WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamical pattern formation

  1. Nonlinear dynamics of pattern formation and pattern recognition in the rabbit olfactory bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Bill

    1986-10-01

    A mathematical model of the process of pattern recognition in the first olfactory sensory cortex of the rabbit is presented. It explains the formation and alteration of spatial patterns in neural activity observed experimentally during classical Pavlovian conditioning. On each inspiration of the animal, a surge of receptor input enters the olfactory bulb. EEG activity recorded at the surface of the bulb undergoes a transition from a low amplitude background state of temporal disorder to coherent oscillation. There is a distinctive spatial pattern of rms amplitude in this oscillation which changes reliably to a second pattern during each successful recognition by the animal of a conditioned stimulus odor. When a new odor is paired as conditioned stimulus, these patterns are replaced by new patterns that stabilize as the animal adapts to the new environment. I will argue that a unification of the theories of pattern formation and associative memory is required to account for these observations. This is achieved in a model of the bulb as a discrete excitable medium with spatially inhomogeneous coupling expressed by a connection matrix. The theory of multiple Hopf bifurcations is employed to find coupled equations for the amplitudes of competing unstable oscillatory modes. These may be created in the system by proper coupling and selectively evoked by specific classes of inputs. This allows a view of limit cycle attractors as “stored” fixed points of a gradient vector field and thereby recovers the more familiar dynamical systems picture of associative memory.

  2. Nanoparticles dynamics on a surface: fractal pattern formation and fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Veronika V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results on the formation and the post-growth relaxation processes of nanofractals on surface. For this study we developed a method which describes the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal and accounts for their diffusion and detachment. We demonstrate...... that these kinetic processes determine the final shape of the islands on surface after post-growth relaxation. We consider different scenarios of fractal relaxation and analyze the time evolution of the island's morphology....

  3. Dynamic spatial pattern formation in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Syed Shahed; Mackey, Michael C

    2014-02-01

    The spatiotemporal evolution of various proteins during the endo-mesodermal specification of the sea urchin embryo in the form of an expanding torus has been known experimentally for some time, and the regulatory network that controls this dynamic evolution of gene expression has been recently partially clarified. In this paper we construct a relatively simple mathematical model of this process that retains the basic features of the gene network and is able to reproduce the spatiotemporal patterns observed experimentally. We show here that a mathematical model based only on the gene-protein interactions so far reported in the literature predicts the origin of the behaviour to lie on a delayed negative feed-back loop due to the protein Blimp1 on the transcription of its corresponding mRNA. However though consistent with earlier results, this contradicts recent findings, where it has been established that the dynamical evolution of Wnt8 protein is independent of Blimp1. This leads us to offer a modified version of the original model based on observations in similar systems, and some more recent work in the sea urchin, assuming the existence of a mechanism involving inhibitory loop on wnt8 transcription. This hypothesis leads to a better match with the experimental results and suggests that the possibility of the existence of such an interaction in the sea urchin should be explored.

  4. Dynamic Transition and Pattern Formation in Taylor Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian MA; Shouhong WANG

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to study both dynamic and structural transitions of the Taylor-Couette flow,by using the dynamic transition theory and geometric theory of incompressible flows developed recently by the authors.In particular,it is shown that as the Taylor number crosses the critical number,the system undergoes either a continuous or a jump dynamic transition,dictated by the sign of a computable,nondimensional parameter R.In addition,it is also shown that the new transition states have the Taylor vortex type of flow structure,which is structurally stable.

  5. Dynamic array generation and pattern formation for optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, P.C.; Glückstad, J.

    2000-01-01

    The generalised phase contrast approach is used for the generation of optical arrays of arbitrary beam shape, suitable for applications in optical tweezers for the manipulation of biological specimens. This approach offers numerous advantages over current techniques involving the use of computer......-generated holograms or diffractive optical elements. We demonstrate a low-loss system for generating intensity patterns suitable for the trapping and manipulation of small particles or specimens....

  6. Robust dynamical pattern formation from a multifunctional minimal genetic circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrera Javier

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A practical problem during the analysis of natural networks is their complexity, thus the use of synthetic circuits would allow to unveil the natural mechanisms of operation. Autocatalytic gene regulatory networks play an important role in shaping the development of multicellular organisms, whereas oscillatory circuits are used to control gene expression under variable environments such as the light-dark cycle. Results We propose a new mechanism to generate developmental patterns and oscillations using a minimal number of genes. For this, we design a synthetic gene circuit with an antagonistic self-regulation to study the spatio-temporal control of protein expression. Here, we show that our minimal system can behave as a biological clock or memory, and it exhibites an inherent robustness due to a quorum sensing mechanism. We analyze this property by accounting for molecular noise in an heterogeneous population. We also show how the period of the oscillations is tunable by environmental signals, and we study the bifurcations of the system by constructing different phase diagrams. Conclusions As this minimal circuit is based on a single transcriptional unit, it provides a new mechanism based on post-translational interactions to generate targeted spatio-temporal behavior.

  7. Bifurcation and spatial pattern formation in spreading of disease with incubation period in a phytoplankton dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randhir Singh Baghel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we propose a three dimensional mathematical model of phytoplankton dynamics with the help of reaction-diffusion equations that studies the bifurcation and pattern formation mechanism. We provide an analytical explanation for understanding phytoplankton dynamics with three population classes: susceptible, incubated, and infected. This model has a Holling type II response function for the population transformation from susceptible to incubated class in an aquatic ecosystem. Our main goal is to provide a qualitative analysis of Hopf bifurcation mechanisms, taking death rate of infected phytoplankton as bifurcation parameter, and to study further spatial patterns formation due to spatial diffusion. Here analytical findings are supported by the results of numerical experiments. It is observed that the coexistence of all classes of population depends on the rate of diffusion. Also we obtained the time evaluation pattern formation of the spatial system.

  8. Dynamic model based on voltage transfer curve for pattern formation in dielectric barrier glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ben; He, Feng; Ouyang, Jiting, E-mail: jtouyang@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Duan, Xiaoxi [Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Simulation work is very important for understanding the formation of self-organized discharge patterns. Previous works have witnessed different models derived from other systems for simulation of discharge pattern, but most of these models are complicated and time-consuming. In this paper, we introduce a convenient phenomenological dynamic model based on the basic dynamic process of glow discharge and the voltage transfer curve (VTC) to study the dielectric barrier glow discharge (DBGD) pattern. VTC is an important characteristic of DBGD, which plots the change of wall voltage after a discharge as a function of the initial total gap voltage. In the modeling, the combined effect of the discharge conditions is included in VTC, and the activation-inhibition effect is expressed by a spatial interaction term. Besides, the model reduces the dimensionality of the system by just considering the integration effect of current flow. All these greatly facilitate the construction of this model. Numerical simulations turn out to be in good accordance with our previous fluid modeling and experimental result.

  9. The dynamics of visual experience, an EEG study of subjective pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Elliott

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since the origin of psychological science a number of studies have reported visual pattern formation in the absence of either physiological stimulation or direct visual-spatial references. Subjective patterns range from simple phosphenes to complex patterns but are highly specific and reported reliably across studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using independent-component analysis (ICA we report a reduction in amplitude variance consistent with subjective-pattern formation in ventral posterior areas of the electroencephalogram (EEG. The EEG exhibits significantly increased power at delta/theta and gamma-frequencies (point and circle patterns or a series of high-frequency harmonics of a delta oscillation (spiral patterns. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Subjective-pattern formation may be described in a way entirely consistent with identical pattern formation in fluids or granular flows. In this manner, we propose subjective-pattern structure to be represented within a spatio-temporal lattice of harmonic oscillations which bind topographically organized visual-neuronal assemblies by virtue of low frequency modulation.

  10. Dynamic expression reveals a two-step patterning of WUS and CLV3 during axillary shoot meristem formation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Wei; Wang, Zhicai; Liang, Yan; Wang, Yonghong; Hu, Yuxin

    2017-07-01

    Seed plants have a remarkable capability to produce axillary meristems (AM) in the leaf axils, however, the dynamic establishment of a stem cell niche in AM is largely uncharacterized. We comprehensively examined the dynamic patterning of WUSCHEL (WUS) and CLAVATA3 (CLV3), the two key marker genes defining the shoot stem cell niches, during AM formation in Arabidopsis, and we found that a two-step patterning of WUS and CLV3 occurred during AM stem cell niche establishment. Our further work on the wus and clv3 mutants implicates that such two-step patterning is likely critical for the maintenance of AM progenitor cells and the specification of AM stem cell niche. These data provide a cytological frame for how a stem cell niche is established during AM formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Vascular Adaptation: Pattern Formation and Cross Validation between an Agent Based Model and a Dynamical System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbey, Marc; Casarin, Stefano; Berceli, Scott A

    2017-09-21

    Myocardial infarction is the global leading cause of mortality (Go et al., 2014). Coronary artery occlusion is its main etiology and it is commonly treated by Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) surgery (Wilson et al, 2007). The long-term outcome remains unsatisfactory (Benedetto, 2016) as the graft faces the phenomenon of restenosis during the post-surgery, which consists of re-occlusion of the lumen and usually requires secondary intervention even within one year after the initial surgery (Harskamp, 2013). In this work, we propose an extensive study of the restenosis phenomenon by implementing two mathematical models previously developed by our group: a heuristic Dynamical System (DS) (Garbey and Berceli, 2013), and a stochastic Agent Based Model (ABM) (Garbey et al., 2015). With an extensive use of the ABM, we retrieved the pattern formations of the cellular events that mainly lead the restenosis, especially focusing on mitosis in intima, caused by alteration in shear stress, and mitosis in media, fostered by alteration in wall tension. A deep understanding of the elements at the base of the restenosis is indeed crucial in order to improve the final outcome of vein graft bypass. We also turned the ABM closer to the physiological reality by abating its original assumption of circumferential symmetry. This allowed us to finely replicate the trigger event of the restenosis, i.e. the loss of the endothelium in the early stage of the post-surgical follow up (Roubos et al., 1995) and to simulate the encroachment of the lumen in a fashion aligned with histological evidences (Owens et al., 2015). Finally, we cross-validated the two models by creating an accurate matching procedure. In this way we added the degree of accuracy given by the ABM to a simplified model (DS) that can serve as powerful predictive tool for the clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamical pattern formation in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid under two orthogonal sinusoidal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yépez, L.D.; Carrillo, J.L.; Donado, F.; Sausedo-Solorio, J.M.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical pattern formation of clusters of magnetic particles in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid, under the influence of a superposition of two perpendicular sinusoidal fields, is studied experimentally. By varying the frequency and phase shift of the perpendicular fields, this configuration enables us to experimentally analyze a wide range of field configurations, including the case of a pure rotating field and the case of an oscillating unidirectional field. The fields are applied parallel to the horizontal plane where the fluid lies or in the vertical plane. For fields applied in the horizontal plane, we observed that, when the ratio of the frequencies increases, the average cluster size exhibits a kind of periodic resonances. When the phase shift between the fields is varied, the average chain length reaches maximal values for the cases of the rotating field and the unidirectional case. We analyze and discuss these results in terms of a weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number. In the case of a rotating field on the vertical plane, we also observe that the competition between the magnetic and the viscous forces determines the average cluster size. We show that this configuration generates a series of physically meaningful self-organization of clusters and transport phenomena. - Highlights: • A weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number is proposed. • The self-propelling clusters appear when a vertical rotating magnetic field is applied. • The largest average chain lengths are reached when frequencies are multiples one another. • Rotating and unidirectional alternating fields produce the largest average chain length values.

  13. Dynamical pattern formation in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid under two orthogonal sinusoidal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yépez, L.D.; Carrillo, J.L. [Instituto de Física de la Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Ciudad Universitaria, Edif. 110 A, Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Donado, F.; Sausedo-Solorio, J.M.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P. [Instituto de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Pachuca 42090, Pachuca (Mexico)

    2016-06-15

    The dynamical pattern formation of clusters of magnetic particles in a low-concentration magnetorheological fluid, under the influence of a superposition of two perpendicular sinusoidal fields, is studied experimentally. By varying the frequency and phase shift of the perpendicular fields, this configuration enables us to experimentally analyze a wide range of field configurations, including the case of a pure rotating field and the case of an oscillating unidirectional field. The fields are applied parallel to the horizontal plane where the fluid lies or in the vertical plane. For fields applied in the horizontal plane, we observed that, when the ratio of the frequencies increases, the average cluster size exhibits a kind of periodic resonances. When the phase shift between the fields is varied, the average chain length reaches maximal values for the cases of the rotating field and the unidirectional case. We analyze and discuss these results in terms of a weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number. In the case of a rotating field on the vertical plane, we also observe that the competition between the magnetic and the viscous forces determines the average cluster size. We show that this configuration generates a series of physically meaningful self-organization of clusters and transport phenomena. - Highlights: • A weighted average of the time-dependent Mason number is proposed. • The self-propelling clusters appear when a vertical rotating magnetic field is applied. • The largest average chain lengths are reached when frequencies are multiples one another. • Rotating and unidirectional alternating fields produce the largest average chain length values.

  14. Complex Pattern Formation from Current-Driven Dynamics of Single-Layer Epitaxial Islands on Crystalline Conducting Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Dasgupta, Dwaipayan; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    We report a systematic study of complex pattern formation resulting from the driven dynamics of single-layer homoepitaxial islands on face-centered cubic (FCC) crystalline conducting substrate surfaces under the action of an externally applied electric field. The analysis is based on an experimentally validated nonlinear model of mass transport via island edge atomic diffusion, which also accounts for edge diffusional anisotropy. We analyze the morphological stability and simulate the field-driven evolution of rounded islands for an electric field oriented along the fast diffusion direction. For larger than critical island sizes on {110} and {100} FCC substrates, we show that multiple necking instabilities generate complex island patterns, including void-containing islands, mediated by sequences of breakup and coalescence events and distributed symmetrically with respect to the electric field direction. We analyze the dependence of the formed patterns on the original island size and on the duration of application of the external field. Starting from a single large rounded island, we characterize the evolution of the number of daughter islands and their average size and uniformity. The analysis reveals that the pattern formation kinetics follows a universal scaling relation. Division of Materials Sciences & Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy (Award No.: DE-FG02-07ER46407).

  15. Complex Pattern Formation from Current-Driven Dynamics of Single-Layer Homoepitaxial Islands on Crystalline Conducting Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Dasgupta, Dwaipayan; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2017-07-01

    We report a systematic study of complex pattern formation resulting from the driven dynamics of single-layer homoepitaxial islands on surfaces of face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline conducting substrates under the action of an externally applied electric field. The analysis is based on an experimentally validated nonlinear model of mass transport via island edge atomic diffusion, which also accounts for edge diffusional anisotropy. We analyze the morphological stability and simulate the field-driven evolution of rounded islands for an electric field oriented along the fast edge diffusion direction. For larger-than-critical island sizes on {110 } and {100 } fcc substrates, we show that multiple necking instabilities generate complex island patterns, including not-simply-connected void-containing islands mediated by sequences of breakup and coalescence events and distributed symmetrically with respect to the electric field direction. We analyze the dependence of the formed patterns on the original island size and on the duration of application of the external field. Starting from a single large rounded island, we characterize the evolution of the number of daughter islands and their average size and uniformity. The evolution of the average island size follows a universal power-law scaling relation, and the evolution of the total edge length of the islands in the complex pattern follows Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami kinetics. Our study makes a strong case for the use of electric fields, as precisely controlled macroscopic forcing, toward surface patterning involving complex nanoscale features.

  16. Dynamics of weed populations : spatial pattern formation and implications for control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.

    1998-01-01

    Modelling studies were carried out to analyse spatio-temporal dynamics of annual weed populations and to identify the key factors that determine the long-term herbicide use of weed control programmes. Three different weed control programmes were studied.

    In the first weed

  17. Pattern formation during electropolishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzhakov, V.V.; Chang, H.; Miller, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Using atomic force microscopy, we find that the surface morphology of a dissolving aluminum anode in a commercial electropolishing electrolyte can exhibit both highly regular and randomly packed stripe and hexagonal patterns with amplitudes of about 5 nm and wavelengths of 100 nm. The driving instability of this pattern formation phenomenon is proposed to be the preferential adsorption of polar or polarizable organic molecules on surface ridges where the contorted double layer produces a higher electric potential gradient. The enhanced relative coverage shields the anode and induces a smaller dissolution rate at the ridges. The instability is balanced by surface diffusion of the adsorbate to yield a length scale of 4π(D s /k d ) 1/2 , where D s is the surface diffusivity and k d is the desorption coefficient of the adsorbate, which correlates well with the measured wavelength. A long-wavelength expansion of the double-layer field yields an interface evolution equation that reproduces all of the observed patterns. In particular, bifurcation analysis and numerical simulation yield a single voltage-dependent dimensionless parameter ξ that measures a balance between smoothing of adsorbate concentration by electric-field-dependent surface diffusion and fluctuation due to interfacial curvature and stretching. Randomly oriented stripes are favored at large ξ (low voltage), while random hills dominate at small ξ (high voltage) with perfectly periodic stripes and hexagonal hill patterns within a small window near ξ=1. These predictions are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with our measurements. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  18. Evolution-development congruence in pattern formation dynamics: Bifurcations in gene expression and regulation of networks structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohsokabe, Takahiro; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    Search for possible relationships between phylogeny and ontogeny is important in evolutionary-developmental biology. Here we uncover such relationships by numerical evolution and unveil their origin in terms of dynamical systems theory. By representing developmental dynamics of spatially located cells with gene expression dynamics with cell-to-cell interaction under external morphogen gradient, gene regulation networks are evolved under mutation and selection with the fitness to approach a prescribed spatial pattern of expressed genes. For most numerical evolution experiments, evolution of pattern over generations and development of pattern by an evolved network exhibit remarkable congruence. Both in the evolution and development pattern changes consist of several epochs where stripes are formed in a short time, while for other temporal regimes, pattern hardly changes. In evolution, these quasi-stationary regimes are generations needed to hit relevant mutations, while in development, they are due to some gene expression that varies slowly and controls the pattern change. The morphogenesis is regulated by combinations of feedback or feedforward regulations, where the upstream feedforward network reads the external morphogen gradient, and generates a pattern used as a boundary condition for the later patterns. The ordering from up to downstream is common in evolution and development, while the successive epochal changes in development and evolution are represented as common bifurcations in dynamical-systems theory, which lead to the evolution-development congruence. Mechanism of exceptional violation of the congruence is also unveiled. Our results provide a new look on developmental stages, punctuated equilibrium, developmental bottlenecks, and evolutionary acquisition of novelty in morphogenesis. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evolution‐development congruence in pattern formation dynamics: Bifurcations in gene expression and regulation of networks structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohsokabe, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Search for possible relationships between phylogeny and ontogeny is important in evolutionary‐developmental biology. Here we uncover such relationships by numerical evolution and unveil their origin in terms of dynamical systems theory. By representing developmental dynamics of spatially located cells with gene expression dynamics with cell‐to‐cell interaction under external morphogen gradient, gene regulation networks are evolved under mutation and selection with the fitness to approach a prescribed spatial pattern of expressed genes. For most numerical evolution experiments, evolution of pattern over generations and development of pattern by an evolved network exhibit remarkable congruence. Both in the evolution and development pattern changes consist of several epochs where stripes are formed in a short time, while for other temporal regimes, pattern hardly changes. In evolution, these quasi‐stationary regimes are generations needed to hit relevant mutations, while in development, they are due to some gene expression that varies slowly and controls the pattern change. The morphogenesis is regulated by combinations of feedback or feedforward regulations, where the upstream feedforward network reads the external morphogen gradient, and generates a pattern used as a boundary condition for the later patterns. The ordering from up to downstream is common in evolution and development, while the successive epochal changes in development and evolution are represented as common bifurcations in dynamical‐systems theory, which lead to the evolution‐development congruence. Mechanism of exceptional violation of the congruence is also unveiled. Our results provide a new look on developmental stages, punctuated equilibrium, developmental bottlenecks, and evolutionary acquisition of novelty in morphogenesis. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 326B:61–84, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution

  20. Understanding Alliance Formation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    military, transportation, and communications technologies, which caused every place in the world to be politically significant. Second, “divisions of power...test a similar claim about the association between distance and dyadic alliance formation. In their first model, in which they use the complete data...1885 to 1990] are positively related to dyadic trade levels, and that their non- defense-pact counterparts are not significantly related to trade in

  1. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  2. Spatiotemporal Wave Patterns: Information Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhail Rabinovich; Lev Tsimring

    2006-01-20

    Pattern formation has traditionally been studied in non-equilibrium physics from the viewpoint of describing the basic structures and their interactions. While this is still an important area of research, the emphasis in the last few years has shifted towards analysis of specific properties of patterns in various complex media. For example, diverse and unexpected phenomena occur in neuro-like media that are characterized by highly non-trivial local dynamics. We carried out an active research program on analysis of spatio-temporal patterns in various physical systems (convection, oscillating fluid layer, soap film), as well as in neuro-like media, with an emphasis on informational aspects of the dynamics. Nonlinear nonequilibrium media and their discrete analogs have a unique ability to represent, memorize, and process the information contained in spatio-temporal patterns. Recent neurophysiological experiments demonstrated a certain universality of spatio-temporal representation of information by neural ensembles. Information processing is also revealed in the spatio-temporal dynamics of cellular patterns in nonequilibrium media. It is extremely important for many applications to study the informational aspects of these dynamics, including the origins and mechanisms of information generation, propagation and storage. Some of our results are: the discovery of self-organization of periodically oscillatory patterns in chaotic heterogeneous media; the analysis of the propagation of the information along a chaotic media as function of the entropy of the signal; the analysis of wave propagation in discrete non-equilibrium media with autocatalytic properties, which simulates the calcium dynamics in cellular membranes. Based on biological experiments we suggest the mechanism by which the spatial sensory information is transferred into the spatio-temporal code in the neural media. We also found a new mechanism of self-pinning in cellular structures and the related phenomenon

  3. Pattern formations and oscillatory phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, Shuichi

    2013-01-01

    Patterns and their formations appear throughout nature, and are studied to analyze different problems in science and make predictions across a wide range of disciplines including biology, physics, mathematics, chemistry, material science, and nanoscience. With the emergence of nanoscience and the ability for researchers and scientists to study living systems at the biological level, pattern formation research has become even more essential. This book is an accessible first of its kind guide for scientists, researchers, engineers, and students who require a general introduction to thi

  4. Mechanical Model of Geometric Cell and Topological Algorithm for Cell Dynamics from Single-Cell to Formation of Monolayered Tissues with Pattern

    KAUST Repository

    Kachalo, Sëma

    2015-05-14

    Geometric and mechanical properties of individual cells and interactions among neighboring cells are the basis of formation of tissue patterns. Understanding the complex interplay of cells is essential for gaining insight into embryogenesis, tissue development, and other emerging behavior. Here we describe a cell model and an efficient geometric algorithm for studying the dynamic process of tissue formation in 2D (e.g. epithelial tissues). Our approach improves upon previous methods by incorporating properties of individual cells as well as detailed description of the dynamic growth process, with all topological changes accounted for. Cell size, shape, and division plane orientation are modeled realistically. In addition, cell birth, cell growth, cell shrinkage, cell death, cell division, cell collision, and cell rearrangements are now fully accounted for. Different models of cell-cell interactions, such as lateral inhibition during the process of growth, can be studied in detail. Cellular pattern formation for monolayered tissues from arbitrary initial conditions, including that of a single cell, can also be studied in detail. Computational efficiency is achieved through the employment of a special data structure that ensures access to neighboring cells in constant time, without additional space requirement. We have successfully generated tissues consisting of more than 20,000 cells starting from 2 cells within 1 hour. We show that our model can be used to study embryogenesis, tissue fusion, and cell apoptosis. We give detailed study of the classical developmental process of bristle formation on the epidermis of D. melanogaster and the fundamental problem of homeostatic size control in epithelial tissues. Simulation results reveal significant roles of solubility of secreted factors in both the bristle formation and the homeostatic control of tissue size. Our method can be used to study broad problems in monolayered tissue formation. Our software is publicly

  5. Pattern formation in optical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, C O; Larionova, Ye

    2007-01-01

    We review pattern formation in optical resonators. The emphasis is on 'particle-like' structures such as vortices or spatial solitons. On the one hand, similarities impose themselves with other fields of physics (condensed matter, phase transitions, particle physics, fluds/super fluids). On the other hand the feedback is led by the resonator mirrors to bi- and multi-stability of the spatial field structure, which is the basic ingredient for optical information processing. The spatial dimension or the 'parallelism' is the strength of optics compared to electronics (and will have to be employed to fully use the advantages optics offers in information processing). But even in the 'serial' processing tasks of telecoms (e.g. information buffering) spatial resonator solitons can do better than the schemes proposed so far-including 'slow light'. Pattern formation in optical resonators will likely be the key to brain-like information processing like cognition, learning and association; to complement the precise but limited algorithmic capabilities of electronic processing. But even in the short term it will be useful for solving serial optical processing problems. The prospects for technical uses of pattern formation in resonators are one motivation for this research. The fundamental similarities with other fields of physics, on the other hand, inspire transfer of concepts between fields; something that has always proven fruitful for gaining deeper insights or for solving technical problems

  6. Vascular pattern formation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpella, Enrico; Helariutta, Ykä

    2010-01-01

    Reticulate tissue systems exist in most multicellular organisms, and the principles underlying the formation of cellular networks have fascinated philosophers, mathematicians, and biologists for centuries. In particular, the beautiful and varied arrangements of vascular tissues in plants have intrigued mankind since antiquity, yet the organizing signals have remained elusive. Plant vascular tissues form systems of interconnected cell files throughout the plant body. Vascular cells are aligned with one another along continuous lines, and vascular tissues differentiate at reproducible positions within organ environments. However, neither the precise path of vascular differentiation nor the exact geometry of vascular networks is fixed or immutable. Several recent advances converge to reconcile the seemingly conflicting predictability and plasticity of vascular tissue patterns. A control mechanism in which an apical-basal flow of signal establishes a basic coordinate system for body axis formation and vascular strand differentiation, and in which a superimposed level of radial organizing cues elaborates cell patterns, would generate a reproducible tissue configuration in the context of an underlying robust, self-organizing structure, and account for the simultaneous regularity and flexibility of vascular tissue patterns. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mantle dynamics following supercontinent formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Philip J.

    This thesis presents mantle convection numerical simulations of supercontinent formation. Approximately 300 million years ago, through the large-scale subduction of oceanic sea floor, continental material amalgamated to form the supercontinent Pangea. For 100 million years after its formation, Pangea remained relatively stationary, and subduction of oceanic material featured on its margins. The present-day location of the continents is due to the rifting apart of Pangea, with supercontinent dispersal being characterized by increased volcanic activity linked to the generation of deep mantle plumes. The work presented here investigates the thermal evolution of mantle dynamics (e.g., mantle temperatures and sub-continental plumes) following the formation of a supercontinent. Specifically, continental insulation and continental margin subduction are analyzed. Continental material, as compared to oceanic material, inhibits heat flow from the mantle. Previous numerical simulations have shown that the formation of a stationary supercontinent would elevate sub-continental mantle temperatures due to the effect of continental insulation, leading to the break-up of the continent. By modelling a vigorously convecting mantle that features thermally and mechanically distinct continental and oceanic plates, this study shows the effect of continental insulation on the mantle to be minimal. However, the formation of a supercontinent results in sub-continental plume formation due to the re-positioning of subduction zones to the margins of the continent. Accordingly, it is demonstrated that continental insulation is not a significant factor in producing sub-supercontinent plumes but that subduction patterns control the location and timing of upwelling formation. A theme throughout the thesis is an inquiry into why geodynamic studies would produce different results. Mantle viscosity, Rayleigh number, continental size, continental insulation, and oceanic plate boundary evolution are

  8. Spatio-temporal pattern formation, fractals, and chaos in conceptual ecological models as applied to coupled plankton-fish dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvinskii, Aleksandr B; Tikhonova, Irina A; Tikhonov, D A; Ivanitskii, Genrikh R; Petrovskii, Sergei V; Li, B.-L.; Venturino, E; Malchow, H

    2002-01-01

    The current turn-of-the-century period witnesses the intensive use of the bioproducts of the World Ocean while at the same time calling for precautions to preserve its ecological stability. This requires that biophysical processes in aquatic systems be comprehensively explored and new methods for monitoring their dynamics be developed. While aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems have much in common in terms of their mathematical description, there are essential differences between them. For example, the mobility of oceanic plankton is mainly controlled by diffusion processes, whereas terrestrial organisms naturally enough obey totally different laws. This paper is focused on the processes underlying the dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous plankton communities. We demonstrate that conceptual reaction-diffusion mathematical models are an appropriate tool for investigating both complex spatio-temporal plankton dynamics and the fractal properties of planktivorous fish school walks. (reviews of topical problems)

  9. Pattern formation and chaos in synergetic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haken, H

    1985-01-01

    A general approach to the reduction of the equations of systems composed of many subsystems of equations for, in general, few order parameters at instability points is sketched. As special case generalized Ginzburg-Landau equations are obtained. Recent results based on these equations, showing pattern formation in the convection instability and flames, are presented. Bifurcations from tori to other tori are treated, and some general conclusions are drawn. Analogies between fluid dynamics and lasers which led to the prediction of laser light chaos by Haken (1975) are pointed out. Finally the suspension of a class of discrete one-dimensional maps is discussed and explicitly presented for a typical case. 21 references.

  10. Study of pattern formation in multilayer adaptive network of phase oscillators in application to brain dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanov, Daniil V.; Nedaivozov, Vladimir O.; Makarov, Vladimir V.; Goremyko, Mikhail V.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2017-04-01

    In the report we study the mechanisms of phase synchronization in the model of adaptive network of Kuramoto phase oscillators and discuss the possibility of the further application of the obtained results for the analysis of the neural network of brain. In our theoretical study the model network represents itself as the multilayer structure, in which the links between the elements belonging to the different layers are arranged according to the competitive rule. In order to analyze the dynamical states of the multilayer network we calculate and compare the values of local and global order parameter, which describe the degree of coherence between the neighboring nodes and the elements over whole network, respectively. We find that the global synchronous dynamics takes place for the large values of the coupling strength and are characterized by the identical topology of the interacting layers and a homogeneous distribution of the link strength within each layer. We also show that the partial (or cluster) synchronization, occurs for the small values of the coupling strength, lead to the emergence of the scale-free topology, within the layers.

  11. Mechanical Model of Geometric Cell and Topological Algorithm for Cell Dynamics from Single-Cell to Formation of Monolayered Tissues with Pattern

    KAUST Repository

    Kachalo, Së ma; Naveed, Hammad; Cao, Youfang; Zhao, Jieling; Liang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    development, and other emerging behavior. Here we describe a cell model and an efficient geometric algorithm for studying the dynamic process of tissue formation in 2D (e.g. epithelial tissues). Our approach improves upon previous methods by incorporating

  12. Dynamic Skin Patterns in Cephalopods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. How

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cephalopods are unrivaled in the natural world in their ability to alter their visual appearance. These mollusks have evolved a complex system of dermal units under neural, hormonal, and muscular control to produce an astonishing variety of body patterns. With parallels to the pixels on a television screen, cephalopod chromatophores can be coordinated to produce dramatic, dynamic, and rhythmic displays, defined collectively here as “dynamic patterns.” This study examines the nature, context, and potential functions of dynamic patterns across diverse cephalopod taxa. Examples are presented for 21 species, including 11 previously unreported in the scientific literature. These range from simple flashing or flickering patterns, to highly complex passing wave patterns involving multiple skin fields.

  13. Dynamic Skin Patterns in Cephalopods

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Martin J.; Norman, Mark D.; Finn, Julian; Chung, Wen-Sung; Marshall, N. Justin

    2017-01-01

    Cephalopods are unrivaled in the natural world in their ability to alter their visual appearance. These mollusks have evolved a complex system of dermal units under neural, hormonal, and muscular control to produce an astonishing variety of body patterns. With parallels to the pixels on a television screen, cephalopod chromatophores can be coordinated to produce dramatic, dynamic, and rhythmic displays, defined collectively here as “dynamic patterns.” This study examines the nature, context, and potential functions of dynamic patterns across diverse cephalopod taxa. Examples are presented for 21 species, including 11 previously unreported in the scientific literature. These range from simple flashing or flickering patterns, to highly complex passing wave patterns involving multiple skin fields. PMID:28674500

  14. The physics of pattern formation at liquid interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, J.V.

    1991-06-01

    This report discusses the following physics of liquid interfaces: pattern formation; perturbing Saffman-Taylor flow with a small gap-gradient; scaling of radial patterns in a viscoelastic solution; dynamic surface tension at an interface between miscible liquids; and random systems

  15. Nonlinear waves and pattern dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2018-01-01

    This book addresses the fascinating phenomena associated with nonlinear waves and spatio-temporal patterns. These appear almost everywhere in nature from sand bed forms to brain patterns, and yet their understanding still presents fundamental scientific challenges. The reader will learn here, in particular, about the current state-of-the art and new results in: Nonlinear water waves: resonance, solitons, focusing, Bose-Einstein condensation, as well as and their relevance for the sea environment (sea-wind interaction, sand bed forms, fiber clustering) Pattern formation in non-equilibrium media: soap films, chimera patterns in oscillating media, viscoelastic Couette-Taylor flow, flow in the wake behind a heated cylinder, other pattern formation. The editors and authors dedicate this book to the memory of Alexander Ezersky, Professor of Fluid Mechanics at the University of Caen Normandie (France) from September 2007 to July 2016. Before 2007, he had served as a Senior Scientist at the Institute of Applied Physi...

  16. Separation vortices and pattern formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Schnipper, Teis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper examples are given of the importance of flow separation for fluid patterns at moderate Reynolds numbers—both in the stationary and in the time-dependent domain. In the case of circular hydraulic jumps, it has been shown recently that it is possible to generalise the Prandtl–Kármán–P...... results for the vortex patterns behind a flapping foil in a flowing soap film, which shows the interaction and competition between the vortices shed from the round leading edge (like the von Kármán vortex street) and those created at the sharp trailing edge....

  17. Patterns and Interfaces in Dissipative Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pismen, L.M

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous pattern formation in nonlinear dissipative systems far from equilibrium is a paradigmatic case of emergent behaviour associated with complex systems. It is encountered in a great variety of settings, both in nature and technology, and has numerous applications ranging from nonlinear optics through solid and fluid mechanics, physical chemistry and chemical engineering to biology. Nature creates its variety of forms through spontaneous pattern formation and self-assembly, and this strategy is likely to be imitated by future biomorphic technologies. This book is a first-hand account by one of the leading players in this field, which gives in-depth descriptions of analytical methods elucidating the complex evolution of nonlinear dissipative systems, and brings the reader to the forefront of current research. The introductory chapter on the theory of dynamical systems is written with a view to applications of its powerful methods to spatial and spatio-temporal patterns. It is followed by two chapters t...

  18. A theory of biological pattern formation

    OpenAIRE

    Gierer, Alfred; Meinhardt, H.

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses the formation of striking patterns within originally near-homogenous tissue, the process prototypical for embryology, and represented in particularly puristic form by cut sections of hydra regenerating a complete animal with head and foot. Essential requirements are autocatalytic, self-enhancing activation, combined with inhibitory or depletion effects of wider range - “lateral inhibition”. Not only de-novo-pattern formation, but also well known, striking features of devel...

  19. Blood drop patterns: Formation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoyang; Zhang, Liyuan; Zang, Duyang; Shen, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The drying of a drop of blood or plasma on a solid substrate leads to the formation of interesting and complex patterns. Inter- and intra-cellular and macromolecular interactions in the drying plasma or blood drop are responsible for the final morphologies of the dried patterns. Changes in these cellular and macromolecular components in blood caused by diseases have been suspected to cause changes in the dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood, which could be used as simple diagnostic tools to identify the health of humans and livestock. However, complex physicochemical driving forces involved in the pattern formation are not fully understood. This review focuses on the scientific development in microscopic observations and pattern interpretation of dried plasma and whole blood samples, as well as the diagnostic applications of pattern analysis. Dried drop patterns of plasma consist of intricate visible cracks in the outer region and fine structures in the central region, which are mainly influenced by the presence and concentration of inorganic salts and proteins during drying. The shrinkage of macromolecular gel and its adhesion to the substrate surface have been thought to be responsible for the formation of the cracks. Dried drop patterns of whole blood have three characteristic zones; their formation as functions of drying time has been reported in the literature. Some research works have applied engineering treatment to the evaporation process of whole blood samples. The sensitivities of the resultant patterns to the relative humidity of the environment, the wettability of the substrates, and the size of the drop have been reported. These research works shed light on the mechanisms of spreading, evaporation, gelation, and crack formation of the blood drops on solid substrates, as well as on the potential applications of dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood in diagnosis. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Boundary-induced pattern formation from uniform temporal oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohsokabe, Takahiro; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2018-04-01

    Pattern dynamics triggered by fixing a boundary is investigated. By considering a reaction-diffusion equation that has a unique spatially uniform and limit cycle attractor under a periodic or Neumann boundary condition, and then by choosing a fixed boundary condition, we found three novel phases depending on the ratio of diffusion constants of activator to inhibitor: transformation of temporally periodic oscillation into a spatially periodic fixed pattern, travelling wave emitted from the boundary, and aperiodic spatiotemporal dynamics. The transformation into a fixed, periodic pattern is analyzed by crossing of local nullclines at each spatial point, shifted by diffusion terms, as is analyzed by using recursive equations, to obtain the spatial pattern as an attractor. The generality of the boundary-induced pattern formation as well as its relevance to biological morphogenesis is discussed.

  1. The dynamics of fragment formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, D.

    1994-09-01

    We demonstrate that in the Quantum Molecular Dynamics model, dynamical correlations can result in the production rate for final state nucleon clusters (and hence composite fragments) being higher than would be expected if statistics and the available phase space were dominant in determining composite formation. An intranuclear cascade or a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model, combined with a statistical approach in the late stage of the collision to determine composites, provides an equivalent description only under limited conditions of centrality and beam energy. We use data on participant fragment production in Au + Au collisions in the Bevalac's BOS time projection chamber to map out the parameter space where statistical clustering provides a good description. In particular, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to 4 He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity and beam energy

  2. Pattern formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parsek, Matthew R.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria are capable of forming elaborate multicellular communities called biofilms. Pattern formation in biofilms depends on cell proliferation and cellular migration in response to the available nutrients and other external cues, as well as on self-generated intercellular signal molecules...... and the production of an extracellular matrix that serves as a structural 'scaffolding' for the biofilm cells. Pattern formation in biofilms allows cells to position themselves favorably within nutrient gradients and enables buildup and maintenance of physiologically distinct subpopulations, which facilitates...... survival of one or more subpopulations upon environmental insult, and therefore plays an important role in the innate tolerance displayed by biofilms toward adverse conditions....

  3. Extracellular matrix dynamics during vertebrate axis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czirók, András; Rongish, Brenda J; Little, Charles D

    2004-04-01

    The first evidence for the dynamics of in vivo extracellular matrix (ECM) pattern formation during embryogenesis is presented below. Fibrillin 2 filaments were tracked for 12 h throughout the avian intraembryonic mesoderm using automated light microscopy and algorithms of our design. The data show that these ECM filaments have a reproducible morphogenic destiny that is characterized by directed transport. Fibrillin 2 particles initially deposited in the segmental plate mesoderm are translocated along an unexpected trajectory where they eventually polymerize into an intricate scaffold of cables parallel to the anterior-posterior axis. The cables coalesce near the midline before the appearance of the next-formed somite. Moreover, the ECM filaments define global tissue movements with high precision because the filaments act as passive motion tracers. Quantification of individual and collective filament "behaviors" establish fate maps, trajectories, and velocities. These data reveal a caudally propagating traveling wave pattern in the morphogenetic movements of early axis formation. We conjecture that within vertebrate embryos, long-range mechanical tension fields are coupled to both large-scale patterning and local organization of the ECM. Thus, physical forces or stress fields are essential requirements for executing an emergent developmental pattern-in this case, paraxial fibrillin cable assembly.

  4. Visualizing Dynamic Bitcoin Transaction Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, Dan; Birch, David; Akroyd, David; Molina-Solana, Miguel; Guo, Yike; Knottenbelt, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This work presents a systemic top-down visualization of Bitcoin transaction activity to explore dynamically generated patterns of algorithmic behavior. Bitcoin dominates the cryptocurrency markets and presents researchers with a rich source of real-time transactional data. The pseudonymous yet public nature of the data presents opportunities for the discovery of human and algorithmic behavioral patterns of interest to many parties such as financial regulators, protocol designers, and security analysts. However, retaining visual fidelity to the underlying data to retain a fuller understanding of activity within the network remains challenging, particularly in real time. We expose an effective force-directed graph visualization employed in our large-scale data observation facility to accelerate this data exploration and derive useful insight among domain experts and the general public alike. The high-fidelity visualizations demonstrated in this article allowed for collaborative discovery of unexpected high frequency transaction patterns, including automated laundering operations, and the evolution of multiple distinct algorithmic denial of service attacks on the Bitcoin network. PMID:27441715

  5. Visualizing Dynamic Bitcoin Transaction Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, Dan; Birch, David; Akroyd, David; Molina-Solana, Miguel; Guo, Yike; Knottenbelt, William J

    2016-06-01

    This work presents a systemic top-down visualization of Bitcoin transaction activity to explore dynamically generated patterns of algorithmic behavior. Bitcoin dominates the cryptocurrency markets and presents researchers with a rich source of real-time transactional data. The pseudonymous yet public nature of the data presents opportunities for the discovery of human and algorithmic behavioral patterns of interest to many parties such as financial regulators, protocol designers, and security analysts. However, retaining visual fidelity to the underlying data to retain a fuller understanding of activity within the network remains challenging, particularly in real time. We expose an effective force-directed graph visualization employed in our large-scale data observation facility to accelerate this data exploration and derive useful insight among domain experts and the general public alike. The high-fidelity visualizations demonstrated in this article allowed for collaborative discovery of unexpected high frequency transaction patterns, including automated laundering operations, and the evolution of multiple distinct algorithmic denial of service attacks on the Bitcoin network.

  6. Rethinking pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halatek, J.; Frey, E.

    2018-05-01

    The present theoretical framework for the analysis of pattern formation in complex systems is mostly limited to the vicinity of fixed (global) equilibria. Here we present a new theoretical approach to characterize dynamical states arbitrarily far from (global) equilibrium. We show that reaction-diffusion systems that are driven by locally mass-conserving interactions can be understood in terms of local equilibria of diffusively coupled compartments. Diffusive coupling generically induces lateral redistribution of the globally conserved quantities, and the variable local amounts of these quantities determine the local equilibria in each compartment. We find that, even far from global equilibrium, the system is well characterized by its moving local equilibria. We apply this framework to in vitro Min protein pattern formation, a paradigmatic model for biological pattern formation. Within our framework we can predict and explain transitions between chemical turbulence and order arbitrarily far from global equilibrium. Our results reveal conceptually new principles of self-organized pattern formation that may well govern diverse dynamical systems.

  7. Pattern formation in superdiffusion Oregonator model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Fan; Yan, Jia; Liu, Fu-Cheng; He, Ya-Feng

    2016-10-01

    Pattern formations in an Oregonator model with superdiffusion are studied in two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulations. Stability analyses are performed by applying Fourier and Laplace transforms to the space fractional reaction-diffusion systems. Antispiral, stable turing patterns, and travelling patterns are observed by changing the diffusion index of the activator. Analyses of Floquet multipliers show that the limit cycle solution loses stability at the wave number of the primitive vector of the travelling hexagonal pattern. We also observed a transition between antispiral and spiral by changing the diffusion index of the inhibitor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205044 and 11405042), the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. Y2012009 and ZD2015025), the Program for Young Principal Investigators of Hebei Province, China, and the Midwest Universities Comprehensive Strength Promotion Project.

  8. Dynamics-based sequential memory: Winnerless competition of patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seliger, Philip; Tsimring, Lev S.; Rabinovich, Mikhail I.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a biologically motivated dynamical principle of sequential memory which is based on winnerless competition (WLC) of event images. This mechanism is implemented in a two-layer neural model of sequential spatial memory. We present the learning dynamics which leads to the formation of a WLC network. After learning, the system is capable of associative retrieval of prerecorded sequences of patterns

  9. Emergent pattern formation in an interstitial biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachreson, Cameron; Wolff, Christian; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Toth, Milos

    2017-01-01

    Collective behavior of bacterial colonies plays critical roles in adaptability, survivability, biofilm expansion and infection. We employ an individual-based model of an interstitial biofilm to study emergent pattern formation based on the assumptions that rod-shaped bacteria furrow through a viscous environment and excrete extracellular polymeric substances which bias their rate of motion. Because the bacteria furrow through their environment, the substratum stiffness is a key control parameter behind the formation of distinct morphological patterns. By systematically varying this property (which we quantify with a stiffness coefficient γ ), we show that subtle changes in the substratum stiffness can give rise to a stable state characterized by a high degree of local order and long-range pattern formation. The ordered state exhibits characteristics typically associated with bacterial fitness advantages, even though it is induced by changes in environmental conditions rather than changes in biological parameters. Our findings are applicable to a broad range of biofilms and provide insights into the relationship between bacterial movement and their environment, and basic mechanisms behind self-organization of biophysical systems.

  10. Pattern formation on Ge by low energy ion beam erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichmann, Marc; Lorbeer, Jan; Frost, Frank; Rauschenbach, Bernd; Ziberi, Bashkim

    2013-01-01

    Modification of nanoscale surface topography is inherent to low-energy ion beam erosion processes and is one of the most important fields of nanotechnology. In this report a comprehensive study of surface smoothing and self-organized pattern formation on Ge(100) by using different noble gases ion beam erosion is presented. The investigations focus on low ion energies (⩽ 2000 eV) and include the entire range of ion incidence angles. It is found that for ions (Ne, Ar) with masses lower than the mass of the Ge target atoms, no pattern formation occurs and surface smoothing is observed for all angles of ion incidence. In contrast, for erosion with higher mass ions (Kr, Xe), ripple formation starts at incidence angles of about 65° depending on ion energy. At smaller incident angles surface smoothing occurs again. Investigations of the surface dynamics for specific ion incidence angles by changing the ion fluence over two orders of magnitude gives a clear evidence for coarsening and faceting of the surface pattern. Both observations indicate that gradient-dependent sputtering and reflection of primary ions play crucial role in the pattern evolution, just at the lowest accessible fluences. The results are discussed in relation to recently proposed redistributive or stress-induced models for pattern formation. In addition, it is argued that a large angular variation of the sputter yield and reflected primary ions can significantly contribute to pattern formation and evolution as nonlinear and non-local processes as supported by simulation of sputtering and ion reflection. (paper)

  11. Pore Scale Dynamics of Microemulsion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal, Evren; Broens, Marc; Armstrong, Ryan T

    2016-07-19

    Experiments in various porous media have shown that multiple parameters come into play when an oleic phase is displaced by an aqueous solution of surfactant. In general, the displacement efficiency is improved when the fluids become quasi-miscible. Understanding the phase behavior oil/water/surfactant systems is important because microemulsion has the ability to generate ultralow interfacial tension (microemulsion formation and the resulting properties under equilibrium conditions. However, the majority of applications where microemulsion is present also involve flow, which has received relatively less attention. It is commonly assumed that the characteristics of an oil/water/surfactant system under flowing conditions are identical to the one under equilibrium conditions. Here, we show that this is not necessarily the case. We studied the equilibrium phase behavior of a model system consisting of n-decane and an aqueous solution of olefin sulfonate surfactant, which has practical applications for enhanced oil recovery. The salt content of the aqueous solution was varied to provide a range of different microemulsion compositions and oil-water interfacial tensions. We then performed microfluidic flow experiments to study the dynamic in situ formation of microemulsion by coinjecting bulk fluids of n-decane and surfactant solution into a T-junction capillary geometry. A solvatochromatic fluorescent dye was used to obtain spatially resolved compositional information. In this way, we visualized the microemulsion formation and the flow of it along with the excess phases. A complex interaction between the flow patterns and the microemulsion properties was observed. The formation of microemulsion influenced the flow regimes, and the flow regimes affected the characteristics of the microemulsion formation. In particular, at low flow rates, slug flow was observed, which had profound consequences on the pore scale mixing behavior and resulting microemulsion properties.

  12. Pattern formation, logistics, and maximum path probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkaldy, J. S.

    1985-05-01

    The concept of pattern formation, which to current researchers is a synonym for self-organization, carries the connotation of deductive logic together with the process of spontaneous inference. Defining a pattern as an equivalence relation on a set of thermodynamic objects, we establish that a large class of irreversible pattern-forming systems, evolving along idealized quasisteady paths, approaches the stable steady state as a mapping upon the formal deductive imperatives of a propositional function calculus. In the preamble the classical reversible thermodynamics of composite systems is analyzed as an externally manipulated system of space partitioning and classification based on ideal enclosures and diaphragms. The diaphragms have discrete classification capabilities which are designated in relation to conserved quantities by descriptors such as impervious, diathermal, and adiabatic. Differentiability in the continuum thermodynamic calculus is invoked as equivalent to analyticity and consistency in the underlying class or sentential calculus. The seat of inference, however, rests with the thermodynamicist. In the transition to an irreversible pattern-forming system the defined nature of the composite reservoirs remains, but a given diaphragm is replaced by a pattern-forming system which by its nature is a spontaneously evolving volume partitioner and classifier of invariants. The seat of volition or inference for the classification system is thus transferred from the experimenter or theoretician to the diaphragm, and with it the full deductive facility. The equivalence relations or partitions associated with the emerging patterns may thus be associated with theorems of the natural pattern-forming calculus. The entropy function, together with its derivatives, is the vehicle which relates the logistics of reservoirs and diaphragms to the analog logistics of the continuum. Maximum path probability or second-order differentiability of the entropy in isolation are

  13. MEDICAL STUDENTS’ FEEDBACK ABOUT FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT PATTERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navajothi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pharmacology is the toughest subject in the II MBBS syllabus. Students have to memorise a lot about the drugs’ name and classification. We are conducting internal assessment exams after completion of each system. Number of failures will be more than 60% in the internal assessments conducted during first six months of II MBBS course. AIM To assess the formative assessment pattern followed in our institution with the students’ feedback and modify the pattern according to the students’ feedback. SETTINGS & DESIGN Prospective Observational Study conducted at Department of Pharmacology, Government Sivagangai Medical College, Sivagangai, Tamil Nadu. MATERIALS AND METHODS Questionnaire was prepared and distributed to the 300 students of Government Sivagangai Medical College and feedback was collected. Data collected was analysed in Microsoft Excel 2007 version. RESULTS Received feedback from 274 students. Most (80% of the students wanted to attend the tests in all systems. Monthly assessment test was preferred by 47% of the students. Students who preferred to finish tests before holidays was 57%. Most (56% of the students preferred tests for 1 hour. Multiple choice question (MCQ type was preferred by 43%, which is not a routine question pattern. Only 7% preferred viva. Recall type of questions was preferred by 41% of the students. CONCLUSION In our institution, internal assessment is conducted as per the students’ mind setup. As the feedback has been the generally followed one, we will add MCQs in the forthcoming tests. Application type questions will be asked for more marks than Recall type of questions.

  14. Analysis of pattern formation in systems with competing range interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, H J; Misko, V R; Peeters, F M

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed pattern formation and identified various morphologies in a system of particles interacting through a non-monotonic potential with a competing range interaction characterized by a repulsive core (r c ) and an attractive tail (r > r c ), using molecular-dynamics simulations. Depending on parameters, the interaction potential models the inter-particle interaction in various physical systems ranging from atoms, molecules and colloids to vortices in low κ type-II superconductors and in recently discovered ‘type-1.5’ superconductors. We constructed a ‘morphology diagram’ in the plane ‘critical radius r c -density n’ and proposed a new approach to characterizing the different types of patterns. Namely, we elaborated a set of quantitative criteria in order to identify the different pattern types, using the radial distribution function (RDF), the local density function and the occupation factor. (paper)

  15. Extrasolar planets formation, detection and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    This latest, up-to-date resource for research on extrasolar planets covers formation, dynamics, atmospheres and detection. After a look at the formation of giant planets, the book goes on to discuss the formation and dynamics of planets in resonances, planets in double stars, atmospheres and habitable zones, detection via spectra and transits, and the history and prospects of ESPs as well as satellite projects.Edited by a renowned expert in solar system dynamics with chapters written by the leading experts in the method described -- from the US and Europe -- this is an ideal textbook for g

  16. Pattern formation of frictional fingers in a gravitational potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Jon Alm; Toussaint, Renaud; Mâløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik; Galland, Olivier; Sandnes, Bjørnar

    2018-01-01

    Aligned finger structures, with a characteristic width, emerge during the slow drainage of a liquid-granular mixture in a tilted Hele-Shaw cell. A transition from vertical to horizontal alignment of the finger structures is observed as the tilting angle and the granular density are varied. An analytical model is presented, demonstrating that the alignment properties are the result of the competition between fluctuating granular stresses and the hydrostatic pressure. The dynamics is reproduced in simulations. We also show how the system explains patterns observed in nature, created during the early stages of a dike formation.

  17. Influence of phase transition on pattern formation during catalytic reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Roberto Fernandes Silva; Lima, D.; Cunha, F. B.

    2000-01-01

    p.434–445 We investigate the influence of the order of surface phase transitions on pattern formation during chemical reaction on mono-crystal catalysts. We use a model consisting of two partial differential equations, one of which describes the dynamics of the surface state with the help of a Ginzburg–Landau potential. Second- or first-order transitions are described by decreasing or increasing the relative value of the third-order coefficient of the potential. We concentrate on the stabi...

  18. Numerical approaches to model perturbation fire in turing pattern formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, R.; Brancaccio, M.; Cuomo, S.; Mazzoleni, S.; Russo, L.; Siettos, K.; Giannino, F.

    2017-11-01

    Turing patterns were observed in chemical, physical and biological systems described by coupled reaction-diffusion equations. Several models have been formulated proposing the water as the causal mechanism of vegetation pattern formation, but this isn't an exhaustive hypothesis in some natural environments. An alternative explanation has been related to the plant-soil negative feedback. In Marasco et al. [1] the authors explored the hypothesis that both mechanisms contribute in the formation of regular and irregular vegetation patterns. The mathematical model consists in three partial differential equations (PDEs) that take into account for a dynamic balance between biomass, water and toxic compounds. A numerical approach is mandatory also to investigate on the predictions of this kind of models. In this paper we start from the mathematical model described in [1], set the model parameters such that the biomass reaches a stable spatial pattern (spots) and present preliminary studies about the occurrence of perturbing events, such as wildfire, that can affect the regularity of the biomass configuration.

  19. Pattern Formation in Predator-Prey Model with Delay and Cross Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinze Lian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the effect of time delay and cross diffusion on the dynamics of a modified Leslie-Gower predator-prey model incorporating a prey refuge. Based on the stability analysis, we demonstrate that delayed feedback may generate Hopf and Turing instability under some conditions, resulting in spatial patterns. One of the most interesting findings is that the model exhibits complex pattern replication: the model dynamics exhibits a delay and diffusion controlled formation growth not only to spots, stripes, and holes, but also to spiral pattern self-replication. The results indicate that time delay and cross diffusion play important roles in pattern formation.

  20. Percolator: Scalable Pattern Discovery in Dynamic Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Sutanay; Purohit, Sumit; Lin, Peng; Wu, Yinghui; Holder, Lawrence B.; Agarwal, Khushbu

    2018-02-06

    We demonstrate Percolator, a distributed system for graph pattern discovery in dynamic graphs. In contrast to conventional mining systems, Percolator advocates efficient pattern mining schemes that (1) support pattern detection with keywords; (2) integrate incremental and parallel pattern mining; and (3) support analytical queries such as trend analysis. The core idea of Percolator is to dynamically decide and verify a small fraction of patterns and their in- stances that must be inspected in response to buffered updates in dynamic graphs, with a total mining cost independent of graph size. We demonstrate a) the feasibility of incremental pattern mining by walking through each component of Percolator, b) the efficiency and scalability of Percolator over the sheer size of real-world dynamic graphs, and c) how the user-friendly GUI of Percolator inter- acts with users to support keyword-based queries that detect, browse and inspect trending patterns. We also demonstrate two user cases of Percolator, in social media trend analysis and academic collaboration analysis, respectively.

  1. Pattern formation in rotating Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantz, M.; Friedrich, R.; Bestehorn, M.; Haken, H.

    1992-12-01

    Using an extension of the Swift-Hohenberg equation we study pattern formation in the Bénard experiment close to the onset of convection in the case of rotating cylindrical fluid containers. For small Taylor numbers we emphasize the existence of slowly rotating patterns and describe behaviour exhibiting defect motion. Finally, we study pattern formation close to the Küppers-Lortz instability. The instability is nucleated at defects and proceeds through front propagation into the bulk patterns.

  2. Pattern formation by dewetting and evaporating sedimenting suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibi, M.; Moller, P.; Fall, A.; Rafaï, S.; Bonn, D.

    2012-01-01

    Pattern formation from drying droplets containing sedimenting particles and dewetting of thin films of such suspensions was studied. The dewetting causes the formation of finger-like patterns near the contact line which leave behind a deposit of branches. We find that the strikingly low speed of

  3. Pattern recognition in molecular dynamics. [FORTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, W H; Schieve, W C [Texas Univ., Austin (USA)

    1977-07-01

    An algorithm for the recognition of the formation of bound molecular states in the computer simulation of a dilute gas is presented. Applications to various related problems in physics and chemistry are pointed out. Data structure and decision processes are described. Performance of the FORTRAN program based on the algorithm in cooperation with the molecular dynamics program is described and the results are presented.

  4. Regular pattern formation in real ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietkerk, Max; Koppel, Johan van de

    2008-01-01

    Localized ecological interactions can generate striking large-scale spatial patterns in ecosystems through spatial self-organization. Possible mechanisms include oscillating consumer–resource interactions, localized disturbance-recovery processes and scale-dependent feedback. Despite abundant

  5. Multidimensional biochemical information processing of dynamical patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2018-02-01

    Cells receive signaling molecules by receptors and relay information via sensory networks so that they can respond properly depending on the type of signal. Recent studies have shown that cells can extract multidimensional information from dynamical concentration patterns of signaling molecules. We herein study how biochemical systems can process multidimensional information embedded in dynamical patterns. We model the decoding networks by linear response functions, and optimize the functions with the calculus of variations to maximize the mutual information between patterns and output. We find that, when the noise intensity is lower, decoders with different linear response functions, i.e., distinct decoders, can extract much information. However, when the noise intensity is higher, distinct decoders do not provide the maximum amount of information. This indicates that, when transmitting information by dynamical patterns, embedding information in multiple patterns is not optimal when the noise intensity is very large. Furthermore, we explore the biochemical implementations of these decoders using control theory and demonstrate that these decoders can be implemented biochemically through the modification of cascade-type networks, which are prevalent in actual signaling pathways.

  6. Pattern formation in reaction diffusion systems with finite geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzi, C.; Wio, H.

