be diagnosed bedside by comparing the simultaneous changes in...... in brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) and cerebral cytoplasmatic redox state. The study describes cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by sevoflurane in piglets....

  4. Mechanisms of oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljkovic, Z; Gokce, N; Loscalzo, J

    2003-01-01

    The endothelium regulates vascular homoeostasis through local elaboration of mediators that modulate vascular tone, platelet adhesion, inflammation, fibrinolysis, and vascular growth. Impaired vascular function contributes to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes. There is growing pathophysiological evidence that increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress participates in proatherogenic mechanisms of vascular dysfunction and atherothrombosis. In this review, the role of oxidative stress in mechanisms of vascular dysfunction is discussed, and potential antioxidant strategies are reviewed. PMID:12743334

  5. Diabetic bladder dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiming Liu; Firouz Daneshgari

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review studies on diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD),a common and bothersome complication of diabetes mellitus.Data sources We performed a search of the English literature through PubMed.The key words used were "diabetes" and "bladder dysfunction" or "cystopathy".Our own data and perspective are included in the discussion.Study selection Studies containing data relevant to DBD were selected.Because of the limited length of this article,we also referenced reviews that contain comprehensive amalgamations of relevant literature.Results The classic symptoms of DBD are decreased bladder sensation,increased bladder capacity,and impaired bladder emptying with resultant elevated post-void residual urine.However,recent clinical and experimental evidence indicate a strong presence of storage problems such as urge incontinence in diabetes.Recent studies of DBD in animal models of type 1 diabetes have revealed temporal effects of diabetes,causing an early phase of compensatory bladder function and a later phase of decompensated bladder function.The pathophysiology of DBD is multifactorial,including disturbances of the detrusor,urothelium,autonomic nerves,and urethra.Polyuria and hyperglycemia play important but distinctive roles in induction of bladder dysfunction in type 1 diabetes.Polyuria causes significant bladder hypertrophy in the early stage of diabetes,whereas oxidative stress in the bladder caused by chronic hyperglycemia may play an important role in the late stage failure of bladder function.Conclusions DBD includes time-dependent and mixed manifestations.The pathological alterations include muscle,nerve,and urothelium.Polyuria and hyperglycemia independently contribute to the pathogenesis of DBD.Treatments for DBD are limited.Future clinical studies on DBD in type 1 and type 2 diabetes should be investigated separately.Animal studies of DBD in type 2 diabetes are needed,from the natural history to mechanisms.Further understanding of the molecular

  6. Endothelial dysfunction in morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauricio, Maria Dolores; Aldasoro, Martin; Ortega, Joaquin; Vila, José María

    2013-01-01

    Morbid obesity is a chronic multifunctional disease characterized by an accumulation of fat. Epidemiological studies have shown that obesity is associated with cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Endothelial dysfunction, as defined by an imbalance between relaxing and contractile endothelial factors, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of these cardiometabolic diseases. Diminished bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) contributes to endothelial dysfunction and impairs endothelium- dependent vasodilatation. But this is not the only mechanism that drives to endothelial dysfunction. Obesity has been associated with a chronic inflammatory process, atherosclerosis, and oxidative stress. Moreover levels of asymmetrical dimethyl-L-arginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), are elevated in obesity. On the other hand, increasing prostanoid-dependent vasoconstriction and decreasing vasodilator prostanoids also lead to endothelial dysfunction in obesity. Other mechanisms related to endothelin-1 (ET-1) or endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) have been proposed. Bariatric surgery (BS) is a safe and effective means to achieve significant weight loss, but its use is limited only to patients with severe obesity including morbid obesity. BS also proved efficient in endothelial dysfunction reduction improving cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities associated with morbid obesity such as diabetes, coronary artery disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and cancer. This review will provide a brief overview of the mechanisms that link obesity with endothelial dysfunction, and how weight loss is a cornerstone treatment for cardiovascular comorbidities obesity-related. A better understanding of the mechanisms of obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction may help develop new therapeutic strategies to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  7. 不同类型的血管性认知损害的执行功能障碍%Executive dysfunction in different subtypes of vascular cognitive impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭起浩; 金丽琳; 傅建辉; 周燕; 赵倩华; 洪震

    2009-01-01

    目的 分析不同类型的血管性认知功能损害(VCI)患者的执行功能损害特征.方法 经头颅MRI证实为皮质下缺血性小血管病(SIVD)患者64例,其中16例单一的执行功能损害(s-VCI-ND)、26例多个认知领域损害(m-VCI-ND)和22例血管性痴呆(VaD)患者,完成一系列神经心理测验,包括总体认知水平、记忆、语言、注意/执行功能、空间结构能力等各个认知领域.其中执行功能检查包括定势转移、优势抑制、工作记忆、概念形成和流畅性5个分因子,共15种独立的分测验.结果 汉诺塔测验、示踪排序测验、同步听觉连续加法测验等在非痴呆VCI(VCI-ND)患者中的完成率低于50%,不适合VCI-ND的检测;s-VCI-ND组与健康对照组比较,分别反映4种执行功能成分的连线测验B耗时数(216.5±69.3、137.4±37.9)、Stroop色词测验卡片C耗时数(115.4±30.1、72.9±17.5)、卡片分类测验(1.9±1.4、2.7±1.2)和范畴流畅性测验(列举动物14.2±2.3、17.7±4.4)差异具有统计学意义(t=4.73、5.72、2.04、3.53,均P<0.05);VCI-ND的认知表现介于健康老人组和VaD组之间,其中m-VCI-ND有比较严重的执行功能损害和情景与语义记忆障碍,其认知缺损模式接近VaD,很可能是VaD的前期状态.结论 SIVD所致VCI的执行功能损害缺乏选择性,部分执行功能测验可以作为早期检测VCI-ND的敏感工具.%Objective To investigate the executive function features of different subtypes of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Methods Sixty-four subjects with subcortical ischaemic vascular disease (SIVD) presumed by medical history and neuroimaging (cranial MRI) were recruited. The clinical and neuropsychological features of the 4 groups were compared: cognitive normal control (n=25), simple executive impairment of VCI-ND (s-VCI-ND, n=16), multi-domain impairment of VCI-ND (m-VCI-ND, n=26) and vascular dementia (VaD) patients (n=22). All participants underwent neuropsychological

  8. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou YM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yong-ming Zou, Da Lu, Li-ping Liu, Hui-hong Zhang, Yu-ying Zhou Department of Neurology, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. Keywords: olfactory dysfunction, Alzheimer’s disease, olfactory testing, progress

  9. [Hypothalamic dysfunction in obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande-Lee, Simone; Velloso, Licio A

    2012-08-01

    Obesity, defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair life quality, is one of the major public health problems worldwide. It results from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure. The control of energy balance in animals and humans is performed by the central nervous system (CNS) by means of neuroendocrine connections, in which circulating peripheral hormones, such as leptin and insulin, provide signals to specialized neurons of the hypothalamus reflecting body fat stores, and induce appropriate responses to maintain the stability of these stores. The majority of obesity cases are associated with central resistance to both leptin and insulin actions. In experimental animals, high-fat diets can induce an inflammatory process in the hypothalamus, which impairs leptin and insulin intracellular signaling pathways, and results in hyperphagia, decreased energy expenditure and, ultimately, obesity. Recent evidence obtained from neuroimaging studies and assessment of inflammatory markers in the cerebrospinal fluid of obese subjects suggests that similar alterations may be also present in humans. In this review, we briefly present the mechanisms involved with the loss of homeostatic control of energy balance in animal models of obesity, and the current evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction in obese humans.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legido, Agustín; Jethva, Reena; Goldenthal, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Using data of the current prevalence of autism as 200:10,000 and a 1:2000 incidence of definite mitochondrial (mt) disease, if there was no linkage of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and mt disease, it would be expected that 1 in 110 subjects with mt disease would have ASD and 1 in 2000 individuals with ASD would have mt disease. The co-occurrence of autism and mt disease is much higher than these figures, suggesting a possible pathogenetic relationship. Such hypothesis was initially suggested by the presence of biochemical markers of abnormal mt metabolic function in patients with ASD, including elevation of lactate, pyruvate, or alanine levels in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or brain; carnitine level in plasma; and level of organic acids in urine, and by demonstrating impaired mt fatty acid β-oxidation. More recently, mtDNA genetic mutations or deletions or mutations of nuclear genes regulating mt function have been associated with ASD in patients or in neuropathologic studies on the brains of patients with autism. In addition, the presence of dysfunction of the complexes of the mt respiratory chain or electron transport chain, indicating abnormal oxidative phosphorylation, has been reported in patients with ASD and in the autopsy samples of brains. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms linking mt dysfunction and ASD include mt activation of the immune system, abnormal mt Ca(2+) handling, and mt-induced oxidative stress. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of brain development may also be disrupted by mt dysfunction, including mt-induced oxidative stress. The role of the purinergic system linking mt dysfunction and ASD is currently under investigation. In summary, there is genetic and biochemical evidence for a mitochondria (mt) role in the pathogenesis of ASD in a subset of children. To determine the prevalence and type of genetic and biochemical mt defects in ASD, there is a need for further research using the latest genetic technology such as next

  11. Autonomic dysfunction in acute ischemic stroke : An underexplored therapeutic area?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, Sylvie; De Vos, Aurelie; De Keyser, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Impaired autonomic function, characterized by a predominance of sympathetic activity, is common in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This review describes methods to measure autonomic dysfunction in stroke patients. It summarizes a potential relationship between ischemic stroke-associated

  12. Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Visual Impairment KidsHealth > For Teens > Visual Impairment Print A A ... with the brain, making vision impossible. What Is Visual Impairment? Many people have some type of visual problem ...

  13. Sepsis-induced brain dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Nicolas; Kandelman, Stanislas; Mantz, Jean; Chrétien, Fabrice; Sharshar, Tarek

    2013-02-01

    Systemic infection is often revealed by or associated with brain dysfunction, which is characterized by alteration of consciousness, ranging from delirium to coma, seizure or focal neurological signs. Its pathophysiology involves an ischemic process, secondary to impairment of cerebral perfusion and its determinants and a neuroinflammatory process that includes endothelial activation, alteration of the blood-brain barrier and passage of neurotoxic mediators. Microcirculatory dysfunction is common to these two processes. This brain dysfunction is associated with increased mortality, morbidity and long-term cognitive disability. Its diagnosis relies essentially on neurological examination that can lead to specific investigations, including electrophysiological testing or neuroimaging. In practice, cerebrospinal fluid analysis is indisputably required when meningitis is suspected. Hepatic, uremic or respiratory encephalopathy, metabolic disturbances, drug overdose, sedative or opioid withdrawal, alcohol withdrawal delirium or Wernicke's encephalopathy are the main differential diagnoses. Currently, treatment consists mainly of controlling sepsis. The effects of insulin therapy and steroids need to be assessed. Various drugs acting on sepsis-induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction, brain oxidative stress and inflammation have been tested in septic animals but not yet in patients.

  14. Dysfunctional Reward Processing in Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admon, Roee; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia - diminished pleasure and/or decreased reactivity to pleasurable stimuli - is a core feature of depression that frequently persists after treatment. As a result, extensive effort has been directed towards characterizing the psychological and biological processes that mediate dysfunctional reward processing in depression. Reward processing can be parsed into sub-components that include motivation, reinforcement learning, and hedonic capacity, which, according to preclinical and neuroimaging evidence, involve partially dissociable brain systems. In line with this, recent findings indicate that behavioral impairments and neural abnormalities in depression vary across distinct reward-related constructs. Ultimately, improved understanding of precise reward-related dysfunctions in depression promises to improve diagnostic and therapeutic efforts in depression. PMID:26258159

  15. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noura eEl Khoury

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF. NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD.Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99% is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease.Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM and type 2 diabetes (T2DM are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment.Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting on Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia.

  16. Resolution of Angina Pectoris and Improvement of the Coronary Flow Reserve after Ranolazine Treatment in a Woman with Isolated Impaired Coronary Microcirculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Santoro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a 61-year-old woman with well controlled arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and smoke and suffering from recurrent angina pectoris despite angiographically normal epicardial coronary vessels and maximal therapy, the replacement of nitrates with novel antiangina drug ranolazine, after 6-month therapy, induced a complete relief of angina and a relevant rising of the transthoracic Doppler-derived coronary flow reserve (CFR. The present clinical case underlines therefore how in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease without epicardial coronary stenosis ranolazine can induce an improvement till the complete solution of the angina symptoms and a substantial increase of CFR as expression of the enhancement of the microvascular coronary function. The improvement of both symptoms and coronary microvascular function is strictly linked to the mechanism of action of the drug. Ranolazine induces in fact a reduction of the intracellular late sodium current that leads to a reduction of the intracellular calcium concentration thus producing a better myocardial diastolic relaxation process which in its turns enhances the myocardial perfusion. The ranolazine acts therefore as a lusitropic drug that improves the diastolic dysfunction and the segmental ischemia thus affecting one of the first steps of the ischemic cascade.

  17. Dysfunction of Rapid Neural Adaptation in Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrachione, Tyler K; Del Tufo, Stephanie N; Winter, Rebecca; Murtagh, Jack; Cyr, Abigail; Chang, Patricia; Halverson, Kelly; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Christodoulou, Joanna A; Gabrieli, John D E

    2016-12-21

    Identification of specific neurophysiological dysfunctions resulting in selective reading difficulty (dyslexia) has remained elusive. In addition to impaired reading development, individuals with dyslexia frequently exhibit behavioral deficits in perceptual adaptation. Here, we assessed neurophysiological adaptation to stimulus repetition in adults and children with dyslexia for a wide variety of stimuli, spoken words, written words, visual objects, and faces. For every stimulus type, individuals with dyslexia exhibited significantly diminished neural adaptation compared to controls in stimulus-specific cortical areas. Better reading skills in adults and children with dyslexia were associated with greater repetition-induced neural adaptation. These results highlight a dysfunction of rapid neural adaptation as a core neurophysiological difference in dyslexia that may underlie impaired reading development. Reduced neurophysiological adaptation may relate to prior reports of reduced behavioral adaptation in dyslexia and may reveal a difference in brain functions that ultimately results in a specific reading impairment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. α₄β₂ Nicotinic receptor stimulation of the GABAergic system within the orbitofrontal cortex ameliorates the severe crossmodal object recognition impairment in ketamine-treated rats: implications for cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloke, Jacob M; Winters, Boyer D

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with atypical multisensory integration. Rats treated sub-chronically with NMDA receptor antagonists to model schizophrenia are severely impaired on a tactile-to-visual crossmodal object recognition (CMOR) task, and this deficit is reversed by systemic nicotine. The current study assessed the receptor specificity of the ameliorative effect of nicotine in the CMOR task, as well as the potential for nicotinic receptor (nAChR) interactions with GABA and glutamate. Male Long-Evans rats were treated sub-chronically for 10 days with ketamine or saline and then tested on the CMOR task after a 10-day washout. Systemic nicotine given before the sample phase of the CMOR task reversed the ketamine-induced impairment, but this effect was blocked by co-administration of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline at a dosage that itself did not cause impairment. Pre-sample systemic co-administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 did not block the remediating effect of nicotine in ketamine-treated rats. The selective α7 nAChR agonist GTS-21 and α4β2 nAChR agonist ABT-418 were also tested, with only the latter reversing the ketamine impairment dose-dependently; bicuculline also blocked this effect. Similarly, infusions of nicotine or ABT-418 into the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) reversed the CMOR impairment in ketamine-treated rats, and systemic bicuculline blocked the effect of intra-OFC ABT-418. These results suggest that nicotine-induced agonism of α4β2 nAChRs within the OFC ameliorates CMOR deficits in ketamine-treated rats via stimulation of the GABAergic system. The findings of this research may have important implications for understanding the nature and potential treatment of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia.

  19. Endothelial dysfunction: EDCF revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAUL M Vanhoutte

    2008-01-01

    Endothelial cells can initiate contraction (constriction) of the vascular smooth muscle cells that surround them. Such endothelium-dependent, acute increases in contractile tone can be due to the withdrawal of the production of nitric oxide, to the production of vasoconstrictor peptides (angiotensin Ⅱ, endothelin-1), to the formation of oxygen-derived free radicals(superoxide anions) and/or the release of vasoconstrictor metabolites of arachidonic acid. The latter have been termed endothelium-derived contracting factor (EDCF) as they can contribute to moment-to-moment changes in contractile activity of the underlying vascular smooth muscle cells. To judge from animal experiments, EDCF-mediated responses are exacerbated when the production of nitric oxide is impaired as well as by aging, spontaneous hypertension and diabetes. To judge from human studies, they contribute to the blunting of endothelium-dependent vasodilatations in aged subjects and essential hypertensive patients. Since EDCF causes vasoconstriction by activation of the TP-receptors on the vascular smooth muscle cells, selective antagonists at these receptors prevent endothelium-dependent contractions, and curtail the endothelial dysfunction in hypertension and diabetes.

  20. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction Page ( 1 ) Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is one of the most common problems of the foot and ankle. It occurs when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the ...

  1. Female Sexual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Female Sexual Dysfunction February 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors ... Resources Mayo Clinic Cleveland Clinic What is female sexual dysfunction (FSD)? Many women have a low sex ...

  2. Connecting heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and renal dysfunction: the role of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Maaten, Jozine M; Damman, Kevin; Verhaar, Marianne C; Paulus, Walter J; Duncker, Dirk J; Cheng, Caroline; van Heerebeek, Loek; Hillege, Hans L; Lam, Carolyn S P; Navis, Gerjan; Voors, Adriaan A

    2016-06-01

    Renal dysfunction in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is common and is associated with increased mortality. Impaired renal function is also a risk factor for developing HFpEF. A new paradigm for HFpEF, proposing a sequence of events leading to myocardial remodelling and dysfunction in HFpEF, was recently introduced, involving inflammatory, microvascular, and cardiac components. The kidney might play a key role in this systemic process. Renal impairment causes metabolic and systemic derangements in circulating factors, causing an activated systemic inflammatory state and endothelial dysfunction, which may lead to cardiomyocyte stiffening, hypertrophy, and interstitial fibrosis via cross-talk between the endothelium and cardiomyocyte compartments. Here, we review the role of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation to explain the link between renal dysfunction and HFpEF, which allows for identification of new early risk markers, prognostic factors, and unique targets for intervention.

  3. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Initially known as multiple system organ failure, the term multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) was first described in the 1960s in adults with bleeding, respiratory failure, and sepsis. It is defined as "the development of potentially reversible physiologic derangement involving two or more organ systems not involved in the disorder that resulted in ICU admission, and arising in the wake of a potentially life threatening physiologic insult."(3) There are many risk factors predisposing to MODS; however, the most common risk factors are shock due to any cause, sepsis, and tissue hypoperfusion. A dysregulated immune response, or immuneparalysis, in which the homeostasis between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory reaction is lost is thought to be key in the development of MODS. The clinical course and evolution of MODS is dependent on a combination of acquired and genetic factors. There are several nonspecific therapies for the prevention and resolution of MODS, mostly care is supportive. Mortality from MODS in septic pediatric patients varies between 11% and 54%. © 2013 Published by Mosby, Inc.

  4. Vaccination-related shoulder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodor, Marko; Montalvo, Enoch

    2007-01-08

    We present two cases of shoulder pain and weakness following influenza and pneumococcal vaccine injections provided high into the deltoid muscle. Based on ultrasound measurements, we hypothesize that vaccine injected into the subdeltoid bursa caused a periarticular inflammatory response, subacromial bursitis, bicipital tendonitis and adhesive capsulitis. Resolution of symptoms followed corticosteroid injections to the subacromial space, bicipital tendon sheath and glenohumeral joint, followed by physical therapy. We conclude that the upper third of the deltoid muscle should not be used for vaccine injections, and the diagnosis of vaccination-related shoulder dysfunction should be considered in patients presenting with shoulder pain following a vaccination.

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  6. Detrimental ELAVL-1/HuR-dependent GSK3β mRNA stabilization impairs resolution in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Olivia; Burns, Nana; Vadász, István; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Edwards, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is accumulation of protein-rich edema in the distal airspaces and its removal is critical for patient survival. Previous studies have shown a detrimental role of Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK) 3β during ARDS via inhibition of alveolar epithelial protein transport. We hypothesized that post-transcriptional regulation of GSK3β could play a functional role in ARDS resolution. To address this hypothesis, we performed an in silico analysis to identify regulatory genes whose expression correlation to GSK3β messenger RNA utilizing two lung cancer cell line array datasets. Among potential regulatory partners of GSK3β, these studies identified the RNA-binding protein ELAVL-1/HuR (Embryonic Lethal, Abnormal Vision, Drosophila-Like) as a central component in a likely GSK3β signaling network. ELAVL-1/HuR is a RNA-binding protein that selectively binds to AU-rich elements of mRNA and enhances its stability thereby increasing target gene expression. Subsequent studies with siRNA suppression of ELAVL-1/HuR demonstrated deceased GSK3β mRNA and protein expression and improved clearance of FITC-albumin in A549 cells. Conversely, stabilization of ELAVL-1/HuR with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 resulted in induction of GSK3β at mRNA and protein level and attenuated FITC-albumin clearance. Utilizing ventilator-induced lung injury or intra-tracheal installation of hydrochloric acid to induce ARDS in mice, we observed increased mRNA and protein expression of ELAVL-1/HuR and GSK3β. Together, our findings indicate a previously unknown interaction between GSK3β and ELAV-1 during ARDS, and suggest the inhibition of the ELAV-1- GSK3β pathways as a novel ARDS treatment approach. PMID:28196122

  7. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario de la Mata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs describe a heterogeneous group of rare inherited metabolic disorders that result from the absence or loss of function of lysosomal hydrolases or transporters, resulting in the progressive accumulation of undigested material in lysosomes. The accumulation of substances affects the function of lysosomes and other organelles, resulting in secondary alterations such as impairment of autophagy, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and apoptosis. LSDs frequently involve the central nervous system (CNS, where neuronal dysfunction or loss results in progressive neurodegeneration and premature death. Many LSDs exhibit signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, which include mitochondrial morphological changes, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, diminished ATP production and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, reduced autophagic flux may lead to the persistence of dysfunctional mitochondria. Gaucher disease (GD, the LSD with the highest prevalence, is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene that results in defective and insufficient activity of the enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase. Decreased catalytic activity and/or instability of GCase leads to accumulation of glucosylceramide (GlcCer and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph in the lysosomes of macrophage cells and visceral organs. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported to occur in numerous cellular and mouse models of GD. The aim of this manuscript is to review the current knowledge and implications of mitochondrial dysfunction in LSDs.

  8. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin; Bo; Su

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smo-king, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide(NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease.

  9. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaric and 3-methylglutaric acids impair redox status and energy production and transfer in rat heart: relevance for the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa, Mateus Struecker; Seminotti, Bianca; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Parmeggiani, Belisa; Grings, Mateus; Wajner, Moacir; Leipnitz, Guilhian

    2016-09-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase (HL) deficiency is characterized by tissue accumulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric (HMG), and 3-methylglutaric (MGA) acids. Affected patients present cardiomyopathy, whose pathomechanisms are not yet established. We investigated the effects of HMG and MGA on energy and redox homeostasis in rat heart using in vivo and in vitro models. In vivo experiments showed that intraperitoneal administration of HMG and MGA decreased the activities of the respiratory chain complex II and creatine kinase (CK), whereas HMG also decreased the activity of complex II-III. Furthermore, HMG and MGA injection increased reactive species production and carbonyl formation, and decreased glutathione concentrations. Regarding the enzymatic antioxidant defenses, HMG and MGA increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities, while only MGA diminished the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, as well as the protein content of SOD1. Pre-treatment with melatonin (MEL) prevented MGA-induced decrease of CK activity and SOD1 levels. In vitro results demonstrated that HMG and MGA increased reactive species formation, induced lipid peroxidation and decreased glutathione. We also verified that reactive species overproduction and glutathione decrease provoked by HMG and MGA were abrogated by MEL and lipoic acid (LA), while only MEL prevented HMG- and MGA-induced lipoperoxidation. Allopurinol (ALP) also prevented reactive species overproduction caused by both metabolites. Our data provide solid evidence that bioenergetics dysfunction and oxidative stress are induced by HMG and MGA in heart, which may explain the cardiac dysfunction observed in HL deficiency, and also suggest that antioxidant supplementation could be considered as adjuvant therapy for affected patients.

  10. Dysfunctional overnight memory consolidation in ecstasy users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithies, Vanessa; Broadbear, Jillian; Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio; Conduit, Russell

    2014-08-01

    Sleep plays an important role in the consolidation and integration of memory in a process called overnight memory consolidation. Previous studies indicate that ecstasy users have marked and persistent neurocognitive and sleep-related impairments. We extend past research by examining overnight memory consolidation among regular ecstasy users (n=12) and drug naïve healthy controls (n=26). Memory recall of word pairs was evaluated before and after a period of sleep, with and without interference prior to testing. In addition, we assessed neurocognitive performances across tasks of learning, memory and executive functioning. Ecstasy users demonstrated impaired overnight memory consolidation, a finding that was more pronounced following associative interference. Additionally, ecstasy users demonstrated impairments on tasks recruiting frontostriatal and hippocampal neural circuitry, in the domains of proactive interference memory, long-term memory, encoding, working memory and complex planning. We suggest that ecstasy-associated dysfunction in fronto-temporal circuitry may underlie overnight consolidation memory impairments in regular ecstasy users.

  11. Parkinson's Disease and Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Tang, Bei-Sha; Guo, Ji-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by the hallmarks of motor symptoms, such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability. However, through clinical investigations in patients and experimental findings in animal models of Parkinson's disease for years, it is now well recognized that Parkinson's disease is more than just a motor-deficit disorder. The majority of Parkinson's disease patients suffer from nonmotor disabilities, for instance, cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, sensory dysfunction, and sleep disorder. So far, anti-PD prescriptions and surgical treatments have been mainly focusing on motor dysfunctions, leaving cognitive impairment a marginal clinical field. Within the nonmotor symptoms, cognitive impairment is one of the most common and significant aspects of Parkinson's disease, and cognitive deficits such as dysexecutive syndrome and visuospatial disturbances could seriously affect the quality of life, reduce life expectancy, prolong the duration of hospitalization, and therefore increase burdens of caregiver and medical costs. In this review, we have done a retrospective study of the recent related researches on epidemiology, clinical manifestation and diagnosis, genetics, and potential treatment of cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease, aiming to provide a summary of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and make it easy for clinicians to tackle this challenging issue in their future practice.

  12. Parkinson's Disease and Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bei-sha

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by the hallmarks of motor symptoms, such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability. However, through clinical investigations in patients and experimental findings in animal models of Parkinson's disease for years, it is now well recognized that Parkinson's disease is more than just a motor-deficit disorder. The majority of Parkinson's disease patients suffer from nonmotor disabilities, for instance, cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, sensory dysfunction, and sleep disorder. So far, anti-PD prescriptions and surgical treatments have been mainly focusing on motor dysfunctions, leaving cognitive impairment a marginal clinical field. Within the nonmotor symptoms, cognitive impairment is one of the most common and significant aspects of Parkinson's disease, and cognitive deficits such as dysexecutive syndrome and visuospatial disturbances could seriously affect the quality of life, reduce life expectancy, prolong the duration of hospitalization, and therefore increase burdens of caregiver and medical costs. In this review, we have done a retrospective study of the recent related researches on epidemiology, clinical manifestation and diagnosis, genetics, and potential treatment of cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease, aiming to provide a summary of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and make it easy for clinicians to tackle this challenging issue in their future practice. PMID:28058128

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, C A; Corti, O; Brice, A

    2014-05-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders (ND) include a wide spectrum of diseases characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunctions or degeneration. With an estimated cost of 135 billion € in 2010 in the European Union (Olesen et al., 2012), they put an enormous economic as well as social burden on modern societies. Hence, they have been the subject of a huge amount of research for the last fifty years. For many of these diseases, our understanding of their profound causes is incomplete and this hinders the discovery of efficient therapies. ND form a highly heterogeneous group of diseases affecting various neuronal subpopulations reflecting different origins and different pathological mechanisms. However, some common themes in the physiopathology of these disorders are emerging. There is growing evidence that mitochondrial dysfunctions play a pivotal role at some point in the course of neurodegeneration. In some cases (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), impairment of mitochondrial functions probably occurs late in the course of the disease. In a subset of ND, current evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunctions play a more seminal role in neuronal demise. Parkinson's disease (PD) presents one of the strongest cases based in part on post-mortem studies that have shown mitochondrial impairment (e.g. reduced complex I activity) and oxidative damage in idiopathic PD brains. The occurrence of PD is largely sporadic, but clinical syndromes resembling sporadic PD have been linked to specific environmental insults or to mutations in at least 5 distinct genes (α-synuclein, parkin, DJ-1, PINK1 and LRRK2). It is postulated that the elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the selective dopaminergic degeneration in familial and environmental Parkinsonism should provide important clues to the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for idiopathic PD. Hence, numerous cellular and animal models of the disease have been generated that mimic these

  14. Modeling cognitive dysfunction in neurofibromatosis-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggs-Andrews, Kelly A; Gutmann, David H

    2013-04-01

    Cognitive dysfunction, including significant impairments in learning, behavior, and attention, is found in over 10% of children in the general population. However, in the common inherited cancer predisposition syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the prevalence of these cognitive deficits approaches 70%. As a monogenic disorder, NF1 provides a unique genetic tool to identify and dissect mechanistically the molecular and cellular bases underlying cognitive dysfunction. In this review, we discuss Nf1 fly and mouse systems that mimic many of the cognitive abnormalities seen in children with NF1. Further, we describe discoveries from these models that have uncovered defects in the regulation of Ras activity, cAMP generation, and dopamine homeostasis as key mechanisms important for cognitive dysfunction in children with NF1.

  15. Methodological issues of postoperative cognitive dysfunction research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a subtle impairment of memory, concentration, and speed of information processing. It is a frequent complication following surgery and can have a debilitating effect on patients' recovery and future prognosis. Neuropsychological testing is needed...... to reveal postoperative cognitive decline, and questionnaires are not useful for this purpose. There is a profound lack of consensus regarding the research methodology for detection of cognitive deterioration, especially the diagnostic criteria. Issues, such as baseline performance, learning effects...

  16. Immune Dysfunction in Uremia—An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald Cohen; Hörl, Walter H.

    2012-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction leads to disturbed renal metabolic activities and to impaired glomerular filtration, resulting in the retention of toxic solutes affecting all organs of the body. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections are the main causes for the increased occurrence of morbidity and mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Both complications are directly or indirectly linked to a compromised immune defense. The specific coordinated roles of polymorphonuclear leukocy...

  17. Microvascular dysfunction as a link between obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Ü; Schram, M T; Houben, A J H M; Muris, D M J; Stehouwer, C D A

    2014-03-01

    Impaired microvascular dilatation from any cause and impaired insulin-mediated capillary recruitment in particular result in suboptimal delivery of glucose and insulin to skeletal muscle, and subsequently impairment of glucose disposal (insulin resistance). In addition, microvascular dysfunction, through functional and/or structural arteriolar and capillary drop-out, and arteriolar constriction, increases peripheral resistance and thus blood pressure. Microvascular dysfunction may thus constitute a pathway that links insulin resistance and hypertension. Overweight and obesity may be an important cause of microvascular dysfunction. Mechanisms linking overweight and obesity to microvascular dysfunction include changes in the secretion of adipokines leading to increased levels of free fatty acids and inflammatory mediators, and decreased levels of adiponectin all of which may impair endothelial insulin signaling. Microvascular dysfunction may thus constitute a new treatment target in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute renal dysfunction in liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in liver diseases, either as part of multiorgan involvement in acute illness or secondary to advanced liver disease. The presence of renal impairment in both groups is a poor prognostic indicator. Renal failure is often multifactorial and can present as pre-renal or intrinsic renal dysfunction. Obstructive or post renal dysfunction only rarely complicates liver disease. Hepatorenal syndrome (MRS) is a unique form of renal failure associated with advanced liver disease or cirrhosis, and is characterized by functional renal impairment without significant changes in renal histology. Irrespective of the type of renal failure, renal hypoperfusion is the central pathogenetic mechanism, due either to reduced perfusion pressure or increased renal vascular resistance. Volume expansion, avoidance of precipitating factors and treatment of underlying liver disease constitute the mainstay of therapy to prevent and reverse renal impairment. Splanchnic vasoconstrictor agents, such as terlipressin, along with volume expansion, and early placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may be effective in improving renal function in HRS. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and molecular absorbent recirculating system (MARS) in selected patients may be life saving while awaiting liver transplantation.

  19. Proximal tubular dysfunction as an indicator of chronic graft dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.O.S. Câmara

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available New strategies are being devised to limit the impact of renal sclerosis on graft function. Individualization of immunosuppression, specifically the interruption of calcineurin-inhibitors has been tried in order to promote better graft survival once chronic graft dysfunction has been established. However, the long-term impact of these approaches is still not totally clear. Nevertheless, patients at higher risk for tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis (TA/IF development should be carefully monitored for tubular function as well as glomerular performance. Since tubular-interstitial impairment is an early event in TA/IF pathogenesis and associated with graft function, it seems reasonable that strategies directed at assessing tubular structural integrity and function would yield important functional and prognostic data. The measurement of small proteins in urine such as α-1-microglobulin, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase, alpha/pi S-glutathione transferases, β-2 microglobulin, and retinol binding protein is associated with proximal tubular cell dysfunction. Therefore, its straightforward assessment could provide a powerful tool in patient monitoring and ongoing clinical assessment of graft function, ultimately helping to facilitate longer patient and graft survival associated with good graft function.

  20. Persistent high fever for more than 10 days during acute phase is a risk factor for endothelial dysfunction in children with a history of Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Hiroshi; Kishi, Kanta; Ozaki, Noriyasu; Shimizu, Tatsuo; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has previously been reported in children with a history of Kawasaki disease, but the determinants of endothelial function in Kawasaki disease patients are still unknown. In this study, we investigated endothelial function in Kawasaki disease patients and attempted to identify risk factors for persistent endothelial dysfunction. Using high-resolution ultrasound, we measured the percent flow-mediated dilatation, an arterial response to reactive hyperemia, to evaluate endothelial function in 67 patients with a history of Kawasaki disease and 28 age- and sex-matched control subjects. We divided the Kawasaki disease patients into a group with impaired endothelial function (the percent flow-mediated dilatation below -2 standard deviations of the control group) and a group with normal endothelial function (the percent flow-mediated dilatation more than -2 standard deviations of control). Logistic multiple regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of impaired endothelial function. In Kawasaki disease patients, the percent flow-mediated dilatation was significantly lower than in the control subjects (9.8±3.6%, compared with 13.1±3.4%, pKawasaki disease patients (3 patients with coronary artery lesions and 10 patients without coronary artery lesions), the percent flow-mediated dilatation was below -2 standard deviations of control. Logistic multiple regression analysis showed that a febrile period of longer than 10 days during the acute phase was the significant risk factor for endothelial dysfunction (odds ratio: 8.562; 95% confidence interval: 1.366-53.68). Presence of coronary artery lesions was not a determinant of endothelial dysfunction. Systemic endothelial dysfunction exists in children with a history of Kawasaki disease, and a febrile period of longer than 10 days during the acute phase is an independent predictor of endothelial dysfunction irrespective of coronary artery involvement. Copyright © 2015 Japanese

  1. Apraxia and motor dysfunction in corticobasal syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Burrell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Corticobasal syndrome (CBS is characterized by multifaceted motor system dysfunction and cognitive disturbance; distinctive clinical features include limb apraxia and visuospatial dysfunction. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS has been used to study motor system dysfunction in CBS, but the relationship of TMS parameters to clinical features has not been studied. The present study explored several hypotheses; firstly, that limb apraxia may be partly due to visuospatial impairment in CBS. Secondly, that motor system dysfunction can be demonstrated in CBS, using threshold-tracking TMS, and is linked to limb apraxia. Finally, that atrophy of the primary motor cortex, studied using voxel-based morphometry analysis (VBM, is associated with motor system dysfunction and limb apraxia in CBS. METHODS: Imitation of meaningful and meaningless hand gestures was graded to assess limb apraxia, while cognitive performance was assessed using the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination - Revised (ACE-R, with particular emphasis placed on the visuospatial subtask. Patients underwent TMS, to assess cortical function, and VBM. RESULTS: In total, 17 patients with CBS (7 male, 10 female; mean age 64.4+/- 6.6 years were studied and compared to 17 matched control subjects. Of the CBS patients, 23.5% had a relatively inexcitable motor cortex, with evidence of cortical dysfunction in the remaining 76.5% patients. Reduced resting motor threshold, and visuospatial performance, correlated with limb apraxia. Patients with a resting motor threshold <50% performed significantly worse on the visuospatial sub-task of the ACE-R than other CBS patients. Cortical function correlated with atrophy of the primary and pre-motor cortices, and the thalamus, while apraxia correlated with atrophy of the pre-motor and parietal cortices. CONCLUSIONS: Cortical dysfunction appears to underlie the core clinical features of CBS, and is associated with atrophy of the primary motor and

  2. Apraxia and motor dysfunction in corticobasal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, James R; Hornberger, Michael; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C; Hodges, John R

    2014-01-01

    Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is characterized by multifaceted motor system dysfunction and cognitive disturbance; distinctive clinical features include limb apraxia and visuospatial dysfunction. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to study motor system dysfunction in CBS, but the relationship of TMS parameters to clinical features has not been studied. The present study explored several hypotheses; firstly, that limb apraxia may be partly due to visuospatial impairment in CBS. Secondly, that motor system dysfunction can be demonstrated in CBS, using threshold-tracking TMS, and is linked to limb apraxia. Finally, that atrophy of the primary motor cortex, studied using voxel-based morphometry analysis (VBM), is associated with motor system dysfunction and limb apraxia in CBS. Imitation of meaningful and meaningless hand gestures was graded to assess limb apraxia, while cognitive performance was assessed using the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination - Revised (ACE-R), with particular emphasis placed on the visuospatial subtask. Patients underwent TMS, to assess cortical function, and VBM. In total, 17 patients with CBS (7 male, 10 female; mean age 64.4+/- 6.6 years) were studied and compared to 17 matched control subjects. Of the CBS patients, 23.5% had a relatively inexcitable motor cortex, with evidence of cortical dysfunction in the remaining 76.5% patients. Reduced resting motor threshold, and visuospatial performance, correlated with limb apraxia. Patients with a resting motor threshold apraxia correlated with atrophy of the pre-motor and parietal cortices. Cortical dysfunction appears to underlie the core clinical features of CBS, and is associated with atrophy of the primary motor and pre-motor cortices, as well as the thalamus, while apraxia correlates with pre-motor and parietal atrophy.

  3. Impaired Picture Arrangement subscores (WAIS-III) associated with decreased place orientation and frontal/occipital blood flow in Alzheimer's disease: Implications for social judgment dysfunction. The Osaki-Tajiri Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yuka; Meguro, Kenichi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kei; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi

    2016-10-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients manifest not only memory impairment but also deficit of social judgment. However, contrary to frequently recognized deficit, only two neuropsychological tests have been established for assessing "judgment" : the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument domain Abstraction & judgment and the Picture Arrangement subscale of WAIS-III. For the former, we previously reported an association with decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the left parietal lobe. Herein, we analyzed the scores of the Picture Arrangement test. Forty-nine AD patients were classified into two groups, i.e., the high and low PA score groups. The (99m)Tc-ECD SPECT investigation was performed with the voxel-based analysis using SPM5. The Mini-Mental State Examination subscores of "place orientation" showed a correlation with the PA scores. The low PA score group exhibited significantly decreased rCBFs in the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus (LIFG), Left Superior Frontal Gyrus (LSFG) and Right Occipital Lobe (ROL), compared with the high PA score group. The ability of PA may be associated with the place orientation, which may be necessary to re-arrange the pictures. The ROL was related to visual recognition. The LSFG may be involved in executive function or "frontal reasoning."

  4. Vestibular Impairment in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Aisha; Oh, Esther S; Bigelow, Robin T; Studenski, Stephanie; Agrawal, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies suggest an association between vestibular and cognitive function. The goal of the study was to investigate whether vestibular function was impaired in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared with cognitively normal individuals. Cross-sectional study. Outpatient memory clinic and longitudinal observational study unit. Older individuals ≥55 years with MCI or AD. Age, sex, and education-matched normal controls were drawn from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). Saccular and utricular function was assessed with cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (c- and oVEMPs) respectively, and horizontal semicircular canal function was assessed with video head impulse testing. Presence or absence of VEMP responses, VEMP amplitude, and vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) gain were measured. Forty-seven individuals with cognitive impairment (MCI N = 15 and AD N = 32) underwent testing and were matched with 94 controls. In adjusted analyses, bilaterally absent cVEMPs were associated with an over three-fold odds of AD (OR 3.42, 95% CI 1.33-8.91, p = 0.011). One microvolt increases in both cVEMP and oVEMP amplitudes were associated with decreased odds of AD (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.09-0.93, p = 0.038 and OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.85-0.99, p = 0.036, respectively). There was no significant difference in VOR gain between the groups. These findings confirm and extend emerging evidence of an association between vestibular dysfunction and cognitive impairment. Further investigation is needed to determine the causal direction for the link between peripheral vestibular loss and cognitive impairment.

  5. Cognitive Impairment: An Increasingly Important Complication of Type 2 Diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saczynski, Jane S; Jónsdóttir, María K; Garcia, Melissa E; Jonsson, Palmi V; Peila, Rita; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Olafsdottir, Elin; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J

    2008-01-01

    Persons with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of cognitive dysfunction. Less is known about which cognitive abilities are affected and how undiagnosed diabetes and impaired fasting glucose relate to cognitive performance...

  6. Diabetes and microvascular disease in Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brundel, M.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of cerebrovascular disease in the development of cognitive dysfunction and dementia is increasingly recognized. Cerebrovascular damage is heterogeneous, ranging from a clinical stroke to more insidious brain changes. The term vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) has been introduced,

  7. Psychosocial dysfunction associated with skin picking disorder and trichotillomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Redden, Sarah A; Leppink, Eric W; Odlaug, Brian L; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2016-05-30

    Skin picking disorder (SPD) and trichotillomania (TTM) are common and oftentimes disabling disorders. 125 Participants with SPD and 152 with TTM undertook clinical and neurocognitive evaluation, and were grouped according to mild, moderate, or severe levels of psychosocial dysfunction. Relationships between functional impairment and other variables were explored using linear regression and categorical analyses. Greater functional impairment was associated with worse disease severity in both groups, and by later symptom onset and lower quality of life in TTM subjects. These results indicate that levels of self-reported psychosocial dysfunction have a strong association with specific clinical aspects of SPD and TTM.

  8. Neuroanatomy and Physiology of Brain Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeraud, Aurelien; Pascal, Quentin; Verdonk, Franck; Heming, Nicholas; Chrétien, Fabrice; Sharshar, Tarek

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE), a complication of sepsis, is often complicated by acute and long-term brain dysfunction. SAE is associated with electroencephalogram pattern changes and abnormal neuroimaging findings. The major processes involved are neuroinflammation, circulatory dysfunction, and excitotoxicity. Neuroinflammation and microcirculatory alterations are diffuse, whereas excitotoxicity might occur in more specific structures involved in the response to stress and the control of vital functions. A dysfunction of the brainstem, amygdala, and hippocampus might account for the increased mortality, psychological disorders, and cognitive impairment. This review summarizes clinical and paraclinical features of SAE and describes its mechanisms at cellular and structural levels.

  9. [Minimal emotional dysfunction and first impression formation in personality disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, M; Vilain, M

    2011-01-01

    "Minimal cerebral dysfunctions" are isolated impairments of basic mental functions, which are elements of complex functions like speech. The best described are cognitive dysfunctions such as reading and writing problems, dyscalculia, attention deficits, but also motor dysfunctions such as problems with articulation, hyperactivity or impulsivity. Personality disorders can be characterized by isolated emotional dysfunctions in relation to emotional adequacy, intensity and responsivity. For example, paranoid personality disorders can be characterized by continuous and inadequate distrust, as a disorder of emotional adequacy. Schizoid personality disorders can be characterized by low expressive emotionality, as a disorder of effect intensity, or dissocial personality disorders can be characterized by emotional non-responsivity. Minimal emotional dysfunctions cause interactional misunderstandings because of the psychology of "first impression formation". Studies have shown that in 100 ms persons build up complex and lasting emotional judgements about other persons. Therefore, minimal emotional dysfunctions result in interactional problems and adjustment disorders and in corresponding cognitive schemata.From the concept of minimal emotional dysfunctions specific psychotherapeutic interventions in respect to the patient-therapist relationship, the diagnostic process, the clarification of emotions and reality testing, and especially an understanding of personality disorders as impairment and "selection, optimization, and compensation" as a way of coping can be derived.

  10. Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Causes Visual Impairment? People rarely lose their eyesight during their teen years. When they do, it's ... inflammation in the eye. It's often found in poor rural countries that have overcrowded living conditions and ...

  11. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management.

  12. Female Sexual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be comfortable with your sexuality, improve your self-esteem and accept your body. Try practicing these healthy ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/female-sexual-dysfunction/basics/definition/CON-20027721 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  13. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  14. Basal ganglia dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ganglia dysfunction. They include: Dystonia (muscle tone problems) Huntington disease (disorder in which nerve cells in certain parts ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 20. Review Date 5/30/2016 Updated by: Amit M. ...

  15. Is reversal of endothelial dysfunction still an attractive target in modern cardiology?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ify; Mordi; Nikolaos; Tzemos

    2014-01-01

    Although the endothelium has a number of important functions, the term endothelial dysfunction is commonly used to describe impairment in its vasodilatory capacity. There have been numerous studies evaluating the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, however assessment of endothelial function is perhaps still primarily thought of as a research tool and has not reached widespread clinical acceptance. In this review we explore the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, its prognostic significance, methods of pharmacological reversal of endothelial dysfunction, and ask the question, is reversal of endothelial dysfunction still an attractive target in modern cardiology?

  16. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Pamela

    1989-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction takes place in the context of women's lives and affects their sexuality and self-esteem. Awareness of these influences are vital to the management of the dysfunction and the promotion of positive sexuality. The family physician's contribution to both the prevention and management of sexual concerns includes an awareness of societal influences and facilitation of a woman's sense of her own power and control over her life.

  17. Neuroanatomical correlates of impaired decision-making and facial emotion recognition in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarretxe-Bilbao, Naroa; Junque, Carme; Tolosa, Eduardo; Marti, Maria-Jose; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Bargallo, Nuria; Zarei, Mojtaba

    2009-09-01

    Decision-making and recognition of emotions are often impaired in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and the amygdala are critical structures subserving these functions. This study was designed to test whether there are any structural changes in these areas that might explain the impairment of decision-making and recognition of facial emotions in early PD. We used the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and the Ekman 60 faces test which are sensitive to the integrity of OFC and amygdala dysfunctions in 24 early PD patients and 24 controls. High-resolution structural magnetic resonance images (MRI) were also obtained. Group analysis using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) showed significant and corrected (P Ekman test performance in PD patients. We conclude that: (i) impairment in decision-making and recognition of facial emotions occurs at the early stages of PD, (ii) these neuropsychological deficits are accompanied by degeneration of OFC and amygdala, and (iii) bilateral OFC reductions are associated with impaired recognition of emotions, and GM volume loss in left lateral OFC is related to decision-making impairment in PD.

  18. Endothelial dysfunction after non-cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, E S; Fonnes, S; Gögenur, I

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More than 50% of patients with increased troponin levels after non-cardiac surgery have an impaired endothelial function pre-operatively. Non-invasive markers of endothelial function have been developed for the assessment of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this paper was to system......BACKGROUND: More than 50% of patients with increased troponin levels after non-cardiac surgery have an impaired endothelial function pre-operatively. Non-invasive markers of endothelial function have been developed for the assessment of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this paper...... was to systematically review the literature to evaluate the association between non-cardiac surgery and non-invasive markers of endothelial function. METHODS: A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library Database according to the PRISMA guidelines. Endothelial dysfunction was described only...... with non-invasive measurements done both pre- and post-operatively and published in English. All types of non-cardiac surgery and both men and women of all ages were included. RESULTS: We found 1722 eligible studies in our search, and of these, five studies fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria...

  19. 应用心肌造影超声心动图结合速度向量成像对糖尿病大鼠心肌微循环与收缩功能障碍的相关性研究%Relationship between myocardial perfusion impairment and dysfunction in diabetic rats using myocardial contrast echocardiography and velocity vector imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卫张蕊; 张军; 张海滨; 苏海砾; 施红; 朱霆; 朱永胜

    2012-01-01

    目的 应用心肌造影超声心动图(MCE)结合速度向量成像(VVI)技术研究糖尿病(DM)大鼠左室心肌微循环障碍与心肌收缩功能损伤之间的相关关系.方法 雄性SD大鼠23只,腹腔注射链脲菌素复制DM模型,另23只体质量匹配的雄性SD大鼠腹腔注射等量生理盐水作为对照.分别在静息状态和潘生丁负荷后,对两组大鼠(12周)乳头肌水平左室短轴行MCE和VVI检查,分别测定心肌血流量(MBF)、心肌血流储备(MFR)、收缩期最大圆周应变率(SRc)及其储备,分析MBF/MFR与SRc/SRc储备之间是否存在相关关系.结果 DM组大鼠的SRc、SRc储备、MBF及MFR均较对照组显著减低.DM组大鼠SRc与MBF之间没有明显相关性,而SR.储备与MFR之间呈现显著的负相关.结论 静息状态下,心肌血流量的降低并不是圆周应变率降低的主要决定因素,而潘生丁负荷后,心肌血流储备的降低可能是心肌圆周应变率储备降低的主要决定因素.%Objective To investigate whether myocardial dysfunction and perfusion impairment had happened in diabetes mellitus(DM)rats,and to assess the relationship between them by using myocardial contrast echocardiography(MCE)and velocity vector imaging(VVI).Methods MCE and VVI were performed from the short-axis views of the mid-left ventricular level both at rest and after dipyridamole stress in control rats and DM rafs(12 weeks after induction with streptozotocin).MCE-derived myocardial blood flow(MBF)and myocardial flow reserve(MFR)and VVI-derived circumferential strain rate(SRc)and SRc reserve were obtained.Results SRc(absolute value)and MBF in the DM group were significantly lower than those in the control group at rest(P =0.03 for SRc and P =0.005 for MBF).SRc reserve and MFR in the DM group were significantly lower than those in the control group after dipyridamole stress (P =0.000 for SRc reserve and P =0.014 for MFR).There was no significant correlation between SRc and MBF at rest in the

  20. Neuropsychological Patterns Differ by Type of Left Ventricle Dysfunction in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratzke-Bauer, Lisa C.; Pozehl, Bunny J.; Paul, Steven M.; Johnson, Julene K.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is common among individuals with heart failure. The purpose of this study was to compare cognitive profiles of individuals with systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Eighty individuals with heart failure completed the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), Mini-Mental State Examination, Trail Making Test, and letter fluency. Approximately 25% of individuals with systolic dysfunction were impaired on the RBANS Total Scale score, compared with only 3% in the diastolic group. Additionally, individuals with systolic dysfunction scored lower than those with diastolic dysfunction on tests of immediate and delayed memory. The groups did not differ on tests of visuospatial skills, but there were mixed results on the RBANS Attention and Language subtests. Overall, the results of this study suggest that individuals with different types of cardiac dysfunction (systolic and diastolic dysfunction) demonstrate differential patterns of performance on neuropsychological tests. These findings have important clinical implications. PMID:23257366

  1. Endothelial dysfunction: a comprehensive appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilariño Jorge O

    2006-02-01

    vasodilatation produced by drugs that are NO donors, such as nitroglycerine, called "endothelium independent". The vasodilatation is quantified by measuring the arterial diameter with high resolution ultrasonography. Laser-Doppler techniques are now starting to be used that also consider tissue perfusion. There is so much proof about endothelial dysfunction that it is reasonable to believe that there is diagnostic and prognostic value in its evaluation for the late outcome. There is no doubt that endothelial dysfunction contributes to the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic disease and could be considered an independent vascular risk factor. Although prolonged randomized clinical trials are needed for unequivocal evidence, the data already obtained allows the methods of evaluation of endothelial dysfunction to be considered useful in clinical practice and have overcome the experimental step, being non-invasive increases its value making it use full for follow-up of the progression of the disease and the effects of different treatments.

  2. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis M. Steyers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD. As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α, reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein, autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-α-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population.

  3. Differential regulation of resolution in inflammation induced by amyloid-β42 and lipopolysaccharides in human microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingqin; Wang, Xiuzhe; Schultzberg, Marianne; Hjorth, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation terminates the inflammatory response in physiological conditions and promotes restoration and healing of the tissue; however, failure in resolution results in chronic inflammation that may lead to disease. Chronic inflammation mediated by microglia is a feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and can be a pathogenic factor in which both treatment targets and diagnostic markers may be found. In addition, there is evidence that the resolution pathway is altered in AD. It is therefore relevant to investigate whether amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, the major component of senile plaque in AD brain, may have a negative influence on components of the resolution cascade. In this pursuit, we exposed microglia to Aβ42, and with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) for comparison with a general infectious stimulus. Differential effects were observed: LPS upregulated components of the resolution pathway including the LXA4 receptor/formyl peptide receptor 2 (ALX/FPR2) and phosphorylated 5-lipoxygenase (p-5-LOX), as well as cholinergic alpha 7 nicotinic receptor (α7nAChR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-δ whereas Aβ42 had an opposite or insignificant effect. Our results indicate that LPS-induced changes in the microglia were conducive for resolution of inflammation, whereas these responses were absent or suppressed in microglia treated with Aβ42. Further studies may prove if Aβ42-induced dysfunction of resolution in microglia contributes to the impaired resolution in the AD brain, and if stimulation of microglial resolution constitutes a treatment strategy for AD.

  4. Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Anna; Ladner, Richard E.

    For many people with hearing impairments, the degree of hearing loss is only a small aspect of their disability and does not necessarily determine the types of accessibility solutions or accommodations that may be required. For some people, the ability to adjust the audio volume may be sufficient. For others, translation to a signed language may be more appropriate. For still others, access to text alternatives may be the best solution. Because of these differences, it is important for researchers in Web accessibility to understand that people with hearing impairments may have very different cultural-linguistic traditions and personal backgrounds.

  5. Voiding dysfunction - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sripathi V

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In a child who is toilet trained the sudden onset of daytime wetting with frequency or urgency is alarming to the parents. Initially this subject was subdivided into a number of descriptive clinical conditions which led to a lot of confusion in recognition and management. Subsequently, the term elimination dysfunction was coined by Stephen Koff to emphasise the association between recurrent urinary infection, wetting, constipation and bladder overactivity. From a urodynamic point of view, in voiding dysfunction, there is either detrusor overactivity during bladder filling or dyssynergic action between the detrusor and the external sphincter during voiding. Identifying a given condition as a ′filling phase dysfunction′ or ′voiding phase dysfunction′ helps to provide appropriate therapy. Objective clinical criteria should be used to define voiding dysfunction. These include bladder wall thickening, large capacity bladder and infrequent voiding, bladder trabeculation and spinning top deformity of the urethra and a clinically demonstrated Vincent′s curtsy. The recognition and treatment of constipation is central to the adequate treatment of voiding dysfunction. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimuation for the treatment of detrusor overactivity, biofeedback with uroflow EMG to correct dyssynergic voiding, and behavioral therapy all serve to correct voiding dysfunction in its early stages. In established neurogenic bladder disease the use of Botulinum Toxin A injections into the detrusor or the external sphincter may help in restoring continence especially in those refractory to drug therapy. However in those children in whom the upper tracts are threatened, augmentation of the bladder may still be needed.

  6. [Endothelial dysfunction in hypertension--clinical implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmala, Wojciech

    2002-04-01

    Endothelial cells produce both vasodilatating compounds as nitric oxide, prostacycline, endothelial derived hyperpolarising factor and counteracting substances known as endothelial derived contracting factors: endothelin, tromboxan A2, prostaglandin H2, free oxygen radicals. Natural balance between both groups affects blood perfusion of various tissues and constitutes important element in blood pressure control. More and more attention is paid to endothelial dysfunction in patogenesis of hypertension. In a number of studies endothelial dysfunction in hypertensive patients was found out as decreased release of nitric oxide or increased production of endothelin. Principle mechanism of impaired function of endothelium in hypertension seems to be decreased production and increased degradation of nitric oxide mainly due to free oxygen radicals. Favorable effects in improvement of endothelial function were achieved by using ACE inhibitors, AT1 receptor blockers and calcium channel antagonists.

  7. Autonomic dysfunction in childhood Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimario, Francis J; Edwards, Carrie

    2012-05-01

    This investigation correlated incidence and degree of autonomic dysfunction with the degree of motor impairment in children hospitalized with Guillain-Barré syndrome. Motor weakness varies, as does the effect on autonomic function including heart rate, vasomotor stability, sweating, continence, and blood pressure. After Institutional Review Board approval, hospitalized patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome syndrome.

  8. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and social dysfunctioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, Judith S.; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Mulligan, Aisling; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    2008-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with functional impairments in different areas of daily life. One such area is social functioning. The purpose of this paper is to critically review research on social dysfunctioning in children with ADHD. Children with ADHD often have co

  9. All Vision Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Statistics and Data > All Vision Impairment All Vision Impairment Vision Impairment Defined Vision impairment is defined as the ... Ethnicity 2010 U.S. Age-Specific Prevalence Rates for Vision Impairment by Age and Race/Ethnicity Table for ...

  10. Neurogenic voiding dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Petros; Apostolidis, Apostolos

    2017-05-01

    This review aims to analyze and discuss all recently published articles associated with neurogenic voiding discussion providing readers with the most updated knowledge and trigger for further research. They include the proposal of a novel classification system for the pathophysiology of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) which combines neurological defect in a distinct anatomic location, and data on bowel dysfunction, autonomic dysreflexia and urine biomarkers; review of patient-reported outcome measures in NLUTD; review of the criteria for the diagnosis of clinically significant urinary infections; novel research findings on the pathophysiology of NLUTD; and review of data on minimally and more invasive treatments. Despite the extended evidence base on NLUTD, there is a paucity of high-quality new research concerning voiding dysfunction as opposed to storage problems. The update aims to inform clinicians about new developments in clinical practice, as well as ignite discussion for further clinical and basic research in the aforementioned areas of NLUTD.

  11. Biology of Sexual Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Sexual activity is a multifaceted activity, involving complex interactions between the nervous system, the endocrine system, the vascular system and a variety of structures that are instrumental in sexual excitement, intercourse and satisfaction. Sexual function has three components i.e., desire, arousal and orgasm. Many sexual dysfunctions can be categorized according to the phase of sexual response that is affected. In actual clinical practice however, sexual desire, arousal and orgasmic difficulties more often than not coexist, suggesting an integration of phases. Sexual dysfunction can result from a wide variety of psychological and physiological causes including derangements in the levels of sex hormones and neurotrensmitters. This review deals with the biology of different phases of sexual function as well as implications of hormones and neurotransmitters in sexual dysfunction

  12. Semantic memory impairment in the earliest phases of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Gade, Anders; Stokholm, Jette

    2005-01-01

    The presence and the nature of semantic memory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been widely debated. This study aimed to determine the frequency of impaired semantic test performances in mild AD and to study whether incipient semantic impairments could be identified in predementia AD...

  13. Semantic memory impairment in the earliest phases of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Gade, Anders; Stokholm, Jette

    2005-01-01

    The presence and the nature of semantic memory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been widely debated. This study aimed to determine the frequency of impaired semantic test performances in mild AD and to study whether incipient semantic impairments could be identified in predementia AD...

  14. Connecting heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and renal dysfunction : the role of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, Jozine M.; Damman, Kevin; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Paulus, Walter J.; Duncker, Dirk J.; Cheng, Caroline; van Heerebeek, Loek; Hillege, Hans L.; Lam, Carolyn S. P.; Navis, Gerjan; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2016-01-01

    Renal dysfunction in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is common and is associated with increased mortality. Impaired renal function is also a risk factor for developing HFpEF. A new paradigm for HFpEF, proposing a sequence of events leading to myocardial remodelling and dysfunc

  15. Roles of olfactory system dysfunction in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Slotnick, Burton M

    2014-10-01

    The olfactory system is involved in sensory functions, emotional regulation and memory formation. Olfactory bulbectomy in rat has been employed as an animal model of depression for antidepressant discovery studies for many years. Olfaction is impaired in animals suffering from chronic stress, and patients with clinical depression were reported to have decreased olfactory function. It is believed that the neurobiological bases of depression might include dysfunction in the olfactory system. Further, brain stimulation, including nasal based drug delivery could provide novel therapies for management of depression.

  16. Hyperlipidemia and erectile dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sae-ChulKim

    2000-01-01

    We have done consecutive studies to investigate the effects of impaired lipid metabolism on the contractile and relaxation response of cavernous smooth muscles and to elucidate its pathogenesis: 1 ) incidence of hyperlipidemia in impotent patients; 2) erection response to intmcavemous injection of papaverine in impotent patients with hyperlipidemia; 3) relaxation responses of isolated cavemosal smooth muscles to endothelium-independent and endothelium-dependent vasodilators in impotent patients with hypercholesterolemia or hypertriglyceridemia; 4) involvement of superoxide radical in the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation of cavernous smooth muscle in hypercholesterolemic rabbits; 5) effects of isolated lipoproteins and triglyceride, combined oxidized LDL plus triglyceride, and combined oxidized LDL plus HDL on contractile and relaxation response of rabbit cavernous smooth muscles; 6) involvement of e-NOS in the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation of cavernous smooth muscle in hypercholesterolemic rabbit. Hypercholesterolemia may cause impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation. Oxidized LDL is the major causative cholesterol of the impaired relaxation response. A chain reaction, the production of superoxide radicals and functional impairment of eNOS may be a major cause of the functional impairment in the early stages of hypercholesterolemia.

  17. Diastolic dysfunction in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Wiese, Signe Skovgaard; Halgreen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Development of esophageal varices, ascites, and hepatic nephropathy is among the major complications of cirrhosis. The presence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, which includes a left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (DD), seems to deteriorate the course of the disease and the prognosis. Increased st...

  18. Female sexual dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giraldi, Annamaria; Wåhlin-Jacobsen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a controversial condition, which has prompted much debate regarding its aetiology, components, and even its existence. Our inability to work together as clinicians, psychologists, patients, and advocates hinders our understanding of FSD, and we will only improve...

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Boland

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability and other more conventional aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the sigificance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis and spatial dynamics and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knockon effects for cell proliferation and growth. Scientifically, there is also scope for defining what mitochondria dysfunction is and here we address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Shared Parenting Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkat, Ira Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Joint custody of children is the most prevalent court ordered arrangement for families of divorce. A growing body of literature indicates that many parents engage in behaviors that are incompatible with shared parenting. This article provides specific criteria for a definition of the Shared Parenting Dysfunction. Clinical aspects of the phenomenon…

  1. Post-stroke cognitive dysfunctions: A clinical and neuroimaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Yuryevich Emelin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging examinations were made in 65 patients (52 men and 13 women aged 65.6±10.1 years who had experienced ischemic stroke. Cognitive impairments (CI were heterogeneous; regulatory functions, attention, and counting were most significantly affected in moderate CI. In mild dementia, mainly poor attention and regulatory dysfunctions were added by clearly-cut impairments of memory, orientation, and visual-spatial function. Brain atrophy, white matter changes, and small focal gray matter damages along with focal post-stroke changes were revealed by neuroimaging in most patients. It was found that besides the volume and location of a damage focus, the signs of impaired integrated mental activity of the brain, regulatory dysfunctions in particular, should be a necessary condition for the verification of post-stroke CI.

  2. Neuropharmacological Treatment of Mental Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McNamara

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD experience significant cognitive and mood impairment -even early in the course of the disease. These mental impairments are only partially responsive to levodopa treatment and are often as disabling as the motor impairment, particularly in mid and late stages of the disease. Investigators have recently begun a search for new agents that can effectively treat mental dysfunction of PD. Although there have been only a handful of properly controlled clinical trials of interventions targeted at amelioration of mental dysfunction in PD, progress has been made. Based on the available evidence, targeting catecholaminergic and cholinergic function may be an effective strategy for amelioration of cognitve, mood and psychiatric disturbances in PD.

  3. Balance Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steno Rinalduzzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stability and mobility in functional motor activities depend on a precise regulation of phasic and tonic muscular activity that is carried out automatically, without conscious awareness. The sensorimotor control of posture involves a complex integration of multisensory inputs that results in a final motor adjustment process. All or some of the components of this system may be dysfunctional in Parkinsonian patients, rendering postural instability one of the most disabling features of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Balance control is critical for moving safely in and adapting to the environment. PD induces a multilevel impairment of this function, therefore worsening the patients’ physical and psychosocial disability. In this review, we describe the complex ways in which PD impairs posture and balance, collecting and reviewing the available experimental evidence.

  4. Cognitive dysfunction after cardiovascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, K S; Steinmetz, J; Rasmussen, L S

    2009-01-01

    This review describes the incidence, risk factors, and long-term consequences of cognitive dysfunction after cardiovascular surgery. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is increasingly being recognized as an important complication, especially in the elderly. A highly sensitive neuropsychol...

  5. What Is a Dysfunctional School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not a school is dysfunctional depends largely on how dysfunctionality in schools is defined and measured. Dysfunctionality, as any construct, is subject to definition and interpretation, and it is thus always marked by perspectivism. But regardless of the definition games occasionally played by academics, some form of reality takes…

  6. Lesson Nine Sinus node dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁端; 吴文烈

    2004-01-01

    @@ Sinus node dysfunction most often is found in the elderly as an isolated phenomenon. Although interruption of the blood supply to the sinus node may produce dysfunction, the correlation between obstruction of the sinus node artery and clinical evidence of sinus node dysfunction is poor.

  7. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elham; Saedi[1; Mohammad; Reza; Gheini[2; Firoozeh; Faiz[3; Mohammad; Ali; Arami[4

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications.In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings.

  8. Diabetes mellitus and cognitive impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedi, Elham; Gheini, Mohammad Reza; Faiz, Firoozeh; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Insulin signaling dysregulation and small vessel disease in the base of diabetes may be important contributing factors in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia pathogenesis, respectively. Optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes and identification of diabetic risk factors and prophylactic approach in type 2 diabetes are very important in the prevention of cognitive complications. In addition, hypoglycemic attacks in children and elderly should be avoided. Anti-diabetic medications especially Insulin may have a role in the management of cognitive dysfunction and dementia but further investigation is needed to validate these findings. PMID:27660698

  9. The cone dysfunction syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboshiha, Jonathan; Dubis, Adam M; Hardcastle, Alison J; Michaelides, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The cone dysfunction syndromes are a heterogeneous group of inherited, predominantly stationary retinal disorders characterised by reduced central vision and varying degrees of colour vision abnormalities, nystagmus and photophobia. This review details the following conditions: complete and incomplete achromatopsia, blue-cone monochromatism, oligocone trichromacy, bradyopsia and Bornholm eye disease. We describe the clinical, psychophysical, electrophysiological and imaging findings that are characteristic to each condition in order to aid their accurate diagnosis, as well as highlight some classically held notions about these diseases that have come to be challenged over the recent years. The latest data regarding the genetic aetiology and pathological changes observed in the cone dysfunction syndromes are discussed, and, where relevant, translational avenues of research, including completed and anticipated interventional clinical trials, for some of the diseases described herein will be presented. Finally, we briefly review the current management of these disorders. PMID:25770143

  10. Right heart dysfunction in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenovsky, Vojtech; Hwang, Seok-Jae; Lin, Grace; Redfield, Margaret M.; Borlaug, Barry A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Right heart function is not well characterized in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The goal of this study was to examine the haemodynamic, clinical, and prognostic correlates of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in HFpEF. Methods and results Heart failure and preserved ejection fraction patients (n = 96) and controls (n = 46) underwent right heart catheterization, echocardiographic assessment, and follow-up. Right and left heart filling pressures, pulmonary artery (PA) pressures, and right-sided chamber dimensions were higher in HFpEF compared with controls, while left ventricular size and EF were similar. Right ventricular dysfunction (defined by RV fractional area change, FAC Right ventricular function was impaired in HFpEF compared with controls using both load-dependent (FAC: 40 ± 10 vs. 53 ± 7%, P Right heart dysfunction is common in HFpEF and is caused by both RV contractile impairment and afterload mismatch from pulmonary hypertension. Right ventricular dysfunction in HFpEF develops with increasing PA pressures, atrial fibrillation, male sex, and left ventricular dysfunction, and may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:24875795

  11. Melatonin in Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatramanujam Srinivasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered one of the major causative factors in the aging process, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R, septic shock, and neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and Huntington's disease (HD. Increased free radical generation, enhanced mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase activity, enhanced NO production, decreased respiratory complex activity, impaired electron transport system, and opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore all have been suggested as factors responsible for impaired mitochondrial function. Melatonin, the major hormone of the pineal gland, also acts as an antioxidant and as a regulator of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Both in vitro and in vivo, melatonin was effective for preventing oxidative stress/nitrosative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction seen in experimental models of PD, AD, and HD. In addition, melatonin is known to retard aging and to inhibit the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R lesions by maintaining respiratory complex activities, electron transport chain, and ATP production in mitochondria. Melatonin is selectively taken up by mitochondrial membranes, a function not shared by other antioxidants. Melatonin has thus emerged as a major potential therapeutic tool for treating neurodegenerative disorders such as PD or AD, and for preventing the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R.

  12. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) is defined as abnormal uterine bleeding that results from an ovarian endocrinopathy. It may be associated with ovulatory and anovulatory cycles. The diagnosis of DUB depends on a thorough history and physical examination to exclude organic disorders. In older women, endometrial biopsy should be done before starting therapy. The treatment depends on an understanding of the menstrual cycle. In less urgent cases, anovulatory cycles are managed using progester...

  13. Biology of Sexual Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    MN, Anil Kumar; Pai, NB; Rao, S; Rao, TSS; Goyal, N.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual activity is a multifaceted activity, involving complex interactions between the nervous system, the endocrine system, the vascular system and a variety of structures that are instrumental in sexual excitement, intercourse and satisfaction. Sexual function has three components i.e., desire, arousal and orgasm. Many sexual dysfunctions can be categorized according to the phase of sexual response that is affected. In actual clinical practice however, sexual desire, arousal and orgasmic di...

  14. Male Gender Role Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Daig, Isolde

    2010-01-01

    Background: Men have a higher alcohol and cigarette consumption than women, they use more drugs, they have twice as high a suicide rate and only a minority of men attend on preventive medical checkups. Hypotheses: The central questions of the present study pertained to the identification of dysfunctional aspects of a male self concept and the possible correlations with risk behaviour of men in different age stages. One possible explanation for this high risk behaviour may be higher mascul...

  15. Hypothalamic dysfunction following whole-brain irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechanick, J.I.; Hochberg, F.H.; LaRocque, A.

    1986-10-01

    The authors describe 15 cases with evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction 2 to 9 years following megavoltage whole-brain x-irradiation for primary glial neoplasm. The patients received 4000 to 5000 rads in 180- to 200-rad fractions. Dysfunction occurred in the absence of computerized tomography-delineated radiation necrosis or hypothalamic invasion by tumor, and antedated the onset of dementia. Fourteen patients displayed symptoms reflecting disturbances of personality, libido, thirst, appetite, or sleep. Hyperprolactinemia (with prolactin levels up to 70 ng/ml) was present in all of the nine patients so tested. Of seven patients tested with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, one demonstrated an abnormal pituitary gland response consistent with a hypothalamic disorder. Seven patients developed cognitive abnormalities. Computerized tomography scans performed a median of 4 years after tumor diagnosis revealed no hypothalamic tumor or diminished density of the hypothalamus. Cortical atrophy was present in 50% of cases and third ventricular dilatation in 58%. Hypothalamic dysfunction, heralded by endocrine, behavioral, and cognitive impairment, represents a common, subtle form of radiation damage.

  16. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Moon Kyoung

    2015-12-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women.

  17. Parkinson’s Disease and Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by the hallmarks of motor symptoms, such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability. However, through clinical investigations in patients and experimental findings in animal models of Parkinson’s disease for years, it is now well recognized that Parkinson’s disease is more than just a motor-deficit disorder. The majority of Parkinson’s disease patients suffer from nonmotor disabilities, for instance, cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, sensory dysfunction, and sleep disorder. So far, anti-PD prescriptions and surgical treatments have been mainly focusing on motor dysfunctions, leaving cognitive impairment a marginal clinical field. Within the nonmotor symptoms, cognitive impairment is one of the most common and significant aspects of Parkinson’s disease, and cognitive deficits such as dysexecutive syndrome and visuospatial disturbances could seriously affect the quality of life, reduce life expectancy, prolong the duration of hospitalization, and therefore increase burdens of caregiver and medical costs. In this review, we have done a retrospective study of the recent related researches on epidemiology, clinical manifestation and diagnosis, genetics, and potential treatment of cognitive deficits in Parkinson’s disease, aiming to provide a summary of cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease and make it easy for clinicians to tackle this challenging issue in their future practice.

  18. 帕金森病患者认知功能亚型损害和认知功能障碍危险因素探讨%The cognition impairment of Parkinson's disease subtypes and risk factors for cognitive dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张荣博; 徐彬

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨帕金森病(PD)患者认知功能亚型损害情况及认知功能障碍危险因素.方法 选择56例PD患者和30例对照者为研究对象,进行简易精神状态量表(MMSE)、蒙特利尔认知评估量表(MoCA)、韦氏成人智力量表数字广度测验量表(WAIS-DS)、韦氏智力量表一积木测验量表测评(WIAC-BD),比较两组患者认知功能亚型状况,并采用相关和回归分析探讨PD患者认知功能损害的影响因素. 结果 PD患者与对照组视空间/执行功能、记忆力、复述、注意力正确率、动物命名、理解、计算、定向力评分分别为(29.84±13.78)分与(44.63±10.95)分、(17.64±3.00)分与(21.93±2.12)分、(1.64±0.90)分与(2.40±0.62)分、64.29%与86.67%、(2.25±0.77)分与(2.70±0.47)分、(2.66±0.67)分与(2.93±0.25)分、(3.98±1.17)分与(4.93±0.25)分、(9.59±0.68)分与(9.93±0.25)分,差异有统计学意义(t值为-5.080、-7.707、4.571、-3.374、-2.710、-5.844、-3.367,x2=4.860,均P<0.05).Pearson相关分析结果显示,PD认知功能评分和受教育年限呈正相关,与病程、UPDRS-Ⅲ、H-Y分级、HAMA、HRSD评分呈负相关(MMSE:r值为0.488、-0.682、-0.478、0.465、-0.611、-0.538,均P<0.05;MoCA:r值为0.553、-0.583、-0.396、-0.384、-0.499、-0.444,均P<0.05),与性别、年龄和起病年龄无关.将病程、受教育年限、UPDRS-Ⅲ、HAMA、H-Y分级、HRSD评分作为自变量,MMSE、MoCA分别作为因变量进行多元线性回归分析,病程、受教育年限对PD认知障碍的影响有统计学意义(MMSE:β=-0.042、0.196,均P=0.000;MoCA:β=-0.052、0.367,均P<0.05). 结论 PD患者认知功能受损,主要损害视空间/执行功能、记忆力、复述、注意力、动物命名、理解、计算、定向力;病程和低受教育水平是PD患者认知功能受损的影响因素.%Objective To explore the cognition impairment of Parkinson's disease (PD) subtypes and the risk factors for cognitive dysfunction

  19. Post Operative Cognitive Dysfunction (POCD in Geriatric Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh MC

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Post-operative mental dysfunction and confusion in aged patients is a well recognized entity. Commonly known as post-operative delirium and cognitive dysfunction (POCD, these are important for any peri-operative physician dealing with geriatric population. The incidence is more in older patients with pre-existing impairment. Impact of POCD is grave. This can result in poor rehabilitation outcome and increased hospital stay. Incidence ranges from 15-50% with ˂5% for cataract surgery and as high as 60% after hip replacement procedures.

  20. Vasoactive substances in the circulatory dysfunction of cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    2001-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension exhibit characteristic haemodynamic changes with a hyperkinetic systemic circulation, abnormal distribution of the blood volume, and neurohumoral dysregulation. Moreover, the circulating levels of several vasoactive substances may be elevated....... Splanchnic vasodilatation is of pathogenic significance for the low systemic vascular resistance and abnormal volume distribution, which are important elements in the development of the concomitant cardiac dysfunction, recently termed cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. The systolic and diastolic functions...... are impaired with direct relation to the degree of liver dysfunction. Significant pathophysiological mechanisms seem to include a reduced beta-adrenergic receptor signal transduction, defective cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, and conductance abnormalities. Various vasodilators. such as nitric oxide...

  1. Peripartum heart failure caused by left ventricular diastolic dysfunction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakogawa, Jun; Nako, Takafumi; Igarashi, Suguru; Nakamura, Shin; Tanaka, Mamoru

    2014-08-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition. The current definition of peripartum cardiomyopathy only includes patients with systolic dysfunction. We describe a 25-year-old nulligravid patient with heart failure, i.e. left ventricular diastolic dysfunction with preserved systolic dysfunction during the third trimester of pregnancy. She complained of dyspnea and was referred to our hospital at 31 weeks of gestation. The patient met the clinical criteria for peripartum cardiomyopathy with the exception of systolic dysfunction. Brain-type natriuretic peptide levels peaked at 1447 pg/dL. The patient responded to therapy for heart failure and showed resolution of her diastolic dysfunction by 1 month postpartum. The case demonstrated the important role of diastolic dysfunction in peripartum heart failure and the possibility of clarifying the pathophysiology of peripartum cardiomyopathy by evaluating diastolic function. Further investigations are needed to provide evidence regarding the clinical role of diastolic dysfunction in peripartum heart failure.