    1990-04-01

    We analyze the one-component, one-dimensional, reaction-diffusion equation through a simple inverse method. We confine the system and fix the boundary conditions as to induce pattern formation. We analyze the stability of those patterns. Our goal is to get information about the reaction term out of the preknowledgment of the pattern. (author). 5 refs

  7. Formation of periodic and localized patterns in an oscillating granular layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranson, I.; Tsimring, L. S.; Materials Science Division; Bar Ilan Univ.; Univ. of California at San Diego

    1998-02-01

    A simple phenomenological model for pattern formation in a vertically vibrated layer of granular particles is proposed. This model exhibits a variety of stable cellular patterns including standing rolls and squares as well as localized excitations (oscillons and worms), similar to recent experimental observations (Umbanhowar et al., 1996). The model is an order parameter equation for the parametrically excited waves coupled to the mass conservation law. The structure and dynamics of the solutions resemble closely the properties of patterns observed in the experiments.

  8. Dynamical patterns of cattle trade movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bajardi

    Full Text Available Despite their importance for the spread of zoonotic diseases, our understanding of the dynamical aspects characterizing the movements of farmed animal populations remains limited as these systems are traditionally studied as static objects and through simplified approximations. By leveraging on the network science approach, here we are able for the first time to fully analyze the longitudinal dataset of Italian cattle movements that reports the mobility of individual animals among farms on a daily basis. The complexity and inter-relations between topology, function and dynamical nature of the system are characterized at different spatial and time resolutions, in order to uncover patterns and vulnerabilities fundamental for the definition of targeted prevention and control measures for zoonotic diseases. Results show how the stationarity of statistical distributions coexists with a strong and non-trivial evolutionary dynamics at the node and link levels, on all timescales. Traditional static views of the displacement network hide important patterns of structural changes affecting nodes' centrality and farms' spreading potential, thus limiting the efficiency of interventions based on partial longitudinal information. By fully taking into account the longitudinal dimension, we propose a novel definition of dynamical motifs that is able to uncover the presence of a temporal arrow describing the evolution of the system and the causality patterns of its displacements, shedding light on mechanisms that may play a crucial role in the definition of preventive actions.

  9. Nonlinear pattern formation of Faraday waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binks, D.J.; Water, van de W.

    1997-01-01

    A cascade of surface wave patterns with increasing rotational symmetry ranging from simple square to tenfold quasiperiodic is observed for Faraday waves. The experiment concerns the excitation of subharmonic standing surface waves by oscillating vertical acceleration. Our observation agrees with the

  10. Pattern formation - Instabilities in sand ripples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. L.; v. Hecke, M.; Haaning, A.

    2001-01-01

    Sand ripples are seen below shallow wavy water and are formed whenever water oscillates over a bed of sand. Here we analyse the instabilities that can upset this perfect patterning when the ripples are subjected to large changes in driving amplitude or frequency, causing them to deform both...

  11. Dynamic moire patterns for profilometry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Oliveira, G N [Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica, TEM/PGMEC, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Passos da Patria, 156, Niteroi, R.J., Cep.: 24.210-240 (Brazil); De Oliveira, M E; Dos Santos, P A M, E-mail: pams@if.uff.br [Instituto de Fisica, Laboratorio de Optica Nao-linear e Aplicada, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Nilton Tavares de Souza, s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, R.J., Cep.:24.210-346 (Brazil)

    2011-01-01

    In the present work is proposed that dynamic moire-like fringe patterns produced by photorefraction, with low spatial frequencies, could be used for profile determination of small objects. The Fourier transform profilometry technique is applied in the projected moire fringe pattern onto an object surface. Basically, the Fourier transform of the projected fringes is obtained. After that, a phase map is generated. Then, the optical profile of object is obtained using phase unwrapping. So, the entire process can be indicated to measure, with good accuracy degree, profile of small objects in sub-micrometer scale in optical mechanical systems.

  12. Formation of banded vegetation patterns resulted from interactions between sediment deposition and vegetation growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tousheng; Zhang, Huayong; Dai, Liming; Cong, Xuebing; Ma, Shengnan

    2018-03-01

    This research investigates the formation of banded vegetation patterns on hillslopes affected by interactions between sediment deposition and vegetation growth. The following two perspectives in the formation of these patterns are taken into consideration: (a) increased sediment deposition from plant interception, and (b) reduced plant biomass caused by sediment accumulation. A spatial model is proposed to describe how the interactions between sediment deposition and vegetation growth promote self-organization of banded vegetation patterns. Based on theoretical and numerical analyses of the proposed spatial model, vegetation bands can result from a Turing instability mechanism. The banded vegetation patterns obtained in this research resemble patterns reported in the literature. Moreover, measured by sediment dynamics, the variation of hillslope landform can be described. The model predicts how treads on hillslopes evolve with the banded patterns. Thus, we provide a quantitative interpretation for coevolution of vegetation patterns and landforms under effects of sediment redistribution. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman, E-mail: evelee@berkeley.edu [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  14. Tree island pattern formation in the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Joel; D'Odorico, P.; Engel, Victor C.; Redwine, Jed

    2016-01-01

    The Florida Everglades freshwater landscape exhibits a distribution of islands covered by woody vegetation and bordered by marshes and wet prairies. Known as “tree islands”, these ecogeomorphic features can be found in few other low gradient, nutrient limited freshwater wetlands. In the last few decades, however, a large percentage of tree islands have either shrank or disappeared in apparent response to altered water depths and other stressors associated with human impacts on the Everglades. Because the processes determining the formation and spatial organization of tree islands remain poorly understood, it is still unclear what controls the sensitivity of these landscapes to altered conditions. We hypothesize that positive feedbacks between woody plants and soil accretion are crucial to emergence and decline of tree islands. Likewise, positive feedbacks between phosphorus (P) accumulation and trees explain the P enrichment commonly observed in tree island soils. Here, we develop a spatially-explicit model of tree island formation and evolution, which accounts for these positive feedbacks (facilitation) as well as for long range competition and fire dynamics. It is found that tree island patterns form within a range of parameter values consistent with field data. Simulated impacts of reduced water levels, increased intensity of drought, and increased frequency of dry season/soil consuming fires on these feedback mechanisms result in the decline and disappearance of tree islands on the landscape.

  15. The formation of labyrinths, spots and stripe patterns in a biochemical approach to cardiovascular calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yochelis, A; Tintut, Y; Demer, L L; Garfinkel, A

    2008-01-01

    Calcification and mineralization are fundamental physiological processes, yet the mechanisms of calcification, in trabecular bone and in calcified lesions in atherosclerotic calcification, are unclear. Recently, it was shown in in vitro experiments that vascular-derived mesenchymal stem cells can display self-organized calcified patterns. These patterns were attributed to activator/inhibitor dynamics in the style of Turing, with bone morphogenetic protein 2 acting as an activator, and matrix GLA protein acting as an inhibitor. Motivated by this qualitative activator-inhibitor dynamics, we employ a prototype Gierer-Meinhardt model used in the context of activator-inhibitor-based biological pattern formation. Through a detailed analysis in one and two spatial dimensions, we explore the pattern formation mechanisms of steady state patterns, including their dependence on initial conditions. These patterns range from localized holes to labyrinths and localized peaks, or in other words, from dense to sparse activator distributions (respectively). We believe that an understanding of the wide spectrum of activator-inhibitor patterns discussed here is prerequisite to their biochemical control. The mechanisms of pattern formation suggest therapeutic strategies applicable to bone formation in atherosclerotic lesions in arteries (where it is pathological) and to the regeneration of trabecular bone (recapitulating normal physiological development)

  16. A Theoretical Model of Jigsaw-Puzzle Pattern Formation by Plant Leaf Epidermal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Akita, Kae; Takigawa-Imamura, Hisako; Yoshimura, Kenji; Miura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Plant leaf epidermal cells exhibit a jigsaw puzzle-like pattern that is generated by interdigitation of the cell wall during leaf development. The contribution of two ROP GTPases, ROP2 and ROP6, to the cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate epidermal cell wall interdigitation has already been examined; however, how interactions between these molecules result in pattern formation remains to be elucidated. Here, we propose a simple interface equation model that incorporates both the cell wall remodeling activity of ROP GTPases and the diffusible signaling molecules by which they are regulated. This model successfully reproduces pattern formation observed in vivo, and explains the counterintuitive experimental results of decreased cellulose production and increased thickness. Our model also reproduces the dynamics of three-way cell wall junctions. Therefore, this model provides a possible mechanism for cell wall interdigitation formation in vivo.

  17. [The physics of pattern formation at liquid interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses pattern formation at liquid interfaces and interfaces within disordered materials. The particular topics discussed are: a racetrack for competing viscous fingers; an experimental realization of periodic boundary conditions; what sets the length scale for patterns between miscible liquids; the fractal dimension of radial Hele-Shaw patterns; detailed analyses of low-contrast Saffman-Taylor flows; and the wetting/absorption properties of polystyrene spheres in binary liquid mixtures

  18. Wavenumber locking and pattern formation in spatially forced systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manor, Rotem; Meron, Ehud; Hagberg, Aric

    2009-01-01

    We study wavenumber locking and pattern formation resulting from weak spatially periodic one-dimensional forcing of two-dimensional systems. We consider systems that produce stationary or traveling stripe patterns when unforced and apply forcing aligned with the stripes. Forcing at close to twice the pattern wavenumber selects, stabilizes, or creates resonant stripes locked at half the forcing wavenumber. If the mismatch between the forcing and pattern wavenumber is high we find that the pattern still locks but develops a wave vector component perpendicular to the forcing direction and forms rectangular and oblique patterns. When the unforced system supports traveling waves, resonant rectangular patterns remain stationary but oblique patterns travel in a direction orthogonal to the traveling waves.

  19. Bifurcation, pattern formation and chaos in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayliss, A.; Matkowsky, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper problems in gaseous combustion and in gasless condensed phase combustion are studied both analytically and numerically. In gaseous combustion we consider the problem of a flame stabilized on a line source of fuel. The authors find both stationary and pulsating axisymmetric solutions as well as stationary and pulsating cellular solutions. The pulsating cellular solutions take the form of either traveling waves or standing waves. Transitions between these patterns occur as parameters related to the curvature of the flame front and the Lewis number are varied. In gasless condensed phase combustion both planar and nonplanar problems are studied. For planar condensed phase combustion we consider two models: accounts for melting and does not. Both models are shown to exhibit a transition from uniformly to pulsating propagating combustion when a parameter related to the activation energy is increased. Upon further increasing this parameter both models undergo a transition to chaos: by intermittency and by a period doubling sequence. In nonplanar condensed phase combustion the nonlinear development of a branch of standing wave solutions is studied and is shown to lead to relaxation oscillations and subsequently to a transition to quasi-periodicity

  20. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M. [Mathematical and Statistical Computing Laboratory, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Shvartsman, Stanislav Y. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  1. Cellular automaton modeling of biological pattern formation characterization, examples, and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Deutsch, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This text explores the use of cellular automata in modeling pattern formation in biological systems. It describes several mathematical modeling approaches utilizing cellular automata that can be used to study the dynamics of interacting cell systems both in simulation and in practice. New in this edition are chapters covering cell migration, tissue development, and cancer dynamics, as well as updated references and new research topic suggestions that reflect the rapid development of the field. The book begins with an introduction to pattern-forming principles in biology and the various mathematical modeling techniques that can be used to analyze them. Cellular automaton models are then discussed in detail for different types of cellular processes and interactions, including random movement, cell migration, adhesive cell interaction, alignment and cellular swarming, growth processes, pigment cell pattern formation, tissue development, tumor growth and invasion, and Turing-type patterns and excitable media. In ...

  2. Nonlinear Dynamics: Integrability, Chaos and Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grammaticos, B

    2004-01-01

    When the editorial office of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General of the Institute of Physics Publishing asked me to review a book on nonlinear dynamics I experienced an undeniable apprehension. Indeed, the domain is a rapidly expanding one and writing a book aiming at a certain degree of completeness looks like an almost impossible task. My uneasiness abated somewhat when I saw the names of the authors, two well-known specialists of the nonlinear domain, but it was only when I held the book in my hands that I felt really reassured. The book is not just a review of the recent (and less so) findings on nonlinear systems. It is also a textbook. The authors set out to provide a detailed, step by step, introduction to the domain of nonlinearity and its various subdomains: chaos, integrability and pattern formation (although this last topic is treated with far less detail than the other two). The public they have in mind is obviously that of university students, graduate or undergraduate, who are interested in nonlinear phenomena. I suspect that a non-negligible portion of readers will be people who have to teach topics which figure among those included in the book: they will find this monograph an excellent companion to their course. The book is written in a pedagogical way, with a profusion of examples, detailed explanations and clear diagrams. The point of view is that of a physicist, which to my eyes is a major advantage. The mathematical formulation remains simple and perfectly intelligible. Thus the reader is not bogged down by fancy mathematical formalism, which would have discouraged the less experienced ones. A host of exercises accompanies every chapter. This will give the novice the occasion to develop his/her problem-solving skills and acquire competence in the use of nonlinear techniques. Some exercises are quite straightforward, like 'verify the relation 14.81'. Others are less so, such as 'prepare a write-up on a) frequency-locking and b) devil

  3. Nonlinear Dynamics: Integrability, Chaos and Patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grammaticos, B [GMPIB, Universite Paris VII, Tour 24--14, 5e etage, Case 7021, 75251 Paris (France)

    2004-02-06

    When the editorial office of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General of the Institute of Physics Publishing asked me to review a book on nonlinear dynamics I experienced an undeniable apprehension. Indeed, the domain is a rapidly expanding one and writing a book aiming at a certain degree of completeness looks like an almost impossible task. My uneasiness abated somewhat when I saw the names of the authors, two well-known specialists of the nonlinear domain, but it was only when I held the book in my hands that I felt really reassured. The book is not just a review of the recent (and less so) findings on nonlinear systems. It is also a textbook. The authors set out to provide a detailed, step by step, introduction to the domain of nonlinearity and its various subdomains: chaos, integrability and pattern formation (although this last topic is treated with far less detail than the other two). The public they have in mind is obviously that of university students, graduate or undergraduate, who are interested in nonlinear phenomena. I suspect that a non-negligible portion of readers will be people who have to teach topics which figure among those included in the book: they will find this monograph an excellent companion to their course. The book is written in a pedagogical way, with a profusion of examples, detailed explanations and clear diagrams. The point of view is that of a physicist, which to my eyes is a major advantage. The mathematical formulation remains simple and perfectly intelligible. Thus the reader is not bogged down by fancy mathematical formalism, which would have discouraged the less experienced ones. A host of exercises accompanies every chapter. This will give the novice the occasion to develop his/her problem-solving skills and acquire competence in the use of nonlinear techniques. Some exercises are quite straightforward, like 'verify the relation 14.81'. Others are less so, such as 'prepare a write-up on a) frequency

  4. E × B shear pattern formation by radial propagation of heat flux waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosuga, Y., E-mail: kosuga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); IAS and RIAM, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); CASS and CMTFO, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Dif-Pradalier, G. [CEA, IRFM, Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Gürcan, Ö. D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

    2014-05-15

    A novel theory to describe the formation of E×B flow patterns by radially propagating heat flux waves is presented. A model for heat avalanche dynamics is extended to include a finite delay time between the instantaneous heat flux and the mean flux, based on an analogy between heat avalanche dynamics and traffic flow dynamics. The response time introduced here is an analogue of the drivers' response time in traffic dynamics. The microscopic foundation for the time delay is the time for mixing of the phase space density. The inclusion of the finite response time changes the model equation for avalanche dynamics from Burgers equation to a nonlinear telegraph equation. Based on the telegraph equation, the formation of heat flux jams is predicted. The growth rate and typical interval of jams are calculated. The connection of the jam interval to the typical step size of the E×B staircase is discussed.

  5. THE RELATION BETWEEN DYNAMICS AND STAR FORMATION IN BARRED GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Garcia, Eric E.; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze optical and near-infrared data of a sample of 11 barred spiral galaxies, in order to establish a connection between star formation and bar/spiral dynamics. We find that 22 regions located in the bars and 20 regions in the spiral arms beyond the end of the bar present azimuthal color/age gradients that may be attributed to star formation triggering. Assuming a circular motion dynamic model, we compare the observed age gradient candidates with stellar population synthesis models. A link can then be established with the disk dynamics that allows us to obtain parameters like the pattern speed of the bar or spiral as well as the positions of resonance radii. We subsequently compare the derived pattern speeds with those expected from theoretical and observational results in the literature (e.g., bars ending near corotation). We find a tendency to overestimate bar pattern speeds derived from color gradients in the bar at small radii, away from corotation; this trend can be attributed to non-circular motions of the young stars born in the bar region. In spiral regions, we find that ∼50% of the color gradient candidates are 'inverse', i.e., with the direction of stellar aging contrary to that of rotation. The other half of the gradients found in spiral arms have stellar ages that increase in the same sense as rotation. Of the nine objects with gradients in both bars and spirals, six (67%) appear to have a bar and a spiral with similar Ω p , while three (33%) do not.

  6. Fluctuation-Induced Pattern Formation in a Surface Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starke, Jens; Reichert, Christian; Eiswirth, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous nucleation, pulse formation, and propagation failure have been observed experimentally in CO oxidation on Pt(110) at intermediate pressures ($\\approx 10^{-2}$mbar). This phenomenon can be reproduced with a stochastic model which includes temperature effects. Nucleation occurs randomly...... due to fluctuations in the reaction processes, whereas the subsequent damping out essentially follows the deterministic path. Conditions for the occurence of stochastic effects in the pattern formation during CO oxidation on Pt are discussed....

  7. Spongiosa Primary Development: A Biochemical Hypothesis by Turing Patterns Formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Rodrigo López-Vaca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a biochemical model describing the formation of primary spongiosa architecture through a bioregulatory model by metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. It is assumed that MMP13 regulates cartilage degradation and the VEGF allows vascularization and advances in the ossification front through the presence of osteoblasts. The coupling of this set of molecules is represented by reaction-diffusion equations with parameters in the Turing space, creating a stable spatiotemporal pattern that leads to the formation of the trabeculae present in the spongy tissue. Experimental evidence has shown that the MMP13 regulates VEGF formation, and it is assumed that VEGF negatively regulates MMP13 formation. Thus, the patterns obtained by ossification may represent the primary spongiosa formation during endochondral ossification. Moreover, for the numerical solution, we used the finite element method with the Newton-Raphson method to approximate partial differential nonlinear equations. Ossification patterns obtained may represent the primary spongiosa formation during endochondral ossification.

  8. Brownian dynamics simulations of insulin microspheres formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Chakrabarti, Amit; Gunton, James

    2010-03-01

    Recent experiments have indicated a novel, aqueous process of microsphere insulin fabrication based on controlled phase separation of protein from water-soluble polymers. We investigate the insulin microsphere crystal formation from insulin-PEG-water systems via 3D Brownian Dynamics simulations. We use the two component Asakura-Oosawa model to simulate the kinetics of this colloid polymer mixture. We first perform a deep quench below the liquid-crystal boundary that leads to fractal formation. We next heat the system to obtain a break-up of the fractal clusters and subsequently cool the system to obtain a spherical aggregation of droplets with a relatively narrow size distribution. We analyze the structure factor S(q) to identify the cluster dimension. S(q) crosses over from a power law q dependence of 1.8 (in agreement with DLCA) to 4 as q increases, which shows the evolution from fractal to spherical clusters. By studying the bond-order parameters, we find the phase transition from liquid-like droplets to crystals which exhibit local HCP and FCC order. This work is supported by grants from the NSF and Mathers Foundation.

  9. Selective metal pattern formation and its EMI shielding efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho-Chul; Kim, Jin-Young; Noh, Chang-Ho; Song, Ki Yong; Cho, Sung-Heon

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for selective metal pattern formation by using an enhanced life-time of photoexcited electron-hole pairs in bilayer thin film of amorphous titanium dioxide and hole-scavenger-containing poly(vinyl alcohol) was proposed. By UV-irradiation through photomask on the bilayer film, the photodefined image of photoelectrons could be easily and simply produced, consequently resulting in selective palladium (Pd) catalyst deposition by reduction. The successive electrolessplating on Pd catalysts and electroplating on electrolessplated pattern were possible. Furthermore, the electromagnetic interference shielding efficiencies of the metal mesh patterns with various characteristic length scales of line width and thickness were investigated

  10. A Multi-Agent Modelling Approach to Simulate Dynamic Activity-Travel Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Q.; Arentze, T.A.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; Janssens, D.; Wets, G.; Bazzan, A.L.C.; Klügl, F.

    2009-01-01

    Contributing to the recent interest in the dynamics of activity-travel patterns, this chapter discusses a framework of an agent-based modeling approach focusing on the dynamic formation of (location) choice sets. Individual travelers are represented as agents, each with their cognition of the

  11. Vegetation pattern formation in a fog-dependent ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthagaray, Ana I; Fuentes, Miguel A; Marquet, Pablo A

    2010-07-07

    Vegetation pattern formation is a striking characteristic of several water-limited ecosystems around the world. Typically, they have been described on runoff-based ecosystems emphasizing local interactions between water, biomass interception, growth and dispersal. Here, we show that this situation is by no means general, as banded patterns in vegetation can emerge in areas without rainfall and in plants without functional root (the Bromeliad Tillandsia landbeckii) and where fog is the principal source of moisture. We show that a simple model based on the advection of fog-water by wind and its interception by the vegetation can reproduce banded patterns which agree with empirical patterns observed in the Coastal Atacama Desert. Our model predicts how the parameters may affect the conditions to form the banded pattern, showing a transition from a uniform vegetated state, at high water input or terrain slope to a desert state throughout intermediate banded states. Moreover, the model predicts that the pattern wavelength is a decreasing non-linear function of fog-water input and slope, and an increasing function of plant loss and fog-water flow speed. Finally, we show that the vegetation density is increased by the formation of the regular pattern compared to the density expected by the spatially homogeneous model emphasizing the importance of self-organization in arid ecosystems. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interfacial wave theory of pattern formation in solidification dendrites, fingers, cells and free boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    2017-01-01

    This comprehensive work explores interfacial instability and pattern formation in dynamic systems away from the equilibrium state in solidification and crystal growth. Further, this significantly expanded 2nd edition introduces and reviews the progress made during the last two decades. In particular, it describes the most prominent pattern formation phenomena commonly observed in material processing and crystal growth in the framework of the previously established interfacial wave theory, including free dendritic growth from undercooled melt, cellular growth and eutectic growth in directional solidification, as well as viscous fingering in Hele-Shaw flow. It elucidates the key problems, systematically derives their mathematical solutions by pursuing a unified, asymptotic approach, and finally carefully examines these results by comparing them with the available experimental results. The asymptotic approach described here will be useful for the investigation of pattern formation phenomena occurring in a much b...

  13. Anomalous patterns of formation and distribution of the brachial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    block Background: Structural variations in the patterns of formation and distribution of the brachial plexus have drawn attentions both in anatomy and anaesthesia. Method: An observational study. Results: The brachial plexus was carefully inspected in both the right and left arms in 90 Nigerian cadavers, comprising of 74 ...

  14. Modelling Global Pattern Formations for Collaborative Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grappiolo, Corrado; Cheong, Yun-Gyung; Khaled, Rilla

    2012-01-01

    We present our research towards the design of a computational framework capable of modelling the formation and evolution of global patterns (i.e. group structures) in a population of social individuals. The framework is intended to be used in collaborative environments, e.g. social serious games...

  15. Pattern formation in three-dimensional reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, T. K.; Knobloch, E.

    1999-08-01

    Existing group theoretic analysis of pattern formation in three dimensions [T.K. Callahan, E. Knobloch, Symmetry-breaking bifurcations on cubic lattices, Nonlinearity 10 (1997) 1179-1216] is used to make specific predictions about the formation of three-dimensional patterns in two models of the Turing instability, the Brusselator model and the Lengyel-Epstein model. Spatially periodic patterns having the periodicity of the simple cubic (SC), face-centered cubic (FCC) or body-centered cubic (BCC) lattices are considered. An efficient center manifold reduction is described and used to identify parameter regimes permitting stable lamellæ, SC, FCC, double-diamond, hexagonal prism, BCC and BCCI states. Both models possess a special wavenumber k* at which the normal form coefficients take on fixed model-independent ratios and both are described by identical bifurcation diagrams. This property is generic for two-species chemical reaction-diffusion models with a single activator and inhibitor.

  16. Dewetting-mediated pattern formation inside the coffee ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weibin; Lan, Ding; Wang, Yuren

    2017-04-01

    The rearrangement of particles in the final stage of droplet evaporation has been investigated by utilizing differential interference contrast microscopy and the formation mechanism of a network pattern inside a coffee ring has been revealed. A tailored substrate with a circular hydrophilic domain is prepared to obtain thin liquid film containing monolayer particles. Real-time bottom-view images show that the evolution of a dry patch could be divided into three stages: rupture initiation, dry patch expansion, and drying of the residual liquid. A growing number of dry patches will repeat these stages to form the network patterns inside the ringlike stain. It can be shown that the suction effect promotes the rupture of the liquid film and the formation of the dry patch. The particle-assembling process is totally controlled by the liquid film dewetting and dominated by the surface tension of the liquid film, which eventually determine the ultimate deposition patterns.

  17. On the physical basis of pattern formation in nonlinear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanduloviciu, M.; Lozneanu, E.; Popescu, S.

    2003-01-01

    Spatial, respectively spatiotemporal patterns appear in a gaseous conductor (plasma) when an external constraint produces a local gradient of electron kinetic energy. Under such conditions, collective quantum effects related to the spatial separation of the excitation and ionization cross-sections determine the appearance of adjacent opposite space charges. The state of the resulting space charge configuration depends on the self-enhancement process of positive ions production, which destabilizes the system. Thus, a spatial pattern in the form of a stable double layer appears after self-organization when the above gradient is smaller than that for which the double layer transits into a moving phase (spatiotemporal pattern). The proposed explanation, based on investigations performed on self-organization phenomena observed in gaseous conductors, suggests a new possibility to clarify the challenging problems concerning the actual physical basis of pattern formation in semiconductors

  18. Simulating discrete models of pattern formation by ion beam sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Alexander K; Kree, Reiner; Yasseri, Taha

    2009-01-01

    A class of simple, (2+1)-dimensional, discrete models is reviewed, which allow us to study the evolution of surface patterns on solid substrates during ion beam sputtering (IBS). The models are based on the same assumptions about the erosion process as the existing continuum theories. Several distinct physical mechanisms of surface diffusion are added, which allow us to study the interplay of erosion-driven and diffusion-driven pattern formation. We present results from our own work on evolution scenarios of ripple patterns, especially for longer timescales, where nonlinear effects become important. Furthermore we review kinetic phase diagrams, both with and without sample rotation, which depict the systematic dependence of surface patterns on the shape of energy depositing collision cascades after ion impact. Finally, we discuss some results from more recent work on surface diffusion with Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers as the driving force for pattern formation during IBS and on Monte Carlo simulations of IBS with codeposition of surfactant atoms.

  19. Pattern formation in two-dimensional square-shoulder systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornleitner, Julia; Kahl, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Using a highly efficient and reliable optimization tool that is based on ideas of genetic algorithms, we have systematically studied the pattern formation of the two-dimensional square-shoulder system. An overwhelming wealth of complex ordered equilibrium structures emerge from this investigation as we vary the shoulder width. With increasing pressure three structural archetypes could be identified: cluster lattices, where clusters of particles occupy the sites of distorted hexagonal lattices, lane formation, and compact particle arrangements with high coordination numbers. The internal complexity of these structures increases with increasing shoulder width.

  20. Pattern formation in two-dimensional square-shoulder systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornleitner, Julia [Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Forschungsszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kahl, Gerhard, E-mail: fornleitner@cmt.tuwien.ac.a [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik and Centre for Computational Materials Science (CMS), Technische Universitaet Wien, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Wien (Austria)

    2010-03-17

    Using a highly efficient and reliable optimization tool that is based on ideas of genetic algorithms, we have systematically studied the pattern formation of the two-dimensional square-shoulder system. An overwhelming wealth of complex ordered equilibrium structures emerge from this investigation as we vary the shoulder width. With increasing pressure three structural archetypes could be identified: cluster lattices, where clusters of particles occupy the sites of distorted hexagonal lattices, lane formation, and compact particle arrangements with high coordination numbers. The internal complexity of these structures increases with increasing shoulder width.

  1. Integument pattern formation involves genetic and epigenetic controls: feather arrays simulated by digital hormone models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall B; Shen, Wei-Min; Will, Peter; Wu, Da-Yu; Lin, Chih-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    Pattern formation is a fundamental morphogenetic process. Models based on genetic and epigenetic control have been proposed but remain controversial. Here we use feather morphogenesis for further evaluation. Adhesion molecules and/or signaling molecules were first expressed homogenously in feather tracts (restrictive mode, appear earlier) or directly in bud or inter-bud regions ( de novo mode, appear later). They either activate or inhibit bud formation, but paradoxically colocalize in the bud. Using feather bud reconstitution, we showed that completely dissociated cells can reform periodic patterns without reference to previous positional codes. The patterning process has the characteristics of being self-organizing, dynamic and plastic. The final pattern is an equilibrium state reached by competition, and the number and size of buds can be altered based on cell number and activator/inhibitor ratio, respectively. We developed a Digital Hormone Model which consists of (1) competent cells without identity that move randomly in a space, (2) extracellular signaling hormones which diffuse by a reaction-diffusion mechanism and activate or inhibit cell adhesion, and (3) cells which respond with topological stochastic actions manifested as changes in cell adhesion. Based on probability, the results are cell clusters arranged in dots or stripes. Thus genetic control provides combinational molecular information which defines the properties of the cells but not the final pattern. Epigenetic control governs interactions among cells and their environment based on physical-chemical rules (such as those described in the Digital Hormone Model). Complex integument patterning is the sum of these two components of control and that is why integument patterns are usually similar but non-identical. These principles may be shared by other pattern formation processes such as barb ridge formation, fingerprints, pigmentation patterning, etc. The Digital Hormone Model can also be applied to

  2. Morphogenesis and pattern formation in biological systems experiments and models

    CERN Document Server

    Noji, Sumihare; Ueno, Naoto; Maini, Philip

    2003-01-01

    A central goal of current biology is to decode the mechanisms that underlie the processes of morphogenesis and pattern formation. Concerned with the analysis of those phenomena, this book covers a broad range of research fields, including developmental biology, molecular biology, plant morphogenesis, ecology, epidemiology, medicine, paleontology, evolutionary biology, mathematical biology, and computational biology. In Morphogenesis and Pattern Formation in Biological Systems: Experiments and Models, experimental and theoretical aspects of biology are integrated for the construction and investigation of models of complex processes. This collection of articles on the latest advances by leading researchers not only brings together work from a wide spectrum of disciplines, but also provides a stepping-stone to the creation of new areas of discovery.

  3. The LLE, pattern formation and a novel coherent source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Fabrizio; Brambilla, Massimo; Gatti, Alessandra; Prati, Franco; Lugiato, Luigi A.

    2017-04-01

    The LLE was introduced in order to provide a paradigmatic model for spontaneous spatial pattern formation in the field of nonlinear optics. In the first part of this paper we describe in details its historical evolution. We underline, first of all, that the multimode instability of optical bistability represents an important precursor of the LLE. Next, we illustrate how the original LLE was conceived in order to describe pattern formation in the planes transverse with respect to the longitudinal direction of propagation of light in the nonlinear medium contained in the optical cavity. We emphasize, in particular, the crucial role of the low transmission limit (also called mean field limit or uniform field limit in the literature) in determining the simplicity of the equation. In discussing transverse pattern formation in the LLE, we underline incidentally the presence of very important quantum aspects related to squeezing of quantum fluctuations and to quantum imaging. We consider not only the case of global patterns but also localized structures (cavity solitons and their control). Then we turn to the temporal/longitudinal version of the LLE, formulated by Haelterman et al. [H. Haelterman, S. Trillo, S. Wabnitz, Opt. Commun. 91, 401 (1992)], and to its equivalence with the transverse LLE in 1D, discussing especially the phenomenon of temporal cavity solitons, their experimental observation and their control. Finally for the first part we turn to the very recent topic of broadband frequency combs, observed in a versatile multiwavelength coherent source (driven Kerr microcavity), which is raising a lot of interest and of research activities because of its very favourable physical characteristics, which support quite promising applicative perspectives. Kerr microcavities realize in an ideal manner the basic assumptions of the LLE, and the spontaneous formation of travelling patterns along the microcavity is the crucial mechanism which creates the combs and governs

  4. Pattern formation in individual-based systems with time-varying parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Peter; Galla, Tobias

    2013-12-01

    We study the patterns generated in finite-time sweeps across symmetry-breaking bifurcations in individual-based models. Similar to the well-known Kibble-Zurek scenario of defect formation, large-scale patterns are generated when model parameters are varied slowly, whereas fast sweeps produce a large number of small domains. The symmetry breaking is triggered by intrinsic noise, originating from the discrete dynamics at the microlevel. Based on a linear-noise approximation, we calculate the characteristic length scale of these patterns. We demonstrate the applicability of this approach in a simple model of opinion dynamics, a model in evolutionary game theory with a time-dependent fitness structure, and a model of cell differentiation. Our theoretical estimates are confirmed in simulations. In further numerical work, we observe a similar phenomenon when the symmetry-breaking bifurcation is triggered by population growth.

  5. Pattern formation of a nonlocal, anisotropic interaction model

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin

    2017-11-24

    We consider a class of interacting particle models with anisotropic, repulsive–attractive interaction forces whose orientations depend on an underlying tensor field. An example of this class of models is the so-called Kücken–Champod model describing the formation of fingerprint patterns. This class of models can be regarded as a generalization of a gradient flow of a nonlocal interaction potential which has a local repulsion and a long-range attraction structure. In contrast to isotropic interaction models the anisotropic forces in our class of models cannot be derived from a potential. The underlying tensor field introduces an anisotropy leading to complex patterns which do not occur in isotropic models. This anisotropy is characterized by one parameter in the model. We study the variation of this parameter, describing the transition between the isotropic and the anisotropic model, analytically and numerically. We analyze the equilibria of the corresponding mean-field partial differential equation and investigate pattern formation numerically in two dimensions by studying the dependence of the parameters in the model on the resulting patterns.

  6. Pattern formation of a nonlocal, anisotropic interaction model

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin; Dü ring, Bertram; Kreusser, Lisa Maria; Markowich, Peter A.; Schö nlieb, Carola-Bibiane

    2017-01-01

    We consider a class of interacting particle models with anisotropic, repulsive–attractive interaction forces whose orientations depend on an underlying tensor field. An example of this class of models is the so-called Kücken–Champod model describing the formation of fingerprint patterns. This class of models can be regarded as a generalization of a gradient flow of a nonlocal interaction potential which has a local repulsion and a long-range attraction structure. In contrast to isotropic interaction models the anisotropic forces in our class of models cannot be derived from a potential. The underlying tensor field introduces an anisotropy leading to complex patterns which do not occur in isotropic models. This anisotropy is characterized by one parameter in the model. We study the variation of this parameter, describing the transition between the isotropic and the anisotropic model, analytically and numerically. We analyze the equilibria of the corresponding mean-field partial differential equation and investigate pattern formation numerically in two dimensions by studying the dependence of the parameters in the model on the resulting patterns.

  7. What drives the formation of global oil trade patterns?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hai-Ying; Ji, Qiang; Fan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the spatial characteristics of current global oil trade patterns are investigated by proposing a new indicator Moran-F. Meanwhile, the factors that influence the formation of oil trade patterns are identified by constructing four different kinds of spatial econometric models. The findings indicate that most oil exporters have an obvious export focus in North America and a relatively balanced export in Europe and the Asia-Pacific region. Besides supply and demand factors, technological progress and energy efficiency have also significantly influenced the oil trade. Moreover, there is a spillover effect of trade flow among different regions, but its impact is weak. In addition, oil importers in the same region have the potential to cooperate due to their similar import sources. Finally, promotion of oil importers' R&D investments can effectively reduce the demand for global oil trade. - Highlights: • A new spatial association Moran-F indicator that applies to trade flows is proposed. • Driving factors affecting the formation of oil trade patterns are identified. • Oil-exporting countries implement various export strategies in different regions. • Supply, demand and technological factors contribute to the oil trade patterns. • Spillover effect of each factor affecting oil trade flows does exist but is limited

  8. Regulative feedback in pattern formation: towards a general relativistic theory of positional information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Johannes; Irons, David; Monk, Nick

    2008-10-01

    Positional specification by morphogen gradients is traditionally viewed as a two-step process. A gradient is formed and then interpreted, providing a spatial metric independent of the target tissue, similar to the concept of space in classical mechanics. However, the formation and interpretation of gradients are coupled, dynamic processes. We introduce a conceptual framework for positional specification in which cellular activity feeds back on positional information encoded by gradients, analogous to the feedback between mass-energy distribution and the geometry of space-time in Einstein's general theory of relativity. We discuss how such general relativistic positional information (GRPI) can guide systems-level approaches to pattern formation.

  9. Nonmonotonic Behavior of Supermultiplet Pattern Formation in a Noisy Lotka-Volterra System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiasconaro, A.; Valenti, D.; Spagnolo, B.

    2004-01-01

    The noise-induced pattern formation in a population dynamical model of three interacting species in the coexistence regime is investigated. A coupled map lattice of Lotka-Volterra equations in the presence of multiplicative noise is used to analyze the spatiotemporal evolution. The spatial correlation of the species concentration as a function of time and of the noise intensity is investigated. A nonmonotonic behavior of the area of the patterns as a function of both noise intensity and evolution time is found. (author)

  10. Dynamical patterns in nematic active matter on a sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkes, Silke; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Sknepnek, Rastko

    2018-04-01

    Using simulations of self-propelled agents with short-range repulsion and nematic alignment, we explore the dynamical phases of a dense active nematic confined to the surface of a sphere. We map the nonequilibrium phase diagram as a function of curvature, alignment strength, and activity. Our model reproduces several phases seen in recent experiments on active microtubule bundles confined the surfaces of vesicles. At low driving, we recover the equilibrium nematic ground state with four +1 /2 defects. As the driving is increased, geodesic forces drive the transition to a polar band wrapping around an equator, with large empty spherical caps corresponding to two +1 defects at the poles. Upon further increasing activity, the bands fold onto themselves, and the system eventually transitions to a turbulent state marked by the proliferation of pairs of topological defects. We highlight the key role of the nematic persistence length in controlling pattern formation in these confined systems with positive Gaussian curvature.

  11. Spatial pattern formation induced by Gaussian white noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarsoglio, Stefania; Laio, Francesco; D'Odorico, Paolo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2011-02-01

    The ability of Gaussian noise to induce ordered states in dynamical systems is here presented in an overview of the main stochastic mechanisms able to generate spatial patterns. These mechanisms involve: (i) a deterministic local dynamics term, accounting for the local rate of variation of the field variable, (ii) a noise component (additive or multiplicative) accounting for the unavoidable environmental disturbances, and (iii) a linear spatial coupling component, which provides spatial coherence and takes into account diffusion mechanisms. We investigate these dynamics using analytical tools, such as mean-field theory, linear stability analysis and structure function analysis, and use numerical simulations to confirm these analytical results. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pattern formation in diffusive excitable systems under magnetic flow effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mvogo, Alain; Takembo, Clovis N.; Ekobena Fouda, H. P.; Kofané, Timoléon C.

    2017-07-01

    We study the spatiotemporal formation of patterns in a diffusive FitzHugh-Nagumo network where the effect of electromagnetic induction has been introduced in the standard mathematical model by using magnetic flux, and the modulation of magnetic flux on membrane potential is realized by using memristor coupling. We use the multi-scale expansion to show that the system equations can be reduced to a single differential-difference nonlinear equation. The linear stability analysis is performed and discussed with emphasis on the impact of magnetic flux. It is observed that the effect of memristor coupling importantly modifies the features of modulational instability. Our analytical results are supported by the numerical experiments, which reveal that the improved model can lead to nonlinear quasi-periodic spatiotemporal patterns with some features of synchronization. It is observed also the generation of pulses and rhythmics behaviors like breathing or swimming which are important in brain researches.

  13. Formation mechanisms and characteristics of transition patterns in oblique detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Shikun; Zhou, Jin; Liu, Shijie; Cai, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    The transition structures of wedge-induced oblique detonation waves (ODWs) in high-enthalpy supersonic combustible mixtures are studied with two-dimensional reactive Euler simulations based on the open-source program AMROC (Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Object-oriented C++). The formation mechanisms of different transition patterns are investigated through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. Results show that transition patterns of ODWs depend on the pressure ratio Pd/Ps, (Pd, Ps are the pressure behind the ODW and the pressure behind the induced shock, respectively). When Pd/Ps > 1.3, an abrupt transition occurs, while when Pd/Ps 1.02Φ∗ (Φ∗ is the critical velocity ratio calculated with an empirical formula).

  14. Class of nonsingular exact solutions for Laplacian pattern formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineev-Weinstein, M.B.; Dawson, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    We present a class of exact solutions for the so-called Laplacian growth equation describing the zero-surface-tension limit of a variety of two-dimensional pattern formation problems. These solutions are free of finite-time singularities (cusps) for quite general initial conditions. They reproduce various features of viscous fingering observed in experiments and numerical simulations with surface tension, such as existence of stagnation points, screening, tip splitting, and coarsening. In certain cases the asymptotic interface consists of N separated moving Saffman-Taylor fingers

  15. Coarsening and pattern formation during true morphological phase separation in unstable thin films under gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avanish; Narayanam, Chaitanya; Khanna, Rajesh; Puri, Sanjay

    2017-12-01

    We address in detail the problem of true morphological phase separation (MPS) in three-dimensional or (2 +1 )-dimensional unstable thin liquid films (>100 nm) under the influence of gravity. The free-energy functionals of these films are asymmetric and show two points of common tangency, which facilitates the formation of two equilibrium phases. Three distinct patterns formed by relative preponderance of these phases are clearly identified in "true MPS". Asymmetricity induces two different pathways of pattern formation, viz., defect and direct pathway for true MPS. The pattern formation and phase-ordering dynamics have been studied using statistical measures such as structure factor, correlation function, and growth laws. In the late stage of coarsening, the system reaches into a scaling regime for both pathways, and the characteristic domain size follows the Lifshitz-Slyozov growth law [L (t ) ˜t1 /3] . However, for the defect pathway, there is a crossover of domain growth behavior from L (t ) ˜t1 /4→t1 /3 in the dynamical scaling regime. We also underline the analogies and differences behind the mechanisms of MPS and true MPS in thin liquid films and generic spinodal phase separation in binary mixtures.

  16. Master stability functions reveal diffusion-driven pattern formation in networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechtel, Andreas; Gramlich, Philipp; Ritterskamp, Daniel; Drossel, Barbara; Gross, Thilo

    2018-03-01

    We study diffusion-driven pattern formation in networks of networks, a class of multilayer systems, where different layers have the same topology, but different internal dynamics. Agents are assumed to disperse within a layer by undergoing random walks, while they can be created or destroyed by reactions between or within a layer. We show that the stability of homogeneous steady states can be analyzed with a master stability function approach that reveals a deep analogy between pattern formation in networks and pattern formation in continuous space. For illustration, we consider a generalized model of ecological meta-food webs. This fairly complex model describes the dispersal of many different species across a region consisting of a network of individual habitats while subject to realistic, nonlinear predator-prey interactions. In this example, the method reveals the intricate dependence of the dynamics on the spatial structure. The ability of the proposed approach to deal with this fairly complex system highlights it as a promising tool for ecology and other applications.

  17. Universal stability curve for pattern formation in pulsed gas-solid fluidized beds of sandlike particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Martín, Lilian; Ottevanger, Coen; van Ommen, J. Ruud; Coppens, Marc-Olivier

    2018-03-01

    A granular layer can form regular patterns, such as squares, stripes, and hexagons, when it is fluidized with a pulsating gas flow. These structures are reminiscent of the well-known patterns found in granular layers excited through vibration, but, contrarily to them, they have been hardly explored since they were first discovered. In this work, we investigate experimentally the conditions leading to pattern formation in pulsed fluidized beds and the dimensionless numbers governing the phenomenon. We show that the onset to the instability is universal for Geldart B (sandlike) particles and governed by the hydrodynamical parameters Γ =ua/(utϕ ¯) and f /fn , where ua and f are the amplitude and frequency of the gas velocity, respectively, ut is the terminal velocity of the particles, ϕ ¯ is the average solids fraction, and fn is the natural frequency of the bed. These findings suggest that patterns emerge as a result of a parametric resonance between the kinematic waves originating from the oscillating gas flow and the bulk dynamics. Particle friction plays virtually no role in the onset to pattern formation, but it is fundamental for pattern selection and stabilization.

  18. Phase separation like dynamics during Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guannan; Thutupalli, Shashi; Wigbers, Manon; Shaevitz, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Collective motion exists in many living organisms as an advantageous strategy to help the entire group with predation, forage, and survival. However, the principles of self-organization underlying such collective motions remain unclear. During various developmental stages of the soil-dwelling bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, different types of collective motions are observed. In particular, when starved, M. xanthus cells eventually aggregate together to form 3-dimensional structures (fruiting bodies), inside which cells sporulate in response to the stress. We study the fruiting body formation process as an out of equilibrium phase separation process. As local cell density increases, the dynamics of the aggregation M. xanthus cells switch from a spatio-temporally random process, resembling nucleation and growth, to an emergent pattern formation process similar to a spinodal decomposition. By employing high-resolution microscopy and a video analysis system, we are able to track the motion of single cells within motile collective groups, while separately tuning local cell density, cell velocity and reversal frequency, probing the multi-dimensional phase space of M. xanthus development.

  19. Gas Price Formation, Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davoust, R.

    2008-07-01

    Our study, focused on gas prices in importing economies, describes wholesale prices and retail prices, their evolution for the last one or two decades, the economic mechanisms of price formation. While an international market for oil has developed thanks to moderate storage and transportation charges, these costs are much higher in the case of natural gas, which involves that this energy is still traded inside continental markets. There are three regional gas markets around the world: North America (the United States, importing mainly from Canada and Mexico), Europe (importing mainly from Russia, Algeria and Norway) and Asia (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China and India, importing mainly from Indonesia, Malaysia and Australia). A market for gas has also developed in South America, but it will not be covered by our paper. In Europe and the US, due to large domestic resources and strong grids, natural gas is purchased mostly through pipelines. In Northeast Asia, there is a lack of such infrastructures, so imported gas takes mainly the form of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), shipped on maritime tankers. Currently, the LNG market is divided into two zones: the Atlantic Basin (Europe and US) and the Pacific Basin (Asia and the Western Coast of America). For the past few years, the Middle East and Africa have tended to be crucial suppliers for both LNG zones. Gas price formation varies deeply between regional markets, depending on several structural factors (regulation, contracting practises, existence of a spot market, liquidity, share of imports). Empirically, the degree of market opening (which corresponds to the seniority in the liberalization process) seems to be the primary determinant of pricing patterns. North America has the most liberalized and well-performing natural gas industry in the world. Gas pricing is highly competitive and is based on supply/demand balances. Spot and futures markets are developed. The British gas sector is also deregulated and thus follows a

  20. Gas Price Formation, Structure and Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoust, R.

    2008-01-01

    Our study, focused on gas prices in importing economies, describes wholesale prices and retail prices, their evolution for the last one or two decades, the economic mechanisms of price formation. While an international market for oil has developed thanks to moderate storage and transportation charges, these costs are much higher in the case of natural gas, which involves that this energy is still traded inside continental markets. There are three regional gas markets around the world: North America (the United States, importing mainly from Canada and Mexico), Europe (importing mainly from Russia, Algeria and Norway) and Asia (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China and India, importing mainly from Indonesia, Malaysia and Australia). A market for gas has also developed in South America, but it will not be covered by our paper. In Europe and the US, due to large domestic resources and strong grids, natural gas is purchased mostly through pipelines. In Northeast Asia, there is a lack of such infrastructures, so imported gas takes mainly the form of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), shipped on maritime tankers. Currently, the LNG market is divided into two zones: the Atlantic Basin (Europe and US) and the Pacific Basin (Asia and the Western Coast of America). For the past few years, the Middle East and Africa have tended to be crucial suppliers for both LNG zones. Gas price formation varies deeply between regional markets, depending on several structural factors (regulation, contracting practises, existence of a spot market, liquidity, share of imports). Empirically, the degree of market opening (which corresponds to the seniority in the liberalization process) seems to be the primary determinant of pricing patterns. North America has the most liberalized and well-performing natural gas industry in the world. Gas pricing is highly competitive and is based on supply/demand balances. Spot and futures markets are developed. The British gas sector is also deregulated and thus follows a

  1. Emergent Patterns of Diversity and Dynamics in Natural Populations of Planktonic Vibrio Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    1973. Ecology of Vibrio parahemolyticus in mixed-template amplifications: formation, consequences and elimination by Chesapeake Bay. J. Bacteriol. 113...Science 1930 and Engineering DOCTORAL DISSERTATION Emergent Patterns of Diversity and Dynamics in Natural Populations of Planktonic Vibrio Bacteria by...DYNAMICS IN NATURAL POPULATIONS OF PLANKTONIC VIBRIO BACTERIA by Janelle Ren6e Thompson B.S. Biological Sciences, Stanford University 1998 M.S

  2. Pattern formation and firing synchronization in networks of map neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qingyun; Duan Zhisheng; Huang Lin; Chen Guanrong; Lu Qishao

    2007-01-01

    Patterns and collective phenomena such as firing synchronization are studied in networks of nonhomogeneous oscillatory neurons and mixtures of oscillatory and excitable neurons, with dynamics of each neuron described by a two-dimensional (2D) Rulkov map neuron. It is shown that as the coupling strength is increased, typical patterns emerge spatially, which propagate through the networks in the form of beautiful target waves or parallel ones depending on the size of networks. Furthermore, we investigate the transitions of firing synchronization characterized by the rate of firing when the coupling strength is increased. It is found that there exists an intermediate coupling strength; firing synchronization is minimal simultaneously irrespective of the size of networks. For further increasing the coupling strength, synchronization is enhanced. Since noise is inevitable in real neurons, we also investigate the effects of white noise on firing synchronization for different networks. For the networks of oscillatory neurons, it is shown that firing synchronization decreases when the noise level increases. For the missed networks, firing synchronization is robust under the noise conditions considered in this paper. Results presented in this paper should prove to be valuable for understanding the properties of collective dynamics in real neuronal networks

  3. Nonlinear pattern formation in bone growth and architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil eSalmon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3D morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatio-temporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here – chaotic nonlinear pattern formation (NPF – which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of group intelligence exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called particle swarm optimization (PSO. This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts osteoclasts and osteocytes, seeing them operating socially in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in-silico simulation of bone modeling.What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder Juvenile Pagets Disease (JPD or Idiopathic Hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here coupling or feedback between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element.This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the emergent consequence of the

  4. Non-linear pattern formation in bone growth and architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Phil

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatiotemporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here - chaotic non-linear pattern formation (NPF) - which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence, and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of "group intelligence" exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called "particle swarm optimization" (PSO). This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, seeing them operating "socially" in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical), resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in silico computer simulation of bone modeling. What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder juvenile Pagets disease or idiopathic hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here, coupling or "feedback" between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element. This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the emergent

  5. Expectation formation in dynamic market experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemeijer, P.

    2009-01-01

    People often make mistakes when predicting economic variables such as prices. It is important to understand how these predictions are formed, since people's expectations have a large impact on the development and stability of economic systems. In this thesis the expectation formation of individuals

  6. Inherent-opening-controlled pattern formation in carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiao; Zhou, Jijie J; Sansom, Elijah; Gharib, Morteza; Haur, Sow Chorng

    2007-01-01

    We have introduced inherent openings into densely packed carbon nanotube arrays to study self-organized pattern formation when the arrays undergo a wetting-dewetting treatment from nanotube tips. These inherent openings, made of circular or elongated hollows in nanotube mats, serve as dewetting centres, from where liquid recedes from. As the dewetting centres initiate dry zones and the dry zones expand, surrounding nanotubes are pulled away from the dewetting centres by liquid surface tension. Among short nanotubes, the self-organized patterns are consistent with the shape of the inherent openings, i.e. slender openings lead to elongated trench-like structures, and circular holes result in relatively round nest-like arrangements. Nanotubes in a relatively high mat are more connected, like in an elastic body, than those in a short mat. Small cracks often initialize themselves in a relatively high mat, along two or more adjacent round openings; each of the cracks evolves into a trench as liquid dries up. Self-organized pattern control with inherent openings needs to initiate the dewetting process above the nanotube tips. If there is no liquid on top, inherent openings barely enlarge themselves after the wetting-dewetting treatment

  7. Patterns of Dynamics : in Honour of Bernold Fiedler's 60th Birthday

    CERN Document Server

    Hell, Juliette; Sandstede, Björn; Scheel, Arnd

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical advances in dynamical-systems theory and their applications to pattern-forming processes in the sciences and engineering are discussed in this volume that resulted from the conference Patterns in Dynamics held in honor of Bernold Fiedler, in Berlin, July 25-29, 2016.The contributions build and develop mathematical techniques, and use mathematical approaches for prediction and control of complex systems. The underlying mathematical theories help extract structures from experimental observations and, conversely, shed light on the formation, dynamics, and control of spatio-temporal patterns in applications. Theoretical areas covered include geometric analysis, spatial dynamics, spectral theory, traveling-wave theory, and topological data analysis; also discussed are their applications to chemotaxis, self-organization at interfaces, neuroscience, and transport processes. .

  8. Dewetting-mediated pattern formation in nanoparticle assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannard, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The deposition of nanoparticles from solution onto solid substrates is a diverse subfield of current nanoscience research. Complex physical and chemical processes underpin the self-assembly and self-organization of colloidal nanoparticles at two-phase (solid-liquid, liquid-air) interfaces and three-phase (solid-liquid-air) contact lines. This review discusses key recent advances made in the understanding of nonequilibrium dewetting processes of nanoparticle-containing solutions, detailing how such an apparently simple experimental system can give rise to such a strikingly varied palette of two-dimensional self-organized nanoparticle array morphologies. Patterns discussed include worm-like domains, cellular networks, microscale rings, and fractal-like fingering structures. There remain many unresolved issues regarding the role of the solvent dewetting dynamics in assembly processes of this type, with a significant focus on how dewetting can be coerced to produce nanoparticle arrays with desirable characteristics such as long-range order. In addition to these topics, methods developed to control nanofluid dewetting through routes such as confining the geometries of drying solutions, depositing onto pre-patterned heterogeneous substrates, and post-dewetting pattern evolution via local or global manipulation are covered. (topical review)

  9. Dewetting-mediated pattern formation in nanoparticle assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannard, Andrew

    2011-03-02

    The deposition of nanoparticles from solution onto solid substrates is a diverse subfield of current nanoscience research. Complex physical and chemical processes underpin the self-assembly and self-organization of colloidal nanoparticles at two-phase (solid-liquid, liquid-air) interfaces and three-phase (solid-liquid-air) contact lines. This review discusses key recent advances made in the understanding of nonequilibrium dewetting processes of nanoparticle-containing solutions, detailing how such an apparently simple experimental system can give rise to such a strikingly varied palette of two-dimensional self-organized nanoparticle array morphologies. Patterns discussed include worm-like domains, cellular networks, microscale rings, and fractal-like fingering structures. There remain many unresolved issues regarding the role of the solvent dewetting dynamics in assembly processes of this type, with a significant focus on how dewetting can be coerced to produce nanoparticle arrays with desirable characteristics such as long-range order. In addition to these topics, methods developed to control nanofluid dewetting through routes such as confining the geometries of drying solutions, depositing onto pre-patterned heterogeneous substrates, and post-dewetting pattern evolution via local or global manipulation are covered.

  10. Impact of mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling on pattern formation and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcke, M; Hudson, J L; Camacho, P; Lechleiter, J D

    1999-07-01

    Energization of mitochondria significantly alters the pattern of Ca2+ wave activity mediated by activation of the inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) in Xenopus oocytes. The number of pulsatile foci is reduced and spiral Ca2+ waves are no longer observed. Rather, target patterns of Ca2+ release predominate, and when fragmented, fail to form spirals. Ca2+ wave velocity, amplitude, decay time, and periodicity are also increased. We have simulated these experimental findings by supplementing an existing mathematical model with a differential equation for mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and release. Our calculations show that mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux plays a critical role in pattern formation by prolonging the recovery time of IP3Rs from a refractory state. We also show that under conditions of high energization of mitochondria, the Ca2+ dynamics can become bistable with a second stable stationary state of high resting Ca2+ concentration.

  11. Dynamic perfusion patterns in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, Patrick; Paesschen, Wim van; Zaknun, John J.; Maes, Alex; Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Locharernkul, Chaichon; Vasquez, Silvia; Carpintiero, Silvina; Bal, C.S.; Dondi, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    To investigate dynamic ictal perfusion changes during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We investigated 37 patients with TLE by ictal and interictal SPECT. All ictal injections were performed within 60 s of seizure onset. Statistical parametric mapping was used to analyse brain perfusion changes and temporal relationships with injection time and seizure duration as covariates. The analysis revealed significant ictal hyperperfusion in the ipsilateral temporal lobe extending to subcortical regions. Hypoperfusion was observed in large extratemporal areas. There were also significant dynamic changes in several extratemporal regions: ipsilateral orbitofrontal and bilateral superior frontal gyri and the contralateral cerebellum and ipsilateral striatum. The study demonstrated early dynamic perfusion changes in extratemporal regions probably involved in both propagation of epileptic activity and initiation of inhibitory mechanisms. (orig.)

  12. Dynamic perfusion patterns in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, Patrick; Paesschen, Wim van [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Zaknun, John J. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); University Hospital of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Maes, Alex [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); AZ Groeninge, Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Locharernkul, Chaichon [Chulalongkorn University, Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Bangkok (Thailand); Vasquez, Silvia; Carpintiero, Silvina [Fleni Instituto de Investigaciones Neurologicas, Nuclear Medicine, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bal, C.S. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); Ospedale Maggiore, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    To investigate dynamic ictal perfusion changes during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We investigated 37 patients with TLE by ictal and interictal SPECT. All ictal injections were performed within 60 s of seizure onset. Statistical parametric mapping was used to analyse brain perfusion changes and temporal relationships with injection time and seizure duration as covariates. The analysis revealed significant ictal hyperperfusion in the ipsilateral temporal lobe extending to subcortical regions. Hypoperfusion was observed in large extratemporal areas. There were also significant dynamic changes in several extratemporal regions: ipsilateral orbitofrontal and bilateral superior frontal gyri and the contralateral cerebellum and ipsilateral striatum. The study demonstrated early dynamic perfusion changes in extratemporal regions probably involved in both propagation of epileptic activity and initiation of inhibitory mechanisms. (orig.)