  2. Assessment of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Monoamine Oxidase Contribution to Oxidative Stress in Human Diabetic Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Duicu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria-related oxidative stress is a pathomechanism causally linked to coronary heart disease (CHD and diabetes mellitus (DM. Recently, mitochondrial monoamine oxidases (MAOs have emerged as novel sources of oxidative stress in the cardiovascular system and experimental diabetes. The present study was purported to assess the mitochondrial impairment and the contribution of MAOs-related oxidative stress to the cardiovascular dysfunction in coronary patients with/without DM. Right atrial appendages were obtained from 75 patients randomized into 3 groups: (1 Control (CTRL, valvular patients without CHD; (2 CHD, patients with confirmed CHD; and (3 CHD-DM, patients with CHD and DM. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry and MAOs expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 emission was assessed by confocal microscopy and spectrophotometrically. The impairment of mitochondrial respiration was substrate-independent in CHD-DM group. MAOs expression was comparable among the groups, with the predominance of MAO-B isoform but no significant differences regarding oxidative stress were detected by either method. Incubation of atrial samples with MAOs inhibitors significantly reduced the H2O2 in all groups. In conclusion, abnormal mitochondrial respiration occurs in CHD and is more severe in DM and MAOs contribute to oxidative stress in human diseased hearts with/without DM.

  3. Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Etesam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment can emerge in the earliest phases of multiple sclerosis. It strongly impacts different aspects of Multiple Sclerosis (MS patients' lives, like employment, social relationships and the overall quality of life; thus, its on-time recognition and treatment is mandatory. This paper discusses issues, diagnostic methods and treatment options for cognitive dysfunctions in MS. This paper is a descriptive review of the related studies in the recent 10 years, performing a keyword search in the main databases4T. Cognitive impairment mostly involves aspects of information processing, memory and executive functioning in MS. Neuropsychological tests like MACFIMS and BRB-N are recommended for its assessment. Still, there is no fully efficient treatment for cognitive impairment. Researchers have shown some positive effects, using disease-modifying therapies and cognitive rehabilitation. Depression, pain, fatigue and other factors influencing cognitive functions must be paid attention to4T. Recognizing cognitive impairment as a major symptom for MS, makes studying this subject one of the priorities in dealing with the disease. Therefore, a consecutive research for identification and management of this part of quality of life in MS patients is obligatory4T.4T

  4. Neuropsychological Dysfunction among HIV Infected Drug Abusers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramani S. Durvasula

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has been documented to cause direct and indirect central nervous system dysfunction that can be observed as a progressive decline in neuropsychological functioning in a large proportion of persons with HIV and AIDS. Neuropsychological decline in individuals with HIV is characterized by cognitive and motor slowing, attentional deficits, executive dysfunction and memory impairment (characterized by intact recognition and deficits in learning and delayed recall. Dementia occurs in a relatively small proportion of HIV infected individuals, though milder NP deficits are observed in 30-50% of persons with advanced disease. Recent evidence suggests that drug users, especially stimulant users, are at risk for accelerated progression of their HIV disease, including a greater risk of neuropsychological dysfunction. Methamphetamine may potentiate HIV Tat protein mediated neurotoxicity giving rise to striatal proinflammatory cytokine stimulation and activation of redox-regulated transcription factors. Oxidative stress due to mitochondrial dysfunction is another candidate process underlying the synergistic effects of stimulant use and HIV. Damage to neurotransmitter systems including the dopaminergic, serotonergic and glutamatergic systems which are affected by both stimulant use and HIV is an alternate explanation. Methamphetamine has also been shown to impede the effectiveness of HAART, which could then in turn allow for more rapid HIV disease progression. A greater prevalence of psychiatric disorders, particularly mood, anxiety and substance use disorders are also observed in HIV positive samples relative to the general population. The changing nature of the HIV pandemic is an ongoing challenge to investigators and clinicians working in this field. Emerging issues requiring additional attention are study of the interactive effects of normal aging and HIV on neurocognition as well as study of the effects of co

  5. Depression and erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlouf, Antoine; Kparker, Ashay; Niederberger, Craig S

    2007-11-01

    Depression and erectile dysfunction (ED) clearly are associated. Although urologists and psychiatrists have long recognized that antidepressant medications affect erectile function negatively, the interplay between the two conditions remains underappreciated. Psychiatrists may be reluctant to question a patient in detail about ED, and urologists seldom perform a formal assessment of the presence of depression in patients who have ED. This article gives a quick overview of the relationship between these two conditions and provides the clinician with the knowledge required to effectively manage ED with comorbid depression.

  6. Oral sensory dysfunction following radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearelly, Shethal; Wang, Steven J; Cheung, Steven W

    2017-10-01

    To assess differences in oral tactile sensation between subjects who have undergone radiation therapy (XRT) compared to healthy controls. Cross-sectional cohort comparison. Thirty-four subjects with a history of XRT were compared with 23 healthy controls. There was no difference in age (P = .23), but there were slightly more males in the XRT cohort (P = .03). The mean (standard deviation) time after XRT completion was 3.84 (4.84) years. Fifty-six percent of the XRT cohort received chemotherapy. Using our previously validated methodology to measure oral tactile sensory threshold quantitatively with Cheung-Bearelly monofilaments, sensory thresholds of four subsites (anterior tongue, buccal mucosa, posterior tongue, soft palate) were compared for the two cohorts. Site-by-site comparisons showed higher forces were required for stimulus detection at all four subsites among subjects in the XRT cohort compared to healthy controls. Mean force in grams for XRT versus control cohorts were: anterior tongue, 0.39 (1.0) versus 0.02 (0.01); buccal mucosa, 0.42 (0.95) versus 0.06 (0.05); posterior tongue, 0.76 (1.46) versus 0.10 (0.07); and soft palate, 0.86 (1.47) versus 0.08 (0.05) (P sensory dysfunction, manifested by increased tactile forces required for stimulus detection. The magnitude of sensory impairment is 18.7 dB. 3b. Laryngoscope, 127:2282-2286, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies.

  8. Impaired endothelial function in lone atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovina Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired endothelial function has been previously documented in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF and underlying comorbidities or older patients with idiopathic AF. The aim of this study was to evaluate systemic endothelial function in younger AF patients (less than 7 days lone AF. The second group comprised of 28 healthy controls in sinus rhythm (the mean age 43 ± 13, 53% male, matched by age, gender and atherosclerotic risk factors. All the participants underwent physical examination, laboratory analysis [including determination of C-reactive protein (CRP], standard echocardiography and exercise-stress testing. Brachial artery FMD and endothelium independent dilation (NMD were assessed with a high-resolution ultrasound probe and arterial diameters taken from 5 consecutive cardiac cycles were averaged for each measurement to accommodate to beat-to-beat flow variations in AF. Results. There were no differences between the 2 groups regarding age, gender and most clinical, laboratory and echocardiographic characteristics (all p > 0.05, apart from the increased heart rate (p = 0.018, body mass index (p = 0.027, CRP levels (p = 0.007 and left atrial anteroposterior dimension (p 0.05. In the multivariate analysis, the independent FMD determinants in our study population were the presence of AF, smoking and total cholesterol levels (all p < 0.001. In patients with AF, the strongest independent FMD determinant was arrhythmia duration (p < 0.001, followed by smoking (p = 0.013 and total cholesterol levels (p = 0.045. Conclusions. Our findings confirm that sustained AF is associated with systemic endothelial dysfunction even in relatively young patients with no cardiovascular disorders or risk factors. AF is an independent contributor to lower FMD and a prolonged arrhythmia duration may confer the risk for more profound endothelial damage.

  9. Spatial memory impairments in a prediabetic rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Soares,E.; Prediger, R. D.; Nunes, S.; A.A. Castro; Viana, S .D.; Lemos, C.; C. M. Souza; Agostinho, P; Cunha, R. A.; E. Carvalho; Ribeiro, C. A. Fontes; Reis, F.; PEREIRA, F. C.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with an increased risk for brain disorders, namely cognitive impairments associated with hippocampal dysfunction underlying diabetic encephalopathy. However, the impact of a prediabetic state on cognitive function is unknown. Therefore, we now investigated whether spatial learning and memory deficits and the underlying hippocampal dysfunction were already present in a prediabetic animal model. Adult Wistar rats drinking high-sucrose (HSu) diet (35% sucrose solution duri...

  10. Vascular dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Lesley J; Morton, Jude S; Davidge, Sandra T

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a complex disorder which affects an estimated 5% of all pregnancies worldwide. It is diagnosed by hypertension in the presence of proteinuria after the 20th week of pregnancy and is a prominent cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. As delivery is currently the only known treatment, preeclampsia is also a leading cause of preterm delivery. Preeclampsia is associated with maternal vascular dysfunction, leading to serious cardiovascular risk both during and following pregnancy. Endothelial dysfunction, resulting in increased peripheral resistance, is an integral part of the maternal syndrome. While the cause of preeclampsia remains unknown, placental ischemia resulting from aberrant placentation is a fundamental characteristic of the disorder. Poor placentation is believed to stimulate the release of a number of factors including pro- and antiangiogenic factors and inflammatory activators into the maternal systemic circulation. These factors are critical mediators of vascular function and impact the endothelium in distinctive ways, including enhanced endothelial oxidative stress. The mechanisms of action and the consequences on the maternal vasculature will be discussed in this review.

  11. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment can be separated from lipofuscin accumulation in aged human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hütter, Eveline; Skovbro, Mette; Lener, Barbara;

    2007-01-01

    According to the free radical theory of aging, reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as a driving force of the aging process, and it is generally believed that mitochondrial dysfunction is a major source of increased oxidative stress in tissues with high content of mitochondria, such as muscle or brain....... However, recent experiments in mouse models of premature aging have questioned the role of mitochondrial ROS production in premature aging. To address the role of mitochondrial impairment and ROS production for aging in human muscles, we have analyzed mitochondrial properties in muscle fibres isolated...... from the vastus lateralis of young and elderly donors. Mitochondrial respiratory functions were addressed by high-resolution respirometry, and ROS production was analyzed by in situ staining with the redox-sensitive dye dihydroethidium. We found that aged human skeletal muscles contain fully functional...

  12. Prefrontal dysfunction and a monkey model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ping; Cui, Ding; Zhao, Xu-Dong; Ma, Yuan-Ye

    2015-04-01

    The prefrontal cortex is implicated in cognitive functioning and schizophrenia. Prefrontal dysfunction is closely associated with the symptoms of schizophrenia. In addition to the features typical of schizophrenia, patients also present with aspects of cognitive disorders. Based on these relationships, a monkey model mimicking the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia has been made using treatment with the non-specific competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, phencyclidine. The symptoms are ameliorated by atypical antipsychotic drugs such as clozapine. The beneficial effects of clozapine on behavioral impairment might be a specific indicator of schizophrenia-related cognitive impairment.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction in DDR-related cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhovich, Alex; Graifer, Dmitry; Stefanovie, Barbora; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-04-01

    Given the key role of mitochondria in various cellular events, it is not surprising that mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF) is seen in many pathological conditions, in particular cancer. The mechanisms defining MDF are not clearly understood and may involve genetic defects, misbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS), impaired autophagy (mitophagy), acquired mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA and inability of cells to cope with the consequences. The importance of MDF arises from its detection in the syndromes with defective DNA damage response (DDR) and cancer predisposition. Here, we will focus on the dual role of these syndromes in cancer predisposition and MDF with specific emphasis on impaired autophagy.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunctions in neurodegenerative diseases: relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroudová, Jana; Singh, Namrata; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions are supposed to be responsible for many neurodegenerative diseases dominating in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). A growing body of evidence suggests that defects in mitochondrial metabolism and particularly of electron transport chain may play a role in pathogenesis of AD. Structurally and functionally damaged mitochondria do not produce sufficient ATP and are more prominent in producing proapoptotic factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this can be an early stage of several mitochondrial disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunctions may be caused by both mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA that code mitochondrial components and by environmental causes. In the following review, common aspects of mitochondrial impairment concerned about neurodegenerative diseases are summarized including ROS production, impaired mitochondrial dynamics, and apoptosis. Also, damaged function of electron transport chain complexes and interactions between pathological proteins and mitochondria are described for AD particularly and marginally for PD and HD.

  15. Structural and functional cerebral impairments in cirrhotic patients with a history of overt hepatic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hua-Jun [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhu, Xi-Qi [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Department of Radiology, The Second Hospital of Nanjing, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Shu, Hao [Department of Neurology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Yang, Ming; Zhang, Yi; Ding, Jie; Wang, Yu [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Teng, Gao-Jun, E-mail: gjteng@vip.sina.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: Diffuse brain atrophy has been observed in cirrhotic patients and recent reports have revealed the persistence of cognitive impairment after clinical resolution of overt hepatic encephalopathy. We sought to explore the continued influence of overt hepatic encephalopathy on neurological function by measuring brain resting-state inherent connectivity, based on an investigation of structural abnormalities. Methods: Neuropsychological tests and structural and functional magnetic resonance scanning were conducted in 20 healthy controls and 21 cirrhotic patients with a history of overt hepatic encephalopathy. The analysis of voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity were performed to detect the alterations in brain structure and function, respectively. Results: Patients showed significantly worse performance in neuropsychological tests as compared with controls, despite apparently normal mental status. Analysis of voxel-based morphometry revealed a decrease in gray matter volume primarily in the midline regions, bilateral insular cortex and caudates, left parahippocampal gyrus, and right cerebellum posterior lobe, while the volume of the bilateral thalamus showed an increase. Of these regions, the posterior cingulate cortex with peak atrophy was selected as the origin for the analysis of functional connectivity. Typical patterns of a default mode network were identified in both groups. Decreased functional connectivity was found in the medial prefrontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, and left middle temporal gyrus in the patients. Conclusions: Both functional and structural impairments were evident after apparent recovery from overt hepatic encephalopathy, demonstrating that brain dysfunction induced by hepatic encephalopathy persisted after clinical resolution and provided a basis for further evolution of the disease.

  16. Vasoactive substances in the circulatory dysfunction of cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2001-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension exhibit characteristic haemodynamic changes with a hyperkinetic systemic circulation, abnormal distribution of the blood volume, and neurohumoral dysregulation. Moreover, the circulating levels of several vasoactive substances may be elevated...... are impaired with direct relation to the degree of liver dysfunction. Significant pathophysiological mechanisms seem to include a reduced beta-adrenergic receptor signal transduction, defective cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, and conductance abnormalities. Various vasodilators. such as nitric oxide...

  17. Heme oxygenase-2 deletion impairs macrophage function: implication in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellner, Lars; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; van Rooijen, Nico; Dunn, Michael W; Abraham, Nader G; Schwartzman, Michal L

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-2 deficiency impairs wound healing and exacerbates inflammation following injury. We examine the impact of HO-2 deficiency on macrophage function and the contribution of macrophage HO-2 to inflammatory and repair responses to injury. Corneal epithelial debridement was performed in control and macrophage-depleted HO-2(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice and in bone marrow chimeras. Peritoneal macrophages were collected for determination of phagocytic activity and classically activated macrophage (M1)-alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Depletion of macrophages delayed corneal healing (13.2%) and increased neutrophil infiltration (54.1%) by day 4 in WT mice, whereas in HO-2(-/-) mice, it did not worsen the already impaired wound healing and exacerbated inflammation. HO-2(-/-) macrophages displayed an altered M1 phenotype with no significant expression of M2 or M2-like activated cells and a 31.3% reduction in phagocytic capacity that was restored by inducing HO-1 activity or supplementing biliverdin. Macrophage depletion had no effect, whereas adoptive transfer of WT bone marrow improved wound healing (34% on day 4) but did not resolve the exaggerated inflammatory response in HO-2(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that HO-2-deficient macrophages are dysfunctional and that macrophage HO-2 is required for proper macrophage function but is insufficient to correct the impaired healing of the HO-2(-/-) cornea, suggesting that corneal epithelial expression of HO-2 is a key to resolution and repair in wound healing.

  18. Impaired vascular responses to relaxin in diet-induced overweight female rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drongelen, J. van; Koppen, A. van; Pertijs, J.C.L.M.; Gooi, J.H.; Parry, L.J.; Sweep, F.C.; Lotgering, F.K.; Smits, P.; Spaanderman, M.E.A.

    2012-01-01

    Relaxin mediates renal and mesenteric vascular adaptations to pregnancy by increasing endothelium-dependent vasodilation and compliance and decreasing myogenic reactivity. Diet-induced overweight and obesity are associated with impaired endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling leading to a re

  19. Neuropsychological abnormalities in children with the Panayiotopoulos syndrome point to parietal lobe dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ricardo; Simões, Mário R; Leal, Alberto J R

    2014-02-01

    Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS) is a common epilepsy syndrome associated with rare clinical seizures and unknown localization of the epileptogenic area. Despite findings of normal development in patients with PS, recent neuropsychological studies point to subtle and diverse cognitive impairments. No well-outlined hypothesis about the localization of the brain dysfunction responsible for these impairments has been proposed. We further explored the cognitive dysfunctions in PS and made inferences on the most likely anatomical localization of brain impairment. A group of 19 patients (aged 6-12) with PS was rated according to spike activity and lateralization. The patients were submitted to a neuropsychological evaluation to assess general intelligence, memory, language, visual-perceptual abilities, attention, and executive functions. Using 35-channel scalp EEG recordings, the N170 face-evoked event-related potential (ERP) was obtained to assess the functional integrity of the ventral pathway. All patients with PS showed normal IQ but subtle and consistent neurocognitive impairments. Namely, we found abnormalities in the copy task of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure and in the Narrative Memory Test. There was no correlation between neuropsychological impairments with spike activity and hemispheric spike lateralization. The N170 ERP was normal in all patients except for one. Our neuropsychological findings demonstrate impairments in visual-perceptual abilities and in semantic processing. These findings, paired with the absence of occipital lobe dysfunction in all neuropsychological studies of PS performed to this date, support the existence of parietal lobe dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cycling and erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Šibli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: For many years medical studies have implicated bicycle riding is causing erectile dysfunction (ED in association with higher perineal pressure. This review focuses upon epidemiological studies assesing the impact of cycling on ED, pathogenesis of ED in cyclists  as well as on research considering changes of perineal pressure, hemodynamics, and nerve conduction when cycling. Investigestors were also interested in different saddle sizes, materials and geometry and also in the impact of saddle and riders position on changes to the perineum. Research on female cyclists is very limited but indicates similar genitourinary disorders as in male cyclists. We also review  research on preventative and therapeutic options regarding bicycle riding and ED.

  1. Cognitive dysfunction and its determinants in patients with neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Varghese

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neurocysticercosis (NCC is the most common parasitic infection of man. In addition to a headache, seizures, and focal deficits, this is associated with significant cognitive dysfunction. Many studies revealed that the number and location of lesions are not always responsible for cognitive dysfunction. Cholinesterase and pseudocholinesterase are found in the walls of the cysticercus which could contribute to cholinergic depletion and thus cognitive dysfunction. Patients and Methods: A total of 43 patients who presented with NCC were evaluated for cognitive deficits, as well as cholinesterase levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF with control CSF from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia. Blood levels of interleukin-10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha were also estimated and correlated with cognitive deficits. Results: There is a mild increase in the acetylcholinesterase in CSF of patients compared to controls, but it did not correlate with cognitive deficits. There is an increase in interleukins to a significant level which correlates with vesicular stage of the organism and cognitive impairment. The number of lesions also correlated with cognitive impairment even though the location did not. The domains of cognitive deficits seen are sustained attention, category fluency, verbal working memory, planning, set shifting, verbal learning, visual memory, and construction. Discussion and Conclusion: NCC is associated with multi-domain cognitive impairment correlates with vescicular stage, proinflammatory cytokines and number of lesions but not location, vesicular stage, and proinflammatory cytokines.

  2. [Clinical consequences of muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauleda Roig, J

    2006-05-01

    The function of respiratory muscles, and mainly inspiratory muscles, is impaired in COPD patients. Most of these impairments are essentially due to pulmonary hyperinflation that puts these muscles in a disadvantageous situation. The main consequence of this dysfunction is respiratory muscle fatigue that may cause shortness of breath, exertion intolerance, and hypoventilation with onset of hypercapnic respiratory failure. This function may be measured at the pulmonary function laboratory by means of unspecific (spirometry, pulmonary volumes) or specific tests (maxim respiratory pressures [MIP - M], transdiaphragmatic pressure, tension-time index of the diaphragm, electromyography, or endura tests). Therapy should aim at improving hyperinflation with bronchodilator therapy, improving muscular strength with rehabilitation, and in severe cases muscle rest with mechanical ventilation. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is a common complication in moderate-severe COPD, and it may be the result of chronic inactivity, hypoxemia, electrolytic impairments, under nutrition, steroids, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. Besides, it may contribute to patients' quality of life worsening, disability, and even an increase in morbimortality. It may tested by impedanciometry, muscle strength tests (dynamometry), imaging tests, and even muscle biopsy in research studies. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is potentially manageable with rehabilitation, nutritional supplementation, and anabolic drugs. However, therapeutic success is often incomplete, so that further studies with new therapeutic strategies are needed.

  3. Cognitive Dysfunction and its Determinants in Patients with Neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Vinod; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Christopher, Rita; Rajeswaran, Jamuna; Prasad, Chandrajit; Subasree, R.; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common parasitic infection of man. In addition to a headache, seizures, and focal deficits, this is associated with significant cognitive dysfunction. Many studies revealed that the number and location of lesions are not always responsible for cognitive dysfunction. Cholinesterase and pseudocholinesterase are found in the walls of the cysticercus which could contribute to cholinergic depletion and thus cognitive dysfunction. Patients and Methods: A total of 43 patients who presented with NCC were evaluated for cognitive deficits, as well as cholinesterase levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with control CSF from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia. Blood levels of interleukin-10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha were also estimated and correlated with cognitive deficits. Results: There is a mild increase in the acetylcholinesterase in CSF of patients compared to controls, but it did not correlate with cognitive deficits. There is an increase in interleukins to a significant level which correlates with vesicular stage of the organism and cognitive impairment. The number of lesions also correlated with cognitive impairment even though the location did not. The domains of cognitive deficits seen are sustained attention, category fluency, verbal working memory, planning, set shifting, verbal learning, visual memory, and construction. Discussion and Conclusion: NCC is associated with multi-domain cognitive impairment correlates with vescicular stage, proinflammatory cytokines and number of lesions but not location, vesicular stage, and proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:27114627

  4. Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased visual ...

  5. Dysfunctional anger and sexual violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A G

    2014-06-01

    Sexual offenses with or without aggression attract attention from the popular media and the scientific community. Empirical research suggests a relationship between anger and sexual violence. This article describes the key themes of dysfunctional anger and sexual violence, and how dysfunctional anger relates to sexual fantasies, sexual offending, and sexual recidivism. The implications of the findings for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  6. Defining sphincter of oddi dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P

    1996-01-01

    Sphincter of Oddi (SO) dysmotility may give rise to pain. The golden standard for the demonstration of SO dysfunction is endoscopic manometry. A number of abnormalities are observed in patients with postcholecystectomy pain and in patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis. Criteria for defi...... for defining SO dysfunction and the possible mechanisms for the precipitation of pain are discussed....

  7. Biomarkers of postoperative delirium and cognitive dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganna eAndrosova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Elderly surgical patients frequently experience postoperative delirium (POD and the subsequent development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD. Clinical features include deterioration in cognition, disturbance in attention and reduced awareness of the environment and result in higher morbidity, mortality and greater utilization of social financial assistance. The aging Western societies can expect an increase in the incidence of POD and POCD. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been studied on the molecular level albeit with unsatisfying small research efforts given their societal burden. Here, we review the known physiological and immunological changes and genetic risk factors, identify candidates for further studies and integrate the information into a draft network for exploration on a systems level. The pathogenesis of these postoperative cognitive impairments is multifactorial; application of integrated systems biology has the potential to reconstruct the underlying network of molecular mechanisms and help in the identification of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers.

  8. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari N. Maia da Silva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions.

  9. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Mari N. Maia; Millington, Rebecca S.; Bridge, Holly; James-Galton, Merle; Plant, Gordon T.

    2017-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical) visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions. PMID:28861031

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, M; Melbye, M; Diaz, L J

    2015-01-01

    -years of follow-up, 19 subjects developed a primary cancer. The corresponding SIR for any primary cancer was 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.68-1.63). Subgroup analyses according to mutational subtype yielded similar results, for example, a SIR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.53 to 1.67) for the m.3243A>G maternally inherited......BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial mutations are commonly reported in tumours, but it is unclear whether impaired mitochondrial function per se is a cause or consequence of cancer. To elucidate this, we examined the risk of cancer in a nationwide cohort of patients with mitochondrial dysfunction. METHODS...... matrilineal relatives to a cohort member with a genetically confirmed maternally inherited mDNA mutation. Information on cancer was obtained by linkage to the Danish Cancer Register. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to assess the relative risk of cancer. RESULTS: During 7334 person...

  11. Acute cognitive dysfunction after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch, M S; Foss, N B; Kristensen, B B;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing hip fracture surgery often experience acute post-operative cognitive dysfunction (APOCD). The pathogenesis of APOCD is probably multifactorial, and no single intervention has been successful in its prevention. No studies have investigated the incidence of APOCD after......, fourth and seventh post-operative days with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score. RESULTS: Thirty-two per cent of patients developed a significant post-operative cognitive decline, which was associated with several pre-fracture patient characteristics, including age and cognitive function......, but also the number of peri-operative transfusions. The development of APOCD was also associated with impaired post-operative rehabilitation and an increased length of stay. APOCD was associated with the development of a major medical complication in 35% of all patients. In 65% of patients developing APOCD...

  12. Muscle dysfunction in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Andersen, J L

    2014-01-01

    implications of muscle dysfunction in cancer patients. The efficacy of exercise training to prevent and/or mitigate cancer-related muscle dysfunction is also discussed. DESIGN: We identified 194 studies examining muscular outcomes in cancer patients by searching PubMed and EMBASE databases. RESULTS: Muscle...... dysfunction is evident across all stages of the cancer trajectory. The causes of cancer-related muscle dysfunction are complex, but may involve a wide range of tumor-, therapy- and/or lifestyle-related factors, depending on the clinical setting of the individual patient. The main importance of muscle...... dysfunction in cancer patients lies in the correlation to vital clinical end points such as cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, therapy complications and quality of life (QoL). Such associations strongly emphasize the need for effective therapeutic countermeasures to be developed and implemented...

  13. Melatonin Improves Outcomes of Heatstroke in Mice by Reducing Brain Inflammation and Oxidative Damage and Multiple Organ Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Tian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here that when untreated mice underwent heat stress, they displayed thermoregulatory deficit (e.g., animals display hypothermia during room temperature exposure, brain (or hypothalamic inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment (e.g., decreased plasma levels of both adrenocorticotrophic hormone and corticosterone during heat stress, multiple organ dysfunction or failure, and lethality. Melatonin therapy significantly reduced the thermoregulatory deficit, brain inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment, multiple organ dysfunction, and lethality caused by heat stroke. Our data indicate that melatonin may improve outcomes of heat stroke by reducing brain inflammation, oxidative damage, and multiple organ dysfunction.

  14. Protective role of melatonin in mitochondrial dysfunction and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradies, Giuseppe; Paradies, Valeria; Ruggiero, Francesca M; Petrosillo, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouse of the eukaryotic cell through their use of oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered an important contributing factor in a variety of physiopathological situations such as aging, heart ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes and several neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as in cell death. Increased formation of reactive oxygen species, altered respiratory chain complexes activity and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore have been suggested as possible factors responsible for impaired mitochondrial function. Therefore, preventing mitochondrial dysfunction could be an effective therapeutic strategy against cellular degenerative processes. Cardiolipin is a unique phospholipid located at the level of inner mitochondrial membrane where it plays an important role in mitochondrial bioenergetics, as well as in cell death. Cardiolipin abnormalities have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in a variety of pathological conditions and aging. Melatonin, the major secretory product of the pineal gland, is a well-known antioxidant agent and thus an effective protector of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Melatonin was reported to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction from oxidative damage by preserving cardiolipin integrity, and this may explain, at least in part, the beneficial effect of this compound in mitochondrial physiopathology. In this article, mechanisms through which melatonin exerts its protective role in mitochondrial dysfunction and related disorders are reviewed.

  15. Prognostic value of endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana; Marice; Ladeia; Raphael; Ribeiro; Sampaio; Maiara; CostaHita; Luis; F; Adan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are at high risk of developing atherosclerosis, associated with higher rates of micro and macro vascular involvement such as coronary artery disease and renal disease. The role of hyperglycemia to induce synthesis of reactive oxygen species by the oxidation of glucose, leading to an increased production of advanced glycosylation end products, as well as inflammation and oxidative stress has been proposed as a possible mechanism in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction(ED). The interaction between C-peptide- the connecting segment of pro-insulin-and nitric oxide in vasodilation is also discussed. Therefore, endothelial dysfunction has been identified as an early marker of vascular disorder in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In some other diseases, ED has been considered an independent predictor of vascular disease, regardless of the method used. Studies have demonstrated the importance of endothelial dysfunction as an useful tool for identifying the risk of vascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, particularly as regards to renal impairment. The aim of this review is to clarify the prognostic value of endothelial dysfunction as a marker of vascular disease in these subjects.

  16. Pharmacotherapy of erectile dysfunction: Current standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kew-Kim Chew

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacotherapy is currently the therapeutic option of choice for erectile dysfunction. Comprising mainly intracavernosal injection therapy using alprostadil or alprostadil combined with phentolamine and/or papaverine and oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, it is safe and effective if appropriately prescribed and administered. The medications in current use produce satisfactory erectile responses by enhancing cavernosal vasodilatation mainly through their ability to promote relaxation of the smooth muscle cells in the corpora cavernosa involving the synthesis and activity of nitric oxide via the cyclic guanosine monophosphate and cyclic adenosine monophosphate biochemical pathways. The main side-effects and complications of intracavernosal injections are postinjection pain, prolonged erections, priapism and penile fibrosis. There may be a variety of side-effects with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition but these are usually inconsequential. Recent serious ill health and the need for ongoing long-acting nitrate therapy or frequent use of short-acting nitrates for angina are absolute contraindications to the use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. Caution has to be exercised in prescribing phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors for patients with impaired renal or hepatic functions or receiving multi-drug therapy for any systemic disease. All patients presenting with erectile dysfunction should be investigated and treated for cardiovascular risk factors. They should also be counseled regarding lifestyle factors particularly healthy balanced diet, regular physical exercise and inappropriate social habits.

  17. Associations of Macro- and Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction With Subclinical Ventricular Dysfunction in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, Ruth F; Guajardo, Isabella; Ayer, Amrita; Mills, Claire; Donovan, Catherine; Beussink, Lauren; Scherzer, Rebecca; Ganz, Peter; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2016-10-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) suffer high rates of heart failure and cardiovascular mortality, and we lack a thorough understanding of what, if any, modifiable factors contribute to cardiac dysfunction in these high-risk patients. To evaluate endothelial function as a potentially modifiable cause of cardiac dysfunction in ESRD, we investigated cross-sectional associations of macro- and microvascular dysfunction with left and right ventricular dysfunction in a well-controlled ESRD cohort. We performed comprehensive echocardiography, including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle-tracking echocardiography of the left and right ventricle, in 149 ESRD patients enrolled in an ongoing prospective, observational study. Of these participants, 123 also underwent endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery (macrovascular function). Microvascular function was measured as the velocity time integral of hyperemic blood flow after cuff deflation. Impaired flow-mediated dilation was associated with higher left ventricular mass, independently of age and blood pressure: per 2-fold lower flow-mediated dilation, left ventricular mass was 4.1% higher (95% confidence interval, 0.49-7.7; P=0.03). After adjustment for demographics, blood pressure, comorbidities, and medications, a 2-fold lower velocity time integral was associated with 9.5% higher E/e' ratio (95% confidence interval, 1.0-16; P=0.03) and 6.7% lower absolute right ventricular longitudinal strain (95% confidence interval, 2.0-12; P=0.003). Endothelial dysfunction is a major correlate of cardiac dysfunction in ESRD, particularly diastolic and right ventricular dysfunction, in patients whose volume status is well controlled. Future investigations are needed to determine whether therapies targeting the vascular endothelium could improve cardiac outcomes in ESRD.

  18. [Female sexual dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Mijal

    2009-09-01

    Female sexual problems are common, frequently overlooked and have a significant impact on the lives of women. Research in the last decade has brought to the understanding and recognition of a number of standpoints, mainly the broad range of normative function. In 2003, the American Urological Association Foundation convened an international committee of experts in the field of women's sexuality, to reconsider the existing definitions of women's sexual dysfunction. Based on the circular response cycle developed by Basson, the group emphasized motivations that might move a woman from being sexually "neutral" to making a decision to be sexual with her partner, as a normative alternative to the need for spontaneous sexual desire as the trigger for sexual behavior. Etiology may stem from medical as well as psychological factors, thus assessment must include a complete evaluation. Treatment includes psycho-education, improvement of interpersonal communication, cognitive behavioral treatment and elucidation and treatment of medical problems, if necessary. Several pharmacological treatments are under investigation, with modest results and uncertainties about their long term safety. This review presents the female sexual response as it is understood today and the current diagnostic and therapeutic understandings and directions.

  19. [Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro; Donnay, Sergio

    2015-10-21

    Recent clinical practice guidelines on thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy have changed health care provided to pregnant women, although their recommendations are under constant revision. Trimester- and area-specific reference ranges for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone are required for proper diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. There is no doubt on the need of therapy for overt hypothyroidism, while therapy for subclinical hypothyroidism is controversial. Further research is needed to settle adverse effects of isolated hypothyroxinemia and thyroid autoimmunity. Differentiation between hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and the usually self-limited gestational transient thyrotoxicosis is critical. It is also important to recognize risk factors for postpartum thyroiditis. Supplementation with iodine is recommended to maintain adequate iodine nutrition during pregnancy and avoid serious consequences in offspring. Controversy remains about universal screening for thyroid disease during pregnancy or case-finding in high-risk women. Opinions of some scientific societies and recent cost-benefit studies favour universal screening. Randomized controlled studies currently under development should reduce the uncertainties that still remain in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Markers of erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin P Davies

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development and marketing of oral pharmacotherapy that is both noninvasive and successful in treating erectile dysfunction (ED, the quest to identify markers of organic ED lost ground. Indeed, the multi-factorial nature of ED may have led many researchers to conclude that searching for a universal marker of ED was futile. However, the realization that ED is strongly correlated with the overall health of men, and may act as a predictor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD and diabetes, has stimulated interest in identifying genes that can distinguish organic ED. In addition, the potential ability to suggest to the patient that ED is reversible (i.e., psychogenic with a simple test would be of significance to both the physician and patient, as well as for reimbursement issues for therapy by insurance companies. Such a marker may also act as a non-subjective measure of the degree of ED and the efficacy of treatment. This review discusses the importance of identifying such markers and recent work identifying potential markers in human patients.

  1. DIASTOLIC DYSFUNCTION: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Diastolic heart failure is an underestimated pathology. Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that HF with a preserved ejection fraction will become the more common form of HF which clinicians will encounter. Symptomatic treatment focuses on the reduction in pulmonary congestion and the improvement in LV filling. Specific treatment is actually lacking, but encouraging data are emerging concerning the use of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone axis blockers, nitric oxide donors, or, very recently, new agents specifically targeting actin–myosin cross-bridges. It is generally considered to have a somewhat better prognosis than systolic HF, but frequency of hospitalizations is comparable in systolic and diastolic HF. 1 Despite the recognition of its importance, definition and diagnostic criteria of diastolic dysfunction and diastolic HF remain controversial. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES This review focus of definition, diagnosis and management of diastolic heart failure with it prognosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS We have studied various guidelines, articles, reviews using given keywords, along with our experience in management of diastolic heart failure in 2015. The articles and the references were reviewed keeping in mind about the simplified management offered to the patient.

  2. Psychoanalysis: a dysfunctional family?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskurth, P

    1998-01-01

    The discussion opens with an account of the author's mother's bizarre family in which a strong, charismatic grandmother maintained absolute control over her large family by encouraging a neurotic dependence in them through daily reports of their complaints. Getting interested in psychoanalysis in an effort to understand the dynamics of this dysfunctional family, the author, a biographer, turned to the study of Melanie Klein, becoming entranced by her ideas. Her research also revealed how Klein had discouraged her followers from developing ideas that diverged in any way from her own. Her portrait of the pioneer analyst provoked intense indignation. A similar pattern of absolute loyalty to his person and theories was to be found in Freud's Secret Committee, formed primarily as a means of getting rid of Jung who had been showing disturbing signs of independence. When Ferenczi and Rank began to pursue independent lines of enquiry in their work, they too were though to be undermining the foundations of classical psychoanalysis. Finally, the author concludes that though there have been sorry incidents in psychoanalysis, we should be mature enough to accept both the contributions of the early pioneers and the realizations that new ideas must be permitted to evolve.

  3. Bioenergetics, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of septic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozza, Fernando A; D'Avila, Joana C; Ritter, Cristiane; Sonneville, Romain; Sharshar, Tarek; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2013-05-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Acute and long-term brain dysfunctions have been demonstrated both in experimental models and septic patients. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy is an early and frequent manifestation but is underdiagnosed, because of the absence of specific biomarkers and of confounding factors such as sedatives used in the intensive care unit. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy may have acute and long-term consequences including development of autonomic dysfunction, delirium, and cognitive impairment. The mechanisms of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involve mitochondrial and vascular dysfunctions, oxidative stress, neurotransmission disturbances, inflammation, and cell death. Here we review specific evidence that links bioenergetics, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the setting of brain dysfunctions associated to sepsis.

  4. [Characteristics of postpartum thyroid dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argatska, A; Nonchev, B; Obretsova, M; Pehlivanov, B

    2015-01-01

    The risk factors and mechanisms for the development of postpartum thyroid dysfunction have been widely discussed. However data on patients suffered spontaneous or induced abortion during early pregnancy are scarce. To reveal the characteristics of thyroid dysfunction in women after an abortion in the first trimester of pregnancy. A total of 28 women (18 euthyroid, 10 with thyroid dysfunction), mean age 30.46 ± 1.01 years following abortion in the first trimester have been included in the study. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodthyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyreoglobulin antibodies (TgAb), thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) were measured and ultrasound assessment of the thyroid was performed 3 and 9 months after the interruption of pregnancy. Hypothyroidism was found in 6 of the women with thyroid dysfunction and thyrotoxicosis--in 4. Clinical features of thyroid dysfunction were observed in 3 patients while in the remaining 7 cases, diagnosis was made on the basis of hormonal levels. Positive titers of thyroid autoantibodies were detected in the majority of the cases with functional disordes. In 6 patients thyroid dysfunction was transient and in 4 hormonal abnormalities persisted on by the 9th month after the abortion. The comparative analysis showed that the volume of the thyroid gland and the degree of hypoehogenicity were significantly higher in patients with thyroid dysfunction compared to euthyroid women. Thyroid dysfunction after abortion in the first trimester is mainly of autoimmune pathogenesis and its characteristics do not differ from those of postpartum thyroiditis. In the majority of patients these disorders are subclinical and may remain unrecognized. A close active follow up of patients at increased risk of functional thyroid disorders after an abortion is required in order to prevent morbidity and identify the cases developing permanent thyroid dysfunction.

  5. Cardiac dysfunction in congenital diaphragmatic hernia: Pathophysiology, clinical assessment, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neil; Kipfmueller, Florian

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is an important consequence of pulmonary hypertension in congenital diaphragmatic hernia and a determinant of disease severity. Increased afterload leads to right ventricular dilatation and diastolic dysfunction. Septal displacement and dysfunction impair left ventricular function, which may also be compromised by fetal hypoplasia. Biventricular failure contributes to systemic hypotension and hypoperfusion. Early and regular echocardiographic assessment of cardiac function and pulmonary artery pressure can guide therapeutic decision-making, including choice and timing of pulmonary vasodilators, cardiotropes, ECMO, and surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Overview and assessment of cognitive function in interpreting postoperative cognitive dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Rina; Hattori, Hideyuki

    2014-11-01

    The most important point for evaluation of the post-operative cognitive dysfunction is that we understand "cognitive function". First we described the definition of the "cognitive function" and second, outlined each function (dysfunction) and introduced the main assessment methods from the view point of neuropsychology. Cognitive function (dysfunction) described in this paper includes consciousness (confusional state, disturbance of consciousness), generalized attention (disorder of generalized attention), memory (amnesia), orientation (disorientation), executive function (dysexecutive syndrome), social cognition (social cognitive impairment), language (aphasia), cognition (agnosia), behavior (apraxia), directed attention (unilateral spatial neglect), and construction (constructional disorder).

  7. Cognitive Impairments Associated with CFS and POTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard A. Jason

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is characterized by fatigue, sleep dysfunction, and cognitive deficits (Fukuda et al., 1994. Research surrounding cognitive functioning among patients with CFS has found difficulty with memory, attention, and information processing. A similar disorder, postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS, is characterized by increased heart rate, fatigue, and mental cloudiness (Raj et al., 2009. Potential implications of cognitive deficits for patients with CFS and/or POTS are discussed, including difficulties with school and/or employment. A few biological theories (i.e., kindling, impairments in the central nervous system, and difficulty with blood flow have emerged as potential explanations for the cognitive deficits reported in both CFS and POTS Future research should continue to examine possible explanations for cognitive impairments in CFS and POTS, and ultimately use this information to try and reduce cognitive impairments for these patients.

  8. Cognitive Dysfunction in Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Tulay Koca

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary symptom of fibromyalgia is widespread pain with muscle tenderness to light palpation. Howeover many patients report a wide range of symptoms including pain, dyscognition, sleep disturbances, fatigue and mood disorders (frequently depression. Such symptoms seem to be related to one another. Besides, a decrease in concentration and memory disorder has recognised as an independent symptom yet; added into literature under the terms and lsquo;dyscognition' and and lsquo;fibrofog'. Recently clinicians interested in investigations about dyscognition in fibromyalgia syndrome. Cognitive symptoms may be exacerbated by the presence of depression, anxiety, sleep dysorders, endocrine disregulations and pain; but the relationship is unclear. Additionally some of recent studies suggest that insulin resistance may represent a risk factor for memory impairment in these patients. There is lack of standardized tests, treatment methods and studies for understanding pathophysiologic pathways of cognitive problems (memory, concentration in fibromyalgia.

  9. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolinson, P Gunnar; Kozar, Albert J; Cibor, Greg

    2003-02-01

    The sacroiliac (SI) joint is a common source of low back pain in the general population. Because it is the link between the lower extremities and the spine, it sustains even higher loads during athletic activity, predisposing athletes to a greater probability of joint dysfunction and pain. The diagnosis and treatment of SI joint dysfunction remains controversial, due to complex anatomy and biomechanics, and a lack of universally accepted nomenclature and terminology, consistently reliable clinical tests and imaging studies, and consistently effective treatments. This article clarifies these issues by presenting a model of SI joint anatomy and function, a systematic approach to the diagnosis of dysfunction, and a comprehensive treatment plan.

  10. Strapping for temporomandibular joint dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Abraham

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD is a common problem seen in many of the dental clinics. Management of this depends on an accurate diagnosis of the cause for the TMJD. Physical therapy and rehabilitation play a vital role in the management of these dysfunctions. Physical therapy is useful in treating post-traumatic stiffness of the TMJ while strapping of the TMJ for a dysfunction along with conventional physical therapy is of benefit in terms of reduction in click, decrease in pain, and an improvement in function.

  11. Strapping for temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Abraham Samuel; John, Sandhya Mary; Unni, Amith

    2008-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) is a common problem seen in many of the dental clinics. Management of this depends on an accurate diagnosis of the cause for the TMJD. Physical therapy and rehabilitation play a vital role in the management of these dysfunctions. Physical therapy is useful in treating post-traumatic stiffness of the TMJ while strapping of the TMJ for a dysfunction along with conventional physical therapy is of benefit in terms of reduction in click, decrease in pain, and an improvement in function.

  12. The relationship between cognitive dysfunction and coping abilities in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Willis, Kelly E; Shear, Paula K; Steffen, John J; Borkin, Joyce

    2002-06-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a core feature of schizophrenia [Psychiatr. Clin. North Am., 16 (1993) 295; Psychopharmacology: The fourth generation of progress, Raven Press, New York (1995) 1171; Clinical Neuropsychology, Oxford University Press, New York (1993) 449] and is related to psychosocial functioning in this population [Am. J. Psychiatry, 153 (1996) 321]. It is unclear whether cognitive dysfunction is related to specific areas of functioning in schizophrenia, such as coping abilities. Individuals with schizophrenia have deficient coping skills, which may contribute to their difficulties dealing with stressors [Am. J. Orthopsychiatry, 62 (1992) 117; J. Abnorm. Psychol., 82 (1986) 189]. The current study examined the relationship between coping abilities and cognitive dysfunction in a community sample of individuals with schizophrenia. It was hypothesized that executive dysfunction and mnemonic impairments would be positively related to deficiencies in active coping efforts involving problem solving and self-initiation (e.g. advocating for oneself and others with mental illness and becoming involved in meaningful activities, such as work), independent of the contributions of the general intellectual deficits associated with the disorder and psychiatric symptoms. The results indicated that both executive dysfunction and mnemonic impairments were related to decreased usage of active coping mechanisms after controlling for general intellectual deficits. Further, recognition memory made independent contributions to the prediction of coping involving action and help seeking after controlling for the effects of negative symptoms. These findings suggest that individuals with schizophrenia may be less flexible in their use of coping strategies, which may in turn contribute to their difficulties in coping with mental illness and its consequences.

  13. Resolution propositions; Proposition de resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    To put a resolution to the meeting in relation with the use of weapons made of depleted uranium is the purpose of this text. The situation of the use of depleted uranium by France during the Gulf war and other recent conflicts will be established. This resolution will give the most strict recommendations face to the eventual sanitary and environmental risks in the use of these kind of weapons. (N.C.)

  14. Multidisciplinary Management of Sexual Dysfunction, Perineal Pain, and Elimination Dysfunction in a Woman with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogliatto, Fabrizio; Bacchio, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease that commonly affects young women and is associated with sexual dysfunction (SD) and lower anourogenital dysfunction, which affect quality of life. We evaluated the importance of an integrated multidisciplinary approach in the Lower Female Ano-Uro-Genital Network (LFAUGN) to manage a variety of complex symptoms. Methods: A 40-year-old woman with MS and primary concerns about perineal pain and SD was treated by a trained midwife from the LFAUGN and a physical therapist after a multidisciplinary diagnostic process that included gynecologic evaluation for perineal pain and SD, physiatric assessment, urologic assessment for bladder retention (BR), and surgical examination for obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS). Physical therapy was integrated with pharmacologic therapy for ODS and with self-catheterization for BR. Results: After 5 months of treatment, the patient reported improvement in functional perineal parameters and perineal pain (visual analogue scale score: 9 at T1 vs. 5 at T2), with resolution of pelvic floor hypertonia. Furthermore, ODS and BR symptoms improved (5-item score: 18 of 20 at T1 vs. 10 of 20 at T2; 1 self-catheterization daily, with postvoid residual volume [PRV] sexual satisfaction increased (Female Sexual Function Index score: 18 of 36 at T1 vs. 23 of 36 at T2). Conclusions: These results suggest that physical therapy, as an integral component of a multidisciplinary approach in a multiprofessional network, may play a pivotal role in improving anourogenital dysfunction and sexual satisfaction. PMID:28243183

  15. Cognitive dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    Full Text Available Abstract Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs comprise a heterogeneous group of complex neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by the presence of progressive cerebellar ataxia, associated or otherwise with ophthalmoplegia, pyramidal signs, extrapyramidal features, pigmentary retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Objective: To verify the presence of cognitive dysfunction among the main types of SCA described in the literature. Methods: the review was conducted using the search system of the PUBMED and OMIM databases. Results: Cognitive dysfunction occurs in a considerable proportion of SCA, particularly in SCA 3, which is the most frequent form of SCA worldwide. Dementia has been described in several other types of SCA such as SCA 2, SCA 17 and DRPLA. Mental retardation is a specific clinical feature of SCA 13. Conclusions: The role of the cerebellum in cognitive functions has been observed in different types of SCAs which can manifest varying degrees of cognitive dysfunction, dementia and mental retardation.

  16. Executive Dysfunction in Geriatric Depression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lockwood, Kathryn A; Alexopoulos, George S; van Gorp, Wilfred G

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to characterize the neuropsychological presentation of geriatric depression and to determine whether depression-related executive dysfunction is more pronounced during advanced age. METHOD...

  17. Heterogeneity in executive impairment in patients with very mild Alzheimer's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, J.; Gade, Anders; Vogel, A.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of executive impairment in mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) has primarily been demonstrated by means of group comparison. Whether executive dysfunction is a common feature of mild AD or only present in a subgroup of patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to describe...

  18. Thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarpour, Sima; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy has a huge impact on the thyroid function in both healthy women and those that have thyroid dysfunction. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnant women is relatively high. Objective: The objective of this review was to increase awareness and to provide a review on adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmune positivity on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this review, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with appropriate keywords for relevant English manuscript. We used a variety of studies, including randomized clinical trials, cohort (prospective and retrospective), case-control and case reports. Those studies on thyroid disorders among non-pregnant women and articles without adequate quality were excluded. Results: Overt hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism has several adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Overt hyperthyroidism was associated with miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preeclampsia and fetal thyroid dysfunction. Overt hypothyroidism was associated with abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, premature birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal death, increased neonatal respiratory distress and infant neuro developmental dysfunction. However the adverse effect of subclinical hypothyroidism, and thyroid antibody positivity on pregnancy outcomes was not clear. While some studies demonstrated higher chance of placental abruption, preterm birth, miscarriage, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, severe preeclampsia and neonatal distress and diabetes in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity; the other ones have not reported these adverse effects. Conclusion: While the impacts of overt thyroid dysfunction on feto-maternal morbidities have been clearly identified and its long

  19. Thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Nazarpour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregnancy has a huge impact on the thyroid function in both healthy women and those that have thyroid dysfunction. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnant women is relatively high. Objective: The objective of this review was to increase awareness and to provide a review on adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmune positivity on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this review, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with appropriate keywords for relevant English manuscript. We used a variety of studies, including randomized clinical trials, cohort (prospective and retrospective, case-control and case reports. Those studies on thyroid disorders among non-pregnant women and articles without adequate quality were excluded. Results: Overt hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism has several adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Overt hyperthyroidism was associated with miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preeclampsia and fetal thyroid dysfunction. Overt hypothyroidism was associated with abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, premature birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal death, increased neonatal respiratory distress and infant neuro developmental dysfunction. However the adverse effect of subclinical hypothyroidism, and thyroid antibody positivity on pregnancy outcomes was not clear. While some studies demonstrated higher chance of placental abruption, preterm birth, miscarriage, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, severe preeclampsia and neonatal distress and diabetes in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity; the other ones have not reported these adverse effects. Conclusion: While the impacts of overt thyroid dysfunction on feto-maternal morbidities have been clearly

  20. Maternal Metabolic Syndrome Programs Mitochondrial Dysfunction via Germline Changes across Three Generations

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica L. Saben; Anna L. Boudoures; Zeenat Asghar; Alysha Thompson; Andrea Drury; Wendy Zhang; Maggie Chi; Andrew Cusumano; Suzanne Scheaffer; Kelle H. Moley

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity impairs offspring health, but the responsible mechanisms are not fully established. To address this question, we fed female mice a high-fat/high-sugar diet from before conception until weaning and then followed the outcomes in the next three generations of offspring, all fed a control diet. We observed that female offspring born to obese mothers had impaired peripheral insulin signaling that was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamic and c...

  1. Pragmatic communication is impaired in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Deborah; Ouyang, Bichun; Lonnquist, Eryn; Newcombe, Jill

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether severity of disease, cognitive function, age, gender, or amount of social interaction were associated with pragmatic dysfunction in Parkinson disease. No studies have previously been done to investigate variables that may be associated with pragmatic dysfunction in Parkinson disease. A case-control study was conducted with 17 Parkinson disease patients and 17 convenience controls. Each Parkinson disease patient and a control were interviewed, and their pragmatic skills were evaluated using a scale of pragmatic communication skills. Correlation analysis was used to determine what factors were associated with pragmatic dysfunction in the Parkinson disease patients. Cases scored lower on the pragmatic scale with a mean of 29.7 compared with 38.9 in the controls (p pragmatic communication skills had moderate to strong correlations with the MMSE (r = .81, p = .002), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score (r = -.71, p = .002), and duration of disease (r = -.53, p = .03). These results show that Parkinson disease patients have impaired pragmatic function compared with controls on both verbal and nonverbal sections, and this impairment correlates with mental state, duration, and severity of disease.

  2. Dysfunctional cognitions and their emotional, behavioral, and functional correlates in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): is the cognitive-behavioral model valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Fernando; López, Pablo; Alvarez Prado, Dolores; Kichic, Rafael; Cetkovich-Bakmas, Marcelo; Lischinsky, Alicia; Manes, Facundo

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the presence of dysfunctional cognitions in adults with ADHD and to determine whether these cognitions are associated with emotional symptoms, maladaptive coping, and functional impairment, as predicted by the cognitive-behavioral model. A total of 35 adult participants with ADHD, 20 nonclinical controls, and 20 non-ADHD clinical controls were assessed with measures of ADHD symptoms, dysfunctional cognitions, depression and anxiety symptoms, coping strategies, and quality of life. ADHD group showed elevated scores of dysfunctional cognitions relative to nonclinical control group and comparable with clinical control group. Dysfunctional cognitions were strongly associated with emotional symptoms. ADHD group also showed elevated scores in maladaptive coping strategies of the escape-avoidance type. Life impairment was satisfactorily predicted in data analysis when ADHD symptoms, dysfunctional cognitions, and emotional symptoms were fitted into a regression model. Cognitive-behavioral therapy model appears to be a valid complementary model for understanding emotional and life impairment in adults with ADHD. © 2012 SAGE Publications.

  3. Evaluation of Helkimo anamnestic and dysfunction index in identical twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kučević Esad H.

    2016-01-01

    and symptoms of impaired function of TMJ were established in 23 twins (38.3%, while the index dysfunction equal to 0 (dI = 0 was found in 37 (61.7% twins. Spearman's correlation (0.728 demonstrates there is a coefficient of interdependence and mutual association between anamnestic index (Ai and the dysfunction index (Di, with statistic significance at 1% (p = 0.000. Conclusion: This comparative statistical analysis showed there is a correlation between anamnestic index (Ai and clinical dysfunction index (Di by Helkimo et al.

  4. Melatonin reduces hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agil, Ahmad; El-Hammadi, Mazen; Jiménez-Aranda, Aroa; Tassi, Mohamed; Abdo, Walied; Fernández-Vázquez, Gumersindo; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to play a role in the development of liver steatosis and insulin resistance, which are both common characteristics of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It was hypothesized that the antioxidant properties of melatonin could potentially improve the impaired functions of hepatic mitochondria in diabetic obese animals. Male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats and lean littermates (ZL) were given either melatonin (10 mg/kg BW/day) orally for 6 wk (M-ZDF and M-ZL) or vehicle as control groups (C-ZDF and C-ZL). Hepatic function was evaluated by measurement of serum alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase levels, liver histopathology and electron microscopy, and hepatic mitochondrial functions. Several impaired functions of hepatic mitochondria were observed in C-ZDF in comparison with C-ZL rats. Melatonin treatment to ZDF rats decreases serum levels of ALT (P diabetic-induced mitochondrial abnormalities, glycogen, and lipid accumulation. Melatonin improves mitochondrial dysfunction in M-ZDF rats by increasing activities of mitochondrial citrate synthase (P melatonin augments ATP production (P melatonin reduces liver steatosis and mitochondria dysfunction in ZDF rats. Therefore, it may be beneficial in the treatment of diabesity.

  5. Conflict Resolution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and shift the focus more to the social impact of growth ana away from growth .... Perspectives on, and approaches towards, conflict and conflict resolution .... transformation, and changes in values and ethical approaches (such as nepotism ... education, life expectancy, employment, childbirth survival and similar indica-.

  6. Dopamine dysfunction in borderline personality disorder: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Robert O

    2004-06-01

    Research on the biological basis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has focused primarily on the serotonin model of impulsive aggression. However, there is evidence that dopamine (DA) dysfunction may also be associated with BPD. Pertinent research and review articles, identified by Medline searches of relevant topics, books, references from bibliographies, and conference proceedings from 1975 to 2003, were reviewed. Evidence of DA dysfunction in BPD derives from the efficacy of traditional and atypical antipsychotic agents in BPD, and from provocative challenges with amphetamine and methylphenidate of subjects with the disorder. In addition, human and animal studies indicate that DA activity plays an important role in emotion information processing, impulse control, and cognition. The results of this review suggest that DA dysfunction is associated with three dimensions of BPD, that is, emotional dysregulation, impulsivity, and cognitive-perceptual impairment. The main limitation of this hypothesis is that the evidence reviewed is circumstantial. There is no study that directly demonstrates DA dysfunction in BPD. In addition, the therapeutic effects of antipsychotic agents observed in BPD may be mediated by non-DA mechanisms of action. If the stated hypothesis is correct, DA dysfunction in BPD may result from genetic, developmental, or environmental factors directly affecting specific DA pathways. Alternatively, DA dysfunction in BPD may be a compensatory response to alterations in the primary neural systems that control emotion, impulse control, and cognition, and that are mediated by the brain's main neurotransmitters, glutamate, and GABA, or in one or more other neuromodulatory pathways such as serotonin, acetylcholine, and norepinephrine. Copyright 2004 Nature Publishing Group

  7. Conclusion: These findings suggest impaired impulse control and abnormal error-monitoring functions in persons with a history of heroin dependence and add to the growing literature on the neurological mechanisms related to cognitive dysfunction in individ%康复期男性海洛因依赖者的错误相关负电位的病例对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈红; 江海峰; 郭茜; 杜江; 王继军; 赵敏

    2013-01-01

    Background: There were 1.2 million registered heroin users in China by the end of 2011, but little research in the country has focused on the neuropsychological functioning of these individuals.Aim: Assess error-related negativity (ERN) - an important indicator of high-level cognitive functioning - among males with heroin dependence undergoing rehabilitation.Method: Twenty male patients in a rehabilitation center who met DSM-IV criteria for heroin dependence and 15 healthy male controls completed 800 trials of Erikson flanker tasks to provoke ERN waves on the 32-electrode electroencephalograph (EEG) when erroneous responses are induced by presenting incongruent flankers around the target stimulus. Mean error rates and reaction times for the task, and the amplitude and latency of crude ERN waves and standardized ERN waves (created by subtracting the wave for correct responses from that for incorrect responses) at three frontal midline EEG electrodes (Fz, FCz, and Cz) were compared between patients and controls.Results: There was no significant difference in error rates between patients and controls but the reaction times for both erroneous and correct responses were shorter in patients than controls. The amplitude of both crude and standardized ERN waves was lower in patients than controls, but this difference became non-significant after adjustment for the lower educational level in the patient group. The latency of the peak value in both the crude and standardized ERN waves was significantly shorter in the patient group; this difference remained significant after adjustment for educational level. There was a significant correlation between the negative amplitude of the standardized ERN wave and the duration of heroin use.Conclusion: These findings suggest impaired impulse control and abnormal error-monitoring functions in persons with a history of heroin dependence and add to the growing literature on the neurological mechanisms related to cognitive dysfunction in

  8. Cerebral versus Ocular Visual Impairment: The Impact on Developmental Neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Maria B C; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Martín-Hernández, Juan; López-Miguel, Alberto; Maldonado, Miguel; Baladrón, Carlos; Bauer, Corinna M; Merabet, Lotfi B

    2016-01-01

    Cortical/cerebral visual impairment (CVI) is clinically defined as significant visual dysfunction caused by injury to visual pathways and structures occurring during early perinatal development. Depending on the location and extent of damage, children with CVI often present with a myriad of visual deficits including decreased visual acuity and impaired visual field function. Most striking, however, are impairments in visual processing and attention which have a significant impact on learning, development, and independence. Within the educational arena, current evidence suggests that strategies designed for individuals with ocular visual impairment are not effective in the case of CVI. We propose that this variance may be related to differences in compensatory neuroplasticity related to the type of visual impairment, as well as underlying alterations in brain structural connectivity. We discuss the etiology and nature of visual impairments related to CVI, and how advanced neuroimaging techniques (i.e., diffusion-based imaging) may help uncover differences between ocular and cerebral causes of visual dysfunction. Revealing these differences may help in developing future strategies for the education and rehabilitation of individuals living with visual impairment.

  9. Erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic viral hepatitis: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Ferdinando; D'Anzeo, Gianluca; Rossi, Andrea; Sciorio, Carmine; Buonomo, Antonio Riccardo; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Borgia, Guglielmo; Mirone, Vincenzo; Gentile, Ivan

    2013-12-01

    This article reviews the literature on epidemiology and pathogenetic factors of erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic viral hepatic (CVH) diseases in men and the potential implications for diagnosis and treatment. A search to identify original articles, reviews and any other article suitable for the purposes of this review was conducted by combining the following terms: erectile dysfunction and/or sexual dysfunction, chronic viral hepatitis, hepatitis B virus infection and hepatitis C virus infection. The results of this review have led to the following main observations: i) there is scarce documentation on the association between CVH and sexual dysfunction; ii) hormonal impairment seems to be a major component in the development of erectile dysfunction in CVH; however, published evidence concerning the contribution of other pathogenetic factors is rare and inconclusive and iii) available treatment options for CVH potentially contribute to the development of sexual dysfunction in these patients. Due to the scarce body of evidence, more research is needed to better clarify the mechanisms underlying the association between CVH and sexual dysfunction, the impact of therapy and associated comorbidities on sexual dysfunction and the role of pharmacological treatments in the management of these patients.

  10. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN YOUNG NORMOTENSIVE SUBJECTS WITH A FAMILY HISTORY OF ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To investigate whether endothelial dysfunction occurred in genetically vulnerable normotensive patients.Methods:Endothelial function was assessed by high-resolution vascular ultrasound.The diameter of brachial arteries were measured at rest.during reactive hyperemia and atfer sublingual nitroglycerine(GTN) in 70 young subjects with a mean age of 44.7(12.1 years:Among them,there were 30 patients with essential hypertension (group 1),20 normotensive patients with a family history of hypertension(group2)and 20 normotensive patients without a family history of cardiovascular diseases that served as controls(group3).Results:Flow-mediated dilatation of brachial arteries was significantly reduced in-roup 1and 2 when compared to group3(Group1:6.8(3.9vs group 2:8.0(3.6vs group3:13.2(5.9%,P<0.01).Conclusion:Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation was impaired in the young normotensive patients with a family history of hypertension.

  11. Cognitive Impairment in Bipolar Disorder: Treatment and Prevention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Brisa; Jiménez, Esther; Torrent, Carla; Reinares, Maria; Bonnin, Caterina del Mar; Torres, Imma; Varo, Cristina; Grande, Iria; Valls, Elia; Salagre, Estela; Sanchez-Moreno, Jose; Martinez-Aran, Anabel; Carvalho, André F

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Over the last decade, there has been a growing appreciation of the importance of identifying and treating cognitive impairment associated with bipolar disorder, since it persists in remission periods. Evidence indicates that neurocognitive dysfunction may significantly influence patients’ psychosocial outcomes. An ever-increasing body of research seeks to achieve a better understanding of potential moderators contributing to cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder in order to develop prevention strategies and effective treatments. This review provides an overview of the available data from studies examining treatments for cognitive dysfunction in bipolar disorder as well as potential novel treatments, from both pharmacological and psychological perspectives. All these data encourage the development of further studies to find effective strategies to prevent and treat cognitive impairment associated with bipolar disorder. These efforts may ultimately lead to an improvement of psychosocial functioning in these patients. PMID:28498954

  12. Identifying and characterising cerebral visual impairment in children: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Swetha Sara; Dutton, Gordon N

    2014-05-01

    Cerebral visual impairment (CVI) comprises visual malfunction due to retro-chiasmal visual and visual association pathway pathology. This can be isolated or accompany anterior visual pathway dysfunction. It is a major cause of low vision in children in the developed and developing world due to increasing survival in paediatric and neonatal care. CVI can present in many combinations and degrees. There are multiple causes and it is common in children with cerebral palsy. CVI can be identified easily, if a structured approach to history-taking is employed. This review describes the features of CVI and describes practical management strategies aimed at helping affected children. A literature review was undertaken using 'Medline' and 'Pubmed'. Search terms included cerebral visual impairment, cortical visual impairment, dorsal stream dysfunction and visual function in cerebral palsy.

  13. Inflammation and cardiac dysfunction during sepsis, muscular dystrophy, and myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays an important role in cardiac dysfunction under different situations. Acute systemic inflammation occurring in patients with severe burns, trauma, and inflammatory diseases causes cardiac dysfunction, which is one of the leading causes of mortality in these patients. Acute sepsis decreases cardiac contractility and impairs myocardial compliance. Chronic inflammation such as that occurring in Duchenne muscular dystropshy and myocarditis may cause adverse cardiac remodeling including myocyte hypertrophy and death, fibrosis, and altered myocyte function. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms for inflammatory cardiomyopathy are still controversial probably due to multiple factors involved. Potential mechanisms include the change in circulating blood volume; a direct inhibition of myocyte contractility by cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF-a, interleukin (IL-1b; abnormal nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS signaling; mitochondrial dysfunction; abnormal excitation-contraction coupling; and reduced calcium sensitivity at the myofibrillar level and blunted b-adrenergic signaling. This review will summarize recent advances in diagnostic technology, mechanisms, and potential therapeutic strategies for inflammation-induced cardiac dysfunction.

  14. Evidence of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism and Implications for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Rossignol

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical mitochondrial diseases occur in a subset of individuals with autism and are usually caused by genetic anomalies or mitochondrial respiratory pathway deficits. However, in many cases of autism, there is evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD without the classic features associated with mitochondrial disease. MtD appears to be more common in autism and presents with less severe signs and symptoms. It is not associated with discernable mitochondrial pathology in muscle biopsy specimens despite objective evidence of lowered mitochondrial functioning. Exposure to environ-mental toxins is the likely etiology for MtD in autism. This dysfunction then contributes to a number of diagnostic symptoms and comorbidities observed in autism including: cognitive impairment, language deficits, abnormal energy metabolism, chronic gastrointestinal problems, abnormalities in fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxidative stress. MtD and oxidative stress may also explain the high male to female ratio found in autism due to increased male vulnerability to these dysfunctions. Biomarkers for mitochondrial dysfunction have been identified, but seem widely under-utilized despite available therapeutic interventions. Nutritional supplementation to decrease oxidative stress along with factors to improve reduced glutathione, as well as hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT represent supported and rationale approaches. The underlying pathophysiology and autistic symptoms of affected individuals would be expected to either improve or cease worsening once effective treatment for MtD is implemented.

  15. Epidemiology and care of female sexual dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    McCool, Megan Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction can have a negative impact on the well-being of an individual. For women, sexual dysfunction encompasses sexual interest / arousal disorder, female orgasmic disorder and genitopelvic pain / penetration disorder. Although sexual dysfunction has been identified as a significant public health problem, research on sexual dysfunction has primarily focused on men rather than women. Comprehensive epidemiological data on female sexual dysfunction and information on current levels o...

  16. Relation between sexual dysfunctions and epilepsy, type of epilepsy, type of antiepileptic drugs: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Carlo; Giacalone, Ninfa; Vella, Marco; Urso, Lidia; Zummo, Leila; Fierro, Brigida

    2017-04-28

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of sexual dysfunctions in males with epilepsy, the type of epilepsy, the frequency of seizures, the type of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the serum hormonal profile and the presence of psychiatric comorbidity. Sixty-one patients focused on type of epilepsy, frequency of seizures, AEDs, hormonal profile and presence of mood disorders. We excluded all patients with severe neurologic and psychiatric impairment and patient who were not able to fill questionnaires. Mean age was 31.2 years (range 18-50 years); 31 patients (50.8%) had an idiopathic generalised epilepsy and 30 (49.2%) a focal epilepsy; among them, latter 18 (60%) had probably symptomatic type and 12 (40%) symptomatic type. Sexual functions were evaluated by "International Inventory of Erectile Function" questionnaire. Out of 61 enrolled patients, 22 (36.7%) showed sexual dysfunctions: erectile dysfunctions in 14 (23%), orgasmic dysfunctions in (11.5%) and sexual drive dysfunctions in 12 (19.7%). Out of 61 patients, 36 were subjected to blood measurement of sexual hormones and 21 (58.3%) showed hormonal modifications. Sexual dysfunction are present in 36.7% of enrolled males with epilepsy; there is any association between sexual dysfunctions and various AEDs in the treatment, except for carbamazepine (CBZ); there is not any association between sexual dysfunctions and frequency of seizures; hormonal changes are associated with sexual dysfunction in males with epilepsy treated with AEDs but not with the orgasmic dysfunction; there is not any association between hormonal changes and type of AEDs, except for CBZ; depression is associated with sexual dysfunctions.

  17. Change in Dysfunctional Beliefs About Sleep in Behavior Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidelman, Polina; Talbot, Lisa; Ivers, Hans; Bélanger, Lynda; Morin, Charles M; Harvey, Allison G

    2016-01-01

    As part of a larger randomized controlled trial, 188 participants were randomized to behavior therapy (BT), cognitive therapy (CT), or cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia. The aims of this study were threefold: (a) to determine whether change in dysfunctional beliefs about sleep was related to change in sleep, insomnia symptoms, and impairment following treatment; (b) to determine whether BT, CT, and CBT differ in their effects on dysfunctional beliefs; and (c) to determine whether the treatments differ in their effects on particular kinds of dysfunctional beliefs. Beliefs, sleep, insomnia symptoms, and sleep-related psychosocial impairment were assessed at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 6- and 12-month follow-up. Greater change in dysfunctional beliefs occurring over the course of BT, CT, or CBT was associated with greater improvement in insomnia symptoms and impairment at posttreatment and both follow-ups. All groups experienced a significant decrease in dysfunctional beliefs during treatment, which were sustained through 6- and 12-month follow-up. Compared with the BT group, a greater proportion of participants in the CT and/or CBT groups endorsed dysfunctional beliefs below a level considered clinically significant at posttreatment and 12-month follow-up. The results demonstrate the importance of targeting dysfunctional beliefs in insomnia treatment, suggest that beliefs may be significantly modified with BT alone, and indicate that cognitive interventions may be particularly powerful in enhancing belief change. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. The effectiveness of physiotherapy treatment on balance dysfunction and postural instability in persons with Parkinson’s disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yitayeh, Asmare; Teshome, Amare

    2016-01-01

    Background Balance dysfunction and postural instability in Parkinson’s disease are among the most relevant determinants of an impaired quality of life. Physiotherapy interventions are essential to reduce the level of disability by treating balance dysfunction and postural instability. The aim of this systematic review with meta-analysis was to test the effectiveness of conventional physiotherapy interventions in the management of balance dysfunction and postural instability in Persons with id...

  19. Mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-hua LI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive dysfunction is common non-motor symptom (NMS in Parkinson's disease (PD, which affects the patients' quality of life and increases the burden of caregivers. Cognitive dysfunction in PD can be mild cognitive impairment (MCI or dementia. MCI presents in the early stage of PD and the incidence rate is increasing with the disease progression. In some cases it can advance to dementia. The diagnosis of MCI in PD includes inclusion criteria, exclusion criteria and damage level evaluation. Non-pharmacological therapy, such as exercise and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT can improve the symptoms of MCI in PD, while the pharmacological treatment remains to be further studied. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.06.002

  20. Visual Impairment, Including Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who Knows What? Survey Item Bank Search for: Visual Impairment, Including Blindness Links updated, April 2017 En ... doesn’t wear his glasses. Back to top Visual Impairments in Children Vision is one of our ...

  1. Speech and Language Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impairment. Many children are identified as having a speech or language impairment after they enter the public school system. A teacher may notice difficulties in a child’s speech or communication skills and refer the child for ...

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Księżakowska-Łakoma

    2014-05-01

    -apoptotic proteins, reduced caspase function and impaired death receptor signaling. Over-expression of the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 gene has also been identified in numerous cancers including colon, thyroid, breast and endometrial cancer. Most studies have found low BCL-2 family gene expression, which could be a sign of blocking apoptosis in breast and endometrial cancer. Moreover, BCL-2 gene expression is correlated with the degree of aggressiveness and differentiation in endometrial cancer. As a result, it could be a valuable predictor of disease progression.

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Mogensen, Martin; Sahlin, Kent

    2008-01-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is a major hallmark of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and obesity that is characterized by impaired insulin-mediated glucose transport and glycogen synthesis and by increased intramyocellular content of lipid metabolites. Several studies have provided evidence...... for mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic and prediabetic subjects, primarily due to a lower content of mitochondria (mitochondrial biogenesis) and possibly to a reduced functional capacity per mitochondrion. This article discusses the latest advances in the understanding of the molecular...... mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle in T2D and obesity, with a focus on possible links between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction....

  4. Review: quantifying mitochondrial dysfunction in complex diseases of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Martin P; Pichaud, Nicolas; Ballard, J William O

    2012-10-01

    There is accumulating evidence that mitochondrial respiratory malfunction is associated with aging-associated complex diseases. However, progress in our understanding of these diseases has been hampered by the sensitivity and throughput of systems employed to quantify dysfunction and inherent limitations of the biological systems studied. In this review, we describe and contrast two methodologies that have been developed for measuring mitochondrial function to address the need for improved sensitivity and increased throughput. We then consider the utility of each methodology in studying three biological systems: isolated mitochondria, cultured cells, and cell fibers and tissues. Finally, we discuss the application of each methodology in the study of mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and aging-associated autophagy impairment and mitochondrial malfunction. We conclude that the methodologies are complementary, and researchers may need to examine multiple biological systems to unravel complex diseases of aging.

  5. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Atkeson

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Amy Atkeson, Sanja JelicDivision of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NYAbstract: Endothelial activation and inflammation are important mediators of accelerated atherogenesis and consequent increased cardiovascular morbidity in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Repetitive episodes of hypoxia/reoxygenation associated with transient cessation of breathing during sleep in OSA resemble ischemia/reperfusion injury and may be the main culprit underlying endothelial dysfunction in OSA. Additional factors such as repetitive arousals resulting in sleep fragmentation and deprivation and individual genetic suseptibility to vascular manifestations of OSA contribute to impaired endothelial function in OSA. The present review focuses on possible mechanisms that underlie endothelial activation and inflammation in OSA.Keywords: endothelial, obstructive sleep apnea, inflammation, dysfunction

  6. Upper gastrointestinal sensory-motor dysfunction in diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingbo Zhao; Jens Br(φ)ndum Fr(φ)kjaer; Asbj(φ)rn Mohr Drewes; Niels Ejskjaer

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) sensory-motor abnormalities are common in patients with diabetes mellitus and may involve any part of the GI tract. Abnormalities are frequently sub-clinical, and fortunately only rarely do severe and life-threatening problems occur. The pathogenesis of abnormal upper GI sensory-motor function in diabetes is incompletely understood and is most likely multi-factorial of origin. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy as well as acute suboptimal control of diabetes has been shown to impair GI motor and sensory function. Morphological and biomechanical remodeling of the GI wall develops during the duration of diabetes,and may contribute to motor and sensory dysfunction. In this review sensory and motility disorders of the upper GI tract in diabetes is discussed; and the morphological changes and biomechanical remodeling related to the sensory-motor dysfunction is also addressed.

  7. A Guide to Medications Inducing Salivary Gland Dysfunction, Xerostomia, and Subjective Sialorrhea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Andy; Joshi, Revan Kumar; Ekström, Jörgen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication-induced salivary gland dysfunction (MISGD), xerostomia (sensation of oral dryness), and subjective sialorrhea cause significant morbidity and impair quality of life. However, no evidence-based lists of the medications that cause these disorders exist. OBJECTIVE: Our objecti...

  8. Fronto-striatal dysfunction during reward processing in unaffected siblings of schizophrenia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, Max; Kahn, René S; Vink, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder that is associated with impaired functioning of the fronto-striatal network, in particular during reward processing. However, it is unclear whether this dysfunction is related to the illness itself or whether it reflects a genetic vulnerability to develop schi

  9. Affective dysfunctions in adolescents at risk for psychosis : Emotion awareness and social functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Sophie; Schothorst, Patricia; van 't Wout, Mascha; Sprong, Mirjam; Ziermans, Tim; van Engeland, Herman; Aleman, Andre; Swaab, Hanna

    2011-01-01

    Studies of individuals at ultra high risk (UHR) for psychosis have revealed deviations in cognitive and neural development before the onset of psychosis. As affective impairments are among the core dysfunctions in psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia, this study assessed emotion processing and

  10. High compliance to computerized tests for assessment of postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, W.F.; van Harten, A.E.; Scheeren, Thomas; Absalom, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Background and Goal of Study: After cardiac surgery many patients experience postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), usually comprising impaired concentration, attention, working memory and executive function. These sometimes subtle defects are usually assessed by neuropsychological examination,

  11. Mitochondrial and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction in Ageing and Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime M. Ross

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system have been described as two hallmarks of the ageing process. Additionally, both systems have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of many age-related diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Interestingly, these two systems are closely interconnected, with the ubiquitin proteasome system maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis by regulating organelle dynamics, the proteome, and mitophagy, and mitochondrial dysfunction impairing cellular protein homeostasis by oxidative damage. Here, we review the current literature and argue that the interplay of the two systems should be considered in order to better understand the cellular dysfunction observed in ageing and age-related diseases. Such an approach may provide valuable insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the ageing process, and further discovery of treatments to counteract ageing and its associated diseases. Furthermore, we provide a hypothetical model for the heterogeneity described among individuals during ageing.

  12. Obesity and pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Kalaivani; Monga, Ash

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is associated with a high prevalence of pelvic floor disorders. Patients with obesity present with a range of urinary, bowel and sexual dysfunction problems as well as uterovaginal prolapse. Urinary incontinence, faecal incontinence and sexual dysfunction are more prevalent in patients with obesity. Uterovaginal prolapse is also more common than in the non-obese population. Weight loss by surgical and non-surgical methods plays a major role in the improvement of these symptoms in such patients. The treatment of symptoms leads to an improvement in their quality of life. However, surgical treatment of these symptoms may be accompanied by an increased risk of complications in obese patients. A better understanding of the mechanism of obesity-associated pelvic floor dysfunction is essential.