  13. Planetary Formation and Dynamics in Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    As of today, over 500 exoplanets have been detected since the first exoplanet was discovered around a solar-like star in 1995. The planets in binaries could be common as stars are usually born in binary or multiple star systems. Although current observations show that the planet host rate in multiple star systems is around 17%, this fraction should be considered as a lower limit because of noticeable selection effects against binaries in planet searches. Most of the current known planet-bearing binary systems are S-types, meaning the companion star acts as a distant satellite, typically orbiting the inner star-planet system over 100 AU away. Nevertheless, there are four systems with a smaller separation of 20 AU, including the Gamma Cephei, GJ 86, HD 41004, and HD 196885. In addition to the planets in circumprimary (S-type) orbits discussed above, planets in circumbinary (P-type) orbits have been found in only two systems. In this thesis, we mainly study the planet formation in the S-type binary systems. In chapter 1, we first summarize current observational facts of exoplanets both in single-star and binary systems, then review the theoretical models of planet formation, with special attention to the application in binary systems. Perturbative effects from stellar companions render the planet formation process in binary systems even more complex than that in single-star systems. The perturbations from a binary companion can excite planetesimal orbits, and increase their mutual impact velocities to the values that might exceed their escape velocity or even the critical velocity for the onset of eroding collisions. The intermediate stage of the formation process---from planetesimals to planetary embryos---is thus the most problematic. In the following chapters, we investigate whether and how the planet formation goes through such a problematic stage. In chapter 2, we study the effects of gas dissipation on the planetesimals' mutual accretion. We find that in a

  14. Similar impact of topological and dynamic noise on complex patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marr, Carsten; Huett, Marc-Thorsten

    2006-01-01

    Shortcuts in a regular architecture affect the information transport through the system due to the severe decrease in average path length. A fundamental new perspective in terms of pattern formation is the destabilizing effect of topological perturbations by processing distant uncorrelated information, similarly to stochastic noise. We study the functional coincidence of rewiring and noisy communication on patterns of binary cellular automata

  15. Soil erosion dynamics response to landscape pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, W.; Skidmore, A.K.; Hao, F.; Wang, T.

    2010-01-01

    Simulating soil erosion variation with a temporal land use database reveals long-term fluctuations in landscape patterns, as well as priority needs for soil erosion conservation. The application of a multi-year land use database in support of a Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) led to an accurate

  16. Pattern dynamics of the reaction-diffusion immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qianqian; Shen, Jianwei; Wang, Zhijie

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we will investigate the effect of diffusion, which is ubiquitous in nature, on the immune system using a reaction-diffusion model in order to understand the dynamical behavior of complex patterns and control the dynamics of different patterns. Through control theory and linear stability analysis of local equilibrium, we obtain the optimal condition under which the system loses stability and a Turing pattern occurs. By combining mathematical analysis and numerical simulation, we show the possible patterns and how these patterns evolve. In addition, we establish a bridge between the complex patterns and the biological mechanism using the results from a previous study in Nature Cell Biology. The results in this paper can help us better understand the biological significance of the immune system.

  17. The Influence of Gene Expression Time Delays on Gierer–Meinhardt Pattern Formation Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Seirin Lee, S.

    2010-03-23

    There are numerous examples of morphogen gradients controlling long range signalling in developmental and cellular systems. The prospect of two such interacting morphogens instigating long range self-organisation in biological systems via a Turing bifurcation has been explored, postulated, or implicated in the context of numerous developmental processes. However, modelling investigations of cellular systems typically neglect the influence of gene expression on such dynamics, even though transcription and translation are observed to be important in morphogenetic systems. In particular, the influence of gene expression on a large class of Turing bifurcation models, namely those with pure kinetics such as the Gierer-Meinhardt system, is unexplored. Our investigations demonstrate that the behaviour of the Gierer-Meinhardt model profoundly changes on the inclusion of gene expression dynamics and is sensitive to the sub-cellular details of gene expression. Features such as concentration blow up, morphogen oscillations and radical sensitivities to the duration of gene expression are observed and, at best, severely restrict the possible parameter spaces for feasible biological behaviour. These results also indicate that the behaviour of Turing pattern formation systems on the inclusion of gene expression time delays may provide a means of distinguishing between possible forms of interaction kinetics. Finally, this study also emphasises that sub-cellular and gene expression dynamics should not be simply neglected in models of long range biological pattern formation via morphogens. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  18. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  19. Pattern formation and three-dimensional instability in rotating flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Erik A.; Aubry, Nadine; Sorensen, Jens N.

    1997-03-01

    A fluid flow enclosed in a cylindrical container where fluid motion is created by the rotation of one end wall as a centrifugal fan is studied. Direct numerical simulations and spatio-temporal analysis have been performed in the early transition scenario, which includes a steady-unsteady transition and a breakdown of axisymmetric to three-dimensional flow behavior. In the early unsteady regime of the flow, the central vortex undergoes a vertical beating motion, accompanied by axisymmetric spikes formation on the edge of the breakdown bubble. As traveling waves, the spikes move along the central vortex core toward the rotating end-wall. As the Reynolds number is increased further, the flow undergoes a three-dimensional instability. The influence of the latter on the previous patterns is studied.

  20. Dynamical Networks for Smog Pattern Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zong, Linqi; Gong, Xinyi; Zhu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Smog, as a form of air pollution, poses as a serious problem to the environment, health, and economy of the world[1-4] . Previous studies on smog mostly focused on the components and the effects of smog [5-10]. However, as the smog happens with increased frequency and duration, the smog pattern which is critical for smog forecast and control, is rarely investigated, mainly due to the complexity of the components, the causes, and the spreading processes of smog. Here we report the first analys...

  1. Dynamic patterns of overexploitation in fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissi, Ilaria; Bardi, Ugo; El Asmar, Toufic; Lavacchi, Alessandro

    2017-09-10

    Understanding overfishing and regulating fishing quotas is a major global challenge for the 21st Century both in terms of providing food for humankind and to preserve the oceans' ecosystems. However, fishing is a complex economic activity, affected not just by overfishing but also by such factors as pollution, technology, financial factors and more. For this reason, it is often difficult to state with complete certainty that overfishing is the cause of the decline of a fishery. In this study, we developed a simple dynamic model specifically designed to isolate and to study the role of depletion on production. The model is based on the well-known Lotka-Volterra model, or Prey-Predator mechanism, assuming that the fish stock and the fishing industry are coupled variables that dynamically affect each other. In the model, the fishing industry acts as the "predator" and the fish stock as the "prey". If the model can fit historical data, in particular relative to the productive decline of specific fisheries, then we have a strong indication that the decline of the fish stock is driving the decline of the fishery production. The model doesn't pretend to be a general description of the fishing industry in all its varied forms; however, the data reported here show that the model can describe several historical cases of fisheries whose production decreased and collapsed, indicating that the overexploitation of the fish stocks is an important factor in the decline of fisheries.

  2. Formation and dynamic change of aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasahara, Mikio

    1986-01-01

    Processes of aerosol particle nucleation are roughly grouped into two types. In one, aerosol is produced as a result of dispersion of solid or liquid by mechanical force while in the other it is formed through phase transition from gas to solid or liquid due to cohesion caused by cooling, expansion or chemical reaction. This article reviews various aspects of aerosol particle nucleation through the latter type of processes and behaviors of the particles formed. Gas-to-particle conversion processes are divided into those of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, and the former include homogeneous homomolecular and homogeneous heteromolecular nucleation processes. Here, homoneneous homomolecular nucleation is described centering on the theories proposed by Backer and Doring-Zeldovich-Volmer-Frenkel while homogeneous heteromolecular systems are outlined citing the theory developed by Kiang and Stauffer. Heterogeneous nucleation (or heterogeneous condensation) is discussed on the basis of the relationship between the mean free path of air molecules and the particle size. Various theories for particle formation and growth are listed and briefly outlined. Some of them are compared with experimental results. Models are cited to explain behaviors of aerosol particles after being formed. Also described is simulation of particle nucleation and growth in relation to atmospheric pollution and possible accidents of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors. (Nogami, K.)

  3. Reptile scale paradigm: Evo-Devo, pattern formation and regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng; Wu, Ping; Baker, Ruth E.; Maini, Philip K.; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this perspective is to highlight the merit of the reptile integument as an experimental model. Reptiles represent the first amniotes. From stem reptiles, extant reptiles, birds and mammals have evolved. Mammal hairs and feathers evolved from Therapsid and Sauropsid reptiles, respectively. The early reptilian integument had to adapt to the challenges of terrestrial life, developing a multi-layered stratum corneum capable of barrier function and ultraviolet protection. For better mechanical protection, diverse reptilian scale types have evolved. The evolution of endothermy has driven the convergent evolution of hair and feather follicles: both form multiple localized growth units with stem cells and transient amplifying cells protected in the proximal follicle. This topological arrangement allows them to elongate, molt and regenerate without structural constraints. Another unique feature of reptile skin is the exquisite arrangement of scales and pigment patterns, making them testable models for mechanisms of pattern formation. Since they face the constant threat of damage on land, different strategies were developed to accommodate skin homeostasis and regeneration. Temporally, they can be under continuous renewal or sloughing cycles. Spatially, they can be diffuse or form discrete localized growth units (follicles). To understand how gene regulatory networks evolved to produce increasingly complex ectodermal organs, we have to study how prototypic scale-forming pathways in reptiles are modulated to produce appendage novelties. Despite the fact that there are numerous studies of reptile scales, molecular analyses have lagged behind. Here, we underscore how further development of this novel experimental model will be valuable in filling the gaps of our understanding of the Evo-Devo of amniote integuments. PMID:19557687

  4. Laser-induced hydrodynamic instability and pattern formation in metallic nanofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshkumar, R.; Trice, J.; Favazza, C.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2007-11-01

    Cost effective methodologies for the robust generation of nanoscale patterns in thin films and at interfaces are crucial in photonic, opto-electronic and solar energy harvesting applications. When ultrathin metal films are exposed to a series of short (ns) laser pulses, spontaneous pattern formation results with spatio-temporal scales that depend on the film height and thermo-physical properties of the film/substrate bilayer. Various self-organization mechanisms have been identified, including a dewetting instability due to a competition between surface tension and dispersion forces, and intrinsic and/or extrinsic thermocapillary effects. We will discuss these mechanisms as well as the evolution of surface perturbations which have been explored using experiments, linear stability analysis and nonlinear dynamical simulations (Trice et al. Phys. Rev. B, 75, 235439 (2007); Favazza et al. Appl. Phys. Lett., 91, 043105 (2007); 88, 153118 (2006)).

  5. Calling patterns in human communication dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Wen-Jie; Li, Ming-Xia; Podobnik, Boris; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-29

    Modern technologies not only provide a variety of communication modes (e.g., texting, cell phone conversation, and online instant messaging), but also detailed electronic traces of these communications between individuals. These electronic traces indicate that the interactions occur in temporal bursts. Here, we study intercall duration of communications of the 100,000 most active cell phone users of a Chinese mobile phone operator. We confirm that the intercall durations follow a power-law distribution with an exponential cutoff at the population level but find differences when focusing on individual users. We apply statistical tests at the individual level and find that the intercall durations follow a power-law distribution for only 3,460 individuals (3.46%). The intercall durations for the majority (73.34%) follow a Weibull distribution. We quantify individual users using three measures: out-degree, percentage of outgoing calls, and communication diversity. We find that the cell phone users with a power-law duration distribution fall into three anomalous clusters: robot-based callers, telecom fraud, and telephone sales. This information is of interest to both academics and practitioners, mobile telecom operators in particular. In contrast, the individual users with a Weibull duration distribution form the fourth cluster of ordinary cell phone users. We also discover more information about the calling patterns of these four clusters (e.g., the probability that a user will call the c(r)-th most contact and the probability distribution of burst sizes). Our findings may enable a more detailed analysis of the huge body of data contained in the logs of massive users.

  6. Simulation of crystalline pattern formation by the MPFC method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starodumov Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Phase Field Crystal model in hyperbolic formulation (modified PFC or MPFC, is investigated as one of the most promising techniques for modeling the formation of crystal patterns. MPFC is a convenient and fundamentally based description linking nano-and meso-scale processes in the evolution of crystal structures. The presented model is a powerful tool for mathematical modeling of the various operations in manufacturing. Among them is the definition of process conditions for the production of metal castings with predetermined properties, the prediction of defects in the crystal structure during casting, the evaluation of quality of special coatings, and others. Our paper presents the structure diagram which was calculated for the one-mode MPFC model and compared to the results of numerical simulation for the fast phase transitions. The diagram is verified by the numerical simulation and also strongly correlates to the previously calculated diagrams. The computations have been performed using software based on the effective parallel computational algorithm.

  7. Procedural generation of aesthetic patterns from dynamics and iteration processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gdawiec Krzysztof

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic patterns are widely used nowadays, e.g., in jewellery design, carpet design, as textures and patterns on wallpapers, etc. Most of the work during the design stage is carried out by a designer manually. Therefore, it is highly useful to develop methods for aesthetic pattern generation. In this paper, we present methods for generating aesthetic patterns using the dynamics of a discrete dynamical system. The presented methods are based on the use of various iteration processes from fixed point theory (Mann, S, Noor, etc. and the application of an affine combination of these iterations. Moreover, we propose new convergence tests that enrich the obtained patterns. The proposed methods generate patterns in a procedural way and can be easily implemented on the GPU. The presented examples show that using the proposed methods we are able to obtain a variety of interesting patterns. Moreover, the numerical examples show that the use of the GPU implementation with shaders allows the generation of patterns in real time and the speed-up (compared with a CPU implementation ranges from about 1000 to 2500 times.

  8. Dynamical Formation and Merger of Binary Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The advent of gravitational wave (GW) astronomy began with Advanced LIGO's 2015 discovery of GWs from coalescing black hole (BH) binaries. GW astronomy holds great promise for testing general relativity, but also for investigating open astrophysical questions not amenable to traditional electromagnetic observations. One such question concerns the origin of stellar mass BH binaries in the universe: do these form primarily from evolution of isolated binaries of massive stars, or do they form through more exotic dynamical channels? The best studied dynamical formation channel involves multibody interactions of BHs and stars in dense globular cluster environments, but many other dynamical scenarios have recently been proposed, ranging from the Kozai effect in hierarchical triple systems to BH binary formation in the outskirts of Toomre-unstable accretion disks surrounding supermassive black holes. The BH binaries formed through these processes will have different distributions of observable parameters (e.g. mass ratios, spins) than BH binaries formed through the evolution of isolated binary stars. In my talk I will overview these and other dynamical formation scenarios, and summarize the key observational tests that will enable Advanced LIGO or other future detectors to determine what formation pathway creates the majority of binary BHs in the universe. NCS thanks NASA, which has funded his work through Einstein postdoctoral grant PF5-160145.

  9. Satellite formation flying relative dynamics, formation design, fuel optimal maneuvers and formation maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Danwei; Poh, Eng Kee

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically describes the concepts and principles for multi-satellite relative motion, passive and near passive formation designs, trajectory planning and control for fuel optimal formation maneuvers, and formation flying maintenance control design. As such, it provides a sound foundation for researchers and engineers in this field to develop further theories and pursue their implementations. Though satellite formation flying is widely considered to be a major advance in space technology, there are few systematic treatments of the topic in the literature. Addressing that gap, the book offers a valuable resource for academics, researchers, postgraduate students and practitioners in the field of satellite science and engineering.

  10. Habit formation and affective responses in location choice dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Q.; Arentze, T.A.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a dynamic agent-based model which simulates how agents search and explore in non-stationary environments and ultimately develop habitual, context-dependent, activity-travel patterns. In this paper, we specifically focus on how emotional values, beliefs and

  11. Heterogeneous patterns enhancing static and dynamic texture classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Núbia Rosa da; Martinez Bruno, Odemir

    2013-01-01

    Some mixtures, such as colloids like milk, blood, and gelatin, have homogeneous appearance when viewed with the naked eye, however, to observe them at the nanoscale is possible to understand the heterogeneity of its components. The same phenomenon can occur in pattern recognition in which it is possible to see heterogeneous patterns in texture images. However, current methods of texture analysis can not adequately describe such heterogeneous patterns. Common methods used by researchers analyse the image information in a global way, taking all its features in an integrated manner. Furthermore, multi-scale analysis verifies the patterns at different scales, but still preserving the homogeneous analysis. On the other hand various methods use textons to represent the texture, breaking texture down into its smallest unit. To tackle this problem, we propose a method to identify texture patterns not small as textons at distinct scales enhancing the separability among different types of texture. We find sub patterns of texture according to the scale and then group similar patterns for a more refined analysis. Tests were performed in four static texture databases and one dynamical one. Results show that our method provide better classification rate compared with conventional approaches both in static and in dynamic texture.

  12. Relative dynamics and motion control of nanosatellite formation flying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimnoo, Ammarin; Hiraki, Koju

    2016-04-01

    Orbit selection is a necessary factor in nanosatellite formation mission design/meanwhile, to keep the formation, it is necessary to consume fuel. Therefore, the best orbit design for nanosatellite formation flying should be one that requires the minimum fuel consumption. The purpose of this paper is to analyse orbit selection with respect to the minimum fuel consumption, to provide a convenient way to estimate the fuel consumption for keeping nanosatellite formation flying and to present a simplified method of formation control. The formation structure is disturbed by J2 gravitational perturbation and other perturbing accelerations such as atmospheric drag. First, Gauss' Variation Equations (GVE) are used to estimate the essential ΔV due to the J2 perturbation and atmospheric drag. The essential ΔV presents information on which orbit is good with respect to the minimum fuel consumption. Then, the linear equations which account for J2 gravitational perturbation of Schweighart-Sedwick are presented and used to estimate the fuel consumption to maintain the formation structure. Finally, the relative dynamics motion is presented as well as a simplified motion control of formation structure by using GVE.

  13. Handling Dynamic Weights in Weighted Frequent Pattern Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Chowdhury Farhan; Tanbeer, Syed Khairuzzaman; Jeong, Byeong-Soo; Lee, Young-Koo

    Even though weighted frequent pattern (WFP) mining is more effective than traditional frequent pattern mining because it can consider different semantic significances (weights) of items, existing WFP algorithms assume that each item has a fixed weight. But in real world scenarios, the weight (price or significance) of an item can vary with time. Reflecting these changes in item weight is necessary in several mining applications, such as retail market data analysis and web click stream analysis. In this paper, we introduce the concept of a dynamic weight for each item, and propose an algorithm, DWFPM (dynamic weighted frequent pattern mining), that makes use of this concept. Our algorithm can address situations where the weight (price or significance) of an item varies dynamically. It exploits a pattern growth mining technique to avoid the level-wise candidate set generation-and-test methodology. Furthermore, it requires only one database scan, so it is eligible for use in stream data mining. An extensive performance analysis shows that our algorithm is efficient and scalable for WFP mining using dynamic weights.

  14. Shock Dynamics in Stellar Outbursts. I. Shock Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D., E-mail: ro@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2017-05-20

    Wave-driven outflows and non-disruptive explosions have been implicated in pre-supernova outbursts, supernova impostors, luminous blue variable eruptions, and some narrow-line and superluminous supernovae. To model these events, we investigate the dynamics of stars set in motion by strong acoustic pulses and wave trains, focusing on nonlinear wave propagation, shock formation, and an early phase of the development of a weak shock. We identify the shock formation radius, showing that a heuristic estimate based on crossing characteristics matches an exact expansion around the wave front and verifying both with numerical experiments. Our general analytical condition for shock formation applies to one-dimensional motions within any static environment, including both eruptions and implosions. We also consider the early phase of shock energy dissipation. We find that waves of super-Eddington acoustic luminosity always create shocks, rather than damping by radiative diffusion. Therefore, shock formation is integral to super-Eddington outbursts.

  15. Dynamic Scaling of Colloidal Gel Formation at Intermediate Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingteng; Bahadur, Divya; Dufresne, Eric M; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Leheny, Robert L; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Szczygiel, Robert; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Sandy, Alec

    2017-10-27

    We have examined the formation and dissolution of gels composed of intermediate volume-fraction nanoparticles with temperature-dependent short-range attractions using small-angle x-ray scattering, x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, and rheology to obtain nanoscale and macroscale sensitivity to structure and dynamics. Gel formation after temperature quenches to the vicinity of the rheologically determined gel temperature, T_{gel}, was characterized via the slowdown of dynamics and changes in microstructure observed in the intensity autocorrelation functions and structure factor, respectively, as a function of quench depth (ΔT=T_{quench}-T_{gel}), wave vector, and formation time t_{f}. We find the wave-vector-dependent dynamics, microstructure, and rheology at a particular ΔT and t_{f} map to those at other ΔTs and t_{f}s via an effective scaling temperature, T_{s}. A single T_{s} applies to a broad range of ΔT and t_{f} but does depend on the particle size. The rate of formation implied by the scaling is a far stronger function of ΔT than expected from the attraction strength between colloids. We interpret this strong temperature dependence in terms of cooperative bonding required to form stable gels via energetically favored, local structures.

  16. Generating spatiotemporal joint torque patterns from dynamical synchronization of distributed pattern generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Pitti

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Pattern generators found in the spinal cords are no more seen as simple rhythmic oscillators for motion control. Indeed, they achieve flexible and dynamical coordination in interaction with the body and the environment dynamics to rise motor synergies. Discovering the mechanisms underlying the control of motor synergies constitute an important research question not only for neuroscience but also for robotics: the motors coordination of high dimensional robotic systems is still a drawback and new control methods based on biological solutions may reduce their overall complexity. We propose to model the flexible combination of motor synergies in embodied systems via partial phase synchronization of distributed chaotic systems; for specific coupling strength, chaotic systems are able to phase synchronize their dynamics to the resonant frequencies of one external force. We take advantage of this property to explore and exploit the intrinsic dynamics of one specified embodied system. In two experiments with bipedal walkers, we show how motor synergies emerge when the controllers phase synchronize to the body’s dynamics, entraining it to its intrinsic behavioral patterns. This stage is characterized by directed information flow from the sensors to the motors exhibiting the optimal situation when the body dynamics drive the controllers (mutual entrainment. Based on our results, we discuss the relevance of our findings for modeling the modular control of distributed pattern generators exhibited in the spinal cords, and for exploring the motor synergies in robots.

  17. Plasma turbulence. Structure formation, selection rule, dynamic response and dynamics transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Sanae I.

    2010-01-01

    The five-year project of Grant-in-Aid for Specially Promoted Research entitled general research on the structure formation and selection rule in plasma turbulence had brought many outcomes. Based on these outcomes, the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) program entitled general research on dynamic response and dynamic transport in plasma turbulence has started. In the present paper, the state-of-the-art of the research activities on the structure formation, selection rule and dynamics in plasma turbulence are reviewed with reference to outcomes of these projects. (author)

  18. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt-Pollmann, U; Lebiedz, D; Diehl, M; Sager, S; Schlöder, J

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  19. Granulometry use for the study of dynamics speckles patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavilioa, Adriana; Fernandez, Margarita; Trivi, Marcelo; Rabal, Hector; Arizaga, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic speckle patterns are generated by laser light scattering on surfaces that exhibit some kind of activity, due to physical or biological processes that take place in the illuminated object. The characterization of this dynamic process is carried out by studying the texture changes of auxiliary images: temporal history of the speckle pattern (THSP) obtained from this speckles patterns. The drying process of water borne paint is studied through a method based on mathematical morphology applied to the THSP image processing. It is based on obtaining the granulometry of these images and their characteristic granulometric spectrum. From the granulometric size distribution of each THSP image four parameters are obtained: mean length, standard deviation, asymmetry and kurtosis. These parameters are found to be suitable as texture features. The Mahalanobis distance is calculated between the texture features of the THSP images representative of the temporary stages of the drying process and the features of the final stage or pattern texture. The behavior of the distance function describes satisfactorily the drying process of the water borne paint. Finally, these results are compared with the obtained by other methods. Compared with others, the granulometric method reported in this work distinguished by its simplicity and easy implementation and can be used to characterize the evolution of any process recorded through dynamic speckles. (Author)

  20. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hans-Georg; Meyer, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO), molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness dewetting patterns and diffusion limited growth pattern of ordered lamella growing within the dewetting areas. Besides structure formation of hydrophilic PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic) PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups. PMID:23385233

  1. The dynamics of streamer formation and its growth mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalikhanov, B.Zh.

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of experimental studies of physical processes responsible for the transformation of the electron avalanche to the streamer and its growth towards the cathode. The new experimental data on the mechanism of formation and the structure of the streamer allow a more concrete understanding of the pattern of evolution of long spark discharges, including the lightning, and the interrelation of basic processes in such discharges. (author)

  2. Quantum properties of transverse pattern formation in second-harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Scotto, P.; Zambrini, R.

    2002-01-01

    these equations through extensive numerical simulations and analytically in the linearized limit. Our study, made below and above the threshold of pattern formation, is guided by a microscopic scheme of photon interaction underlying pattern formation in second-harmonic generation. Close to the threshold...

  3. Dynamic Trap Formation and Elimination in Colloidal Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, O.

    2013-03-21

    Using first-principles simulations on PbS and CdSe colloidal quantum dots, we find that surface defects form in response to electronic doping and charging of the nanoparticles. We show that electronic trap states in nanocrystals are dynamic entities, in contrast with the conventional picture wherein traps are viewed as stable electronic states that can be filled or emptied, but not created or destroyed. These traps arise from the formation or breaking of atomic dimers at the nanoparticle surface. The dimers\\' energy levels can reside within the bandgap, in which case a trap is formed. Fortunately, we are also able to identify a number of shallow-electron-affinity cations that stabilize the surface, working to counter dynamic trap formation and allowing for trap-free doping. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  4. Dynamic Trap Formation and Elimination in Colloidal Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, O.; Thon, S. M.; Ip, A. H.; Sargent, E. H.

    2013-01-01

    Using first-principles simulations on PbS and CdSe colloidal quantum dots, we find that surface defects form in response to electronic doping and charging of the nanoparticles. We show that electronic trap states in nanocrystals are dynamic entities, in contrast with the conventional picture wherein traps are viewed as stable electronic states that can be filled or emptied, but not created or destroyed. These traps arise from the formation or breaking of atomic dimers at the nanoparticle surface. The dimers' energy levels can reside within the bandgap, in which case a trap is formed. Fortunately, we are also able to identify a number of shallow-electron-affinity cations that stabilize the surface, working to counter dynamic trap formation and allowing for trap-free doping. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  5. Pattern formation in plastic liquid films on elastomers by ratcheting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiangshui; Yang, Jiawei; Jin, Lihua; Clarke, David R; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-04-20

    Plastic liquids, also known as Bingham liquids, retain their shape when loads are small, but flow when loads exceed a threshold. We discovered that plastic liquid films coated on elastomers develop wavy patterns under cyclic loads. As the number of cycles increases, the wavelength of the patterns remains unchanged, but the amplitude of the patterns increases and then saturates. Because the patterns develop progressively under cyclic loads, we call this phenomenon as "patterning by ratcheting". We observe the phenomenon in plastic liquids of several kinds, and studied the effects of thickness, the cyclic frequency of the stretch, and the range of the stretch. Finite element simulations show that the ratcheting phenomenon can occur in materials described by a commonly used model of elastic-plastic deformation.

  6. Modeling of metal nanocluster growth on patterned substrates and surface pattern formation under ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    This work addresses the metal nanocluster growth process on prepatterned substrates, the development of atomistic simulation method with respect to an acceleration of the atomistic transition states, and the continuum model of the ion-beam inducing semiconductor surface pattern formation mechanism. Experimentally, highly ordered Ag nanocluster structures have been grown on pre-patterned amorphous SiO{sub 2} surfaces by oblique angle physical vapor deposition at room temperature. Despite the small undulation of the rippled surface, the stripe-like Ag nanoclusters are very pronounced, reproducible and well-separated. The first topic is the investigation of this growth process with a continuum theoretical approach to the surface gas condensation as well as an atomistic cluster growth model. The atomistic simulation model is a lattice-based kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) method using a combination of a simplified inter-atomic potential and experimental transition barriers taken from the literature. An effective transition event classification method is introduced which allows a boost factor of several thousand compared to a traditional KMC approach, thus allowing experimental time scales to be modeled. The simulation predicts a low sticking probability for the arriving atoms, millisecond order lifetimes for single Ag monomers and {approx}1 nm square surface migration ranges of Ag monomers. The simulations give excellent reproduction of the experimentally observed nanocluster growth patterns. The second topic specifies the acceleration scheme utilized in the metallic cluster growth model. Concerning the atomistic movements, a classical harmonic transition state theory is considered and applied in discrete lattice cells with hierarchical transition levels. The model results in an effective reduction of KMC simulation steps by utilizing a classification scheme of transition levels for thermally activated atomistic diffusion processes. Thermally activated atomistic movements

  7. Modeling of metal nanocluster growth on patterned substrates and surface pattern formation under ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    This work addresses the metal nanocluster growth process on prepatterned substrates, the development of atomistic simulation method with respect to an acceleration of the atomistic transition states, and the continuum model of the ion-beam inducing semiconductor surface pattern formation mechanism. Experimentally, highly ordered Ag nanocluster structures have been grown on pre-patterned amorphous SiO{sub 2} surfaces by oblique angle physical vapor deposition at room temperature. Despite the small undulation of the rippled surface, the stripe-like Ag nanoclusters are very pronounced, reproducible and well-separated. The first topic is the investigation of this growth process with a continuum theoretical approach to the surface gas condensation as well as an atomistic cluster growth model. The atomistic simulation model is a lattice-based kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) method using a combination of a simplified inter-atomic potential and experimental transition barriers taken from the literature. An effective transition event classification method is introduced which allows a boost factor of several thousand compared to a traditional KMC approach, thus allowing experimental time scales to be modeled. The simulation predicts a low sticking probability for the arriving atoms, millisecond order lifetimes for single Ag monomers and {approx}1 nm square surface migration ranges of Ag monomers. The simulations give excellent reproduction of the experimentally observed nanocluster growth patterns. The second topic specifies the acceleration scheme utilized in the metallic cluster growth model. Concerning the atomistic movements, a classical harmonic transition state theory is considered and applied in discrete lattice cells with hierarchical transition levels. The model results in an effective reduction of KMC simulation steps by utilizing a classification scheme of transition levels for thermally activated atomistic diffusion processes. Thermally activated atomistic movements

  8. Near-infrared light-responsive dynamic wrinkle patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fudong; Hou, Honghao; Yin, Jie; Jiang, Xuesong

    2018-04-01

    Dynamic micro/nanopatterns provide an effective approach for on-demand tuning of surface properties to realize a smart surface. We report a simple yet versatile strategy for the fabrication of near-infrared (NIR) light-responsive dynamic wrinkles by using a carbon nanotube (CNT)-containing poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer as the substrate for the bilayer systems, with various functional polymers serving as the top stiff layers. The high photon-to-thermal energy conversion of CNT leads to the NIR-controlled thermal expansion of the elastic CNT-PDMS substrate, resulting in dynamic regulation of the applied strain (ε) of the bilayer system by the NIR on/off cycle to obtain a reversible wrinkle pattern. The switchable surface topological structures can transfer between the wrinkled state and the wrinkle-free state within tens of seconds via NIR irradiation. As a proof-of-concept application, this type of NIR-driven dynamic wrinkle pattern was used in smart displays, dynamic gratings, and light control electronics.

  9. Listening to sound patterns as a dynamic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mari Riess

    2003-04-01

    The act of listening to a series of sounds created by some natural event is described as involving an entrainmentlike process that transpires in real time. Some aspects of this dynamic process are suggested. In particular, real-time attending is described in terms of an adaptive synchronization activity that permits a listener to target attending energy to forthcoming elements within an acoustical pattern (e.g., music, speech, etc.). Also described are several experiments that illustrate features of this approach as it applies to attending to musiclike patterns. These involve listeners' responses to changes in either the timing or the pitch structure (or both) of various acoustical sequences.

  10. Spatio-temporal pattern formation in predator-prey systems with fitness taxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, Irene T.; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2018-01-01

    We pose a spatial predator–prey model in which the movement of animals is not purely diffusive, but also contains a drift term in the direction of higher specific growth rates. We refer to this as fitness taxis. We conduct a linear stability analysis of the resulting coupled reaction–advection–di......We pose a spatial predator–prey model in which the movement of animals is not purely diffusive, but also contains a drift term in the direction of higher specific growth rates. We refer to this as fitness taxis. We conduct a linear stability analysis of the resulting coupled reaction...... of diffusive motion, is ecologically plausible, and provides an alternative mechanism for formation of patterns in spatially explicit ecosystem models, with emphasis on non-stationary spatio-temporal dynamics....

  11. Mechanism Underlying the Spatial Pattern Formation of Dominant Tree Species in a Natural Secondary Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Jia

    Full Text Available Studying the spatial pattern of plant species may provide significant insights into processes and mechanisms that maintain stand stability. To better understand the dynamics of naturally regenerated secondary forests, univariate and bivariate Ripley's L(r functions were employed to evaluate intra-/interspecific relationships of four dominant tree species (Populus davidiana, Betula platyphylla, Larix gmelinii and Acer mono and to distinguish the underlying mechanism of spatial distribution. The results showed that the distribution of soil, water and nutrients was not fragmented but presented clear gradients. An overall aggregated distribution existed at most distances. No correlation was found between the spatial pattern of soil conditions and that of trees. Both positive and negative intra- and interspecific relationships were found between different DBH classes at various distances. Large trees did not show systematic inhibition of the saplings. By contrast, the inhibition intensified as the height differences increased between the compared pairs. Except for Larix, universal inhibition of saplings by upper layer trees occurred among other species, and this reflected the vertical competition for light. Therefore, we believe that competition for light rather than soil nutrients underlies the mechanism driving the formation of stand spatial pattern in the rocky mountainous areas examined.

  12. Dynamical and photometric models of star formation in tidal tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation into the causes of star formation in tidal tails has been conducted using a restricted three-body dynamical model in conjunction with a broadband photometric evolutionary code. Test particles are initially placed in circular orbits around a softened point mass and then perturbed by a companion passing in a parabotic orbit. During the passage, the density evolution of the galaxy is examined both in regions within the disk and in selected comoving regions in the tidal features. Even without the inclusion of self-gravity and hydrodynamics, regions of compression form inside the disk, along the tidal tail, and in the tidal bridge causing local density increases of up to 500 percent. By assuming that the density changes relate to the star-formation rate via a Schmidt (1959) law, limits on the density changes needed to make detectable changes in the colors are calculated. A spiral galaxy population is synthesized and the effects of modest changes in the star-formation rate are explored using a broadband photometric evolutionary code. Density changes similar to those found in the dynamical models will cause detectable changes in the colors of a stellar population. From these models, it is determined that the blue colors and knotty features observed in the tidal features of some galaxies result from increased rates of star formation induced by tidally produced density increases. Limitations of this model are discussed along with photometric evolutionary models based on the density evolution in the tails. 52 refs

  13. Pattern formations in chaotic spatio-temporal systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    5Beijing–Hong Kong–Singapore Joint Center of Nonlinear and Complex Systems, ... For theoretical studies most previous work has focused on pattern .... Lyapunov exponents from arbitrary initial conditions, and the plots look rather.

  14. Endothelial cell motility, coordination and pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czirok, Andras

    2013-01-01

    How vascular networks assemble is a fundamental problem of developmental biology that also has medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how can tissue level structures be controlled through cell behavior patterns like motility and adhesion that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes? We discuss the various ideas that have been proposed as mechanisms for vascular network assembly: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and multicellular sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. All of these processes yield emergent patterns, thus endothelial cells can form an interconnected structure autonomously, without guidance from an external pre-pattern. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Topics in Complexity: Dynamical Patterns in the Cyberworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hong

    Quantitative understanding of mechanism in complex systems is a common "difficult" problem across many fields such as physical, biological, social and economic sciences. Investigation on underlying dynamics of complex systems and building individual-based models have recently been fueled by big data resulted from advancing information technology. This thesis investigates complex systems in social science, focusing on civil unrests on streets and relevant activities online. Investigation consists of collecting data of unrests from open digital source, featuring dynamical patterns underlying, making predictions and constructing models. A simple law governing the progress of two-sided confrontations is proposed with data of activities at micro-level. Unraveling the connections between activity of organizing online and outburst of unrests on streets gives rise to a further meso-level pattern of human behavior, through which adversarial groups evolve online and hyper-escalate ahead of real-world uprisings. Based on the patterns found, noticeable improvement of prediction of civil unrests is achieved. Meanwhile, novel model created from combination of mobility dynamics in the cyberworld and a traditional contagion model can better capture the characteristics of modern civil unrests and other contagion-like phenomena than the original one.

  16. Dynamics of blood flow and thrombus formation in a multi-bypass microfluidic ladder network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; Sylman, Joanna L; Lakshmanan, Hari H S; McCarty, Owen J T; Maddala, Jeevan

    2017-02-01

    The reaction dynamics of a complex mixture of cells and proteins, such as blood, in branched circulatory networks within the human microvasculature or extravascular therapeutic devices such as extracorporeal oxygenation machine (ECMO) remains ill-defined. In this report we utilize a multi-bypass microfluidics ladder network design with dimensions mimicking venules to study patterns of blood platelet aggregation and fibrin formation under complex shear. Complex blood fluid dynamics within multi-bypass networks under flow were modeled using COMSOL. Red blood cells and platelets were assumed to be non-interacting spherical particles transported by the bulk fluid flow, and convection of the activated coagulation factor II, thrombin, was assumed to be governed by mass transfer. This model served as the basis for predicting formation of local shear rate gradients, stagnation points and recirculation zones as dictated by the bypass geometry. Based on the insights from these models, we were able to predict the patterns of blood clot formation at specific locations in the device. Our experimental data was then used to adjust the model to account for the dynamical presence of thrombus formation in the biorheology of blood flow. The model predictions were then compared to results from experiments using recalcified whole human blood. Microfluidic devices were coated with the extracellular matrix protein, fibrillar collagen, and the initiator of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation, tissue factor. Blood was perfused through the devices at a flow rate of 2 µL/min, translating to physiologically relevant initial shear rates of 300 and 700 s -1 for main channels and bypasses, respectively. Using fluorescent and light microscopy, we observed distinct flow and thrombus formation patterns near channel intersections at bypass points, within recirculation zones and at stagnation points. Findings from this proof-of-principle ladder network model suggest a specific correlation between

  17. Advances in dynamics, patterns, cognition challenges in complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Pikovsky, Arkady; Rulkov, Nikolai; Tsimring, Lev

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on recent progress in complexity research based on the fundamental nonlinear dynamical and statistical theory of oscillations, waves, chaos, and structures far from equilibrium. Celebrating seminal contributions to the field by Prof. M. I. Rabinovich of the University of California at San Diego, this volume brings together perspectives on both the fundamental aspects of complexity studies, as well as in applications in different fields ranging from granular patterns to understanding of the cognitive brain and mind dynamics. The slate of world-class authors review recent achievements that together present a broad and coherent coverage of modern research in complexity greater than the sum of its parts. Presents the most up-to-date developments in the studies of complexity Combines basic and applied aspects Links background nonlinear theory of oscillations and waves with modern approaches Allows readers to recognize general dynamical principles across the applications fields.

  18. Dynamic patterns in a supported lipid bilayer driven by standing surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Martin; Neumann, Jürgen; Wixforth, Achim; Rädler, Joachim O; Schneider, Matthias F

    2009-11-07

    In the past decades supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) have been an important tool in order to study the physical properties of biological membranes and cells. So far, controlled manipulation of SLBs is very limited. Here we present a new technology to create lateral patterns in lipid membranes controllable in both space and time. Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are used to generate lateral standing waves on a piezoelectric substrate which create local "traps" in the lipid bilayer and lead to a lateral modulation in lipid concentration. We demonstrate that pattern formation is reversible and does not affect the integrity of the lipid bilayer as shown by extracting the diffusion constant of fluid membranes. The described method could possibly be used to design switchable interfaces for the lateral transport and organization of membrane bound macromolecules to create dynamic bioarrays and control biofilm formation.

  19. Viscoelasticity and pattern formations in stock market indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Güngör; Gündüz, Aydın

    2017-06-01

    The viscoelastic and thermodynamic properties of four stock indices, namely, DJI, Nasdaq-100, Nasdaq-Composite, and S&P were analyzed for a period of 30 years from 1986 to 2015. The asset values (or index) can be placed into Aristotelian `potentiality-actuality' framework by using scattering diagram. Thus, the index values can be transformed into vectorial forms in a scattering diagram, and each vector can be split into its horizontal and vertical components. According to viscoelastic theory, the horizontal component represents the conservative, and the vertical component represents the dissipative behavior. The related storage and the loss modulus of these components are determined and then work-like and heat-like terms are calculated. It is found that the change of storage and loss modulus with Wiener noise (W) exhibit interesting patterns. The loss modulus shows a featherlike pattern, whereas the storage modulus shows figurative man-like pattern. These patterns are formed due to branchings in the system and imply that stock indices do have a kind of `fine-order' which can be detected when the change of modulus values are plotted with respect to Wiener noise. In theoretical calculations it is shown that the tips of the featherlike patterns stay at negative W values, but get closer to W = 0 as the drift in the system increases. The shift of the tip point from W = 0 indicates that the price change involves higher number of positive Wiener number corrections than the negative Wiener. The work-like and heat-like terms also exhibit patterns but with different appearance than modulus patterns. The decisional changes of people are reflected as the arrows in the scattering diagram and the propagation path of these vectors resemble the path of crack propagation. The distribution of the angle between two subsequent vectors shows a peak at 90°, indicating that the path mostly obeys the crack path occurring in hard objects. Entropy mimics the Wiener noise in the evolution

  20. A natural experiment of social network formation and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tuan Q; Airoldi, Edoardo M

    2015-05-26

    Social networks affect many aspects of life, including the spread of diseases, the diffusion of information, the workers' productivity, and consumers' behavior. Little is known, however, about how these networks form and change. Estimating causal effects and mechanisms that drive social network formation and dynamics is challenging because of the complexity of engineering social relations in a controlled environment, endogeneity between network structure and individual characteristics, and the lack of time-resolved data about individuals' behavior. We leverage data from a sample of 1.5 million college students on Facebook, who wrote more than 630 million messages and 590 million posts over 4 years, to design a long-term natural experiment of friendship formation and social dynamics in the aftermath of a natural disaster. The analysis shows that affected individuals are more likely to strengthen interactions, while maintaining the same number of friends as unaffected individuals. Our findings suggest that the formation of social relationships may serve as a coping mechanism to deal with high-stress situations and build resilience in communities.

  1. Dynamics of intense laser channel formation in an underdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.; Petrov, G.M.; Velikovich, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    Efficient guiding and propagation of multi-keV x-rays in plasmas can be achieved by dynamically modifying the media through plasma channel formation. The dynamics of plasma channel formation is studied in preformed underdense plasma irradiated by a high intensity laser. This is done by a two-dimensional model coupling laser propagation to a relativistic particle-in-cell model. For laser intensity of 10 20 W/cm 2 and a laser beam width of 5 μm the channel formation proceeds on a time scale of 60-70 fs in uniform plasma with density 10 18 cm -3 . The channel closes shortly after the rear of the laser pulse has passed due to Coulomb attraction from the ion core. Electron cavitation occurs only if the laser intensity is above a certain threshold intensity and the laser pulse duration exceeds 100 fs. X-ray generation and propagation is feasible for ultrarelativistic laser pulses with small beam width, less than ∼20 μm, and duration of more than 100 fs

  2. Dynamics of Research Team Formation in Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Caihong; Wan, Yuzi; Chen, Yu

    Most organizations encourage the formation of teams to accomplish complicated tasks, and vice verse, effective teams could bring lots benefits and profits for organizations. Network structure plays an important role in forming teams. In this paper, we specifically study the dynamics of team formation in large research communities in which knowledge of individuals plays an important role on team performance and individual utility. An agent-based model is proposed, in which heterogeneous agents from research communities are described and empirically tested. Each agent has a knowledge endowment and a preference for both income and leisure. Agents provide a variable input (‘effort’) and their knowledge endowments to production. They could learn from others in their team and those who are not in their team but have private connections in community to adjust their own knowledge endowment. They are allowed to join other teams or work alone when it is welfare maximizing to do so. Various simulation experiments are conducted to examine the impacts of network topology, knowledge diffusion among community network, and team output sharing mechanisms on the dynamics of team formation.

  3. Cloud-particle galactic gas dynamics and star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, W.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Galactic gas dynamics, spiral structure, and star formation are discussed in the context of N-body computational studies based on a cloud-particle model of the interstellar medium. On the small scale, the interstellar medium appears to be cloud-dominated and supernova-perturbed. The cloud-particle model simulates cloud-cloud collisions, the formation of stellar associations, and supernova explosions as dominant local processes. On the large scale in response to a spiral galactic gravitational field, global density waves and galactic shocks develop with large-scale characteristics similar to those found in continuum gas dynamical studies. Both the system of gas clouds and the system of young stellar associations forming from the clouds share in the global spiral structure. However, with the attributes of neither assuming a continuum of gas (as in continuum gas dynamical studies) nor requiring a prescribed equation of state such as the isothermal condition so often employed, the cloud-particle picture retains much of the detail lost in earlier work: namely, the small-scale features and structures so important in understanding the local, turbulent state of the interstellar medium as well as the degree of raggedness often observed superposed on global spiral structure. (Auth.)

  4. Pattern formation in the bistable Gray-Scott model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazin, W.; Rasmussen, K.E.; Mosekilde, Erik

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a computer simulation study of a variety of far-from-equilibrium phenomena that can arise in a bistable chemical reaction-diffusion system which also displays Turing and Hopf instabilities. The Turing bifurcation curve and the wave number for the patterns of maximum linear grow...

  5. Looking at the origin of phenotypic variation from pattern formation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    evolutionary considerations, a large number of researchers, ... This article critically reviews some widespread views about the overall functioning of development. ... Thus, a great deal about the evolution and functioning of ... variants and thus take patterns of phenotypic variation as ..... Evolutionary thinking to the rescue.

  6. Formation, evolution, and dynamics of young solar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gressel, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    This book's interdisciplinary scope aims at bridging various communities: 1) cosmochemists, who study meteoritic samples from our own solar system, 2) (sub-) millimetre astronomers, who measure the distribution of dust and gas of star-forming regions and planet-forming discs, 3) disc modellers, who describe the complex photo-chemical structure of parametric discs to fit these to observation, 4) computational astrophysicists, who attempt to decipher the dynamical structure of magnetised gaseous discs, and the effects the resulting internal structure has on the aerodynamic re-distribution of embedded solids, 5) theoreticians in planet formation theory, who aim to piece it all together eventually arriving at a coherent holistic picture of the architectures of planetary systems discovered by 6) the exoplanet observers, who provide us with unprecedented samples of exoplanet worlds. Combining these diverse fields the book sheds light onto the riddles that research on planet formation is currently confronted with, a...

  7. Patterns of partnership formation among lone mothers in Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Cordula Zabel

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the determinants of partnership formation among lone mothers in Russia, using data from the Russian Generations and Gender Survey (GGS) and the Education and Employment Survey (EES). The central research question is whether difficult economic circumstances pressure lone mothers to enter new partnerships sooner than they would under other circumstances, limiting their freedom of choice of type of living arrangement. The empirical results show that while occupation influence...

  8. Signal Processing, Pattern Formation and Adaptation in Neural Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-29

    rhythmic patterns. As such, our models are appropriate for describing various phenomena in the auditory system, including critical nonlinear...several distinct intrinsic behaviors available near a Hopf bifurcation or a Bautin (a.k.a. double limit cycle) bifurcation. Stability analysis shows...example the perception of pitch at event timescales (Meddis & O’Mard, 2006) and the perception of pulse and meter at rhythmic timescales (Large

  9. Fluctuation-Driven Neural Dynamics Reproduce Drosophila Locomotor Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Maesani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The neural mechanisms determining the timing of even simple actions, such as when to walk or rest, are largely mysterious. One intriguing, but untested, hypothesis posits a role for ongoing activity fluctuations in neurons of central action selection circuits that drive animal behavior from moment to moment. To examine how fluctuating activity can contribute to action timing, we paired high-resolution measurements of freely walking Drosophila melanogaster with data-driven neural network modeling and dynamical systems analysis. We generated fluctuation-driven network models whose outputs-locomotor bouts-matched those measured from sensory-deprived Drosophila. From these models, we identified those that could also reproduce a second, unrelated dataset: the complex time-course of odor-evoked walking for genetically diverse Drosophila strains. Dynamical models that best reproduced both Drosophila basal and odor-evoked locomotor patterns exhibited specific characteristics. First, ongoing fluctuations were required. In a stochastic resonance-like manner, these fluctuations allowed neural activity to escape stable equilibria and to exceed a threshold for locomotion. Second, odor-induced shifts of equilibria in these models caused a depression in locomotor frequency following olfactory stimulation. Our models predict that activity fluctuations in action selection circuits cause behavioral output to more closely match sensory drive and may therefore enhance navigation in complex sensory environments. Together these data reveal how simple neural dynamics, when coupled with activity fluctuations, can give rise to complex patterns of animal behavior.

  10. A simplified memory network model based on pattern formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kesheng; Zhang, Xiyun; Wang, Chaoqing; Liu, Zonghua

    2014-12-01

    Many experiments have evidenced the transition with different time scales from short-term memory (STM) to long-term memory (LTM) in mammalian brains, while its theoretical understanding is still under debate. To understand its underlying mechanism, it has recently been shown that it is possible to have a long-period rhythmic synchronous firing in a scale-free network, provided the existence of both the high-degree hubs and the loops formed by low-degree nodes. We here present a simplified memory network model to show that the self-sustained synchronous firing can be observed even without these two necessary conditions. This simplified network consists of two loops of coupled excitable neurons with different synaptic conductance and with one node being the sensory neuron to receive an external stimulus signal. This model can be further used to show how the diversity of firing patterns can be selectively formed by varying the signal frequency, duration of the stimulus and network topology, which corresponds to the patterns of STM and LTM with different time scales. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the underlying mechanism of firing patterns.

  11. Pattern formation in annular systems of repulsive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschler, Christian; Starke, Jens; Sørensen, Mads P.; Gaididei, Yuri B.; Christiansen, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    General particle models with symmetric and asymmetric repulsion are studied and investigated for finite-range and exponential interaction in an annulus. In the symmetric case transitions from one- to multi-lane behavior including multistability are observed for varying particle density and for a varying curvature with fixed density. Hence, the system cannot be approximated by a periodic channel. In the asymmetric case, which is important in pedestrian dynamics, we reveal an inhomogeneous new phase, a traveling wave reminiscent of peristaltic motion. - Highlights: • An asymmetrically interacting repulsive particle model is introduced. • Multi-stability is found in a pedestrian dynamics model. • Transitions from one- to multi-lane behavior are studied numerically.

  12. Swarming and Pattern Formation due to Selective Attraction and Repulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the collective dynamics of self-propelled particles with selective attraction and repulsion interactions. Each particle, or individual, may respond differently to its neighbours depending on the sign of their relative velocity. Thus, it is able to distinguish approaching (coming closer) and retreating (moving away) individuals. This differentiation of the social response is motivated by the response to looming visual stimuli and may be seen as a generalization of the previously pro...

  13. Explaining formation of Astronomical Jets using Dynamic Universe Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    2016-07-01

    Astronomical jets are observed from the centres of many Galaxies including our own Milkyway. The formation of such jet is explained using SITA simulations of Dynamic Universe Model. For this purpose the path traced by a test neutron is calculated and depicted using a set up of one densemass of the mass equivalent to mass of Galaxy center, 90 stars with similar masses of stars near Galaxy center, mass equivalents of 23 Globular Cluster groups, 16 Milkyway parts, Andromeda and Triangulum Galaxies at appropriate distances. Five different kinds of theoretical simulations gave positive results The path travelled by this test neutron was found to be an astronomical jet emerging from Galaxy center. This is another result from Dynamic Universe Model. It solves new problems like a. Variable Mass Rocket Trajectory Problem b. Explaining Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations c. Astronomical jets observed from Milkyway Center d. Prediction of Blue shifted Galaxies e. Explaining Pioneer Anomaly f. Prediction of New Horizons satellite trajectory etc. Dynamic Universe Model never reduces to General relativity on any condition. It uses a different type of mathematics based on Newtonian physics. This mathematics used here is simple and straightforward. As there are no differential equations present in Dynamic Universe Model, the set of equations give single solution in x y z Cartesian coordinates for every point mass for every time step

  14. Correlated conductance parameters in leech heart motor neurons contribute to motor pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Damon G; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2013-01-01

    Neurons can have widely differing intrinsic membrane properties, in particular the density of specific conductances, but how these contribute to characteristic neuronal activity or pattern formation is not well understood. To explore the relationship between conductances, and in particular how they influence the activity of motor neurons in the well characterized leech heartbeat system, we developed a new multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley style leech heart motor neuron model. To do so, we evolved a population of model instances, which differed in the density of specific conductances, capable of achieving specific output activity targets given an associated input pattern. We then examined the sensitivity of measures of output activity to conductances and how the model instances responded to hyperpolarizing current injections. We found that the strengths of many conductances, including those with differing dynamics, had strong partial correlations and that these relationships appeared to be linked by their influence on heart motor neuron activity. Conductances that had positive correlations opposed one another and had the opposite effects on activity metrics when perturbed whereas conductances that had negative correlations could compensate for one another and had similar effects on activity metrics.

  15. Nanoscale pattern formation at surfaces under ion-beam sputtering: A perspective from continuum models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuerno, Rodolfo; Castro, Mario; Munoz-Garcia, Javier; Gago, Raul; Vazquez, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Although reports on surface nanostructuring of solid targets by low to medium energy ion irradiation date back to the 1960s, only with the advent of high resolution tools for surface/interface characterization has the high potential of this procedure been recognized as a method for efficient production of surface patterns. Such morphologies are made up of periodic arrangements of nanometric sized features, like ripples and dots, with interest for technological applications due to their electronic, magnetic, and optical properties. Thus, roughly for the last ten years large efforts have been directed towards harnessing this nanofabrication technique. However, and particularly in view of recent experimental developments, we can say that the basic mechanisms controlling these pattern formation processes remain poorly understood. The lack of nanostructuring at low angles of incidence on some pure monoelemental targets, the role of impurities in the surface dynamics and other recent observations are challenging the classic view on the phenomenon as the mere interplay between the curvature dependence of the sputtering yield and surface diffusion. We review the main attempts at a theoretical (continuum) description of these systems, with emphasis on recent developments. Strong hints already exist that the nature of the morphological instability has to be rethought as originating in the material flow that is induced by the ion beam.

  16. Dynamic Membrane Formation in Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Bioreactors: Role of Extracellular Polymeric Substances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Yu

    Full Text Available Dynamic membrane (DM formation in dynamic membrane bioreactors plays an important role in achieving efficient solid-liquid separation. In order to study the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS to DM formation in anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR processes, EPS extraction from and re-addition to bulk sludge were carried out in short-term filtration tests. DM formation behaviors could be well simulated by cake filtration model, and sludge with EPS re-addition showed the highest resistance coefficient, followed by sludge after EPS extraction. The DM layers exhibited a higher resistance and a lower porosity for the sludge sample after EPS extraction and for the sludge with EPS re-addition. Particle size of sludge flocs decreased after EPS extraction, and changed little with EPS re-addition, which was confirmed by interaction energy analysis. Further investigations by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analysis and batch tests suggested that the removal of in-situ EPS stimulated release of soluble EPS, and re-added EPS were present as soluble EPS rather than bound EPS, which thus improved the formation of DM. The present work revealed the role of EPS in anaerobic DM formation, and could facilitate the operation of AnDMBR processes.

  17. Patterns Formation in a Self-Gravitating Isentropic Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humi, Mayer

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we consider a hydrodynamic model for the matter density distribution in a self gravitating, isentropic 2-d disk of gas where the isentropy coefficient is allowed to be a function of position. For this model we prove analytically the existence of steady state and time dependent solutions in which the matter density in the disk is oscillatory and pattern forming. This research is motivated in part by recent astronomical observations and Laplace conjecture (made in 1796) that planetary systems evolve from a family of isolated rings that are formed within a primitive interstellar gas cloud.

  18. A survey on pattern formation of autonomous mobile robots: asynchrony, obliviousness and visibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Yukiko

    2013-01-01

    A robot system consists of autonomous mobile robots each of which repeats Look-Compute-Move cycles, where the robot observes the positions of other robots (Look phase), computes the track to the next location (Compute phase), and moves along the track (Move phase). In this survey, we focus on self-organization of mobile robots, especially their power of forming patterns. The formation power of a robot system is the class of patterns that the robots can form, and existing results show that the robot system's formation power is determined by their asynchrony, obliviousness, and visibility. We briefly survey existing results, with impossibilities and pattern formation algorithms. Finally, we present several open problems related to the pattern formation problem of mobile robots

  19. The physics of pattern formation at liquid interface: Progress report, June 1, 1988--May 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, J.V.

    1989-06-01

    This paper describes pattern formation at liquid interfaces. Results shed light on questions which underlie the theory of solidification. Also reviewed are random system issues of wetting of curved surfaces and fluctuations in swollen polymeric gel

  20. Face Liveness Detection Using Dynamic Local Ternary Pattern (DLTP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajida Parveen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Face spoofing is considered to be one of the prominent threats to face recognition systems. However, in order to improve the security measures of such biometric systems against deliberate spoof attacks, liveness detection has received significant recent attention from researchers. For this purpose, analysis of facial skin texture properties becomes more popular because of its limited resource requirement and lower processing cost. The traditional method of skin analysis for liveness detection was to use Local Binary Pattern (LBP and its variants. LBP descriptors are effective, but they may exhibit certain limitations in near uniform patterns. Thus, in this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of Local Ternary Pattern (LTP as an alternative to LBP. In addition, we adopted Dynamic Local Ternary Pattern (DLTP, which eliminates the manual threshold setting in LTP by using Weber’s law. The proposed method was tested rigorously on four facial spoof databases: three are public domain databases and the other is the Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM face spoof database, which was compiled through this study. The results obtained from the proposed DLTP texture descriptor attained optimum accuracy and clearly outperformed the reported LBP and LTP texture descriptors.

  1. Global patterns of phytoplankton dynamics in coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerl, H.; Yin, Kedong; Cloern, J.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific Committee on Ocean Research Working Group 137 Meeting; Hangzhou, China, 17-21 October 2010; Phytoplankton biomass and community structure have undergone dramatic changes in coastal ecosystems over the past several decades in response to climate variability and human disturbance. These changes have short- and long-term impacts on global carbon and nutrient cycling, food web structure and productivity, and coastal ecosystem services. There is a need to identify the underlying processes and measure the rates at which they alter coastal ecosystems on a global scale. Hence, the Scientific Committee on Ocean Research (SCOR) formed Working Group 137 (WG 137), "Global Patterns of Phytoplankton Dynamics in Coastal Ecosystems: A Comparative Analysis of Time Series Observations" (http://wg137.net/). This group evolved from a 2007 AGU-sponsored Chapman Conference entitled "Long Time-Series Observations in Coastal Ecosystems: Comparative Analyses of Phytoplankton Dynamics on Regional to Global Scales.".

  2. Automated numerical simulation of biological pattern formation based on visual feedback simulation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingzhu; Xu, Hui; Zeng, Xingjuan; Zhao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    There are various fantastic biological phenomena in biological pattern formation. Mathematical modeling using reaction-diffusion partial differential equation systems is employed to study the mechanism of pattern formation. However, model parameter selection is both difficult and time consuming. In this paper, a visual feedback simulation framework is proposed to calculate the parameters of a mathematical model automatically based on the basic principle of feedback control. In the simulation framework, the simulation results are visualized, and the image features are extracted as the system feedback. Then, the unknown model parameters are obtained by comparing the image features of the simulation image and the target biological pattern. Considering two typical applications, the visual feedback simulation framework is applied to fulfill pattern formation simulations for vascular mesenchymal cells and lung development. In the simulation framework, the spot, stripe, labyrinthine patterns of vascular mesenchymal cells, the normal branching pattern and the branching pattern lacking side branching for lung branching are obtained in a finite number of iterations. The simulation results indicate that it is easy to achieve the simulation targets, especially when the simulation patterns are sensitive to the model parameters. Moreover, this simulation framework can expand to other types of biological pattern formation.