  13. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Keane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive, neurodegenerative condition that has increasingly been linked with mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of the electron transport chain. This inhibition leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of cellular energy levels, which can consequently cause cellular damage and death mediated by oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. A number of genes that have been shown to have links with inherited forms of PD encode mitochondrial proteins or proteins implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, supporting the central involvement of mitochondria in PD. This involvement is corroborated by reports that environmental toxins that inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain have been shown to be associated with PD. This paper aims to illustrate the considerable body of evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction with neuronal cell death in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc of PD patients and to highlight the important need for further research in this area.

  14. Vocal cord dysfunction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Blakeslee E; Kemp, James S

    2007-06-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction is characterised by paradoxical vocal cord adduction that occurs during inspiration, resulting in symptoms of dyspnoea, wheeze, chest or throat tightness and cough. Although the condition is well described in children and adults, confusion with asthma often triggers the use of an aggressive treatment regimen directed against asthma. The laryngoscopic demonstration of vocal cord adduction during inspiration has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction, but historical factors and pulmonary function findings may provide adequate clues to the correct diagnosis. Speech therapy, and in some cases psychological counselling, is often beneficial in this disorder. The natural course and prognosis of vocal cord dysfunction are still not well described in adults or children.

  15. Sexual dysfunctions in psoriatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabela Sarbu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder with a worldwide occurrence characterized by well-defined infiltrated erythematous papules and plaques, covered by silvery white or yellowish scales. It is a physically, socially and emotionally invalidating disorder that affects 1-2% of the population. Sexual health is an important part of general health and sexual dysfunctions can negatively affect self-esteem, confidence, interpersonal relationships and the quality of life. Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI, Psoriasis Disability Index (PDI and the Impact of Psoriasis on Quality of Life (IPSO questionnaire are all questionnaires used to assess the quality of life of patients with psoriasis and each has one question regarding sexual dysfunction. Several scales were also designed to particularly assess sexual satisfaction in men and women. The aim of this paper is to perform an overview of the existing studies on sexual dysfunction in psoriatic patients.

  16. Specificity of neuropsychological impairment in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a comparison with social phobic and normal control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L J; Hollander, E; DeCaria, C M; Stein, D J; Simeon, D; Liebowitz, M R; Aronowitz, B R

    1996-01-01

    Specificity of neuropsychological dysfunction in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was assessed by comparing neuropsychological performance in 65 OCD patients, 17 social phobic patients, and 32 normal control subjects. Although both patient groups showed visual constructional impairment relative to normal subjects, only patients with social phobia showed executive dysfunction. Nonconcurrent state anxiety did not correlate with neuropsychological performance. Among anxiety disorders, neuropsychological dysfunction may not be specific to OCD, but the functions implicated may differ across patient groups.

  17. Thyroid Dysfunction and its Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Agnihotri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the present review article is on thyroid dysfunctions which can be hypo or hyper thyroidism. Along with the ongoing allopathic treatment options, one can go for the alternative therapies or natural cures. Various nutritional supplements including iodine, botanicals like guggul and many more play an effective role in the management of thyroid dysfunction apart from the pharmaceuticals like synthetic T3 and T4 hormones and procaine thyroid. Along with these, homeopathy and yoga are equally important. The discussion suggests and emphasizes the importance of improving the lifestyle and nutritional diet; and further providing spiritual support along with natural thyroid medication.

  18. Does stress induce bowel dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ming; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Kao, John Y

    2014-08-01

    Psychological stress is known to induce somatic symptoms. Classically, many gut physiological responses to stress are mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. There is, however, a growing body of evidence of stress-induced corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) release causing bowel dysfunction through multiple pathways, either through the HPA axis, the autonomic nervous systems, or directly on the bowel itself. In addition, recent findings of CRF influencing the composition of gut microbiota lend support for the use of probiotics, antibiotics, and other microbiota-altering agents as potential therapeutic measures in stress-induced bowel dysfunction.

  19. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giovanna Scioli

    Full Text Available Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery.We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, placental growth factor (PlGF and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4 expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction.PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Antioxidant therapy and

  20. Unary resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubert, Clément; Bagnol, Marc; Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    of the cut-elimination procedure of linear logic known as the geometry of interaction . This framework is restricted to terms (logic programs, rewriting rules) using only unary symbols, and this restriction is shown to be complete for polynomial time computation by encoding pushdown automata. Soundness w......We give a characterization of deterministic polynomial time computation based on an algebraic structure called the resolution semiring, whose elements can be understood as logic programs or sets of rewriting rules over first-order terms. This construction stems from an interactive interpretation...

  1. Dose Impaired Relaxation of Left Ventricle Affect Early Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Bagheri

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available "nAlthough systolic dysfunction is revealed as a prognostic factor in cardiac surgery , the role of diastolic dysfunction as a predictive factor is less evaluated. In this retrospective study from 872 patients that underwent isolated coronary artery bypass graft(Jan 2008-Feb 2009,388 patients had normal left ventricular ejection fraction (>50%. These are divided in two groups, Group 1: 361 patients without diastolic dysfunction (impaired relaxation and Group 2: 27 patients with diastolic dysfunction ( impaired relaxation . Mean age in group 1 was 57.72 year and in group 2 was 61.16 year (P =0.07. Risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertention and dyslipidemia were similar. Although overall complication rate was higher in group 2( 11.1% vs 2.8% P value 0.05,but when each complication was studied individually no significant statistical difference was found. Also no significant statistical difference was found in mortality (2.2% in group 1 vs 7.4% in group 2 P =0.1. In conclusion, from clinical standpoint diastolic dysfunction can be an important factor in assessing surgical outcome in patients whom underwent coronary artery bypass grafting.

  2. High Triglycerides Predicts Arteriogenic Erectile Dysfunction and Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Subjects With Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Giovanni; Cipriani, Sarah; Rastrelli, Giulia; Sforza, Alessandra; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The atherogenic role of triglycerides (TG) remains controversial. The aim of the present study is to analyze the contribution of TG in the pathogenesis of erectile dysfunction (ED) and to verify the value of elevated TG in predicting major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). An unselected series of 3,990 men attending our outpatient clinic for sexual dysfunction was retrospectively studied. A subset of this sample (n = 1,687) was enrolled in a longitudinal study. Several clinical, biochemical, and instrumental (penile color Doppler ultrasound; PCDU) factors were evaluated. Among the patients studied, after adjustment for confounders, higher TG levels were associated with arteriogenic ED and a higher risk of clinical and biochemical hypogonadism. Conversely, no association between TG and other sexual dysfunctions was observed. When pathological PCDU parameters-including flaccid acceleration (<1.17 m/sec(2)) or dynamic peak systolic velocity (PSV <35 cm/sec)-were considered, the negative association between impaired penile flow and higher TG levels was confirmed, even when subjects taking lipid-lowering drugs or those with diabetes were excluded from the analysis (OR = 6.343 [1.243;32.362], P = .026 and 3.576 [1.104;11.578]; P = .34 for impaired acceleration and PSV, respectively). Similarly, when the same adjusted models were applied, TG levels were associated with a higher risk of hypogonadism, independently of the definition criteria (OR = 2.892 [1.643;5.410], P < .0001 and 4.853 [1.965;11.990]; P = .001 for total T <12 and 8 nM, respectively). In the longitudinal study, after adjusting for confounders, elevated TG levels (upper quartile: 162-1686 mg/dL) were independently associated with a higher incidence of MACE (HR = 2.469 [1.019;5.981]; P = .045), when compared to the rest of the sample. Our data suggest an association between elevated TG and arteriogenic ED and its cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification. Whether the use of TG lowering drugs

  3. Visual impairment and traits of autism in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzesińska, Magdalena; Kapias, Joanna; Nowakowska-Domagała, Katarzyna; Kocur, Józef

    2017-04-30

    Visual impairment present from birth or from an early childhood may lead to psychosocial and emotional disorders. 11-40% of children in the group with visual impairment show traits of autism. The aim of this paper was to present the selected examples of how visual impairment in children is related to the occurrence of autism and to describe the available tools for diagnosing autism in children with visual impairment. So far the relation between visual impairment in children and autism has not been sufficiently confirmed. Psychiatric and psychological diagnosis of children with visual impairment has some difficulties in differentiating between "blindism" and traits typical for autism resulting from a lack of standardized diagnostic tools used to diagnosing children with visual impairment. Another difficulty in diagnosing autism in children with visual impairment is the coexistence of other disabilities in case of most children with vision impairment. Additionally, apart from difficulties in diagnosing autistic disorders in children with eye dysfunctions there is also a question of what tools should be used in therapy and rehabilitation of patients.

  4. Houttuynia cordata Improves Cognitive Deficits in Cholinergic Dysfunction Alzheimer's Disease-Like Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Eugene; Kim, Hyo Geun; Park, Hanbyeol; Kang, Min Seo; Lee, Bongyong; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-05-01

    Cognitive impairment is a result of dementia of diverse causes, such as cholinergic dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (Saururaceae) has long been used as a traditional herbal medicine. It has biological activities including protective effects against amyloid beta (Aβ) toxicity, via regulation of calcium homeostasis, in rat hippocampal cells. To extend previous reports, we investigated the effects of water extracts of H. cordata herb (HCW) on tauopathies, also involving calcium influx. We then confirmed the effects of HCW in improving memory impairment and neuronal damage in mice with Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. We also investigated the effects of HCW against scopolamine-induced cholinergic dysfunction in mice. In primary neuronal cells, HCW inhibited the phosphorylation of tau by regulating p25/p35 expression in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. In mice with Aβ-induced neurotoxicity, HCW improved cognitive impairment, as assessed with behavioral tasks, such as novel object recognition, Y-maze, and passive avoidance tasks. HCW also inhibited the degeneration of neurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, HCW, which had an IC50 value of 79.7 μg/ml for acetylcholinesterase inhibition, ameliorated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment significantly in Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks. These results indicate that HCW improved cognitive impairment, due to cholinergic dysfunction, with inhibitory effects against tauopathies and cholinergic antagonists, suggesting that HCW may be an interesting candidate to investigate for the treatment of AD.

  5. Sweating dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinn, L; Schrag, A; Viswanathan, R; Lees, A; Quinn, N; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    2003-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence and nature of sweating disturbances in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and investigated their correlation with other clinical features and with Quality of Life (QoL) measures. A questionnaire on symptoms and consequences of sweating dysfunction was compl

  6. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  7. Ageing with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Faaborg, Pia Møller; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study with postal survey was to describe changes in the patterns of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and bowel management in a population of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) followed for two decades. In 1996, a validated questionnaire on bowel function was sent to the...

  8. Swallowing dysfunction in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Brennan, M.T.; Verdonck- de Leeuw, I.M.; Gibson, R.J.; Eilers, J.G.; Waltimo, T.; Bots, C.P.; Michelet, M.; Sollecito, T.P.; Rouleau, T.S.; Sewnaik, A.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Fliedner, M.C.; Silverman, S.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction) is a debilitating, depressing, and potentially life-threatening complication in cancer patients that is likely underreported. The present paper is aimed to review relevant dysphagia literature between 1990 and 2010 with a focus on assessment tools, prevalen

  9. Swallowing dysfunction in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Brennan, Mike T.; Leeuw, Irma M. Verdonck-de; Gibson, Rachel J.; Eilers, June G.; Waltimo, Tuomas; Bots, Casper P.; Michelet, Marisol; Sollecito, Thomas P.; Rouleau, Tanya S.; Sewnaik, Aniel; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Fliedner, Monica C.; Silverman, Sol; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.

    Purpose Dysphagia (swallowing dysfunction) is a debilitating, depressing, and potentially life-threatening complication in cancer patients that is likely underreported. The present paper is aimed to review relevant dysphagia literature between 1990 and 2010 with a focus on assessment tools,

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction and Huntington disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a chronic autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disease. The gene coding Huntingtin has been identified, but the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease are still not fully understood. This paper reviews the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in pathogenesis of HD.

  11. Cognitive dysfunction in senior pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell-Davis, Sharon L

    2008-02-01

    Aging pets can experience declines in memory, learning, perception, and awareness. These pets may be disoriented, forget previously learned behaviors, develop new fears and anxiety, or change their interactions with people. When these changes are due to cognitive dysfunction, behavioral and environmental adjustments along with medical therapy can slow the progression and keep pets active longer.

  12. Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Martin D; Nicholls, David G

    2011-04-15

    Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction requires definition of the dysfunction to be investigated. Usually, it is the ability of the mitochondria to make ATP appropriately in response to energy demands. Where other functions are of interest, tailored solutions are required. Dysfunction can be assessed in isolated mitochondria, in cells or in vivo, with different balances between precise experimental control and physiological relevance. There are many methods to measure mitochondrial function and dysfunction in these systems. Generally, measurements of fluxes give more information about the ability to make ATP than do measurements of intermediates and potentials. For isolated mitochondria, the best assay is mitochondrial respiratory control: the increase in respiration rate in response to ADP. For intact cells, the best assay is the equivalent measurement of cell respiratory control, which reports the rate of ATP production, the proton leak rate, the coupling efficiency, the maximum respiratory rate, the respiratory control ratio and the spare respiratory capacity. Measurements of membrane potential provide useful additional information. Measurement of both respiration and potential during appropriate titrations enables the identification of the primary sites of effectors and the distribution of control, allowing deeper quantitative analyses. Many other measurements in current use can be more problematic, as discussed in the present review.

  13. Preliminary findings of the effects of autonomic dysfunction on functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Li; Leung, Howan; Chen, Xiang Yan; Han, Jing Hao; Leung, Thomas; Soo, Yannie; Wong, Eddie; Chan, Anne; Lau, Alexander; Wong, Ka Sing

    2012-05-01

    Impaired autonomic function is common in the acute poststroke phase but little is known about its effects on functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. This study sought to investigate the impact of autonomic dysfunction by Ewing's classification on functional outcome 2 months after acute ischemic stroke. 34 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients within 7 days after onset were enrolled. On admission, autonomic function was assessed by Ewing's battery tests. Stroke severity was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), autonomy in activities of daily living by the Barthel Index (BI), and global disability by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). BI and mRS were also evaluated 2 months after ischemic stroke onset. On admission, eight patients were diagnosed as minor autonomic dysfunction and 26 patients as relatively severe autonomic dysfunction. The prevalence of relatively severe autonomic dysfunction in ischemic stroke patients was 76.5%. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the minor and severe autonomic dysfunction groups. 2 months after stroke onset, the mean BI score of patients with minor autonomic dysfunction and severe autonomic dysfunction increased from 76.3±15.3 on admission to 95.0±7.1, 66.5±15.2 on admission to 74.8±15.9 respectively. The mean BI score after 2-month stroke onset and the change in BI from admission to 2-month outcome (delta BI) in patients with severe autonomic dysfunction were lower than those in patients with minor autonomic dysfunction (all Pacute stroke patients. Relatively severe autonomic dysfunction is related to an unfavorable functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Autonomic Blockade Reverses Endothelial Dysfunction in Obesity-Associated Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Alfredo; Figueroa, Rocío; Paranjape, Sachin Y; Farley, Ginnie; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo

    2016-10-01

    Impaired nitric oxide (NO) vasodilation (endothelial dysfunction) is associated with obesity and thought to be a factor in the development of hypertension. We previously found that NO synthesis inhibition had similar pressor effects in obese hypertensives compared with healthy control during autonomic blockade, suggesting that impaired NO vasodilation is secondary to sympathetic activation. We tested this hypothesis by determining the effect of autonomic blockade (trimethaphan 4 mg/min IV) on NO-mediated vasodilation (increase in forearm blood flow to intrabrachial acetylcholine) compared with endothelial-independent vasodilation (intrabrachial sodium nitroprusside) in obese hypertensive subjects (30hypertension and provides further rationale to explore it as a therapeutic target. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Mitochondrial aging and age-related dysfunction of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Sobenin, Igor A; Revin, Victor V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2014-01-01

    Age-related changes in mitochondria are associated with decline in mitochondrial function. With advanced age, mitochondrial DNA volume, integrity and functionality decrease due to accumulation of mutations and oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aged subjects, mitochondria are characterized by impaired function such as lowered oxidative capacity, reduced oxidative phosphorylation, decreased ATP production, significant increase in ROS generation, and diminished antioxidant defense. Mitochondrial biogenesis declines with age due to alterations in mitochondrial dynamics and inhibition of mitophagy, an autophagy process that removes dysfunctional mitochondria. Age-dependent abnormalities in mitochondrial quality control further weaken and impair mitochondrial function. In aged tissues, enhanced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis contributes to an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. However, implementation of strategies such as caloric restriction and regular physical training may delay mitochondrial aging and attenuate the age-related phenotype in humans.

  16. Erectile Dysfunction and Hypertension: Impact on Cardiovascular Risk and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Javaroni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction (ED is a common complaint in hypertensive men and can represent a systemic vascular disease, an adverse effect of antihypertensive medication or a frequent concern that may impair drug compliance. ED has been considered an early marker of cardiovascular disease. The connection between both conditions seems to be located in the endothelium, which may become unable to generate the necessary dilatation in penile vascular bed in response to sexual excitement, producing persistent impairment in erection. On the other hand, the real influence of antihypertensive drugs in erectile function still deserves discussion. Therefore, regardless of ED mechanism in hypertension, early diagnosis and correct approach of sexual life represent an important step of cardiovascular evaluation which certainly contributes for a better choice of hypertension treatment, preventing some complications and restoring the quality of life.

  17. Neurocognitive impairment in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Chitra; Strange, Charlie; Bachman, David

    2012-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder with far-reaching health implications. One of the major consequences of OSAS is an impact on neurocognitive functioning. Several studies have shown that OSAS has an adverse effect on inductive and deductive reasoning, attention, vigilance, learning, and memory. Neurocognitive impairment can be measured objectively with tests such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task, the Steer Clear Performance Test, and tests of repetitive finger tapping. In children, OSAS may cause attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in addition to behavioral problems and learning disabilities. Risk factors for cognitive impairment include increasing age, male sex, apolipoprotein E ε4 allele positivity, current cigarette smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, Down syndrome, hypothyroidism, significant alcohol consumption, stroke, and the use of psychoactive medications. At a cellular level, OSAS likely causes cognitive impairment through intermittent hypoxia, hormonal imbalance, and/or systemic inflammation, either independently or via the resultant endothelial dysfunction that occurs. Excessive daytime sleepiness should be measured and minimized in all studies of neurocognitive impairment. Recent studies have used functional and structural neuroimaging to delineate the brain areas affected in patients with OSAS with neurocognitive dysfunction. A common finding in several of these studies is decreased hippocampal volume. Other affected brain areas include the frontal and parietal lobes of the brain, which show focal reductions in gray matter. These changes can be reversed at least partially with the use of CPAP, which highlights the importance of early recognition and treatment of OSAS. The currently available data in this field are quite limited, and more research is needed.

  18. Corticotropin-releasing factor: a possible key to gut dysfunction in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Lauren T; Kidson, Susan H; Michell, William L

    2013-01-01

    Critically ill patients frequently display unexplained or incompletely explained features of gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction, including gastric stasis, ileus, and diarrhea. This makes nutrition delivery challenging, and may contribute to poor outcomes. The typical bowel dysfunction seen in severely ill patients includes retarded gastric emptying, unsynchronized intestinal motility, and intestinal hyperpermeability. These functional changes appear similar to the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-mediated bowel dysfunctions associated with stress of various types and some GI disorders and diseases. CRF has been shown to be present within the GI tract and its action on CRF receptors within the gut have been shown to reduce gastric emptying, alter intestinal motility, and increase intestinal permeability. However, the precise role of CRF in the GI dysfunction in critical illness remains unclear. In this short review, we provide an update on GI dysfunction during stress and review the possible role of CRF in the aetiology of gut dysfunction. We suggest that activation of CRF signaling pathways in critical illness might be key to understanding the mechanisms underlying the gut dysfunction that impairs enteral feeding in the intensive care unit.

  19. Cognitive Dysfunction Survey of the Japanese Patients with Moyamoya Disease (COSMO-JAPAN Study): study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yasushi; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular occlusive disease characterized by progressive stenosis or by occlusion at the terminal portion of the bilateral internal carotid arteries. The unusual vascular network (moyamoya vessels) at the base of the brain with this disease as collateral channels is developed in this disease. Social independence because of cognitive impairment has recently been recognized as an important unsolved social issue with adult moyamoya disease. The patients with cognitive impairment have difficulty in proving their status because the standard neuroradiological and neuropsychological methods to define cognitive impairment with moyamoya disease are not determined. These patients with cognitive impairment should be supported by social welfare as psychologically handicapped persons. Thus Cognitive Dysfunction Survey of the Japanese Patients with Moyamoya Disease (COSMO-JAPAN study) is planned. In this study, we want to establish a standard finding of the cognitive impairment in patients with moyamoya disease.

  20. Cerebral hemodynamic dysfunction in parkinsonian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Vladetić

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim The purpose of this investigation was to determine the cerebral hemodynamics in patients withparkinsonism and the influence of hemodynamic dysfunction in developing the lacunar infarcts.Methods Fifty patients with the signs of parkinsonism were included in this study. The patients weredevided into two subgroups depending on whether they had vascular parkinsonism (VP (N-22 or idiopathicParkinson disease (N-28. The control group consisted of 30 patients who had ischemic stroke.The conventional transcranial dopler sonography was performed to evaluate the cerebral blood flow.To evaluate the cognitive impairment we performed the mini mental state examination to patients withparkinsonism.Results Patients with vascular parkinsonism have greater cognitive disturbances than patients withParkinson disease. In most of the parkinsonian patients the cerebral blood flow was decreased and themicroangiopathy was present.Conclusion In most patients with parkinsonism, the cerebral blood flow was decreased as a consequenceof microangiopathy. In our opinion, this led to lacunar infarction in VP patients, but can also bea risk factor for developing the same changes in patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease.

  1. Gap Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-25

    Gap Resolution is a software package that was developed to improve Newbler genome assemblies by automating the closure of sequence gaps caused by repetitive regions in the DNA. This is done by performing the follow steps:1) Identify and distribute the data for each gap in sub-projects. 2) Assemble the data associated with each sub-project using a secondary assembler, such as Newbler or PGA. 3) Determine if any gaps are closed after reassembly, and either design fakes (consensus of closed gap) for those that closed or lab experiments for those that require additional data. The software requires as input a genome assembly produce by the Newbler assembler provided by Roche and 454 data containing paired-end reads.

  2. Subclinical Thyroid Dysfunction and Fracture Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Manuel R; Bauer, Douglas C; Collet, Tinh-Hai

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Associations between subclinical thyroid dysfunction and fractures are unclear and clinical trials are lacking. OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of subclinical thyroid dysfunction with hip, nonspine, spine, or any fractures. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: The databases of MEDLI...

  3. Autonomic dysfunction in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Winkler; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension are frequently associated with signs of circulatory dysfunction and peripheral polyneuropathy, which includes defects of the autonomic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction, which is seen in both alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis and increases...

  4. Assessing resolution in super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmerle, Justin; Wegel, Eva; Schermelleh, Lothar; Dobbie, Ian M

    2015-10-15

    Resolution is a central concept in all imaging fields, and particularly in optical microscopy, but it can be easily misinterpreted. The mathematical definition of optical resolution was codified by Abbe, and practically defined by the Rayleigh Criterion in the late 19th century. The limit of conventional resolution was also achieved in this period, and it was thought that fundamental constraints of physics prevented further increases in resolution. With the recent development of a range of super-resolution techniques, it is necessary to revisit the concept of optical resolution. Fundamental differences in super-resolution modalities mean that resolution is not a directly transferrable metric between techniques. This article considers the issues in resolution raised by these new technologies, and presents approaches for comparing resolution between different super-resolution methods.

  5. Dipyridamole, cold pressor test, and demonstration of endothelial dysfunction: a PET study of myocardial perfusion in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas; Meyer, Christian; Nielsen, Flemming S;

    2003-01-01

    Much evidence suggests endothelial dysfunction to be present in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and to be important for the development of myocardial ischemia. Endothelial function in the coronary vessels may be studied in various ways. We compared the effect of cold pressor testing...... coronary disease, endothelial dysfunction is strongly suggested by an impaired increase in CBF both to dipyridamole and to CPT. This dysfunction was reversed by infusion of an ACE inhibitor. Although ACE inhibition during CPT did induce significant increases in CBF in the patients, the changes during ACE...

  6. COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTIONS IN DIABETIC POLYNEUROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirena Valkova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of our study was to examine cognitive status, short – term memory, delayed recall and the retention of visual information in diabetics with polyneuropathy and to establish the impacts of some risk factors on cognitive performance.Contingent and methods: We assessed 47 diabetic patients with polyneuropathy, using the Mini Mental State Examination, 10 words test, the Benton visual retention test and the Hamilton scale.Results: Global cognitive dysfunction, decline in verbal memory and visual retention and tendency for depressive mood were observed. We found statistically significant interaction of ageing, sex, severity of pain, duration and late onset of diabetes mellitus (DM on cognitive functioning. Therapy association on cognition was not found.Conclusions: Our study confirms the hypothesis of global cognitive dysfunction, associated with diabetic polyneuropathy. The interactions of sex and pain severity require further study. We arise a hypothesis of asymmetrical brain injury in diabetics.

  7. [Sexual dysfunction following pelvic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, K

    1997-11-01

    In male, sexual dysfunction was a common complication that occurred after radical pelvic surgery: radical protectomy, radical cysto-, prostatectomy. Upon the recent pelvic neuroanatomical findings and preservation of these nerves, it is now possible to perform successful cancer operation on the rectum, prostate or bladder with preservation of sexual function in the group of early cancer patients. Depending on the location and severity of these nerve injury, this could result in temporary or permanent erectile and ejaculation dysfunction. In female, the total hysterectomy for cervical cancer sacrifices or injuries the faculty of pregnancy or sexual intercourse. The oophorectomies causes a deficiency of female hormones. But recently the numbers of patients with a small or early stages cancer of uterine or ovary are increasing and we have become to be able to save the functions of these organs in many patients well with minimum local excision or partial resection of them.

  8. Neck pain causes respiratory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapreli, Eleni; Vourazanis, Evangelos; Strimpakos, Nikolaos

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a presumptive mechanism for the development of changes in respiratory function due to chronic neck pain. The patient with neck pain presents a number of factors that could constitute a predisposition of leading to a respiratory dysfunction: (a) the decreased strength of deep neck flexors and extensors, (b) the hyperactivity and increased fatigability of superficial neck flexors, (c) the limitation of range of motion, (d) the decrease in proprioception and disturbances in neuromuscular control, (e) the existence of pain and (f) the psychosocial influence of dysfunction. The possible connection of neck pain and respiratory function could have a great impact on various clinical aspects notably patient assessment, rehabilitation and pharmacological prescription.

  9. Drug-induced sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, S A

    1982-01-01

    Commonly used drugs that may cause sexual dysfunction are reviewed. The anatomy and physiology of the normal sexual response are reviewed. The influence of drugs on neurogenic, hormonal, and vascular mechanisms may result in diminished libido, impotence, ejaculatory and orgasmic difficulties, inhibited vaginal lubrication, menstrual irregularities, and gynecomastia in men or painful breast enlargement in women. Parasympatholytic agents, which interfere with cholinergic transmission, may affect erectile potency, while adrenergic inhibiting agents may interfere with ejaculatory control. Central nervous system depressants or sedating drugs, drugs producing hyperprolactinemia, and antiandrogenic drugs also may affect the normal sexual response. Drugs such as antihypertensive and antipsychotic agents may induce sexual dysfunction that can result in patient noncompliance. Usually, drug-induced side effects are reversible with discontinuation of the offending agent.

  10. Early detection of tubular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscator, M

    1991-11-01

    The determination of low-molecular-weight proteins in urine as a tool for early detection of damage to the proximal tubules is briefly discussed. Beta 2-microglobulin, retinol-binding protein and alpha 1-microglobulin are at present the most widely used markers for tubular dysfunction. The determination of beta 2-microglobulin has earlier been the method of choice, but due to its instability at low pH there are certain disadvantages. Available data indicate that alpha 1-microglobulin may replace beta 2-microglobulin for screening purposes. The low-molecular-weight proteins are at present the best markers for early detection of tubular dysfunction; other constituents are not as well suited for this, even if the determination of urine enzymes has its supporters.

  11. Ketones prevent synaptic dysfunction induced by mitochondrial respiratory complex inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Young; Vallejo, Johana; Rho, Jong M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Ketones have previously shown beneficial effects in models of neurodegenerative disorders, particularly against associated mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive impairment. However, evidence of a synaptic protective effect of ketones remains lacking. We tested the effects of ketones on synaptic impairment induced by mitochondrial respiratory complex (MRC) inhibitors using electrophysiological, reactive oxygen species (ROS) imaging and biochemical techniques. MRC inhibitors dose-dependently suppressed both population spike (PS) and field potential amplitudes in the CA1 hippocampus. Pre-treatment with ketones strongly prevented changes in the PS, whereas partial protection was seen in the field potential. Rotenone (Rot; 100 nmol/L), a MRC I inhibitor, suppressed synaptic function without altering ROS levels and PS depression by Rot was unaffected by antioxidants. In contrast, antioxidant-induced PS recovery against the MRC II inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP; 1 mmol/L) was similar to the synaptic protective effects of ketones. Ketones also suppressed ROS generation induced by 3-NP. Finally, ketones reversed the decreases in ATP levels caused by Rot and 3-NP. In summary, our data demonstrate that ketones can preserve synaptic function in CA1 hippocampus induced by MRC dysfunction, likely through an antioxidant action and enhanced ATP generation. PMID:20374433

  12. Cognitive dysfunction in patients with renal failure requiring hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Thimmaiah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Renal failure patients show significant impairment on measures of attention and memory, and consistently perform significantly better on neuropsychological measures of memory and attention, approximately 24 hours after hemodialysis treatment. The objectives are to determine the cognitive dysfunction in patients with renal failure requiring hemodialysis. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 subjects comprising of 30 renal failure patients and 30 controls were recruited. The sample was matched for age, sex, and socioeconomic status. The tools used were the Standardized Mini-Mental State Examination and the Brief Cognitive Rating Scale. Results: The patients showed high cognitive dysfunction in the pre-dialysis group, in all the five dimensions (concentration, recent memory, past memory, orientation and functioning, and self-care, and the least in the 24-hour post dialysis group. This difference was found to be statistically significant (P=0.001. Conclusion: Patients with renal failure exhibited pronounced cognitive impairment and these functions significantly improved after the introduction of hemodialysis.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction in schizophrenia: pathways, mechanisms and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Ashwini; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Berk, Michael; Debnath, Monojit

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a critical role in regulating cellular functions including bioenergetics, calcium homeostasis, redox signalling, and apoptotic cell death. Mitochondria are also essential to many aspects of neurodevelopment and neuronal functions. However, mitochondrial impairment may affect bioenergetics in the developing brain and alter critical neuronal processes leading to neurodevelopmental abnormalities. Schizophrenia is a chronic and severe neuropsychiatric disorder of neurodevelopmental origin. Immuno-inflammatory pathway is one of the widely appreciated mechanisms that has consistently been implicated in the neurodevelopmental origin of schizophrenia. However, the source of inflammation and the underlying neurobiological mechanisms leading to schizophrenia are yet to be fully ascertained. Recent understanding reveals that perturbation of mitochondrial network dynamics might lead to various nervous system disorders with inflammatory pathologies. Mitochondrial deficit, altered redox balance and chronic low-grade inflammation are evident in schizophrenia. It is hypothesized that oxidative/nitrosative stress responses due to mitochondrial dysfunctions might activate immuno-inflammatory pathways and subsequently lead to neuroprogressive changes in schizophrenia. Herein, we summarise the current understanding of molecular links between mitochondrial dysfunctions and pathogenesis of schizophrenia based on evidence from genomics, proteomics and imaging studies, which together support a role for mitochondrial impairment in the pathogenetic pathways of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  15. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-02

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents.

  16. Myofascial Pain Dysfunction Syndrome (MPDS)

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Myofascial Pain Dysfunction Syndrome (MPDS) is one of the most important causes of the orofacial pain. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate 40 related variables in this regard. Materials and Methods: Thirty nine patients with MPDS were evaluated in this study. Different factors including age, gender, occupation, marital status, sensitivity of masticatory muscles, maximum opening of the mouth, deviation, deflection, involvement of temporomandibular joint, habit, parafun...

  17. Hypnotic metaphor and sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, L G

    1987-01-01

    Although hypnosis can be very effective in alleviating sexual problems, few sex therapists use hypnotic methods. This paper seeks to encourage a greater use of hypnosis among clinicians by presenting: a description of the new hypnosis exemplified in the work of Milton H. Erickson; an explanation of one of Erickson's most important and innovative methods, the use of multiple embedded metaphors; and case histories illustrating the application of hypnotic approaches to sexual dysfunction.

  18. A Scale of Socioemotional Dysfunction in Frontotemporal Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsuglia, Joseph P.; Kaiser, Natalie C.; Wilkins, Stacy Schantz; Joshi, Aditi; Barrows, Robin J.; Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Panchal, Hemali Vijay; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Mather, Michelle J.; Mendez, Mario F.

    2014-01-01

    Early social dysfunction is a hallmark symptom of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD); however, validated measures for assessing social deficits in dementia are needed. The purpose of the current study was to examine the utility of a novel informant-based measure of social impairment, the Socioemotional Dysfunction Scale (SDS) in early-onset dementia. Sixteen bvFTD and 18 early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (EOAD) participants received standard clinical neuropsychological measures and neuroimaging. Caregiver informants were administered the SDS. Individuals with bvFTD exhibited greater social dysfunction on the SDS compared with the EOAD group; t(32) = 6.32, p < .001. The scale demonstrated preliminary evidence for discriminating these frequently misdiagnosed groups (area under the curve = 0.920, p = <.001) and internal consistency α = 0.977. The SDS demonstrated initial evidence as an effective measure for detecting abnormal social behavior and discriminating bvFTD from EOAD. Future validation is recommended in larger and more diverse patient groups. PMID:25331776

  19. Oxidative modification of tropomyosin and myocardial dysfunction following coronary microembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Marcella; Skyschally, Andreas; Menabò, Roberta; Boengler, Kerstin; Gres, Petra; Schulz, Rainer; Haude, Michael; Erbel, Raimund; Di Lisa, Fabio; Heusch, Gerd

    2006-04-01

    We addressed a potential mechanism of myocardial dysfunction following coronary microembolization at the level of myofibrillar proteins. Anaesthetized pigs underwent intracoronary infusion of microspheres. After 6 h, the microembolized areas (MEA) had decreased systolic wall thickening to 38 +/- 7% of baseline and a 2.62 +/- 0.40-fold increase in the formation of disulphide cross-bridges (DCB) in tropomyosin relative to that in remote areas. The impairment in contractile function correlated inversely with DCB formation (r = -0.68; P = 0.015) and was associated with increased TNF-alpha content. DCB formation was reflected by increased tropomyosin immunoreactivity and abolished in vitro by dithiothreitol. Ascorbic acid prevented contractile dysfunction as well as increased DCB and TNF-alpha. In anaesthetized dogs, 8 h after intracoronary microspheres infusion, contractile function was reduced to 8+/-10% of baseline and DCB in MEA was 1.48+/-0.12 higher than that in remote areas. In conscious dogs, 6 days after intracoronary microspheres infusion, myocardial function had returned to baseline and DCB was no longer different between remote and MEA. Again contractile function correlated inversely with DCB formation (r = -0.83; P = 0.005). Myofibrillar protein oxidation may represent a mechanistic link between inflammation and contractile dysfunction following coronary microembolization.

  20. Hemodynamic Profiles of Functional and Dysfunctional Forms of Repetitive Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Cristina; Brosschot, Jos F; Lonigro, Antonia; Medea, Barbara; Van Diest, Ilse; Thayer, Julian F

    2017-04-01

    The ability of the human brain to escape the here and now (mind wandering) can take functional (problem solving) and dysfunctional (perseverative cognition) routes. Although it has been proposed that only the latter may act as a mediator of the relationship between stress and cardiovascular disease, both functional and dysfunctional forms of repetitive thinking have been associated with blood pressure (BP) reactivity of the same magnitude. However, a similar BP reactivity may be caused by different physiological determinants, which may differ in their risk for cardiovascular pathology. To examine the way (hemodynamic profile) and the extent (compensation deficit) to which total peripheral resistance and cardiac output compensate for each other in determining BP reactivity during functional and dysfunctional types of repetitive thinking. Fifty-six healthy participants randomly underwent a perseverative cognition, a mind wandering, and a problem solving induction, each followed by a 5-min recovery period while their cardiovascular parameters were continuously monitored. Perseverative cognition and problem solving (but not mind wandering) elicited BP increases of similar magnitude. However, perseverative cognition was characterized by a more vascular (versus myocardial) profile compared to mind wandering and problem solving. As a consequence, BP recovery was impaired after perseverative cognition compared to the other two conditions. Given that high vascular resistance and delayed recovery are the hallmarks of hypertension the results suggest a potential mechanism through which perseverative cognition may act as a mediator in the relationship between stress and risk for developing precursors to cardiovascular disease.

  1. Mitochondrial disease and endocrine dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jasmine; Rahman, Joyeeta; Achermann, John C; Dattani, Mehul T; Rahman, Shamima

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondria are critical organelles for endocrine health; steroid hormone biosynthesis occurs in these organelles and they provide energy in the form of ATP for hormone production and trafficking. Mitochondrial diseases are multisystem disorders that feature defective oxidative phosphorylation, and are characterized by enormous clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogeneity. To date, mitochondrial diseases have been found to result from >250 monogenic defects encoded across two genomes: the nuclear genome and the ancient circular mitochondrial genome located within mitochondria themselves. Endocrine dysfunction is often observed in genetic mitochondrial diseases and reflects decreased intracellular production or extracellular secretion of hormones. Diabetes mellitus is the most frequently described endocrine disturbance in patients with inherited mitochondrial diseases, but other endocrine manifestations in these patients can include growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, hypoparathyroidism and thyroid disease. Although mitochondrial endocrine dysfunction frequently occurs in the context of multisystem disease, some mitochondrial disorders are characterized by isolated endocrine involvement. Furthermore, additional monogenic mitochondrial endocrine diseases are anticipated to be revealed by the application of genome-wide next-generation sequencing approaches in the future. Understanding the mitochondrial basis of endocrine disturbance is key to developing innovative therapies for patients with mitochondrial diseases.

  2. Generalized Resolution and NC—Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘叙华; 孙吉贵

    1994-01-01

    The relation between generalized resolution and NC-resolution is discussed.The proof of the completeness of NC linear resolution is then given.The incompleteness of NC lock resolution is also presented,thus the conclusion in [3] of “a simple completeness-preserving restriction” is shown to be wrong.

  3. Development or Impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakansson, Gisela

    2010-01-01

    Joanne Paradis' Keynote Article on bilingualism and specific language impairment (SLI) is an impressive overview of research in language acquisition and language impairment. Studying different populations is crucial both for theorizing about language acquisition mechanisms, and for practical purposes of diagnosing and supporting children with…

  4. Development or Impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakansson, Gisela

    2010-01-01

    Joanne Paradis' Keynote Article on bilingualism and specific language impairment (SLI) is an impressive overview of research in language acquisition and language impairment. Studying different populations is crucial both for theorizing about language acquisition mechanisms, and for practical purposes of diagnosing and supporting children with…

  5. Symptoms of Nerve Dysfunction After Hip Arthroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dippmann, Christian; Thorborg, Kristian; Kraemer, Otto

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The primary purpose of this study was to analyze the rate, pattern, and severity of symptoms of nerve dysfunction after hip arthroscopy (HA) by reviewing prospectively collected data. The secondary purpose was to study whether symptoms of nerve dysfunction were related to traction time...... year after HA concerning symptoms of nerve dysfunction, possible localization, and erectile dysfunction. Fifty patients participated and returned fully completed questionnaires. Patients reporting symptoms of nerve dysfunction 1 year after HA were re-examined. RESULTS: Twenty-three of 50 patients (46......%) reported symptoms of nerve dysfunction during the first week after HA; this was reduced to 14 patients (28%) after 6 weeks, 11 patients (22%) after 26 weeks, and 9 patients (18%) after 1 year. One patient experienced temporary erectile dysfunction. No difference in traction time between patients...

  6. Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesiewicz, Theresa A.; Baker, Matthew J.; Wahba, Mervat; Hauser, Robert A.

    2003-03-01

    Autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), affects 70% to 80% of patients, and causes significant morbidity and discomfort. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction symptoms in PD include sexual dysfunction, swallowing and gastrointestinal disorders, bowel and bladder abnormalities, sleep disturbances, and derangements of cardiovascular regulation, particularly, orthostatic hypotension. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in PD may be caused by an underlying degenerative process that affects the autonomic ganglia, brainstem nuclei, and hypothalamic nuclei. Anti-parkinsonian medications can cause or worsen symptoms of ANS dysfunction. The care of a PD patient with ANS dysfunction relies on its recognition and directed treatment, including coordinated care between the neurologist and appropriate subspecialist. Pharmacotherapy may be useful to treat orthostasis, gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual dysfunction.

  7. Endothelial dysfunction is associated with carotid plaque: a cross-sectional study from the population based Northern Manhattan Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boden-Albala Bernadette

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impaired vascular function occurs early in atherogenesis. Brachial flow mediated dilatation (FMD is a non-invasive measure of vascular function and may be an important marker of preclinical atherosclerosis. Data on the association between FMD and carotid plaque in multi-ethnic populations are limited. The objective of this study was to determine whether endothelial dysfunction is independently associated with carotid plaque in a community of northern Manhattan. Methods In the population-based Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS, high-resolution B-mode ultrasound images of the brachial and carotid arteries were obtained in 643 stroke-free subjects (mean age 66 years; 55% women; 65% Caribbean-Hispanic, 17% African-American, 16% Caucasian. Brachial FMD was measured during reactive hyperemia. Maximum carotid plaque thickness (MCPT was measured at the peak plaque prominence. Results The mean brachial FMD was 5.78 ± 3.83 %. Carotid plaque was present in 339 (53% subjects. The mean MCPT was 1.68 ± 0.82 mm, and the 75th percentile was 2.0 mm. Reduced FMD was significantly associated with increased MCPT. After adjusting for demographics, vascular risk factors, and education, each percent of FMD decrease was associated with a significant 0.02 mm increase in MCPT (p = 0.028. In a dichotomous adjusted model, blunted FMD was associated with an increased risk of MCPT ≥ 2.0 mm (OR, 1.11 for every 1% decrease in FMD; 95% CI, 1.03–1.19. Conclusion Decreased brachial FMD is independently associated with carotid plaque. Non-invasive evaluation of endothelial dysfunction may be a useful marker of preclinical atherosclerosis and help to individualize cardiovascular risk assessment beyond traditional risk factors.

  8. Evidence That Anorectal Transplantation Is the Logical Treatment for Serious Anorectal Dysfunction and Permanent Colostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Galvao, F H; Araki, J; Seid, V E; Waisberg, D R; Traldi, M C; Naito, M; Araujo, B C; Lanchotte, C; Chaib, E; D'Albuquerque, L A C

    2016-03-01

    Anorectal dysfunction resulting in fecal incontinence or permanent colostomy is a current public health concern that strongly impairs patient quality of life. Present treatment options for this complex disease are expensive and usually ineffective. Anorectal transplantation is the logical treatment for fecal incontinence and permanent colostomy. This procedure has been clinically effective in a few cases reported in the medical literature. Furthermore, experiments in rats, pigs, and dogs have shown promising results, with functional recovery of the graft. In this article we describe the scientific evidence that anorectal transplantation may be an important option for treating anorectal dysfunction.

  9. Skeletal muscle dysfunction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Cheol Kim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ho Cheol Kim1, Mahroo Mofarrahi2, Sabah NA Hussain21Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Gyeongsang University Hospital, Jinju, Korea; 2Critical Care and Respiratory Divisions, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a debilitating disease characterized by inflammation-induced airflow limitation and parenchymal destruction. In addition to pulmonary manifestations, patients with COPD develop systemic problems, including skeletal muscle and other organ-specific dysfunctions, nutritional abnormalities, weight loss, and adverse psychological responses. Patients with COPD often complain of dyspnea on exertion, reduced exercise capacity, and develop a progressive decline in lung function with increasing age. These symptoms have been attributed to increases in the work of breathing and in impairments in gas exchange that result from airflow limitation and dynamic hyperinflation. However, there is mounting evidence to suggest that skeletal muscle dysfunction, independent of lung function, contributes significantly to reduced exercise capacity and poor quality of life in these patients. Limb and ventilatory skeletal muscle dysfunction in COPD patients has been attributed to a myriad of factors, including the presence of low grade systemic inflammatory processes, nutritional depletion, corticosteroid medications, chronic inactivity, age, hypoxemia, smoking, oxidative and nitrosative stresses, protein degradation and changes in vascular density. This review briefly summarizes the contribution of these factors to overall skeletal muscle dysfunction in patients with COPD, with particular attention paid to the latest advances in the field.Keywords: skeletal muscles, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diaphragm, quadriceps, fatigue, disuse, atrophy, smoking, exercise

  10. Right ventricular dysfunction affects survival after surgical left ventricular restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couperus, Lotte E; Delgado, Victoria; Palmen, Meindert; van Vessem, Marieke E; Braun, Jerry; Fiocco, Marta; Tops, Laurens F; Verwey, Harriëtte F; Klautz, Robert J M; Schalij, Martin J; Beeres, Saskia L M A

    2017-04-01

    Several clinical and left ventricular parameters have been associated with prognosis after surgical left ventricular restoration in patients with ischemic heart failure. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of right ventricular function. A total of 139 patients with ischemic heart failure (62 ± 10 years; 79% were male; left ventricular ejection fraction 27% ± 7%) underwent surgical left ventricular restoration. Biventricular function was assessed with echocardiography before surgery. The independent association between all-cause mortality and right ventricular fractional area change, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, and right ventricular longitudinal peak systolic strain was assessed. The additive effect of multiple impaired right ventricular parameters on mortality also was assessed. Baseline right ventricular fractional area change was 42% ± 9%, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion was 18 ± 3 mm, and right ventricular longitudinal peak systolic strain was -24% ± 7%. Within 30 days after surgery, 15 patients died. Right ventricular fractional area change (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.98; P right ventricular longitudinal peak systolic strain (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.26; P Right ventricular function was impaired in 21%, 20%, and 27% of patients on the basis of right ventricular fractional area change, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, and right ventricular longitudinal peak systolic strain, respectively. Any echocardiographic parameter of right ventricular dysfunction was present in 39% of patients. The coexistence of several impaired right ventricular parameters per patient was independently associated with increased 30-day mortality (hazard ratio, 2.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-4.87, P right ventricular systolic dysfunction is independently associated with increased mortality in patients with ischemic heart failure undergoing surgical left

  11. Reduced Treatment-Emergent Sexual Dysfunction as a Potential Target in the Development of New Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Baldwin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleasurable sexual activity is an essential component of many human relationships, providing a sense of physical, psychological, and social well-being. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and satisfaction, both in untreated and treated patients. The findings of randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that most of the currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with the development or worsening of sexual dysfunction, in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts but can endure over long periods and may reduce self-esteem and affect mood and relationships adversely. Sexual dysfunction during antidepressant treatment is typically associated with many possible causes, but the risk and type of dysfunction vary with differing compounds and should be considered when making decisions about the relative merits and drawbacks of differing antidepressants. A range of interventions can be considered when managing patients with sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants, including the prescription of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, but none of these approaches can be considered “ideal.” As treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction is less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in their pharmacological properties, and because current management approaches are less than ideal, a reduced burden of treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction represents a tolerability target in the development of novel antidepressants.

  12. Reduced treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction as a potential target in the development of new antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, David S; Palazzo, M Carlotta; Masdrakis, Vasilios G

    2013-01-01

    Pleasurable sexual activity is an essential component of many human relationships, providing a sense of physical, psychological, and social well-being. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and satisfaction, both in untreated and treated patients. The findings of randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that most of the currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with the development or worsening of sexual dysfunction, in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts but can endure over long periods and may reduce self-esteem and affect mood and relationships adversely. Sexual dysfunction during antidepressant treatment is typically associated with many possible causes, but the risk and type of dysfunction vary with differing compounds and should be considered when making decisions about the relative merits and drawbacks of differing antidepressants. A range of interventions can be considered when managing patients with sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants, including the prescription of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, but none of these approaches can be considered "ideal." As treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction is less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in their pharmacological properties, and because current management approaches are less than ideal, a reduced burden of treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction represents a tolerability target in the development of novel antidepressants.

  13. Executive Function Is Selectively Impaired in Old Age Bipolar Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caixeta, Leonardo; Soares, Vânia L. D.; Vieira, Renata T.; Soares, Cândida D.; Caixeta, Victor; Ferreira, Sandra B.; Aversi-Ferreira, Tales A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the cognitive signature of bipolar disorder (BD) in elderly brains. The neuropsychological features of depressive elderly with early-onset BD are largely unknown. This issue is relevant because cognitive impairment can produce an additional impact on the already compromised functionality of elderly with BD. The aim of this study is to assess executive functions (EFs) in the depressive phase of elderly outpatients with early-onset BD. Methods: Forty-nine elderly outpatients with early-onset BD were assessed with several neuropsychological tests for EF in the depressive phase of the disorder. Results: Executive dysfunction is very common in old age bipolar depression. Thirteen patients (26.5%) had a pseudodementia presentation. The worst performances were observed in the following tests: Trail Making B, Stroop Test 3, Backward Digit Span and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Conclusion: Executive dysfunction profile in elderly BD is complex and heterogeneous, but most cases display difficulties in working memory, inhibitory control, mental flexibility, and information processing speed. The performance of elderly with bipolar depression in executive assessment can be divided into two main categories: (1) Single EF domain impairment; and (2) Multiple EF domain impairment with or without a pseudodementia syndrome. Executive dysfunction in old age bipolar depression may be explained by lack of sufficient mental energy to run those cognitive processes that require larger amounts of effort to be performed.

  14. Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichgans, Martin; Leys, Didier

    2017-02-03

    Cerebrovascular disease typically manifests with stroke, cognitive impairment, or both. Vascular cognitive impairment refers to all forms of cognitive disorder associated with cerebrovascular disease, regardless of the specific mechanisms involved. It encompasses the full range of cognitive deficits from mild cognitive impairment to dementia. In principle, any of the multiple causes of clinical stroke can cause vascular cognitive impairment. Recent work further highlights a role of microinfarcts, microhemorrhages, strategic white matter tracts, loss of microstructural tissue integrity, and secondary neurodegeneration. Vascular brain injury results in loss of structural and functional connectivity and, hence, compromise of functional networks within the brain. Vascular cognitive impairment is common both after stroke and in stroke-free individuals presenting to dementia clinics, and vascular pathology frequently coexists with neurodegenerative pathology, resulting in mixed forms of mild cognitive impairment or dementia. Vascular dementia is now recognized as the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, and there is increasing awareness that targeting vascular risk may help to prevent dementia, even of the Alzheimer type. Recent advances in neuroimaging, neuropathology, epidemiology, and genetics have led to a deeper understanding of how vascular disease affects cognition. These new findings provide an opportunity for the present reappraisal of vascular cognitive impairment. We further briefly address current therapeutic concepts.

  15. 综合康复治疗对骨折后肘关节功能障碍的疗效观察%Study on effect of comprehensive rehabilitative treatment on elbow dysfunction following fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟冬娅; 胡晓芳

    2001-01-01

    @@ Background:Long- term mobilization or pain after fracture will impair elbow function and ability of activity of daily living. Objective:To investigate the effect of comprehensive rehabilitation treatment on elbow dysfunction following fracture.

  16. White matter atrophy and cognitive dysfunctions in neuromyelitis optica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Blanc

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of central nervous system characterized by optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive acute transverse myelitis. NMO patients have cognitive dysfunctions but other clinical symptoms of brain origin are rare. In the present study, we aimed to investigate cognitive functions and brain volume in NMO. The study population consisted of 28 patients with NMO and 28 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex and educational level. We applied a French translation of the Brief Repeatable Battery (BRB-N to the NMO patients. Using SIENAx for global brain volume (Grey Matter, GM; White Matter, WM; and whole brain and VBM for focal brain volume (GM and WM, NMO patients and controls were compared. Voxel-level correlations between diminished brain concentration and cognitive performance for each tests were performed. Focal and global brain volume of NMO patients with and without cognitive impairment were also compared. Fifteen NMO patients (54% had cognitive impairment with memory, executive function, attention and speed of information processing deficits. Global and focal brain atrophy of WM but not Grey Matter (GM was found in the NMO patients group. The focal WM atrophy included the optic chiasm, pons, cerebellum, the corpus callosum and parts of the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, including superior longitudinal fascicle. Visual memory, verbal memory, speed of information processing, short-term memory and executive functions were correlated to focal WM volumes. The comparison of patients with, to patients without cognitive impairment showed a clear decrease of global and focal WM, including brainstem, corticospinal tracts, corpus callosum but also superior and inferior longitudinal fascicles. Cognitive impairment in NMO patients is correlated to the decreased of global and focal WM volume of the brain. Further studies are needed to better understand the precise origin of cognitive impairment in

  17. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  18. Drug addiction and sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaazaa, Adham; Bella, Anthony J; Shamloul, Rany

    2013-09-01

    This article attempts to review the most current and the well-established facts concerning drug addiction and sexual dysfunction. Surprisingly, even though alcohol is prevalent in many societies with many myths surrounding its sexual-enhancing effects, current scientific research cannot provide a solid conclusion on its effect on sexual function. Unfortunately, the same concept applies to tobacco smoking; however, most of the current knowledge tends to support the notion that it, indeed, can negatively affect sexual function. Similar ambiguities also prevail with substances of abuse.

  19. Endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi AR Hadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hadi AR Hadi, Jassim Al SuwaidiDepartment of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hamad General Hospital – Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, State of Qatar; Department of Cardioscience, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, UAEAbstract: Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even in the presence of intensive glycemic control. Substantial clinical and experimental evidence suggest that both diabetes and insulin resistance cause a combination of endothelial dysfunctions, which may diminish the anti-atherogenic role of the vascular endothelium. Both insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction appear to precede the development of overt hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, in patients with diabetes or insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction may be a critical early target for preventing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Microalbuminuria is now considered to be an atherosclerotic risk factor and predicts future cardiovascular disease risk in diabetic patients, in elderly patients, as well as in the general population. It has been implicated as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature cardiovascular mortality for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as for patients with essential hypertension. A complete biochemical understanding of the mechanisms by which hyperglycemia causes vascular functional and structural changes associated with the diabetic milieu still eludes us. In recent years, the numerous biochemical and metabolic pathways postulated to have a causal role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular disease have been distilled into several unifying hypotheses. The role of chronic hyperglycemia in the development of diabetic microvascular complications and in neuropathy has been clearly established. However, the biochemical or cellular links between elevated blood glucose levels, and the vascular lesions remain

  20. Diagnosis of vascular cognitive impairment and its main categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez García, P L; Rodríguez García, D

    2015-05-01

    A review of current criteria for the diagnosis of categories related with vascular cognitive impairment, in particular the nomenclature, diagnostic criteria, and differential clinical-radiological findings. The criteria for the diagnosis of vascular cognitive impairment have evolved, but available criteria were designed basically for differentiating between vascular dementia and dementia due to Alzheimer disease, and for research purposes. Nevertheless, in clinical practice precise elements are required for: 1) Clinical diagnosis of dementia and mild cognitive impairment; 2) Clinical and neuroimaging criteria for identification of the various cerebrovascular lesions associated with cognitive dysfunction, and 3) A formulation of the aetiogenic-pathogenic relationship between cognitive impairment and cerebrovascular lesions. For this reason, a review was carried out on the diagnostic elements of vascular cognitive impairment categories, classification, and their most relevant characteristics. It highlights the characteristic for the diagnosis of multi-infarction dementia, strategic single infarct dementia, small vessel disease with dementia, mixed dementia, and vascular mild cognitive impairment. Standardisation is required, by a multidisciplinary expert team, as regards nomenclature and criteria for the diagnosis of the full spectrum associated with vascular cognitive impairment and especially for vascular dementia and its categories. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Anesthetics impact the resolution of inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Chiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Local and volatile anesthetics are widely used for surgery. It is not known whether anesthetics impinge on the orchestrated events in spontaneous resolution of acute inflammation. Here we investigated whether a commonly used local anesthetic (lidocaine and a widely used inhaled anesthetic (isoflurane impact the active process of resolution of inflammation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using murine peritonitis induced by zymosan and a systems approach, we report that lidocaine delayed and blocked key events in resolution of inflammation. Lidocaine inhibited both PMN apoptosis and macrophage uptake of apoptotic PMN, events that contributed to impaired PMN removal from exudates and thereby delayed the onset of resolution of acute inflammation and return to homeostasis. Lidocaine did not alter the levels of specific lipid mediators, including pro-inflammatory leukotriene B(4, prostaglandin E(2 and anti-inflammatory lipoxin A(4, in the cell-free peritoneal lavages. Addition of a lipoxin A(4 stable analog, partially rescued lidocaine-delayed resolution of inflammation. To identify protein components underlying lidocaine's actions in resolution, systematic proteomics was carried out using nanospray-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Lidocaine selectively up-regulated pro-inflammatory proteins including S100A8/9 and CRAMP/LL-37, and down-regulated anti-inflammatory and some pro-resolution peptides and proteins including IL-4, IL-13, TGF-â and Galectin-1. In contrast, the volatile anesthetic isoflurane promoted resolution in this system, diminishing the amplitude of PMN infiltration and shortening the resolution interval (Ri approximately 50%. In addition, isoflurane down-regulated a panel of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, as well as proteins known to be active in cell migration and chemotaxis (i.e., CRAMP and cofilin-1. The distinct impact of lidocaine and isoflurane on selective molecules may underlie their opposite

  2. The Influence of Autonomic Dysfunction Associated with Aging and Type 2 Diabetes on Daily Life Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrold Petrofsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D and ageing have well documented effects on every organ in the body. In T2D the autonomic nervous system is impaired due to damage to neurons, sensory receptors, synapses and the blood vessels. This paper will concentrate on how autonomic impairment alters normal daily activities. Impairments include the response of the blood vessels to heat, sweating, heat transfer, whole body heating, orthostatic intolerance, balance, and gait. Because diabetes is more prevalent in older individuals, the effects of ageing will be examined. Beginning with endothelial dysfunction, blood vessels have impairment in their ability to vasodilate. With this and synaptic damage, the autonomic nervous system cannot compensate for effectors such as pressure on and heating of the skin. This and reduced ability of the heart to respond to stress, reduces autonomic orthostatic compensation. Diminished sweating causes the skin and core temperature to be high during whole body heating. Impaired orthostatic tolerance, impaired vision and vestibular sensing, causes poor balance and impaired gait. Overall, people with T2D must be made aware and counseled relative to the potential consequence of these impairments.

  3. Profound Olfactory Dysfunction in Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E.; Bayona, Edgardo A.; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime; Osman, Allen; Doty, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease strongly identified with deficient acetylcholine receptor transmission at the post-synaptic neuromuscular junction, is accompanied by a profound loss of olfactory function. Twenty-seven MG patients, 27 matched healthy controls, and 11 patients with polymiositis, a disease with peripheral neuromuscular symptoms analogous to myasthenia gravis with no known central nervous system involvement, were tested. All were administered the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and the Picture Identification Test (PIT), a test analogous in content and form to the UPSIT designed to control for non-olfactory cognitive confounds. The UPSIT scores of the myasthenia gravis patients were markedly lower than those of the age- and sex-matched normal controls [respective means (SDs) = 20.15 (6.40) & 35.67 (4.95); p<0.0001], as well as those of the polymiositis patients who scored slightly below the normal range [33.30 (1.42); p<0.0001]. The latter finding, along with direct monitoring of the inhalation of the patients during testing, implies that the MG-related olfactory deficit is unlikely due to difficulties sniffing, per se. All PIT scores were within or near the normal range, although subtle deficits were apparent in both the MG and PM patients, conceivably reflecting influences of mild cognitive impairment. No relationships between performance on the UPSIT and thymectomy, time since diagnosis, type of treatment regimen, or the presence or absence of serum anti-nicotinic or muscarinic antibodies were apparent. Our findings suggest that MG influences olfactory function to the same degree as observed in a number of neurodegenerative diseases in which central nervous system cholinergic dysfunction has been documented. PMID:23082113

  4. Hypertrophic Obesity and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the past 50 years, scientists have recognized that not all adipose tissue is alike, and that health risk is associated with the location as well as the amount of body fat. Different depots are sufficiently distinct with respect to fatty-acid storage and release as to probably play unique roles in human physiology. Whether fat redistribution causes metabolic disease or whether it is a marker of underlying processes that are primarily responsible is an open question. CONTENT: The limited expandability of the subcutaneous adipose tissue leads to inappropriate adipose cell expansion (hypertrophic obesity with local inflammation and a dysregulated and insulin-resistant adipose tissue. The inability to store excess fat in the subcutaneous adipose tissue is a likely key mechanism for promoting ectopic fat accumulation in tissues and areas where fat can be stored, including the intra-abdominal and visceral areas, in the liver, epi/pericardial area, around vessels, in the myocardium, and in the skeletal muscles. Many studies have implicated ectopic fat accumulation and the associated lipotoxicity as the major determinant of the metabolic complications of obesity driving systemic insulin resistance, inflammation, hepatic glucose production, and dyslipidemia. SUMMARY: In summary, hypertrophic obesity is due to an impaired ability to recruit and differentiate available adipose precursor cells in the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Thus, the subcutaneous adipose tissue may be particular in its limited ability in certain individuals to undergo adipogenesis during weight increase. Inability to promote subcutaneous adipogenesis under periods of affluence would favor lipid overlow and ectopic fat accumulation with negative metabolic consequences. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipogenesis, subcutaneous adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, adipocyte dysfunction.

  5. HIV, opiates, and enteric neuron dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, J J

    2015-04-01

    Human immune deficient virus (HIV) is an immunosuppressive virus that targets CD4(+) T-lymphocytes. HIV infections cause increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and cancer. HIV infection can also alter central nervous system (CNS) function causing cognitive impairment. HIV does not infect neurons but it does infect astrocytes and microglia in the CNS. HIV can also infect enteric glia initiating an intestinal inflammatory response which causes enteric neural injury and gut dysfunction. Part of the inflammatory response is HIV induced production of proteins including, Transactivator of transcription (Tat) which contribute to neuronal injury after release from HIV infected glial cells. A risk factor for HIV infection is intravenous drug use with contaminated needles and chronic opiate use can exacerbate neural injury in the nervous system. While most research focuses on the actions of Tat and other HIV related proteins and opiates on the brain, recent data indicate that Tat can cause intestinal inflammation and disruption of enteric neuron function, including alteration of Na(+) channel activity and action potential generation. A paper published in this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility extends these findings by identifying an interaction between Tat and morphine on enteric neuron Na(+) channels and on intestinal motility in vivo using a Tat expressing transgenic mouse model. These new data show that Tat protein can enhance the inhibitory actions of morphine on action potential generation and propulsive motility. These findings are important to our understanding of how HIV causes diarrhea in infected patients and for the use of opioid drugs to treat HIV-induced diarrhea.

  6. [Female sexual dysfunction: classification, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Mijal; Hochner-Celnikier, Drorit; Mock, Moshe

    2004-11-01

    The successful pharmacological treatment of erectile dysfunction in males has led to increasing interest in the sexual problems of women. Yet in recent years there has been growing consensus regarding the differences between male and female sexuality. William Masters and Virginia Johnson's model of sexual response, revised by Helen Singer Kaplan, has been generally accepted for many decades. This model consists of 4 successive phases: desire, excitement (arousal), orgasm and resolution. Rosemary Basson has suggested a different model, valid especially in long-term relationships. According to Basson, a woman may decide to seek a stimuli necessary to ignite sexual desire, for reasons which are not sexual (such as the need for intimacy or emotional bonding). The desire develops at a latter stage, as a consequence and not as a cause. As the understanding of the sexual response grows, new methods of classification and treatment are being developed. Female sexual dysfunction is common, frequently neglected and has a significant impact on the lives of women. It has a diverse etiology including anatomical, physiological, medical as well as psychological and social factors. The assessment of these disorders incorporates both medical and psychological evaluation. The treatment includes education, improvement of inter-personal communication, behavioral treatment and the solution of medical problems. Different medications are being developed but most have yet to be proven effective. This review presents the female sexual response as it is understood today and the different methods of classification, diagnosis and treatment of female sexual dysfunction.

  7. NON INVASIVE ASSESSMENT OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN ESSENTIAL HYPERTENTION WITH OR WITHOUT MICROALBUMINURIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND : Endothelial dysfunction is an early event in atherosclerosis and is known to app ear long before the formati on of structural atherosclerotic changes. Assessment of endothelial function , thus , can provide valuable insight into pre - intrusive phase of atherosclerosis and can be used as an early marker of future atherosclerotic disease. Fl ow mediated dilation (FMD is known to depend on ability of the endothelium to release NO in response to shear stress and can be used reliably as an estimate of endothelial function in various disease states. AIMS OF THE STUDY : To study endothelial dysfunct ion in patients with hypertension and compare with non - hypertensive subjects.To correlate the duration of hypertension with prevalence of endothelial dysfunction.To correlate microalbuminuria with endothelial dysfunction in essential hypertension.To correl ate risk factors of atherosclerosis in essential hypertension with endothelial dysfunction. METHODS : Endothelial function was assessed non - invasively by high resolution Duplex Doppler Ultrasound of Brachial Artery in fifty cases of hypertensives with or wit hout microalbuminuria and twenty controls who were healthy subjects. Brachial artery assessment was performed in both cases and control. RESULTS : In this study , it is observed that among 50 hypertensives , endothelial dysfunction was seen in 15 (30% , wherea s none of control had endothelial dysfunction. The mean age for hypertensives who had endothelial dysfunction was (50.56 in males and ( 48.83 in females. Among the cases 9 (60% of males and 6 (40% of females had FMD < 4.5%. Among hypertensives 12 (24% had microalbuminuria. Hypertensives with microalbuminuria having endothelial dysfunction were 4 (33.3% and hypertensives without microalbuminuria and havingendothelial dysfunction were 8 (66.7%. CONCLUSION : In this study , of 50 hypertensives , endothelial dysfunction was present in 15 (30% cases. Endothelial

  8. Temporal lobe dysfunction in childhood autism: a PET study; Dysfonctionnement bitemporal dans l'autisme infantile: etude en tomographie par emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boddaert, N.; Poline, J.B.; Brunelle, F.; Zilbovicius, M. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, ER-M INSERM 0205, DSV, DRM CEA, 91 - Orsay (France); Brunelle, F. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Necker-Enfants-Malades, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, 75 - Paris (France); Chabane, N. [Hopital Robert-Debre, Service de Pedopsychiatrie, 75 - Paris (France); Barthelemy, C.; Zilbovicius, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Bretonneau, INSERM Unite 316, 37 - Tours (France); Bourgeois, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Necker-Enfants-Malades, Dept. de Pediatrie, 75 - Paris (France); Samson, Y. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pitie-Salpetriere, Service des Urgences Cerebraux Vasculaires, 75 - Paris (France)

    2002-12-01

    Childhood autism is a severe developmental disorder that impairs the acquisition of some of the most important skills in human life. Progress in understanding the neural basis of childhood autism requires clear and reliable data indicating specific neuro-anatomical or neuro-physiological abnormalities. The purpose of the present study was to research localized brain dysfunction in autistic children using functional brain imaging. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured with positron emission tomography (PET) in 21 primary autistic children and 10 age-matched non autistic children. A statistical parametric analysis of rCBF images revealed significant bilateral temporal hypoperfusion in the associative auditory cortex (superior temporal gyrus) and in the multimodal cortex (superior temporal sulcus) in the autistic group (p<0.001). In addition, temporal hypoperfusion was detected individually in 77% of autistic children. These findings provide robust evidence of well localized functional abnormalities in autistic children located in the superior temporal lobe. Such localized abnormalities were not detected with the low resolution PET camera (14-22). This study suggests that high resolution PET camera combined with statistical parametric mapping is useful to understand developmental disorders. (authors)

  9. Impairments to Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an external Non-Government web site. Impairments to Vision Normal Vision Diabetic Retinopathy Age-related Macular Degeneration In this ... pictures, fixate on the nose to simulate the vision loss. In diabetic retinopathy, the blood vessels in ...

  10. Stormwater Impaired Watersheds

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Stormwater impaired watersheds occuring on both the Priority Waters (Part D - Completed TMDL) and 303(d) list of waters (Part A - need TMDL) The Vermont State...

  11. Kids' Quest: Vision Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... least one other developmental disability, such as intellectual disabilities, cerebral palsy, hearing loss, or epilepsy. Vision impairment is more common in older people than in children. Guide dogs are the guiding ...

  12. Speech impairment (adult)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003204.htm Speech impairment (adult) To use the sharing features on ... 2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the limelight of Parkinson's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rebecca; Starkov, Anatoly A; Beal, M Flint; Thomas, Bobby

    2009-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder with unknown etiology. It is marked by widespread neurodegeneration in the brain with profound loss of A9 midbrain dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. Several theories of biochemical abnormalities have been linked to pathogenesis of PD of which mitochondrial dysfunction due to an impairment of mitochondrial complex I and subsequent oxidative stress seems to take the center stage in experimental models of PD and in postmortem tissues of sporadic forms of illness. Recent identification of specific gene mutations and their influence on mitochondrial functions has further reinforced the relevance of mitochondrial abnormalities in disease pathogenesis. In both sporadic and familial forms of PD abnormal mitochondrial paradigms associated with disease include impaired functioning of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, aging associated damage to mitochondrial DNA, impaired calcium buffering, and anomalies in mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. Here we provide an overview of specific mitochondrial functions affected in sporadic and familial PD that play a role in disease pathogenesis. We propose to utilize these gained insights to further streamline and focus the research to better understand mitochondria's role in disease development and exploit potential mitochondrial targets for therapeutic interventions in PD pathogenesis.

  14. Multiple sclerosis and sexual dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Ni Guo; Si-Yuan He; Hong-Liang Zhang; Jiang Wu; Yi Yang

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system characterized by episodic and progressive neurologic dysfunction resulting from inflammatory and autoimmune reactions.The underlying pathogenesis of MS remains largely unclear.However,it is currently accepted as a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease.Among other clinical manifestations,sexual dysfunction (SD) is a painful but still underreported and underdiagnosed symptom of the disorder.SD in MS patients may result from a complex set of conditions and may be associated with multiple anatomic,physiologic,biologic,medical and psychological factors.SD arises primarily from lesions affecting the neural pathways involved in physiologic function.In addition,psychological factors,the side effects of medications and physical symptoms such as fatigue,muscular weakness,menstrual changes,pain and concerns about bladder and bowel incontinence may also be involved.Since MS primarily affects young people,SD secondary to MS may have a great impact on quality of life.Thus,maintaining a healthy sexual life with MS is an important priority.The treatment of SD requires multidisciplinary teamwork and cooperation among specialists,individual patients,partners and the society.

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF, several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cyclic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  16. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive tissues, increased hepatic glucose production, increased lipolysis in adipose tissue, and altered insulin secretion. Studies of individuals with insulin resistance, both with established T2D and high-risk individuals, have consistently demonstrated a diverse array of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Giannattasio, Sergio; Moro, Loredana

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with cancer development and progression. Recent evidences suggest that pathogenic mutations or depletion of the mitochondrial genome can contribute to development of chemoresistance in malignant tumors. In this review we will describe the current knowledge on the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of chemoresistance in cancer. We will also discuss the significance of this research topic in the context of development of more effective, targeted therapeutic modalities and diagnostic strategies for cancer patients, with a particular focus on the potential use of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients displaying mitochondrial DNA mutations. We will discuss recent studies highlighting the importance of the cross-talk between the tumor microenvironment and mitochondrial functionality in determining selective response to certain chemotherapeutic drugs. Finally, owing to the similarities between cancer and yeast cell metabolism, we will point out the use of yeast as a model system to study cancer-related genes and for anti-cancer drugs screening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome induces vascular dysfunction in obese OLETF rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Penghao [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension and Department of Hypertension, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Xie, Qihai [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Jiading District Central Hospital, Shanghai (China); Wei, Tong [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension and Department of Hypertension, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Yichen [Department of Pharmacology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Hong, E-mail: hchen100@shsmu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Shen, Weili, E-mail: wlshen@sibs.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension and Department of Hypertension, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2015-12-04

    Objective: Obesity-induced vascular dysfunction is related to chronic low-grade systemic inflammation. Recent studies indicate that NLRP3, a multiprotein complex formed by NOD-like receptor (NLR) family members, is a key component mediating internal sterile inflammation, but the role in obesity-related vascular dysfunction is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigate whether NLRP3 activation is involved in vascular inflammation in obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats (OLETF). Methods and results: Male OLETF with their control Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats (LETO) were studied at 3 and 12 months of age. Aortic relaxation in response to acetylcholine decreased gradually with age in both strains, with early and persistent endothelium dysfunction in obese OLETF compared with age-matched LETO controls. These changes are associated with parallel changes of aortic endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) content, macrophage accumulation and intimal thickening. NLRP3 increased in OLETF rats compared to LETO. Consistent with inflammasome activation, the conversion of procaspase-1 to cleaved and activated forms as well as IL-1β markedly increased in OLETF rats. Additionally, we observed increased expression of dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion-relative protein optic atropy-1(OPA1). Altered mitochondrial dynamics was associated with elevated oxidative stress level in OLETF aortas. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that obesity seems to accelerate endothelial dysfunction in OLETFs via the activation of NLRP3 and mitochondrial dysfunction. - Highlights: • NLRP3 is involved in obesity-induced vascular dysfunction. • Impaired mitochondrial dynamics may have been linked to mitochondrial defect and inflammasome activation. • Obesity seems to accelerate vascular dysfunction via NLRP3 activation and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  19. Angiostatic factors in the pulmonary endarterectomy material from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension patients cause endothelial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Zabini

    Full Text Available Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH is a rare disease with persistent thrombotic occlusion or stenosis of the large pulmonary arteries resulting in pulmonary hypertension. Surgical removal of the neointimal layer of these vessels together with the non-resolved thrombus consisting of organized collagen-rich fibrotic areas with partly recanalized regions is the treatment of choice (pulmonary endarterectomy, PEA. The present study investigates endothelial cells isolated from such material as well as factors present in the surgical PEA material, which may contribute to impairment of recanalization and thrombus non-resolution. We observed muscularized vessels and non-muscularized vessels in the PEA material. The isolated endothelial cells from the PEA material showed significantly different calcium homeostasis as compared to pulmonary artery endothelial cells (hPAECs from normal controls. In the supernatant (ELISA as well as on the tissue level (histochemical staining of the PEA material, platelet factor 4 (PF4, collagen type I and interferon-gamma-inducible 10 kD protein (IP-10 were detected. CXCR3, the receptor for PF4 and IP-10, was particularly elevated in the distal parts of the PEA material as compared to human control lung (RT-PCR. PF4, collagen type I and IP-10 caused significant changes in calcium homeostasis and affected the cell proliferation, migration and vessel formation in hPAECs. The presence of angiostatic factors like PF4, collagen type I and IP-10, as recovered from the surgical PEA material from CTEPH patients, may lead to changes in calcium homeostasis and endothelial dysfunction.

  20. Functional and morphological alterations associated with working memory dysfunction in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chung-Man; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2017-03-01

    Background Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has been related to functional brain activities and structural brain abnormalities. Purpose To investigate the neural mechanism on working memory dysfunction in patients with GAD in terms of the combined functional and morphological brain abnormalities. Material and Methods Patients with GAD and healthy controls matched for age, sex, and education level underwent high-resolution T1-weighted (T1W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI). In this study, fMRI and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were used for assessing the differential brain activation patterns, as well as for comparing the morphological alterations between the two groups. Results In response to the neutral distractors, the patients showed significantly lower activities in the regions of the fusiform gyrus (FuG), superior parietal gyrus (SPG), precuneus (PCu), superior occipital gyrus (SOG), lingual gyrus (LiG), cuneus (Cun), calcarine cortex (CaC), parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) and cerebellar cortex (Cb) compared to the controls. In response to the anxiety-inducing distractors, the patients showed significantly higher activity in the hippocampus and lower activities in the regions of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), FuG, SPG, PCu, SOG, and Cb. Also, the patients showed a significant reduction of the white matter volumes in the DLPFC, anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC) and midbrain. Conclusion This study provides the first evidence for the association between the morphometric alterations and functional deficit in the working memory processing with the neutral and anxiety-inducing distractors in GAD patients. These findings would be helpful to understand the neural mechanisms on working memory impairment in connection with GAD symptoms.

  1. Apraxia and Motor Dysfunction in Corticobasal Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Burrell, James R.; Michael Hornberger; Steve Vucic; Kiernan, Matthew C.; Hodges, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is characterized by multifaceted motor system dysfunction and cognitive disturbance; distinctive clinical features include limb apraxia and visuospatial dysfunction. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to study motor system dysfunction in CBS, but the relationship of TMS parameters to clinical features has not been studied. The present study explored several hypotheses; firstly, that limb apraxia may be partly due to visuospatial impai...

  2. The treatment of autonomic dysfunction in tetanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T van den Heever

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of generalised tetanus in a 50-year-old female patient after sustaining a wound to her right lower leg. She developed autonomic dysfunction, which included labile hypertension alternating with hypotension and sweating. The autonomic dysfunction was treated successfully with a combination of morphine sulphate infusion, magnesium sulphate, and clonidine. She also received adrenaline and phenylephrine infusions as needed for hypotension. We then discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features and treatment options of autonomic dysfunction.

  3. Multiple system atrophy and cognitive dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-yang LANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As the survival of patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA is prolonged, patients may present cognitive dysfunction or even dementia in addition to autonomic dysfunction, damage of extrapyramidal system and cerebellar ataxia. This article made a brief summary on the research progress of MSA combined with cognitive dysfunction reported at home and abroad. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.06.003

  4. The Possible Link between GABAergic Dysfunction and Cognitive Decline in a Patient with Idiopathic Hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Tatsuhiro; Kakimoto, Akihiro; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Kono, Satoshi; Bunai, Tomoyasu; Hosoi, Yasushi; Sakao-Suzuki, Makiko; Konishi, Takashi; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (IHP) is accompanied by cognitive impairment. We report the case of a 70-year-old IHP patient with cognitive disturbance. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral calcification in basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Neuropsychological assessment revealed low scores for intelligence, memory, and perseverative errors. Brain positron emission tomography showed a significant reduction in [(18)F]-Fludeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in bilateral frontal, left temporal and parietal cortices, along with a marked reduction in [(11)C]-flumazenil binding in left frontal, temporal, parietal, and bilateral cerebellum. These findings suggest cognitive impairment in IHP may be ascribed to GABAergic dysfunction, thus leading to, or coexisting with, cerebral hypometabolism.