  3. Pattern formation in annular systems of repulsive particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschler, Christian; Starke, Jens; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2016-01-01

    General particle models with symmetric and asymmetric repulsion are studied and investigated for finite-range and exponential interaction in an annulus. In the symmetric case transitions from one- to multi-lane behavior including multistability are observed for varying particle density and for a ...... and for a varying curvature with fixed density. Hence, the system cannot be approximated by a periodic channel. In the asymmetric case, which is important in pedestrian dynamics, we reveal an inhomogeneous new phase, a traveling wave reminiscent of peristaltic motion....

  4. THE DYNAMIC OF REGIONAL TRADE SPECIALISATION PATTERN IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Ancuţa Stângaciu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the evolution of the regional trade specialization pattern in Romanian regions, by studying the dynamic of their comparative advantages over the period 2000 - 2009. The study finds that, in almost all regions (exceptions are North-East and South-East Region the international specialization has increased for products in which regions were initially relatively less specialized and has decreased for those in which they were initially highly specialized. Finally, most regions recorded large respectively small specialization improvements in products for which the internal respectively external demand expanded at the fastest rate over the time.

  5. Phase-Transition-Induced Pattern Formation Applied to Basic Research on Homeopathy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokornaczyk, Maria Olga; Scherr, Claudia; Bodrova, Natalia Borisovna; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2018-05-16

     Methods based on phase-transition-induced pattern formation (PTPF) are increasingly used in medical research. Frequent application fields are medical diagnosis and basic research in homeopathy. Here, we present a systematic review of experimental studies concerning PTPF-based methods applied to homeopathy research. We also aimed at categorizing the PTPF methods included in this review.  Experimental studies were collected from scientific databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Russian eLibrary) and from experts in the research field in question, following the PRISMA guidelines. The studies were rated according to pre-defined scientific criteria.  The review included 15 experimental studies. We identified seven different PTPF methods applied in 12 experimental models. Among these methods, phase-transition was triggered through evaporation, freezing, or solution, and in most cases led to the formation of crystals. First experimental studies concerning the application of PTPF methods in homeopathic research were performed in the first half of the 20th century; however, they were not continued in the following years. Only in the last decade, different research groups re-launched the idea, introducing new experimental approaches and computerized pattern evaluation techniques. The here-identified PTPF methods are for the first time proposed to be classified as one group of methods based on the same basic physical phenomenon.  Although the number of experimental studies in the area is still rather limited, the long tradition in the application of PTPF methods and the dynamics of the present developments point out the high potential of these methods and indicate that they might meet the demand for scientific methods to study potentized preparations. The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  6. Distinct eye movement patterns enhance dynamic visual acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palidis, Dimitrios J; Wyder-Hodge, Pearson A; Fooken, Jolande; Spering, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is the ability to resolve fine spatial detail in dynamic objects during head fixation, or in static objects during head or body rotation. This ability is important for many activities such as ball sports, and a close relation has been shown between DVA and sports expertise. DVA tasks involve eye movements, yet, it is unclear which aspects of eye movements contribute to successful performance. Here we examined the relation between DVA and the kinematics of smooth pursuit and saccadic eye movements in a cohort of 23 varsity baseball players. In a computerized dynamic-object DVA test, observers reported the location of the gap in a small Landolt-C ring moving at various speeds while eye movements were recorded. Smooth pursuit kinematics-eye latency, acceleration, velocity gain, position error-and the direction and amplitude of saccadic eye movements were linked to perceptual performance. Results reveal that distinct eye movement patterns-minimizing eye position error, tracking smoothly, and inhibiting reverse saccades-were related to dynamic visual acuity. The close link between eye movement quality and DVA performance has important implications for the development of perceptual training programs to improve DVA.

  7. Patterns of Family Formation in Response to Sex Ratio Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacht, Ryan; Kramer, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The impact that unbalanced sex ratios have on health and societal outcomes is of mounting contemporary concern. However, it is increasingly unclear whether it is male- or female-biased sex ratios that are associated with family and social instability. From a socio-demographic perspective, male-biased sex ratios leave many men unable to find a mate, elevating competition among males, disrupting family formation and negatively affecting social stability. In contrast, from a mating-market perspective, males are expected to be less willing to marry and commit to a family when the sex ratio is female-biased and males are rare. Here we use U.S. data to evaluate predictions from these competing frameworks by testing the relationship between the adult sex ratio and measures of family formation. We find that when women are rare men are more likely to marry, be part of a family and be sexually committed to a single partner. Our results do not support claims that male-biased sex ratios lead to negative family outcomes due to a surplus of unmarried men. Rather, our results highlight the need to pay increased attention to female-biased sex ratios.

  8. Physical-chemical mechanisms of pattern formation during gastrulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgui, Behnaz; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Teimouri, Hamid

    2018-03-01

    Gastrulation is a fundamental phase during the biological development of most animals when a single layer of identical embryo cells is transformed into a three-layer structure, from which the organs start to develop. Despite a remarkable progress in quantifying the gastrulation processes, molecular mechanisms of these processes remain not well understood. Here we theoretically investigate early spatial patterning in a geometrically confined colony of embryonic stem cells. Using a reaction-diffusion model, a role of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP4) signaling pathway in gastrulation is specifically analyzed. Our results show that for slow diffusion rates of BMP4 molecules, a new length scale appears, which is independent of the size of the system. This length scale separates the central region of the colony with uniform low concentrations of BMP molecules from the region near the colony edge where the concentration of signaling molecules is elevated. The roles of different components of the signaling pathway are also explained. Theoretical results are consistent with recent in vitro experiments, providing microscopic explanations for some features of early embryonic spatial patterning. Physical-chemical mechanisms of these processes are discussed.

  9. Dynamics of exciplex formation in rare gas media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Lorenzo, German, E-mail: grojas37@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica General y Matematicas, Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, La Habana (Cuba)] [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Rubayo-Soneira, Jesus [Departamento de Fisica General y Matematicas, Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, La Habana (Cuba); Alberti, Sebastian Fernandez [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Roque Saenz Pena 180, Bernal B1876BXD (Argentina)

    2009-07-30

    A hopping-surface algorithm has been used to simulate the dynamics induced in rare gas matrices due to the photoexcitation ({sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 1}) of atomic mercury embedded in them. Especially, the study of the dynamics of an exciplex formation in a model system consisting of solid xenon doped with atomic mercury. The process starts upon the photoexcitation of the Hg atom to its {sup 3}P{sub 1} electronic excited state. Diatomics-in-Molecule approach has been used for constructing the adiabatic potential surfaces. In all trajectories we show that a triatomic Xe-Hg{sup *}-Xe complex is formed, but in two conformations: bent and linear. The mechanisms leading to the formation of one or the other are identified. Mainly, are noted the thermal fluctuations of the Hg impurity and the shape of the potential surfaces. Furthermore, we show that non-radiative intrastate relaxation occurs via a conical intersection between the excited state surfaces. The simulated spectra are in very good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Dynamics of exciplex formation in rare gas media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Lorenzo, German; Rubayo-Soneira, Jesus; Alberti, Sebastian Fernandez

    2009-01-01

    A hopping-surface algorithm has been used to simulate the dynamics induced in rare gas matrices due to the photoexcitation ( 1 S 0 → 3 P 1 ) of atomic mercury embedded in them. Especially, the study of the dynamics of an exciplex formation in a model system consisting of solid xenon doped with atomic mercury. The process starts upon the photoexcitation of the Hg atom to its 3 P 1 electronic excited state. Diatomics-in-Molecule approach has been used for constructing the adiabatic potential surfaces. In all trajectories we show that a triatomic Xe-Hg * -Xe complex is formed, but in two conformations: bent and linear. The mechanisms leading to the formation of one or the other are identified. Mainly, are noted the thermal fluctuations of the Hg impurity and the shape of the potential surfaces. Furthermore, we show that non-radiative intrastate relaxation occurs via a conical intersection between the excited state surfaces. The simulated spectra are in very good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Swarming and pattern formation due to selective attraction and repulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2012-12-06

    We discuss the collective dynamics of self-propelled particles with selective attraction and repulsion interactions. Each particle, or individual, may respond differently to its neighbours depending on the sign of their relative velocity. Thus, it is able to distinguish approaching (coming closer) and retreating (moving away) individuals. This differentiation of the social response is motivated by the response to looming visual stimuli and may be seen as a generalization of the previously proposed escape and pursuit interactions motivated by empirical evidence for cannibalism as a driving force of collective migration in locusts and Mormon crickets. The model can account for different types of behaviour such as pure attraction, pure repulsion or escape and pursuit, depending on the values (signs) of the different response strengths. It provides, in the light of recent experimental results, an interesting alternative to previously proposed models of collective motion with an explicit velocity-alignment interaction. We discuss the derivation of a coarse-grained description of the system dynamics, which allows us to derive analytically the necessary condition for emergence of collective motion. Furthermore, we analyse systematically the onset of collective motion and clustering in numerical simulations of the model for varying interaction strengths. We show that collective motion arises only in a subregion of the parameter space, which is consistent with the analytical prediction and corresponds to an effective escape and/or pursuit response.

  12. Formation and field-driven dynamics of nematic spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Fred; Abukhdeir, Nasser Mohieddin

    2017-07-19

    Unlike the canonical application of liquid crystals (LCs), LC displays, emerging technologies based on LC materials are increasingly leveraging the presence of nanoscale defects. The inherent nanoscale characteristics of LC defects present both significant opportunities as well as barriers for the application of this fascinating class of materials. Simulation-based approaches to the study of the effects of confinement and interface anchoring conditions on LC domains has resulted in significant progress over the past decade, where simulations are now able to access experimentally-relevant length scales while simultaneously capturing nanoscale defect structures. In this work, continuum simulations were performed in order to study the dynamics of micron-scale nematic LC spheroids of varying shape. Nematic spheroids are one of the simplest inherently defect-containing LC structures and are relevant to polymer-dispersed LC-based "smart" window technology. Simulation results include nematic phase formation and external field-switching dynamics of nematic spheroids ranging in shape from oblate to prolate. Results include both qualitative and quantitative insight into the complex coupling of nanoscale defect dynamics and structure transitions to micron-scale reorientation. Dynamic mechanisms are presented and related to structural transitions in LC defects present in the nematic domain. Domain-averaged metrics including order parameters and response times are determined for a range of experimentally-accessible electric field strengths. These results have both fundamental and technological relevance, in that increased understanding of LC dynamics in the presence of defects is a key barrier to continued advancement in the field.

  13. Excimer Formation Dynamics of Dipyrenyldecane in Structurally Different Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Anita; Pandey, Siddharth

    2017-12-07

    Ionic liquids, being composed of ions alone, may offer alternative pathways for molecular aggregation. These pathways could be controlled by the chemical structure of the cation and the anion of the ionic liquids. Intramolecular excimer formation dynamics of a bifluorophoric probe, 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)decane [1Py(10)1Py], where the fluorophoric pyrene moieties are separated by a long decyl chain, is investigated in seven different ionic liquids in 10-90 °C temperature range. The long alkyl separator allows for ample interaction with the solubilizing milieu prior to the formation of the excimer. The ionic liquids are composed of two sets, one having four ionic liquids of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation ([bmim + ]) with different anions and the other having four ionic liquids of bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion ([Tf 2 N - ]) with different cations. The excimer-to-monomer emission intensity ratio (I E /I M ) is found to increase with increasing temperature in sigmoidal fashion. Chemical structure of the ionic liquid controls the excimer formation efficiency, as I E /I M values within ionic liquids with the same viscosities are found to be significantly different. The excited-state intensity decay kinetics of 1Py(10)1Py in ionic liquids do not adhere to a simplistic Birk's scheme, where only one excimer conformer forms after excitation. The apparent rate constants of excimer formation (k a ) in highly viscous ionic liquids are an order of magnitude lower than those reported in organic solvents. In general, the higher the viscosity of the ionic liquid, the more sensitive is the k a to the temperature with higher activation energy, E a . The trend in E a is found to be similar to that for activation energy of the viscous flow (E a,η ). Stokes-Einstein relationship is not followed in [bmim + ] ionic liquids; however, with the exception of [choline][Tf 2 N], it is found to be followed in [Tf 2 N - ] ionic liquids suggesting the cyclization dynamics of 1Py(10)1Py

  14. Dynamics of crater formations in immersed granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas, G.; Vidal, V.; Géminard, J.

    2009-12-01

    Craters are part of the widespread phenomena observed in nature. Among the main applications to natural phenomena, aside from meteorite impact craters, are the formation and growth of volcanic edifices, by successive ejecta emplacement and/or erosion. The time evolution and dynamics play a crucial role here, as the competition between volcanic-jet mass-flux (degassing and ejecta) and crater-size evolution may control directly the eruptive regime. Crater morphology in dry granular material has been extensively studied, both experimentally and theoretically. Most of these studies investigate the final, steady crater shape resulting from the collision of solid bodies with the material surface and scaling laws are derived. In immersed granular material, craters generated by an underwater vortex ring, or underwater impact craters generated by landslide, have been reported. In a previous experimental study, Gostiaux et al. [Gran. Matt., 2002] have investigated the dynamics of air flowing through an immersed granular layer. They reported that, depending on the flow rate, the system exhibits two qualitatively different regimes: At small flow rate, the bubbling regime during which bubbles escape the granular layer independently one from another; At large flow rate, the open-channel regime which corresponds to the formation of a channel crossing the whole thickness of the granular bed through which air escapes almost continuously. At intermediate flow rate, a spontaneous alternation between these two regimes is observed. Here, we report the dynamics of crater formations at the free surface of an immersed granular bed, locally crossed by an ascending gas flow. We reproduce the experimental conditions of Gostiaux et al. (2002) in two dimensions: In a vertical Hele-Shaw cell, the crater consists of two sand piles which develop around the location of the gas emission. We observe that the typical size of the crater increases logarithmically with time, independently of the gas

  15. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Georg Braun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO, molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness < 10 nm result from an interplay between dewetting patterns and diffusion limited growth pattern of ordered lamella growing within the dewetting areas. Besides structure formation of hydrophilic PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups.

  16. Two-dimensional colloidal fluids exhibiting pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Blesson; Chalmers, Christopher; Archer, Andrew J

    2015-12-28

    Fluids with competing short range attraction and long range repulsive interactions between the particles can exhibit a variety of microphase separated structures. We develop a lattice-gas (generalised Ising) model and analyse the phase diagram using Monte Carlo computer simulations and also with density functional theory (DFT). The DFT predictions for the structures formed are in good agreement with the results from the simulations, which occur in the portion of the phase diagram where the theory predicts the uniform fluid to be linearly unstable. However, the mean-field DFT does not correctly describe the transitions between the different morphologies, which the simulations show to be analogous to micelle formation. We determine how the heat capacity varies as the model parameters are changed. There are peaks in the heat capacity at state points where the morphology changes occur. We also map the lattice model onto a continuum DFT that facilitates a simplification of the stability analysis of the uniform fluid.

  17. Time rescaling and pattern formation in biological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2014-09-01

    Biological evolution is analyzed as a process of continuous measurement in which biosystems interpret themselves in the environment resulting in changes of both. This leads to rescaling of internal time (heterochrony) followed by spatial reconstructions of morphology (heterotopy). The logical precondition of evolution is the incompleteness of biosystem's internal description, while the physical precondition is the uncertainty of quantum measurement. The process of evolution is based on perpetual changes in interpretation of information in the changing world. In this interpretation the external biospheric gradients are used for establishment of new features of organization. It is concluded that biological evolution involves the anticipatory epigenetic changes in the interpretation of genetic symbolism which cannot generally be forecasted but can provide canalization of structural transformations defined by the existing organization and leading to predictable patterns of form generation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pattern formation due to non-linear vortex diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.; Surdeanu, R.; Huijbregtse, J. M.; Rector, J. H.; Dam, B.; Einfeld, J.; Wördenweber, R.; Griessen, R.

    Penetration of magnetic flux in YBa 2Cu 3O 7 superconducting thin films in an external magnetic field is visualized using a magneto-optic technique. A variety of flux patterns due to non-linear vortex diffusion is observed: (1) Roughening of the flux front with scaling exponents identical to those observed in burning paper including two distinct regimes where respectively spatial disorder and temporal disorder dominate. In the latter regime Kardar-Parisi-Zhang behavior is found. (2) Fractal penetration of flux with Hausdorff dimension depending on the critical current anisotropy. (3) Penetration as ‘flux-rivers’. (4) The occurrence of commensurate and incommensurate channels in films with anti-dots as predicted in numerical simulations by Reichhardt, Olson and Nori. It is shown that most of the observed behavior is related to the non-linear diffusion of vortices by comparison with simulations of the non-linear diffusion equation appropriate for vortices.

  19. Vesicles and vesicle gels - structure and dynamics of formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradzielski, M

    2003-01-01

    Vesicles constitute an interesting morphology formed by self-aggregating amphiphilic molecules. They exhibit a rich structural variety and are of interest both from a fundamental point of view (for studying closed bilayer systems) and from a practical point of view (whenever one is interested in the encapsulation of active molecules). In many circumstances vesicular structures have to be formed by external forces, but of great interest are amphiphilic systems, where they form spontaneously. Here the question arises of whether this means that they are also thermodynamically stable structures, which at least in some systems appears to be the case. If such vesicles are well defined in size, it is possible to pack them densely and thereby form vesicle gels that possess highly elastic properties even for relatively low volume fractions of amphiphile. Conditions for the formation and the microstructure of such vesicle gels have been studied in some detail for the case of unilamellar vesicles. Another important and topical issue is the dynamics of vesicle formation/breakdown, as the understanding of the transition process will open the way to a deeper understanding of their stability and also allow controlling of the structures formed, by means of their formation processes. Significant progress in the study of the transformation processes has been achieved, in particular by means of time-resolved scattering experiments. (topical review)

  20. Seasonal and temporal patterns of NDMA formation potentials in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Habibullah; Kim, Daekyun; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-02-01

    The seasonal and temporal patterns of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation potentials (FPs) were examined with water samples collected monthly for 21 month period in 12 surface waters. This long term study allowed monitoring the patterns of NDMA FPs under dynamic weather conditions (e.g., rainy and dry periods) covering several seasons. Anthropogenically impacted waters which were determined by high sucralose levels (>100 ng/L) had higher NDMA FPs than limited impacted sources (NDMA FP showed more variability in spring months, while seasonal mean values remained relatively consistent. The study also showed that watershed characteristics played an important role in the seasonal and temporal patterns. In the two dam-controlled river systems (SW A and G), the NDMA FP levels at the downstream sampling locations were controlled by the NDMA levels in the dams independent of either the increases in discharge rates due to water releases from the dams prior to or during the heavy rain events or intermittent high NDMA FP levels observed at the upstream of dams. The large reservoirs and impoundments on rivers examined in this study appeared serving as an equalization basin for NDMA precursors. On the other hand, in a river without an upstream reservoir (SW E), the NDMA levels were influenced by the ratio of an upstream wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent discharge to the river discharge rate. The impact of WWTP effluent decreased during the high river flow periods due to rain events. Linear regression with independent variables DOC, DON, and sucralose yielded poor correlations with NDMA FP (R(2) NDMA FP (R(2) = 0.53). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimating dew formation in rice, using seasonally averaged diel patterns of weather variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, W.; Goudriaan, J.

    2004-01-01

    If dew formation cannot be measured it has to be estimated. Available simulation models for estimating dew formation require hourly weather data as input. However, such data are not available for places without an automatic weather station. In such cases the diel pattern of weather variables might

  2. Anode pattern formation in atmospheric pressure air glow discharges with water anode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreycken, T.; Bruggeman, P.J.; Leys, C.

    2009-01-01

    Pattern formation in the anode layer at a water electrode in atmospheric pressure glow discharges in air is studied. With increasing current a sequence of different anode spot structures occurs from a constricted homogeneous spot in the case of small currents to a pattern consisting of small

  3. Pattern formation and self-organization in a simple precipitation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volford, Andras; Izsak, F.; Ripzam, Matyas; Lagzi, Istvan

    Various types of pattern formation and self-organization phenomena can be observed in biological, chemical, and geochemical systems due to the interaction of reaction with diffusion. The appearance of static precipitation patterns was reported first by Liesegang in 1896. Traveling waves and

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Nonlinear Dynamics: Integrability, Chaos and Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammaticos, B.

    2004-02-01

    When the editorial office of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General of the Institute of Physics Publishing asked me to review a book on nonlinear dynamics I experienced an undeniable apprehension. Indeed, the domain is a rapidly expanding one and writing a book aiming at a certain degree of completeness looks like an almost impossible task. My uneasiness abated somewhat when I saw the names of the authors, two well-known specialists of the nonlinear domain, but it was only when I held the book in my hands that I felt really reassured. The book is not just a review of the recent (and less so) findings on nonlinear systems. It is also a textbook. The authors set out to provide a detailed, step by step, introduction to the domain of nonlinearity and its various subdomains: chaos, integrability and pattern formation (although this last topic is treated with far less detail than the other two). The public they have in mind is obviously that of university students, graduate or undergraduate, who are interested in nonlinear phenomena. I suspect that a non-negligible portion of readers will be people who have to teach topics which figure among those included in the book: they will find this monograph an excellent companion to their course. The book is written in a pedagogical way, with a profusion of examples, detailed explanations and clear diagrams. The point of view is that of a physicist, which to my eyes is a major advantage. The mathematical formulation remains simple and perfectly intelligible. Thus the reader is not bogged down by fancy mathematical formalism, which would have discouraged the less experienced ones. A host of exercises accompanies every chapter. This will give the novice the occasion to develop his/her problem-solving skills and acquire competence in the use of nonlinear techniques. Some exercises are quite straightforward, like `verify the relation 14.81'. Others are less so, such as `prepare a write-up on a) frequency-locking and b) devil

  5. PSEUDOBULGE FORMATION AS A DYNAMICAL RATHER THAN A SECULAR PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedes, Javiera; Mayer, Lucio; Carollo, Marcella [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zuerich, Wolgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Madau, Piero [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-07-20

    We investigate the formation and evolution of the pseudobulge in 'Eris', a high-resolution N-body + smoothed particle hydrodynamic cosmological simulation that successfully reproduces a Milky-Way-like massive late-type spiral in an cold dark matter universe. At the present epoch, Eris has a virial mass M{sub vir} {approx_equal} 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, a photometric stellar mass M{sub *} = 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, a bulge-to-total ratio B/T = 0.26, and a weak nuclear bar. We find that the bulk of the pseudobulge forms quickly at high redshift via a combination of non-axisymmetric disk instabilities and tidal interactions or mergers, both occurring on dynamical timescales, not through slow secular processes at lower redshift. Its subsequent evolution is not strictly secular either, and is closely intertwined with the evolution of the stellar bar. In fact, the structure that we recognize as a pseudobulge today evolved from a stellar bar that formed at high redshift due to tidal interactions with satellites, was destroyed by minor mergers at z {approx} 3, re-formed shortly after, and weakened again following a steady gas inflow at z {approx}< 1. The gradual dissolution of the bar ensued at z {approx} 1 and continues until the present without increasing the stellar velocity dispersion in the inner regions. In this scenario, the pseudobulge is not a separate component from the inner disk in terms of formation path; rather, it is the first step in the inside-out formation of the baryonic disk, in agreement with the fact that pseudobulges of massive spiral galaxies typically have a dominant old stellar population. If our simulations do indeed reproduce the formation mechanisms of massive spirals, then the progenitors of late-type galaxies should have strong bars and small photometric pseudobulges at high redshift.

  6. Salinity effects on the dynamics and patterns of desiccation cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, N.; Zhou, P.

    2012-12-01

    Cracking arising from desiccation is a ubiquitous phenomenon encountered in various industrial and geo-environmental applications including drying of clayey soil, cement, ceramics, gels, and many more colloidal suspensions. Presence of cracks in muddy sediments modifies the characteristics of the medium such as pore structure, porosity, and permeability which in turn influence various flow and transport processes. Thus it remains a topic of great interest in many disciplines to describe the dynamics of desiccation cracking under various boundary conditions. To this end, we conducted a comprehensive study to investigate effects of NaCl concentrations on cracking dynamics and patterns during desiccation of Bentonite. Mixtures of Bentonite and NaCl solutions were prepared with NaCl concentration varying from 2 to 10 percent in 0.5 percent increment (totally 17 configurations). The slurry was placed in a Petri dish mounted on a digital balance to record the evaporation dynamics. The atmospheric conditions were kept constant using an environmental chamber. An automatic camera was used to record the dynamics of macro-cracks (mm scale) at the surface of desiccating clay each minute. The obtained results illustrate the significant effects of salt concentration on the initiation, propagation, morphology and general dynamics of macro-cracks. We found that higher salt concentrations results in larger macro cracks' lengths attributed to the effects of NaCl on compressing the electric double layer of particles at increasing electrolyte concentrations which reduce considerably the repulsive forces among the particles and causing instability of the slurry and flocculation of the colloidal particles. Rheological measurements by means of a stress controlled rheometer revealed that the yield stress of the slurry decreases as NaCl concentration increases which may indicate aggregation of larger units in the slurry as a result of flocculation causing larger cracks' lengths due to

  7. Pattern formation induced by cross-diffusion in a predator–prey system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Guiquan; Jin Zhen; Liu Quanxing; Li Li

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the Holling–Tanner model for predator–prey with self and cross-diffusion. From the Turing theory, it is believed that there is no Turing pattern formation for the equal self-diffusion coefficients. However, combined with cross-diffusion, it shows that the system will exhibit spotted pattern by both mathematical analysis and numerical simulations. Furthermore, asynchrony of the predator and the prey in the space. The obtained results show that cross-diffusion plays an important role on the pattern formation of the predator–prey system. (general)

  8. Non-linear diffusion and pattern formation in vortex matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.; Surdeanu, R.; Huijbregtse, J. M.; Rector, J. H.; Dam, B.; Griessen, R.; Einfeld, J.; Woerdenweber, R.

    2000-03-01

    Penetration of magnetic flux in YBa_2Cu_3O7 superconducting thin films and crystals in externally applied magnetic fields is visualized with a magneto-optical technique. A variety of flux patterns due to non-linear vortex behavior is observed: 1. Roughening of the flux front^1 with scaling exponents identical to those observed in burning paper^2. Two regimes are found where respectively spatial disorder and temporal disorder dominate. In the latter regime Kardar-Parisi-Zhang behavior is found. 2. Roughening of the flux profile similar to the Oslo model for rice-piles. 3. Fractal penetration of flux^3 with Hausdorff dimension depending on the critical current anisotropy. 4. Penetration as 'flux-rivers'. 5. The occurrence of commensurate and incommensurate channels in films with anti-dots as predicted in numerical simulations by Reichhardt, Olson and Nori^4. By comparison with numerical simulations, it is shown that most of the observed behavior can be explained in terms of non-linear diffusion of vortices. ^1R. Surdeanu, R.J. Wijngaarden, E. Visser, J.M. Huijbregtse, J.H. Rector, B. Dam and R. Griessen, Phys.Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 2054 ^2J. Maunuksela, M. Myllys, O.-P. Kähkönen, J. Timonen, N. Provatas, M.J. Alava, T. Ala-Nissila, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1515 (1997) ^3R. Surdeanu, R.J. Wijngaarden, B. Dam, J. Rector, R. Griessen, C. Rossel, Z.F. Ren and J.H. Wang, Phys Rev B 58 (1998) 12467 ^4C. Reichhardt, C.J. Olson and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. B 58, 6534 (1998)

  9. How pattern formation in ring networks of excitatory and inhibitoryspiking neurons depends on the input current regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit eKriener

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern formation, i.e., the generation of an inhomogeneous spatial activity distribution in a dynamical system with translation invariant structure, is a well-studied phenomenon in neuronal network dynamics,specifically in neural field models. These are population models to describe the spatio-temporal dynamics of large groups of neurons in terms of macroscopic variables such as population firing rates. Though neural field models are often deduced from and equipped with biophysically meaningfulproperties, a direct mapping to simulations of individual spiking neuron populations is rarely considered. Neurons have a distinct identity defined by their action on their postsynaptic targets. In its simplest form they act either excitatorily or inhibitorily.When the distribution of neuron identities is assumed to be periodic, pattern formation can be observed, given the coupling strength is supercritical, i.e., larger than a critical weight. We find that this critical weight is strongly dependent on the characteristics of the neuronal input, i.e., depends on whether neurons are mean- orfluctuation driven, and different limits in linearizing the full non-linear system apply in order to assess stability.In particular, if neurons are mean-driven, the linearization has a very simple form and becomesindependent of both the fixed point firing rate and the variance of the input current, while in the very strongly fluctuation-driven regime the fixed point rate, as well as the input mean and variance areimportant parameters in the determination of the critical weight.We demonstrate that interestingly even in ``intermediate'' regimes, when the system is technically fluctuation-driven, the simple linearization neglecting the variance of the input can yield the better prediction of the critical couplingstrength. We moreover analyze the effects of structural randomness by rewiring individualsynapses or redistributing weights, as well as coarse-graining on pattern

  10. How pattern formation in ring networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons depends on the input current regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriener, Birgit; Helias, Moritz; Rotter, Stefan; Diesmann, Markus; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation, i.e., the generation of an inhomogeneous spatial activity distribution in a dynamical system with translation invariant structure, is a well-studied phenomenon in neuronal network dynamics, specifically in neural field models. These are population models to describe the spatio-temporal dynamics of large groups of neurons in terms of macroscopic variables such as population firing rates. Though neural field models are often deduced from and equipped with biophysically meaningful properties, a direct mapping to simulations of individual spiking neuron populations is rarely considered. Neurons have a distinct identity defined by their action on their postsynaptic targets. In its simplest form they act either excitatorily or inhibitorily. When the distribution of neuron identities is assumed to be periodic, pattern formation can be observed, given the coupling strength is supracritical, i.e., larger than a critical weight. We find that this critical weight is strongly dependent on the characteristics of the neuronal input, i.e., depends on whether neurons are mean- or fluctuation driven, and different limits in linearizing the full non-linear system apply in order to assess stability. In particular, if neurons are mean-driven, the linearization has a very simple form and becomes independent of both the fixed point firing rate and the variance of the input current, while in the very strongly fluctuation-driven regime the fixed point rate, as well as the input mean and variance are important parameters in the determination of the critical weight. We demonstrate that interestingly even in "intermediate" regimes, when the system is technically fluctuation-driven, the simple linearization neglecting the variance of the input can yield the better prediction of the critical coupling strength. We moreover analyze the effects of structural randomness by rewiring individual synapses or redistributing weights, as well as coarse-graining on the formation of

  11. Pattern formation through spatial interactions in a modified Daisyworld model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Tommaso; Primavera, Leonardo; Lepreti, Fabio; Vecchio, Antonio; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    The Daisyworld model is based on a hypothetical planet, like the Earth, which receives the radiant energy coming from a Sun-like star, and populated by two kinds of identical plants differing by their colour: white daisies reflecting light and black daisies absorbing light. The interactions and feedbacks between the collective biota of the planet and the incoming radiation form a self-regulating system where the conditions for life are maintained. We investigate a modified version of the Daisyworld model where a spatial dependency on latitude is introduced, and both a variable heat diffusivity along latitude and a simple greenhouse model are included. We show that the spatial interactions between the variables of the system can generate some equilibrium patterns which can locally stabilize the coexistence of the two vegetation types. The feedback on albedo is able to generate new equilibrium solutions which can efficiently self-regulate the planet climate, even for values of the solar luminosity relatively far from the current Earth conditions. The extension to spatial Daisyworld gives room to the possibility of inhomogeneous solar forcing in a curved planet, with explicit differences between poles and equator and the direct use of the heat diffusion equation. As a first approach, to describe a spherical planet, we consider the temperature T(θ,t) and the surface coverage as depending only on time and on latitude θ (-90° ≤ θ ≤ 90°). A second step is the introduction of the greenhouse effect in the model, the process by which outgoing infrared radiation is partly screened by greenhouse gases. This effect can be described by relaxing the black-body radiation hypothesis and by introducing a grayness function g(T) in the heat equation. As a third step, we consider a latitude dependence of the Earth's conductivity, χ = χ(θ). Considering these terms, using spherical coordinates and symmetry with respect to θ, the modified Daisyworld equations reduce to the

  12. Stochastic Dynamics of Clay Translocation and Formation of Argillic Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, S.; Richter, D. D., Jr.; Porporato, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    The formation of argillic horizons in vertical soil profiles is mainly attributed to lessivage, namely the transport of clay from an upper E horizon to a deeper illuviated horizon. Because of the long timescales involved in this phenomenon, quantitative modeling is useful to explore the role of clay lessivage on soil formation and sub-surface clay accumulation. The limitations of detailed models of colloidal transport to short timescales make it necessary to resort to simple models. Here, we present a parsimonious model of clay transport in which lessivage is interpreted stochastically. Clay particles approach the soil surface at a speed equal to the erosion rate and are intermittently transported to deeper soil layers when percolation events occur or removed by erosion. Along with the evolution of clay particles trajectories, the model predicts the vertical clay profile, the depth of the B horizon, and the mean time to erosion. Dimensional analysis reveals the two dimensionless parameters governing the dynamics, leading to a new classification of soil types based on erosion rates and intensity of lessivage.

  13. Dynamical hindrance to compound nucleus formation in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blocki, J.; Feldmeier, H.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    A large number of dynamical trajectories corresponding to colliding nuclei, as represented by an idealized, sharp-surfaced liquid-drop model with one-body dissipation are examined. The objective was to delineate quantitatively, within this model, the behaviour of the extra-extra-push energy E XX in its dependence on the mass /or charge/ numbers of the colliding nuclei. Qualitatively, the results are as anticipated on the basis of earlier studies: the appearance of a dynamical limitation on compound nucleus formation beyond a certain threshold locus in the A 1 . A 2 plane, with the energy E XX rising smoothly but rapidly beyond the threshold. The reduction of the two-dimensional function E XX /A 1 ,A 2 / to a one-dimensional function of a mean fissility x m appears possible as a rough approximation. As expected, the mean fissility x and the entrance channel fissility x 0 . The optimum choice appears to be one in which x is given about twice the weight of x 0

  14. Social Group Dynamics and Patterns of Latin American Integration Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Dubé

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes to incorporate social psychology elements with mainstream political science and international relations theories to help understand the contradictions related to the integration processes in Latin America. Through a theoretical analysis, it contributes to the challenge proposed by Dabène (2009 to explain the “resilience” of the Latin American regional integration process in spite of its “instability and crises.” Our main proposition calls for considering Latin America as a community and its regional organizations as “social groups.” In conclusion, three phenomena from the field of social psychology and particularly social group dynamics shed light on these contradictory patterns: the value of the group and the emotional bond, groupthink, and cognitive dissonance.

  15. The structure and dynamics of patterns of Benard convection cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivier, N.; Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London; Lausanne Univ.

    1990-08-01

    Benard-Marangoni convection, in containers with large aspect ratio, exhibits space-filling cellular structures, highly deformable, but crystallized. They contain dislocations and grain boundaries generated and moved by elementary topological transformations, and are subjected to a weak shear stress due to the earth's rotation. The cellular structure and its fluctuations are analyzed from a crystallographic viewpoint, by using two complementary approaches. One is a global analysis of cellular structures in cylindrical symmetry. Their structural stability and defect pattern are obtained as topological mode-locking of a continuous structural parameter. The other, a local, molecular dynamics of the cells, gives a realistic parametrization of the forces and the transformations by generalizing the Voronoi cell construction in one extra dimension. 23 refs., 8 figs

  16. From lag synchronization to pattern formation in one-dimensional open flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zengrong; Luo Jigui

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the relation between synchronization and pattern formation in one-dimensional discrete and continuous open flow models is investigated in detail. Firstly a sufficient condition for globally asymptotical stability of lag/anticipating synchronization among lattices of these models is proved by analytic method. Then, by analyzing and simulating lag/anticipating synchronization in discrete case, three kinds of pattern of wave (it is called wave pattern) travelling in the lattices are discovered. Finally, a proper definition for these kinds of pattern is proposed

  17. Dynamics of alliance formation and the egalitarian revolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Gavrilets

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arguably the most influential force in human history is the formation of social coalitions and alliances (i.e., long-lasting coalitions and their impact on individual power. Understanding the dynamics of alliance formation and its consequences for biological, social, and cultural evolution is a formidable theoretical challenge. In most great ape species, coalitions occur at individual and group levels and among both kin and non-kin. Nonetheless, ape societies remain essentially hierarchical, and coalitions rarely weaken social inequality. In contrast, human hunter-gatherers show a remarkable tendency to egalitarianism, and human coalitions and alliances occur not only among individuals and groups, but also among groups of groups. These observations suggest that the evolutionary dynamics of human coalitions can only be understood in the context of social networks and cognitive evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we develop a stochastic model describing the emergence of networks of allies resulting from within-group competition for status or mates between individuals utilizing dyadic information. The model shows that alliances often emerge in a phase transition-like fashion if the group size, awareness, aggressiveness, and persuasiveness of individuals are large and the decay rate of individual affinities is small. With cultural inheritance of social networks, a single leveling alliance including all group members can emerge in several generations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose a simple and flexible theoretical approach for studying the dynamics of alliance emergence applicable where game-theoretic methods are not practical. Our approach is both scalable and expandable. It is scalable in that it can be generalized to larger groups, or groups of groups. It is expandable in that it allows for inclusion of additional factors such as behavioral, genetic, social, and cultural features. Our results suggest that a rapid

  18. Dynamic instability of genomic methylation patterns in pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooi Steen KT

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic methylation patterns are established during gametogenesis, and perpetuated in somatic cells by faithful maintenance methylation. There have been previous indications that genomic methylation patterns may be less stable in embryonic stem (ES cells than in differentiated somatic cells, but it is not known whether different mechanisms of de novo and maintenance methylation operate in pluripotent stem cells compared with differentiating somatic cells. Results In this paper, we show that ablation of the DNA methyltransferase regulator DNMT3L (DNA methyltransferase 3-like in mouse ES cells renders them essentially incapable of de novo methylation of newly integrated retroviral DNA. We also show that ES cells lacking DNMT3L lose DNA methylation over time in culture, suggesting that DNA methylation in ES cells is the result of dynamic loss and gain of DNA methylation. We found that wild-type female ES cells lose DNA methylation at a much faster rate than do male ES cells; this defect could not be attributed to sex-specific differences in expression of DNMT3L or of any DNA methyltransferase. We also found that human ES and induced pluripotent stem cell lines showed marked but variable loss of methylation that could not be attributed to sex chromosome constitution or time in culture. Conclusions These data indicate that DNA methylation in pluripotent stem cells is much more dynamic and error-prone than is maintenance methylation in differentiated cells. DNA methylation requires DNMT3L in stem cells, but DNMT3L is not expressed in differentiating somatic cells. Error-prone maintenance methylation will introduce unpredictable phenotypic variation into clonal populations of pluripotent stem cells, and this variation is likely to be much more pronounced in cultured female cells. This epigenetic variability has obvious negative implications for the clinical applications of stem cells.

  19. Polar Pattern Formation in Driven Filament Systems Require Non-Binary Particle Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Weber, Christoph A; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R

    2015-10-01

    Living matter has the extraordinary ability to behave in a concerted manner, which is exemplified throughout nature ranging from the self-organisation of the cytoskeleton to flocks of animals [1-4]. The microscopic dynamics of constituents have been linked to the system's meso- or macroscopic behaviour in silico via the Boltzmann equation for propelled particles [5-10]. Thereby, simplified binary collision rules between the constituents had to be assumed due to the lack of experimental data. We report here experimentally determined binary collision statistics by studying the recently introduced molecular system, the high density actomyosin motility assay [11-13]. We demonstrate that the alignment effect of the binary collision statistics is too weak to account for the observed ordering transition. The transition density for polar pattern formation decreases quadratically with filament length, which indicates that multi-filament collisions drive the observed ordering phenomenon and that a gas-like picture cannot explain the transition of the system to polar order. The presented findings demonstrate that the unique properties of biological active matter systems require a description that goes well beyond a gas-like picture developed in the framework of kinetic theories.

  20. Polar pattern formation in driven filament systems requires non-binary particle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Weber, Christoph A.; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2015-10-01

    From the self-organization of the cytoskeleton to the synchronous motion of bird flocks, living matter has the extraordinary ability to behave in a concerted manner. The Boltzmann equation for self-propelled particles is frequently used in silico to link a system’s meso- or macroscopic behaviour to the microscopic dynamics of its constituents. But so far such studies have relied on an assumption of simplified binary collisions owing to a lack of experimental data suggesting otherwise. We report here experimentally determined binary-collision statistics by studying a recently introduced molecular system, the high-density actomyosin motility assay. We demonstrate that the alignment induced by binary collisions is too weak to account for the observed ordering transition. The transition density for polar pattern formation decreases quadratically with filament length, indicating that multi-filament collisions drive the observed ordering phenomenon and that a gas-like picture cannot explain the transition of the system to polar order. Our findings demonstrate that the unique properties of biological active-matter systems require a description that goes well beyond that developed in the framework of kinetic theories.

  1. Pattern formation, social forces, and diffusion instability in games with success-driven motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbing, Dirk

    2009-02-01

    A local agglomeration of cooperators can support the survival or spreading of cooperation, even when cooperation is predicted to die out according to the replicator equation, which is often used in evolutionary game theory to study the spreading and disappearance of strategies. In this paper, it is shown that success-driven motion can trigger such local agglomeration and may, therefore, be used to supplement other mechanisms supporting cooperation, like reputation or punishment. Success-driven motion is formulated here as a function of the game-theoretical payoffs. It can change the outcome and dynamics of spatial games dramatically, in particular as it causes attractive or repulsive interaction forces. These forces act when the spatial distributions of strategies are inhomogeneous. However, even when starting with homogeneous initial conditions, small perturbations can trigger large inhomogeneities by a pattern-formation instability, when certain conditions are fulfilled. Here, these instability conditions are studied for the prisoner’s dilemma and the snowdrift game. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that asymmetrical diffusion can drive social, economic, and biological systems into the unstable regime, if these would be stable without diffusion.

  2. Multidimensional pattern formation has an infinite number of constants of motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineev-Weinstein, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Extending our previous work on two-dimensional growth for the Laplace equation [M. B. Mineev, Physica D 43, 288 (1990)] we study here multidimensional growth for arbitrary elliptic equations, describing inhomogeneous and anisotropic pattern-formation processes. We find that these nonlinear processes are governed by an infinite number of conservation laws. Moreover, in many cases all 2 dynamics of the interface can be reduced to the linear time dependence of only one ''moment'' M 0 , which corresponds to the changing volume, while all higher moments M l are constant in time. These moments have a purely geometrical nature, and thus carry information about the moving shape. These conserved quantities [Eqs. (7) and (8) of this article] are interpreted as coefficients of the multipole expansion of the Newtonian potential created by the mass uniformly occupying the domain enclosing the moving interface. Thus the question of how to recover the moving shape using these conserved quantities is reduced to the classical inverse potential problem of reconstructing the shape of a body from its exterior gravitational potential. Our results also suggest the possibility of controlling a moving interface by appropriately varying the location and strength of sources and sinks

  3. Dynamic analysis and pattern visualization of forest fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, António M; Tenreiro Machado, J A

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses forest fires in the perspective of dynamical systems. Forest fires exhibit complex correlations in size, space and time, revealing features often present in complex systems, such as the absence of a characteristic length-scale, or the emergence of long range correlations and persistent memory. This study addresses a public domain forest fires catalogue, containing information of events for Portugal, during the period from 1980 up to 2012. The data is analysed in an annual basis, modelling the occurrences as sequences of Dirac impulses with amplitude proportional to the burnt area. First, we consider mutual information to correlate annual patterns. We use visualization trees, generated by hierarchical clustering algorithms, in order to compare and to extract relationships among the data. Second, we adopt the Multidimensional Scaling (MDS) visualization tool. MDS generates maps where each object corresponds to a point. Objects that are perceived to be similar to each other are placed on the map forming clusters. The results are analysed in order to extract relationships among the data and to identify forest fire patterns.

  4. Pattern formation of nanoflowers during the vapor-liquid-solid growth of silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Joonho; Thompson-Flagg, Rebecca; Ekerdt, John G.; Shih, C.-K.

    2008-01-01

    Pattern formation of nanoflowers during the vapor-liquid-solid growth of Si nanowires is reported. Using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometer analysis, we show that the flower consists of an Au/SiO x core-shell structure. Moreover, the growth of flower starts at the interface between the gold catalyst and the silicon nanowire, presumably by enhanced oxidation at this interface. The pattern formation can be classified as dense branching morphology (DBM). It is the first observation of DBM in a spherical geometry and at the nanoscale. The analysis of the average branching distance of this pattern shows that the pattern is most likely formed during the growth process, not the cooling process, and that the curvature of the gold droplet plays a crucial role in the frequency of branching

  5. The mechanism of Turing pattern formation in a positive feedback system with cross diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiyan; Liu, Tuoqi; Zhang, Jiajun; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze a reaction–diffusion (R–D) system with a double negative feedback loop and find cases where self diffusion alone cannot lead to Turing pattern formation but cross diffusion can. Specifically, we first derive a set of sufficient conditions for Turing instability by performing linear stability analysis, then plot two bifurcation diagrams that specifically identify Turing regions in the parameter phase plane, and finally numerically demonstrate representative Turing patterns according to the theoretical predictions. Our analysis combined with previous studies actually implies an interesting fact that Turing patterns can be generated not only in a class of monostable R–D systems where cross diffusion is not necessary but also in a class of bistable R–D systems where cross diffusion is necessary. In addition, our model would be a good candidate for experimentally testing Turing pattern formation from the viewpoint of synthetic biology. (paper)

  6. Violent Relaxation, Dynamical Instabilities and the Formation of Elliptical Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, L. A.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN: El problema de la formaci6n de galaxias elfpticas por medjo de colapso gravitacional sin disipaci6n de energfa es estudiado usando un gran numero de simulaciones numericas. Se muestra que este tipo de colapsos, partiendo de condiciones iniciales frfas donde la energfa cinetica inicial representa s6lo un 5%, 0 , de a potencial inicial, produce sistemas relajados de forma triaxial muy similares a las galaxias elfpticas reales en sus formas y perfiles de densidad en proyecci6i . La forina triaxial resulta de la acci6n de una inestabilidad dinamica que aparece en sistemas 'inicos dominados por movimientos radiales, mientras que el perfil de densidad final Cs debido al llamado relajamiento violento que tiende a producir una distribuci6n en espacio fase unica. Estos dos fen6menos tienden a borrar los detalles particulares sobre las condiciones iniciales y dan lugar a una evoluci6n convergente hacia sistemas realistas, esto innecesario el uso de condiciones iniciales especiales (excepto por Ia condici6i de que estas deben ser frfas). Las condiciones iniciales frfas producen los movimientos radiales y fluctuaciones de la energfa potencial requeridos por ambos fen6menos. ABSTRACT: The problem of formation of elliptical galaxies via dissipationless collapse is studied using a large set of numerical simulations. It is shown that dissipationless collapses from cold initial conditions, where the total initial kinetic energy is less than 5% ofthe initial potential energy, lead to relaxed triaxial systems ery similar to real elliptical galaxies ii projected shape and density profiles. The triaxial shape is due to the of a dynamical instability that appears on systems dominated by radial orbits, while final density profile is due to violent relaxation that tends to produce a unique distribution iii space. These two phenomena erase memory of the initial prodtice a convergent evolution toward realistic systems, thus making unnecessary use o[special initial conditions (other

  7. Dynamic of ozone formation in nanosecond microwave discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmedzhanov, R.A.; Vikharev, A.L.; Gorbachev, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Nanosecond gas discharges are efficient sources of chemically active plasma. Studies of the nanosecond microwave discharge are interesting for remote modification of the chemical composition of the atmosphere in term of its purification, for diagnostics of impurities and ozone replenishment in the regions of local open-quotes ozone holesclose quotes. In this connection a study of plasma chemical processes in such a discharge seems appropriate, as well as modeling of ecological consequences of the effect of powerful microwave radiation on the atmosphere. The present paper contains generalized results of studying the process of ozone formation in a pulse-periodic freely localized nanosecond microwave discharge. The experiments were performed in a wide range of parameters: microwave radiation wavelength λ = 0.8 and 3cm, pulse duration τ = 6 and 500ns, pulse power P = 50kW and 20MW, pulse repetition rate F = 1-10 3 Hz. The working gases were air and oxygen under pressure P = 10-100Torr. As a source of the microwave radiation a pulse magnetron was used with a device for pulse compression based on the waveguide resonator, and a relativistic microwave generator. The discharge was produced in the focus of the parabolic mirror and had the form of homogeneous cylinder. The plasma chemical processes were studied in two cases. The discharge was created either in the quartz tube placed along the focal line of the mirror or in the free air. Dynamics of formation of ozone and nitrogen oxides in the discharge was studied by means of absorption spectroscopy in the regime of accumulation of the products of chemical reactions (in a closed volume) and their diffusion spreading

  8. Effect of growth parameters on spatial pattern formation of cadmium hydroxide in agar gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palaniandavar, N.; Gnanam, F.D.; Ramasamy, P.

    1986-01-01

    The interrelated effects of growth parameters on spatial pattern formation of cadmium hydroxide in agar gel medium have been investigated. The main parameters are concentration of electrolytes, pH of the medium, density of the gel, the concentration of parasitic electrolyte and the concentration of additives. The pattern formation is explained on the basis of electrical double layer theory coupled with diffusion. Using Shinohara's revised coagulation concept, the flocculation value is calculated. With suitable combinations of parameter values, dendritic growth and spherulitic growth of cadmium hydroxide crystals have been observed. (author)

  9. Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML): an open format for representing quantitative biological dynamics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoda, Koji; Tohsato, Yukako; Ho, Kenneth H L; Onami, Shuichi

    2015-04-01

    Recent progress in live-cell imaging and modeling techniques has resulted in generation of a large amount of quantitative data (from experimental measurements and computer simulations) on spatiotemporal dynamics of biological objects such as molecules, cells and organisms. Although many research groups have independently dedicated their efforts to developing software tools for visualizing and analyzing these data, these tools are often not compatible with each other because of different data formats. We developed an open unified format, Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML; current version: 0.2), which provides a basic framework for representing quantitative biological dynamics data for objects ranging from molecules to cells to organisms. BDML is based on Extensible Markup Language (XML). Its advantages are machine and human readability and extensibility. BDML will improve the efficiency of development and evaluation of software tools for data visualization and analysis. A specification and a schema file for BDML are freely available online at http://ssbd.qbic.riken.jp/bdml/. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. [Study on formation process of honeycomb pattern in dielectric barrier discharge by optical emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li-Fang; Zhu, Ping; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yu

    2014-04-01

    The authors report on the first investigation of the variations in the plasma parameters in the formation process of the honeycomb pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge by optical emission spectrum in argon and air mixture. The discharge undergoes hexagonal lattice, concentric spot-ring pattern and honeycomb pattern with the applied voltage increasing. The molecular vibration temperature, electron excitation temperature and electronic density of the three kinds of patterns were investigated by the emission spectra of nitrogen band of second positive system (C3pi(u) --> B3 pi(g)), the relative intensity ratio method of spectral lines of Ar I 763.51 nm (2P(6) --> 1S(5)) and Ar I 772.42 nm (2P(2) -->1S(3)) and the broadening of spectral line 696.5 nm respectively. It was found that the molecular vibration temperature and electron excitation temperature of the honeycomb pattern are higher than those of the hexagonal lattice, but the electron density of the former is lower than that of the latter. The discharge powers of the patterns were also measured with the capacitance method. The discharge power of the honeycomb pattern is much higher than that of the hexagonal lattice. These results are of great importance to the formation mechanism of the patterns in dielectric barrier discharge.

  11. Formation of self-organized anode patterns in arc discharge simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trelles, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation and self-organization are phenomena commonly observed experimentally in diverse types of plasma systems, including atmospheric-pressure electric arc discharges. However, numerical simulations reproducing anode pattern formation in arc discharges have proven exceedingly elusive. Time-dependent three-dimensional thermodynamic non-equilibrium simulations reveal the spontaneous formation of self-organized patterns of anode attachment spots in the free-burning arc, a canonical thermal plasma flow established by a constant dc current between an axi-symmetric electrode configuration in the absence of external forcing. The number of spots, their size and distribution within the pattern depend on the applied total current and on the resolution of the spatial discretization, whereas the main properties of the plasma flow, such as maximum temperatures, velocity and voltage drop, depend only on the former. The sensibility of the solution to the spatial discretization stresses the computational requirements for comprehensive arc discharge simulations. The obtained anode patterns qualitatively agree with experimental observations and confirm that the spots originate at the fringes of the arc–anode attachment. The results imply that heavy-species–electron energy equilibration, in addition to thermal instability, has a dominant role in the formation of anode spots in arc discharges. (paper)

  12. Hardware format pattern banks for the Associative memory boards in the ATLAS Fast Tracker Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Grewcoe, Clay James

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this project is to streamline and update the process of encoding the pattern bank to hardware format in the Associative memory board (AM) of the Fast Tracker (FTK) for the ATLAS detector. The encoding is also adapted to Gray code to eliminate possible misreadings in high frequency devices such as this one, ROOT files are used to store the pattern banks because of the compression utilized in ROOT.

  13. Predicting the distribution of spiral waves from cell properties in a developmental-path model of Dictyostelium pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Geberth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is one of the model systems of biological pattern formation. One of the most successful answers to the challenge of establishing a spiral wave pattern in a colony of homogeneously distributed D. discoideum cells has been the suggestion of a developmental path the cells follow (Lauzeral and coworkers. This is a well-defined change in properties each cell undergoes on a longer time scale than the typical dynamics of the cell. Here we show that this concept leads to an inhomogeneous and systematic spatial distribution of spiral waves, which can be predicted from the distribution of cells on the developmental path. We propose specific experiments for checking whether such systematics are also found in data and thus, indirectly, provide evidence of a developmental path.

  14. Characterizing Suspension Plasma Spray Coating Formation Dynamics through Curvature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) enables the production of variety of microstructures with unique mechanical and thermal properties. In SPS, a liquid carrier (ethanol/water) is used to transport the sub-micrometric feedstock into the plasma jet. Considering complex deposition dynamics of SPS technique, there is a need to better understand the relationships among spray conditions, ensuing particle behavior, deposition stress evolution and resultant properties. In this study, submicron yttria-stabilized zirconia particles suspended in ethanol were sprayed using a cascaded arc plasma torch. The stresses generated during the deposition of the layers (termed evolving stress) were monitored via the change in curvature of the substrate measured using an in situ measurement apparatus. Depending on the deposition conditions, coating microstructures ranged from feathery porous to dense/cracked deposits. The evolving stresses and modulus were correlated with the observed microstructures and visualized via process maps. Post-deposition bi-layer curvature measurement via low temperature thermal cycling was carried out to quantify the thermo-elastic response of different coatings. Lastly, preliminary data on furnace cycle durability of different coating microstructures were evaluated. This integrated study involving in situ diagnostics and ex situ characterization along with process maps provides a framework to describe coating formation mechanisms, process parametrics and microstructure description.

  15. Classification of time series patterns from complex dynamic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schryver, J.C.; Rao, N.

    1998-07-01

    An increasing availability of high-performance computing and data storage media at decreasing cost is making possible the proliferation of large-scale numerical databases and data warehouses. Numeric warehousing enterprises on the order of hundreds of gigabytes to terabytes are a reality in many fields such as finance, retail sales, process systems monitoring, biomedical monitoring, surveillance and transportation. Large-scale databases are becoming more accessible to larger user communities through the internet, web-based applications and database connectivity. Consequently, most researchers now have access to a variety of massive datasets. This trend will probably only continue to grow over the next several years. Unfortunately, the availability of integrated tools to explore, analyze and understand the data warehoused in these archives is lagging far behind the ability to gain access to the same data. In particular, locating and identifying patterns of interest in numerical time series data is an increasingly important problem for which there are few available techniques. Temporal pattern recognition poses many interesting problems in classification, segmentation, prediction, diagnosis and anomaly detection. This research focuses on the problem of classification or characterization of numerical time series data. Highway vehicles and their drivers are examples of complex dynamic systems (CDS) which are being used by transportation agencies for field testing to generate large-scale time series datasets. Tools for effective analysis of numerical time series in databases generated by highway vehicle systems are not yet available, or have not been adapted to the target problem domain. However, analysis tools from similar domains may be adapted to the problem of classification of numerical time series data.

  16. Dynamic Corneal Surface Mapping with Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, S.; Gualini, M. M. S.

    2013-06-01

    In view of the fast advancement in ophthalmic technology and corneal surgery, there is a strong need for the comprehensive mapping and characterization techniques for corneal surface. Optical methods with precision non-contact approaches have been found to be very useful for such bio measurements. Along with the normal mapping approaches, elasticity of corneal surface has an important role in its characterization and needs to be appropriately measured or estimated for broader diagnostics and better prospective surgical results, as it has important role in the post-op corneal surface reconstruction process. Use of normal corneal topographic devices is insufficient for any intricate analysis since these devices operate at relatively moderate resolution. In the given experiment, Pulsed Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry has been utilized along with an excitation mechanism to measure the dynamic response of the sample cornea. A Pulsed ESPI device has been chosen for the study because of its micron-level resolution and other advantages in real-time deformation analysis. A bovine cornea has been used as a sample in the subject experiment. The dynamic response has been taken on a chart recorder and it is observed that it does show a marked deformation at a specific excitation frequency, which may be taken as a characteristic elasticity parameter for the surface of that corneal sample. It was seen that outside resonance conditions the bovine cornea was not that much deformed. Through this study, the resonance frequency and the corresponding corneal deformations are mapped and plotted in real time. In these experiments, data was acquired and processed by FRAMES plus computer analysis system. With some analysis of the results, this technique can help us to refine a more detailed corneal surface mathematical model and some preliminary work was done on this. Such modelling enhancements may be useful for finer ablative surgery planning. After further experimentation

  17. Stress-driven pattern formation in living and non-living matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Amalie

    . On the smallest scale of nanometers, we study thin films of block copolymers, which have potential applications as self-organizing templates for microelectronics. By performing a thin-shell expansion of a well-known model for block copolymers, we develop an effective model for the impact of curvature on pattern......Spatial pattern formation is abundant in nature and occurs in both living and non-living matter. Familiar examples include sand ripples, river deltas, zebra fur and snail shells. In this thesis, we focus on patterns induced by mechanical stress, and develop continuum theories for three systems...

  18. Trickle-down boundary conditions in aeolian dune-field pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. C.; Kocurek, G.

    2015-12-01

    One the one hand, wind-blown dune-field patterns emerge within the overarching boundary conditions of climate, tectonics and eustasy implying the presence of these signals in the aeolian geomorphic and stratigraphic record. On the other hand, dune-field patterns are a poster-child of self-organization, in which autogenic processes give rise to patterned landscapes despite remarkable differences in the geologic setting (i.e., Earth, Mars and Titan). How important are climate, tectonics and eustasy in aeolian dune field pattern formation? Here we develop the hypothesis that, in terms of pattern development, dune fields evolve largely independent of the direct influence of 'system-scale' boundary conditions, such as climate, tectonics and eustasy. Rather, these boundary conditions set the stage for smaller-scale, faster-evolving 'event-scale' boundary conditions. This 'trickle-down' effect, in which system-scale boundary conditions indirectly influence the event scale boundary conditions provides the uniqueness and richness of dune-field patterned landscapes. The trickle-down effect means that the architecture of the stratigraphic record of dune-field pattern formation archives boundary conditions, which are spatially and temporally removed from the overarching geologic setting. In contrast, the presence of an aeolian stratigraphic record itself, reflects changes in system-scale boundary conditions that drive accumulation and preservation of aeolian strata.