  5. Reduced baroreflex sensitivity and pulmonary dysfunction in alcoholic cirrhosis: effect of hyperoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Iversen, J.S.; Krag, A.

    2010-01-01

    matched controls underwent hemodynamic and pulmonary investigations. BRS was assessed by cross-spectral analysis of variabilities between blood pressure and heart rate time series. A 100% oxygen test was performed with the assessment of arterial oxygen tensions (Pa(O(2))) and alveolar-arterial oxygen......Patients with cirrhosis exhibit impaired regulation of the arterial blood pressure, reduced baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and prolonged QT interval. In addition, a considerable number of patients have a pulmonary dysfunction with hypoxemia, impaired lung diffusing capacity (Dl(CO)), and presence...

  6. Modafinil for attentional and psychomotor dysfunction in advanced cancer: a double-blind, randomised, cross-over trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorff, L E; Jønsson, B H; Sjøgren, P

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive impairment seems to be highly prevalent in patients with advanced cancer. Modafinil, a novel vigilance and wake-promoting agent, may be an alternative treatment. We wanted to investigate this treatment on attentional and psychomotor dysfunction in cancer patients. 28 cancer patients...... cognitive tests of psychomotor speed and attention. Furthermore subjective scores of depression and drowsiness were significantly improved by modafinil....

  7. Physical Dysfunction and Nonorganic Signs in Patients With Chronic Neck Pain : Exploratory Study Into Interobserver Reliability and Construct Validity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wim; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Knol -de Vries, Grietje; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Repeated-measurement design. OBJECTIVES: To explore interobserver reliability of the modified physical dysfunction severity (mPDS) as a measure for impairment of the cervical spine and the modified cervical nonorganic signs (mcNOS) as a measure for behavioral signs, and to explore cons

  8. Microbial Translocation and B Cell Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut mucosal barrier disrupted in HIV disease, resulting in increased systemic exposure to microbial products such as Lipo Polys Accharide (LPS. The association of enhanced microbial translocation and B cell dysfunction in HIV disease is not fully understood. High dose and short term exposure of microbial Toll-Like Receptor (TLR agonists were used as vaccine adjuvants, however, low dose and long term exposure of TLR agonists could be harmful. The characteristics of B cell dysfunction in HIV disease included B cell, especially memory B cell depletion, enhanced levels of autoimmune antibodies and impaired vaccine or antigen responsiveness. This review discusses and explores the possibility of the effect of microbial translocation on memory B cell depletion and impaired vaccine responses in HIV infection. By determining the mechanisms of B cell depletion and perturbations in HIV disease, it may be possible to design interventions that can improve immune responses to vaccines, reduce selected opportunistic infections and perhaps slow disease progression.

  9. Diabetes-related dysfunction of the small intestine and the colon: focus on motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Viktor József; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Izbéki, Ferenc; Körei, Anna Erzsébet; Gerő, László; Lengyel, Csaba; Kempler, Péter; Várkonyi, Tamás

    2015-11-01

    In contrast to gastric dysfunction, diabetes-related functional impairments of the small and large intestine have been studied less intensively. The gastrointestinal tract accomplishes several functions, such as mixing and propulsion of luminal content, absorption and secretion of ions, water, and nutrients, defense against pathogens, and elimination of waste products. Diverse functions of the gut are regulated by complex interactions among its functional elements, including gut microbiota. The network-forming tissues, the enteric nervous system) and the interstitial cells of Cajal, are definitely impaired in diabetic patients, and their loss of function is closely related to the symptoms in diabetes, but changes of other elements could also play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus-related motility disorders. The development of our understanding over the recent years of the diabetes-induced dysfunctions in the small and large intestine are reviewed in this article.

  10. The Link Between Stress Disorders and Autonomic Dysfunction in Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasna eSabharwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease of muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and cardiac dysfunction. Patients afflicted with muscular dystrophy exhibit autonomic dysfunction along with cognitive impairment, severe depression, sadness, and anxiety. Although the psychological aspects of cardiovascular disorders and stress disorders are well known, the physiological mechanism underlying this relationship is not well understood, particularly in muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the goal of this perspective is to highlight the importance of autonomic dysfunction and psychological stress disorders in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy. This article will for the first time - (i outline autonomic mechanisms that are common to both psychological stress and cardiovascular disorders in muscular dystrophy; (ii propose therapies that would improve behavioral and autonomic functions in muscular dystrophy.

  11. Intestinal dysfunction associated with acute thoracolumbar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschiera, J L; Beerman, S P

    1990-03-01

    The frequency of intestinal dysfunction, particularly intestinal ileus, among patients with acute thoracolumbar fractures and no neurologic compromise was assessed. We reviewed the medical records of 70 patients who met specific criteria. Only four (6%) of these patients developed intestinal dysfunction, manifested by vomiting, abdominal distention, diminished bowel sounds, or an intestinal ileus documented by an abdominal roentgenogram. Conservative initial nutritional management of the patients did not reduce the incidence of intestinal dysfunction. This study suggests that patients with acute thoracolumbar fractures and no neurologic compromise are not at substantial risk of intestinal dysfunction and that nasogastric suction and restriction of oral intake are unnecessary in the initial management of these patients.

  12. Cardiovascular dysfunction in infants with neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Armstrong, Katey

    2012-04-01

    Severe perinatal asphyxia with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy occurs in approximately 1-2\\/1000 live births and is an important cause of cerebral palsy and associated neurological disabilities in children. Multiorgan dysfunction commonly occurs as part of the asphyxial episode, with cardiovascular dysfunction occurring in up to a third of infants. This narrative paper attempts to review the literature on the importance of early recognition of cardiac dysfunction using echocardiography and biomarkers such as troponin and brain type natriuretic peptide. These tools may allow accurate assessment of cardiac dysfunction and guide therapy to improve outcome.

  13. The relationship between depression and erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, S N; Roose, S P

    2000-06-01

    Normal sexual function is a biopsychosocial process; sexual dysfunction almost always has organic and psychologic components, and it requires multidisciplinary, goal-directed evaluation and treatment. Factors such as aging, declining testosterone levels, medical illness, certain medications, and comorbid depressive illness can contribute to sexual dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common male sexual dysfunction encountered in the clinical setting. Comorbidity between ED and depressive illness is high, but the causal relationship is unclear, and likely bidirectional. In this article, we review the existing literature on the relationship between depression and ED.

  14. Contractile dysfunction in muscle may underlie androgen-dependent motor dysfunction in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Kentaro; Halievski, Katherine; Vicente, Laura; Xu, Youfen; Zeolla, Donald; Poort, Jessica; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Wiseman, Robert W; Breedlove, S Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2015-04-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness linked to a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). Current evidence indicates that mutant AR causes SBMA by acting in muscle to perturb its function. However, information about how muscle function is impaired is scant. One fundamental question is whether the intrinsic strength of muscles, an attribute of muscle independent of its mass, is affected. In the current study, we assess the contractile properties of hindlimb muscles in vitro from chronically diseased males of three different SBMA mouse models: a transgenic (Tg) model that broadly expresses a full-length human AR with 97 CAGs (97Q), a knock-in (KI) model that expresses a humanized AR containing a CAG expansion in the first exon, and a Tg myogenic model that overexpresses wild-type AR only in skeletal muscle fibers. We found that hindlimb muscles in the two Tg models (97Q and myogenic) showed marked losses in their intrinsic strength and resistance to fatigue, but were minimally affected in KI males. However, diseased muscles of all three models showed symptoms consistent with myotonic dystrophy type 1, namely, reduced resting membrane potential and deficits in chloride channel mRNA. These data indicate that muscle dysfunction is a core feature of SBMA caused by at least some of the same pathogenic mechanisms as myotonic dystrophy. Thus mechanisms controlling muscle function per se independent of mass are prime targets for SBMA therapeutics.

  15. Contractile dysfunction in muscle may underlie androgen-dependent motor dysfunction in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Kentaro; Halievski, Katherine; Vicente, Laura; Xu, Youfen; Zeolla, Donald; Poort, Jessica; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Wiseman, Robert W.; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness linked to a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). Current evidence indicates that mutant AR causes SBMA by acting in muscle to perturb its function. However, information about how muscle function is impaired is scant. One fundamental question is whether the intrinsic strength of muscles, an attribute of muscle independent of its mass, is affected. In the current study, we assess the contractile properties of hindlimb muscles in vitro from chronically diseased males of three different SBMA mouse models: a transgenic (Tg) model that broadly expresses a full-length human AR with 97 CAGs (97Q), a knock-in (KI) model that expresses a humanized AR containing a CAG expansion in the first exon, and a Tg myogenic model that overexpresses wild-type AR only in skeletal muscle fibers. We found that hindlimb muscles in the two Tg models (97Q and myogenic) showed marked losses in their intrinsic strength and resistance to fatigue, but were minimally affected in KI males. However, diseased muscles of all three models showed symptoms consistent with myotonic dystrophy type 1, namely, reduced resting membrane potential and deficits in chloride channel mRNA. These data indicate that muscle dysfunction is a core feature of SBMA caused by at least some of the same pathogenic mechanisms as myotonic dystrophy. Thus mechanisms controlling muscle function per se independent of mass are prime targets for SBMA therapeutics. PMID:25663674

  16. HIV protease inhibitors acutely impair glucose-stimulated insulin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Joseph C; Remedi, Maria S; Qiu, Haijun; Nichols, Colin G; Hruz, Paul W

    2003-07-01

    HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) acutely and reversibly inhibit the insulin-responsive glucose transporter Glut 4, leading to peripheral insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. Minimal modeling analysis of glucose tolerance tests on PI-treated patients has revealed an impaired insulin secretory response, suggesting additional pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction. To determine whether beta-cell function is acutely affected by PIs, we assayed glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in rodent islets and the insulinoma cell line MIN6. Insulin release from MIN6 cells and rodent islets was significantly inhibited by the PI indinavir with IC(50) values of 1.1 and 2.1 micro mol/l, respectively. The uptake of 2-deoxyglucose in MIN6 cells was similarly inhibited (IC(50) of 2.0 micro mol/l), whereas glucokinase activity was unaffected at drug levels as high as 1 mmol/l. Glucose utilization was also impaired at comparable drug levels. Insulin secretogogues acting downstream of glucose transport mostly reversed the indinavir-mediated inhibition of insulin release in MIN6 cells. Intravenous infusion of indinavir during hyperglycemic clamps on rats significantly suppressed the first-phase insulin response. These data suggest that therapeutic levels of PIs are sufficient to impair glucose sensing by beta-cells. Thus, together with peripheral insulin resistance, beta-cell dysfunction likely contributes to altered glucose homeostasis associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  17. Impaired associative learning with food rewards in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihao; Manson, Kirk F; Schiller, Daniela; Levy, Ifat

    2014-08-04

    Obesity is a major epidemic in many parts of the world. One of the main factors contributing to obesity is overconsumption of high-fat and high-calorie food, which is driven by the rewarding properties of these types of food. Previous studies have suggested that dysfunction in reward circuits may be associated with overeating and obesity. The nature of this dysfunction, however, is still unknown. Here, we demonstrate impairment in reward-based associative learning specific to food in obese women. Normal-weight and obese participants performed an appetitive reversal learning task in which they had to learn and modify cue-reward associations. To test whether any learning deficits were specific to food reward or were more general, we used a between-subject design in which half of the participants received food reward and the other half received money reward. Our results reveal a marked difference in associative learning between normal-weight and obese women when food was used as reward. Importantly, no learning deficits were observed with money reward. Multiple regression analyses also established a robust negative association between body mass index and learning performance in the food domain in female participants. Interestingly, such impairment was not observed in obese men. These findings suggest that obesity may be linked to impaired reward-based associative learning and that this impairment may be specific to the food domain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neural correlates of obsessive-compulsive related dysfunctional beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Pino; Orbegozo, Arantxa; Pujol, Jesús; López-Solà, Clara; Fullana, Miquel Àngel; Segalàs, Cinto; Real, Eva; Subirà, Marta; Martínez-Zalacaín, Ignacio; Menchón, José M; Harrison, Ben J; Cardoner, Narcís; Soriano-Mas, Carles

    2013-12-02

    There have been few attempts to integrate neurobiological and cognitive models of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), although this might constitute a key approach to clarify the complex etiology of the disorder. Our study aimed to explore the neural correlates underlying dysfunctional beliefs hypothesized by cognitive models to be involved in the development and maintenance of OCD. We obtained a high-resolution magnetic resonance image from fifty OCD patients and 30 healthy controls, and correlated them, voxel-wise, with the severity of OC-related dysfunctional beliefs assessed by the Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire-44. In healthy controls, significant negative correlations were observed between anterior temporal lobe (ATL) volume and scores on perfectionism/intolerance of uncertainty and overimportance/need to control thoughts. No significant correlations between OBQ-44 domains and regional gray matter volumes were observed in OCD patients. A post-hoc region-of-interest analysis detected that the ATLs was bilaterally smaller in OCD patients. On splitting subjects into high- and low-belief subgroups, we observed that such brain structural differences between OCD patients and healthy controls were explained by significantly larger ATL volumes among healthy subjects from the low-belief subgroup. Our results suggest a significant correlation between OC-related dysfunctional beliefs and morphometric variability in the anterior temporal lobe, a brain structure related to socio-emotional processing. Future studies should address the interaction of these correlations with environmental factors to fully characterize the bases of OC-related dysfunctional beliefs and to advance in the integration of biological and cognitive models of OCD.

  19. CLINICAL PICTURE AND TREATMENT TACTICS OF PATIENTS WITH TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT NEUROMUSCULAR DYSFUNCTIONAL SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We have analyzed the results of diagnostics and treatment of 36 patients with neuromuscular dysfunctional syndrome of TMJ. We have found that the cause of pathology is acute damage, stress, parafunction of masseteric muscules, durable influence on the joint. NDS is characterized by the impairment of masseteric muscularfunction, that results in motional restriction in all directions. Treatment must include elimination of etiological factors, symptoms of the disease, normalization of masseteric...

  20. Fluctuating plasma phosphorus level by changes in dietary phosphorus intake induces endothelial dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Watari, Eriko; Taketani, Yutaka; Kitamura, Tomoyo; Tanaka, Terumi; Ohminami, Hirokazu; Abuduli, Maerjianghan; Harada, Nagakatsu; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Yamamoto, Hironori; Takeda, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    High serum phosphorus (P) impairs endothelial function by increasing oxidative stress and decreasing nitric oxide production. Serum P levels fluctuate due to circadian rhythms or dietary P intake in healthy people and due to dialysis in end-stage chronic kidney disease patients. Here we examined whether fluctuating plasma P caused by changes in dietary P intake may be involved in endothelial dysfunction, resulting in increased cardiovascular risk. Rats were fed a diet containing 0.6% P for 16...

  1. Mitochondrial and Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction in Ageing and Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime M. Ross; Lars Olson; Giuseppe Coppotelli

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system have been described as two hallmarks of the ageing process. Additionally, both systems have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of many age-related diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Interestingly, these two systems are closely interconnected, with the ubiquitin proteasome system maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis by regulating organelle dynamics, t...

  2. Joint keynote presentation – “Erectile dysfunction in Neurological Disorders”

    OpenAIRE

    Treacy, C.L.; Steggall, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The nature and severity of a man’s neurological condition may have a profound effect on erectile function and this warrants careful consideration in relation to providing supportive treatment options that are effective, safe and acceptable for the individual and his partner. Neurological disorders contribute to erectile dysfunction (ED) in a number of different ways and may occur as a direct result of impairment in the central nervous system, the peripheral nervous system, or a combination of...

  3. Microvascular dysfunction: an emerging pathway in the pathogenesis of obesity-related insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muris, Dennis M J; Houben, Alfons J H M; Schram, Miranda T; Stehouwer, Coen D A

    2013-03-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its major risk factor, obesity, has reached epidemic proportions in Western society. How obesity leads to insulin resistance and subsequent T2DM is incompletely understood. It has been established that insulin can redirect blood flow in skeletal muscle from non-nutritive to nutritive capillary networks, without increasing total blood flow. This results in a net increase of the overall number of perfused nutritive capillary networks and thereby increases insulin-mediated glucose uptake by skeletal muscle. This process, referred to as functional (nutritive) capillary recruitment, has been shown to be endothelium-dependent and to require activation of the phosphatidylinositol-kinase (PI3K) pathway in the endothelial cell. Several studies have demonstrated that these processes are impaired in states of microvascular dysfunction. In obesity, changes in several adipokines are likely candidates to influence insulin signaling pathways in endothelial cells, thereby causing microvascular dysfunction. Microvascular dysfunction, in turn, impairs the timely access of glucose and insulin to their target tissues, and may therefore be an additional cause of insulin resistance. Thus, microvascular dysfunction may be a key feature in the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. In the present review, we will discuss the evidence for this emerging role for the microcirculation as a possible link between obesity and insulin resistance.

  4. Mst1 inhibits CMECs autophagy and participates in the development of diabetic coronary microvascular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Mingming; Hu, Jianqiang; Wang, Tingting; Duan, Yu; Man, Wanrong; Wu, Bin; Feng, Jiaxu; Sun, Lei; Li, Congye; Zhang, Rongqing; Wang, Haichang; Sun, Dongdong

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications account for a substantial proportion of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Abnormalities of cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) lead to impaired cardiac microvascular vessel integrity and subsequent cardiac dysfunction, underlining the importance of coronary microvascular dysfunction. In this study, experimental diabetes models were constructed using Mst1 transgenic, Mst1 knockout and sirt1 knockout mice. Diabetic Mst1 transgenic mice exhibited impaired cardiac microvessel integrity and decreased cardiac function. Mst1 overexpression deceased CMECs autophagy as evidenced by decreased LC3 expression and enhanced protein aggregation when subjected to high glucose culture. Mst1 knockout improved cardiac microvessel integrity and enhanced cardiac functions in diabetic mice. Mst1 knockdown up-regulated autophagy as indicated by more typical autophagosomes and increased LC3 expression in CMECs subjected to high glucose cultures. Mst1 knockdown also promoted autophagic flux in the presence of bafilomycin A1. Mst1 overexpression increased CMECs apoptosis, whereas Mst1 knockout decreased CMECs apoptosis. Sirt1 knockout abolished the effects of Mst1 overexpression in cardiac microvascular injury and cardiac dysfunction. In conclusion, Mst1 knockout preserved cardiac microvessel integrity and improved cardiac functions in diabetic mice. Mst1 decreased sirt1 activity, inhibited autophagy and enhanced apoptosis in CMECs, thus participating in the pathogenesis of diabetic coronary microvascular dysfunction. PMID:27680548

  5. Dietary phosphate restriction ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in adenine-induced kidney disease rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Tan Vu; Watari, Eriko; Taketani, Yutaka; Kitamura, Tomoyo; Shiota, Asuka; Tanaka, Terumi; Tanimura, Ayako; Harada, Nagakatsu; Nakaya, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Hironori; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia causes endothelial dysfunction as well as vascular calcification. Management of serum phosphate level by dietary phosphate restriction or phosphate binders is considered to be beneficial to prevent chronic kidney disease patients from cardiovascular disease, but it has been unclear whether keeping lower serum phosphate level can ameliorate endothelial dysfunction. In this study we investigated whether low-phosphate diet can ameliorate endothelial dysfunction in adenine-induced kidney disease rats, one of useful animal model of chronic kidney disease. Administration of 0.75% adenine-containing diet for 21 days induced renal failure with hyperphosphatemia, and impaired acetylcholine-dependent vasodilation of thoracic aortic ring in rats. Then adenine-induced kidney disease rats were treated with either control diet (1% phosphate) or low-phosphate diet (0.2% phosphate) for 16 days. Low-phosphate diet ameliorated not only hyperphosphatemia but also the impaired vasodilation of aorta. In addition, the activatory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1177 and Akt at serine 473 in the aorta were inhibited by in adenine-induced kidney disease rats. The inhibited phosphorylations were improved by the low-phosphate diet treatment. Thus, dietary phosphate restriction can improve aortic endothelial dysfunction in chronic kidney disease with hyperphosphatemia by increase in the activatory phosphorylations of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and Akt. PMID:22798709

  6. Does cognitive dysfunction conform to a distinctive pattern in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli Incalzi, Raffaele; Marra, Camillo; Salvigni, Bruna Lorena; Petrone, Albino; Gemma, Antonella; Selvaggio, David; Mormile, Flaminio

    2004-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a recognized cause of cognitive dysfunction. By using a cross-sectional comparative study, we aimed to verify whether neuropsychological performance of untreated OSA patients conforms to a distinctive pattern. Forty-nine newly diagnosed, untreated OSA patients, 27 with multi-infarctual dementia (MID), 31 with mild to moderate dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT) and 63 with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), all free from major comorbid dementing conditions were chosen for the study. The groups were matched for age and education. We found a bimodal distribution of cognitive performance in OSA group, which was therefore divided into two clusters having better (OSAb, n = 35) and worse (OSAw, n = 14) performance on a battery of 10 cognitive indexes. Cognitive performances of OSAb, OSAw, MID, DAT and COPD were compared by discriminant analysis. OSAb performed better than OSAw in all but one test. Deductive thinking and verbal attainment were more severely impaired in OSAw than in COPD patients. Constructive ability, deductive thinking and both verbal attainment and immediate memory were comparably impaired in OSAw and DAT. The mean neuropsychological scores of OSAw and MID were comparable, but 71% of OSAw patients had a distinctive cognitive profile, i.e. a group specific pattern of cognitive dysfunction, according to discriminant analysis. One of four newly diagnosed OSA patients had a severe and distinctive neuropsychological dysfunction mainly involving inductive and deductive thinking, and constructive ability. Some analogy with cognitive pattern of MID suggests that a mainly subcortical damage underlies this dysfunction.

  7. Early neural and vascular dysfunctions in diabetic rats are largely sequelae of increased sorbitol oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ido, Yasuo; Nyengaard, Jens R; Chang, Kathy; Tilton, Ronald G; Kilo, Charles; Mylari, Banavara L; Oates, Peter J; Williamson, Joseph R

    2010-01-01

    These experiments were undertaken to assess the importance of cytoplasmic (c) sorbitol oxidation versus mitochondrial (m) pyruvate oxidation in mediating neural and vascular dysfunction attributable to hyperglycemia in diabetic rats. Increased oxidation of sorbitol is coupled to enzymatic reduction of free oxidized NAD(+)c to reduced NADHc, manifested by an increased ratio of NADH to NAD(+)c. Likewise, increased oxidation of pyruvate is coupled to reduction of NAD(+)m to NADHm, which increases the NADH/NAD(+)m ratio. Specific inhibitors of sorbitol production or sorbitol oxidation normalized: increased diabetic nerve NADH/NAD(+)c, impaired nerve-conduction velocity, and vascular dysfunction in sciatic nerve, retina, and aorta; however, they had little or no impact on increased NADH/NAD(+)m. These observations provide, for the first time, strong in vivo evidence for the primacy of sorbitol oxidation versus. pyruvate oxidation in mediating the metabolic imbalances, impaired nerve conduction, and vascular dysfunction evoked by diabetes. These findings are consistent with (a) the fact that oxidation of sorbitol produces "prooxidant" NADHc uncoupled from subsequent production of "antioxidant" pyruvate required for reoxidation of NADHc to NAD(+)c by lactate dehydrogenase, and (b) the hypothesis that neural and vascular dysfunction in early diabetes are caused primarily by increased NADHc, which fuels superoxide production by NADH-driven oxidases.

  8. Prevalence of neurobehavioral, social, and emotional dysfunction in patients treated for childhood craniopharyngioma: a systematic literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Zada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Craniopharyngiomas (CP are locally invasive and frequently recurring neoplasms often resulting in neurological and endocrinological dysfunction in children. In addition, social-behavioral impairment is commonly reported following treatment for childhood CP, yet remains to be fully understood. The authors aimed to further characterize the prevalence of neurobehavioral, social, and emotional dysfunction in survivors of childhood craniopharyngiomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed to identify studies formally assessing neurobehavioral, social, and emotional outcomes in patients treated for CP prior to 18 years of age. Studies published between the years 1990-2012 that reported the primary outcome (prevalence of neurobehavioral, social, emotional/affective dysfunction, and/or impaired quality of life (QoL in ≥ 10 patients were included. RESULTS: Of the 471 studies screened, 11 met inclusion criteria. Overall neurobehavioral dysfunction was reported in 51 of 90 patients (57% with available data. Social impairment (i.e. withdrawal, internalizing behavior was reported in 91 of 222 cases (41%. School dysfunction was reported in 48 of 136 patients (35%. Emotional/affective dysfunction was reported in 58 of 146 patients (40%, primarily consisting of depressive symptoms. Health related quality of life was affected in 49 of 95 patients (52%. Common descriptors of behavior in affected children included irritability, impulsivity, aggressiveness, and emotional outbursts. CONCLUSIONS: Neurobehavioral, social, and emotional impairment is highly prevalent in survivors of childhood craniopharyngioma, and often affects quality of life. Thorough neurobehavioral/emotional screening and appropriate counseling is recommended in this population. Additional research is warranted to identify risk factors and treatment strategies for these disorders.

  9. Inside the Spiral of Dysfunction: The Personal Consequences of Working for a Dysfunctional Leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuck, Brad; Rose, Kevin; Bergman, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunctional leaders suffocate others with coercive power and ego, are unpredictable, and often lack self-awareness about their dysfunction. Dysfunctional leaders are incredibly difficult to work with and can cause a series of cascading personal consequences for employees who work with them. This Perspectives in Human Resource Development essay…

  10. Diabetes and sexual dysfunction: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiorino MI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maria Ida Maiorino,1 Giuseppe Bellastella,1 Katherine Esposito2 1Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Geriatric Sciences, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy Abstract: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in nearly all countries. It has been associated with sexual dysfunction, both in males and in females. Diabetes is an established risk factor for sexual dysfunction in men, as a threefold increased risk of erectile dysfunction was documented in diabetic men, as compared with nondiabetic men. Among women, evidence regarding the association between diabetes and sexual dysfunction are less conclusive, although most studies have reported a higher prevalence of female sexual dysfunction in diabetic women as compared with nondiabetic women. Female sexual function appears to be more related to social and psychological components than to the physiological consequence of diabetes. Hyperglycemia, which is a main determinant of vascular and microvascular diabetic complications, may participate in the pathogenetic mechanisms of sexual dysfunction in diabetes. Moreover, diabetic people may present several clinical conditions, including hypertension, overweight and obesity, metabolic syndrome, cigarette smoking, and atherogenic dyslipidemia, which are themselves risk factors for sexual dysfunction, both in men and in women. The adoption of healthy lifestyles may reduce insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress – all of which are desirable achievements in diabetic patients. Improved well-being may further contribute to reduce and prevent sexual dysfunction in both sexes. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, diabetes complications, erectile dysfunction, female sexual dysfunction, lifestyle changes

  11. Impaired speech repetition and left parietal lobe damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridriksson, Julius; Kjartansson, Olafur; Morgan, Paul S; Hjaltason, Haukur; Magnusdottir, Sigridur; Bonilha, Leonardo; Rorden, Christopher

    2010-08-18

    Patients with left hemisphere damage and concomitant aphasia usually have difficulty repeating others' speech. Although impaired speech repetition, the primary symptom of conduction aphasia, has been associated with involvement of the left arcuate fasciculus, its specific lesion correlate remains elusive. This research examined speech repetition among 45 stroke patients who underwent aphasia testing and MRI examination. Based on lesion-behavior mapping, the primary structural damage most closely associated with impaired speech repetition was found in the posterior portion of the left arcuate fasciculus. However, perfusion-weighted MRI revealed that tissue dysfunction, in the form of either frank damage or hypoperfusion, to the left inferior parietal lobe, rather than the underlying white matter, was associated with impaired speech repetition. This latter result suggests that integrity of the left inferior parietal lobe is important for speech repetition and, as importantly, highlights the importance of examining cerebral perfusion for the purpose of lesion-behavior mapping in acute stroke.

  12. Environmental Enteric Dysfunction in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Sana; Ali, Asad; Duggan, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Diarrheal diseases are a major cause of childhood death in resource-poor countries, killing approximately 760,000 children younger than 5 years each year. Although deaths due to diarrhea have declined dramatically, high rates of stunting and malnutrition have persisted. Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a subclinical condition caused by constant fecal-oral contamination with resultant intestinal inflammation and villous blunting. These histological changes were first described in the 1960s, but the clinical effect of EED is only just being recognized in the context of failure of nutritional interventions and oral vaccines in resource-poor countries. We review the existing literature regarding the underlying causes of and potential interventions for EED in children, highlighting the epidemiology, clinical and histologic classification of the entity, and discussing novel biomarkers and possible therapies. Future research priorities are also discussed.

  13. Olfactory dysfunction in Down's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C; Jinich, S

    1996-01-01

    Down's Syndrome subjects over 40 years old show neuropathology similar to that of Alzheimer's disease. The olfactory system is particularly vulnerable in Alzheimer's disease, both anatomically and functionally. Several measures of sensory and cognitive functioning were studied in the older Down's Syndrome patient, with the hypothesis of significant olfactory dysfunction. Participants were 23 Down's subjects, and 23 controls. The Dementia Rating Scale showed mean scores of 103 for Down's subjects and 141 for controls. Down's subjects showed significant deficits in odor detection threshold, odor identification, and odor recognition memory. Normal performance in a taste threshold task, similar to the olfactory threshold task in subject demands, suggested that the Down's syndrome subjects' poor performance was not due to task demands. Deficits in olfaction may provide a sensitive and early indicator of the deterioration and progression of the brain in older subjects with Down's Syndrome.

  14. Muscle dysfunction in male hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, A K; Katiyar, B C; Misra, S; Thacker, A K; Singh, N K

    1986-05-01

    Twenty-eight consecutive male patients with primary and secondary hypogonadism (14 each) were evaluated clinically and electrophysiologically for muscle dysfunction. Although generalised muscle weakness was initially reported by only 9 patients, on direct questioning, it was recorded in 19. Objective weakness was found in 13 patients and it involved both the proximal and distal limb muscles. Quantitative electromyography showed evidence of myopathy in the proximal muscle in 25 patients, i.e., reduced MUP duration and amplitude with increased polyphasia in the deltoid and the gluteus maximus. There were no denervation potentials. None of the patients showed clinical neuropathy or NCV abnormalities. Thus, the profile of muscle involvement in hypogonadism closely simulates limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and other endocrine myopathies. The incidence of muscle involvement was higher in secondary hypogonadism. Diminished androgens in primary hypogonadism and diminished growth hormone in the secondary hypogonadism are probably responsible for the myopathy.

  15. Animal models of erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehlata V Gajbhiye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have contributed to a great extent to understanding and advancement in the field of sexual medicine. Many current medical and surgical therapies in sexual medicine have been tried based on these animal models. Extensive literature search revealed that the compiled information is limited. In this review, we describe various experimental models of erectile dysfunction (ED encompassing their procedures, variables of assessment, advantages and disadvantages. The search strategy consisted of review of PubMed based articles. We included original research work and certain review articles available in PubMed database. The search terms used were "ED and experimental models," "ED and nervous stimulation," "ED and cavernous nerve stimulation," "ED and central stimulation," "ED and diabetes mellitus," "ED and ageing," "ED and hypercholesteremia," "ED and Peyronie′s disease," "radiation induced ED," "telemetric recording," "ED and mating test" and "ED and non-contact erection test."

  16. Flibanserin for female sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reviriego, C

    2014-08-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is the most commonly described form of female sexual dysfunction. There is currently no pharmacological therapy approved to treat HSDD, and therefore, there is an unmet medical need for the development of efficacious treatment alternatives. Flibanserin is a novel, non-hormonal drug for the treatment of HSDD in pre- and postmenopausal women, although the application submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by Sprout Pharmaceuticals is only for premenopausal women. Flibanserin works by correcting an imbalance of the levels of the neurotransmitters that affect sexual desire. More specifically, flibanserin increases dopamine and norepinephrine, both responsible for sexual excitement, and decreases serotonin, responsible for sexual inhibition. Clinically, flibanserin has exhibited some encouraging results in terms of its ability to increase the frequency of satisfying sexual events, and the intensity of sexual desire. However, adverse events such as dizziness, nausea, fatigue and somnolence, typical of a centrally acting drug, are also frequently related to flibanserin treatment.

  17. Coronary microvascular dysfunction: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Filippo; Camici, Paolo G.; Bairey Merz, Cathleen Noel

    2014-01-01

    Many patients undergoing coronary angiography because of chest pain syndromes, believed to be indicative of obstructive atherosclerosis of the epicardial coronary arteries, are found to have normal angiograms. In the past two decades, a number of studies have reported that abnormalities in the function and structure of the coronary microcirculation may occur in patients without obstructive atherosclerosis, but with risk factors or with myocardial diseases as well as in patients with obstructive atherosclerosis; furthermore, coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) can be iatrogenic. In some instances, CMD represents an epiphenomenon, whereas in others it is an important marker of risk or may even contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and myocardial diseases, thus becoming a therapeutic target. This review article provides an update on the clinical relevance of CMD in different clinical settings and also the implications for therapy. PMID:24366916

  18. Nutraceuticals, aging, and cognitive dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Elizabeth; Zicker, Steven C

    2004-01-01

    Decline in cognitive function that accompanies aging in dogs might have a biological basis, and many of the disorders associated with aging in canines might be preventable through dietary modifications that incorporate specific nutraceuticals. Based on previous research and the results of laboratory and clinical studies, antioxidants might be one class of nutraceutical that benefits aged dogs. Brains of aged dogs accumulate oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, which can lead to dysfunction of neuronal cells. The production of free radicals and lack of increase in compensatory antioxidant enzymes might lead to detrimental modifications to important macromolecules within neurons. Reducing oxidative damage through food ingredients rich in a broad spectrum of antioxidants significantly improves, or slows the decline of, learning and memory in aged dogs; however, determining which compounds, combinations, dosage ranges, when to initiate intervention, and long-term effects constitute critical gaps in knowledge about this subject.

  19. Ambulatory anaesthesia and cognitive dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars S; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    serious adverse outcomes, hence difficult to obtain sound scientific evidence for avoiding complications. RECENT FINDINGS: Few studies have assessed recovery of cognitive function after ambulatory surgery, but it seems that both propofol and modern volatile anaesthetics are rational choices for general...... anaesthesia in the outpatient setting. Cognitive complications such as delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction are less frequent in ambulatory surgery than with hospitalization. SUMMARY: The elderly are especially susceptible to adverse effects of the hospital environment such as immobilisation......, sleep deprivation, unfamiliar surroundings, and medication errors. Enhanced recovery programmes (fast-track regimens) may allow earlier discharge which is probably beneficial for the elderly. Frailty is becoming an increasingly important concept that needs to be clinically considered in elderly patients...

  20. Neutrophil function in healthy aged horses and horses with pituitary dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Dianne; Hill, Kim; Anton, Jason

    2015-06-15

    Immunosuppression leading to opportunist bacterial infection is a well-recognized sequela of equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID). The mechanisms responsible for immune dysfunction in PPID however, are as of yet poorly characterized. Horses with PPID have high concentrations of hormones known to impact immune function including α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and insulin. α-MSH and related melanocortins have been shown in rodents and people to impair neutrophil function by decreasing superoxide production (known as oxidative burst activity), migration and adhesion. The goal of this study was to determine if neutrophil function is impaired in horses with PPID and, if so, to determine if plasma α-MSH or insulin concentration correlated with the severity of neutrophil dysfunction. Specifically, neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst activity, chemotaxis and adhesion were assessed. Results of this study indicate that horses with PPID have reduced neutrophil function, characterized by decreased oxidative burst activity and adhesion. In addition, chemotaxis was greater in healthy aged horses than in young horses or aged horses with PPID. Plasma insulin: α-MSH ratio, but not individual hormone concentration was correlated to neutrophil oxidative burst activity. In summary, neutrophil function is impaired in horses with PPID, likely due to altered hormone concentrations and may contribute to increased risk of opportunistic infections. Whether regulation of hormone concentration profiles in horses with PPID using therapeutic intervention improves neutrophil function and reduces infections needs to be explored.

  1. Thyroid dysfunction in infertile women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S G Perminova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the rate and structure of thyroid diseases in infertile women and to asses their reproductive system depending upon the thyroid pathology. Subjects and methods. The study was based on the results of screening of T status of 496 women with infertility (main group and 80 fertile women (control group. Traditional methods of diagnosis of infertility were used along with special methods of investigation including assessment of function and structure of T (TTH, fT4, fT3, AT-TPO, AT-rTTH, ultrasound examination of T, thin-niddle aspirational biopsy, scintigraphy of T. A complex evaluation of the reproductive system status in infertile women was done depending on the type of T pathology. Results. Infertile women were found to suffer from thyroid dysfunction 3.8 times as more often as fertile ones (48% and 12.5%, p <0.05. Its structure included mainly AT-TPO carrier phenomenon in combination with ultrasound markers of thyroid autoimmunity (24%, hypothyroidism following thyroid autoimmunity (9.4% demonstrating itself as clinical (0.8%, subclinical (8.6%, and euthyroid (7.8% goiters. The portion of women with infertility and hyperthyroidism was small (0.6%. An association of thyroid autoimmunity with idiopathic infertility, endometriosis, endocrine infertility was found. Conclusion. It is necessary to perform a screening assessment of the function and structure of T in infertile women within diagnostic search for the reasons of infertility and in-time correction of the revealed thyroid dysfunction.

  2. Test Performance Related Dysfunctional Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep TÜTÜNCÜ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Examinations by using tests are very frequently used in educational settings and successful studying before the examinations is a complex matter to deal with. In order to understand the determinants of success in exams better, we need to take into account not only emotional and motivational, but also cognitive aspects of the participants such as dysfunctional beliefs. Our aim is to present the relationship between candidates’ characteristics and distorted beliefs/schemata just before an examination. Method: The subjects of the study were 30 female and 30 male physicians who were about to take the medical specialization exam (MSE in Turkey. Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS and Young Schema Questionnaire Short Form (YSQ-SF were applied to the subjects. The statistical analysis was done using the F test, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square test and spearman’s correlation test. Results: It was shown that some of the DAS and YSQ-SF scores were significantly higher in female gender, in the group who could not pass the exam, who had repetitive examinations, who had their first try taking an examination and who were unemployed at the time of the examination. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that candidates seeking help before MSE examination could be referred for cognitive therapy or counseling even they do not have any psychiatric diagnosis due to clinically significant cognitive distortion. Measurement and treatment of cognitive distortions that have negative impact on MSE performance may improve the cost-effectiveness and mental well being of the young doctors.