  19. A central pattern generator producing alternative outputs: pattern, strength, and dynamics of premotor synaptic input to leech heart motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Brian J; Weaver, Adam L; Wenning, Angela; García, Paul S; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2007-11-01

    The central pattern generator (CPG) for heartbeat in medicinal leeches consists of seven identified pairs of segmental heart interneurons and one unidentified pair. Four of the identified pairs and the unidentified pair of interneurons make inhibitory synaptic connections with segmental heart motor neurons. The CPG produces a side-to-side asymmetric pattern of intersegmental coordination among ipsilateral premotor interneurons corresponding to a similarly asymmetric fictive motor pattern in heart motor neurons, and asymmetric constriction pattern of the two tubular hearts, synchronous and peristaltic. Using extracellular recordings from premotor interneurons and voltage-clamp recordings of ipsilateral segmental motor neurons in 69 isolated nerve cords, we assessed the strength and dynamics of premotor inhibitory synaptic output onto the entire ensemble of heart motor neurons and the associated conduction delays in both coordination modes. We conclude that premotor interneurons establish a stereotypical pattern of intersegmental synaptic connectivity, strengths, and dynamics that is invariant across coordination modes, despite wide variations among preparations. These data coupled with a previous description of the temporal pattern of premotor interneuron activity and relative phasing of motor neuron activity in the two coordination modes enable a direct assessment of how premotor interneurons through their temporal pattern of activity and their spatial pattern of synaptic connectivity, strengths, and dynamics coordinate segmental motor neurons into a functional pattern of activity.

  20. Combinatorial Study of Surface Pattern Formation in Thin Block Copolymer Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Archie P.; Douglas, Jack F.; Meredith, J. Carson; Amis, Eric J.; Karim, Alamgir

    2001-01-01

    Surface pattern formation in diblock copolymer films is investigated as a function of film thickness h and molecular mass M . Smooth films are observed for certain h ranges centered about multiples of the lamellar thickness L 0 , and we attribute this effect to an increase in the surface chain density with h in the outer brushlike copolymer layer. We also observe apparently stable labyrinthine surface patterns for other h ranges, and the average size of these patterns is found to scale as λ∼L -2.5 0 . Hole and island patterns occur for h ranges between those of the labyrinthine patterns and the smooth regions, and their size similarly decreases with L 0 and M

  1. Formation of quasistationary vortex and transient hole patterns through vortex merger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, R.; Lee, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Collection of point-like intense vortices arranged symmetrically outside of a uniform circular vortex patch, both enclosed in a free-slip circular boundary, are numerically time evolved for up to 10-15 patch turnover times. These patterns are found to merge with the patch by successively inducing nonlinear dispersive modes (V-states) on the surface of the patch, draw off fingers of vorticity (filamentation), trap the irrotational regions as the fingers symmetrize under the shear flow of the patch and point-like vortices (wave breaking) followed by the vortex-hole capture. While the hole patterns are observed to break up over several turnover periods the vortex patterns appear to evolve into quasistationary patterns for some cases of an initial number of point-like vortices N pv . The bounded V-states, filamentation, and vortex (hole) pattern formation are discussed in some detail and their possible connection to recently observed vortex 'crystals' is pointed out

  2. Opinion formation models in static and dynamic social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pramesh

    We study models of opinion formation on static as well as dynamic networks where interaction among individuals is governed by widely accepted social theories. In particular, three models of competing opinions based on distinct interaction mechanisms are studied. A common feature in all of these models is the existence of a tipping point in terms of a model parameter beyond which a rapid consensus is reached. In the first model that we study on a static network, a node adopts a particular state (opinion) if a threshold fraction of its neighbors are already in that state. We introduce a few initiator nodes which are in state '1' in a population where every node is in state '0'. Thus, opinion '1' spreads through the population until no further influence is possible. Size of the spread is greatly affected by how these initiator nodes are selected. We find that there exists a critical fraction of initiators pc that is needed to trigger global cascades for a given threshold phi. We also study heuristic strategies for selecting a set of initiator nodes in order to maximize the cascade size. The structural properties of networks also play an important role in the spreading process. We study how the dynamics is affected by changing the clustering in a network. It turns out that local clustering is helpful in spreading. Next, we studied a model where the network is dynamic and interactions are homophilic. We find that homophily-driven rewiring impedes the reaching of consensus and in the absence of committed nodes (nodes that are not influenceable on their opinion), consensus time Tc diverges exponentially with network size N . As we introduce a fraction of committed nodes, beyond a critical value, the scaling of Tc becomes logarithmic in N. We also find that slight change in the interaction rule can produce strikingly different scaling behaviors of T c . However, introducing committed agents in the system drastically improves the scaling of the consensus time regardless of

  3. Study of pattern formation at liquid interfaces: Progress report, November 1986-October 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, J.V.

    1987-10-01

    This paper summarizes the work done on the following topics at the University of Pittsburgh: the behavior of a tip-splitting, viscous-fingering system and the role of interfacial noise in pattern formation on planar interfaces; the search for instability on a quenched liquid interface; and binary liquid gels and polymer solutions

  4. Selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnichenko, A.V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning was studied. DLC films was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, filtered vacuum arc deposition, laser ablation, magnetron sputtering and ion-beam lithography methods. The DLC coatings were...

  5. Category Formation in Autism: Can Individuals with Autism Form Categories and Prototypes of Dot Patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastgeb, Holly Zajac; Dundas, Eva M.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Strauss, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence suggesting that individuals with autism have difficulty with categorization. One basic cognitive ability that may underlie this difficulty is the ability to abstract a prototype. The current study examined prototype and category formation with dot patterns in high-functioning adults with autism and matched…

  6. Collective motion of cells mediates segregation and pattern formation in co-cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elod Méhes

    Full Text Available Pattern formation by segregation of cell types is an important process during embryonic development. We show that an experimentally yet unexplored mechanism based on collective motility of segregating cells enhances the effects of known pattern formation mechanisms such as differential adhesion, mechanochemical interactions or cell migration directed by morphogens. To study in vitro cell segregation we use time-lapse videomicroscopy and quantitative analysis of the main features of the motion of individual cells or groups. Our observations have been extensive, typically involving the investigation of the development of patterns containing up to 200,000 cells. By either comparing keratocyte types with different collective motility characteristics or increasing cells' directional persistence by the inhibition of Rac1 GTP-ase we demonstrate that enhanced collective cell motility results in faster cell segregation leading to the formation of more extensive patterns. The growth of the characteristic scale of patterns generally follows an algebraic scaling law with exponent values up to 0.74 in the presence of collective motion, compared to significantly smaller exponents in case of diffusive motion.

  7. The effect of the signalling scheme on the robustness of pattern formation in development

    KAUST Repository

    Kang, H.-W.

    2012-03-21

    Pattern formation in development is a complex process which involves spatially distributed signals called morphogens that influence gene expression and thus the phenotypic identity of cells. Usually different cell types are spatially segregated, and the boundary between them may be determined by a threshold value of some state variable. The question arises as to how sensitive the location of such a boundary is to variations in properties, such as parameter values, that characterize the system. Here, we analyse both deterministic and stochastic reaction-diffusion models of pattern formation with a view towards understanding how the signalling scheme used for patterning affects the variability of boundary determination between cell types in a developing tissue.

  8. The performance model of dynamic virtual organization (VO) formations within grid computing context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Liangxiu

    2009-01-01

    Grid computing aims to enable 'resource sharing and coordinated problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional virtual organizations (VOs)'. Within the grid computing context, successful dynamic VO formations mean a number of individuals and institutions associated with certain resources join together and form new VOs in order to effectively execute tasks within given time steps. To date, while the concept of VOs has been accepted, few research has been done on the impact of effective dynamic virtual organization formations. In this paper, we develop a performance model of dynamic VOs formation and analyze the effect of different complex organizational structures and their various statistic parameter properties on dynamic VO formations from three aspects: (1) the probability of a successful VO formation under different organizational structures and statistic parameters change, e.g. average degree; (2) the effect of task complexity on dynamic VO formations; (3) the impact of network scales on dynamic VO formations. The experimental results show that the proposed model can be used to understand the dynamic VO formation performance of the simulated organizations. The work provides a good path to understand how to effectively schedule and utilize resources based on the complex grid network and therefore improve the overall performance within grid environment.

  9. Dynamics of growth zone patterning in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auman, Tzach; Vreede, Barbara M I; Weiss, Aryeh; Hester, Susan D; Williams, Terri A; Nagy, Lisa M; Chipman, Ariel D

    2017-05-15

    We describe the dynamic process of abdominal segment generation in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus We present detailed morphological measurements of the growing germband throughout segmentation. Our data are complemented by cell division profiles and expression patterns of key genes, including invected and even-skipped as markers for different stages of segment formation. We describe morphological and mechanistic changes in the growth zone and in nascent segments during the generation of individual segments and throughout segmentation, and examine the relative contribution of newly formed versus existing tissue to segment formation. Although abdominal segment addition is primarily generated through the rearrangement of a pool of undifferentiated cells, there is nonetheless proliferation in the posterior. By correlating proliferation with gene expression in the growth zone, we propose a model for growth zone dynamics during segmentation in which the growth zone is functionally subdivided into two distinct regions: a posterior region devoted to a slow rate of growth among undifferentiated cells, and an anterior region in which segmental differentiation is initiated and proliferation inhibited. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Traction force dynamics predict gap formation in activated endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valent, Erik T.; Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P. van; Hinsbergh, Victor W.M. van; Hordijk, Peter L., E-mail: p.hordijk@vumc.nl

    2016-09-10

    In many pathological conditions the endothelium becomes activated and dysfunctional, resulting in hyperpermeability and plasma leakage. No specific therapies are available yet to control endothelial barrier function, which is regulated by inter-endothelial junctions and the generation of acto-myosin-based contractile forces in the context of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the spatiotemporal distribution and stimulus-induced reorganization of these integral forces remain largely unknown. Traction force microscopy of human endothelial monolayers was used to visualize contractile forces in resting cells and during thrombin-induced hyperpermeability. Simultaneously, information about endothelial monolayer integrity, adherens junctions and cytoskeletal proteins (F-actin) were captured. This revealed a heterogeneous distribution of traction forces, with nuclear areas showing lower and cell-cell junctions higher traction forces than the whole-monolayer average. Moreover, junctional forces were asymmetrically distributed among neighboring cells. Force vector orientation analysis showed a good correlation with the alignment of F-actin and revealed contractile forces in newly formed filopodia and lamellipodia-like protrusions within the monolayer. Finally, unstable areas, showing high force fluctuations within the monolayer were prone to form inter-endothelial gaps upon stimulation with thrombin. To conclude, contractile traction forces are heterogeneously distributed within endothelial monolayers and force instability, rather than force magnitude, predicts the stimulus-induced formation of intercellular gaps. - Highlights: • Endothelial monolayers exert dynamic- and heterogeneous traction forces. • High traction forces correlate with junctional areas and the F-actin cytoskeleton. • Newly formed inter-endothelial gaps are characterized by opposing traction forces. • Force stability is a key feature controlling endothelial permeability.

  11. Traction force dynamics predict gap formation in activated endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valent, Erik T.; Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P. van; Hinsbergh, Victor W.M. van; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    In many pathological conditions the endothelium becomes activated and dysfunctional, resulting in hyperpermeability and plasma leakage. No specific therapies are available yet to control endothelial barrier function, which is regulated by inter-endothelial junctions and the generation of acto-myosin-based contractile forces in the context of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the spatiotemporal distribution and stimulus-induced reorganization of these integral forces remain largely unknown. Traction force microscopy of human endothelial monolayers was used to visualize contractile forces in resting cells and during thrombin-induced hyperpermeability. Simultaneously, information about endothelial monolayer integrity, adherens junctions and cytoskeletal proteins (F-actin) were captured. This revealed a heterogeneous distribution of traction forces, with nuclear areas showing lower and cell-cell junctions higher traction forces than the whole-monolayer average. Moreover, junctional forces were asymmetrically distributed among neighboring cells. Force vector orientation analysis showed a good correlation with the alignment of F-actin and revealed contractile forces in newly formed filopodia and lamellipodia-like protrusions within the monolayer. Finally, unstable areas, showing high force fluctuations within the monolayer were prone to form inter-endothelial gaps upon stimulation with thrombin. To conclude, contractile traction forces are heterogeneously distributed within endothelial monolayers and force instability, rather than force magnitude, predicts the stimulus-induced formation of intercellular gaps. - Highlights: • Endothelial monolayers exert dynamic- and heterogeneous traction forces. • High traction forces correlate with junctional areas and the F-actin cytoskeleton. • Newly formed inter-endothelial gaps are characterized by opposing traction forces. • Force stability is a key feature controlling endothelial permeability.

  12. Formation of coffee-stain patterns at the nanoscale: The role of nanoparticle solubility and solvent evaporation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Milzetti, Jasmin; Leroy, Frédéric; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2017-03-21

    When droplets of nanoparticle suspension evaporate from surfaces, they leave behind a deposit of nanoparticles. The mechanism of evaporation-induced pattern formation in the deposit is studied by molecular dynamics simulations for sessile nanodroplets. The influence of the interaction between nanoparticles and liquid molecules and the influence of the evaporation rate on the final deposition pattern are addressed. When the nanoparticle-liquid interaction is weaker than the liquid-liquid interaction, an interaction-driven or evaporation-induced layer of nanoparticles appears at the liquid-vapor interface and eventually collapses onto the solid surface to form a uniform deposit independently of the evaporation rate. When the nanoparticle-liquid and liquid-liquid interactions are comparable, the nanoparticles are dispersed inside the droplet and evaporation takes place with the contact line pinned at a surface defect. In such a case, a pattern with an approximate ring-like shape is found with fast evaporation, while a more uniform distribution is observed with slower evaporation. When the liquid-nanoparticle interaction is stronger than the liquid-liquid interaction, evaporation always occurs with receding contact line. The final deposition pattern changes from volcano-like to pancake-like with decreasing evaporation rate. These findings might help to design nanoscale structures like nanopatterns or nanowires on surface through controlled solvent evaporation.

  13. River plume patterns and dynamics within the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, J.A.; DiGiacomo, P.M.; Weisberg, S.B.; Nezlin, N.P.; Mengel, M.; Jones, B.H.; Ohlmann, J.C.; Washburn, L.; Terrill, E.J.; Farnsworth, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Stormwater river plumes are important vectors of marine contaminants and pathogens in the Southern California Bight. Here we report the results of a multi-institution investigation of the river plumes across eight major river systems of southern California. We use in situ water samples from multi-day cruises in combination with MODIS satellite remote sensing, buoy meteorological observations, drifters, and HF radar current measurements to evaluate the dispersal patterns and dynamics of the freshwater plumes. River discharge was exceptionally episodic, and the majority of storm discharge occurred in a few hours. The combined plume observing techniques revealed that plumes commonly detach from the coast and turn to the left, which is the opposite direction of Coriolis influence. Although initial offshore velocity of the buoyant plumes was ∼50 cm/s and was influenced by river discharge inertia (i.e., the direct momentum of the river flux) and buoyancy, subsequent advection of the plumes was largely observed in an alongshore direction and dominated by local winds. Due to the multiple day upwelling wind conditions that commonly follow discharge events, plumes were observed to flow from their respective river mouths to down-coast waters at rates of 20–40 km/d. Lastly, we note that suspended-sediment concentration and beam-attenuation were poorly correlated with plume salinity across and within the sampled plumes (mean r2=0.12 and 0.25, respectively), while colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence was well correlated (mean r2=0.56), suggesting that CDOM may serve as a good tracer of the discharged freshwater in subsequent remote sensing and monitoring efforts of plumes.

  14. The role of irradiated tissue during pattern formation in the regenerating limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maden, M.

    1979-01-01

    The amphibian limb regeneration blastema is used here to examine whether irradiated, non-dividing tissue can participate in the development of new patterns of morphogenesis. Irradiated blastemas were rotated 180 0 on normal stumps and normal blastemas rotated on irradiated stumps. In both cases supernumerary elements developed from the unirradiated tissue. The supernumeraries were defective but this did not seem to be due to a lack of tissue. Rather it suggested that this could be a realization of compartments in vertebrate development or simply reflect the limited regulative ability of the blastema. The results are also discussed in relation to a recent model of pattern formation. (author)

  15. Dynamical patterning modules: physico-genetic determinants of morphological development and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Stuart A; Bhat, Ramray

    2008-01-01

    The shapes and forms of multicellular organisms arise by the generation of new cell states and types and changes in the numbers and rearrangements of the various kinds of cells. While morphogenesis and pattern formation in all animal species are widely recognized to be mediated by the gene products of an evolutionarily conserved 'developmental-genetic toolkit', the link between these molecular players and the physics underlying these processes has been generally ignored. This paper introduces the concept of 'dynamical patterning modules' (DPMs), units consisting of one or more products of the 'toolkit' genes that mobilize physical processes characteristic of chemically and mechanically excitable meso- to macroscopic systems such as cell aggregates: cohesion, viscoelasticity, diffusion, spatiotemporal heterogeneity based on lateral inhibition and multistable and oscillatory dynamics. We suggest that ancient toolkit gene products, most predating the emergence of multicellularity, assumed novel morphogenetic functions due to change in the scale and context inherent to multicellularity. We show that DPMs, acting individually and in concert with each other, constitute a 'pattern language' capable of generating all metazoan body plans and organ forms. The physical dimension of developmental causation implies that multicellular forms during the explosive radiation of animal body plans in the middle Cambrian, approximately 530 million years ago, could have explored an extensive morphospace without concomitant genotypic change or selection for adaptation. The morphologically plastic body plans and organ forms generated by DPMs, and their ontogenetic trajectories, would subsequently have been stabilized and consolidated by natural selection and genetic drift. This perspective also solves the apparent 'molecular homology-analogy paradox', whereby widely divergent modern animal types utilize the same molecular toolkit during development by proposing, in contrast to the Neo

  16. A nonlinear dynamics approach for incorporating wind-speed patterns into wind-power project evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, Ray; Bittelli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Wind-energy production may be expanded beyond regions with high-average wind speeds (such as the Midwest U.S.A.) to sites with lower-average speeds (such as the Southeast U.S.A.) by locating favorable regional matches between natural wind-speed and energy-demand patterns. A critical component of wind-power evaluation is to incorporate wind-speed dynamics reflecting documented diurnal and seasonal behavioral patterns. Conventional probabilistic approaches remove patterns from wind-speed data. These patterns must be restored synthetically before they can be matched with energy-demand patterns. How to accurately restore wind-speed patterns is a vexing problem spurring an expanding line of papers. We propose a paradigm shift in wind power evaluation that employs signal-detection and nonlinear-dynamics techniques to empirically diagnose whether synthetic pattern restoration can be avoided altogether. If the complex behavior of observed wind-speed records is due to nonlinear, low-dimensional, and deterministic system dynamics, then nonlinear dynamics techniques can reconstruct wind-speed dynamics from observed wind-speed data without recourse to conventional probabilistic approaches. In the first study of its kind, we test a nonlinear dynamics approach in an application to Sugarland Wind-the first utility-scale wind project proposed in Florida, USA. We find empirical evidence of a low-dimensional and nonlinear wind-speed attractor characterized by strong temporal patterns that match up well with regular daily and seasonal electricity demand patterns.

  17. Collective Behavior of Chiral Active Matter: Pattern Formation and Enhanced Flocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebchen, Benno; Levis, Demian

    2017-08-01

    We generalize the Vicsek model to describe the collective behavior of polar circle swimmers with local alignment interactions. While the phase transition leading to collective motion in 2D (flocking) occurs at the same interaction to noise ratio as for linear swimmers, as we show, circular motion enhances the polarization in the ordered phase (enhanced flocking) and induces secondary instabilities leading to structure formation. Slow rotations promote macroscopic droplets with late time sizes proportional to the system size (indicating phase separation) whereas fast rotations generate patterns consisting of phase synchronized microflocks with a controllable characteristic size proportional to the average single-particle swimming radius. Our results defy the viewpoint that monofrequent rotations form a vapid extension of the Vicsek model and establish a generic route to pattern formation in chiral active matter with possible applications for understanding and designing rotating microflocks.

  18. Formation dynamics of UV and EUV induced hydrogen plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolgov, A.A.; Lee, Christopher James; Yakushev, O.; Lopaev, D.V.; Abrikosov, A.; Krivtsun, V.M.; Zotovich, A.; Bijkerk, F.

    2014-01-01

    The comparative study of the dynamics of ultraviolet (UV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) induced hydrogen plasma was performed. It was shown that for low H2 pressures and bias voltages, the dynamics of the two plasmas are significantly different. In the case of UV radiation, the plasma above the

  19. Dynamics, Stability, and Evolutionary Patterns of Mesoscale Intrathermocline Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    different manner from a dynamic eddy, which underscores inherent limitations of intrusion modeling in quiescent background states. Finally, it...of observed values. (3) A static eddy dissipates in a very different manner from a dynamic eddy, which underscores inherent limitations of...does not react to the environment in a physical manner . This establishes a need for future research on eddies to be modeled on a dynamically rotating

  20. SWARM-BOT: Pattern Formation in a Swarm of Self-Assembling Mobile Robots

    OpenAIRE

    El Kamel, A.; Mellouli, K.; Borne, P.; Sahin, E.; Labella, T.H.; Trianni, V.; Deneubourg, J.-L.; Rasse, P.; Floreano, D.; Gambardella, L.M.; Mondada, F.; Nolfi, S.; Dorigo, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new robotic system, called swarm-bot. The system consists of a swarm of mobile robots with the ability to connect to/disconnect from each other to self-assemble into different kinds of structures. First, we describe our vision and the goals of the project. Then we present preliminary results on the formation of patterns obtained from a grid-world simulation of the system.

  1. Individual Rules for Trail Pattern Formation in Argentine Ants (Linepithema humile)

    OpenAIRE

    Perna, Andrea; Granovskiy, Boris; Garnier, Simon; Nicolis, Stamatios C.; Labédan, Marjorie; Theraulaz, Guy; Fourcassié, Vincent; Sumpter, David J. T.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the formation of trail patterns by Argentine ants exploring an empty arena. Using a novel imaging and analysis technique we estimated pheromone concentrations at all spatial positions in the experimental arena and at different times. Then we derived the response function of individual ants to pheromone concentrations by looking at correlations between concentrations and changes in speed or direction of the ants. Ants were found to turn in response to local pheromone concentrations,...

  2. Self-Assembly, Pattern Formation and Growth Phenomena in Nano-Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A

    2006-01-01

    Nano-science and nano-technology are rapidly developing scientific and technological areas that deal with physical, chemical and biological processes that occur on nano-meter scale – one millionth of a millimeter. Self-organization and pattern formation play crucial role on nano-scales and promise new, effective routes to control various nano-scales processes. This book contains lecture notes written by the lecturers of the NATO Advanced Study Institute "Self-Assembly, Pattern Formation and Growth Phenomena in Nano-Systems" that took place in St Etienne de Tinee, France, in the fall 2004. They give examples of self-organization phenomena on micro- and nano-scale as well as examples of the interplay between phenomena on nano- and macro-scales leading to complex behavior in various physical, chemical and biological systems. They discuss such fascinating nano-scale self-organization phenomena as self-assembly of quantum dots in thin solid films, pattern formation in liquid crystals caused by light, self-organi...

  3. Numerical and Experimental Study on the Formation and Dispersion Patterns of Multiple Explosively Formed Penetrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Feng Liu

    Full Text Available Abstract Three-dimensional numerical simulations and experiments were performed to examine the formation and spatial dispersion patterns of integral multiple explosively formed penetrators (MEFP warhead with seven hemispherical liners. Numerical results had successfully described the formation process and distribution pattern of MEFP. A group of penetrators consisting of a central penetrator surrounded by 6 penetrators is formed during the formation process of MEFP and moves in the direction of aiming position. The maximum divergence angle of the surrounding penetrator group was 7.8°, and the damage area could reach 0.16 m2 at 1.2 m. The laws of perforation dispersion patterns of MEFP were also obtained through a nonlinear fitting of the perforation information on the target at different standoffs. The terminal effects of the MEFP warhead were performed on three #45 steel targets with a dimension of 160cm ( 160cm ( 1.5cm at various standoffs (60, 80, and 120 cm. The simulation results were validated through penetration experiments at different standoffs. It has shown excellent agreement between simulation and experiment results.

  4. How memory of direct animal interactions can lead to territorial pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Jonathan R; Lewis, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic home range analysis (MHRA) is a highly effective tool for understanding spacing patterns of animal populations. It has hitherto focused on populations where animals defend their territories by communicating indirectly, e.g. via scent marks. However, many animal populations defend their territories using direct interactions, such as ritualized aggression. To enable application of MHRA to such populations, we construct a model of direct territorial interactions, using linear stability analysis and energy methods to understand when territorial patterns may form. We show that spatial memory of past interactions is vital for pattern formation, as is memory of 'safe' places, where the animal has visited but not suffered recent territorial encounters. Additionally, the spatial range over which animals make decisions to move is key to understanding the size and shape of their resulting territories. Analysis using energy methods, on a simplified version of our system, shows that stability in the nonlinear system corresponds well to predictions of linear analysis. We also uncover a hysteresis in the process of territory formation, so that formation may depend crucially on initial space-use. Our analysis, in one dimension and two dimensions, provides mathematical groundwork required for extending MHRA to situations where territories are defended by direct encounters. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern and Biofilm Formation Ability of Clinically Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serotype typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Ghasemmahdi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria with biofilm formation ability may be a major threat to public health and food safety and sanitation. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine antibiotic resistance patterns and biofilm production characteristics of Salmonella typhimurium isolated from different species of birds. Materials and Methods: The antibiotic resistance patterns of 38 pre-identified isolates were screened by standard Kirby-Bauer disc-diffusion method performed on Mueller–Hinton agar to a panel of 17 antibiotics. The extent of biofilm formation was measured by Microtiter plate (MTP-based systems. Results: The highest antimicrobial resistance was detected against nalidixic acid (97%, followed by doxycycline (86%, colistin (84%, streptomycin (84% and tetracycline (84%. All isolates were sensitive to amikacin (100% and 97% and 95% of the isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime and ceftriaxone, respectively. Twenty one different antibiotic resistance patterns were observed among S. typhimurium isolates. According to the results of the microtitre plate biofilm assay, there was a wide variation in biofilm forming ability among S. typhimurium isolates. Most of the isolates (60.52% were not capable of producing biofilm, while 26.31%, 7.89%, and 5.26% isolates were weak, strong and moderate biofilm producers, respectively. Conclusions: It was concluded that nearly all S. typhimurium isolates revealed a high multiple antibiotic resistant with low biofilm forming capabilities which proposed low association between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance of a major food important pathogen.

  6. Density of founder cells affects spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kovács, Akos T

    2014-10-01

    In nature, most bacteria live in surface-attached sedentary communities known as biofilms. Biofilms are often studied with respect to bacterial interactions. Many cells inhabiting biofilms are assumed to express 'cooperative traits', like the secretion of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). These traits can enhance biofilm-related properties, such as stress resilience or colony expansion, while being costly to the cells that express them. In well-mixed populations cooperation is difficult to achieve, because non-cooperative individuals can reap the benefits of cooperation without having to pay the costs. The physical process of biofilm growth can, however, result in the spatial segregation of cooperative from non-cooperative individuals. This segregation can prevent non-cooperative cells from exploiting cooperative neighbors. Here we examine the interaction between spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms. We show, experimentally and by mathematical modeling, that the density of cells at the onset of biofilm growth affects pattern formation during biofilm growth. At low initial cell densities, co-cultured strains strongly segregate in space, whereas spatial segregation does not occur at high initial cell densities. As a consequence, EPS-producing cells have a competitive advantage over non-cooperative mutants when biofilms are initiated at a low density of founder cells, whereas EPS-deficient cells have an advantage at high cell densities. These results underline the importance of spatial pattern formation for competition among bacterial strains and the evolution of microbial cooperation.

  7. Formation mechanism of dot-line square superlattice pattern in dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weibo; Dong, Lifang, E-mail: donglfhbu@163.com, E-mail: pyy1616@163.com; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Xinpu [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); College of Quality and Technical Supervision, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Pan, Yuyang, E-mail: donglfhbu@163.com, E-mail: pyy1616@163.com [College of Quality and Technical Supervision, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the formation mechanism of the dot-line square superlattice pattern (DLSSP) in dielectric barrier discharge. The spatio-temporal structure studied by using the intensified-charge coupled device camera shows that the DLSSP is an interleaving of three different subpatterns in one half voltage cycle. The dot square lattice discharges first and, then, the two kinds of line square lattices, which form square grid structures discharge twice. When the gas pressure is varied, DLSSP can transform from square superlattice pattern (SSP). The spectral line profile method is used to compare the electron densities, which represent the amounts of surface charges qualitatively. It is found that the amount of surface charges accumulated by the first discharge of DLSSP is less than that of SSP, leading to a bigger discharge area of the following discharge (lines of DLSSP instead of halos of SSP). The spatial distribution of the electric field of the surface charges is simulated to explain the formation of DLSSP. This paper may provide a deeper understanding for the formation mechanism of complex superlattice patterns in DBD.

  8. Function and Dynamics of Tetraspanins during Antigen Recognition and Immunological Synapse Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eRocha-Perugini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs are specialized membrane platforms driven by protein-protein interactions that integrate membrane receptors and adhesion molecules. Tetraspanins participate in antigen recognition and presentation by antigen presenting cells (APCs through the organization of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs and their downstream induced-signaling, as well as the regulation of MHC-II-peptide trafficking. T lymphocyte activation is triggered upon specific recognition of antigens present on the APC surface during immunological synapse (IS formation. This dynamic process is characterized by a defined spatial organization involving the compartmentalization of receptors and adhesion molecules in specialized membrane domains that are connected to the underlying cytoskeleton and signaling molecules. Tetraspanins contribute to the spatial organization and maturation of the IS by controlling receptor clustering and local accumulation of adhesion receptors and integrins, their downstream signaling and linkage to the actin cytoskeleton. This review offers a perspective on the important role of TEMs in the regulation of antigen recognition and presentation, and in the dynamics of IS architectural organization.

  9. Function and Dynamics of Tetraspanins during Antigen Recognition and Immunological Synapse Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Perugini, Vera; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Martínez del Hoyo, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs) are specialized membrane platforms driven by protein–protein interactions that integrate membrane receptors and adhesion molecules. Tetraspanins participate in antigen recognition and presentation by antigen-­presenting cells (APCs) through the organization of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) and their downstream-induced signaling, as well as the regulation of MHC-II–peptide trafficking. T lymphocyte activation is triggered upon specific recognition of antigens present on the APC surface during immunological synapse (IS) formation. This dynamic process is characterized by a defined spatial organization involving the compartmentalization of receptors and adhesion molecules in specialized membrane domains that are connected to the underlying cytoskeleton and signaling molecules. Tetraspanins contribute to the spatial organization and maturation of the IS by controlling receptor clustering and local accumulation of adhesion receptors and integrins, their downstream signaling, and linkage to the actin cytoskeleton. This review offers a perspective on the important role of TEMs in the regulation of antigen recognition and presentation and in the dynamics of IS architectural organization. PMID:26793193

  10. Spontaneous formation of dynamical groups in an adaptive networked system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Menghui; Guan Shuguang; Lai, C-H

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we investigate a model of an adaptive networked dynamical system, where the coupling strengths among phase oscillators coevolve with the phase states. It is shown that in this model the oscillators can spontaneously differentiate into two dynamical groups after a long time evolution. Within each group, the oscillators have similar phases, while oscillators in different groups have approximately opposite phases. The network gradually converts from the initial random structure with a uniform distribution of connection strengths into a modular structure that is characterized by strong intra-connections and weak inter-connections. Furthermore, the connection strengths follow a power-law distribution, which is a natural consequence of the coevolution of the network and the dynamics. Interestingly, it is found that if the inter-connections are weaker than a certain threshold, the two dynamical groups will almost decouple and evolve independently. These results are helpful in further understanding the empirical observations in many social and biological networks.

  11. Spontaneous and Flow-Driven Interfacial Phase Change: Dynamics of Microemulsion Formation at the Pore Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagavifar, Mohsen; Xu, Ke; Jang, Sung Hyun; Balhoff, Matthew T; Pope, Gary A

    2017-11-14

    The dynamic behavior of microemulsion-forming water-oil-amphiphiles mixtures is investigated in a 2.5D micromodel. The equilibrium phase behavior of such mixtures is well-understood in terms of macroscopic phase transitions. However, what is less understood and where experimental data are lacking is the coupling between the phase change and the bulk flow. Herein, we study the flow of an aqueous surfactant solution-oil mixture in porous media and analyze the dependence of phase formation and spatial phase configurations on the bulk flow rate. We find that a microemulsion forms instantaneously as a boundary layer at the initial surface of contact between the surfactant solution and oil. The boundary layer is temporally continuous because of the imposed convection. In addition to the imposed flow, we observe spontaneous pulsed Marangoni flows that drag the microemulsion and surfactant solution into the oil stream, forming large (macro)emulsion droplets. The formation of the microemulsion phase at the interface distinguishes the situation from that of the more common Marangoni flow with only two phases present. Additionally, an emulsion forms via liquid-liquid nucleation or the Ouzo effect (i.e., spontaneous emulsification) at low flow rates and via mechanical mixing at high flow rates. With regard to multiphase flow, contrary to the common belief that the microemulsion is the wetting liquid, we observe that the minor oil phase wets the solid surface. We show that a layered flow pattern is formed because of the out-of-equilibrium phase behavior at high volumetric flow rates (order of 2 m/day) where advection is much faster than the diffusive interfacial mass transfer and transverse mixing, which promote equilibrium behavior. At lower flow rates (order of 30 cm/day), however, the dynamic and equilibrium phase behaviors are well-correlated. These results clearly show that the phase change influences the macroscale flow behavior.

  12. Dynamics of bubble formation in highly viscous liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancholi, Ketan; Stride, Eleanor; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2008-04-15

    There has recently been considerable interest in the development of devices for the preparation of monodisperse microbubble suspensions for use as ultrasound contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles. These applications require not only a high degree of bubble uniformity but also a maximum bubble size of 8 mum, and this provides a strong motivation for developing an improved understanding of the process of bubble formation in a given device. The aim of this work was to investigate bubble formation in a T-junction device and determine the influence of the different processing parameters upon bubble size, in particular, liquid viscosity. Images of air bubble formation in a specially designed T-junction were recorded using a high-speed camera for different ratios of liquid to gas flow rate (Ql/Qg) and different liquid viscosities (microl). It was found that theoretical predictions of the flow profile in the focal region based on analysis of axisymmetric Stokes flow were accurate to within 6% when compared with the experimental data, indicating that this provided a suitable means of describing the bubble formation process. Both the theoretical and experimental results showed that Ql/Qg and mul had a significant influence upon bubble formation and eventual size, with higher flow rates and higher viscosities producing smaller bubbles. There were, however, found to be limiting values of Ql/Qg and mul beyond which no further reduction in bubble size was achieved.

  13. Chemotactic preferences govern competition and pattern formation in simulated two-strain microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centler, Florian; Thullner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Substrate competition is a common mode of microbial interaction in natural environments. While growth properties play an important and well-studied role in competition, we here focus on the influence of motility. In a simulated two-strain community populating a homogeneous two-dimensional environment, strains competed for a common substrate and only differed in their chemotactic preference, either responding more sensitively to a chemoattractant excreted by themselves or responding more sensitively to substrate. Starting from homogeneous distributions, three possible behaviors were observed depending on the competitors' chemotactic preferences: (i) distributions remained homogeneous, (ii) patterns formed but dissolved at a later time point, resulting in a shifted community composition, and (iii) patterns emerged and led to the extinction of one strain. When patterns formed, the more aggregating strain populated the core of microbial aggregates where starving conditions prevailed, while the less aggregating strain populated the more productive zones at the fringe or outside aggregates, leading to a competitive advantage of the less aggregating strain. The presence of a competitor was found to modulate a strain's behavior, either suppressing or promoting aggregate formation. This observation provides a potential mechanism by which an aggregated lifestyle might evolve even if it is initially disadvantageous. Adverse effects can be avoided as a competitor hinders aggregate formation by a strain which has just acquired this ability. The presented results highlight both, the importance of microbial motility for competition and pattern formation, and the importance of the temporal evolution, or history, of microbial communities when trying to explain an observed distribution.

  14. Finite element simulation of dynamic wetting flows as an interface formation process

    KAUST Repository

    Sprittles, J.E.; Shikhmurzaev, Y.D.

    2013-01-01

    A mathematically challenging model of dynamic wetting as a process of interface formation has been, for the first time, fully incorporated into a numerical code based on the finite element method and applied, as a test case, to the problem

  15. Dynamic behavior of a social model for opinion formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordogna, Clelia M.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2007-12-01

    The dynamic behavior of a social group influenced by both a strong leader and the mass media, which is modeled according to the social impact theory, is studied under two situations: (i) The strong leader changes his/her state of opinion periodically while the mass media are not considered. In this case, the leader is capable of driving the group between a dynamically ordered state with a weak leader-group coupling (high-frequency regime) and a dynamically disordered state where the group follows the opinion of the leader (low-frequency regime). (ii) The mass-media change periodically their message and have to compete with a strong leader that keeps his/her state of opinion unchanged. In this case, the mass media require an amplitude threshold in order to overcome the influence of the leader and drive the system into a dynamically disordered state. The dynamic behavior characteristic of the studied social opinion model shares many features of physical systems that are relevant in the fields of statistical mechanics and condensed matter.

  16. The self-adaptation to dynamic failures for efficient virtual organization formations in grid computing context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Liangxiu

    2009-01-01

    Grid computing aims to enable 'resource sharing and coordinated problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional virtual organizations (VOs)'. However, due to the nature of heterogeneous and dynamic resources, dynamic failures in the distributed grid environment usually occur more than in traditional computation platforms, which cause failed VO formations. In this paper, we develop a novel self-adaptive mechanism to dynamic failures during VO formations. Such a self-adaptive scheme allows an individual and member of VOs to automatically find other available or replaceable one once a failure happens and therefore makes systems automatically recover from dynamic failures. We define dynamic failure situations of a system by using two standard indicators: mean time between failures (MTBF) and mean time to recover (MTTR). We model both MTBF and MTTR as Poisson distributions. We investigate and analyze the efficiency of the proposed self-adaptation mechanism to dynamic failures by comparing the success probability of VO formations before and after adopting it in three different cases: (1) different failure situations; (2) different organizational structures and scales; (3) different task complexities. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme can automatically adapt to dynamic failures and effectively improve the dynamic VO formation performance in the event of node failures, which provide a valuable addition to the field.

  17. Self-similar pattern formation and continuous mechanics of self-similar systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Dyskin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In many cases, the critical state of systems that reached the threshold is characterised by self-similar pattern formation. We produce an example of pattern formation of this kind – formation of self-similar distribution of interacting fractures. Their formation starts with the crack growth due to the action of stress fluctuations. It is shown that even when the fluctuations have zero average the cracks generated by them could grow far beyond the scale of stress fluctuations. Further development of the fracture system is controlled by crack interaction leading to the emergence of self-similar crack distributions. As a result, the medium with fractures becomes discontinuous at any scale. We develop a continuum fractal mechanics to model its physical behaviour. We introduce a continuous sequence of continua of increasing scales covering this range of scales. The continuum of each scale is specified by the representative averaging volume elements of the corresponding size. These elements determine the resolution of the continuum. Each continuum hides the cracks of scales smaller than the volume element size while larger fractures are modelled explicitly. Using the developed formalism we investigate the stability of self-similar crack distributions with respect to crack growth and show that while the self-similar distribution of isotropically oriented cracks is stable, the distribution of parallel cracks is not. For the isotropically oriented cracks scaling of permeability is determined. For permeable materials (rocks with self-similar crack distributions permeability scales as cube of crack radius. This property could be used for detecting this specific mechanism of formation of self-similar crack distributions.

  18. Complementary striped expression patterns of NK homeobox genes during segment formation in the annelid Platynereis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudemont, Alexandra; Dray, Nicolas; Hudry, Bruno; Le Gouar, Martine; Vervoort, Michel; Balavoine, Guillaume

    2008-05-15

    NK genes are related pan-metazoan homeobox genes. In the fruitfly, NK genes are clustered and involved in patterning various mesodermal derivatives during embryogenesis. It was therefore suggested that the NK cluster emerged in evolution as an ancestral mesodermal patterning cluster. To test this hypothesis, we cloned and analysed the expression patterns of the homologues of NK cluster genes Msx, NK4, NK3, Lbx, Tlx, NK1 and NK5 in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii, a representative of trochozoans, the third great branch of bilaterian animals alongside deuterostomes and ecdysozoans. We found that most of these genes are involved, as they are in the fly, in the specification of distinct mesodermal derivatives, notably subsets of muscle precursors. The expression of the homologue of NK4/tinman in the pulsatile dorsal vessel of Platynereis strongly supports the hypothesis that the vertebrate heart derived from a dorsal vessel relocated to a ventral position by D/V axis inversion in a chordate ancestor. Additionally and more surprisingly, NK4, Lbx, Msx, Tlx and NK1 orthologues are expressed in complementary sets of stripes in the ectoderm and/or mesoderm of forming segments, suggesting an involvement in the segment formation process. A potentially ancient role of the NK cluster genes in segment formation, unsuspected from vertebrate and fruitfly studies so far, now deserves to be investigated in other bilaterian species, especially non-insect arthropods and onychophorans.

  19. High repeatability from 3D experimental platform for quantitative analysis of cellular branch pattern formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Nobata, Rina; Kawahara, Tomohiro

    2018-04-24

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell and tissue cultures more closely mimic biological environments than two-dimensional (2D) cultures and are therefore highly desirable in culture experiments. However, 3D cultures often fail to yield repeatable experimental results because of variation in the initial culture conditions, such as cell density and distribution in the extracellular matrix, and therefore reducing such variation is a paramount concern. Here, we present a 3D culture platform that demonstrates highly repeatable experimental results, obtained by controlling the initial cell cluster shape in the gel cube culture device. A micro-mould with the desired shape was fabricated by photolithography or machining, creating a 3D pocket in the extracellular matrix contained in the device. Highly concentrated human bronchial epithelial cells were then injected in the pocket so that the cell cluster shape matched the fabricated mould shape. Subsequently, the cubic device supplied multi-directional scanning, enabling high-resolution capture of the whole tissue structure with only a low-magnification lens. The proposed device significantly improved the repeatability of the developed branch pattern, and multi-directional scanning enabled quantitative analysis of the developed branch pattern formations. A mathematical simulation was also conducted to reveal the mechanisms of branch pattern formation. The proposed platform offers the potential to accelerate any research field that conducts 3D culture experiments, including tissue regeneration and drug development.

  20. Clastic patterned ground in Lomonosov crater, Mars: examining fracture controlled formation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Alexander M.; Balme, Matthew R.; Patel, Manish R.; Hagermann, Axel

    2017-10-01

    The area surrounding Lomonosov crater on Mars has a high density of seemingly organised boulder patterns. These form seemingly sorted polygons and stripes within kilometre scale blockfields, patches of boulder strewn ground which are common across the Martian high latitudes. Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain the formation of clastic patterned ground on Mars. It has been proposed that these structures could have formed through freeze-thaw sorting, or conversely by the interaction of boulders with underlying fracture polygons. In this investigation a series of sites were examined to evaluate whether boulder patterns appear to be controlled by the distribution of underlying fractures and test the fracture control hypotheses for their formation. It was decided to focus on this suite of mechanisms as they are characterised by a clear morphological relationship, namely the presence of an underlying fracture network which can easily be evaluated over a large area. It was found that in the majority of examples at these sites did not exhibit fracture control. Although fractures were present at many sites there were very few sites where the fracture network appeared to be controlling the boulder distribution. In general these were not the sites with the best examples of organization, suggesting that the fracture control mechanisms are not the dominant geomorphic process organising the boulders in this area.

  1. Formation of mixed and patterned self-assembled films of alkylphosphonates on commercially pure titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudzka, Katarzyna; Sanchez Treviño, Alda Y.; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A., E-mail: marodri@ugr.es; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A.

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Chemically-tailored titanium surfaces were prepared by self-assembly of alkylphosphonates. • Mixed self-assembled films were prepared with aqueous mixtures of two alkylphosphonates. • Single self-assembled films were altered by laser abrasion. • Mixed and patterned self-assembled films on titanium may guide the bone-like formation. - Abstract: Titanium is extensively employed in biomedical devices, in particular as implant. The self-assembly of alkylphosphonates on titanium surfaces enable the specific adsorption of biomolecules to adapt the implant response against external stimuli. In this work, chemically-tailored cpTi surfaces were prepared by self-assembly of alkylphosphonate molecules. By bringing together attributes of two grafting molecules, aqueous mixtures of two alkylphosphonates were used to obtain mixed self-assembled films. Single self-assembled films were also altered by laser abrasion to produce chemically patterned cpTi surfaces. Both mixed and patterned self-assembled films were confirmed by AFM, ESEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Water contact angle measurements also revealed the composition of the self-assembly films. Chemical functionalization with two grafting phosphonate molecules and laser surface engineering may be combined to guide the bone-like formation on cpTi, and the future biological response in the host.

  2. Gain-of-function screen for genes that affect Drosophila muscle pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Staudt

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the production of an EP-element insertion library with more than 3,700 unique target sites within the Drosophila melanogaster genome and its use to systematically identify genes that affect embryonic muscle pattern formation. We designed a UAS/GAL4 system to drive GAL4-responsive expression of the EP-targeted genes in developing apodeme cells to which migrating myotubes finally attach and in an intrasegmental pattern of cells that serve myotubes as a migration substrate on their way towards the apodemes. The results suggest that misexpression of more than 1.5% of the Drosophila genes can interfere with proper myotube guidance and/or muscle attachment. In addition to factors already known to participate in these processes, we identified a number of enzymes that participate in the synthesis or modification of protein carbohydrate side chains and in Ubiquitin modifications and/or the Ubiquitin-dependent degradation of proteins, suggesting that these processes are relevant for muscle pattern formation.

  3. A dynamical model for plant cell wall architecture formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, B.M.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a dynamical mathematical model to explain cell wall architecture in plant cells. The highly regular textures observed in cell walls reflect the spatial organisation of the cellulose microfibrils (CMFs), the most important structural component of cell walls. Based on a geometrical theory

  4. Complexity of gold nanoparticle formation disclosed by dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Sørensen, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    from redox potential, pH, conductivity, and turbidity of the solution enables distinct observation of reduction and nucleation/growth of AuNPs phases. The dynamics of the electrochemical potential shows that reduction of gold salt (HAuCl 4 and its hydrolyzed forms) occurs via intermediate [AuCl 2...

  5. Dynamics of biofilm formation in a model drinking water distribution system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of biofilm formation in non-chlorinated groundwater-based drinking water was studied in a model distribution system. The formation of biofilm was closely monitored for a period of 522 days by total bacterial counts (AODC), heterotrophic plate counts (R2A media), and ATP content...

  6. Formation Dynamics of Oral Oil Coatings and Their Effect on Subsequent Sweetness Perception of Liquid Stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camacho, S.; Eck, van Arianne; De Velde, Van Fred; Stieger, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the formation of oral coatings and their influence on subsequent taste perception is necessary to understand possible taste-masking effects by oil coatings. This study investigated (a) the dynamics of the formation of oral oil coatings formed by o/w emulsions and (b) the effect of oral

  7. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, Andrey; Smolander, S.

    2011-01-01

    the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation event days shows a highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated the suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing the most important characteristics of particle dynamics...... within the boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles...

  8. Inactivation of the Huntington's disease gene (Hdh impairs anterior streak formation and early patterning of the mouse embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conlon Ronald A

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntingtin, the HD gene encoded protein mutated by polyglutamine expansion in Huntington's disease, is required in extraembryonic tissues for proper gastrulation, implicating its activities in nutrition or patterning of the developing embryo. To test these possibilities, we have used whole mount in situ hybridization to examine embryonic patterning and morphogenesis in homozygous Hdhex4/5 huntingtin deficient embryos. Results In the absence of huntingtin, expression of nutritive genes appears normal but E7.0–7.5 embryos exhibit a unique combination of patterning defects. Notable are a shortened primitive streak, absence of a proper node and diminished production of anterior streak derivatives. Reduced Wnt3a, Tbx6 and Dll1 expression signify decreased paraxial mesoderm and reduced Otx2 expression and lack of headfolds denote a failure of head development. In addition, genes initially broadly expressed are not properly restricted to the posterior, as evidenced by the ectopic expression of Nodal, Fgf8 and Gsc in the epiblast and T (Brachyury and Evx1 in proximal mesoderm derivatives. Despite impaired posterior restriction and anterior streak deficits, overall anterior/posterior polarity is established. A single primitive streak forms and marker expression shows that the anterior epiblast and anterior visceral endoderm (AVE are specified. Conclusion Huntingtin is essential in the early patterning of the embryo for formation of the anterior region of the primitive streak, and for down-regulation of a subset of dynamic growth and transcription factor genes. These findings provide fundamental starting points for identifying the novel cellular and molecular activities of huntingtin in the extraembryonic tissues that govern normal anterior streak development. This knowledge may prove to be important for understanding the mechanism by which the dominant polyglutamine expansion in huntingtin determines the loss of neurons in

  9. Inactivation of the Huntington's disease gene (Hdh) impairs anterior streak formation and early patterning of the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Juliana M; Calzonetti, Teresa; Hilditch-Maguire, Paige; Duyao, Mabel P; Conlon, Ronald A; MacDonald, Marcy E

    2005-08-18

    Huntingtin, the HD gene encoded protein mutated by polyglutamine expansion in Huntington's disease, is required in extraembryonic tissues for proper gastrulation, implicating its activities in nutrition or patterning of the developing embryo. To test these possibilities, we have used whole mount in situ hybridization to examine embryonic patterning and morphogenesis in homozygous Hdh(ex4/5) huntingtin deficient embryos. In the absence of huntingtin, expression of nutritive genes appears normal but E7.0-7.5 embryos exhibit a unique combination of patterning defects. Notable are a shortened primitive streak, absence of a proper node and diminished production of anterior streak derivatives. Reduced Wnt3a, Tbx6 and Dll1 expression signify decreased paraxial mesoderm and reduced Otx2 expression and lack of headfolds denote a failure of head development. In addition, genes initially broadly expressed are not properly restricted to the posterior, as evidenced by the ectopic expression of Nodal, Fgf8 and Gsc in the epiblast and T (Brachyury) and Evx1 in proximal mesoderm derivatives. Despite impaired posterior restriction and anterior streak deficits, overall anterior/posterior polarity is established. A single primitive streak forms and marker expression shows that the anterior epiblast and anterior visceral endoderm (AVE) are specified. Huntingtin is essential in the early patterning of the embryo for formation of the anterior region of the primitive streak, and for down-regulation of a subset of dynamic growth and transcription factor genes. These findings provide fundamental starting points for identifying the novel cellular and molecular activities of huntingtin in the extraembryonic tissues that govern normal anterior streak development. This knowledge may prove to be important for understanding the mechanism by which the dominant polyglutamine expansion in huntingtin determines the loss of neurons in Huntington's disease.

  10. Meniscus Dynamics in Bubble Formation. Part I: Experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Marek; Bunganič, Radovan; Drahoš, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 10 (2009), s. 1349-1356 ISSN 0263-8762 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200720801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble formation * perforated plate * meniscus oscillations Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.223, year: 2009

  11. Meniscus Dynamics in Bubble Formation. Part II: Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Marek; Bunganič, Radovan; Drahoš, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 10 (2009), s. 1357-1365 ISSN 0263-8762 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200720801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble formation * periodic bubbling * meniscus oscillations Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.223, year: 2009

  12. Dynamics of formation of ferromanganese nodules in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Ghosh, A.K.

    ., 2008). It is therefore interesting to examine and model the various factors that might influence the formation, growth and characters of nodules in the neighbouring sectors within the IONF (sector A to D, Fig. 2). The seafloor underlying... these sectors, originated from the Indian Ocean Ridge System (IORS), and is strikingly different from one sector to another. For example, the sectors A and C were formed during crustal stretching, and are characterised by a largely smooth seafloor...

  13. Dynamic expression pattern of kinesin accessory protein in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    terization of the function of the DmKAP gene, we studied its expression pattern at different stages of development using the mRNA in .... region of the developing brain. ..... Kido M and Hirokawa N 1998 Randomization of left-right asymmetry ...

  14. Dynamic monitoring of landscape patterns and ecological processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Landscape patterns and ecological processes have been in long-term research focus in the field of landscape ecology, but how to measure their quantitative relations is still open. This work chooses the Hulunbeier grassland as the study area where ecosystem shows high vulnerability, frequent evolvement of landscape ...

  15. Disappearing scales in carps: re-visiting Kirpichnikov's model on the genetics of scale pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Casas

    Full Text Available The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the 'S' gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called 'N' has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude × nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype, those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov's work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here. We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dose-dependent effect probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation.

  16. Disappearing scales in carps: Re-visiting Kirpichnikov's model on the genetics of scale pattern formation

    KAUST Repository

    Casas, Laura; Szűcs, Ré ka; Vij, Shubha; Goh, Chin Heng; Kathiresan, Purushothaman; Né meth, Sá ndor; Jeney, Zsigmond; Bercsé nyi, Mikló s; Orbá n, Lá szló

    2013-01-01

    The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n) regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the 'S' gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called 'N' has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude x nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s) showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype), those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov's work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern) to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here). We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dosedependent effect) probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation. 2013 Casas et al.

  17. Disappearing scales in carps: Re-visiting Kirpichnikov's model on the genetics of scale pattern formation

    KAUST Repository

    Casas, Laura

    2013-12-30

    The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n) regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the \\'S\\' gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called \\'N\\' has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude x nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s) showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype), those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov\\'s work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern) to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here). We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dosedependent effect) probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation. 2013 Casas et al.

  18. Formation and dynamics of a solar eruptive flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Satoshi; Kusano, Kanya; Büchner, Jörg; Skála, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Solar eruptions are well-known drivers of extreme space weather, which can greatly disturb the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere. The triggering process and initial dynamics of these eruptions are still an area of intense study. Here we perform a magnetohydrodynamic simulation taking into account the observed photospheric magnetic field to reveal the dynamics of a solar eruption in a real magnetic environment. In our simulation, we confirmed that tether-cutting reconnection occurring locally above the polarity inversion line creates a twisted flux tube, which is lifted into a toroidal unstable area where it loses equilibrium, destroying the force-free state, and driving the eruption. Consequently, a more highly twisted flux tube is built up during this initial phase, which can be further accelerated even when it returns to a stable area. We suggest that a nonlinear positive feedback process between the flux tube evolution and reconnection is the key to ensure this extra acceleration.

  19. Continuous fine pattern formation by screen-offset printing using a silicone blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Nagase, Kazuro; Ikedo, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Seiya; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro; Iwata, Shiro

    2014-09-01

    Screen-offset printing combines screen-printing on a silicone blanket with transference of the print from the blanket to a substrate. The blanket absorbs organic solvents in the ink, and therefore, the ink does not disperse through the material. This prevents blurring and allows fine patterns with widths of a few tens of micrometres to be produced. However, continuous printing deteriorates the pattern’s shape, which may be a result of decay in the absorption abilities of the blanket. Thus, we have developed a new technique for refreshing the blanket by substituting high-boiling-point solvents present on the blanket surface with low-boiling-point solvents. We analyse the efficacy of this technique, and demonstrate continuous fine pattern formation for 100 screen-offset printing processes.

  20. Continuous fine pattern formation by screen-offset printing using a silicone blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Nagase, Kazuro; Ikedo, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Seiya; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro; Iwata, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    Screen-offset printing combines screen-printing on a silicone blanket with transference of the print from the blanket to a substrate. The blanket absorbs organic solvents in the ink, and therefore, the ink does not disperse through the material. This prevents blurring and allows fine patterns with widths of a few tens of micrometres to be produced. However, continuous printing deteriorates the pattern’s shape, which may be a result of decay in the absorption abilities of the blanket. Thus, we have developed a new technique for refreshing the blanket by substituting high-boiling-point solvents present on the blanket surface with low-boiling-point solvents. We analyse the efficacy of this technique, and demonstrate continuous fine pattern formation for 100 screen-offset printing processes. (paper)

  1. Laboratory experiments on dynamics of anthropogenic ferrimagnetics in sand formations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kapička, Aleš; Fialová, Hana; Petrovský, Eduard; Kodešová, R.; Kopáč, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 38, Special issue (2008), s. 52-53 ISSN 1335-2806. [Paleo, Rock and Environmental Magnetism. Castle Meeting /11./. 22.06.2008-28.06.2008, Bojnice] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300120701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : soil pollution * dynamics of anthropogenic particles * magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  2. Spatial and temporal dynamics of land use pattern response to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urban settlements account for only two percent of the Earth's land surface. However, over half of the world's population resides in cities (United Nations, 2001). The quantitative evidences presented here showed that there were drastic changes in the temporal and spatial dynamics of land use/land cover. As an overall ...

  3. Dynamics of forest herbivory: quest for pattern and principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Mattson; Pekka Niemila; Matti Rossi

    1996-01-01

    Herbivory on woody plants is highly variable in both space and time. This proceedings addresses one of its root causes, the highly intricate and dynamic relationships that exist between most herbivores and their host plants. It emphasizes that the consequences of herbivory both to the consumer and to the producer plant often balance on a razor`s edge--depending on...

  4. Distinct eye movement patterns enhance dynamic visual acuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palidis, Dimitrios J.; Wyder-Hodge, Pearson A.; Fooken, Jolande; Spering, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is the ability to resolve fine spatial detail in dynamic objects during head fixation, or in static objects during head or body rotation. This ability is important for many activities such as ball sports, and a close relation has been shown between DVA and sports expertise. DVA tasks involve eye movements, yet, it is unclear which aspects of eye movements contribute to successful performance. Here we examined the relation between DVA and the kinematics of smooth pursuit and saccadic eye movements in a cohort of 23 varsity baseball players. In a computerized dynamic-object DVA test, observers reported the location of the gap in a small Landolt-C ring moving at various speeds while eye movements were recorded. Smooth pursuit kinematics—eye latency, acceleration, velocity gain, position error—and the direction and amplitude of saccadic eye movements were linked to perceptual performance. Results reveal that distinct eye movement patterns—minimizing eye position error, tracking smoothly, and inhibiting reverse saccades—were related to dynamic visual acuity. The close link between eye movement quality and DVA performance has important implications for the development of perceptual training programs to improve DVA. PMID:28187157

  5. Delayed frost formation on hybrid nanostructured surfaces with patterned high wetting contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Youmin; Zhou, Peng; Yao, Shuhuai

    2014-11-01

    Engineering icephobic surfaces that can retard the frost formation and accumulation are important to vehicles, wind turbines, power lines, and HVAC systems. For condensation frosting, superhydrophobic surfaces promote self-removal of condensed droplets before freezing and consequently delay the frost growth. However, a small thermal fluctuation may lead to a Cassie-to-Wenzel transition, and thus dramatically enhance the frost formation and adhesion. In this work, we investigated the heterogeneous ice nucleation on hybrid nanostructured surfaces with patterned high wetting contrast. By judiciously introducing hydrophilic micro-patches into superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, we demonstrated that such a novel hybrid structure can efficiently defer the ice nucleation as compared to a superhydrophobic surface with nanostructures only. We observed efficient droplet jumping and higher coverage of droplets with diameter smaller than 10 μm, both of which suppress frost formation. The hybrid surface avoids the formation of liquid-bridges for Cassie-to-Wenzel transition, therefore eliminating the `bottom-up' droplet freezing from the cold substrate. These findings provide new insights to improve anti-frosting and anti-icing by using heterogeneous wettability in multiscale structures.

  6. Formation factor of regular porous pattern in poly-α-methylstyrene film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ruizhuang; Xu Jiajing; Gao Cong; Ma Shuang; Chen Sufen; Luo Xuan; Fang Yu; Li Bo

    2015-01-01

    Regular poly-α-methylstyrene (PAMS) porous film with macron-sized cells was prepared by casting the solution in the condition with high humidity. In this paper, the effects of the molecular weight of PAMS, PAMS concentration, humidity, temperature, volatile solvents and the thickness of liquid of solution on formation of regular porous pattern in PAMS film were discussed. The results show that these factors significantly affect the pore size and the pore distribution. The capillary force and Benard-Marangoni convection are main driving forces for the water droplet moving and making pores regular arrangement. (authors)

  7. Dynamical scenario of intermediary mass fragments formation in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayik, S.; Belkacem, M.; Gregoire, C.; Stryjewski, J.; Suraud, E.

    1989-01-01

    We briefly remind the possible dynamical scenario of fragments formation in heavy-ion collisions at some tens fo MeV/A. We discuss how present day dynamical models can describe fragment formation. We next turn to the Boltzmann-Langevin formalism which provides a well defined theoretical framework for the understanding of the growing of the dynamical instabilities leading to multifragmentation. We present a first numerical solution of the Boltzmann-Langevin equation and we apply the formalism to the onset of multifragmentation of the 40 Ca + 40 Ca system between 20 and 60 MeV/A beam energy [fr

  8. Global stability and pattern formation in a nonlocal diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wenjie; Shi, Junping; Wang, Mingxin

    2018-06-01

    A diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition model with nonlocal intraspecific and interspecific competition between species is formulated and analyzed. The nonlocal competition strength is assumed to be determined by a diffusion kernel function to model the movement pattern of the biological species. It is shown that when there is no nonlocal intraspecific competition, the dynamics properties of nonlocal diffusive competition problem are similar to those of classical diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition model regardless of the strength of nonlocal interspecific competition. Global stability of nonnegative constant equilibria are proved using Lyapunov or upper-lower solution methods. On the other hand, strong nonlocal intraspecific competition increases the system spatiotemporal dynamic complexity. For the weak competition case, the nonlocal diffusive competition model may possess nonconstant positive equilibria for some suitably large nonlocal intraspecific competition coefficients.

  9. Single camera analyses in studying pattern forming dynamics of player interactions in team sports.

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Ricardo; Fernandes, Orlando; Folgado, Hugo; Araújo, Duarte

    2013-01-01

    A network of patterned interactions between players characterises team ball sports. Thus, interpersonal coordination patterns are an important topic in the study of performance in such sports. A very useful method has been the study of inter-individual interactions captured by a single camera filming an extended performance area. The appropriate collection of positional data allows investigating the pattern forming dynamics emerging in different performance sub-phases of team ball sports. Thi...

  10. Spatial-temporal-spectral EEG patterns of BOLD functional network connectivity dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoš, Martin; Mareček, Radek; Slavíček, Tomáš; Mikl, Michal; Rektor, Ivan; Jan, Jiří

    2018-06-01

    Objective. Growing interest in the examination of large-scale brain network functional connectivity dynamics is accompanied by an effort to find the electrophysiological correlates. The commonly used constraints applied to spatial and spectral domains during electroencephalogram (EEG) data analysis may leave part of the neural activity unrecognized. We propose an approach that blindly reveals multimodal EEG spectral patterns that are related to the dynamics of the BOLD functional network connectivity. Approach. The blind decomposition of EEG spectrogram by parallel factor analysis has been shown to be a useful technique for uncovering patterns of neural activity. The simultaneously acquired BOLD fMRI data were decomposed by independent component analysis. Dynamic functional connectivity was computed on the component’s time series using a sliding window correlation, and between-network connectivity states were then defined based on the values of the correlation coefficients. ANOVA tests were performed to assess the relationships between the dynamics of between-network connectivity states and the fluctuations of EEG spectral patterns. Main results. We found three patterns related to the dynamics of between-network connectivity states. The first pattern has dominant peaks in the alpha, beta, and gamma bands and is related to the dynamics between the auditory, sensorimotor, and attentional networks. The second pattern, with dominant peaks in the theta and low alpha bands, is related to the visual and default mode network. The third pattern, also with peaks in the theta and low alpha bands, is related to the auditory and frontal network. Significance. Our previous findings revealed a relationship between EEG spectral pattern fluctuations and the hemodynamics of large-scale brain networks. In this study, we suggest that the relationship also exists at the level of functional connectivity dynamics among large-scale brain networks when no standard spatial and spectral

  11. On the Dynamical Regimes of Pattern-Accelerated Electroconvection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Scott M; Wessling, Matthias; Mani, Ali

    2016-03-03

    Recent research has established that electroconvection can enhance ion transport at polarized surfaces such as membranes and electrodes where it would otherwise be limited by diffusion. The onset of such overlimiting transport can be influenced by the surface topology of the ion selective membranes as well as inhomogeneities in their electrochemical properties. However, there is little knowledge regarding the mechanisms through which these surface variations promote transport. We use high-resolution direct numerical simulations to develop a comprehensive analysis of electroconvective flows generated by geometric patterns of impermeable stripes and investigate their potential to regularize electrokinetic instabilities. Counterintuitively, we find that reducing the permeable area of an ion exchange membrane, with appropriate patterning, increases the overall ion transport rate by up to 80%. In addition, we present analysis of nonpatterned membranes, and find a novel regime of electroconvection where a multivalued current is possible due to the coexistence of multiple convective states.

  12. Meniscus Dynamics in Bubble Formation: A Parametric Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stanovský, Petr; Růžička, Marek; Martins, A.; Teixeira, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 14 (2011), s. 3258-3267 ISSN 0009-2509. [International Conference on Gas–Liquid and Gas–Liquid–Solid Reactor Engineering /10./. Braga, 26.06.2011-29.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110; GA AV ČR KJB200720901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble formation * transparent perforated plate * meniscus oscillations Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.431, year: 2011

  13. Dynamics and Formation of Obscuring Tori in AGNs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannikova, Elena Yu.; Sergeyev, Alexey V., E-mail: bannikova@astron.kharkov.ua [Institute of Radio Astronomy, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kharkiv (Ukraine); Institute of Astronomy, V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2017-12-12

    We considered the evolution of a self-gravitating clumpy torus in the gravitational field of the central mass of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the framework of the N-body problem. The initial conditions take into account winds with different opening angles. Results of our N-body simulations show that the clouds moving on orbits with a spread in inclinations and eccentricities form a toroidal region. The velocity of the clouds at the inner boundary of the torus is lower than in a disk model that can explain the observed rotation curves. We discuss the scenario of torus formation related with the beginning of the AGN stage.

  14. Structure, dynamics and movement patterns of the Australian pig industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, I J; Davis, J; Sergeant, E S G; Garner, M G

    2014-03-01

    To assess management practices and movement patterns that could influence the establishment and spread of exotic animal diseases (EAD) in pigs in Australia. A literature review of published information and a telephone survey of 370 pig producers owning >10 pigs who were registered with the PigPass national vendor declaration scheme. The movement and marketing patterns of Australian pig producers interviewed were divided into two groups based predominantly on the size of the herd. Major pig producers maintain closed herds, use artificial insemination and market direct to abattoirs. Smaller producers continue to purchase from saleyards and market to other farms, abattoirs and through saleyards in an apparently opportunistic fashion. The role of saleyards in the Australian pig industry continues to decline, with 92% of all pigs marketed directly from farm to abattoir. This survey described movement patterns that will assist in modelling the potential spread of EAD in the Australian pig industry. Continued movement towards vertical integration and closed herds in the Australian pig industry effectively divides the industry into a number of compartments that mitigate against the widespread dissemination of disease to farms adopting these practices. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  15. Reorientation Timescales and Pattern Dynamics for Titan's Dunes: Does the Tail Wag the Dog or the Dragon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. G.; Ewing, R. C.; Cassini Radar Science Team, T.

    2011-12-01

    Fields of bedform patterns persist across many orders of magnitude, from cm-scale sub-aqueous current ripples to km-scale aeolian dunes, and form with surprisingly little difference in expression despite a range of formative environments. Because of the remarkable similarity between and among patterns, extracting information about climate and environment from these patterns is a challenge. For example, crest orientation is not diagnostic of a particular flow regime; similar patterns form under many different flow configurations. On Titan, these challenges have played out with many attempts to reconcile dune-field patterns with modeled and expected wind regimes. We propose that thinking about the change in dune orientation, rather than the orientation itself, can provide new insights on the long-term stability of the dune-field patterns and the formative wind regime. In this work, we apply the re-orientation model presented by Werner and Kocurek [Geology, 1997] to the equatorial dune fields of Titan. We measure variations in pattern parameters (crest spacing, crest length and defect density, which is the number of defect pairs per total crest length) both within and between Titan's dune fields to describe pattern maturity and identify areas where changes in dune orientation are likely to occur (or may already be occurring). Measured defect densities are similar to Earth's largest linear dune fields, such as the Namib Sand Sea and the Simpson Desert. We use measured defect densities in the Werner and Kocurek model to estimate crestline reorientation rates. We find reorientation timescales varying from ten to a hundred thousand times the average migration timescale (time to migrate a bedform one meter, ~1 Titan year according to Tokano (Aeolian Research, 2010)). Well organized patterns have the longest reorientation time scales (~10^5 migration timescales), while the topographically or spatially isolated patches of dunes show the shortest reorientation times (~10

  16. Weblog patterns and human dynamics with decreasing interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.-L.; Fan, C.; Guo, Z.-H.

    2011-06-01

    In order to describe the phenomenon that people's interest in doing something always keep high in the beginning while gradually decreases until reaching the balance, a model which describes the attenuation of interest is proposed to reflect the fact that people's interest becomes more stable after a long time. We give a rigorous analysis on this model by non-homogeneous Poisson processes. Our analysis indicates that the interval distribution of arrival-time is a mixed distribution with exponential and power-law feature, which is a power law with an exponential cutoff. After that, we collect blogs in ScienceNet.cn and carry on empirical study on the interarrival time distribution. The empirical results agree well with the theoretical analysis, obeying a special power law with the exponential cutoff, that is, a special kind of Gamma distribution. These empirical results verify the model by providing an evidence for a new class of phenomena in human dynamics. It can be concluded that besides power-law distributions, there are other distributions in human dynamics. These findings demonstrate the variety of human behavior dynamics.

  17. Dynamical Treatment of Virialization Heating in Galaxy Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom

    2008-01-01

    In a hierarchical picture of galaxy formation virialization continually transforms gravitational potential energy into kinetic energies of the baryonic and dark matter. For the gaseous component the kinetic, turbulent energy is transformed eventually into internal thermal energy through shocks and viscous dissipation. Traditionally this virialization and shock heating has been assumed to occur instantaneously, allowing an estimate of the gas temperature to be derived from the virial temperature defined from the embedding dark matter halo velocity dispersion. As the mass grows the virial temperature of a halo grows. Mass accretion hence can be translated into a heating term. We derive this heating rate from the extended Press Schechter formalism and demonstrate its usefulness in semianalytical models of galaxy formation. Our method explicitly conserves energy, unlike the previous impulsive heating assumptions. Our formalism can trivially be applied in all current semianalytical models as the heating term can be computed directly from the underlying merger trees. Our analytic results for the first cooling halos and the transition from cold to hot accretion are in agreement with numerical simulations.

  18. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs generally have low volatilities and are combustion-resistant, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of primary radiation chemistry, charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of reactions and product distributions. We study these issues by characterization of primary radiolysis products and measurements of their yields and reactivity, quantification of electron solvation dynamics and scavenging of electrons in different states of solvation. From this knowledge we wish to learn how to predict radiolytic mechanisms and control them or mitigate their effects on the properties of materials used in nuclear fuel processing, for example, and to apply IL radiation chemistry to answer questions about general chemical reactivity in ionic liquids that will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that the slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increase the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alter product distributions and subsequent chemistry. This difference from conventional solvents has profound effects on predicting and controlling radiolytic yields

  19. Movement dynamics of working tool for subsoil furrow formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zoria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A furrow depth at the corn furrow drilling depends on the working depth of the furrower hoe also on stability of drill openers operaring depth. The main factors which influence on the furrower motion steadiness are field microrelief, soil condition, tillage mode and their design parameters. The effect of two first factors groups on the hoe with a furrower occurs at random and is determined as a sum of dispersions of every variable at the dynamic unit output. A transfer function was determined on the basis of the received mathematical model. The amplitude frequency characteristics of the dynamic system were calculated. The analysis of the theoretical amplitude frequency characteristics showed jointed elastic junction of the cultivator hoe with the furrower in a shape of wing flap or blades with the row-crop drill frame results its fluctuation amplitude raising in longitudinal and vertical planes. It was ascertained for the frequency range from 1.3 to 1.6 Hz which represent field microrelief fluctuation, but not resonant ones. The authors proved that significant fluctuation decrease of the furrower is possible if it be equipped with a spring which rate equals more than 20 kN per m. It was recommended to change jointed elastic junction with the rigid one on the soils with the unit resistance up to 50 kN per m.

  20. Formation Learning Control of Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles With Heterogeneous Nonlinear Uncertain Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chengzhi; Licht, Stephen; He, Haibo

    2017-09-26

    In this paper, a new concept of formation learning control is introduced to the field of formation control of multiple autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), which specifies a joint objective of distributed formation tracking control and learning/identification of nonlinear uncertain AUV dynamics. A novel two-layer distributed formation learning control scheme is proposed, which consists of an upper-layer distributed adaptive observer and a lower-layer decentralized deterministic learning controller. This new formation learning control scheme advances existing techniques in three important ways: 1) the multi-AUV system under consideration has heterogeneous nonlinear uncertain dynamics; 2) the formation learning control protocol can be designed and implemented by each local AUV agent in a fully distributed fashion without using any global information; and 3) in addition to the formation control performance, the distributed control protocol is also capable of accurately identifying the AUVs' heterogeneous nonlinear uncertain dynamics and utilizing experiences to improve formation control performance. Extensive simulations have been conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  1. Patterned biofilm formation reveals a mechanism for structural heterogeneity in bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huan; Hou, Shuyu; Yongyat, Chanokpon; De Tore, Suzanne; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-09-03

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and are the major cause of chronic infections in humans and persistent biofouling in industry. Despite the significance of bacterial biofilms, the mechanism of biofilm formation and associated drug tolerance is still not fully understood. A major challenge in biofilm research is the intrinsic heterogeneity in the biofilm structure, which leads to temporal and spatial variation in cell density and gene expression. To understand and control such structural heterogeneity, surfaces with patterned functional alkanthiols were used in this study to obtain Escherichia coli cell clusters with systematically varied cluster size and distance between clusters. The results from quantitative imaging analysis revealed an interesting phenomenon in which multicellular connections can be formed between cell clusters depending on the size of interacting clusters and the distance between them. In addition, significant differences in patterned biofilm formation were observed between wild-type E. coli RP437 and some of its isogenic mutants, indicating that certain cellular and genetic factors are involved in interactions among cell clusters. In particular, autoinducer-2-mediated quorum sensing was found to be important. Collectively, these results provide missing information that links cell-to-cell signaling and interaction among cell clusters to the structural organization of bacterial biofilms.

  2. Influence of patterned topographic features on the formation of cardiac cell clusters and their rhythmic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L; Liu, L; Magome, N; Agladze, K; Chen, Y

    2013-01-01

    In conventional primary cultures, cardiac cells prepared from a newborn rat undergo spontaneous formation of cell clusters after several days. These cell clusters may be non-homogeneously distributed on a flat surface and show irregular beating which can be recorded by calcium ion imaging. In order to improve the cell cluster homogeneity and the beating regularity, patterned topographic features were used to guide the cellular growth and the cell layer formation. On the substrate with an array of broadly spaced cross features made of photoresist, cells grew on the places that were not occupied by the crosses and thus formed a cell layer with interconnected cell clusters. Accordingly, spatially coordinated regular beating could be recorded over the whole patterned area. In contrast, when cultured on the substrate with broadly spaced but inter-connected cross features, the cardiac cell layer showed beatings which were neither coordinated in space nor regular in time. Finally, when cultured on the substrate with narrowly spaced features, the cell beating became spatially coordinated but still remained irregular. Our results suggest a way to improve the rhythmic property of cultured cardiac cell layers which might be useful for further investigations. (paper)

  3. Influence of fast advective flows on pattern formation of Dictyostelium discoideum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Albert; Zykov, Vladimir; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2018-01-01

    We report experimental and numerical results on pattern formation of self-organizing Dictyostelium discoideum cells in a microfluidic setup under a constant buffer flow. The external flow advects the signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) downstream, while the chemotactic cells attached to the solid substrate are not transported with the flow. At high flow velocities, elongated cAMP waves are formed that cover the whole length of the channel and propagate both parallel and perpendicular to the flow direction. While the wave period and transverse propagation velocity are constant, parallel wave velocity and the wave width increase linearly with the imposed flow. We also observe that the acquired wave shape is highly dependent on the wave generation site and the strength of the imposed flow. We compared the wave shape and velocity with numerical simulations performed using a reaction-diffusion model and found excellent agreement. These results are expected to play an important role in understanding the process of pattern formation and aggregation of D. discoideum that may experience fluid flows in its natural habitat. PMID:29590179

  4. REGULAR PATTERN MINING (WITH JITTER ON WEIGHTED-DIRECTED DYNAMIC GRAPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. GUPTA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Real world graphs are mostly dynamic in nature, exhibiting time-varying behaviour in structure of the graph, weight on the edges and direction of the edges. Mining regular patterns in the occurrence of edge parameters gives an insight into the consumer trends over time in ecommerce co-purchasing networks. But such patterns need not necessarily be precise as in the case when some product goes out of stock or a group of customers becomes unavailable for a short period of time. Ignoring them may lead to loss of useful information and thus taking jitter into account becomes vital. To the best of our knowledge, no work has been yet reported to extract regular patterns considering a jitter of length greater than unity. In this article, we propose a novel method to find quasi regular patterns on weight and direction sequences of such graphs. The method involves analysing the dynamic network considering the inconsistencies in the occurrence of edges. It utilizes the relation between the occurrence sequence and the corresponding weight and direction sequences to speed up this process. Further, these patterns are used to determine the most central nodes (such as the most profit yielding products. To accomplish this we introduce the concept of dynamic closeness centrality and dynamic betweenness centrality. Experiments on Enron e-mail dataset and a synthetic dynamic network show that the presented approach is efficient, so it can be used to find patterns in large scale networks consisting of many timestamps.

  5. Global Format for Conservative Time Integration in Nonlinear Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2014-01-01

    The widely used classic collocation-based time integration procedures like Newmark, Generalized-alpha etc. generally work well within a framework of linear problems, but typically may encounter problems, when used in connection with essentially nonlinear structures. These problems are overcome....... In the present paper a conservative time integration algorithm is developed in a format using only the internal forces and the associated tangent stiffness at the specific time integration points. Thus, the procedure is computationally very similar to a collocation method, consisting of a series of nonlinear...... equivalent static load steps, easily implemented in existing computer codes. The paper considers two aspects: representation of nonlinear internal forces in a form that implies energy conservation, and the option of an algorithmic damping with the purpose of extracting energy from undesirable high...

  6. Distributed Consensus-Based Robust Adaptive Formation Control for Nonholonomic Mobile Robots with Partial Known Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxia Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the distributed consensus-based robust adaptive formation control for nonholonomic mobile robots with partially known dynamics. Firstly, multirobot formation control problem has been converted into a state consensus problem. Secondly, the practical control strategies, which incorporate the distributed kinematic controllers and the robust adaptive torque controllers, are designed for solving the formation control problem. Thirdly, the specified reference trajectory for the geometric centroid of the formation is assumed as the trajectory of a virtual leader, whose information is available to only a subset of the followers. Finally, numerical results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approaches.

  7. Social influence and the collective dynamics of opinion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussaïd, Mehdi; Kämmer, Juliane E; Analytis, Pantelis P; Neth, Hansjörg

    2013-01-01

    Social influence is the process by which individuals adapt their opinion, revise their beliefs, or change their behavior as a result of social interactions with other people. In our strongly interconnected society, social influence plays a prominent role in many self-organized phenomena such as herding in cultural markets, the spread of ideas and innovations, and the amplification of fears during epidemics. Yet, the mechanisms of opinion formation remain poorly understood, and existing physics-based models lack systematic empirical validation. Here, we report two controlled experiments showing how participants answering factual questions revise their initial judgments after being exposed to the opinion and confidence level of others. Based on the observation of 59 experimental subjects exposed to peer-opinion for 15 different items, we draw an influence map that describes the strength of peer influence during interactions. A simple process model derived from our observations demonstrates how opinions in a group of interacting people can converge or split over repeated interactions. In particular, we identify two major attractors of opinion: (i) the expert effect, induced by the presence of a highly confident individual in the group, and (ii) the majority effect, caused by the presence of a critical mass of laypeople sharing similar opinions. Additional simulations reveal the existence of a tipping point at which one attractor will dominate over the other, driving collective opinion in a given direction. These findings have implications for understanding the mechanisms of public opinion formation and managing conflicting situations in which self-confident and better informed minorities challenge the views of a large uninformed majority.

  8. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate

  9. IONIC LIQUIDS: RADIATION CHEMISTRY, SOLVATION DYNAMICS AND REACTIVITY PATTERNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WISHART, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate the influence of ILs on charge transport processes. Methods. Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies at BNL

  10. Accelerated fluctuation analysis by graphic cards and complex pattern formation in financial markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preis, Tobias; Virnau, Peter; Paul, Wolfgang; Schneider, Johannes J

    2009-01-01

    The compute unified device architecture is an almost conventional programming approach for managing computations on a graphics processing unit (GPU) as a data-parallel computing device. With a maximum number of 240 cores in combination with a high memory bandwidth, a recent GPU offers resources for computational physics. We apply this technology to methods of fluctuation analysis, which includes determination of the scaling behavior of a stochastic process and the equilibrium autocorrelation function. Additionally, the recently introduced pattern formation conformity (Preis T et al 2008 Europhys. Lett. 82 68005), which quantifies pattern-based complex short-time correlations of a time series, is calculated on a GPU and analyzed in detail. Results are obtained up to 84 times faster than on a current central processing unit core. When we apply this method to high-frequency time series of the German BUND future, we find significant pattern-based correlations on short time scales. Furthermore, an anti-persistent behavior can be found on short time scales. Additionally, we compare the recent GPU generation, which provides a theoretical peak performance of up to roughly 10 12 floating point operations per second with the previous one.

  11. Detecting regularities in soccer dynamics: A T-pattern approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentino Zurloni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La dinámica del juego en partidos de fútbol profesional es un fenómeno complejo que no ha estado resuelto de forma óptima a través delas vías tradicionales que han pretendido la cuantificación en deportes de equipo. El objetivo de este estudio es el de detectar la dinámica existente mediante un análisis de patrones temporales. Específicamente, se pretenden revelar las estructuras ocultas pero estables que subyacen a las situaciones interactivas que determinan las acciones de ataque en el fútbol. El planteamiento metodológico se basa en un diseño observacional, y con apoyo de registros digitales y análisis informatizados. Los datos se analizaron mediante el programa Theme 6 beta, el cual permite detectar la estructura temporaly secuencial de las series de datos, poniendo de manifiesto patrones que regular o irregularmente ocurren repetidamente en un período de observación. El Theme ha detectado muchos patrones temporales (T-patterns en los partidos de fútbol analizados. Se hallaron notables diferencias entre los partidos ganados y perdidos. El número de distintos T-patterns detectados fue mayor para los partidos perdidos, y menor para los ganados, mientras que el número de eventos codificados fue similar. El programa Theme y los T-patterns mejoran las posibilidades investigadoras respecto a un análisis de rendimiento basado en la frecuencia, y hacen que esta metodología sea eficaz para la investigación y constituya un apoyo procedimental en el análisis del deporte. Nuestros resultados indican que se requieren posteriores investigaciones relativas a posibles conexiones entre la detección de estas estructuras temporales y las observaciones humanas respecto al rendimiento en el fútbol. Este planteamiento sería un apoyo tanto para los miembros de los equipos como para los entrenadores, permitiendo alcanzar una mejor comprensión de la dinámica del juego y aportando una información que no ofrecen los métodos tradicionales.

  12. The dynamics of secretion during sea urchin embryonic skeleton formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilt, Fred H.; Killian, Christopher E.; Hamilton, Patricia; Croker, Lindsay

    2008-01-01

    Skeleton formation involves secretion of massive amounts of mineral precursor, usually a calcium salt, and matrix proteins, many of which are deposited on, or even occluded within, the mineral. The cell biological underpinnings of this secretion and subsequent assembly of the biomineralized skeletal element is not well understood. We ask here what is the relationship of the trafficking and secretion of the mineral and matrix within the primary mesenchyme cells of the sea urchin embryo, cells that deposit the endoskeletal spicule. Fluorescent labeling of intracellular calcium deposits show mineral precursors are present in granules visible by light microscopy, from whence they are deposited in the endoskeletal spicule, especially at its tip. In contrast, two different matrix proteins tagged with GFP are present in smaller post-Golgi vesicles only seen by electron microscopy, and the secreted protein are only incorporated into the spicule in the vicinity of the cell of origin. The matrix protein, SpSM30B, is post-translationally modified during secretion, and this processing continues after its incorporation into the spicule. Our findings also indicate that the mineral precursor and two well characterized matrix proteins are trafficked by different cellular routes

  13. Sectoral patterns versus firm-level heterogeneity - The dynamics of eco-innovation strategies in the automotive sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faria, Lourenco; Andersen, Maj Munch

    2017-01-01

    analysis using patent data from 1965 to 2012. Our findings suggest a process of co-evolution of firms' strategies and indicate that strong sectoral-specific patterns of eco-innovation are present in this sector from the mid-2000s onwards. For fuel cells technologies, however, we observe the formation......This paper sheds light on some important but underestimated elements of green industrial dynamics: the evolution of firms' eco-innovation strategies and activities within a sector. While eco-innovation sectoral case studies have taken place before, our analysis is distinct in investigating the rate......, direction and extent of eco-innovation in the automotive sector, represented here by the main automakers, in order to identify possibly sectoral-specific patterns in firms' strategies, as opposed to divergent strategic behaviors, grounded on evolutionary economic theory. We conduct a two-step empirical...

  14. Dynamics, patterns and causes of fires in Northwestern Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenteras, Dolors; Retana, Javier

    2012-01-01

    According to recent studies, two widespread droughts occurred in the Amazon basin, one during 2005 and one during 2010. The drought increased the prevalence of climate-driven fires over most of the basin. Given the importance of human-atmosphere-vegetation interactions in tropical rainforests, these events have generated concerns over the vulnerability of this area to climate change. This paper focuses on one of the wettest areas of the basin, Northwestern Amazonia, where the interactions between the climate and fires are much weaker and where little is known about the anthropogenic drivers of fires. We have assessed the response of fires to climate over a ten-year period, and analysed the socio-economic and demographic determinants of fire occurrence. The patterns of fires and climate and their linkages in Northwestern Amazonia differ from the enhanced fire response to climate variation observed in the rest of Amazonia. The highest number of recorded fires in Northwestern Amazonia occurred in 2004 and 2007, and this did not coincide with the periods of extreme drought experienced in Amazonia in 2005 and 2010. Rather, during those years, Northwestern Amazonia experienced a relatively small numbers of fire hotspots. We have shown that fire occurrence correlated well with deforestation and was determined by anthropogenic drivers, mainly small-scale agriculture, cattle ranching (i.e., pastures) and active agricultural frontiers (including illegal crops). Thus, the particular climatic conditions for air convergence and rainfall created by proximity to the Andes, coupled with the presence of one of the most active colonisation fronts in the region, make this region differently affected by the general drought-induced fire patterns experienced by the rest of the Amazon. Moreover, the results suggest that, even in this wet region, humans are able to modify the frequency of fires and impact these historically well preserved forests.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of ferroelectric domain formation by oxygen vacancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; You, Jeong Ho; Chen, Jinghong; Yeo, Changdong

    2018-05-01

    An oxygen vacancy, known to be detrimental to ferroelectric properties, has been investigated numerically for the potential uses to control ferroelectric domains in films using molecular dynamics simulations based on the first-principles effective Hamiltonian. As an electron donor, an oxygen vacancy generates inhomogeneous electrostatic and displacement fields which impose preferred polarization directions near the oxygen vacancy. When the oxygen vacancies are placed at the top and bottom interfaces, the out-of-plane polarizations are locally developed near the interfaces in the directions away from the interfaces. These polarizations from the interfaces are in opposite directions so that the overall out-of-plane polarization becomes significantly reduced. In the middle of the films, the in-plane domains are formed with containing 90° a 1/a 2 domain walls and the films are polarized along the [1 1 0] direction even when no electric field is applied. With oxygen vacancies placed at the top interface only, the films exhibit asymmetric hysteresis loops, confirming that the oxygen vacancies are one of the possible sources of ferroelectric imprint. It has been qualitatively demonstrated that the domain structures in the imprint films can be turned on and off by controlling an external field along the thickness direction. This study shows qualitatively that the oxygen vacancies can be utilized for tuning ferroelectric domain structures in films.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of defect formation during energetic Cu deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, Charles M.; Sprague, James A.

    2002-01-01

    The deposition of energetic Cu atoms from 5 to 80 eV onto (0 0 1) Cu was simulated with molecular dynamics. The Cu-Cu interaction potential was a spline of the embedded atom potential developed from equilibrium data, and the universal scattering potential. Incident Cu atoms substituted for first layer substrate atoms by an exchange process at energies as low as 5 eV. Incident Cu atoms of 20 eV penetrated to the second substrate layer, and 20 eV was sufficient energy to produce interstitial defects. Incident atoms of 80 eV penetrated to the third atomic layer, produced interstitials 12 atomic layers into the substrate by focused replacement collision sequences, and produced sputtered atoms with a 16% yield. Interstitial clusters of up to 7 atoms were observed. The observed mechanisms of film growth included: the direct deposition of atoms into film equilibrium atom positions, the exchange of substrate atoms to equilibrium film atoms positions, and the migration of interstitials to equilibrium film atom positions. The relative frequency of each process was a function of incident energy. Since all observed growth mechanisms resulted in film atoms in equilibrium atomic positions, these simulations suggest that stresses in homoepitaxial Cu thin films are due to point defects. Vacancies would produce tensile strain and interstitial atoms would produce compressive strain in the films. It is proposed that immobile interstitial clusters could be responsible for retaining interstitial atoms and clusters in growing metal thin films

  17. Feeding intensity pattern in complete and incomplete fusion dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linda, Sneha B.; Giri, Pankaj K.; Singh, D.; Kumar, Harish; Afzal Ansari, M.; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R.P.

    2017-01-01

    The heavy ion (HI) induced reactions has been a topic of special interest at energies above the Coulomb barrier. In these HI reactions, the most dominant modes are complete fusion (CF) and incomplete fusion (ICF) process. In ICF process, only a part of projectile fuses with the target nucleus, while remaining part of projectile moves in the forward cone. In the complete fusion (CF) process, the projectile is completely fused with the target nucleus, forming a highly excited composite system, which decays by evaporating low energy nuclear particles. To investigate the CF and ICF dynamics by measurement of spin distribution of ERs using 16 O projectile with 154 Sm target, an attempt has been made. The present particle-γ coincidence experiment have been performed using 15UD Pelletron Accelerator facility at Inter University Accelerator (IUAC), New Delhi, India. Gamma Detector Array (GDA) coupled with Charged Particle Detector Array (CPDA) experiment setup was used

  18. Ionic liquids: radiation chemistry, solvation dynamics and reactivity patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishart, J.F.; Funston, A.M.; Szreder, T.

    2006-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of energy production, chemical industry and environmental applications. Pulse radiolysis of [R 4 N][NTf 2 ] [R 4 N][N(CN) 2 ], and [R 4 P][N(CN) 2 ] ionic liquids produces solvated electrons that absorb over a broad range in the near infrared and persisting for hundreds of nanoseconds. Systematic cation variation shows that solvated electron's spectroscopic properties depend strongly on the lattice structure of the ionic liquid. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that

  19. Local-heterogeneous responses and transient dynamics of cage breaking and formation in colloidal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Preetom; Teramoto, Hiroshi; Li, Chun-Biu; Terdik, Joseph Z; Scherer, Norbert F; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2014-09-14

    Quantifying the interactions in dense colloidal fluids requires a properly designed order parameter. We present a modified bond-orientational order parameter, ψ̄6, to avoid problems of the original definition of bond-orientational order parameter. The original bond-orientational order parameter can change discontinuously in time but our modified order parameter is free from the discontinuity and, thus, it is a suitable measure to quantify the dynamics of the bond-orientational ordering of the local surroundings. Here we analyze ψ̄6 in a dense driven monodisperse quasi-two-dimensional colloidal fluids where a single particle is optically trapped at the center. The perturbation by the trapped and driven particle alters the structure and dynamics of the neighboring particles. This perturbation disturbs the flow and causes spatial and temporal distortion of the bond-orientational configuration surrounding each particle. We investigate spatio-temporal behavior of ψ̄6 by a Wavelet transform that provides a time-frequency representation of the time series of ψ̄6. It is found that particles that have high power in frequencies corresponding to the inverse of the timescale of perturbation undergo distortions of their packing configurations that result in cage breaking and formation dynamics. To gain insight into the dynamic structure of cage breaking and formation of bond-orientational ordering, we compare the cage breaking and formation dynamics with the underlying dynamical structure identified by Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) estimated from the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field. The LCSs are moving separatrices that effectively divide the flow into distinct regions with different dynamical behavior. It is shown that the spatial distribution of the FTLE field and the power of particles in the wavelet transform have positive correlation, implying that LCSs provide a dynamic structure that dominates the dynamics of cage breaking and formation of the

  20. Globally Stable Microresonator Turing Pattern Formation for Coherent High-Power THz Radiation On-Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Wei; Yang, Jinghui; Yang, Shang-Hua; Yu, Mingbin; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Zelevinsky, T.; Jarrahi, Mona; Wong, Chee Wei

    2017-10-01

    In nonlinear microresonators driven by continuous-wave (cw) lasers, Turing patterns have been studied in the formalism of the Lugiato-Lefever equation with emphasis on their high coherence and exceptional robustness against perturbations. Destabilization of Turing patterns and the transition to spatiotemporal chaos, however, limit the available energy carried in the Turing rolls and prevent further harvest of their high coherence and robustness to noise. Here, we report a novel scheme to circumvent such destabilization, by incorporating the effect of local mode hybridizations, and we attain globally stable Turing pattern formation in chip-scale nonlinear oscillators with significantly enlarged parameter space, achieving a record-high power-conversion efficiency of 45% and an elevated peak-to-valley contrast of 100. The stationary Turing pattern is discretely tunable across 430 GHz on a THz carrier, with a fractional frequency sideband nonuniformity measured at 7.3 ×10-14 . We demonstrate the simultaneous microwave and optical coherence of the Turing rolls at different evolution stages through ultrafast optical correlation techniques. The free-running Turing-roll coherence, 9 kHz in 200 ms and 160 kHz in 20 minutes, is transferred onto a plasmonic photomixer for one of the highest-power THz coherent generations at room temperature, with 1.1% optical-to-THz power conversion. Its long-term stability can be further improved by more than 2 orders of magnitude, reaching an Allan deviation of 6 ×10-10 at 100 s, with a simple computer-aided slow feedback control. The demonstrated on-chip coherent high-power Turing-THz system is promising to find applications in astrophysics, medical imaging, and wireless communications.

  1. THE DYNAMICAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE BAR AND SPIRAL PATTERNS OF NGC 1365

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speights, Jason C.; Rooke, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Theories that attempt to explain the dynamical relationship between bar and spiral patterns in galactic disks make different predictions about the radial profile of the pattern speed. These are tested for the H-alpha bar and spiral patterns of NGC 1365. The radial profile of the pattern speed is measured by fitting mathematical models that are based on the Tremaine–Weinberg method. The results show convincing evidence for the bar rotating at a faster rate than the spiral pattern, inconsistent with a global wave mode or a manifold. There is evidence for mode coupling of the bar and spiral patterns at the overlap of corotation and inner Lindblad resonances (ILRs), but the evidence is unreliable and inconsistent. The results are the most consistent with the bar and spiral patterns being dynamically distinct features. The pattern speed of the bar begins near an ILR and ends near the corotation resonance (CR). The radial profile of the pattern speed beyond the bar most closely resembles what is expected for coupled spiral modes and tidal interactions.

  2. Dichotomous-noise-induced pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debojyoti; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-06-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion system in which one of the parameters is subjected to dichotomous noise by controlling the flow of one of the reacting species in a continuous-flow-stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) -membrane reactor. The linear stability analysis in an extended phase space is carried out by invoking Furutzu-Novikov procedure for exponentially correlated multiplicative noise to derive the instability condition in the plane of the noise parameters (correlation time and strength of the noise). We demonstrate that depending on the correlation time an optimal strength of noise governs the self-organization. Our theoretical analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on pattern formation in a chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system.

  3. Perfect pattern formation of neutral atoms in an addressable optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vala, J.; Whaley, K.B.; Thapliyal, A.V.; Vazirani, U.; Myrgren, S.; Weiss, D.S.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a physical scheme for formation of an arbitrary pattern of neutral atoms in an addressable optical lattice. We focus specifically on the generation of a perfect optical lattice of simple orthorhombic structure with unit occupancy, as required for initialization of a neutral atom quantum computer. The scheme employs a compacting process that is accomplished by sequential application of two types of operations: a flip operator that changes the internal state of the atoms, and a shift operator that selectively moves the atoms in one internal state along the lattice principal axis. Realizations of these elementary operations and their physical limitations are analyzed. The complexity of the compacting scheme is analyzed and we show that this scales linearly with the number of lattice sites per row of the lattice

  4. From pattern formation to material computation multi-agent modelling of physarum polycephalum

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses topics of mobile multi-agent systems, pattern formation, biological modelling, artificial life, unconventional computation, and robotics. The behaviour of a simple organism which is capable of remarkable biological and computational feats that seem to transcend its simple component parts is examined and modelled. In this book the following question is asked: How can something as simple as Physarum polycephalum - a giant amoeboid single-celled organism which does not possess any neural tissue, fixed skeleton or organised musculature - can approximate complex computational behaviour during its foraging, growth and adaptation of its amorphous body plan, and with such limited resources? To answer this question the same apparent limitations as faced by the organism are applied: using only simple components with local interactions. A synthesis approach is adopted and a mobile multi-agent system with very simple individual behaviours is employed. It is shown their interactions yield emergent beha...

  5. Liquid crystal droplet formation and anchoring dynamics in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Ben; Shen, Amy; Feng, James; Link, Darren

    2004-11-01

    Liquid crystal drops dispersed in a continuous phase of silicon oil are generated with a narrow distribution in droplet size in microfluidic devices both above and below the nematic to isotropic transition temperature. For these two cases, we observe not only the different LC droplet generation and coalescence dynamics, but also distinct droplet morphology. Our experiments show that the nematic liquid crystalline order is important for the LC droplet formation and anchoring dynamics.

  6. Hierarchical classification of dynamically varying radar pulse repetition interval modulation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Martikainen, Kalle; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2010-12-01

    The central purpose of passive signal intercept receivers is to perform automatic categorization of unknown radar signals. Currently, there is an urgent need to develop intelligent classification algorithms for these devices due to emerging complexity of radar waveforms. Especially multifunction radars (MFRs) capable of performing several simultaneous tasks by utilizing complex, dynamically varying scheduled waveforms are a major challenge for automatic pattern classification systems. To assist recognition of complex radar emissions in modern intercept receivers, we have developed a novel method to recognize dynamically varying pulse repetition interval (PRI) modulation patterns emitted by MFRs. We use robust feature extraction and classifier design techniques to assist recognition in unpredictable real-world signal environments. We classify received pulse trains hierarchically which allows unambiguous detection of the subpatterns using a sliding window. Accuracy, robustness and reliability of the technique are demonstrated with extensive simulations using both static and dynamically varying PRI modulation patterns. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acinetobacter baumannii in Southern Croatia: clonal lineages, biofilm formation, and resistance patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliterna, Vanja; Kaliterna, Mariano; Hrenović, Jasna; Barišić, Zvonimir; Tonkić, Marija; Goic-Barisic, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most prevalent causes of severe hospital-acquired infections and is responsible for the dramatic increase in carbapenem resistance in Croatia in the last 5 years. Such data have encouraged multicenter research focused on the organism's ability to form biofilm, susceptibility to antibiotics, and particular genotype lineage. Biofilm formation in 109 unrelated clinical isolates of A. baumannii recovered in six cities of Southern Croatia was investigated. Genotyping was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and antibiotic profile was tested by applying the disc diffusion method and confirmed by determining the minimum inhibitory concentrations. The ability to form biofilm in vitro was determined from overnight cultures of the collected isolates on microtiter plates, after staining with crystal violet, and quantified at 570 nm after solubilization with ethanol. The statistical relevance was calculated in an appropriate program with level of statistical confidence. There was no significant difference in biofilm formation due to the genotype lineage. Isolates collected from intensive care units (ICUs) and isolated from respiratory samples were more likely to create a biofilm compared with isolates from other departments and other samples. There was a significant difference in the ability to produce biofilm in relation to antibiotic resistance pattern. A large proportion of A. baumannii isolates that were resistant to ampicillin/sulbactam, carbapenems, and amikacin were found to be biofilm-negative. In contrast, isolates susceptible and intermediately susceptible to ampicillin/sulbactam, carbapenems, and amikacin were biofilm producers. Clinical isolates of A. baumannii from respiratory samples in ICUs with a particular susceptibility pattern are more prone to form biofilm.

  8. Mathematics and biology: a Kantian view on the history of pattern formation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Siegfried

    2011-12-01

    Driesch's statement, made around 1900, that the physics and chemistry of his day were unable to explain self-regulation during embryogenesis was correct and could be extended until the year 1972. The emergence of theories of self-organisation required progress in several areas including chemistry, physics, computing and cybernetics. Two parallel lines of development can be distinguished which both culminated in the early 1970s. Firstly, physicochemical theories of self-organisation arose from theoretical (Lotka 1910-1920) and experimental work (Bray 1920; Belousov 1951) on chemical oscillations. However, this research area gained broader acceptance only after thermodynamics was extended to systems far from equilibrium (1922-1967) and the mechanism of the prime example for a chemical oscillator, the Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction, was deciphered in the early 1970s. Secondly, biological theories of self-organisation were rooted in the intellectual environment of artificial intelligence and cybernetics. Turing wrote his The chemical basis of morphogenesis (1952) after working on the construction of one of the first electronic computers. Likewise, Gierer and Meinhardt's theory of local activation and lateral inhibition (1972) was influenced by ideas from cybernetics. The Gierer-Meinhardt theory provided an explanation for the first time of both spontaneous formation of spatial order and of self-regulation that proved to be extremely successful in elucidating a wide range of patterning processes. With the advent of developmental genetics in the 1980s, detailed molecular and functional data became available for complex developmental processes, allowing a new generation of data-driven theoretical approaches. Three examples of such approaches will be discussed. The successes and limitations of mathematical pattern formation theory throughout its history suggest a picture of the organism, which has structural similarity to views of the organic world held by the philosopher

  9. Self-organized pattern formation upon femtosecond laser ablation by circularly polarized light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlamova, Olga; Costache, Florenta; Reif, Juergen; Bestehorn, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Surface ripples generation upon femtosecond laser ablation is attributed to self-organized structure formation from instability. We report that linear arrangements are observed not only for linearly polarized light but also for ablation with circularly polarized light. Long ordered chains of spherical nanoparticles, reminding of bead-strings are almost parallel but exhibit typical non-linear dynamics features such as bifurcations. In a first attempt to understand the self-assembly, we rely on models recently developed for the description of similar structures upon ion beam erosion and for the simulation of instabilities in thin liquid films. Our picture describes an unstable surface layer, non-uniformly eroded through Coulomb repulsion between individual positive charges

  10. Dynamic fracture and fragmentation patterns of borosilicate laminate glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez del Río, T.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behaviour of laminate borosilicate glasses (BSG with polyvinylbutiral (PVB interfaces (0,38 mm located at different distances from the impact point have been studied and compared with monolithic glass. The mechanical behaviour under impact loads have been studied using a compression split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB. In these experiments, the stress-strain curves of the materials at high loading rates and the capability of transmitting and reflecting the impact energy have been determined. The influence of the position of the interface on the fragmentation statistics of the SHPB recovered fragments has also been considered and analysed according to the published theoretical models.

    En este trabajo se ha estudiado los comportamientos dinámicos de un vidrio monolítico de borosilicato y varios laminados de cristal de borosilicato (BSG con intercaras de polyvinylbutiral (PVB (0,38 mm situados a diferentes distancias respecto del punto de impacto. Los resultados de las diferentes configuraciones de laminados se han comparado con el vidrio monolítico. El comportamiento mecánico bajo cargas de impacto se han estudiado realizando ensayos de compresión con una barra Hopkinson (SHPB. A partir de estos experimentos se obtienen las curvas tensión-deformación de los materiales a altas velocidades de carga y su capacidad de transmitir y reflejar la energía del impacto. La influencia de la posición de la interfaz en las estadísticas de la fragmentación de los fragmentos recuperados también se ha considerado y analizado de acuerdo a los modelos teóricos publicados.

  11. Quantum noise and spatio-temporal pattern formation in nonlinear optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten

    2002-01-01

    a nondegenerate parametric oscillation. We find that this model may completely stabilize the instabilities normally expected in SHG, but it may also give rise to entirely new phenomena, such as oscillating cavity solitons, intensity spirals and self-pulsing solutions. Especially the self-pulsing is important...... rise to spatially modulated structures, patterns. The two main parts of the thesis are the classical model and the quantum mechanical model, the latter being an extension of the former by including the inherent quantum fluctuations of light. From a theoretical point of view the classical dynamics...... are investigated with an experimental implementation in mind. Thus, we study the internally pumped optical parametric oscillator (IPOPO) as an experimentally more realistic model than the usual SHG model. In the IPOPO a competing process to SHG is taken into account, where the generated second harmonic drives...

  12. Granular patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Aranson, Igor S

    2009-01-01

    This title presents a review of experiments and novel theoretical concepts needed to understand the mechanisms of pattern formation in granular materials. An effort is made to connect concepts and ideas developed in granular physics with new emergent fields, especially in biology, such as cytoskeleton dynamics.

  13. Formation of ring-patterned nanoclusters by laser–plume interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivayoganathan, Mugunthan; Tan Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    This article reports for the first time a unique study performed to regulate the ring diameter of nanoclusters fabricated during femtosecond laser ablation of solids and a mechanism is proposed for the formation of those ring clusters. The ring nanoclusters are made out of nanoparticles with a range of 10–30 nm. Our experimental studies showed the synthesis of ring nanoclusters with random diameter distribution on metals, nonmetals, and semiconductors, such as titanium, aluminum, glasses, ceramics, graphite, and silicon. To regulate the ring size, the effects of laser parameters, such as wavelength, pulse duration, pulse energy, and repetition rate on the ring diameter are analyzed. The influence of ablated materials and the background gas on ring size is also elaborated in this article. The motion of plume species under the influence of ponderomotive force on free electrons possibly played a key role in the formation of the ring-patterned nanoclusters. This study could help to understand the fundamentals in laser ablative nanosynthesis as well as to produce nanostructures with organized ring diameter that controls the density and porosity of those 3D nanostructures.

  14. X-ray photoemission spectromicroscopy of titanium silicide formation in patterned microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F.

    1997-01-01

    Titanium silicide has the lowest resistivity of all the refractory metal silicides and has good thermal stability as well as excellent compatibility with Al metallization. It is used as an intermediate buffer layer between W vias and the Si substrate to provide good electrical contact in ULSI technology, whose submicron patterned features form the basis of the integrated circuits of today and tomorrow, in the self aligned silicide (salicide) formation process. TiSi 2 exists in two phases: a metastable C49 base-centered orthorhombic phase with specific resistivity of 60-90 μΩ-cm that is formed at a lower temperature (formation anneal) and the stable 12-15 μΩ-cm resistivity face-centered orthorhombic C54 phase into which C49 is transformed with a higher temperature (conversion anneal) step. C54 is clearly the target for low resistivity VLSI interconnects. However, it has been observed that when dimensions shrink below 1/mic (or when the Ti thickness drops below several hundred angstroms), the transformation of C49 into C54 is inhibited and agglomeration often occurs in fine lines at high temperatures. This results in a rise in resistivity due to incomplete transformation to C54 and because of discontinuities in the interconnect line resulting from agglomeration. Spectromicroscopy is an appropriate tool to study the evolution of the TiSi2 formation process because of its high resolution chemical imaging ability which can detect bonding changes even in the absence of changes in the relative amounts of species and because of the capability of studying thick open-quotes as isclose quotes industrial samples

  15. X-ray photoemission spectromicroscopy of titanium silicide formation in patterned microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Stoughton, WI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Titanium silicide has the lowest resistivity of all the refractory metal silicides and has good thermal stability as well as excellent compatibility with Al metallization. It is used as an intermediate buffer layer between W vias and the Si substrate to provide good electrical contact in ULSI technology, whose submicron patterned features form the basis of the integrated circuits of today and tomorrow, in the self aligned silicide (salicide) formation process. TiSi{sub 2} exists in two phases: a metastable C49 base-centered orthorhombic phase with specific resistivity of 60-90 {mu}{Omega}-cm that is formed at a lower temperature (formation anneal) and the stable 12-15 {mu}{Omega}-cm resistivity face-centered orthorhombic C54 phase into which C49 is transformed with a higher temperature (conversion anneal) step. C54 is clearly the target for low resistivity VLSI interconnects. However, it has been observed that when dimensions shrink below 1/mic (or when the Ti thickness drops below several hundred angstroms), the transformation of C49 into C54 is inhibited and agglomeration often occurs in fine lines at high temperatures. This results in a rise in resistivity due to incomplete transformation to C54 and because of discontinuities in the interconnect line resulting from agglomeration. Spectromicroscopy is an appropriate tool to study the evolution of the TiSi2 formation process because of its high resolution chemical imaging ability which can detect bonding changes even in the absence of changes in the relative amounts of species and because of the capability of studying thick {open_quotes}as is{close_quotes} industrial samples.

  16. Formation mechanisms of periodic longitudinal microstructure and texture patterns in friction stir welded magnesium AZ80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiscocks, J., E-mail: j.hiscocks@queensu.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Diak, B.J. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Gerlich, A.P. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Waterloo University, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Daymond, M.R. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-12-15

    Many studies of friction stir welding have shown that periodicity of metal flow around the tool pin may result in the formation of periodic differences in microstructure and texture in the weld nugget area correlated with the weld pitch. The current work investigates the periodicity of magnesium weld microtexture in the nugget region and its association with material flow using optical and electron microscopy. Two welds created in AZ80 at different processing conditions are presented in detail, one illustrating periodic longitudinal texture change, and one showing for the first time that periodic variations in texture, grain size, or composition are not defining features of periodic nugget flow. While nugget texture is dominated by shear deformation, it was found here to be affected to a lesser degree by compaction of material behind the welding tool, which led to reduction in intensity of the shear texture fiber. The decreased tendency for magnesium based alloys to form periodic patterns as compared to aluminum based alloys is explained with reference to the shear textures. - Highlights: •It is shown here that periodic material flow in the nugget does not necessitate longitudinal texture patterns. •Longitudinal texture patterns are shown to be present or absent in Mg AZ80 based on processing conditions. •Texture in the nugget is mainly dictated by shear deformation, but has measurable effects from other deformation modes. •Explanation of why longitudinal texture change is frequently reported in aluminum but not magnesium alloys is provided. •A new vector visualization of material flow based on EBSD data analysis is shown.

  17. Formation of ordered microphase-separated pattern during spin coating of ABC triblock copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weihuan; Luo, Chunxia; Zhang, Jilin; Han, Yanchun

    2007-03-14

    In this paper, the authors have systematically studied the microphase separation and crystallization during spin coating of an ABC triblock copolymer, polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO). The microphase separation of PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO and the crystallization of PEO blocks can be modulated by the types of the solvent and the substrate, the spinning speed, and the copolymer concentration. Ordered microphase-separated pattern, where PEO and P2VP blocks adsorbed to the substrate and PS blocks protrusions formed hexagonal dots above the P2VP domains, can only be obtained when PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO is dissolved in N,N-dimethylformamide and the films are spin coated onto the polar substrate, silicon wafers or mica. The mechanism of the formation of regular pattern by microphase separation is found to be mainly related to the inducement of the substrate (middle block P2VP wetting the polar substrate), the quick vanishment of the solvent during the early stage of the spin coating, and the slow evaporation of the remaining solvent during the subsequent stage. On the other hand, the probability of the crystallization of PEO blocks during spin coating decreases with the reduced film thickness. When the film thickness reaches a certain value (3.0 nm), the extensive crystallization of PEO is effectively prohibited and ordered microphase-separated pattern over large areas can be routinely prepared. When the film thickness exceeds another definite value (12.0 nm), the crystallization of PEO dominates the surface morphology. For films with thickness between these two values, microphase separation and crystallization can simultaneously occur.

  18. Vegetation pattern formation in semiarid systems induced by long-range competition in the absence of facilitation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, Ricardo; Calabrese, Justin M.; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Lopez, Cristobal

    2014-05-01

    Regular patterns and spatial organization of vegetation have been observed in many arid and semiarid ecosystems worldwide, covering a diverse range of plant taxa and soil types. A key common ingredient in these systems is that plant growth is severely limited by water availability, and thus plants likely compete strongly for water. The study of such patterns is especially interesting because their features may reveal much about the underlying physical and biological processes that generated them in addition to giving information on the characteristics of the ecosystem. It is possible, for instance, to infer their resilience against anthropogenic disturbances or climatic changes that could cause abrupt shifts in the system and lead it to a desert state. Therefore much research has focused on identifying the underlying mechanisms that can produce spatial patterning in water-limited systems (Klausmeier, 1999). They are believed to arise from the interplay between long-range competition and facilitation processes acting at smaller distances (Borgogno et al., 2009). This combination of mechanisms is justified by arguing that water percolates more readily through the soil in vegetated areas (short range), and that plants compete for water resources over greater distances via long lateral roots (long range). However, recent studies have shown that even in the limit of local facilitation patterns may still appear (Martinez-Garcia et al., 2013). In this work (Martinez-Garcia et al., 2013b), we show that, under rather general conditions, long-range competition alone is the minimal ingredient to shape gapped and stripped vegetation patterns typical of models that also account for facilitation in addition to competition. To this end we propose a simple, general model for the dynamics of vegetation, which includes only long-range competition between plants. Competition is introduced through a nonlocal term, where the kernel function quantifies the intensity of the interaction

  19. Dynamic properties of anhydrites, marls and salts of the Gachsaran evaporitic formation, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorjian, M; Memarian, H; Moosavi, M; Mehrgini, B

    2013-01-01

    A large carbonate oil field in Iran is suffering from severe casing collapses and related operational problems in anhydrite, marl and salt sequences of the Gachsaran cap rock formation. To investigate the causes and cures of operational problems, specifically casing collapse, knowing geomechanical properties of anhydrite, marl and salt of this formation is a prerequisite. However, taking cores in this formation is virtually impossible due to high solubility and weakness of the rocks. Moreover, there are insufficient well log data in this formation and the only available running well log is V p . In this paper, in order to obtain the dynamic parameters of the Gachsaran formation, V p , V s and ρ b in anhydrite, marl and salt cores, which had been taken from depths up to 300 m, were measured. Moreover, V p and V s in salt cores under different triaxial and hydrostatic stress conditions were obtained. The V p –V s, (V p /V s )–V p and V p –ρ b relations in anhydrite, marl and salt were investigated. The established relations in these anhydrite samples were verified by the data derived from limited cores which were taken from 3600 m depth. The relations between dynamic properties of salt with lateral and hydrostatic stresses were investigated. In conclusion, V s , ρ b and the ratio of V p /V s in anhydrite and marl can be estimated through the established relations and having V p logs in the Gachsaran formation. As a result, the dynamic properties of these rocks can be calculated in different depths of this evaporitic formation. Furthermore, the dynamic properties of salt rock seem to be constant in various depths and under differing triaxial and hydrostatic stress conditions. (paper)

  20. Genetic and proteomic evidence for roles of Drosophila SUMO in cell cycle control, Ras signaling, and early pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghua Nie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMO is a protein modifier that is vital for multicellular development. Here we present the first system-wide analysis, combining multiple approaches, to correlate the sumoylated proteome (SUMO-ome in a multicellular organism with the developmental roles of SUMO. Using mass-spectrometry-based protein identification, we found over 140 largely novel SUMO conjugates in the early Drosophila embryo. Enriched functional groups include proteins involved in Ras signaling, cell cycle, and pattern formation. In support of the functional significance of these findings, sumo germline clone embryos exhibited phenotypes indicative of defects in these same three processes. Our cell culture and immunolocalization studies further substantiate roles for SUMO in Ras signaling and cell cycle regulation. For example, we found that SUMO is required for efficient Ras-mediated MAP kinase activation upstream or at the level of Ras activation. We further found that SUMO is dynamically localized during mitosis to the condensed chromosomes, and later also to the midbody. Polo kinase, a SUMO substrate found in our screen, partially colocalizes with SUMO at both sites. These studies show that SUMO coordinates multiple regulatory processes during oogenesis and early embryogenesis. In addition, our database of sumoylated proteins provides a valuable resource for those studying the roles of SUMO in development.

  1. Designing a Robust Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Controller for Spacecraft Formation Flying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inseok Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The robust nonlinear dynamic inversion (RNDI control technique is proposed to keep the relative position of spacecrafts while formation flying. The proposed RNDI control method is based on nonlinear dynamic inversion (NDI. NDI is nonlinear control method that replaces the original dynamics into the user-selected desired dynamics. Because NDI removes nonlinearities in the model by inverting the original dynamics directly, it also eliminates the need of designing suitable controllers for each equilibrium point; that is, NDI works as self-scheduled controller. Removing the original model also provides advantages of ease to satisfy the specific requirements by simply handling desired dynamics. Therefore, NDI is simple and has many similarities to classical control. In real applications, however, it is difficult to achieve perfect cancellation of the original dynamics due to uncertainties that lead to performance degradation and even make the system unstable. This paper proposes robustness assurance method for NDI. The proposed RNDI is designed by combining NDI and sliding mode control (SMC. SMC is inherently robust using high-speed switching inputs. This paper verifies similarities of NDI and SMC, firstly. And then RNDI control method is proposed. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by simulations applied to spacecraft formation flying problem.

  2. Dynamic model updating based on strain mode shape and natural frequency using hybrid pattern search technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Yang, Zhichun; Wang, Le; Ouyang, Yan; Zhang, Xinping

    2018-05-01

    Aiming at providing a precise dynamic structural finite element (FE) model for dynamic strength evaluation in addition to dynamic analysis. A dynamic FE model updating method is presented to correct the uncertain parameters of the FE model of a structure using strain mode shapes and natural frequencies. The strain mode shape, which is sensitive to local changes in structure, is used instead of the displacement mode for enhancing model updating. The coordinate strain modal assurance criterion is developed to evaluate the correlation level at each coordinate over the experimental and the analytical strain mode shapes. Moreover, the natural frequencies which provide the global information of the structure are used to guarantee the accuracy of modal properties of the global model. Then, the weighted summation of the natural frequency residual and the coordinate strain modal assurance criterion residual is used as the objective function in the proposed dynamic FE model updating procedure. The hybrid genetic/pattern-search optimization algorithm is adopted to perform the dynamic FE model updating procedure. Numerical simulation and model updating experiment for a clamped-clamped beam are performed to validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the present method. The results show that the proposed method can be used to update the uncertain parameters with good robustness. And the updated dynamic FE model of the beam structure, which can correctly predict both the natural frequencies and the local dynamic strains, is reliable for the following dynamic analysis and dynamic strength evaluation.

  3. Formation dynamics of FeN thin films on Cu(100)

    KAUST Repository

    Heryadi, Dodi; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the structural and magnetic properties of thin films of FeN we have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of their formation on Cu(100) substrates. The iron nitride layers exhibit a p4gm(2 × 2) reconstruction and order

  4. Cooper pair formation dynamics in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaindl, R.A.; Carnahan, M.A.; Orenstein, J.; Chemla, D.S.; Oh, S.; Eckstein, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    We utilize ultrafast terahertz pulses to monitor the carrier dynamics in the high-TC superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta. The temperature, density and time dependence distinctly exposes a bimolecular recombination process of quasiparticles which underlies formation of Cooper pairs

  5. Effects of internal friction on contact formation dynamics of polymer chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yukun; Li, Peng; Zhao, Nanrong

    2018-04-01

    A theoretical framework is presented to study the contact formation dynamics of polymer chains, in accompany with an electron-transfer quenching. Based on a non-Markovian Smoluchowski equation supplemented with an exponential sink term, we derive the mean time of contact formation under Wilemski-Fixman approximation. Our particular attentions are paid to the effect of internal friction. We find out that internal friction induces a novel fractional viscosity dependence, which will become more remarkable as internal friction increases. Furthermore, we clarify that internal friction inevitably promotes a diffusion-controlled mechanism by slowing the chain relaxation. Finally, we apply our theory to rationalise the experimental investigation for contact formation of a single-stranded DNA. The theoretical results can reproduce the experimental data very well with quite reasonable estimation for the intrinsic parameters. Such good agreements clearly demonstrate the validity of our theory which has appropriately addressed the very role of internal friction to the relevant dynamics.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of amyloid fibril formation by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence reveals complex aggregation kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M Streets

    Full Text Available An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, β-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports β-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation.

  7. Formation dynamics of FeN thin films on Cu(100)

    KAUST Repository

    Heryadi, Dodi

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the structural and magnetic properties of thin films of FeN we have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of their formation on Cu(100) substrates. The iron nitride layers exhibit a p4gm(2 × 2) reconstruction and order ferromagnetically in agreement with experiment. We establish the dynamics and time scale of the film formation as a function of the film thickness. The process is split in two phases: formation of almost flat FeN layers and optimization of the distance to the substrate. Our calculated magnetic moments are 1.67 μ B, 2.14 μ B, and 2.21 μ B for one, two, and three monolayers of iron nitride. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Living on the edge: contrasted wood-formation dynamics in Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris under Mediterranean conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edurne eMartinez Del Castillo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wood formation in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. was intra-annually monitored to examine plastic responses of the xylem phenology according to altitude in one of the southernmost areas of their distribution range, i.e. in the Moncayo Natural Park, Spain. The monitoring was done from 2011 to 2013 at 1180 and 1580 m a.s.l., corresponding to the lower and upper limits of European beech forest in this region. Microcores containing phloem, cambium and xylem were collected biweekly from twenty-four trees from the beginning of March to the end of November to assess the different phases of wood formation. The samples were prepared for light microscopy to observe the following phenological phases: onset and end of cell production, onset and end of secondary wall formation in xylem cells and onset of cell maturation. The temporal dynamics of wood formation widely differed among years, altitudes and tree species. For Fagus sylvatica, the onset of cambial activity varied between the first week of May and the third week of June. Cambial activity then slowed down and stopped in summer, resulting in a length of growing season of 48–75 days. In contrast, the growing season for Pinus sylvestris started earlier and cambium remained active in autumn, leading to a period of activity varying from 139-170 days. The intra-annual wood-formation pattern is site and species-specific. Comparison with other studies shows a clear latitudinal trend in the duration of wood formation, positive for Fagus sylvatica and negative for Pinus sylvestris.

  9. Dynamics of Verticillium species microsclerotia in field soils in response to fumigation, cropping patterns, and flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many soil-inhabiting fungi are capable of surviving the dynamic soil microenvironment through the formation of resilient resting structures, such as thick-walled spores, melanized hyphae, and sclerotia. Verticillium dahliae is a soil-inhabiting, economically significant plant pathogenic fungus that ...

  10. A Preliminary Formation Flying Orbit Dynamics Analysis for Leonardo-BRDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven P.; Mailhe, Laurie M.

    2001-01-01

    Leonardo-BRDF is a NASA mission concept proposed to allow the investigation of radiative transfer and its effect on the Earth's climate and atmospheric phenomenon. Enabled by the recent developments in small-satellite and formation flying technology, the mission is envisioned to be composed of an array of spacecraft in carefully designed orbits. The different perspectives provided by a distributed array of spacecraft offer a unique advantage to study the Earth's albedo. This paper presents the orbit dynamics analysis performed in the context of the Leonardo-BRDF science requirements. First, the albedo integral is investigated and the effect of viewing geometry on science return is studied. The method used in this paper, based on Gauss quadrature, provides the optimal formation geometry to ensure that the value of the integral is accurately approximated. An orbit design approach is presented to achieve specific relative orbit geometries while simultaneously satisfying orbit dynamics constraints to reduce formation-keeping fuel expenditure. The relative geometry afforded by the design is discussed in terms of mission requirements. An optimal two-burn initialization scheme is presented with the required delta-V to distribute all spacecraft from a common parking orbit into their appropriate orbits in the formation. Finally, formation-keeping strategies are developed and the associated delta-V's are calculated to maintain the formation in the presence of perturbations.

  11. Deriving the pattern speed using dynamical modelling of gas flows in barred galaxies .

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez, I.; Freeman, K. C.; Fux, R.; Zurita, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the methodology to derive the bar pattern speed from dynamical simulations. The results are robust to the changes in the vertical-scale height and in the mass-to-light (M/L) ratios. There is a small range of parameters for which the kinematics can be fitted. We have also

  12. Dynamical patterns of calcium signaling in a functional model of neuron-astrocyte networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D.E.; Koreshkov, R.N.; Brazhe, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a functional mathematical model for neuron-astrocyte networks. The model incorporates elements of the tripartite synapse and the spatial branching structure of coupled astrocytes. We consider glutamate-induced calcium signaling as a specific mode of excitability and transmission...... in astrocytic-neuronal networks. We reproduce local and global dynamical patterns observed experimentally....

  13. Monitoring intra-annual dynamics of wood formation with microcores and dendrometers in Picea abies at two different altitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocozza, Claudia; Palombo, Caterina; Tognetti, Roberto; La Porta, Nicola; Anichini, Monica; Giovannelli, Alessio; Emiliani, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Seasonal analyses of cambial cell production and day-by-day stem radial increment can help to elucidate how climate modulates wood formation in conifers. Intra-annual dynamics of wood formation were determined with microcores and dendrometers and related to climatic signals in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). The seasonal dynamics of these processes were observed at two sites of different altitude, Savignano (650 m a.s.l.) and Lavazè (1800 m a.s.l.) in the Italian Alps. Seasonal dynamics of cambial activity were found to be site specific, indicating that the phenology of cambial cell production is highly variable and plastic with altitude. There was a site-specific trend in the number of cells in the wall thickening phase, with the maximum cell production in early July (DOY 186) at Savignano and in mid-July (DOY 200) at Lavazè. The formation of mature cells showed similar trends at the two sites, although different numbers of cells and timing of cell differentiation were visible in the model shapes; at the end of ring formation in 2010, the number of cells was four times higher at Savignano (106.5 cells) than at Lavazè (26.5 cells). At low altitudes, microcores and dendrometers described the radial growth patterns comparably, though the dendrometer function underlined the higher upper asymptote of maximum growth in comparison with the cell production function. In contrast, at high altitude, these functions exhibited different trends. The best model was obtained by fitting functions of the Gompertz model to the experimental data. By combining radial growth and cambial activity indices we defined a model system able to synchronize these processes. Processes of adaptation of the pattern of xylogenesis occurred, enabling P. abies to occupy sites with contrasting climatic conditions. The use of daily climatic variables in combination with plant functional traits obtained by sensors and/or destructive sampling could provide a suitable tool to better

  14. Dynamics and Physiological Roles of Stochastic Firing Patterns Near Bifurcation Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bing; Gu, Huaguang

    2017-06-01

    Different stochastic neural firing patterns or rhythms that appeared near polarization or depolarization resting states were observed in biological experiments on three nervous systems, and closely matched those simulated near bifurcation points between stable equilibrium point and limit cycle in a theoretical model with noise. The distinct dynamics of spike trains and interspike interval histogram (ISIH) of these stochastic rhythms were identified and found to build a relationship to the coexisting behaviors or fixed firing frequency of four different types of bifurcations. Furthermore, noise evokes coherence resonances near bifurcation points and plays important roles in enhancing information. The stochastic rhythms corresponding to Hopf bifurcation points with fixed firing frequency exhibited stronger coherence degree and a sharper peak in the power spectrum of the spike trains than those corresponding to saddle-node bifurcation points without fixed firing frequency. Moreover, the stochastic firing patterns changed to a depolarization resting state as the extracellular potassium concentration increased for the injured nerve fiber related to pathological pain or static blood pressure level increased for aortic depressor nerve fiber, and firing frequency decreased, which were different from the physiological viewpoint that firing frequency increased with increasing pressure level or potassium concentration. This shows that rhythms or firing patterns can reflect pressure or ion concentration information related to pathological pain information. Our results present the dynamics of stochastic firing patterns near bifurcation points, which are helpful for the identification of both dynamics and physiological roles of complex neural firing patterns or rhythms, and the roles of noise.

  15. The Virtual Teacher (VT) Paradigm: Learning New Patterns of Interpersonal Coordination Using the Human Dynamic Clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrubiec, Viviane; Dumas, Guillaume; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio; Kelso, J A Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Virtual Teacher paradigm, a version of the Human Dynamic Clamp (HDC), is introduced into studies of learning patterns of inter-personal coordination. Combining mathematical modeling and experimentation, we investigate how the HDC may be used as a Virtual Teacher (VT) to help humans co-produce and internalize new inter-personal coordination pattern(s). Human learners produced rhythmic finger movements whilst observing a computer-driven avatar, animated by dynamic equations stemming from the well-established Haken-Kelso-Bunz (1985) and Schöner-Kelso (1988) models of coordination. We demonstrate that the VT is successful in shifting the pattern co-produced by the VT-human system toward any value (Experiment 1) and that the VT can help humans learn unstable relative phasing patterns (Experiment 2). Using transfer entropy, we find that information flow from one partner to the other increases when VT-human coordination loses stability. This suggests that variable joint performance may actually facilitate interaction, and in the long run learning. VT appears to be a promising tool for exploring basic learning processes involved in social interaction, unraveling the dynamics of information flow between interacting partners, and providing possible rehabilitation opportunities.

  16. Individual Rules for Trail Pattern Formation in Argentine Ants (Linepithema humile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Andrea; Granovskiy, Boris; Garnier, Simon; Nicolis, Stamatios C.; Labédan, Marjorie; Theraulaz, Guy; Fourcassié, Vincent; Sumpter, David J. T.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the formation of trail patterns by Argentine ants exploring an empty arena. Using a novel imaging and analysis technique we estimated pheromone concentrations at all spatial positions in the experimental arena and at different times. Then we derived the response function of individual ants to pheromone concentrations by looking at correlations between concentrations and changes in speed or direction of the ants. Ants were found to turn in response to local pheromone concentrations, while their speed was largely unaffected by these concentrations. Ants did not integrate pheromone concentrations over time, with the concentration of pheromone in a 1 cm radius in front of the ant determining the turning angle. The response to pheromone was found to follow a Weber's Law, such that the difference between quantities of pheromone on the two sides of the ant divided by their sum determines the magnitude of the turning angle. This proportional response is in apparent contradiction with the well-established non-linear choice function used in the literature to model the results of binary bridge experiments in ant colonies (Deneubourg et al. 1990). However, agent based simulations implementing the Weber's Law response function led to the formation of trails and reproduced results reported in the literature. We show analytically that a sigmoidal response, analogous to that in the classical Deneubourg model for collective decision making, can be derived from the individual Weber-type response to pheromone concentrations that we have established in our experiments when directional noise around the preferred direction of movement of the ants is assumed. PMID:22829756

  17. Individual rules for trail pattern formation in Argentine ants (Linepithema humile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Perna

    Full Text Available We studied the formation of trail patterns by Argentine ants exploring an empty arena. Using a novel imaging and analysis technique we estimated pheromone concentrations at all spatial positions in the experimental arena and at different times. Then we derived the response function of individual ants to pheromone concentrations by looking at correlations between concentrations and changes in speed or direction of the ants. Ants were found to turn in response to local pheromone concentrations, while their speed was largely unaffected by these concentrations. Ants did not integrate pheromone concentrations over time, with the concentration of pheromone in a 1 cm radius in front of the ant determining the turning angle. The response to pheromone was found to follow a Weber's Law, such that the difference between quantities of pheromone on the two sides of the ant divided by their sum determines the magnitude of the turning angle. This proportional response is in apparent contradiction with the well-established non-linear choice function used in the literature to model the results of binary bridge experiments in ant colonies (Deneubourg et al. 1990. However, agent based simulations implementing the Weber's Law response function led to the formation of trails and reproduced results reported in the literature. We show analytically that a sigmoidal response, analogous to that in the classical Deneubourg model for collective decision making, can be derived from the individual Weber-type response to pheromone concentrations that we have established in our experiments when directional noise around the preferred direction of movement of the ants is assumed.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of the formation, structure, and dynamics of small phospholipid vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, SJ; Mark, AE

    2003-01-01

    Here, we use coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the spontaneous aggregation of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids into small unilamellar vesicles. We show that the aggregation process occurs on a nanosecond time scale, with bicelles and cuplike vesicles formed at

  19. Rayleigh-Taylor instability and mushroom-pattern formation in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Kazuki; Suzuki, Naoya; Saito, Hiroki; Akamatsu, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface in an immiscible two-component Bose-Einstein condensate is investigated using the mean field and Bogoliubov theories. Rayleigh-Taylor fingers are found to grow from the interface and mushroom patterns are formed. Quantized vortex rings and vortex lines are then generated around the mushrooms. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability and mushroom-pattern formation can be observed in a trapped system.

  20. Identifying forest patterns from space to explore dynamics across the circumpolar boreal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesano, P. M.; Neigh, C. S. R.; Feng, M.; Channan, S.; Sexton, J. O.; Wagner, W.; Wooten, M.; Poulter, B.; Wang, L.

    2017-12-01

    A variety of forest patterns are the result of interactions between broad-scale climate and local-scale site factors and history across the northernmost portion of the circumpolar boreal. Patterns of forest extent, height, and cover help describe forest structure transitions that influence future and reflect past dynamics. Coarse spaceborne observations lack structural detail at forest transitions, which inhibits understanding of these dynamics. We highlight: (1) the use of sub-meter spaceborne stereogrammetry for deriving structure estimates in boreal forests; (2) its potential to complement other spaceborne estimates of forest structure at critical scales; and (3) the potential of these sub-meter and other Landsat-derived structure estimates for improving understanding of broad-scale boreal dynamics such as carbon flux and albedo, capturing the spatial variability of the boreal-tundra biome boundary, and assessing its potential for change.

  1. Unraveling dynamics of human physical activity patterns in chronic pain conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschiv-Ionescu, Anisoara; Buchser, Eric; Aminian, Kamiar

    2013-06-01

    Chronic pain is a complex disabling experience that negatively affects the cognitive, affective and physical functions as well as behavior. Although the interaction between chronic pain and physical functioning is a well-accepted paradigm in clinical research, the understanding of how pain affects individuals' daily life behavior remains a challenging task. Here we develop a methodological framework allowing to objectively document disruptive pain related interferences on real-life physical activity. The results reveal that meaningful information is contained in the temporal dynamics of activity patterns and an analytical model based on the theory of bivariate point processes can be used to describe physical activity behavior. The model parameters capture the dynamic interdependence between periods and events and determine a `signature' of activity pattern. The study is likely to contribute to the clinical understanding of complex pain/disease-related behaviors and establish a unified mathematical framework to quantify the complex dynamics of various human activities.

  2. Long-wave-instability-induced pattern formation in an evaporating sessile or pendent liquid layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tao; Duan, Fei

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the nonlinear dynamics and stability of an evaporating liquid layer subject to vapor recoil, capillarity, thermocapillarity, ambient cooling, viscosity, and negative or positive gravity combined with buoyancy effects in the lubrication approximation. Using linear theory, we identify the mechanisms of finite-time rupture, independent of thermocapillarity and direction of gravity, and predict the effective growth rate of an interfacial perturbation which reveals competition among the mechanisms. A stability diagram is predicted for the onset of long-wave (LW) evaporative convection. In the two-dimensional simulation, we observe well-defined capillary ridges on both sides of the valley under positive gravity and main and secondary droplets under negative gravity, while a ridge can be trapped in a large-scale drained region in both cases. Neglecting the other non-Boussinesq effects, buoyancy does not have a significant influence on interfacial evolution and rupture time but makes contributions to the evaporation-driven convection and heat transfer. The average Nusselt number is found to increase with a stronger buoyancy effect. The flow field and interface profile jointly manifest the LW Marangoni-Rayleigh-Bénard convection under positive gravity and the LW Marangoni convection under negative gravity. In the three-dimensional simulation of moderate evaporation with a random perturbation, the rupture patterns are characterized by irregular ridge networks with distinct height scales for positive and negative gravity. A variety of interfacial and internal dynamics are displayed, depending on evaporation conditions, gravity, Marangoni effect, and ambient cooling. Reasonable agreement is found between the present results and the reported experiments and simulations. The concept of dissipative compacton also sheds light on the properties of interfacial fractalization.

  3. Dynamics of Semantic and Word-Formation Subsystems of the Russian Language: Historical Dynamics of the Word Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Ivanovna Dmitrieva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article provides comprehensive justification of the principles and methods of the synchronic and diachronic research of word-formation subsystems of the Russian language. The authors also study the ways of analyzing historical dynamics of word family as the main macro-unit of word-formation system. In the field of analysis there is a family of words with the stem 'ход-' (the meaning of 'motion', word-formation of which is investigated in different periods of the Russian literary language. Significance of motion-verbs in the process of forming a language picture of the world determined the character and the structure of this word family as one of the biggest in the history of the Russian language. In the article a structural and semantic dynamics of the word family 'ход-' is depicted. The results of the study show that in the ancient period the prefixes of verbal derivatives were formed, which became the apex-branched derivational paradigms existing in modern Russian. The old Russian period of language development is characterized by the appearance of words with connotative meaning (with suffixes -ishk-, -ichn-, as well as the words with possessive semantics (with suffixes –ev-, -sk-. In this period the verbs with the postfix -cz also supplement the analyzed word family. The period of formation of the National Russian language was marked by the loss of a large number of abstract nouns and the appearance of neologisms from some old Russian abstract nouns. The studied family in the modern Russian language is characterized by the following processes: the appearance of terms, the active semantic derivation, the weakening of word-formation variability, the semantic differentiation of duplicate units, the development of subsystem of words with connotative meanings, and the preservation of derivatives in all functional styles.

  4. Brittle fracture in viscoelastic materials as a pattern-formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, M.; Pilipenko, D.; Spatschek, R.; Brener, E. A.

    2011-04-01

    A continuum model of crack propagation in brittle viscoelastic materials is presented and discussed. Thereby, the phenomenon of fracture is understood as an elastically induced nonequilibrium interfacial pattern formation process. In this spirit, a full description of a propagating crack provides the determination of the entire time dependent shape of the crack surface, which is assumed to be extended over a finite and self-consistently selected length scale. The mechanism of crack propagation, that is, the motion of the crack surface, is then determined through linear nonequilibrium transport equations. Here we consider two different mechanisms, a first-order phase transformation and surface diffusion. We give scaling arguments showing that steady-state solutions with a self-consistently selected propagation velocity and crack shape can exist provided that elastodynamic or viscoelastic effects are taken into account, whereas static elasticity alone is not sufficient. In this respect, inertial effects as well as viscous damping are identified to be sufficient crack tip selection mechanisms. Exploring the arising description of brittle fracture numerically, we study steady-state crack propagation in the viscoelastic and inertia limit as well as in an intermediate regime, where both effects are important. The arising free boundary problems are solved by phase field methods and a sharp interface approach using a multipole expansion technique. Different types of loading, mode I, mode III fracture, as well as mixtures of them, are discussed.

  5. Self-organized control in cooperative robots using a pattern formation principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starke, Jens; Ellsaesser, Carmen; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Self-organized modular approaches proved in nature to be robust and optimal and are a promising strategy to control future concepts of flexible and modular manufacturing processes. We show how this can be applied to a model of flexible manufacturing based on time-dependent robot-target assignment problems where robot teams have to serve manufacturing targets such that an objective function is optimized. Feasibility of the self-organized solutions can be guaranteed even for unpredictable situations like sudden changes in the demands or breakdowns of robots. As example an uncrewed space mission is visualized in a simulation where robots build a space station. - Highlights: → Adapting a pattern formation principle to control cooperative robots in a robust way. → Flexible manufacturing systems are modelled by time-dependent assignment problems. → Coupled selection equations guarantee feasibility of solutions. → Solution structure (permutations) is not destroyed by inhomogeneous growth rates. → Example of an uncrewed space mission shows effectivity and robustness.

  6. Pattern formation and filamentation in low temperature, magnetized plasmas - a numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menati, Mohamad; Konopka, Uwe; Thomas, Edward

    2017-10-01

    In low-temperature discharges under the influence of high magnetic field, pattern and filament formation in the plasma has been reported by different groups. The phenomena present themselves as bright plasma columns (filaments) oriented parallel to the magnetic field lines at high magnetic field regime. The plasma structure can filament into different shapes from single columns to spiral and bright rings when viewed from the top. In spite of the extensive experimental observations, the observed effects lack a detailed theoretical and numerical description. In an attempt to numerically explain the plasma filamentation, we present a simplified model for the plasma discharge and power deposition into the plasma. Based on the model, 2-D and 3-D codes are being developed that solve Poisson's equation along with the fluid equations to obtain a self-consistent description of the plasma. The model and preliminary results applied to the specific plasma conditions will be presented. This work was supported by the US Dept. of Energy and NSF, DE-SC0016330, PHY-1613087.

  7. DYNAMIC MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF URBAN SPATIAL PATTERN (RESIDENTIAL CHOICE OF LOCATION: MOBILITY VS EXTERNALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahma Fitriani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Household’s residential choice of location determines urban spatial pattern (e.g sprawl. The static model which assumes that the choice has been affected by distance to the CBD and location specific externality, fails to capture the evoution of the pattern over time. Therefore this study proposes a dynamic version of the model. It analyses the effects of externalities on the optimal solution of development decision as function of time. It also derives the effect of mobility and externality on the rate of change of development pattern through time. When the increasing rate of utility is not as significant as the increasing rate of income, the externalities will delay the change of urban spatial pattern over time. If the mobility costs increase by large amount relative to the increase of income and inflation rate, then the mobility effect dominates the effects of externalities in delaying the urban expansion.

  8. Visualization and analysis of flow patterns of human carotid bifurcation by computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yunjing; Gao Peiyi; Lin Yan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate flow patterns at carotid bifurcation in vivo by combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD)and MR angiography imaging. Methods: Seven subjects underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography of carotid artery in Siemens 3.0 T MR. Flow patterns of the carotid artery bifurcation were calculated and visualized by combining MR vascular imaging post-processing and CFD. Results: The flow patterns of the carotid bifurcations in 7 subjects were varied with different phases of a cardiac cycle. The turbulent flow and back flow occurred at bifurcation and proximal of internal carotid artery (ICA) and external carotid artery (ECA), their occurrence and conformation were varied with different phase of a cardiac cycle. The turbulent flow and back flow faded out quickly when the blood flow to the distal of ICA and ECA. Conclusion: CFD combined with MR angiography can be utilized to visualize the cyclical change of flow patterns of carotid bifurcation with different phases of a cardiac cycle. (authors)

  9. Game Design Document Format For Video Games With Passive Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratama Wirya Atmaja

    2016-07-01

    satisfaction of its players is the primary mean to measure its quality. One important element of player’s satisfaction is a proper difficulty level, which is neither too easy nor too hard. The current state-of-the-art way to implement it is with Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment (DDA, which allows the difficulty level of a video game to be adjusted at run-time. Currently, the most popular type of DDA is the passive one. Meanwhile, Game Design Document (GDD is an important artefact in the development process of a video game software, and there is still no GDD format that supports the design of passive DDA mechanism. The aim of this research was to find a new GDD format that supports the mechanism. We modified a general purpose GDD format by adding new parts for designing passive DDA mechanism. We tested the usefulness of the modified format in a testing process involving developers and players. The developers developed video games using the modified GDD format and the general purpose one. Their development processes were observed and evaluated to know if there were any difficulties. The resulting video games were played by the players to find which are better in terms of passive DDA mechanism. The result of developer testing showed that the modified format is better than the general purpose one. The result of player testing showed that the video games made with the modified format are better than their counterparts, albeit by an insignificant margin. Based on the results, we declare that the modified GDD format is successful.Keywords: Video game, requirement engineering, game design document, dynamic difficulty adjustment, software development.

  10. Neural dynamics of social tie formation in economic decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bault, Nadège; Pelloux, Benjamin; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; van Winden, Frans

    2015-06-01

    The disposition for prosocial conduct, which contributes to cooperation as arising during social interaction, requires cortical network dynamics responsive to the development of social ties, or care about the interests of specific interaction partners. Here, we formulate a dynamic computational model that accurately predicted how tie formation, driven by the interaction history, influences decisions to contribute in a public good game. We used model-driven functional MRI to test the hypothesis that brain regions key to social interactions keep track of dynamics in tie strength. Activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex tracked the individual's public good contributions. Activation in the bilateral posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), and temporo-parietal junction was modulated parametrically by the dynamically developing social tie-as estimated by our model-supporting a role of these regions in social tie formation. Activity in these two regions further reflected inter-individual differences in tie persistence and sensitivity to behavior of the interaction partner. Functional connectivity between pSTS and mPFC activations indicated that the representation of social ties is integrated in the decision process. These data reveal the brain mechanisms underlying the integration of interaction dynamics into a social tie representation which in turn influenced the individual's prosocial decisions. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Molecular-dynamics simulation of defect formation energy in boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, W.H.; Hwang, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the defect formation energy of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using molecular dynamics simulation. Although the defect with tetragon-octagon pairs (TOP) is favored in the flat BNNTs cap, BN clusters, and the growth of BNNTs, the formation energy of the TOP defect is significantly higher than that of the pentagon-heptagon pairs (PHP) defect in BNNTs. The PHP defect reduces the effect of the structural distortion caused by the TOP defect, in spite of homoelemental bonds. The instability of the TOP defect generates the structural transformation into BNNTs with no defect at about 1500 K. This mechanism shows that the TOP defect is less favored in case of BNNTs

  12. Dynamic Stall Vortex Formation of OA-209 Airfoil at Low Reynolds Number

    OpenAIRE

    Aung Myo Thu; Sang Eon Jeon; Yung Hwan Byun; Soo Hyung Park

    2014-01-01

    The unsteady flow field around oscillating OA-209 airfoil at a Reynolds number of 3.5×105 were investigated. Three different reduced frequencies were tested in order to see how it affects the hysteresis loop of an airfoil. At a reduced frequency of 0.05 the deep dynamic stall phenomenon was observed. Lift overshooting was observed as a result of dynamic stall vortex (DSV) shedding. Further investigation was carried out to find out the cause of DSV formation and shedding over airfoil. Particle...

  13. Experimentally observed evolution between dynamic patterns and intrinsic localized modes in a driven nonlinear electrical cyclic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shige, S.; Miyasaka, K.; Shi, W.; Soga, Y.; Sato, M.; Sievers, A. J.

    2018-02-01

    Locked intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) and large amplitude lattice spatial modes (LSMs) have been experimentally measured for a driven 1-D nonlinear cyclic electric transmission line, where the nonlinear element is a saturable capacitor. Depending on the number of cells and electrical lattice damping an LSM of fixed shape can be tuned across the modal spectrum. Interestingly, by tuning the driver frequency away from this spectrum the LSM can be continuously converted into ILMs and vice versa. The differences in pattern formation between simulations and experimental findings are due to a low concentration of impurities. Through this novel nonlinear excitation and switching channel in cyclic lattices either energy balanced or unbalanced LSMs and ILMs may occur. Because of the general nature of these dynamical results for nonintegrable lattices applications are to be expected. The ultimate stability of driven aero machinery containing nonlinear periodic structures may be one example.

  14. Two tree-formation methods for fast pattern search using nearest-neighbour and nearest-centroid matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schomaker, Lambertus; Mangalagiu, D.; Vuurpijl, Louis; Weinfeld, M.; Schomaker, Lambert; Vuurpijl, Louis

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes tree­based classification of character images, comparing two methods of tree formation and two methods of matching: nearest neighbor and nearest centroid. The first method, Preprocess Using Relative Distances (PURD) is a tree­based reorganization of a flat list of patterns,

  15. Enhancing pattern of gastric carcinoma at dynamic incremental CT: correlation with gross and histologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hong Seop; Lee, Dong Ho; Kim, Yoon Hwa; Ko, Young Tae; Lim, Joo Won; Yoon, Yup

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the enhancing pattern of gastric carcinomas at dynamic incremental CT and to correlate it with pathologic findings. We retrospectively evaluated the enhancement pattern of stomach cancer on dynamic incremental CT of the 78 patients. All the lesions had been pathologically proved after surgery. The enhancement pattern was categorized as good or poor in the early phase;homogeneous, heterogeneous or ring enhancement;the presence or absence of delayed enhancement. There were 16 cases of early gastric cancer (EGC), and 62 cases of advanced gastric cancer(AGC). The Borrmann type of AGC were 1(n=1), 2(n=20), 3=(n=32), 4(n=8) and 5(n=1). The histologic patterns of AGC were tubular(n=49), signet ring cell(n=10), and mucinous(n=3). The enhancing patterns were compared with gross and histologic findings and delayed enhancement was correlated with pathologic evidence of desmoplasia. Good enhancement of tumor was seen in 24/41cases (58.5%) with AGC Borrmann type 3-5, in 6/21(28.6%) with AGC Borrmann type 1-2, and in 3/16(18.8%) with EGC (P<.05). By histologic pattern, good enhancement of tumor was seen in 8/10(80%) with signet ring cell type, in 21/49(42.9%) with tubular type, and in 1/3(33.3%) with mucinous type(P<.05). EGC was homogeneously enhanced in 14/16cases (87.5%), but AGC was heterogeneously enhanced in 33/62(53.2%), respectively(P<.01). There was no significant correlation between delayed enhancement and the presence of desmoplasia. AGC Borrmann type 3-5 and signet ring cell type have a tendency to show good enhancement and EGC is more homogeneously enhanced at dynamic incremental CT

  16. Switching among graphic patterns is governed by oscillatory coordination dynamics: Implications for understanding handwriting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier-Giorgio eZanone

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Revisiting an original idea by Hollerbach (1981, previous work has established that the production of graphic shapes, assumed to be the blueprint for handwriting, is governed by the dynamics of orthogonal non-linear coupled oscillators. Such dynamics determines few stable coordination patterns, giving rise to a limited set of preferred graphic shapes, namely, four lines and four ellipsoids independent of orientation. The present study investigates the rules of switching among such graphic coordination patterns. Seven participants were required to voluntarily switch within twelve pairs of shapes presented on a graphic tablet. In line with previous theoretical and experimental work on bimanual coordination, results corroborated our hypothesis that the relative stability of the produced coordination patterns determines the time needed for switching: the transition to a more stable pattern was shorter, and inversely. Moreover, switching between patterns with the same orientation but different eccentricities was faster than with a change in orientation. Nonetheless, the switching time covaried strictly with the change in relative phase effected by the transition between two shapes, whether this implied a change in eccentricity or in orientation. These findings suggest a new operational definition of what the (motor units or strokes of handwriting are and shed a novel light on how co-articulation and recruitment of degrees of freedom may occur in graphic skills. They also yield some leads for understanding the acquisition and the neural underpinnings of handwriting.

  17. Swarming and complex pattern formation in Paenibacillus vortex studied by imaging and tracking cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Eshel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swarming motility allows microorganisms to move rapidly over surfaces. The Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus vortex exhibits advanced cooperative motility on agar plates resulting in intricate colonial patterns with geometries that are highly sensitive to the environment. The cellular mechanisms that underpin the complex multicellular organization of such a simple organism are not well understood. Results Swarming by P. vortex was studied by real-time light microscopy, by in situ scanning electron microscopy and by tracking the spread of antibiotic-resistant cells within antibiotic-sensitive colonies. When swarming, P. vortex was found to be peritrichously flagellated. Swarming by the curved cells of P. vortex occurred on an extremely wide range of media and agar concentrations (0.3 to 2.2% w/v. At high agar concentrations (> 1% w/v rotating colonies formed that could be detached from the main mass of cells by withdrawal of cells into the latter. On lower percentage agars, cells moved in an extended network composed of interconnected "snakes" with short-term collision avoidance and sensitivity to extracts from swarming cells. P. vortex formed single Petri dish-wide "supercolonies" with a colony-wide exchange of motile cells. Swarming cells were coupled by rapidly forming, reversible and non-rigid connections to form a loose raft, apparently connected via flagella. Inhibitors of swarming (p-Nitrophenylglycerol and Congo Red were identified. Mitomycin C was used to trigger filamentation without inhibiting growth or swarming; this facilitated dissection of the detail of swarming. Mitomycin C treatment resulted in malcoordinated swarming and abortive side branch formation and a strong tendency by a subpopulation of the cells to form minimal rotating aggregates of only a few cells. Conclusion P. vortex creates complex macroscopic colonies within which there is considerable reflux and movement and interaction of cells. Cell

  18. OCCURRENCE OF ACCELERATING FIELD, FORMATION AND DYNAMICS OF RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON BEAM NEAR JUPITER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Maslov

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The possible dynamics of the electron beam, formed in the vicinity of Io, the natural satellite of Jupiter, and injected toward Jupiter, has been investigated analytically. When a beam penetrates the Jupiter plasma to a certain depth, the beam-plasma instability can be developed. In this case, the distribution function of electrons is expanded additionally by excited oscillations. These electrons, when their energy is of order of a required certain value, cause UV polar light. For closing of a current, the formation of a double electric layer is necessary. The necessary parameters and conditions for the formation of a double layer with a large jump of an electric potential at a certain height have been formulated, its properties, stability, behavior over time and beam reflection in its field for closing of a current have been described. Reflection of the beam can lead to its vortex dynamics.

  19. Terrestrial Planet Formation: Dynamical Shake-up and the Low Mass of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2017-05-01

    We consider a dynamical shake-up model to explain the low mass of Mars and the lack of planets in the asteroid belt. In our scenario, a secular resonance with Jupiter sweeps through the inner solar system as the solar nebula depletes, pitting resonant excitation against collisional damping in the Sun’s protoplanetary disk. We report the outcome of extensive numerical calculations of planet formation from planetesimals in the terrestrial zone, with and without dynamical shake-up. If the Sun’s gas disk within the terrestrial zone depletes in roughly a million years, then the sweeping resonance inhibits planet formation in the asteroid belt and substantially limits the size of Mars. This phenomenon likely occurs around other stars with long-period massive planets, suggesting that asteroid belt analogs are common.

  20. Dynamical entanglement formation and dissipation effects in two double quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Pulido, L D [Centro de Investigacion CientIfica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2732, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Rojas, F [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico)

    2006-11-01

    We study the static and dynamic formation of entanglement in charge states of a two double quantum dot array with two mobile electrons under the effect of an external driving field. We include dissipation via contact with a phonon bath. By using the density matrix formalism and an open quantum system approach, we describe the dynamical behaviour of the charge distribution (polarization), concurrence (measure of the degree of entanglement) and Bell state probabilities (two qubit states with maximum entanglement) of such a system, including the role of dot asymmetry and temperature effects. Our results show that it is possible to obtain entangled states as well as a most probable Bell state, which can be controlled by the driving field. We also evaluate how the entanglement formation based on charge states deteriorates as the temperature or asymmetry increases.

  1. Time series analyses of breathing patterns of lung cancer patients using nonlinear dynamical system theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewatia, D K; Tolakanahalli, R P; Paliwal, B R; Tomé, W A

    2011-04-07

    The underlying requirements for successful implementation of any efficient tumour motion management strategy are regularity and reproducibility of a patient's breathing pattern. The physiological act of breathing is controlled by multiple nonlinear feedback and feed-forward couplings. It would therefore be appropriate to analyse the breathing pattern of lung cancer patients in the light of nonlinear dynamical system theory. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the one-dimensional respiratory time series of lung cancer patients based on nonlinear dynamics and delay coordinate state space embedding. It is very important to select a suitable pair of embedding dimension 'm' and time delay 'τ' when performing a state space reconstruction. Appropriate time delay and embedding dimension were obtained using well-established methods, namely mutual information and the false nearest neighbour method, respectively. Establishing stationarity and determinism in a given scalar time series is a prerequisite to demonstrating that the nonlinear dynamical system that gave rise to the scalar time series exhibits a sensitive dependence on initial conditions, i.e. is chaotic. Hence, once an appropriate state space embedding of the dynamical system has been reconstructed, we show that the time series of the nonlinear dynamical systems under study are both stationary and deterministic in nature. Once both criteria are established, we proceed to calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), which is an invariant quantity under time delay embedding. The LLE for all 16 patients is positive, which along with stationarity and determinism establishes the fact that the time series of a lung cancer patient's breathing pattern is not random or irregular, but rather it is deterministic in nature albeit chaotic. These results indicate that chaotic characteristics exist in the respiratory waveform and techniques based on state space dynamics should be employed for tumour motion management.

  2. Time series analyses of breathing patterns of lung cancer patients using nonlinear dynamical system theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewatia, D K; Tolakanahalli, R P; Paliwal, B R; Tome, W A, E-mail: tewatia@wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2011-04-07

    The underlying requirements for successful implementation of any efficient tumour motion management strategy are regularity and reproducibility of a patient's breathing pattern. The physiological act of breathing is controlled by multiple nonlinear feedback and feed-forward couplings. It would therefore be appropriate to analyse the breathing pattern of lung cancer patients in the light of nonlinear dynamical system theory. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the one-dimensional respiratory time series of lung cancer patients based on nonlinear dynamics and delay coordinate state space embedding. It is very important to select a suitable pair of embedding dimension 'm' and time delay '{tau}' when performing a state space reconstruction. Appropriate time delay and embedding dimension were obtained using well-established methods, namely mutual information and the false nearest neighbour method, respectively. Establishing stationarity and determinism in a given scalar time series is a prerequisite to demonstrating that the nonlinear dynamical system that gave rise to the scalar time series exhibits a sensitive dependence on initial conditions, i.e. is chaotic. Hence, once an appropriate state space embedding of the dynamical system has been reconstructed, we show that the time series of the nonlinear dynamical systems under study are both stationary and deterministic in nature. Once both criteria are established, we proceed to calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), which is an invariant quantity under time delay embedding. The LLE for all 16 patients is positive, which along with stationarity and determinism establishes the fact that the time series of a lung cancer patient's breathing pattern is not random or irregular, but rather it is deterministic in nature albeit chaotic. These results indicate that chaotic characteristics exist in the respiratory waveform and techniques based on state space dynamics should be employed

  3. Time series analyses of breathing patterns of lung cancer patients using nonlinear dynamical system theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewatia, D K; Tolakanahalli, R P; Paliwal, B R; Tome, W A

    2011-01-01

    The underlying requirements for successful implementation of any efficient tumour motion management strategy are regularity and reproducibility of a patient's breathing pattern. The physiological act of breathing is controlled by multiple nonlinear feedback and feed-forward couplings. It would therefore be appropriate to analyse the breathing pattern of lung cancer patients in the light of nonlinear dynamical system theory. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the one-dimensional respiratory time series of lung cancer patients based on nonlinear dynamics and delay coordinate state space embedding. It is very important to select a suitable pair of embedding dimension 'm' and time delay 'τ' when performing a state space reconstruction. Appropriate time delay and embedding dimension were obtained using well-established methods, namely mutual information and the false nearest neighbour method, respectively. Establishing stationarity and determinism in a given scalar time series is a prerequisite to demonstrating that the nonlinear dynamical system that gave rise to the scalar time series exhibits a sensitive dependence on initial conditions, i.e. is chaotic. Hence, once an appropriate state space embedding of the dynamical system has been reconstructed, we show that the time series of the nonlinear dynamical systems under study are both stationary and deterministic in nature. Once both criteria are established, we proceed to calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), which is an invariant quantity under time delay embedding. The LLE for all 16 patients is positive, which along with stationarity and determinism establishes the fact that the time series of a lung cancer patient's breathing pattern is not random or irregular, but rather it is deterministic in nature albeit chaotic. These results indicate that chaotic characteristics exist in the respiratory waveform and techniques based on state space dynamics should be employed for tumour motion management.

  4. On Oscillatory Pattern of Malaria Dynamics in a Population with Temporary Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tumwiine

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a model to study the dynamics of malaria in the human and mosquito population to explain the stability patterns of malaria. The model results show that the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable and occurs whenever the basic reproduction number, R0 is less than unity. We also note that when R0>1, the disease-free equilibrium is unstable and the endemic equilibrium is stable. Numerical simulations show that recoveries and temporary immunity keep the populations at oscillation patterns and eventually converge to a steady state.

  5. Dynamic-stochastic modeling of snow cover formation on the European territory of Russia

    OpenAIRE

    A. N. Gelfan; V. M. Moreido

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic-stochastic model, which combines a deterministic model of snow cover formation with a stochastic weather generator, has been developed. The deterministic snow model describes temporal change of the snow depth, content of ice and liquid water, snow density, snowmelt, sublimation, re-freezing of melt water, and snow metamorphism. The model has been calibrated and validated against the long-term data of snow measurements over the territory of the European Russia. The model showed good ...

  6. Changing Dynamics of Cross-Border Intimate Partnership Formations in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    Intimate partnership formations across the borders at various levels challenge stereotypes and lead to enhanced social diversity but are understudied in Scandinavia. Our workshop presents and discusses these phenomena through research, practice and policy issues from Denmark and Finland within...... interdisciplinary framework. It explores processes related to "us and them" redefinitions and minority-majority relations through focus on motivations,identity, life course,gender,family dynamics especially intergenerational conflicts, diaspora and policy effects.  ...

  7. Habit Formation in Natural Cheese Consumption An Approach Based on Dynamic Demand Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    WAKABAYASHI, Katsufumi

    2010-01-01

    In expectation of growing cheese consumption, natural cheese production is being increased to reduce surplus milk and create high added value in raw milk. Other studies found positive trends in cheese consumption. However, those studies neither clarified recent trends, nor distinguished natural cheese from processed cheese. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the structure of natural cheese consumption, focusing on habit formation. We test structural changes in cheese demand using dynamic...

  8. Algorithmic Information Dynamics of Persistent Patterns and Colliding Particles in the Game of Life

    KAUST Repository

    Zenil, Hector

    2018-02-18

    We demonstrate the way to apply and exploit the concept of \\\\textit{algorithmic information dynamics} in the characterization and classification of dynamic and persistent patterns, motifs and colliding particles in, without loss of generalization, Conway\\'s Game of Life (GoL) cellular automaton as a case study. We analyze the distribution of prevailing motifs that occur in GoL from the perspective of algorithmic probability. We demonstrate how the tools introduced are an alternative to computable measures such as entropy and compression algorithms which are often nonsensitive to small changes and features of non-statistical nature in the study of evolving complex systems and their emergent structures.

  9. Colchicine affects cell motility, pattern formation and stalk cell differentiation in Dictyostelium by altering calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloz, Yekaterina; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-04-01

    Previous work, verified here, showed that colchicine affects Dictyostelium pattern formation, disrupts morphogenesis, inhibits spore differentiation and induces terminal stalk cell differentiation. Here we show that colchicine specifically induces ecmB expression and enhances accumulation of ecmB-expressing cells at the posterior end of multicellular structures. Colchicine did not induce a nuclear translocation of DimB, a DIF-1 responsive transcription factor in vitro. It also induced terminal stalk cell differentiation in a mutant strain that does not produce DIF-1 (dmtA-) and after the treatment of cells with DIF-1 synthesis inhibitor cerulenin (100 μM). This suggests that colchicine induces the differentiation of ecmB-expressing cells independent of DIF-1 production and likely through a signaling pathway that is distinct from the one that is utilized by DIF-1. Depending on concentration, colchicine enhanced random cell motility, but not chemotaxis, by 3-5 fold (10-50 mM colchicine, respectively) through a Ca(2+)-mediated signaling pathway involving phospholipase C, calmodulin and heterotrimeric G proteins. Colchicine's effects were not due to microtubule depolymerization as other microtubule-depolymerizing agents did not have these effects. Finally normal morphogenesis and stalk and spore cell differentiation of cells treated with 10 mM colchicine were rescued through chelation of Ca2+ by BAPTA-AM and EDTA and calmodulin antagonism by W-7 but not PLC inhibition by U-73122. Morphogenesis or spore cell differentiation of cells treated with 50 mM colchicine could not be rescued by the above treatments but terminal stalk cell differentiation was inhibited by BAPTA-AM, EDTA and W-7, but not U-73122. Thus colchicine disrupts morphogenesis and induces stalk cell differentiation through a Ca(2+)-mediated signaling pathway involving specific changes in gene expression and cell motility. Copyright © 2011 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B

  10. Ancestral patterning of tergite formation in a centipede suggests derived mode of trunk segmentation in trilobites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ortega-Hernández

    Full Text Available Trilobites have a rich and abundant fossil record, but little is known about the intrinsic mechanisms that orchestrate their body organization. To date, there is disagreement regarding the correspondence, or lack thereof, of the segmental units that constitute the trilobite trunk and their associated exoskeletal elements. The phylogenetic position of trilobites within total-group Euarthropoda, however, allows inferences about the underlying organization in these extinct taxa to be made, as some of the fundamental genetic processes for constructing the trunk segments are remarkably conserved among living arthropods. One example is the expression of the segment polarity gene engrailed, which at embryonic and early postembryonic stages is expressed in extant panarthropods (i.e. tardigrades, onychophorans, euarthropods as transverse stripes that define the posteriormost region of each trunk segment. Due to its conservative morphology and allegedly primitive trunk tagmosis, we have utilized the centipede Strigamia maritima to study the correspondence between the expression of engrailed during late embryonic to postembryonic stages, and the development of the dorsal exoskeletal plates (i.e. tergites. The results corroborate the close correlation between the formation of the tergite borders and the dorsal expression of engrailed, and suggest that this association represents a symplesiomorphy within Euarthropoda. This correspondence between the genetic and phenetic levels enables making accurate inferences about the dorsoventral expression domains of engrailed in the trunk of exceptionally preserved trilobites and their close relatives, and is suggestive of the widespread occurrence of a distinct type of genetic segmental mismatch in these extinct arthropods. The metameric organization of the digestive tract in trilobites provides further support to this new interpretation. The wider evolutionary implications of these findings suggest the presence of a

  11. Cross-correlation patterns in social opinion formation with sequential data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Anindya S.

    2016-11-01

    Recent research on large-scale internet data suggests existence of patterns in the collective behavior of billions of people even though each of them may pursue own activities. In this paper, we interpret online rating activity as a process of forming social opinion about individual items, where people sequentially choose a rating based on the current information set comprising all previous ratings and own preferences. We construct an opinion index from the sequence of ratings and we show that (1) movie-specific opinion converges much slower than an independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) sequence of ratings, (2) rating sequence for individual movies shows lesser variation compared to an i.i.d. sequence of ratings, (3) the probability density function of the asymptotic opinions has more spread than that defined over opinion arising from i.i.d. sequence of ratings, (4) opinion sequences across movies are correlated with significantly higher and lower correlation compared to opinion constructed from i.i.d. sequence of ratings, creating a bimodal cross-correlation structure. By decomposing the temporal correlation structures from panel data of movie ratings, we show that the social effects are very prominent whereas group effects cannot be differentiated from those of surrogate data and individual effects are quite small. The former explains a large part of extreme positive or negative correlations between sequences of opinions. In general, this method can be applied to any rating data to extract social or group-specific effects in correlation structures. We conclude that in this particular case, social effects are important in opinion formation process.

  12. Turing pattern dynamics and adaptive discretization for a superdiffusive Lotka-Volterra system

    OpenAIRE

    Bendahmane , Mostafa; Ruiz-Baier , Ricardo; Tian , Canrong

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We focus our attention on the effects of introducing the fractional-in-space operator into a Lotka-Volterra competitive model describing population superdiffusion. First, we address the weak solvability of the coupled problem employing the Faedo-Galerkin method and compactness arguments. In addition, we are interested in how cross superdiffusion influences the formation of spatial patterns: a linear stability analysis has been carried out, showing that cross superdiffu...

  13. Statistical analysis of dimer formation in supersaturated metal vapor based on molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenchenko, Anna E.; Vorontsov, Alexander G.; Gelchinski, Boris R.; Sannikov, Grigorii P.

    2018-04-01

    We discuss the problem of dimer formation during the homogeneous nucleation of atomic metal vapor in an inert gas environment. We simulated nucleation with molecular dynamics and carried out the statistical analysis of double- and triple-atomic collisions as the two ways of long-lived diatomic complex formation. Close pair of atoms with lifetime greater than the mean time interval between atom-atom collisions is called a long-lived diatomic complex. We found that double- and triple-atomic collisions gave approximately the same probabilities of long-lived diatomic complex formation, but internal energy of the resulted state was essentially lower in the second case. Some diatomic complexes formed in three-particle collisions are stable enough to be a critical nucleus.

  14. Dynamics of C2 formation in laser-produced carbon plasma in helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Polek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the role of helium ambient gas on the dynamics of C 2 species formation in laser-produced carbon plasma. The plasma was produced by focusing 1064 nm pulses from an Nd:YAG laser onto a carbon target. The emission from the C 2 species was studied using optical emission spectroscopy, and spectrally resolved and integrated fast imaging. Our results indicate that the formation of C 2 in the plasma plume is strongly affected by the pressure of the He gas. In vacuum, the C 2 emission zone was located near the target and C 2 intensity oscillations were observed both in axial and radial directions with increasing the He pressure. The oscillations in C 2 intensity at higher pressures in the expanding plume could be caused by various formation zones of carbon dimers.

  15. Hg-Xe exciplex formation in mixed Xe/Ar matrices: molecular dynamics and luminescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada-García, Rolando; Rojas-Lorenzo, Germán; Crépin, Claudine; Ryan, Maryanne; McCaffrey, John G

    2015-03-19

    Luminescence of Hg((3)P1) atoms trapped in mixed Ar/Xe matrices containing a small amount of Xe is reported. Broad emission bands, strongly red-shifted from absorption are recorded which are assigned to strong complexes formed between the excited mercury Hg* and xenon atoms. Molecular dynamics calculations are performed on simulated Xe/Ar samples doped with Hg to follow the behavior of Hg* in the mixed rare gas matrices leading to exciplex formation. The role of Xe atoms in the first solvation shell (SS1) around Hg was investigated in detail, revealing the formation of two kinds of triatomic exciplexes; namely, Xe-Hg*-Xe and Ar-Hg*-Xe. The first species exists only when two xenon atoms are present in SS1 with specific geometries allowing the formation of a linear or quasi-linear exciplex. In the other geometries, or in the presence of only one Xe in SS1, a linear Ar-Hg*-Xe exciplex is formed. The two kinds of exciplexes have different emission bands, the most red-shifted being that involving two Xe atoms, whose emission is very close to that observed in pure Xe matrices. Simulations give a direct access to the analysis of the experimental absorption, emission, and excitation spectra, together with the dynamics of exciplexes formation.

  16. Eco-innovation Dynamics and Green Economic Change: the role of sectoral-specific patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maj Munch; Faria, Lourenco

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the features of Green Economic Change process at the meso-level, the greening of industries. We posit that, as for “traditional” innovations, it is possible to identify sectoral eco-innovation patterns and that these represent key but neglected factors in the dynamics...... of green economic evolution. . The paper represents early speculative conceptual work. We have posited that, as for “general” innovations, it is possible to identify sectoral eco-innovation patterns and that these represent key but neglected factors in the dynamics of green economic chance. The paper...... identifies seven specific characteristics of eco-innovation which form the basis for identifying 4 core hypothesis which may explain sectoral heterogeneity and identify likely sectoral eco-innovation leaders....

  17. Synoptic thermodynamic and dynamic patterns associated with Quitandinha River flooding events in Petropolis, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fabricio Polifke; Justi da Silva, Maria Gertrudes Alvarez; Rotunno Filho, Otto Corrêa; Pires, Gisele Dornelles; Sampaio, Rafael João; de Araújo, Afonso Augusto Magalhães

    2018-05-01

    Natural disasters are the result of extreme or intense natural phenomena that cause severe impacts on society. These impacts can be mitigated through preventive measures that can be aided by better knowledge of extreme phenomena and monitoring of forecasting and alert systems. The city of Petropolis (in a mountainous region of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) is prone to heavy rain events, often leading to River overflows, landslides, and loss of life. In that context, this work endeavored to characterize the thermodynamic and dynamic synoptic patterns that trigger heavy rainfall episodes and the corresponding flooding of Quitandinha River. More specifically, we reviewed events from the time period between January 2013 and December 2014 using reanalysis data. We expect that the overall description obtained of synoptic patterns should provide adequate qualitative aid to the decision-making processes involved in operational forecasting procedures. We noticed that flooding events were related to the presence of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ), frontal systems (FS), and convective storms (CS). These systems showed a similar behavior on high-frequency wind components, notably with respect to northwest winds before precipitation and to a strong southwest wind component during rainfall events. Clustering analyses indicated that the main component for precipitation formation with regard to CS systems comes from daytime heating, with the dynamic component presenting greater efficiency for the FS configurations. The SACZ events were influenced by moisture availability along the vertical column of the atmosphere and also due to dynamic components of precipitation efficiency and daytime heating, the latter related to the continuous transport of moisture from the Amazon region and South Atlantic Ocean towards Rio de Janeiro state.

  18. Spontaneous formation and dynamics of half-skyrmions in a chiral liquid-crystal film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nych, Andriy; Fukuda, Jun-Ichi; Ognysta, Uliana; Žumer, Slobodan; Muševič, Igor

    2017-12-01

    Skyrmions are coreless vortex-like excitations emerging in diverse condensed-matter systems, and real-time observation of their dynamics is still challenging. Here we report the first direct optical observation of the spontaneous formation of half-skyrmions. In a thin film of a chiral liquid crystal, depending on experimental conditions including film thickness, they form a hexagonal lattice whose lattice constant is a few hundred nanometres, or appear as isolated entities with topological defects compensating their charge. These half-skyrmions exhibit intriguing dynamical behaviour driven by thermal fluctuations. Numerical calculations of real-space images successfully corroborate the experimental observations despite the challenge because of the characteristic scale of the structures close to the optical resolution limit. A thin film of a chiral liquid crystal thus offers an intriguing platform that facilitates a direct investigation of the dynamics of topological excitations such as half-skyrmions and their manipulation with optical techniques.

  19. Dynamical barrier for the formation of solitary waves in discrete lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevrekidis, P.G.; Espinola-Rocha, J.A.; Drossinos, Y.; Stefanov, A.

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of the existence of a dynamical barrier of 'mass' that needs to be excited on a lattice site to lead to the formation and subsequent persistence of localized modes for a nonlinear Schroedinger lattice. We contrast the existence of a dynamical barrier with its absence in the static theory of localized modes in one spatial dimension. We suggest an energetic criterion that provides a sufficient, but not necessary, condition on the amplitude of a single-site initial condition required to form a solitary wave. We show that this effect is not one-dimensional by considering its two-dimensional analog. The existence of a sufficient condition for the excitation of localized modes in the non-integrable, discrete, nonlinear Schroedinger equation is compared to the dynamics of excitations in the integrable, both discrete and continuum, version of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation

  20. Dynamical barrier for the formation of solitary waves in discrete lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevrekidis, P.G. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)], E-mail: kevrekid@math.umass.edu; Espinola-Rocha, J.A. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Drossinos, Y. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy); School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Stefanov, A. [Department of Mathematics, University of Kansas, 1460 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence, KS 66045-7523 (United States)

    2008-03-24

    We consider the problem of the existence of a dynamical barrier of 'mass' that needs to be excited on a lattice site to lead to the formation and subsequent persistence of localized modes for a nonlinear Schroedinger lattice. We contrast the existence of a dynamical barrier with its absence in the static theory of localized modes in one spatial dimension. We suggest an energetic criterion that provides a sufficient, but not necessary, condition on the amplitude of a single-site initial condition required to form a solitary wave. We show that this effect is not one-dimensional by considering its two-dimensional analog. The existence of a sufficient condition for the excitation of localized modes in the non-integrable, discrete, nonlinear Schroedinger equation is compared to the dynamics of excitations in the integrable, both discrete and continuum, version of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation.

  1. Molecular dynamics and density functional simulations of tungsten nanostructure formation by helium plasma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.M.; Takayama, A.; Oda, Y.

    2014-10-01

    For the purposes of long-term use of tungsten diverter walls, it is necessary to suppress the surface deterioration due to the helium ash which induces the formations of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures. In the present paper, the formation mechanisms of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures were explained by the four-step process which is composed of the penetration process, the diffusion and agglomeration process, the helium bubble growth process and the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure formation process. The first to third step processes of the four-step process were investigated by using binary collision approximation, density functional theory and molecular dynamics, respectively. Furthermore, newly developed molecular dynamics and Monte-Carlo hybrid simulation has successfully reproduced the early formation process of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure. From these simulations, we here suggest the following key mechanisms of the formations of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures: (1) By comparison between helium, neon, argon and hydrogen, the noble gas atoms can agglomerate limitlessly not only at a vacancy but also at an interstitial site. In particular, at the low incident energy, only helium atoms bring about the nucleation for helium bubble. (2) In the helium bubble growth process, the strain of the tungsten material around a helium atom is released as a dislocation loop, which is regarded as the loop punching phenomenon. (3) In the tungsten nanostructure formation process, the bursting of a helium bubble forms cavity and convexity in the surface. The helium bubbles tend to be grown and to burst at the cavity region, and then the difference of height between the cavity and convexity on the surface are enhanced. Consequently, the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure is formed. (author)

  2. Exploring Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Cellular Automata for Pattern Recognition in Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Gisele Helena Barboni; Machicao, Jeaneth; Bruno, Odemir Martinez

    2016-11-01

    Network science is an interdisciplinary field which provides an integrative approach for the study of complex systems. In recent years, network modeling has been used for the study of emergent phenomena in many real-world applications. Pattern recognition in networks has been drawing attention to the importance of network characterization, which may lead to understanding the topological properties that are related to the network model. In this paper, the Life-Like Network Automata (LLNA) method is introduced, which was designed for pattern recognition in networks. LLNA uses the network topology as a tessellation of Cellular Automata (CA), whose dynamics produces a spatio-temporal pattern used to extract the feature vector for network characterization. The method was evaluated using synthetic and real-world networks. In the latter, three pattern recognition applications were used: (i) identifying organisms from distinct domains of life through their metabolic networks, (ii) identifying online social networks and (iii) classifying stomata distribution patterns varying according to different lighting conditions. LLNA was compared to structural measurements and surpasses them in real-world applications, achieving improvement in the classification rate as high as 23%, 4% and 7% respectively. Therefore, the proposed method is a good choice for pattern recognition applications using networks and demonstrates potential for general applicability.

  3. Characterizing Dynamic Walking Patterns and Detecting Falls with Wearable Sensors Using Gaussian Process Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taehwan Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available By incorporating a growing number of sensors and adopting machine learning technologies, wearable devices have recently become a prominent health care application domain. Among the related research topics in this field, one of the most important issues is detecting falls while walking. Since such falls may lead to serious injuries, automatically and promptly detecting them during daily use of smartphones and/or smart watches is a particular need. In this paper, we investigate the use of Gaussian process (GP methods for characterizing dynamic walking patterns and detecting falls while walking with built-in wearable sensors in smartphones and/or smartwatches. For the task of characterizing dynamic walking patterns in a low-dimensional latent feature space, we propose a novel approach called auto-encoded Gaussian process dynamical model, in which we combine a GP-based state space modeling method with a nonlinear dimensionality reduction method in a unique manner. The Gaussian process methods are fit for this task because one of the most import strengths of the Gaussian process methods is its capability of handling uncertainty in the model parameters. Also for detecting falls while walking, we propose to recycle the latent samples generated in training the auto-encoded Gaussian process dynamical model for GP-based novelty detection, which can lead to an efficient and seamless solution to the detection task. Experimental results show that the combined use of these GP-based methods can yield promising results for characterizing dynamic walking patterns and detecting falls while walking with the wearable sensors.

  4. Data-Driven Engineering of Social Dynamics: Pattern Matching and Profit Maximization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huan-Kai; Lee, Hao-Chih; Pan, Jia-Yu; Marculescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we define a new problem related to social media, namely, the data-driven engineering of social dynamics. More precisely, given a set of observations from the past, we aim at finding the best short-term intervention that can lead to predefined long-term outcomes. Toward this end, we propose a general formulation that covers two useful engineering tasks as special cases, namely, pattern matching and profit maximization. By incorporating a deep learning model, we derive a solution using convex relaxation and quadratic-programming transformation. Moreover, we propose a data-driven evaluation method in place of the expensive field experiments. Using a Twitter dataset, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our dynamics engineering approach for both pattern matching and profit maximization, and study the multifaceted interplay among several important factors of dynamics engineering, such as solution validity, pattern-matching accuracy, and intervention cost. Finally, the method we propose is general enough to work with multi-dimensional time series, so it can potentially be used in many other applications.

  5. Pathological manifestation of difference in washout pattern of adrenal hyperplasia on dynamic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishie, Akihiro; Asayama, Yoshiki; Ishigami, Kousei

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the washout pattern and constituent cell in adrenal hyperplasia (AH) has not been fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the radiological or pathological factors determining the washout pattern of AH on dynamic CT. Ten patients with 14 surgically proven AHs were enrolled. Dynamic CT was scanned before (pre-contrast image) and 60 seconds (early phase) and 240 seconds (delayed phase) after administration of iodine contrast. The absolute percentage washout (APW) of each nodular lesion was calculated using the following formula: APW(%)=(TAearly-TAdelay) / (TAearly-TApre)×100, when TApre, TAearly and TAdelay were defined as tumour attenuation values of pre-contrast, early and delayed phases, respectively. Pathologically, the clear cell ratio (CCR) constituting each nodular lesion was qualitatively assessed. Regression analysis was performed to evaluate a correlation between each pair of CCR, TApre, (TAearly-TAdelay) and APW. There was a significant correlation between each pair of CCR, TApre and APW. CCR decreased as TApre increased (r=0.81, P<0.001). APW increased as CCR decreased r=0.80, P<0.001) or as TApre increased (r=0.74, P<0.01). The key factors of washout pattern of AH on dynamic CT were CCR and TApre. The difference in constituent cell was associated with variability in APW of AH.

  6. Data-Driven Engineering of Social Dynamics: Pattern Matching and Profit Maximization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Kai Peng

    Full Text Available In this paper, we define a new problem related to social media, namely, the data-driven engineering of social dynamics. More precisely, given a set of observations from the past, we aim at finding the best short-term intervention that can lead to predefined long-term outcomes. Toward this end, we propose a general formulation that covers two useful engineering tasks as special cases, namely, pattern matching and profit maximization. By incorporating a deep learning model, we derive a solution using convex relaxation and quadratic-programming transformation. Moreover, we propose a data-driven evaluation method in place of the expensive field experiments. Using a Twitter dataset, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our dynamics engineering approach for both pattern matching and profit maximization, and study the multifaceted interplay among several important factors of dynamics engineering, such as solution validity, pattern-matching accuracy, and intervention cost. Finally, the method we propose is general enough to work with multi-dimensional time series, so it can potentially be used in many other applications.

  7. Data-Driven Engineering of Social Dynamics: Pattern Matching and Profit Maximization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huan-Kai; Lee, Hao-Chih; Pan, Jia-Yu; Marculescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we define a new problem related to social media, namely, the data-driven engineering of social dynamics. More precisely, given a set of observations from the past, we aim at finding the best short-term intervention that can lead to predefined long-term outcomes. Toward this end, we propose a general formulation that covers two useful engineering tasks as special cases, namely, pattern matching and profit maximization. By incorporating a deep learning model, we derive a solution using convex relaxation and quadratic-programming transformation. Moreover, we propose a data-driven evaluation method in place of the expensive field experiments. Using a Twitter dataset, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our dynamics engineering approach for both pattern matching and profit maximization, and study the multifaceted interplay among several important factors of dynamics engineering, such as solution validity, pattern-matching accuracy, and intervention cost. Finally, the method we propose is general enough to work with multi-dimensional time series, so it can potentially be used in many other applications. PMID:26771830

  8. Stimulation of Changes, Collective Commitment and The Patterns of Group Formation in Community Development in South Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Syafiuddin

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to examine the pattern of group formation, related to the stimulation of change through the empowerment of farmers and poor fishermen The pattern of group formation is the basis for sustainable development. The research method used is qualitative descriptive method and relevant research type such as case study and triangulasi. The results of the study showed that (1) stimulation of changes made through development programs or community empowerment in the areas studied both among farm households and poor fishermen households for some programs received positive response from farmers and fishermen. However, the collective commitment to the breeding is relatively weak, since the group formed in each program is not done through good planning and concepts. (2) there are two patterns of group formation that are natural and formed formations initiated by outsiders. Groups that are naturally formed are more institutionalized and have characteristics such as intense and relatively routine interaction, strong mutual trust, and have a common form or mechanism shared for common purposes. The group can form the basis for sustainable development in improving the welfare of the poor.

  9. Chronnectome fingerprinting: Identifying individuals and predicting higher cognitive functions using dynamic brain connectivity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Liao, Xuhong; Xia, Mingrui; He, Yong

    2018-02-01

    The human brain is a large, interacting dynamic network, and its architecture of coupling among brain regions varies across time (termed the "chronnectome"). However, very little is known about whether and how the dynamic properties of the chronnectome can characterize individual uniqueness, such as identifying individuals as a "fingerprint" of the brain. Here, we employed multiband resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from the Human Connectome Project (N = 105) and a sliding time-window dynamic network analysis approach to systematically examine individual time-varying properties of the chronnectome. We revealed stable and remarkable individual variability in three dynamic characteristics of brain connectivity (i.e., strength, stability, and variability), which was mainly distributed in three higher order cognitive systems (i.e., default mode, dorsal attention, and fronto-parietal) and in two primary systems (i.e., visual and sensorimotor). Intriguingly, the spatial patterns of these dynamic characteristics of brain connectivity could successfully identify individuals with high accuracy and could further significantly predict individual higher cognitive performance (e.g., fluid intelligence and executive function), which was primarily contributed by the higher order cognitive systems. Together, our findings highlight that the chronnectome captures inherent functional dynamics of individual brain networks and provides implications for individualized characterization of health and disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Bursty communication patterns facilitate spreading in a threshold-based epidemic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Masuda, Naoki; Holme, Petter

    2013-01-01

    Records of social interactions provide us with new sources of data for understanding how interaction patterns affect collective dynamics. Such human activity patterns are often bursty, i.e., they consist of short periods of intense activity followed by long periods of silence. This burstiness has been shown to affect spreading phenomena; it accelerates epidemic spreading in some cases and slows it down in other cases. We investigate a model of history-dependent contagion. In our model, repeated interactions between susceptible and infected individuals in a short period of time is needed for a susceptible individual to contract infection. We carry out numerical simulations on real temporal network data to find that bursty activity patterns facilitate epidemic spreading in our model.

  11. Short-range dynamics and prediction of mesoscale flow patterns in the MISTRAL field experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.O.; Kaufmann, P.; Talkner, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    In a limited area of about 50 km by 50 km with complex topography, wind measurements on a dense network were performed during the MISTRAL field experiment in 1991-1992. From these data the characteristic wind fields were identified by an automated classification method. The dynamics of the resulting twelve typical regional flow patterns is studied. It is discussed how transitions between the flow patterns take place and how well the transition probabilities can be described in the framework of a Markov model. Guided by this discussion, a variety of prediction models were tested which allow a short-term forecast of the flow pattern type. It is found that a prediction model which uses forecast information from the synoptic scale has the best forecast skill. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs.

  12. Bursty communication patterns facilitate spreading in a threshold-based epidemic dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Takaguchi

    Full Text Available Records of social interactions provide us with new sources of data for understanding how interaction patterns affect collective dynamics. Such human activity patterns are often bursty, i.e., they consist of short periods of intense activity followed by long periods of silence. This burstiness has been shown to affect spreading phenomena; it accelerates epidemic spreading in some cases and slows it down in other cases. We investigate a model of history-dependent contagion. In our model, repeated interactions between susceptible and infected individuals in a short period of time is needed for a susceptible individual to contract infection. We carry out numerical simulations on real temporal network data to find that bursty activity patterns facilitate epidemic spreading in our model.

  13. Enhancement pattern of small hepatic hemangioma: findings on multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung In; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Jae Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae

    1999-01-01

    To compare the enhancement characteristics of small hemangiomas seen on multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MR imaging. Thirteen patients with 20 hepatic hemangiomas less than 25mm in diameter underwent both multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MR imaging. All lesions were assigned to one of three classified into 3 categories according to the enhancement pattern seen on multiphase spiral CT : typical delayed pooling, atypical early enhancement, or continuous low attenuation. The enhancement patterns seen on spiral CT and on dynamic MRI were correlated. On CT scans, ten lesions (50%) showed delayed pooling. Six (30%) showed early arterial enhancement and four (20%) showed continuous low attenuation. On delayed-phase MRI, all lesions showed delayed high signal intensity compared to adjacent liver parenchyma. Four of six lesions with early enhancement on CT showed peripheral globular enhancement on early arterial-phase MRI. On multiphase spiral CT scans, small hemangiomas can show variable atypical enhancement features. In this situation, contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI is helpful for the diagnosis of hemangiomas

  14. Linking dynamic patterns of neural activity in orbitofrontal cortex with decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Erin L; Stoll, Frederic M; Rudebeck, Peter H

    2018-04-01

    Humans and animals demonstrate extraordinary flexibility in choice behavior, particularly when deciding based on subjective preferences. We evaluate options on different scales, deliberate, and often change our minds. Little is known about the neural mechanisms that underlie these dynamic aspects of decision-making, although neural activity in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) likely plays a central role. Recent evidence from studies in macaques shows that attention modulates value responses in OFC, and that ensembles of OFC neurons dynamically signal different options during choices. When contexts change, these ensembles flexibly remap to encode the new task. Determining how these dynamic patterns emerge and relate to choices will inform models of decision-making and OFC function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pattern formation and control of spatiotemporal chaos in a reaction diffusion prey–predator system supplying additional food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorai, Santu; Poria, Swarup

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal dynamics of a predator–prey system in presence of spatial diffusion is investigated in presence of additional food exists for predators. Conditions for stability of Hopf as well as Turing patterns in a spatial domain are determined by making use of the linear stability analysis. Impact of additional food is clear from these conditions. Numerical simulation results are presented in order to validate the analytical findings. Finally numerical simulations are carried out around the steady state under zero flux boundary conditions. With the help of numerical simulations, the different types of spatial patterns (including stationary spatial pattern, oscillatory pattern, and spatiotemporal chaos) are identified in this diffusive predator–prey system in presence of additional food, depending on the quantity, quality of the additional food and the spatial domain and other parameters of the model. The key observation is that spatiotemporal chaos can be controlled supplying suitable additional food to predator. These investigations may be useful to understand complex spatiotemporal dynamics of population dynamical models in presence of additional food.

  16. Multifunctional surfaces with biomimetic nanofibres and drug-eluting micro-patterns for infection control and bone tissue formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XN Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available For long-term orthopaedic implants, the creation of a surface that is repulsive to bacteria while adhesive to tissue cells represents a promising strategy to control infection. To obtain such multifunctional surfaces, two possible approaches were explored to incorporate a model antibiotic, rifampicin (Rf, into the osteogenic polycaprolactone (PCL/chitosan (CHS biomimetic nanofibre meshes by (1 blending Rf into the electrospinning solutions and then electrospinning into nanofibres (i.e., Rf-incorporating fibres, or (2 depositing Rf-containing poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA micro-patterns onto the PCL/chitosan nanofibre meshes via ink-jet printing (i.e., Rf-eluting micro-pattern/fibre. Rapid release of Rf from both meshes was measured even though a relatively slower release rate was obtained from the Rf-eluting micro-pattern ones. Antibacterial assay with Staphylococcus epidermidis showed that both mesh surfaces could effectively kill bacteria and prevent biofilm formation. However, only Rf-eluting micro-pattern meshes favoured the attachment, spreading and metabolic activity of preosteoblasts in the cell culture study. Furthermore, the Rf-eluting micro-pattern meshes could better support the osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblasts by up-regulating the gene expression of bone markers (type I collagen and alkaline phosphatase. Clearly, compared to Rf-incorporating nanofibre meshes, Rf-eluting micro-patterns could effectively prevent biofilm formation without sacrificing the osteogenic properties of PCL/chitosan nanofibre surfaces. This finding provides an innovative avenue to design multifunctional surfaces for enhancing bone tissue formation while controlling infection.

  17. Finite element simulation of dynamic wetting flows as an interface formation process

    KAUST Repository

    Sprittles, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    A mathematically challenging model of dynamic wetting as a process of interface formation has been, for the first time, fully incorporated into a numerical code based on the finite element method and applied, as a test case, to the problem of capillary rise. The motivation for this work comes from the fact that, as discovered experimentally more than a decade ago, the key variable in dynamic wetting flows - the dynamic contact angle - depends not just on the velocity of the three-phase contact line but on the entire flow field/geometry. Hence, to describe this effect, it becomes necessary to use the mathematical model that has this dependence as its integral part. A new physical effect, termed the \\'hydrodynamic resist to dynamic wetting\\', is discovered where the influence of the capillary\\'s radius on the dynamic contact angle, and hence on the global flow, is computed. The capabilities of the numerical framework are then demonstrated by comparing the results to experiments on the unsteady capillary rise, where excellent agreement is obtained. Practical recommendations on the spatial resolution required by the numerical scheme for a given set of non-dimensional similarity parameters are provided, and a comparison to asymptotic results available in limiting cases confirms that the code is converging to the correct solution. The appendix gives a user-friendly step-by-step guide specifying the entire implementation and allowing the reader to easily reproduce all presented results, including the benchmark calculations. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Nonequilibrium transition and pattern formation in a linear reaction-diffusion system with self-regulated kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shibashis; Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2018-02-01

    We consider a reaction-diffusion system with linear, stochastic activator-inhibitor kinetics where the time evolution of concentration of a species at any spatial location depends on the relative average concentration of its neighbors. This self-regulating nature of kinetics brings in spatial correlation between the activator and the inhibitor. An interplay of this correlation in kinetics and disparity of diffusivities of the two species leads to symmetry breaking non-equilibrium transition resulting in stationary pattern formation. The role of initial noise strength and the linear reaction terms has been analyzed for pattern selection.

  19. Merging constitutional and motional covalent dynamics in reversible imine formation and exchange processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaříček, Petr; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-06-06

    The formation and exchange processes of imines of salicylaldehyde, pyridine-2-carboxaldehyde, and benzaldehyde have been studied, showing that the former has features of particular interest for dynamic covalent chemistry, displaying high efficiency and fast rates. The monoimines formed with aliphatic α,ω-diamines display an internal exchange process of self-transimination type, inducing a local motion of either "stepping-in-place" or "single-step" type by bond interchange, whose rate decreases rapidly with the distance of the terminal amino groups. Control of the speed of the process over a wide range may be achieved by substituents, solvent composition, and temperature. These monoimines also undergo intermolecular exchange, thus merging motional and constitutional covalent behavior within the same molecule. With polyamines, the monoimines formed execute internal motions that have been characterized by extensive one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and EXSY proton NMR studies. In particular, with linear polyamines, nondirectional displacement occurs by shifting of the aldehyde residue along the polyamine chain serving as molecular track. Imines thus behave as simple prototypes of systems displaying relative motions of molecular moieties, a subject of high current interest in the investigation of synthetic and biological molecular motors. The motional processes described are of dynamic covalent nature and take place without change in molecular constitution. They thus represent a category of dynamic covalent motions, resulting from reversible covalent bond formation and dissociation. They extend dynamic covalent chemistry into the area of molecular motions. A major further step will be to achieve control of directionality. The results reported here for imines open wide perspectives, together with other chemical groups, for the implementation of such features in multifunctional molecules toward the design of molecular devices presenting a complex combination of

  20. Cloud fluid models of gas dynamics and star formation in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck-Marcell, Curtis; Scalo, John M.; Appleton, P. N.

    1987-01-01

    The large dynamic range of star formation in galaxies, and the apparently complex environmental influences involved in triggering or suppressing star formation, challenges the understanding. The key to this understanding may be the detailed study of simple physical models for the dominant nonlinear interactions in interstellar cloud systems. One such model is described, a generalized Oort model cloud fluid, and two simple applications of it are explored. The first of these is the relaxation of an isolated volume of cloud fluid following a disturbance. Though very idealized, this closed box study suggests a physical mechanism for starbursts, which is based on the approximate commensurability of massive cloud lifetimes and cloud collisional growth times. The second application is to the modeling of colliding ring galaxies. In this case, the driving processes operating on a dynamical timescale interact with the local cloud processes operating on the above timescale. The results is a variety of interesting nonequilibrium behaviors, including spatial variations of star formation that do not depend monotonically on gas density.

  1. Resolving the HONO formation mechanism in the ionosphere via ab initio molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rongxing; Li, Lei; Zhong, Jie; Zhu, Chongqin; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-04-26

    Solar emission produces copious nitrosonium ions (NO(+)) in the D layer of the ionosphere, 60 to 90 km above the Earth's surface. NO(+) is believed to transfer its charge to water clusters in that region, leading to the formation of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) and protonated water cluster. The dynamics of this reaction at the ionospheric temperature (200-220 K) and the associated mechanistic details are largely unknown. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations and transition-state search, key structures of the water hydrates-tetrahydrate NO(+)(H2O)4 and pentahydrate NO(+)(H2O)5-are identified and shown to be responsible for HONO formation in the ionosphere. The critical tetrahydrate NO(+)(H2O)4 exhibits a chain-like structure through which all of the lowest-energy isomers must go. However, most lowest-energy isomers of pentahydrate NO(+)(H2O)5 can be converted to the HONO-containing product, encountering very low barriers, via a chain-like or a three-armed, star-like structure. Although these structures are not the global minima, at 220 K, most lowest-energy NO(+)(H2O)4 and NO(+)(H2O)5 isomers tend to channel through these highly populated isomers toward HONO formation.

  2. Propagation dynamics and X-pulse formation in phase-mismatched second-harmonic generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiulis, G.; Jukna, V.; Jedrkiewicz, O.; Clerici, M.; Rubino, E.; DiTrapani, P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concerns the theoretical, numerical, and experimental study of the second-harmonic-generation (SHG) process under conditions of phase and group-velocity mismatch and aims to demonstrate the dimensionality transition of the SHG process caused by the change of the fundamental wave diameter. We show that SHG from a narrow fundamental beam leads to the spontaneous self-phase-matching process with, in addition, the appearance of angular dispersion for the off-axis frequency components generated. The angular dispersion sustains the formation of the short X pulse in the second harmonic (SH) and is recognized as three-dimensional (3D) dynamics. On the contrary, the large-diameter fundamental beam reduces the number of the degrees of freedom, does not allow the generation of the angular dispersion, and maintains the so-called one-dimensional (1D) SHG dynamics, where the self-phase-matching appears just for axial components and is accompanied by the shrinking of the SH temporal bandwidth, and sustains a long SH pulse formation. The transition from long SH pulse generation typical of the 1D dynamics to the short 3D X pulse is illustrated numerically and experimentally by changing the conditions from the self-defocusing to the self-focusing regime by simply tuning the phase mismatch. The numerical and experimental verification of the analytical results are also presented.

  3. Community helping services: dynamic of formation and expressiveness of the cultural care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landim, Fátima Luna Pinheiro

    2006-01-01

    Community helping services is an expression used by the social movements to designate families that live in shacks installed in a public area intended for building of own house at a community helping system. Studies in ethnonursing that aimed: in order to detail dynamic configuration in a community helping service. It took place in an community helping area located in the outskirts of Fortaleza, Ceará. The community members acting as general informants from the local culture, while eight (8) women heads-of-families, working as key informers. The data collect used the Observation-Participation-Reflection Model. The analyses were processing by the time that the dates were collected, considering the categories: inserting in the community helping culture to obtain their history; community helping is not a slum -describing the formation dynamic. Established that the formation dynamic of the community helping go on the own house representation as a symbol of " a better life". To assimilate such expression introducing in own cultural universe is a challenge for the nursing to assist a care culture congruent.

  4. More Than Filaments and Cores: Statistical Study of Structure Formation and Dynamics in Nearby Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, How-Huan; Goodman, Alyssa

    2018-01-01

    In the past decade, multiple attempts at understanding the connection between filaments and star forming cores have been made using observations across the entire epectrum. However, the filaments and the cores are usually treated as predefined--and well-defined--entities, instead of structures that often come at different sizes, shapes, with substantially different dynamics, and inter-connected at different scales. In my dissertation, I present an array of studies using different statistical methods, including the dendrogram and the probability distribution function (PDF), of structures at different size scales within nearby molecular clouds. These structures are identified using observations of different density tracers, and where possible, in the multi-dimensional parameter space of key dynamic properties--the LSR velocity, the velocity dispersion, and the column density. The goal is to give an overview of structure formation in nearby star-forming clouds, as well as of the dynamics in these structures. I find that the overall statistical properties of a larger structure is often the summation/superposition of sub-structures within, and that there could be significant variations due to local physical processes. I also find that the star formation process within molecular clouds could in fact take place in a non-monolithic manner, connecting potentially merging and/or transient structures, at different scales.

  5. Nanoscale E-Cadherin ligand patterns show threshold size for cellular adhesion and adherence junction formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Stine H; Pedersen, Gitte Albinus; Nejsum, Lene Niemann

    2012-01-01

    The role of ligand spatial distribution on the formation of cadherin mediated cell-cell contacts is studied utilizing nanopatterns of E-cadherin ligands. Protein patches ranging in size from 100 nm to 800 nm prepared by colloidal lithography critically influence adhesion, spreading and formation ...

  6. Laser-induced superhydrophobic grid patterns on PDMS for droplet arrays formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farshchian, Bahador [Ingram School of Engineering, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Gatabi, Javad R. [Materials Science, Engineering and Commercialization, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Bernick, Steven M.; Park, Sooyeon [Ingram School of Engineering, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Lee, Gwan-Hyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Droopad, Ravindranath [Ingram School of Engineering, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Materials Science, Engineering and Commercialization, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States); Kim, Namwon, E-mail: n_k43@txstate.edu [Ingram School of Engineering, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Superhydrophobic grid patterns were processed on the surface of PDMS using a pulsed nanosecond laser. • Droplet arrays form instantly on the laser-patterned PDMS with the superhydrophobic grid pattern when the PDMS sample is simply immersed in and withdrawn from water. • Droplet size can be controlled by controlling the pitch size of superhydrophobic grid and the withdrawal speed. - Abstract: We demonstrate a facile single step laser treatment process to render a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface superhydrophobic. By synchronizing a pulsed nanosecond laser source with a motorized stage, superhydrophobic grid patterns were written on the surface of PDMS. Hierarchical micro and nanostructures were formed in the irradiated areas while non-irradiated areas were covered by nanostructures due to deposition of ablated particles. Arrays of droplets form spontaneously on the laser-patterned PDMS with superhydrophobic grid pattern when the PDMS sample is simply immersed in and withdrawn from water due to different wetting properties of the irradiated and non-irradiated areas. The effects of withdrawal speed and pitch size of superhydrophobic grid on the size of formed droplets were investigated experimentally. The droplet size increases initially with increasing the withdrawal speed and then does not change significantly beyond certain points. Moreover, larger droplets are formed by increasing the pitch size of the superhydrophobic grid. The droplet arrays formed on the laser-patterned PDMS with wettability contrast can be used potentially for patterning of particles, chemicals, and bio-molecules and also for cell screening applications.

  7. Pattern formation in urbanism : A critical reflection on urban morphology, planning and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Çaliskan, O.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is all about urban patterns, what we see through the windows of the plane with an admiration of their relief-like scenery covering the land surface. In a sense, the spatial pattern within our cities is the biggest collectively produced artifact of human beings. It is both the originator

  8. Pattern formation under residual compressive stress in free sustained aluminum films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Senjiang; Ye Quanlin; Zhang Yongju; Cai Pinggen; Xu Xiaojun; Chen Jiangxing; Ye Gaoxiang

    2005-01-01

    A nearly free sustained aluminum (Al) film system has been successfully fabricated by vapor phase deposition of Al atoms on silicone oil surfaces and an unusual type of ordered patterns at the micrometer scale has been systematically studied. The ordered patterns are composed of a large number of parallel key-shaped domains and possess a sandwiched structure. The nucleation and growth of the patterns are very susceptible to the growth period, deposition rate, nominal film thickness and location of the film. The experiment shows that the ordered patterns are induced by the residual compressive stress in the film owing to contraction of the liquid surface after deposition. The appearance of these stress relief patterns generally represents the stress distribution in the nearly free sustained Al films, which mainly results from the characteristic boundary condition and the nearly zero adhesion of the solid-liquid interface

  9. Dynamic temperature dependence patterns in future energy demand models in the context of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hekkenberg, M.; Moll, H.C.; Uiterkamp, A.J.M. Schoot

    2009-01-01

    Energy demand depends on outdoor temperature in a 'u' shaped fashion. Various studies have used this temperature dependence to investigate the effects of climate change on energy demand. Such studies contain implicit or explicit assumptions to describe expected socio-economic changes that may affect future energy demand. This paper critically analyzes these implicit or explicit assumptions and their possible effect on the studies' outcomes. First we analyze the interaction between the socio-economic structure and the temperature dependence pattern (TDP) of energy demand. We find that socio-economic changes may alter the TDP in various ways. Next we investigate how current studies manage these dynamics in socio-economic structure. We find that many studies systematically misrepresent the possible effect of socio-economic changes on the TDP of energy demand. Finally, we assess the consequences of these misrepresentations in an energy demand model based on temperature dependence and climate scenarios. Our model results indicate that expected socio-economic dynamics generally lead to an underestimation of future energy demand in models that misrepresent such dynamics. We conclude that future energy demand models should improve the incorporation of socio-economic dynamics. We propose dynamically modeling several key parameters and using direct meteorological data instead of degree days. (author)

  10. Learning about Locomotion Patterns from Visualizations: Effects of Presentation Format and Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Birgit; Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The rapid development of computer graphics technology has made possible an easy integration of dynamic visualizations into computer-based learning environments. This study examines the relative effectiveness of dynamic visualizations, compared either to sequentially or simultaneously presented static visualizations. Moreover, the degree of realism…

  11. Hedgehog signaling is required for formation of the notochord sheath and patterning of nuclei pulposi within the intervertebral discs

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kyung-Suk; Harfe, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    The vertebrae notochord is a transient rod-like structure that produces secreted factors that are responsible for patterning surrounding tissues. During later mouse embryogenesis, the notochord gives rise to the middle part of the intervertebral disc, called the nucleus pulposus. Currently, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for forming the intervertebral discs. Here we demonstrate that hedgehog signaling is required for formation of the intervertebral discs. Remo...

  12. [Dynamic evolution of landscape spatial pattern in Taihu Lake basin, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Xie, Xiao Ping; Chen, Zhi Cong

    2017-11-01

    Based on the land-use satellite image datasets of 2000, 2010 and 2015, the landscape index, dynamic change model, landscape transfer matrix and CLUE-S model were integrated to analyze the dynamic evolution of the landscape spatial pattern of Taihu Lake basin. The results showed that the landscape type of the basin was dominated by cultivated land and construction land, and the degree of landscape fragmentation was strengthened from 2000 to 2015, and the distribution showed a uniform trend. From the point of transfer dynamic change, the cultivated land and construction land changed significantly, which was reduced by 6761 km 2 (2.1%) and increased by 6615.33 km 2 (8.4%), respectively. From the landscape transfer, it could be seen that the main change direction of the cultivated land reduction was the construction land, and the cultivated land with 7866.30 km 2 was converted into construction land, accounting for 91.6% of the cultivated land change, and the contribution to the construction land was 96.5%. The trend of dynamic changes of cultivated and construction land in the counties and cities was the same as that of the whole Taihu Lake basin. For Shanghai Central Urban, as well as Pudong District, Lin'an City, Baoshan District, Minhang District, Jiading District and Changzhou City, the area of the cultivated land and construction land changed more prominently. However, compared with the CLUE-S model for the landscape pattern change in 2030, the change of cultivated and construction lands would be the largest in the natural development scenario. Under the ecological protection scenario, the area of grassland would increase and the dynamic degree would reach 54.5%. Under the situation of cultivated land protection, the conversion of cultivated land to construction land would be decreased.

  13. Reversible formation of aminals: a new strategy to control the release of bioactive volatiles from dynamic mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Guillaume; Levrand, Barbara; Trachsel, Alain; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Herrmann, Andreas

    2010-05-14

    Dynamic mixtures generated by reversible aminal formation of fragrance aldehydes with N,N-dibenzyl alkyldiamines in aqueous systems were found to be suitable delivery systems for the controlled release of bioactive volatiles.

  14. Evidence for Dynamically Driven Formation of the GW170817 Neutron Star Binary in NGC 4993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmese, A.; et al.

    2017-11-09

    We present a study of NGC 4993, the host galaxy of the GW170817 gravitational wave event, the GRB170817A short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) and the AT2017gfo kilonova. We use Dark Energy Camera imaging, AAT spectra and publicly available data, relating our findings to binary neutron star (BNS) formation scenarios and merger delay timescales. NGC4993 is a nearby (40 Mpc) early-type galaxy, with $i$-band S\\'ersic index $n=4.0$ and low asymmetry ($A=0.04\\pm 0.01$). These properties are unusual for sGRB hosts. However, NGC4993 presents shell-like structures and dust lanes indicative of a recent galaxy merger, with the optical transient located close to a shell. We constrain the star formation history (SFH) of the galaxy assuming that the galaxy merger produced a star formation burst, but find little to no on-going star formation in either spatially-resolved broadband SED or spectral fitting. We use the best-fit SFH to estimate the BNS merger rate in this type of galaxy, as $R_{NSM}^{gal}= 5.7^{+0.57}_{-3.3} \\times 10^{-6} {\\rm yr}^{-1}$. If star formation is the only considered BNS formation scenario, the expected number of BNS mergers from early-type galaxies detectable with LIGO during its first two observing seasons is $0.038^{+0.004}_{-0.022}$, as opposed to $\\sim 0.5$ from all galaxy types. Hypothesizing that the binary system formed due to dynamical interactions during the galaxy merger, the subsequent time elapsed can constrain the delay time of the BNS coalescence. By using velocity dispersion estimates and the position of the shells, we find that the galaxy merger occurred $t_{\\rm mer}\\lesssim 200~{\\rm Myr}$ prior to the BNS coalescence.

  15. Dynamics of Hippocampal Protein Expression During Long-term Spatial Memory Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovok, Natalia; Nesher, Elimelech; Levin, Yishai; Reichenstein, Michal; Pinhasov, Albert

    2016-01-01

    trafficking, enhancement of metabolic activity, and Wnt signaling pathway during the steep phase of memory formation; and (3) cytoskeleton organization proteins. Taken together, this study clearly demonstrates dynamic assembly and disassembly of protein-protein interaction networks depending on the stage of memory formation engrams. PMID:26598641

  16. Dynamics of Hippocampal Protein Expression During Long-term Spatial Memory Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovok, Natalia; Nesher, Elimelech; Levin, Yishai; Reichenstein, Michal; Pinhasov, Albert; Michaelevski, Izhak

    2016-02-01

    trafficking, enhancement of metabolic activity, and Wnt signaling pathway during the steep phase of memory formation; and (3) cytoskeleton organization proteins. Taken together, this study clearly demonstrates dynamic assembly and disassembly of protein-protein interaction networks depending on the stage of memory formation engrams. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Evidence for Dynamically Driven Formation of the GW170817 Neutron Star Binary in NGC 4993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmese, A.; Hartley, W.; Tarsitano, F.; Conselice, C.; Lahav, O.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Lin, H.; Soares-Santos, M.; Tucker, D.; Brout, D.; Banerji, M.; Bechtol, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Fruchter, A.; García-Bellido, J.; Herner, K.; Levan, A. J.; Li, T. S.; Lidman, C.; Misra, K.; Sako, M.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, M.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Krause, E.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, R. G.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Schindler, R.; Smith, R. C.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.

    2017-11-01

    We present a study of NGC 4993, the host galaxy of the GW170817 gravitational-wave event, the GRB 170817A short gamma-ray burst (sGRB), and the AT 2017gfo kilonova. We use Dark Energy Camera imaging, AAT spectra, and publicly available data, relating our findings to binary neutron star (BNS) formation scenarios and merger delay timescales. NGC 4993 is a nearby early-type galaxy, with an I-band Sérsic index n = 4.0 and low asymmetry (A = 0.04 ± 0.01). These properties are unusual for sGRB hosts. However, NGC 4993 presents shell-like structures and dust lanes indicative of a recent galaxy merger, with the optical transient located close to a shell. We constrain the star formation history (SFH) of the galaxy assuming that the galaxy merger produced a star formation burst, but find little to no ongoing star formation in either spatially resolved broadband SED or spectral fitting. We use the best-fit SFH to estimate the BNS merger rate in this type of galaxy, as {R}{NSM}{gal}={5.7}-3.3+0.57× {10}-6{{yr}}-1. If star formation is the only considered BNS formation scenario, the expected number of BNS mergers from early-type galaxies detectable with LIGO during its first two observing seasons is {0.038}-0.022+0.004, as opposed to ˜0.5 from all galaxy types. Hypothesizing that the binary formed due to dynamical interactions during the galaxy merger, the subsequent time elapsed can constrain the delay time of the BNS coalescence. By using velocity dispersion estimates and the position of the shells, we find that the galaxy merger occurred t mer ≲ 200 Myr prior to the BNS coalescence.

  18. Role of the temperature dynamics in formation of nanopatterns upon single femtosecond laser pulses on gold

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gurevich, E.L.; Levy, Yoann; Gurevich, S.V.; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 5 (2017), s. 1-12, č. článku 054305. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1602; GA MŠk LM2015086; GA MŠk EF15_003/0000445 Grant - others:OP VVV - BIATRI(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_003/0000445 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : periodic surface-structures * pattern-formation * ablation * metals * irradiation * spallation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  19. Predictive modeling of multicellular structure formation by using Cellular Particle Dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Matthew; Shafiee, Ashkan; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2014-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is an effective computational method for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multicellular systems. A typical example is the fusion of spheroidal bioink particles during post bioprinting structure formation. In CPD cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short-range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through integration of their equations of motion. CPD was successfully applied to describe and predict the fusion of 3D tissue construct involving identical spherical aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that CPD can also predict tissue formation involving uneven spherical aggregates whose volumes decrease during the fusion process. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  20. UAV formation control design with obstacle avoidance in dynamic three-dimensional environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai; Xia, Yuanqing; Huang, Kaoli

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the artificial potential field method combined with rotational vectors for a general problem of multi-unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) systems tracking a moving target in dynamic three-dimensional environment. An attractive potential field is generated between the leader and the target. It drives the leader to track the target based on the relative position of them. The other UAVs in the formation are controlled to follow the leader by the attractive control force. The repulsive force affects among the UAVs to avoid collisions and distribute the UAVs evenly on the spherical surface whose center is the leader-UAV. Specific orders or positions of the UAVs are not required. The trajectories of avoidance obstacle can be obtained through two kinds of potential field with rotation vectors. Every UAV can choose the optimal trajectory to avoid the obstacle and reconfigure the formation after passing the obstacle. Simulations study on UAV are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed method.

  1. Dynamical prediction and pattern mapping in short-term load forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, Luis Antonio; Rodrigues, Daniela D.; Lima, Silvio T. [Departamento de Engenharia Eletronica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Martinez, Carlos Barreira [Departamento de Engenharia Hidraulica e Recursos Hidricos, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    This work will not put forward yet another scheme for short-term load forecasting but rather will provide evidences that may improve our understanding about fundamental issues which underlay load forecasting problems. In particular, load forecasting will be decomposed into two main problems, namely dynamical prediction and pattern mapping. It is argued that whereas the latter is essentially static and becomes nonlinear when weekly features in the data are taken into account, the former might not be deterministic at all. In such cases there is no determinism (serial correlations) in the data apart from the average cycle and the best a model can do is to perform pattern mapping. Moreover, when there is determinism in addition to the average cycle, the underlying dynamics are sometimes linear, in which case there is no need to resort to nonlinear models to perform dynamical prediction. Such conclusions were confirmed using real load data and surrogate data analysis. In a sense, the paper details and organizes some general beliefs found in the literature on load forecasting. This sheds some light on real model-building and forecasting problems and helps understand some apparently conflicting results reported in the literature. (author)

  2. Patterns of horse-rider coordination during endurance race: a dynamical system approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Viry

    Full Text Available In riding, most biomechanical studies have focused on the description of the horse locomotion in unridden condition. In this study, we draw the prospect of how the basic principles established in inter-personal coordination by the theory of Coordination Dynamics may provide a conceptual and methodological framework for understanding the horse-rider coupling. The recent development of mobile technologies allows combined horse and rider recordings during long lasting natural events such as endurance races. Six international horse-rider dyads were thus recorded during a 120 km race by using two tri-axial accelerometers placed on the horses and riders, respectively. The analysis concentrated on their combined vertical displacements. The obtained shapes and angles of Lissajous plots together with values of relative phase between horse and rider displacements at lower reversal point allowed us to characterize four coordination patterns, reflecting the use of two riding techniques per horse's gait (trot and canter. The present study shows that the concepts, methods and tools of self-organizing dynamic system approach offer new directions for understanding horse-rider coordination. The identification of the horse-rider coupling patterns constitutes a firm basis to further study the coalition of multiple constraints that determine their emergence and their dynamics in endurance race.

  3. Formation and Dynamics of Waves in a Cortical Model of Cholinergic Modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Roach

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is a regulator of neural excitability and one of the neurochemical substrates of sleep. Amongst the cellular effects induced by cholinergic modulation are a reduction in spike-frequency adaptation (SFA and a shift in the phase response curve (PRC. We demonstrate in a biophysical model how changes in neural excitability and network structure interact to create three distinct functional regimes: localized asynchronous, traveling asynchronous, and traveling synchronous. Our results qualitatively match those observed experimentally. Cortical activity during slow wave sleep (SWS differs from that during REM sleep or waking states. During SWS there are traveling patterns of activity in the cortex; in other states stationary patterns occur. Our model is a network composed of Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons with a M-current regulated by ACh. Regulation of ACh level can account for dynamical changes between functional regimes. Reduction of the magnitude of this current recreates the reduction in SFA the shift from a type 2 to a type 1 PRC observed in the presence of ACh. When SFA is minimal (in waking or REM sleep state, high ACh patterns of activity are localized and easily pinned by network inhomogeneities. When SFA is present (decreasing ACh, traveling waves of activity naturally arise. A further decrease in ACh leads to a high degree of synchrony within traveling waves. We also show that the level of ACh determines how sensitive network activity is to synaptic heterogeneity. These regimes may have a profound functional significance as stationary patterns may play a role in the proper encoding of external input as memory and traveling waves could lead to synaptic regularization, giving unique insights into the role and significance of ACh in determining patterns of cortical activity and functional differences arising from the patterns.

  4. A numerical study on the dynamics of droplet formation in a microfluidic double T-junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Ich-Long; Dang, Trung-Dung; Byon, Chan; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, droplet formations in microfluidic double T-junctions (MFDTD) are investigated based on a two-dimensional numerical model with volume of fluid method. Parametric ranges for generating alternating droplet formation (ADF) are identified. A physical background responsible for the ADF is suggested by analyzing the dynamical stability of flow system. Since the phase discrepancy between dispersed flows is mainly caused by non-symmetrical breaking of merging droplet, merging regime becomes the alternating regime at appropriate conditions. In addition, the effects of channel geometries on droplet formation are studied in terms of relative channel width. The predicted results show that the ADF region is shifted toward lower capillary numbers when channel width ratio is less than unity. The alternating droplet size increases with the increase of channel width ratio. When this ratio reaches unity, alternating droplets can be formed at very high water fraction (wf = 0.8). The droplet formation in MFDTD depends significantly on the viscosity ratio, and the droplet size in ADF decreases with the increase of the viscosity ratio. The understanding of underlying physics of the ADF phenomenon is useful for many applications, including nanoparticle synthesis with different concentrations, hydrogel bead generation, and cell transplantation in biomedical therapy.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of polyelectrolyte brushes under poor solvent conditions: origins of bundle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gui-Li; Merlitz, Holger; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2014-03-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are applied to investigate salt-free planar polyelectrolyte brushes under poor solvent conditions. Starting above the Θ-point with a homogeneous brush and then gradually reducing the temperature, the polymers initially display a lateral structure formation, forming vertical bundles of chains. A further reduction of the temperature (or solvent quality) leads to a vertical collapse of the brush. By varying the size and selectivity of the counterions, we show that lateral structure formation persists and therefore demonstrate that the entropy of counterions being the dominant factor for the formation of the bundle phase. By applying an external compression force on the brush we calculate the minimal work done on the polymer phase only and prove that the entropy gain of counterions in the bundle state, as compared to the homogeneously collapsed state at the same temperature, is responsible for the lateral microphase segregation. As a consequence, the observed lateral structure formation has to be regarded universal for osmotic polymer brushes below the Θ-point.

  6. Ion Dynamics at Shocks: Ion Reflection and Beam Formation at Quasi-perpendicular Shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucharek, Harald; Moebius, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    The physics of collisionless shocks is controlled by the ion dynamics. The generation of gyrating ions by reflection as well as the formation of field-aligned ion beams are essential parts of this dynamic. On the one hand reflection is most likely the first interaction of ions with the shock before they undergo the downstream thermalization process. On the other hand field-aligned ion beams, predominately found at the quasi-perpendicular bow shock, propagate into the distant foreshock region and may create wave activity. We revisit ion reflection, the source and basic production mechanism of field-aligned ion beams, by using multi-spacecraft measurements and contrast these observations with existing theories. Finally, we propose an alternative production mechanism

  7. Formation Dynamics of Potassium-Based Graphite Intercalation Compounds: An Ab Initio Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiankai; Song, Bo; Tománek, David

    2018-04-01

    This paper is a contribution to the Physical Review Applied collection in memory of Mildred S. Dresselhaus. We use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to study the microscopic dynamics of potassium intercalation in graphite. Upon adsorbing on graphite from the vapor phase, K atoms transfer their valence charge to the substrate. K atoms adsorbed on the surface diffuse rapidly along the graphene basal plane and eventually enter the interlayer region following a "U -turn" across the edge, gaining additional energy. This process is promoted at higher coverages associated with higher K pressure, leading to the formation of a stable intercalation compound. We find that the functionalization of graphene edges is an essential prerequisite for intercalation since bare edges reconstruct and reconnect, closing off the entry channels for the atoms.

  8. Deracemization of Axially Chiral Nicotinamides by Dynamic Salt Formation with Enantiopure Dibenzoyltartaric Acid (DBTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitoshi Yagishita

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic atroposelective resolution of chiral salts derived from oily racemic nicotinamides and enantiopure dibenzoyltartaric acid (DBTA was achieved by crystallization. The absolute structures of the axial chiral nicotinamides were determined by X-ray structural analysis. The chirality could be controlled by the selection of enantiopure DBTA as a chiral auxiliary. The axial chirality generated by dynamic salt formation was retained for a long period after dissolving the chiral salt in solution even after removal of the chiral acid. The rate of racemization of nicotinamides could be controlled based on the temperature and solvent properties, and that of the salts was prolonged compared to free nicotinamides, as the molecular structure of the pyridinium ion in the salts was different from that of acid-free nicotinamides.

  9. Global format for energy-momentum based time integration in nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2014-01-01

    A global format is developed for momentum and energy consistent time integration of second‐order dynamic systems with general nonlinear stiffness. The algorithm is formulated by integrating the state‐space equations of motion over the time increment. The internal force is first represented...... of mean value products at the element level or explicit use of a geometric stiffness matrix. An optional monotonic algorithmic damping, increasing with response frequency, is developed in terms of a single damping parameter. In the solution procedure, the velocity is eliminated and the nonlinear...

  10. Dynamics of seed magnetic island formation due to geometrically coupled perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.; LaHaye, R.J.

    1998-06-01

    Seed magnetic island formation due to a dynamically growing external source in toroidal confinement devices is modeled as an initial value forced reconnection problem. For an external source whose amplitude grows on a time scale quickly compared to the Sweet-Parker time of resistive magnetohydrodynamics, the induced reconnection is characterized by a current sheet and a reconnected flux amplitude which lags in time the source amplitude. This suggests that neoclassical tearing modes, whose excitation requires a seed magnetic island, are more difficult to cause in high Lundquist number plasmas

  11. Electroless formation of silver nanoaggregates: An experimental and molecular dynamics approach

    KAUST Repository

    Gentile, Francesco T.

    2014-02-20

    The ability to manipulate matter to create non-conventional structures is one of the key issues of material science. The understanding of assembling mechanism at the nanoscale allows us to engineer new nanomaterials, with physical properties intimately depending on their structure.This paper describes new strategies to obtain and characterise metal nanostructures via the combination of a top-down method, such as electron beam lithography, and a bottom-up technique, such as the chemical electroless deposition. We realised silver nanoparticle aggregates within well-defined patterned holes created by electron beam lithography on silicon substrates. The quality characteristics of the nanoaggregates were verified by using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging. Moreover, we compared the experimental findings to molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles growth. We observed a very high dependence of the structure characteristics on the pattern nanowell aspect ratio. We found that high-quality metal nanostructures may be obtained in patterns with well aspect ratio close to one, corresponding to a maximum diameter of 50 nm, a limit above which the fabricated structures become less regular and discontinuous. When regular shapes and sizes are necessary, as in nanophotonics, these results suggest the pattern characteristics to obtain isolated, uniform and reproducible metal nanospheres. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  12. Formation of precise 2D Au particle arrays via thermally induced dewetting on pre-patterned substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of precise 2D Au nanoparticle arrays over a large area is presented. The technique was based on pre-patterning of the substrate before the deposition of a thin Au film, and the creation of periodic particle arrays by subsequent dewetting induced by annealing. Two types of pre-patterned substrates were used: The first comprised an array of pyramidal pits and the second an array of circular holes. For the dewetting of Au films on the pyramidal pit substrate, the structural curvature-driven diffusion cooperates with capillarity-driven diffusion, resulting in the formation of precise 2D particle arrays for films within a structure dependent thickness-window. For the dewetting of Au films on the circular hole substrate, the periodic discontinuities in the films, induced by the deposition, can limit the diffusion paths and lead to the formation of one particle per individual separated region (holes or mesas between holes, and thus, result in the evolution of precise 2D particle arrays. The influence of the pre-patterned structures and the film thickness is analyzed and discussed. For both types of pre-patterned substrate, the Au film thickness had to be adjusted in a certain thickness-window in order to achieve the precise 2D particle arrays.

  13. Formation of precise 2D Au particle arrays via thermally induced dewetting on pre-patterned substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ran

    2011-01-01

    Summary The fabrication of precise 2D Au nanoparticle arrays over a large area is presented. The technique was based on pre-patterning of the substrate before the deposition of a thin Au film, and the creation of periodic particle arrays by subsequent dewetting induced by annealing. Two types of pre-patterned substrates were used: The first comprised an array of pyramidal pits and the second an array of circular holes. For the dewetting of Au films on the pyramidal pit substrate, the structural curvature-driven diffusion cooperates with capillarity-driven diffusion, resulting in the formation of precise 2D particle arrays for films within a structure dependent thickness-window. For the dewetting of Au films on the circular hole substrate, the periodic discontinuities in the films, induced by the deposition, can limit the diffusion paths and lead to the formation of one particle per individual separated region (holes or mesas between holes), and thus, result in the evolution of precise 2D particle arrays. The influence of the pre-patterned structures and the film thickness is analyzed and discussed. For both types of pre-patterned substrate, the Au film thickness had to be adjusted in a certain thickness-window in order to achieve the precise 2D particle arrays. PMID:21977445

  14. The structure, dynamics, and star formation rate of the Orion nebula cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues to the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, which is consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances, the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the interstellar medium density, which is estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor ∼1.8 to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within ∼5-8 free-fall times (t ff ). This implies a star formation efficiency per t ff of ε ff ∼ 0.04-0.07 (i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation).

  15. Non-equilibrium magnetic colloidal dispersions at liquid-air interfaces: dynamic patterns, magnetic order and self-assembled swimmers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snezhko, Alexey

    2011-01-01

    Colloidal dispersions of interacting particles subjected to an external periodic forcing often develop nontrivial self-assembled patterns and complex collective behavior. A fundamental issue is how collective ordering in such non-equilibrium systems arises from the dynamics of discrete interacting components. In addition, from a practical viewpoint, by working in regimes far from equilibrium new self-organized structures which are generally not available through equilibrium thermodynamics can be created. In this review spontaneous self-assembly phenomena in magnetic colloidal dispersions suspended at liquid-air interfaces and driven out of equilibrium by an alternating magnetic field are presented. Experiments reveal a new type of nontrivially ordered self-assembled structures emerging in such systems in a certain range of excitation parameters. These dynamic structures emerge as a result of the competition between magnetic and hydrodynamic forces and have complex unconventional magnetic ordering. Nontrivial self-induced hydrodynamic fields accompany each out-of-equilibrium pattern. Spontaneous symmetry breaking of the self-induced surface flows leading to a formation of self-propelled microstructures has been discovered. Some features of the self-localized structures can be understood in the framework of the amplitude equation (Ginzburg-Landau type equation) for parametric waves coupled to the conservation law equation describing the evolution of the magnetic particle density and the Navier-Stokes equation for hydrodynamic flows. To understand the fundamental microscopic mechanisms governing self-assembly processes in magnetic colloidal dispersions at liquid-air interfaces a first-principle model for a non-equilibrium self-assembly is presented. The latter model allows us to capture in detail the entire process of out-of-equilibrium self-assembly in the system and reproduces most of the observed phenomenology. (topical review)

  16. Dark energy with a gradient coupling to the dark matter fluid: cosmological dynamics and structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Jibitesh; Khyllep, Wompherdeiki; Tamanini, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    We consider scalar field models of dark energy interacting with dark matter through a coupling proportional to the contraction of the four-derivative of the scalar field with the four-velocity of the dark matter fluid. The coupling is realized at the Lagrangian level employing the formalism of Scalar-Fluid theories, which use a consistent Lagrangian approach for relativistic fluid to describe dark matter. This framework produces fully covariant field equations, from which we can derive unequivocal cosmological equations at both background and linear perturbations levels. The background evolution is analyzed in detail applying dynamical systems techniques, which allow us to find the complete asymptotic behavior of the universe given any set of model parameters and initial conditions. Furthermore we study linear cosmological perturbations investigating the growth of cosmic structures within the quasi-static approximation. We find that these interacting dark energy models give rise to interesting phenomenological dynamics, including late-time transitions from dark matter to dark energy domination, matter and accelerated scaling solutions and dynamical crossing of the phantom barrier. Moreover we obtain possible deviations from standard ΛCDM behavior at the linear perturbations level, which have an impact on the dynamics of structure formation and might provide characteristic observational signatures.

  17. Mediating Dynamic Supply Chain Formation by Collaborative Single Machine Earliness/Tardiness Agents in Supply Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, a trend of forming dynamic supply chains with different trading partners over different e-marketplaces has emerged. These supply chains, which are called “supply mesh,” generally refer to heterogeneous electronic marketplaces in which dynamic supply chains, as per project (often make-to-order, are formed across different parties. Conceptually, in a supply mesh a dynamic supply chain is formed vertically, mediating several companies for a project. Companies that are on the same level horizontally are either competitors or cohorts. A complex scenario such as this makes it challenging to find the right group of members for a dynamic supply chain. Earlier on, a multiagent model called the collaborative single machine earliness/tardiness (CSET model was proposed for the optimal formation of make-to-order supply chains. This paper contributes the particular agent designs, for enabling the mediation of CSET in a supply mesh, and the possibilities are discussed. It is demonstrated via a computer simulation, based on samples from the U.S. textile industry, that by using intelligent agents under the CSET model it is possible to automatically find an ideal group of trading partners from a supply mesh.

  18. The formation of continuous opinion dynamics based on a gambling mechanism and its sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yueying; Alexandre Wang, Qiuping; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2017-09-01

    The formation of continuous opinion dynamics is investigated based on a virtual gambling mechanism where agents fight for a limited resource. We propose a model with agents holding opinions between -1 and 1. Agents are segregated into two cliques according to the sign of their opinions. Local communication happens only when the opinion distance between corresponding agents is no larger than a pre-defined confidence threshold. Theoretical analysis regarding special cases provides a deep understanding of the roles of both the resource allocation parameter and confidence threshold in the formation of opinion dynamics. For a sparse network, the evolution of opinion dynamics is negligible in the region of low confidence threshold when the mindless agents are absent. Numerical results also imply that, in the presence of economic agents, high confidence threshold is required for apparent clustering of agents in opinion. Moreover, a consensus state is generated only when the following three conditions are satisfied simultaneously: mindless agents are absent, the resource is concentrated in one clique, and confidence threshold tends to a critical value(=1.25+2/ka ; k_a>8/3 , the average number of friends of individual agents). For fixed a confidence threshold and resource allocation parameter, the most chaotic steady state of the dynamics happens when the fraction of mindless agents is about 0.7. It is also demonstrated that economic agents are more likely to win at gambling, compared to mindless ones. Finally, the importance of three involved parameters in establishing the uncertainty of model response is quantified in terms of Latin hypercube sampling-based sensitivity analysis.

  19. Directed formation of micro- and nanoscale patterns of functional light-harvesting LH2 complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Nicholas P; Janusz, Stefan; Escalante-Marun, Maryana; Timney, John; Ducker, Robert E; Olsen, John D; Otto, Cees; Subramaniam, Vinod; Leggett, Graham J; Hunter, C Neil

    2007-11-28

    The precision placement of the desired protein components on a suitable substrate is an essential prelude to any hybrid "biochip" device, but a second and equally important condition must also be met: the retention of full biological activity. Here we demonstrate the selective binding of an optically active membrane protein, the light-harvesting LH2 complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, to patterned self-assembled monolayers at the micron scale and the fabrication of nanometer-scale patterns of these molecules using near-field photolithographic methods. In contrast to plasma proteins, which are reversibly adsorbed on many surfaces, the LH2 complex is readily patterned simply by spatial control of surface polarity. Near-field photolithography has yielded rows of light-harvesting complexes only 98 nm wide. Retention of the native optical properties of patterned LH2 molecules was demonstrated using in situ fluorescence emission spectroscopy.

  20. Module-based complexity formation: periodic patterning in feathers and hairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Yeh, Chao-Yuan; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall

    2013-01-01

    Patterns describe order which emerges from homogeneity. Complex patterns on the integument are striking because of their visibility throughout an organism’s lifespan. Periodic patterning is an effective design because the ensemble of hair or feather follicles (modules) allows the generation of complexity, including regional variations and cyclic regeneration, giving the skin appendages a new lease on life. Spatial patterns include the arrangements of feathers and hairs in specific number, size, and spacing.We explorehowa field of equivalent progenitor cells can generate periodically arranged modules based on genetic information, physical–chemical rules and developmental timing. Reconstitution experiments suggest a competitive equilibrium regulated by activators/inhibitors involving Turing reaction-diffusion. Temporal patterns result from oscillating stem cell activities within each module (microenvironment regulation), reflected as growth (anagen) and resting (telogen) phases during the cycling of feather and hair follicles. Stimulating modules with activators initiates the spread of regenerative hair waves, while global inhibitors outside each module (macroenvironment) prevent this. Different wave patterns can be simulated by cellular automata principles. Hormonal status and seasonal changes can modulate appendage phenotypes, leading to ‘organ metamorphosis’, with multiple ectodermal organ phenotypes generated from the same precursors. We discuss potential novel evolutionary steps using this module-based complexity in several amniote integument organs, exemplified by the spectacular peacock feather pattern. We thus explore the application of the acquired knowledge of patterning in tissue engineering. New hair follicles can be generated after wounding. Hairs and feathers can be reconstituted through self-organization of dissociated progenitor cells. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.