  3. Late life depression with cognitive impairment: Evaluation and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo H Wilkins

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Consuelo H Wilkins1,2, Jose Mathews2, Yvette I Sheline21Department of Medicine (Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Science; 2Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Older adults with depression often present with signs and symptoms indicative of functional or cognitive impairment. These somatic symptoms make evaluating and treating depression in older adults more complex. Late life depression (LLD, depression in adults over the age of 65, is more frequently associated with cognitive changes. Cognitive impairment in LLD may be a result of the depressive disorder or an underlying dementing condition. Memory complaints are also common in older adults with depression. There is a wide range of cognitive impairment in LLD including decreased central processing speed, executive dysfunction, and impaired short-term memory. The etiology of cognitive impairment in LLD may include cerebrovascular disease, a significant risk factor for LLD, which likely interrupts key pathways between frontal white matter and subcortical structures important in mood regulation. Because depressive symptoms often coexist with dementia, it is important to determine the temporal relationship between depressive symptoms and cognitive change. If depressive symptoms pre-date the cognitive impairment and cognitive symptoms are mild and temporary, LLD is the likely etiology of the cognitive impairment. If cognitive changes appear prior to depressive symptoms and persist after LLD is successfully treated, an underlying dementia is more likely. Clinicians should be exclude common conditions such as thyroid disease which can contribute to depressive symptoms and cognitive impairment prior to treating LLD. Both antidepressants and psychotherapy can be effective in treating LLD. Subsequent evaluations following treatment should also reassess cognition.Keywords: late life depression, cognitive impairment, diagnosis, treatment

  4. Incidental learning of sound categories is impaired in developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabay, Yafit; Holt, Lori L

    2015-12-01

    Developmental dyslexia is commonly thought to arise from specific phonological impairments. However, recent evidence is consistent with the possibility that phonological impairments arise as symptoms of an underlying dysfunction of procedural learning. The nature of the link between impaired procedural learning and phonological dysfunction is unresolved. Motivated by the observation that speech processing involves the acquisition of procedural category knowledge, the present study investigates the possibility that procedural learning impairment may affect phonological processing by interfering with the typical course of phonetic category learning. The present study tests this hypothesis while controlling for linguistic experience and possible speech-specific deficits by comparing auditory category learning across artificial, nonlinguistic sounds among dyslexic adults and matched controls in a specialized first-person shooter videogame that has been shown to engage procedural learning. Nonspeech auditory category learning was assessed online via within-game measures and also with a post-training task involving overt categorization of familiar and novel sound exemplars. Each measure reveals that dyslexic participants do not acquire procedural category knowledge as effectively as age- and cognitive-ability matched controls. This difference cannot be explained by differences in perceptual acuity for the sounds. Moreover, poor nonspeech category learning is associated with slower phonological processing. Whereas phonological processing impairments have been emphasized as the cause of dyslexia, the current results suggest that impaired auditory category learning, general in nature and not specific to speech signals, could contribute to phonological deficits in dyslexia with subsequent negative effects on language acquisition and reading. Implications for the neuro-cognitive mechanisms of developmental dyslexia are discussed.

  5. Incidental Learning of Sound Categories is Impaired in Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabay, Yafit; Holt, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is commonly thought to arise from specific phonological impairments. However, recent evidence is consistent with the possibility that phonological impairments arise as symptoms of an underlying dysfunction of procedural learning. The nature of the link between impaired procedural learning and phonological dysfunction is unresolved. Motivated by the observation that speech processing involves the acquisition of procedural category knowledge, the present study investigates the possibility that procedural learning impairment may affect phonological processing by interfering with the typical course of phonetic category learning. The present study tests this hypothesis while controlling for linguistic experience and possible speech-specific deficits by comparing auditory category learning across artificial, nonlinguistic sounds among dyslexic adults and matched controls in a specialized first-person shooter videogame that has been shown to engage procedural learning. Nonspeech auditory category learning was assessed online via within-game measures and also with a post-training task involving overt categorization of familiar and novel sound exemplars. Each measure reveals that dyslexic participants do not acquire procedural category knowledge as effectively as age- and cognitive-ability matched controls. This difference cannot be explained by differences in perceptual acuity for the sounds. Moreover, poor nonspeech category learning is associated with slower phonological processing. Whereas phonological processing impairments have been emphasized as the cause of dyslexia, the current results suggest that impaired auditory category learning, general in nature and not specific to speech signals, could contribute to phonological deficits in dyslexia with subsequent negative effects on language acquisition and reading. Implications for the neuro-cognitive mechanisms of developmental dyslexia are discussed. PMID:26409017

  6. Impaired cardiac mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and enhanced mitochondrial oxidative stress in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Liselotte B; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen; Hansen, Christina N; Leifsson, Pall S; Yokota, Takashi

    2015-05-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are important players in the development of various cardiovascular diseases, but their roles in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) remain unknown. We examined whether mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity was impaired with enhanced mitochondrial oxidative stress in HCM. Cardiac and skeletal muscles were obtained from 9 domestic cats with spontaneously occurring HCM with preserved left ventricular systolic function and from 15 age-matched control cats. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacities with nonfatty acid and fatty acid substrates in permeabilized fibers and isolated mitochondria were assessed using high-resolution respirometry. ROS release originating from isolated mitochondria was assessed by spectrofluorometry. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were also measured as a marker of oxidative damage. Mitochondrial ADP-stimulated state 3 respiration with complex I-linked nonfatty acid substrates and with fatty acid substrates, respectively, was significantly lower in the hearts of HCM cats compared with control cats. Mitochondrial ROS release during state 3 with complex I-linked substrates and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in the heart were significantly increased in cats with HCM. In contrast, there were no significant differences in mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity, mitochondrial ROS release, and oxidative damage in skeletal muscle between groups. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity with both nonfatty acid substrates and fatty acid substrates was impaired with increased mitochondrial ROS release in the feline HCM heart. These findings provide new insights into the pathophysiology of HCM and support the hypothesis that restoration of the redox state in the mitochondria is beneficial in the treatment of HCM. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in the peroxisomal disease X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Erauskin, J; Galino, J; Ruiz, M; Cuezva, J M; Fabregat, I; Cacabelos, D; Boada, J; Martínez, J; Ferrer, I; Pamplona, R; Villarroya, F; Portero-Otín, M; Fourcade, S; Pujol, A

    2013-08-15

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited metabolic disorder of the nervous system characterized by axonopathy in spinal cords and/or cerebral demyelination, adrenal insufficiency and accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in plasma and tissues. The disease is caused by malfunction of the ABCD1 gene, which encodes a peroxisomal transporter of VLCFAs or VLCFA-CoA. In the mouse, Abcd1 loss causes late onset axonal degeneration in the spinal cord, associated with locomotor disability resembling the most common phenotype in patients, adrenomyeloneuropathy. We have formerly shown that an excess of the VLCFA C26:0 induces oxidative damage, which underlies the axonal degeneration exhibited by the Abcd1(-) mice. In the present study, we sought to investigate the noxious effects of C26:0 on mitochondria function. Our data indicate that in X-ALD patients' fibroblasts, excess of C26:0 generates mtDNA oxidation and specifically impairs oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) triggering mitochondrial ROS production from electron transport chain complexes. This correlates with impaired complex V phosphorylative activity, as visualized by high-resolution respirometry on spinal cord slices of Abcd1(-) mice. Further, we identified a marked oxidation of key OXPHOS system subunits in Abcd1(-) mouse spinal cords at presymptomatic stages. Altogether, our results illustrate some of the mechanistic intricacies by which the excess of a fatty acid targeted to peroxisomes activates a deleterious process of oxidative damage to mitochondria, leading to a multifaceted dysfunction of this organelle. These findings may be of relevance for patient management while unveiling novel therapeutic targets for X-ALD.

  8. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eZorzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1 cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction.

  9. Implications of immune dysfunction on endometriosis associated infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica E; Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P; Khalaj, Kasra; Koti, Madhuri; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2017-01-24

    Endometriosis is a complex, inflammatory disease that affects 6-10% of reproductive-aged women. Almost half of the women with endometriosis experience infertility. Despite the excessive prevalence, the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility is unknown and a cure is not available. While many theories have been suggested to link endometriosis and infertility, a consensus among investigators has not emerged. In this extensive review of the literature as well as research from our laboratory, we provide potential insights into the role of immune dysfunction in endometriosis associated infertility. We discuss the implication of the peritoneal inflammatory microenvironment on various factors that contribute to infertility such as hormonal imbalance, oxidative stress and how these could further lead to poor oocyte, sperm and embryo quality, impaired receptivity of the endometrium and implantation failure.

  10. Möbius Syndrome: Surgical Treatment for Eyelid Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lopez-Valverde

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Möbius syndrome is a heterogeneous congenital disorder that is linked to bilateral palsies of the cranial nerves VI and VII, resulting in congenital facial paralysis sometimes associated with impaired ocular abduction. Case Report: We present the case of a 44-year-old woman with Möbius syndrome and inferior recurrent keratitis secondary to scleral show in both eyes. We decided to use a cartilage graft from the ear in the inferior eyelid to avoid eyelid retraction and scleral show. Discussion: Patients with Möbius syndrome have a severe dysfunction of their facial mimic. Their treatment must be individualized, depending on their age, clinical examination and symptoms.

  11. Visuospatial dysfunction and problem solving in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin-Golomb, A; Braun, A E

    1997-01-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) perform deficiently on Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM), in contrast to their relatively good performance on many other problem-solving tasks. The question is raised as to whether a visuospatial deficit may account for poor RCPM performance in PD. The authors analyzed RCPM results in 50 nondemented participants with PD and 39 age-matched healthy control participants. The PD group made significantly more errors than the control group on all RCPM subtests, including the subtest that mainly assessed visuospatial function (RCPM-A). For the PD group, the composite score of other visuospatial tests, but not the composite scores of tests of executive function or verbal memory, significantly predicted performance on the RCPM-A. Visuospatial impairment in PD may arise from dysfunction of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit that also includes the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and, importantly, the posterior parietal lobes.

  12. [Combination therapy of prostatitis-associated copulative dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliumberg, B I; Shatylko, T V; Tverdokhleb, S A; Fomkin, R N; Voskoboĭnikova, I V

    2014-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis is characterized by clinical polymorphism, that may include pain, dysuria, asthenovegetative syndrome, and others. Symptoms associated with impaired copulatory cycle in chronic prostatitis have a significant impact on the quality of life of patient. Sexual dysfunction and sexuality cessation can exacerbate the inflammation of the prostate gland and worsen the underlying disease. The study included 60 patients diagnosed with chronic bacterial prostatitis, complicated by sexual disorders. Patients were divided into two comparable groups of 30 persons. Control group ofpatients received standard antibacterial therapy; study group ofpatients in addition received phytodrug prostanorm. At the end of treatment, higher IIEF-5 scores, increasing number of lecithin granules in the prostate secretion, as well as reducing the severity of irritative symptoms were registered in the study group.

  13. Empathy dysfunction in children and adolescents with disruptive behavior disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wied, Minet; Gispen-de Wied, Christine; van Boxtel, Anton

    2010-01-10

    In this essay, we focus on empathy in children and adolescents with disruptive behavior disorders (DBD), based on the assumption that lack of empathy is a risk factor for the development of DBD. We reflect on the heterogeneity of DBD, the complex nature of the empathy construct, discuss empathy's role in aggression, and review recent findings from studies on empathic skills in children and adolescents with DBD. Research suggests that the mechanisms underlying empathy problems may be different for DBD subtypes. Individuals with psychopathic tendencies may show a selective impairment in empathy with sadness and fear due to abnormalities in neural circuits connected with the amygdala. Individuals without these tendencies may show little empathy for a variety of reasons, such as hostile attributions, anxiety and/or poor regulatory skills. Understanding more about the nature and causes of empathy dysfunction in DBD could aid in identifying subtypes and help to improve prevention and intervention programs. Suggestions for future research are made.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases associated with copper imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Luisa; Lombardo, Marco F; Ciriolo, Maria R; Rotilio, Giuseppe

    2004-03-01

    Copper is an essential transition metal ion for the function of key metabolic enzymes, but its uncontrolled redox reactivity is source of reactive oxygen species. Therefore a network of transporters strictly controls the trafficking of copper in living systems. Deficit, excess, or aberrant coordination of copper are conditions that may be detrimental, especially for neuronal cells, which are particularly sensitive to oxidative stress. Indeed, the genetic disturbances of copper homeostasis, Menkes' and Wilson's diseases, are associated with neurodegeneration. Furthermore, copper interacts with the proteins that are the hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, prion diseases, and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In all cases, copper-mediated oxidative stress is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction, which is a common feature of neurodegeneration. In particular we recently demonstrated that in copper deficiency, mitochondrial function is impaired due to decreased activity of cytochrome c oxidase, leading to production of reactive oxygen species, which in turn triggers mitochondria-mediated apoptotic neurodegeneration.

  15. Diastolic dysfunction in the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, J C; López, P; Mancebo, J; Zapata, L

    2016-11-01

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is a common finding in critically ill patients. It is characterized by a progressive deterioration of the relaxation and the compliance of the left ventricle. Two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is a cornerstone in its diagnosis. Acute pulmonary edema associated with hypertensive crisis is the most frequent presentation of diastolic dysfunction critically ill patients. Myocardial ischemia, sepsis and weaning failure from mechanical ventilation also may be associated with diastolic dysfunction. The treatment is based on the reduction of pulmonary congestion and left ventricular filling pressures. Some studies have found a prognostic role of diastolic dysfunction in some diseases such as sepsis. The present review aims to analyze thoroughly the echocardiographic diagnosis and the most frequent scenarios in critically ill patients in whom diastolic dysfunction plays a key role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Attachment, borderline personality, and romantic relationship dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathan; Stepp, Stephanie D; Wan, Ming Wai; Hope, Holly; Morse, Jennifer Q; Steele, Miriam; Steele, Howard; Pilkonis, Paul A

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have implicated attachment and disturbances in romantic relationships as important indicators for Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). The current research extends our current knowledge by examining the specific associations among attachment, romantic relationship dysfunction, and BPD, above and beyond the contribution of emotional distress and nonromantic interpersonal functioning in two distinct samples. Study 1 comprised a community sample of women (N = 58) aged 25-36. Study 2 consisted of a psychiatric sample (N = 138) aged 21-60. Results from both Study 1 and Study 2 demonstrated that (1) attachment was specifically related to BPD symptoms and romantic dysfunction, (2) BPD symptoms were specifically associated with romantic dysfunction, and (3) the association between attachment and romantic dysfunction was statistically mediated by BPD symptoms. The findings support specific associations among attachment, BPD symptoms, and romantic dysfunction.

  17. Social communication impairments: pragmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Robert L

    2007-06-01

    Social communication or pragmatic impairments are characterized and illustrated as involving inappropriate or ineffective use of language and gesture in social contexts. Three clinical vignettes illustrate different pragmatic impairments and the wealth of diagnostic information that can be garnered from observation of a child's social communication behavior. Definitions of, and developmental milestones in, domains of pragmatic competence are provided. Several screening instruments are suggested for use in assessing pragmatic competence within the time-frame of a pediatric examination. Frequent comorbid psychiatric conditions are described and a sample of current neurobiologic research is briefly summarized.

  18. An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model of Acquired Brain Injury Patient Impairments and Caregiver Psychosocial Functioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrin, Paul B; Norup, Anne; Caracuel, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to use actor-partner interdependence modeling (APIM) to examine the simultaneous effects of both acquired brain injury (ABI) patient and caregiver ratings of patient impairments on both patient and caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction. M...

  19. Impaired sense of smell and color discrimination in monogenic and idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertelge, Lena; Brüggemann, Norbert; Schmidt, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Olfaction is typically impaired in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), but its role is uncertain in monogenic PD. Diminished color discrimination has been suggested as another early sign of dopaminergic dysfunction but not been systematically studied. Furthermore, it is unknown whether both def...

  20. Heterogeneity in executive impairment in patients with very mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Jette; Vogel, Asmus; Gade, Anders;

    2006-01-01

    The presence of executive impairment in mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) has primarily been demonstrated by means of group comparison. Whether executive dysfunction is a common feature of mild AD or only present in a subgroup of patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to describe...

  1. Impaired Systolic Function by Strain Imaging in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraigher-Krainer, Elisabeth; Shah, Amil M.; Gupta, Deepak K.; Santos, Angela; Claggett, Brian; Pieske, Burkert; Zile, Michael R.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Lefkowitz, Marty P.; Packer, Milton; McMurray, John J. V.; Solomon, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine the frequency and magnitude of impaired systolic deformation in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Background Although diastolic dysfunction is widely considered a key pathophysiologic mediator of HFpEF, the prevalence of concomitant sys

  2. Electrophysiological Evidence for Selective Impairment of Optic Flow Perception in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Takao; Fujita, Takako; Ogata, Katsuya; Goto, Yoshinobu; Munetsuna, Shinji; Kamio, Yoko; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2011-01-01

    People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often show inferior global motion performance with superior performance in detail form perception, suggesting dysfunction of the dorsal visual stream. To elucidate the neural basis of impaired global motion perception in ASD, we measured psychophysical threshold and visual event-related potentials (ERPs)…

  3. Modest Visceral Fat Gain Causes Endothelial Dysfunction In Healthy Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Corral, Abel; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima H.; Sierra-Johnson, Justo; Orban, Marek; Gami, Apoor; Davison, Diane; Singh, Prachi; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha; Huyber, Christine; Votruba, Susanne; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Jensen, Michael D.; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine the impact of fat gain and its distribution on endothelial function in lean healthy humans. Background Endothelial dysfunction has been identified as an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. Whether fat gain impairs endothelial function is unknown. Methods A randomized controlled study to assess the effects of fat gain on endothelial function. We recruited 43 normal weight healthy volunteers (mean age 29 years; 18 women). Subjects were assigned to gain weight (approximately 4 kg) (n=35) or to maintain weight (n=8). Endothelial function (brachial artery flow mediated dilation -FMD) was measured at baseline, after fat gain (8 weeks) and after weight loss (16 weeks) for fat-gainers and at baseline and follow-up (8 weeks) for weight-maintainers. Body composition was measured by DXA and abdominal CT scans. Results After an average weight gain of 4.1 kg, fat-gainers significantly increased their total, visceral and subcutaneous fat. Blood pressure and overnight polysomnography did not change after fat gain or loss. FMD remained unchanged in weight-maintainers. FMD decreased in fat-gainers (9.1 ± 3% vs. 7.8 ± 3.2%, p =0.003), but recovered to baseline when subjects shed the gained weight. There was a significant correlation between the decrease in FMD and the increase in visceral fat gain (rho = −0.42, p=0.004), but not with subcutaneous fat gain (rho = −0.22, p=0.15). Conclusions In normal weight healthy young subjects, modest fat gain results in impaired endothelial function, even in the absence of changes in blood pressure. Endothelial function recovers after weight loss. Increased visceral rather than subcutaneous fat predicts endothelial dysfunction. PMID:20705223

  4. Renal dysfunction prevalence and clinical impact in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palazzuoli A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Palazzuoli, Susanna Benincasa, Stefanie Grothgar, Pasquale Di Sipio, Giovanni Paganini, Marco Pellegrini, Ranuccio NutiDepartment of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Cardiology Section, Le Scotte Hospital, University of Siena, ItalyAbstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with a significant increase in death and cardiovascular mortality. However the exact mechanism by which CKD impairs the cardiovascular outcome is not well established. Some reasons may lie in the association of CKD with several other cardiovascular and noncardiovascular disorders including accelerated systemic atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, increased levels of inflammatory factors, anemic status, bone mineral dysfunction, electrolyte imbalance, and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS activation. Therefore several risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, lipid disorders, and older age are common in both conditions. In patients affected with heart failure (HF a key role is represented by the neurohormonal activation. This condition causes fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, as well as increased congestion and cardiac workload. Moreover, HF during the decompensated phases is often associated with a worsening renal function that leads to further RAAS activation, microvascular damage, and intrarenal flow redistribution. In order to clarify the interactions between these factors, several questions need to be answered: the universal definition of “worsening renal function,” the identification of the best laboratory parameters to investigate renal function in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and a better definition of the comorbidities’ role in the determination of the outcome, especially in patients with chronic HF. A clarification of these key points could lead to the individualization of new specific therapeutic targets and to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with HF and

  5. Dimensional psychiatry: reward dysfunction and depressive mood across psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägele, Claudia; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Rapp, Michael; Sterzer, Philipp; Beck, Anne; Bermpohl, Felix; Stoy, Meline; Ströhle, Andreas; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Dolan, Raymond J; Heinz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A dimensional approach in psychiatry aims to identify core mechanisms of mental disorders across nosological boundaries. We compared anticipation of reward between major psychiatric disorders, and investigated whether reward anticipation is impaired in several mental disorders and whether there is a common psychopathological correlate (negative mood) of such an impairment. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a monetary incentive delay (MID) task to study the functional correlates of reward anticipation across major psychiatric disorders in 184 subjects, with the diagnoses of alcohol dependence (n = 26), schizophrenia (n = 44), major depressive disorder (MDD, n = 24), bipolar disorder (acute manic episode, n = 13), attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, n = 23), and healthy controls (n = 54). Subjects' individual Beck Depression Inventory-and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-scores were correlated with clusters showing significant activation during reward anticipation. During reward anticipation, we observed significant group differences in ventral striatal (VS) activation: patients with schizophrenia, alcohol dependence, and major depression showed significantly less ventral striatal activation compared to healthy controls. Depressive symptoms correlated with dysfunction in reward anticipation regardless of diagnostic entity. There was no significant correlation between anxiety symptoms and VS functional activation. Our findings demonstrate a neurobiological dysfunction related to reward prediction that transcended disorder categories and was related to measures of depressed mood. The findings underline the potential of a dimensional approach in psychiatry and strengthen the hypothesis that neurobiological research in psychiatric disorders can be targeted at core mechanisms that are likely to be implicated in a range of clinical entities.

  6. Aural symptoms in patients referred for temporomandibular pain/dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejersjö, Christina; Näslund, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of studying frequency of aural symptoms and associations with symptoms of TMD new patients referred to the Orofacial Pain Clinic, Odontologen, Göteborg, were asked, at their first appointment and before meeting a specialist, to report any symptoms regarding pain or fullness/swelling of the ear, impaired hearing, sensitivity to sound, and irritation/itching of the ear. They also answered a standardized questionnaire regarding temporomandibular pain and/or dysfunction, and classified their degree of TMD symptoms on a five-point verbal scale and a visual analogue scale. 108 consecutive patients were included in the study, they completed the questionnaires and were examined and diagnosed by different specialists at the clinic. Any ear symptoms were reported by 68% of the patients, fullness of ear by 44% and impaired hearing by 37%. 38% of the patients had previously consulted a physician, and most of them had had pharmacological treatment due to their ear symptoms. Females reported more pain in the ear (P = 0.034) and more sensitivityto sound (P = 0.046) than men. No significant association was found between age and aural symptoms. The degree of TMD- symptoms, as reported by the five grade scale, showed significant association with aural symptoms (P osteoartrosis) and disc displacement. Itching in the ear was frequently reported (24%) and was associated with myalgia (P = 0.003) and tension headache (P = 0.018). A medical examination by an ear-nose-throat specialist of 19 patients reporting a sensation of fullness of ear, did not reveal any objectifiable ear disease. To conclude, aural symptoms are common in patients with temporomandibular pain and/or dysfunction, are associated with TMD-symptoms and should be regarded as possible symptoms of TMD. A cooperation between physicians and dentists can give these patients a good treatment.

  7. X Irradiation Induces Acute Cognitive Decline via Transient Synaptic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitasari, Anggraeini; Koganezawa, Noriko; Ishizuka, Yuta; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Natsume; Nakano, Takashi; Shirao, Tomoaki

    2016-04-01

    Cranial X irradiation can severely impair higher brain function, resulting in neurocognitive deficits. Radiation-induced brain injury is characterized by acute, early and late delayed changes, and morbidity is evident more than 6 months after irradiation. While the acute effects of radiation exposure on the brain are known, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we examined the acute effect of X radiation on synaptic function using behavioral analysis and immunohistochemistry. We found that 10 Gy whole-brain irradiation immediately after conditioning (within 30 min) impaired the formation of fear memory, whereas irradiation 24 h prior to conditioning did not. To investigate the mechanisms underlying these behavioral changes, we irradiated one hemisphere of the brain and analyzed synaptic function and adult neurogenesis immunohistochemically. We focused on drebrin, whose loss from dendritic spines is a surrogate marker of synaptopathy. The intensity of drebrin immunoreactivity started to decrease in the irradiated hemisphere 2 h after exposure. The immunostaining intensity recovered to preirradiation levels by 24 h, indicating that X radiation induced transient synaptic dysfunction. Interestingly, the number of newly generated neurons was not changed at 2 h postirradiation, whereas it was significantly decreased at 8 and 24 h postirradiation. Because irradiation 24 h prior to conditioning had no effect on fear memory, our findings suggest that radiation-induced death of newly-generated neurons does not substantially impact fear memory formation. The radiation-induced synaptic dysfunction likely caused a transient memory deficit during the critical period for fear memory formation (approximately 1-3 h after conditioning), which coincides with a change in drebrin immunostaining in the hippocampus, a structure critical for fear memory formation.

  8. Endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic diseases: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Davel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium plays a vital role in maintaining circulatory homeostasis by the release of relaxing and contracting factors. Any change in this balance may result in a process known as endothelial dysfunction that leads to impaired control of vascular tone and contributes to the pathogenesis of some cardiovascular and endocrine/metabolic diseases. Reduced endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO bioavailability and increased production of thromboxane A2, prostaglandin H2 and superoxide anion in conductance and resistance arteries are commonly associated with endothelial dysfunction in hypertensive, diabetic and obese animals, resulting in reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and in increased vasoconstrictor responses. In addition, recent studies have demonstrated the role of enhanced overactivation ofβ-adrenergic receptors inducing vascular cytokine production and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS uncoupling that seem to be the mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction in hypertension, heart failure and in endocrine-metabolic disorders. However, some adaptive mechanisms can occur in the initial stages of hypertension, such as increased NO production by eNOS. The present review focuses on the role of NO bioavailability, eNOS uncoupling, cyclooxygenase-derived products and pro-inflammatory factors on the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in hypertension, sympathetic hyperactivity, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. These are cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic diseases of high incidence and mortality around the world, especially in developing countries and endothelial dysfunction contributes to triggering, maintenance and worsening of these pathological situations.

  9. Mechanisms of disease: Mitochondrial dysfunction in sensory neuropathy and other complications in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernyhough, Paul; McGavock, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a major complication of diabetes that involves the sensory and autonomic nervous systems and leads to significant morbidity and impact on quality of life of patients. Mitochondrial stress has been proposed as a major mediator of insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes and a trigger of diabetic complications such as nephropathy and cardiomyopathy in humans and animal models. Recent studies in the peripheral nervous system in type 1 and type 2 diabetic animal models suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegeneration in diabetes. This chapter focuses on the nature of sensory nerve dysfunction in diabetes and presents these findings in the context of diabetes-induced nerve degeneration mediated by alterations in mitochondrial physiology. Diabetes-induced dysfunction in calcium homeostasis is discussed and causative associations with suboptimal mitochondrial physiology are developed. Comparisons are made with mitochondrial-dependent dysfunction in muscle and cardiac tissue in diabetes. It is clear that across a range of complications of diabetes mitochondrial physiology is impaired; in general, a reduction in respiratory chain capability is apparent. Where appropriate, we provide clinical evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of complications in patients with diabetes. This abnormal activity may predispose mitochondria to generate elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS), although experimental proof remains lacking, but more importantly will deleteriously alter the bioenergetic status of neurons.

  10. Features of borderline personality disorder, perceived childhood emotional invalidation, and dysfunction within current romantic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Edward A; Braithwaite, Scott R; Joiner, Thomas E; Fincham, Frank D

    2008-12-01

    The mechanisms through which current romantic relationship dysfunction develops in individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms are still unclear. One possible pathway may be childhood experiences of emotional invalidation by parents, which may result in the development of poor social problem-solving skills or cognitive responses such as splitting, which impair current romantic relationships. This study examines the relationship between features of BPD and current romantic relationship dysfunction, and demonstrates that perceived emotional invalidation by parents during childhood mediates the relationship between BPD features and current romantic relationship dysfunction. Structural equations modeling was used to test the hypothesized model in 758 young adults in an ethnically diverse community sample. The proposed model fit the data well; perceived childhood emotional invalidation partially mediated the relationship between features of BPD and romantic relationship dysfunction, even when controlling for the presence of a major depressive episode in the last year. The findings of this study suggest that individuals with features of BPD experience relationship dysfunction that cannot be accounted for by comorbid depression and that perceived childhood emotional invalidation may contribute to these problems. Copyright 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Erectile dysfunction in heart failure patients: a critical reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, L; Torlasco, C; Lauretta, L; Loffi, M; Maranta, F; Salonia, A; Margonato, A; Montorsi, F; Fragasso, G

    2013-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome with a constantly increasing incidence and prevalence in western countries. Total absence of sexual activity is registered in 30% of HF patients. Moreover, HF-induced reduction in exercise tolerance, side effects of HF medications and the coexistence of shared risk factors between HF and sexual dysfunction may further aggravate the sexual health of HF patients. The purpose of this review is to examine the pathophysiological mechanisms behind the association of erectile dysfunction (ED) and HF, the potential therapeutic approaches and the eventual indications for sexual activity in HF patients. Medline and Cochrane Library search was performed from January 1970 through October 2012 to retrieve relevant papers outlining the association between ED and HF. Many evidences have outlined a tight association between ED and HF pathophysiological standpoint. Shared risk factors, common pathogenic traits and epidemiologic association represent some of the links between these conditions. Erectile dysfunction has been recognized as an earlier predictor of cardiovascular events; moreover, HF itself may cause and/or worsen ED because of its particular feature and co-morbidities. Furthermore, some cardiovascular drugs may contribute to impaired erectile function. In stable patients with stable HF, sexual activity is generally not contraindicated but it should be encouraged, as a form of moderate-intensity physical exertion. An effective treatment of ED in HF patients should be founded on the correction of reversible risk factors, on the choice of cardiovascular drugs with the lowest effect upon patient's erectile function, and on the use of phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors. Physicians should be aware of the close relation between HF and ED and of the related clinical and therapeutic implications, in order to improve patients quality of life and clinical outcome. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  12. Lipasuria in acute pancreatitis: result of tubular dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, R; Buehler, H; Kehl, O; Ammann, R

    1987-01-01

    Lipase, in contrast to amylase, is completely reabsorbed by the proximal tubules after glomerular filtration. Therefore, no lipase is detectable in the unconcentrated urine according to the current opinion. The handling of lipase (detected with an enzyme-immunoassay) by the kidney was investigated in comparison with creatinine, amylase, and beta-2-microglobulin by clearance studies in acute pancreatitis (n = 10), burn injury (n = 4), glomerular proteinuria (n = 8), and controls without evidence of pancreatic or renal diseases (n = 5). In initial stages of acute pancreatitis a measurable clearance of lipase (mean: 49.6 microliters/min, range: 0.5-234) was found in association with corresponding increased clearances of beta-2-microglobulin (mean: 10.5 ml/min, range: 0.02-58.9) and of amylase (mean: 8.9 ml/min, range: 2.4-22.6) in nine of ten patients. This finding is consistent with a defect of tubular function. However, regression analysis failed to show a significant correlation between lipase and beta-2-microglobulin clearance. Repeated measurements during the course of pancreatitis in seven patients showed reversibility of tubular dysfunction. In patients with burn injury a similar elevation of clearances of beta-2-microglobulin and of amylase was found, but tubular dysfunction in this condition was not associated with lipasuria. In glomerular proteinuria a lipase clearance was found in two of five cases with moderate, and in the other three cases with severe impairment of creatinine clearance. beta-2-microglobulin clearance was normal in the former and only slightly elevated in the latter group. In conclusion lipase is measurable in the urine of most patients with acute pancreatitis as a result of a reversible tubular dysfunction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Sensorimotor dysfunctions as primary features of autism spectrum disorders

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    Mosconi, Matthew W.; Sweeney, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Motor impairments in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have received far less research attention than core social-communication and cognitive features. Yet, behavioral, neurophysiological, neuroimaging and histopathological studies have documented abnormal motor system development in the majority of individuals with ASD suggesting that these deficits may be primary to the disorder. There are several unique advantages to studying motor development in ASD. First, the neurophysiological substrates of motor skills have been well-characterized via animal and human lesion studies. Second, many of the single-gene disorders associated with ASD also are characterized by motor dysfunctions. Third, recent evidence suggests that the onset of motor dysfunctions may precede the emergence of social and communication deficits during the first year of life in ASD. Motor deficits documented in ASD indicate disruptions throughout the neuroaxis affecting cortex, striatum, the cerebellum and brainstem. Questions remain regarding the timing and development of motor system alterations in ASD, their association with defining clinical features, and their potential for parsing heterogeneity in ASD. Pursuing these questions through neurobiologically informed translational research holds great promise for identifying gene-brain pathways associated with ASD. PMID:26335740

  14. Erectile dysfunction and central obesity: an Italian perspective

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    Giovanni Corona

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction (ED is a frequent complication of obesity. The aim of this review is to critically analyze the framework of obesity and ED, dissecting the connections between the two pathological entities. Current clinical evidence shows that obesity, and in particular central obesity, is associated with both arteriogenic ED and reduced testosterone (T levels. It is conceivable that obesity-associated hypogonadism and increased cardiovascular risk might partially justify the higher prevalence of ED in overweight and obese individuals. Conversely, the psychological disturbances related to obesity do not seem to play a major role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related ED. However, both clinical and preclinical data show that the association between ED and visceral fat accumulation is independent from known obesity-associated comorbidities. Therefore, how visceral fat could impair penile microcirculation still remains unknown. This point is particularly relevant since central obesity in ED subjects categorizes individuals at high cardiovascular risk, especially in the youngest ones. The presence of ED in obese subjects might help healthcare professionals in convincing them to initiate a virtuous cycle, where the correction of sexual dysfunction will be the reward for improved lifestyle behavior. Unsatisfying sexual activity represents a meaningful, straightforward motivation for consulting healthcare professionals, who, in turn, should take advantage of the opportunity to encourage obese patients to treat, besides ED, the underlying unfavorable conditions, thus not only restoring erectile function, but also overall health.

  15. Catalase Deficiency Accelerates Diabetic Renal Injury Through Peroxisomal Dysfunction

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    Hwang, Inah; Lee, Jiyoun; Huh, Joo Young; Park, Jehyun; Lee, Hi Bahl; Ho, Ye-Shih; Ha, Hunjoo

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in diabetes complications, including diabetic nephropathy (DN). Plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) as well as glucose are increased in diabetes, and peroxisomes and mitochondria participate in FFA oxidation in an interconnected fashion. Therefore, we investigated whether deficiency of catalase, a major peroxisomal antioxidant, accelerates DN through peroxisomal dysfunction and abnormal renal FFA metabolism. Diabetes was induced by multiple injections of low-dose streptozotocin into catalase knock-out (CKO) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice. Murine mesangial cells (MMCs) transfected with catalase small interfering RNA followed by catalase overexpression were used to further elucidate the role of endogenous catalase. Despite equivalent hyperglycemia, parameters of DN, along with markers of oxidative stress, were more accelerated in diabetic CKO mice than in diabetic WT mice up to 10 weeks of diabetes. CKO mice and MMCs showed impaired peroxisomal/mitochondrial biogenesis and FFA oxidation. Catalase deficiency increased mitochondrial ROS and fibronectin expression in response to FFAs, which were effectively restored by catalase overexpression or N-acetylcysteine. These data provide unprecedented evidence that FFA-induced peroxisomal dysfunction exacerbates DN and that endogenous catalase plays an important role in protecting the kidney from diabetic stress through maintaining peroxisomal and mitochondrial fitness. PMID:22315314

  16. Reducing RBM20 activity improves diastolic dysfunction and cardiac atrophy.

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    Hinze, Florian; Dieterich, Christoph; Radke, Michael H; Granzier, Henk; Gotthardt, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Impaired diastolic filling is a main contributor to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a syndrome with increasing prevalence and no treatment. Both collagen and the giant sarcomeric protein titin determine diastolic function. Since titin's elastic properties can be adjusted physiologically, we evaluated titin-based stiffness as a therapeutic target. We adjusted RBM20-dependent cardiac isoform expression in the titin N2B knockout mouse with increased ventricular stiffness. A ~50 % reduction of RBM20 activity does not only maintain cardiac filling in diastole but also ameliorates cardiac atrophy and thus improves cardiac function in the N2B-deficient heart. Reduced RBM20 activity partially normalized gene expression related to muscle development and fatty acid metabolism. The adaptation of cardiac growth was related to hypertrophy signaling via four-and-a-half lim-domain proteins (FHLs) that translate mechanical input into hypertrophy signals. We provide a novel link between cardiac isoform expression and trophic signaling via FHLs and suggest cardiac splicing as a therapeutic target in diastolic dysfunction. Increasing the length of titin isoforms improves ventricular filling in heart disease. FHL proteins are regulated via RBM20 and adapt cardiac growth. RBM20 is a therapeutic target in diastolic dysfunction.

  17. Melatonin and succinate reduce rat liver mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes.

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    Zavodnik, I B; Lapshina, E A; Cheshchevik, V T; Dremza, I K; Kujawa, J; Zabrodskaya, S V; Reiter, R J

    2011-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in response to hyperglycemia during diabetes lead to pathological consequences of hyperglycemia. The aim of the present work was to investigate the role of a specific functional damage in rat liver mitochondria during diabetes as well as to evaluate the possibility of metabolic and antioxidative correction of mitochondrial disorders by pharmacological doses of succinate and melatonin. In rat liver mitochondria, streptozotocin-induced diabetes was accompanied by marked impairments of metabolism: we observed a significant activation of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (by 60%, pdiabetic animals, melatonin (10 mg/kg b.w., 30 days) or succinate (50 mg/kg b.w., 30 days) reversed the oxygen consumption rate V(3) and the acceptor control ratio to those in nondiabetic animals. Melatonin enhanced the inhibited activity of catalase in the cytoplasm of liver cells and prevented mitochondrial glutathione-S-transferase inhibition while succinate administration prevented α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activation. The mitochondria dysfunction associated with diabetes was partially remedied by succinate or melatonin administration. Thus, these molecules may have benefits for the treatment of diabetes. The protective mechanism may be related to improvements in mitochondrial physiology and the antioxidative status of cells.

  18. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renita E Horton

    Full Text Available In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF, allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics.

  19. Monitorization of Acute Brain Dysfunction in Critical Illness

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    Günseli Orhun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain dysfunction is a clinical condition which is commonly observed in intensive care units and exhibits neurological changes ranging from delirium to coma. Typically observed during sepsis in critical patients, this syndrome is also named as “sepsis-associated encephalopathy” and this situation is of significance since it is related to mortality, increase of morbidity and long-term cognitive impairment. Monitorization of brain functions in critically ill patients should be commenced with detailed neurological examination and effects of sedative drugs, which can alter neurological responses during evaluation, should be taken into consideration. On the other hand, brain imaging methods and electrophysiological examinations are diagnostic procedures which complement neurological examination. While computed tomography enables diagnosis of structural intracerebral lesions, magnetic resonance imaging provides important information on primary pathological mechanisms of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and structural alterations developing in the brain. Evidence of diagnosis and prognosis of acute brain dysfunction can be acquired through use of electroencephalography for. Although it was believed that neurological biomarkers can be useful in determination of diagnosis and prognosis, further studies are needed in this subject.

  20. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Renita E; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L; Sheehy, Sean P; Pasqualini, Francesco S; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics.