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Sample records for dynamic tumor bed

  1. The Tumor Macroenvironment: Cancer-Promoting Networks Beyond Tumor Beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Melanie R; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the macroenvironment and the primary tumor will enable the design of specific therapies that have the potential to prevent dissemination and metastatic spread. This chapter will summarize recent findings detailing how the primary tumor and systemic tumor macroenvironment coordinate malignant progression. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. THE TUMOR MACROENVIRONMENT: CANCER-PROMOTING NETWORKS BEYOND TUMOR BEDS

    OpenAIRE

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Puchalt, Alfredo Perales; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, and myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the mac...

  3. How dynamic are ice-stream beds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Damon; Bingham, Robert G.; King, Edward C.; Smith, Andrew M.; Brisbourne, Alex M.; Spagnolo, Matteo; Graham, Alastair G. C.; Hogg, Anna E.; Vaughan, David G.

    2018-05-01

    Projections of sea-level rise contributions from West Antarctica's dynamically thinning ice streams contain high uncertainty because some of the key processes involved are extremely challenging to observe. An especially poorly observed parameter is sub-decadal stability of ice-stream beds, which may be important for subglacial traction, till continuity and landform development. Only two previous studies have made repeated geophysical measurements of ice-stream beds at the same locations in different years, but both studies were limited in spatial extent. Here, we present the results from repeat radar measurements of the bed of Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica, conducted 3-6 years apart, along a cumulative ˜ 60 km of profiles. Analysis of the correlation of bed picks between repeat surveys shows that 90 % of the bed displays no significant change despite the glacier increasing in speed by up to 40 % over the last decade. We attribute the negligible detection of morphological change at the bed of Pine Island Glacier to the ubiquitous presence of a deforming till layer, wherein sediment transport is in steady state, such that sediment is transported along the basal interface without inducing morphological change to the radar-sounded basal interface. Given the precision of our measurements, the upper limit of subglacial erosion observed here is 500 mm a-1, far exceeding erosion rates reported for glacial settings from proglacial sediment yields, but substantially below subglacial erosion rates of 1.0 m a-1 previously reported from repeat geophysical surveys in West Antarctica.

  4. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  5. Dynamics of a shallow fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsimring, Lev S. [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0402 (United States); Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna [School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, (India); Sherman, Philip [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0402 (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The results of the experimental study of the dynamics of a shallow fluidized bed are reported. The behavior of granular material is controlled by the interplay of two factors--levitation due to the upward airflow, and sliding back due to gravity. Near the threshold of instability, the system shows critical behavior with remarkably long transient dynamics. The experimental observations are compared with a simple cellular automata model. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  6. Comparison of posterior fossa and tumor bed boost in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, A C; Saw, C B; Wen, B C

    2000-10-01

    To quantify the difference between the area of brain irradiated using the posterior fossa boost (PFB) and tumor bed boost (TBB) in medulloblastoma, we studied 15 simulation radiographs of patients treated in our institution from 1990 and 1999. The PFB was compared with the TBB, which was defined as the tumor bed plus 2-cm margin as demonstrated by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. The PFB field treated a mean area of 9.43 cm2 more brain than the TBB. In 3 patients (20%), the area of the brain in the TBB was larger than the PFB. In 11 patients (73.3%), the PFB field had more than 10% more brain than the TBB. The cochlea was in the PFB and TBB field in all patients. In more than two thirds of patients, the area of brain irradiated with the PFB was at least 10% greater than the TBB. Future studies are needed to determine whether the TBB can replace the PFB in patients with medulloblastoma.

  7. Inhibition of IL-17A suppresses enhanced-tumor growth in low dose pre-irradiated tumor beds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jung Lee

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation induces modification of the tumor microenvironment such as tumor surrounding region, which is relevant to treatment outcome after radiotherapy. In this study, the effects of pre-irradiated tumor beds on the growth of subsequently implanted tumors were investigated as well as underlying mechanism. The experimental model was set up by irradiating the right thighs of C3H/HeN mice with 5 Gy, followed by the implantation of HCa-I and MIH-2. Both implanted tumors in the pre-irradiated bed showed accelerated-growth compared to the control. Tumor-infiltrated lymphocyte (TIL levels were increased, as well as pro-tumor factors such as IL-6 and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1 in the pre-irradiated group. In particular, the role of pro-tumor cytokine interleukin-17A (IL-17A was investigated as a possible target mechanism because IL-6 and TGF-β are key factors in Th17 cells differentiation from naïve T cells. IL-17A expression was increased not only in tumors, but also in CD4+ T cells isolated from the tumor draining lymph nodes. The effect of IL-17A on tumor growth was confirmed by treating tumors with IL-17A antibody, which abolished the acceleration of tumor growth. These results indicate that the upregulation of IL-17A seems to be a key factor for enhancing tumor growth in pre-irradiated tumor beds.

  8. Definition of postlumpectomy tumor bed for radiotherapy boost field planning: CT versus surgical clips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Hadassah; Prosnitz, Robert G.; Olson, John A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the location and extent of the tumor bed as defined by surgical clips and computed tomography (CT) scans, after lumpectomy, for electron boost planning as part of breast radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Planning CT images of 31 operated breasts in 30 patients who underwent lumpectomy were reviewed. One or more clips were placed in the lumpectomy cavity. Serial CT images were used to measure the depth and transverse and longitudinal dimensions. The area and geometric center of the tumor bed were defined by the clips and CT. Results: The CT and clip measurements were identical for the maximal tumor depth in 27 of 30 patients. The CT bed extended beyond the clips by 0-7 mm medially in the transverse/longitudinal extent (multiclip patients). The median distance between the geometric centers in the coronal plane for the tumor bed center was larger for patients with single clips than for those with multiple clips (p 2 . The CT bed was more readily visible in patients with a shorter interval between surgery and radiotherapy. Conclusion: The maximal depth of the tumor bed was similar using the two methods. The extent and centers of the clip-and CT-determined beds differed significantly. This may indicate an underestimation of the tumor bed as defined by clips only and justifies integration of CT information in boost field planning

  9. Fixed-bed Reactor Dynamics and Control - A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, S. B.

    1986-01-01

    The industrial diversity of fixed bed reactors offers a challenging and relevant set of control problems. These intricate problems arise due to the rather complex dynamics of fixed bed reactors and to the complexity of actual reactor configurations. Many of these control problems are nonlinear...... and multi-variable. During the last decade fixed bed reactor control strategies have been proposed and investigated experimentally. This paper reviews research on these complex control problems with an emphasis upon solutions which have been demon-strated to work in the laboratory and hold promise...

  10. The Dynamics of Developmental and Tumor Angiogenesis—A Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Yi; Jakobsson, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The blood vasculature in cancers has been the subject of intense interest during the past four decades. Since the original ideas of targeting angiogenesis to treat cancer were proposed in the 1970s, it has become evident that more knowledge about the role of vessels in tumor biology is needed to fully take advantage of such strategies. The vasculature serves the surrounding tissue in a multitude of ways that all must be taken into consideration in therapeutic manipulation. Aspects of delivery of conventional cytostatic drugs, induction of hypoxia affecting treatment by radiotherapy, changes in tumor cell metabolism, vascular leak and trafficking of leukocytes are affected by interventions on vascular function. Many tumors constitute a highly interchangeable milieu undergoing proliferation, apoptosis, and necrosis with abundance of growth factors, enzymes and metabolites. These aspects are reflected by the abnormal tortuous, leaky vascular bed with detached mural cells (pericytes). The vascular bed of tumors is known to be unstable and undergoing remodeling, but it is not until recently that this has been dynamically demonstrated at high resolution, facilitated by technical advances in intravital microscopy. In this review we discuss developmental genetic loss-of-function experiments in the light of tumor angiogenesis. We find this a valid comparison since many studies phenocopy the vasculature in development and tumors

  11. The Dynamics of Developmental and Tumor Angiogenesis—A Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Yi; Jakobsson, Lars, E-mail: Lars.jakobsson@ki.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm SE-17177 (Sweden)

    2012-04-11

    The blood vasculature in cancers has been the subject of intense interest during the past four decades. Since the original ideas of targeting angiogenesis to treat cancer were proposed in the 1970s, it has become evident that more knowledge about the role of vessels in tumor biology is needed to fully take advantage of such strategies. The vasculature serves the surrounding tissue in a multitude of ways that all must be taken into consideration in therapeutic manipulation. Aspects of delivery of conventional cytostatic drugs, induction of hypoxia affecting treatment by radiotherapy, changes in tumor cell metabolism, vascular leak and trafficking of leukocytes are affected by interventions on vascular function. Many tumors constitute a highly interchangeable milieu undergoing proliferation, apoptosis, and necrosis with abundance of growth factors, enzymes and metabolites. These aspects are reflected by the abnormal tortuous, leaky vascular bed with detached mural cells (pericytes). The vascular bed of tumors is known to be unstable and undergoing remodeling, but it is not until recently that this has been dynamically demonstrated at high resolution, facilitated by technical advances in intravital microscopy. In this review we discuss developmental genetic loss-of-function experiments in the light of tumor angiogenesis. We find this a valid comparison since many studies phenocopy the vasculature in development and tumors.

  12. How to Boost the Breast Tumor Bed? A Multidisciplinary Approach in Eight Steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Servois, Vincent; Laki, Fatima; Pollet, Guillaume A.; Salmon, Remy; Thomas, Alexandra; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Campana, Francois M.D.; Fourquet, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a new procedure for breast radiotherapy that will improve tumor bed localization and radiotherapy treatment using a multidisciplinary approach. Patients and Methods: This pilot study was conducted by departments of radiation oncology, surgery, and radiology. A new procedure has been implemented, summarized as eight steps: from pre-surgery contrast CT to surgery, tumor bed planning target volume (PTV) determination, and finally breast and tumor bed irradiation. Results: Twenty patients presenting with T1N0M0 tumors were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent lumpectomy with the placement of surgical clips in the tumor bed region. During surgery, 1 to 5 clips were placed in the lumpectomy cavity before the plastic procedure. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative CT scans in the treatment position. The two sets of images were registered with a match-point registration. All volumes were contoured and the results evaluated. The PTV included the clips region, the gross tumor volume, and the surgical scar, with an overall margin of 5-10 mm in all directions, corresponding to localization and setup uncertainties. For each patient the boost PTV was discussed and compared with our standard forward-planned PTV. Conclusions: We demonstrate the feasibility of a tumor bed localization and treatment procedure that seems adaptable to routine practice. Our study shows the advantages of a multidisciplinary approach for tumor bed localization and treatment. The use of more than 1 clip associated with pre- to postoperative CT image registration allows better definition of the PTV boost volume

  13. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokkam, Ram [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics and control of a recycle fixed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. Primarily to describe the dynamic behaviour that can be observed in a fixed bed reactor with recycle of unconverted reactant. Secondly to describe the possibilities of model reduction in order to facilitate control design. Reactant recycle has been shown...... to introduce periodic solution to the fixed bed reactor, a phenomenon which is not seen for the system without the recycle, at least not within the Peclet number range investigated in the present work. The possibility of model reduction by the methods of modal decomposition, and by characteristics...

  15. Improving oncoplastic breast tumor bed localization for radiotherapy planning using image registration algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodzinski, Marek; Skalski, Andrzej; Ciepiela, Izabela; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Kedzierawski, Piotr; Gajda, Janusz

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about tumor bed localization and its shape analysis is a crucial factor for preventing irradiation of healthy tissues during supportive radiotherapy and as a result, cancer recurrence. The localization process is especially hard for tumors placed nearby soft tissues, which undergo complex, nonrigid deformations. Among them, breast cancer can be considered as the most representative example. A natural approach to improving tumor bed localization is the use of image registration algorithms. However, this involves two unusual aspects which are not common in typical medical image registration: the real deformation field is discontinuous, and there is no direct correspondence between the cancer and its bed in the source and the target 3D images respectively. The tumor no longer exists during radiotherapy planning. Therefore, a traditional evaluation approach based on known, smooth deformations and target registration error are not directly applicable. In this work, we propose alternative artificial deformations which model the tumor bed creation process. We perform a comprehensive evaluation of the most commonly used deformable registration algorithms: B-Splines free form deformations (B-Splines FFD), different variants of the Demons and TV-L1 optical flow. The evaluation procedure includes quantitative assessment of the dedicated artificial deformations, target registration error calculation, 3D contour propagation and medical experts visual judgment. The results demonstrate that the currently, practically applied image registration (rigid registration and B-Splines FFD) are not able to correctly reconstruct discontinuous deformation fields. We show that the symmetric Demons provide the most accurate soft tissues alignment in terms of the ability to reconstruct the deformation field, target registration error and relative tumor volume change, while B-Splines FFD and TV-L1 optical flow are not an appropriate choice for the breast tumor bed localization problem

  16. Modeling stationary and dynamic pebbles in a pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xiang; Montgomery, Trent; Zhang, Sijun

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the stationary and dynamic pebbles in a pebble bed reactor (PBR) by means of discrete element method (DEM). At first, the packing structure of stationary pebbles is simulated by filling process until the settling of pebbles into PBR. The packing structural properties are obtained and analyzed. Subsequently, when the outlet of PBR is open during the operational maintenance of PBR, the stationary pebbles start to flow downward and are removed at the bottom of PBR. The dynamic behavior of pebbles is predicted and discussed. Our results indicate the DEM can offer both macroscopic and microscopic information for PBR design calculations and safety assessment. (author)

  17. Dynamics and mechanics of bed-load tracer particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Phillips

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanics of bed load at the flood scale is necessary to link hydrology to landscape evolution. Here we report on observations of the transport of coarse sediment tracer particles in a cobble-bedded alluvial river and a step-pool bedrock tributary, at the individual flood and multi-annual timescales. Tracer particle data for each survey are composed of measured displacement lengths for individual particles, and the number of tagged particles mobilized. For single floods we find that measured tracer particle displacement lengths are exponentially distributed; the number of mobile particles increases linearly with peak flood Shields stress, indicating partial bed load transport for all observed floods; and modal displacement distances scale linearly with excess shear velocity. These findings provide quantitative field support for a recently proposed modeling framework based on momentum conservation at the grain scale. Tracer displacement is weakly negatively correlated with particle size at the individual flood scale; however cumulative travel distance begins to show a stronger inverse relation to grain size when measured over many transport events. The observed spatial sorting of tracers approaches that of the river bed, and is consistent with size-selective deposition models and laboratory experiments. Tracer displacement data for the bedrock and alluvial channels collapse onto a single curve – despite more than an order of magnitude difference in channel slope – when variations of critical Shields stress and flow resistance between the two are accounted for. Results show how bed load dynamics may be predicted from a record of river stage, providing a direct link between climate and sediment transport.

  18. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-11-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent/phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique.

  19. Domain of attraction computation for tumor dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doban, A.I.; Lazar, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose the use of rational Lyapunov functions to estimate the domain of attraction of the tumor dormancy equilibrium of immune cells-malignant cells interaction dynamics. A procedure for computing rational Lyapunov functions is worked out, with focus on obtaining a meaningful

  20. The impact of structural development on near bed flow dynamics in gravel bed rivers: coupling flume experiments with numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockelford, A.; Hardy, R. J.; Rice, S. P.; Powell, M.

    2017-12-01

    It is increasingly being recognised that gravel bed rivers develop a surface `texture' in response to changes in the flow and sediment regime. This textural response often takes the form of a bed structure which develops to ultimately stabilise the surface across a range of spatio-temporal scales and it is these topographical structures which determine the flow structures that develop over the river bed. However, our ability to measure and parameterise that structure in ways that are useful and meaningful for the prediction of flow dynamics, still remains inadequate; this paper uses a three dimensional numerical model to assess how the temporal development of structure influences the near bed flow dynamics. Using a suite of flume based experiments a unimodal grain size distribution (σg = 1.30, D50 = 8.8mm) was exposed to three different levels of constant bed shear that produced sediment transport conditions ranging from marginal transport to conditions approaching full mobility of all size fractions. Surface structuring characteristics were measured at a high spatio-temporal resolution such that the time evolution of the beds could be fully described. In total 54 surfaces were generated and run through a Reynolds averaged three dimensional numerical model with an Rng turbulence closure. The topography input included using an immersed boundary technique within a Cartesian framework. Discussion concentrates on the how the trajectory of structural evolution under the different treatments affects the near bed flow dynamics. Specifically links are made between how the scales of boundary topography influence the flow and discusses how the measured flow variability at any one point will contain both locally derived and upstream-inherited flow structures, according to the range of scales of bed topography present. Keywords: Graded, Sediment, Structure, Turbulence, Modelling

  1. Coarse-grained debris flow dynamics on erodible beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzoni, Stefano; Gregoretti, Carlo; Stancanelli, Laura Maria

    2017-03-01

    A systematic set of flume experiments is used to investigate the features of velocity profiles within the body of coarse-grained debris flows and the dependence of the transport sediment concentration on the relevant parameters (runoff discharge, bed slope, grain size, and form). The flows are generated in a 10 m long laboratory flume, initially filled with a layer consisting of loose debris. After saturation, a prescribed water discharge is suddenly supplied over the granular bed, and the runoff triggers a debris flow wave that reaches nearly steady conditions. Three types of material have been used in the tests: gravel with mean grain size of 3 and 5 mm, and 3 mm glass spheres. Measured parameters included: triggering water discharge, volumetric sediment discharge, sediment concentration, flow depth, and velocity profiles. The dynamic similarity with full-sized debris flows is discussed on the basis of the relevant dimensionless parameters. Concentration data highlight the dependence on the slope angle and the importance of the quasi-static friction angle. The effects of flow rheology on the shape of velocity profiles are analyzed with attention to the role of different stress-generating mechanisms. A remarkable collapse of the dimensionless profiles is obtained by scaling the debris flow velocity with the runoff velocity, and a power law characterization is proposed following a heuristic approach. The shape of the profiles suggests a smooth transition between the different rheological regimes (collisional and frictional) that establish in the upper and lower regions of the flow and is compatible with the presence of multiple length scales dictated by the type of contacts (instantaneous or long lasting) between grains.

  2. Characterization of the vascular bed of head-and neck advanced tumors by radioactive emboli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serson, D.

    1982-01-01

    A radioisotopic method, using labeled particles for the determination of regions irrigated by an artery is established. Patients with advanced head and neck cancer were studied, whose treatment was carried out with antiblastics by intra-arterial via. To check the vascular territory early reached by intra-arterial chemotherapy we used albumin macro-particles labeled with iodine 131. The method resulted harmless and of great importance for localization of the tumor bed. It was also observed that the method may be used for localization of the chemotherapic infusion in other sectors of the body or for the anatomic determination of the arterial vascularization. (Author) [pt

  3. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan

  4. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia amin.oroji@siswa.um.edu.my, mohd@um.edu.my (Malaysia); Yarahmadian, Shantia [Mathematics Department Mississippi State University, USA Syarahmadian@math.msstate.edu (United States)

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  5. Information dynamics in carcinogenesis and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatenby, Robert A; Frieden, B Roy

    2004-12-21

    The storage and transmission of information is vital to the function of normal and transformed cells. We use methods from information theory and Monte Carlo theory to analyze the role of information in carcinogenesis. Our analysis demonstrates that, during somatic evolution of the malignant phenotype, the accumulation of genomic mutations degrades intracellular information. However, the degradation is constrained by the Darwinian somatic ecology in which mutant clones proliferate only when the mutation confers a selective growth advantage. In that environment, genes that normally decrease cellular proliferation, such as tumor suppressor or differentiation genes, suffer maximum information degradation. Conversely, those that increase proliferation, such as oncogenes, are conserved or exhibit only gain of function mutations. These constraints shield most cellular populations from catastrophic mutator-induced loss of the transmembrane entropy gradient and, therefore, cell death. The dynamics of constrained information degradation during carcinogenesis cause the tumor genome to asymptotically approach a minimum information state that is manifested clinically as dedifferentiation and unconstrained proliferation. Extreme physical information (EPI) theory demonstrates that altered information flow from cancer cells to their environment will manifest in-vivo as power law tumor growth with an exponent of size 1.62. This prediction is based only on the assumption that tumor cells are at an absolute information minimum and are capable of "free field" growth that is, they are unconstrained by external biological parameters. The prediction agrees remarkably well with several studies demonstrating power law growth in small human breast cancers with an exponent of 1.72+/-0.24. This successful derivation of an analytic expression for cancer growth from EPI alone supports the conceptual model that carcinogenesis is a process of constrained information degradation and that malignant

  6. Tumor bed delineation for external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T. Jonathan; Tao, Randa; Elkhuizen, Paula H.M.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Li, Guang; Powell, Simon N.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been considered an alternative to whole breast irradiation for patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy. APBI delivers higher doses of radiation in fewer fractions to the post-lumpectomy tumor bed with a 1–2 cm margin, targeting the area at the highest risk of local recurrence while sparing normal breast tissue. However, there are inherent challenges in defining accurate target volumes for APBI. Studies have shown that significant interobserver variation exists among radiation oncologists defining the lumpectomy cavity, which raises the question of how to improve the accuracy and consistency in the delineation of tumor bed volumes. The combination of standardized guidelines and surgical clips significantly improves an observer’s ability in delineation, and it is the standard in multiple ongoing external-beam APBI trials. However, questions about the accuracy of the clips to mark the lumpectomy cavity remain, as clips only define a few points at the margin of the cavity. This paper reviews the techniques that have been developed so far to improve target delineation in APBI delivered by conformal external beam radiation therapy, including the use of standardized guidelines, surgical clips or fiducial markers, pre-operative computed tomography imaging, and additional imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Alternatives to post-operative APBI, future directions, and clinical recommendations were also discussed

  7. Determining tumor blood flow parameters from dynamic image measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libertini, Jessica M.

    2008-11-01

    Many recent cancer treatments focus on preventing angiogenesis, the process by which a tumor promotes the growth of large and efficient capillary beds for the increased nourishment required to support the tumor's rapid growth[l]. To measure the efficacy of these treatments in a timely fashion, there is an interest in using data from dynamic sequences of contrast-enhanced medical imaging, such as MRI and CT, to measure blood flow parameters such as perfusion, permeability-surface-area product, and the relative volumes of the plasma and extracellular-extravascular space. Starting with a two compartment model presented by the radiology community[2], this work challenges the application of a simplification to this problem, which was originally developed to model capillary reuptake[3]. While the primary result of this work is the demonstration of the inaccuracy of this simplification, the remainder of the paper is dedicated to presenting alternative methods for calculating the perfusion and plasma volume coefficients. These methods are applied to model data sets based on real patient data, and preliminary results are presented.

  8. Dynamic MRI study for breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Tsuneaki

    1990-01-01

    Application of MRI for diagnosis of breast tumors was retrospectively examined in 103 consecutive cases. Contrast enhancement, mostly by dynamic study, was performed in 83 cases using Gd-DTPA and 0.5 T superconductive apparatus. Results were compared to those of mammography and sonography. On dynamic study, carcinoma showed abrupt rise of signal intensity with clear-cut peak formation in early phase, while benign fibroadenoma showed slow rise of signal intensity and prolonged enhancement without peak formation. In 12 of 33 carcinomas (33%), peripheral ring enhancement was noted reflecting vascular stroma of histologic sections. All fibroadenomas showed homogenous enhancement without peripheral ring. In MRI, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 86%, 96%, 91%. In mammography 82%, 95%, 87% and in ultrasonography 91%, 95%, 93%. Although MRI should not be regarded as routine diagnostic procedure because of expense and limited availability, it may afford useful additional information when standard mammographic findings are not conclusive. (author)

  9. Modeling mussel bed influence on fine sediment dynamics on a Wadden Sea intertidal flat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Bas; Augustijn, Dionysius C.M.; van Wesenbeeck, Bregje K.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; de Vries, Mindert

    2008-01-01

    Mussel beds are coherent colonies of mussels and are widespread in the Dutch Wadden Sea and the Eastern Scheldt estuary. Mussel beds are known to be an important factor in biogeomorphological processes, primarily because of the influence on fine sediment dynamics. Ongoing research to explore the use

  10. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Dynamic transition between fixed- and mobile-bed: mathematical and numerical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugliani, Daniel; Pasqualini, Matteo; Rosatti, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Free-surface flows with high sediment transport (as debris flow or hyper-concentrated flow) are composed by a mixture of fluid and solid phase, usually water and sediment. When these flows propagate over loose beds, particles constituting the mixture of water and sediments strongly interact with the ones forming the bed, leading to erosion or deposition. However, there are lots of other situations when the mixture flows over rigid bedrocks or over artificially paved transects, so there is no mass exchange between bed and mixture. The two situations are usually referred to as, respectively, mobile- and fixed-bed conditions. From a mathematical point of view, the systems of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) that describe these flows derive from mass and momentum balance of both phases, but, the two resulting PDEs systems are different. The main difference concerns the concentration: in the mobile-bed condition, the concentration is linked to the local flow conditions by means of a suitable rheological relation, while in the fixed-bed case, the concentration is an unknown of the problem. It is quite common that a free surface flow with high sediment transport, in its path, encounters both conditions. In the recent work of Rosatti & Zugliani 2015, the mathematical and numerical description of the transition between fixed- and mobile-bed was successfully resolved, for the case of low sediment transport phenomena, by the introduction of a suitable erodibility variable and satisfactory results were obtained. The main disadvantage of the approach is related to the erodibility variable, that changes in space, based on bed characteristics, but remains constant in time. However, the nature of the bed can change dynamically as result of deposition over fixed bed or high erosion over mobile bed. With this work, we extend the applicability of the mentioned approach to the more complex PDEs describing the hyper-concentrated flow. Moreover, we introduce a strategy that allows

  12. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayer, F; Rahim, H B; Kogelnik, H D; Menzel, C; Merz, F; Deutschmann, H; Kranzinger, M

    1996-03-15

    To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern afterloading techniques offer possibilities of

  13. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlmayer, Felix; Rahim, Hassan B. K.; Kogelnik, H. Dieter; Menzel, Christian; Merz, Florian; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kranzinger, Manfred

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. Methods and Materials: During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Results: Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Conclusion: Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern

  14. Local and systemic tumor immune dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderling, Heiko

    Tumor-associated antigens, stress proteins, and danger-associated molecular patterns are endogenous immune adjuvants that can both initiate and continually stimulate an immune response against a tumor. In retaliation, tumors can hijack intrinsic immune regulatory programs that are intended to prevent autoimmune disease, thereby facilitating continued growth despite the activated antitumor immune response. In metastatic disease, this ongoing tumor-immune battle occurs at each site. Adding an additional layer of complexity, T cells activated at one tumor site can cycle through the blood circulation system and extravasate in a different anatomic location to surveil a distant metastasis. We propose a mathematical modeling framework that incorporates the trafficking of activated T cells between metastatic sites. We extend an ordinary differential equation model of tumor-immune system interactions to multiple metastatic sites. Immune cells are activated in response to tumor burden and tumor cell death, and are recruited from tumor sites elsewhere in the body. A model of T cell trafficking throughout the circulatory system can inform the tumor-immune interaction model about the systemic distribution and arrival of T cells at specific tumor sites. Model simulations suggest that metastases not only contribute to immune surveillance, but also that this contribution varies between metastatic sites. Such information may ultimately help harness the synergy of focal therapy with the immune system to control metastatic disease.

  15. The behavior of xenon dynamic adsorption on granular activated carbon packed bed adsorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chongyang Zhou; Shujuan Feng; Guoqing Zhou; Yuren Jin; Junfu Liang; Jingming Xu

    2011-01-01

    In order to retard radioxenon release into the atmosphere from nuclear power station or to sensitively monitor its concentration to ensure environmental and human safety, it is necessary to know the behavior of xenon dynamic adsorption on granular activated carbon pack bed adsorber. The quantities, including the dynamic adsorption coefficient (k d ), the amount of xenon adsorbed (q), the length of mass transfer zone (L MTZ ) and the length of the unused bed (LUB), used to describe the adsorption behavior, were sorted out and calculated. The factors, including xenon concentrations, pressures and temperatures, to affect these quantities were investigated. The results show that: (1) The values of k d and q decrease with increasing temperatures, but increase with increasing pressures, (2) The values of L MTZ and LUB increase with increasing temperatures or pressures, but are independent of concentrations. Knowledge of these quantities is very helpful for packed bed adsorber operation. (author)

  16. Dynamic behavior of a solid particle bed in a liquid pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping; Yasunaka, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Morita, Koji; Fukuda, Kenji; Yamano, Hidemasa; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic behavior of solid particle beds in a liquid pool against pressure transients was investigated to model the mobility of core materials in a postulated disrupted core of a liquid metal fast reactor. A series of experiments was performed with a particle bed of different bed heights, comprising different monotype solid particles, where variable initial pressures of the originally pressurized nitrogen gas were adopted as the pressure sources. Computational simulations of the experiments were performed using SIMMER-III, a fast reactor safety analysis code. Comparisons between simulated and experimental results show that the physical model for multiphase flows used in the SIMMER-III code can reasonably represent the transient behaviors of pool multiphase flows with rich solid phases, as observed in the current experiments. This demonstrates the basic validity of the SIMMER-III code on simulating the dynamic behaviors induced by pressure transients in a low-energy disrupted core of a liquid metal fast reactor with rich solid phases

  17. Numerical modeling of local scour around hydraulic structure in sandy beds by dynamic mesh method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fei; Liang, Bingchen; Bai, Yuchuan; Zhu, Zhixia; Zhu, Yanjun

    2017-10-01

    Local scour, a non-negligible factor in hydraulic engineering, endangers the safety of hydraulic structures. In this work, a numerical model for simulating local scour was constructed, based on the open source code computational fluid dynamics model OpenFOAM. We consider both the bedload and suspended load sediment transport in the scour model and adopt the dynamic mesh method to simulate the evolution of the bed elevation. We use the finite area method to project data between the three-dimensional flow model and the two-dimensional (2D) scour model. We also improved the 2D sand slide method and added it to the scour model to correct the bed bathymetry when the bed slope angle exceeds the angle of repose. Moreover, to validate our scour model, we conducted and compared the results of three experiments with those of the developed model. The validation results show that our developed model can reliably simulate local scour.

  18. Usefulness of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Yang Gu; Suh, Soo Jhi; Zeon, Seok Kil; Woo, Sung Ku; Kim, Hong; Kim, Jung Sik; Lee, Sung Moon; Lee, Hee Jung; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of dynamic MR imaging in the differential diagnosis of brain tumors. Dynamic MR imaging was performed in 43 patients with histopathologically proved brain tumors. Serial images were sequentially obtained every 30 seconds for 3-5 minutes with use of spin-echo technique(TR 200msec/TE 15msec) after rapid injection of Gd-DTPA in a dose of 0.1mmol/kg body weight. Dynamics of contrast enhancement of the brain tumors were analyzed visually and by the sequential contrast enhancement ratio(CER). On the dynamic MR imaging, contrast enhancement pattern of the gliomas showed gradual increase in signal intensity(SI) till 180 seconds and usually had a longer time to peak of the CER. The SI of metastatic brain tumors increased steeply till 30 seconds and then rapidly or gradually decreased and the tumors had a shorter time to peak of the CER. Meningiomas showed a rapid ascent in SI till 30 to 60 seconds and then made a plateau or slight descent of the CER. Lymphomas and germinomas showed relatively rapid increase of SI till 30 seconds and usually had a longer time peak of the CER. Dynamic MR imaging with Gd-DTPA may lead to further information about the brain tumors as the sequential contrast enhancement pattern and CER parameters seem to be helpful in discriminating among the brain tumors

  19. CT of portal vein tumor thrombosis. Usefulness of dynamic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Kazumasa; Inoue, Yuichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Nemoto, Yutaka; Nakamura, Kenji [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1983-08-01

    We evaluated CT findings of portal vein tumor thrombosis in 16 hepatomas by plain, contrast and dynamic CT. Plain and contrast CT findings were an enlargement of the portal vein (81%), intraluminal low density area (63%). Dynamic CT enhanced the diagnostic capability of the tumor thrombus as a relatively low density area because of the marked enhancement of the portal vein. In addition, dynamic CT newly demonstrated hyperdense peripheral ring (35%) and arterio portal shunt (35%). It is advisable to select the scan level to include the portal vein when dynamic CT is performed in the patient of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Dynamics of a small direct cycle pebble bed HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkerk, E.C.; Heek, A.I. van

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch market for combined generation of heat and power identifies a unit size of 40 MW thermal for the conceptual design of a nuclear cogeneration plant. The ACACIA system provides 14 MW(e) electricity combined with 17 t/h of high temperature steam (220 deg. C, 10 bar) with a pebble bed high temperature reactor directly coupled with a helium compressor and a helium turbine. To come to quantitative statements about the ACACIA transient behaviour, a calculational coupling between the high temperature reactor core analysis code package Panthermix (Panther-Thermix/Direkt) and the thermal hydraulic code RELAP5 for the energy conversion system has been made. This paper will present the analysis of safety related transients. The usual incident scenarios Loss of Coolant Incident (LOCI) and Loss of Flow Incident (LOFI) have been analysed. Besides, also a search for the real maximum fuel temperature (inside a fuel pebble anywhere in the core) has been made. It appears that the maximum fuel temperatures are not reached during a LOFI or LOCI with a halted mass flow rate, but for situations with a small mass flow rate, 1-0.5%. As such, a LOFI or LOCI does not represent the worst-case scenario in terms of maximal fuel temperature. (author)

  1. Dispersed plug flow model for upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors with focus on granular sludge dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalyuzhnyi, S.V.; Fedorovich, V.V.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A new approach to model upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB)-reactors, referred to as a one-dimensional dispersed plug flow model, was developed. This model focusses on the granular sludge dynamics along the reactor height, based on the balance between dispersion, sedimentation and convection using

  2. Application of point kinetic model in the study of fluidized bed reactor dynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio de; Streck, Elaine E.

    1995-01-01

    In this work the dynamical behavior of the fluidized bed nuclear reactor is analysed. The main goal consist to study the effect of the acceleration term in the point kinetic equations. Numerical simulations are reported considering constant acceleration. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs

  3. Diagnóstico do tumor glômico pela dermatoscopia do leito e da matriz ungueal Diagnosis of glomus tumor by nail bed and matrix dermoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura de Sena Nogueir Maehara

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A cirurgia é o tratamento definitivo para os tumores glômicos. Algumas vezes, esse procedimento pode representar um desafio, pois, apesar de ser um tumor bem delimitado, a sua visualização pode ser difícil. O uso da dermatoscopia do leito e da matriz ungueal facilita o diagnóstico e auxilia a localização e delimitação do tumor. Trata-se de método simples e de baixo custo que não implica risco adicional ao paciente que irá se submeter a um procedimento cirúrgico.Surgery is the best treatment for glomus tumors. Sometimes this can be a challenging procedure because, despite being a well-defined tumor, its visualization can be difficult. The use of nail bed and matrix dermoscopy facilitates the diagnosis and aids in the localization and demarcation of the tumor. It is a simple and low-cost procedure that does not involve additional risks to the patient who will undergo surgery.

  4. International Workshop on Mathematical Modeling of Tumor-Immune Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Peter; Mallet, Dann

    2014-01-01

    This collection of papers offers a broad synopsis of state-of-the-art mathematical methods used in modeling the interaction between tumors and the immune system. These papers were presented at the four-day workshop on Mathematical Models of Tumor-Immune System Dynamics held in Sydney, Australia from January 7th to January 10th, 2013. The workshop brought together applied mathematicians, biologists, and clinicians actively working in the field of cancer immunology to share their current research and to increase awareness of the innovative mathematical tools that are applicable to the growing field of cancer immunology. Recent progress in cancer immunology and advances in immunotherapy suggest that the immune system plays a fundamental role in host defense against tumors and could be utilized to prevent or cure cancer. Although theoretical and experimental studies of tumor-immune system dynamics have a long history, there are still many unanswered questions about the mechanisms that govern the interaction betwe...

  5. Dynamic Quantitative T1 Mapping in Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Herrmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human brain tumors such as glioblastomas are typically detected using conventional, nonquantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques, such as T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI. In this manuscript, we tested whether dynamic quantitative T1 mapping by MRI can localize orthotopic glioma tumors in an objective manner. Quantitative T1 mapping was performed by MRI over multiple time points using the conventional contrast agent Optimark. We compared signal differences to determine the gadolinium concentration in tissues over time. The T1 parametric maps made it easy to identify the regions of contrast enhancement and thus tumor location. Doubling the typical human dose of contrast agent resulted in a clearer demarcation of these tumors. Therefore, T1 mapping of brain tumors is gadolinium dose dependent and improves detection of tumors by MRI. The use of T1 maps provides a quantitative means to evaluate tumor detection by gadolinium-based contrast agents over time. This dynamic quantitative T1 mapping technique will also enable future quantitative evaluation of various targeted MRI contrast agents.

  6. Development of research reactor simulator and its application to dynamic test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee-Choon; Baang, Dane; Park, Jae-Chang; Lee, Seung-Wook; Bae, Sung Won

    2014-01-01

    We developed a real-time simulator for 'High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO), and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator into a dynamic test-bed (DTB) to test the functions and dynamic control performance of reactor regulating system (RRS) in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The software includes a mathematical model that implements plant dynamics in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface module. The developed research reactor simulators are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by actual RRS cabinet, and was interfaced using a hard-wired and network-based interface. RRS cabinet generates control signals for reactor power control based on the various feedback signals from DTB, and the DTB runs plant dynamics based on the RRS control signals. Thus the Hardware-In-the-Loop Simulation between RRS and the emulated plant (DTB) has been implemented and tested in this configuration. The test result shows that the developed DTB and actual RRS cabinet works together simultaneously resulting in quite good dynamic control performances. (author)

  7. Dynamic behavior of tobacco waste in the coal-fired fluidized-bed boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai; Chang, Jian; Chen, Honggang; Yang, Yongping [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). National Eng Lab for Biomass Power Generation Equipment; Yu, Bangting [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Heavy Oil Processing

    2013-07-01

    Circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology is an advanced method for utilizing coal and other solid fuels in an environmentally acceptable manner. During the processing procedure in the nicotiana tabacum plants, lots of tobacco stem wastes are produced, which are normally being dumped to the landfill field. If this kind of waste can be used as a part of the fuel to be added into the coal in a CFB combustor, it will reduce the use of coal and then cut the net carbon emissions. To understand the complicated fluid dynamics of nicotiana tabacum wastes in the coal-fired CFB boiler, the mixing and segregation behavior of tobacco stalk are preliminary measured in a cylindrical fluidized bed. Obvious segregation behavior is found due to distinct differences in density and shape between tobacco stem and coal, which results in poor fluidization quality and bad combustion efficiency. To overcome this disadvantage, a jet with high gas velocity is introduced through the air distributor and a detailed experimental study is conducted in a fluidized bed made up of stem-sand mixture with different solid components at various jet velocities, which greatly improve the mixing performance of stem in the fluidized bed. The above findings are helpful for the technological upgrading of small- or middle-sized CFB boiler with adding tobacco stem into coal.

  8. STUDY OF GAS SEPARATION PROCESS BY DYNAMIC ADSORPTION IN FIXED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Solomon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of mass transfer at gas separation by dynamic adsorption in fixed bed of impregnated silica gel is presented in this work. By means of a mathematical model based on constants and coefficient easy to evaluate, the distributions of adsorbate concentration in gas and solid phases were determined as a function of time and throughout the height of the fixed bed, under isothermal conditions.With this aim, water vapors from air were adsorbed in a fixed bed of impregnated silica gel. The values of the volumetric mass transfer coefficient, Kv, were determined experimentally at several values of air superficial velocity, an air relative humidity of 69�20at 38 °C. The influence of the gas flow velocity and initial water concentration in adsorbent on the distribution of water concentration in both phases was established as a function of time and throughout the height of the fixed bed. The results obtained allow one to determination of the local adsorption rate.

  9. The dynamics of coherent flow structures within a submerged permeable bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, G.; Best, J.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Hardy, R. J.; Lead, J.

    2009-12-01

    The existence of complex 3D coherent vortical structures in turbulent boundary layers has been widely reported from experimental observations (Adrian et al., 2007, Christensen and Adrian, 2001) and investigations of natural open channel flows (e.g. Kostaschuk and Church, 1993; Best, 2005). The interaction between these flow structures and the solid boundary that is responsible for their generation is also receiving increasing attention due to the central role played by turbulence in governing erosion-deposition processes. Yet, for the majority of studies, the bed roughness has been represented using rough impermeable surfaces. While not inherently acknowledged, most research in this area is thus only strictly applicable to those natural river beds composed either of bedrock or clay, or that have armoured, impermeable, surfaces. Recently, many researchers have noted the need to account for the role of bed permeability in order to accurately reproduce the true nature of flow over permeable gravel-bed rivers. For these cases, the near-bed flow is inherently and mutually linked to the interstitial-flow occurring in the porous solid matrix. This interaction is established through turbulence mechanisms occurring across the interface that may be important for influencing the incipient motion of cohesionless sediment. However, the nature of this turbulence and the formation of coherent structures within such permeable beds remain substantially unresolved due to the technical challenges of collecting direct data in this region. In this paper, we detail the existence and dynamic nature of coherent vortical structures within the individual pore spaces of a permeable bed submerged by a free stream flow. Laboratory experiments are reported in which a permeable flume bed was constructed using spheres packed in an offset cubic arrangement. We applied a high resolution E-PIV (Endoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry) approach in order to fully resolve the instantaneous structure of

  10. Spectrally based bathymetric mapping of a dynamic, sand‐bedded channel: Niobrara River, Nebraska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilbone, Elizabeth; Legleiter, Carl; Alexander, Jason S.; McElroy, Brandon

    2018-01-01

    Methods for spectrally based mapping of river bathymetry have been developed and tested in clear‐flowing, gravel‐bed channels, with limited application to turbid, sand‐bed rivers. This study used hyperspectral images and field surveys from the dynamic, sandy Niobrara River to evaluate three depth retrieval methods. The first regression‐based approach, optimal band ratio analysis (OBRA), paired in situ depth measurements with image pixel values to estimate depth. The second approach used ground‐based field spectra to calibrate an OBRA relationship. The third technique, image‐to‐depth quantile transformation (IDQT), estimated depth by linking the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of depth to the CDF of an image‐derived variable. OBRA yielded the lowest depth retrieval mean error (0.005 m) and highest observed versus predicted R2 (0.817). Although misalignment between field and image data did not compromise the performance of OBRA in this study, poor georeferencing could limit regression‐based approaches such as OBRA in dynamic, sand‐bedded rivers. Field spectroscopy‐based depth maps exhibited a mean error with a slight shallow bias (0.068 m) but provided reliable estimates for most of the study reach. IDQT had a strong deep bias but provided informative relative depth maps. Overprediction of depth by IDQT highlights the need for an unbiased sampling strategy to define the depth CDF. Although each of the techniques we tested demonstrated potential to provide accurate depth estimates in sand‐bed rivers, each method also was subject to certain constraints and limitations.

  11. Modeling evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic mutations in hierarchically organized tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sottoriva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC concept is a highly debated topic in cancer research. While experimental evidence in favor of the cancer stem cell theory is apparently abundant, the results are often criticized as being difficult to interpret. An important reason for this is that most experimental data that support this model rely on transplantation studies. In this study we use a novel cellular Potts model to elucidate the dynamics of established malignancies that are driven by a small subset of CSCs. Our results demonstrate that epigenetic mutations that occur during mitosis display highly altered dynamics in CSC-driven malignancies compared to a classical, non-hierarchical model of growth. In particular, the heterogeneity observed in CSC-driven tumors is considerably higher. We speculate that this feature could be used in combination with epigenetic (methylation sequencing studies of human malignancies to prove or refute the CSC hypothesis in established tumors without the need for transplantation. Moreover our tumor growth simulations indicate that CSC-driven tumors display evolutionary features that can be considered beneficial during tumor progression. Besides an increased heterogeneity they also exhibit properties that allow the escape of clones from local fitness peaks. This leads to more aggressive phenotypes in the long run and makes the neoplasm more adaptable to stringent selective forces such as cancer treatment. Indeed when therapy is applied the clone landscape of the regrown tumor is more aggressive with respect to the primary tumor, whereas the classical model demonstrated similar patterns before and after therapy. Understanding these often counter-intuitive fundamental properties of (non-hierarchically organized malignancies is a crucial step in validating the CSC concept as well as providing insight into the therapeutical consequences of this model.

  12. Development of Research Reactor Simulator and Its Application to Dynamic Test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Seung Wook; Bang, Dane; Bae, Sung Won

    2014-01-01

    We developed HANARO and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) real-time simulator for operating staff training. The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator as a dynamic test-bed to test the reactor regulating system in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator configuration is divided into hardware and software. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The simulator software is divided into three major parts: a mathematical modeling module, which executes the plant dynamic modeling program in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface (HMI) module. The developed research reactors are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by a hardware controller and the simulator and target controller were interfaced with a hard-wired and network-based interface

  13. Dynamic modeling of fixed-bed adsorption of flue gas using a variable mass transfer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jehun; Lee, Jae W.

    2016-01-01

    This study introduces a dynamic mass transfer model for the fixed-bed adsorption of a flue gas. The derivation of the variable mass transfer coefficient is based on pore diffusion theory and it is a function of effective porosity, temperature, and pressure as well as the adsorbate composition. Adsorption experiments were done at four different pressures (1.8, 5, 10 and 20 bars) and three different temperatures (30, 50 and 70 .deg. C) with zeolite 13X as the adsorbent. To explain the equilibrium adsorption capacity, the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model was adopted, and the parameters of the isotherm equation were fitted to the experimental data for a wide range of pressures and temperatures. Then, dynamic simulations were performed using the system equations for material and energy balance with the equilibrium adsorption isotherm data. The optimal mass transfer and heat transfer coefficients were determined after iterative calculations. As a result, the dynamic variable mass transfer model can estimate the adsorption rate for a wide range of concentrations and precisely simulate the fixed-bed adsorption process of a flue gas mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

  14. Development of Research Reactor Simulator and Its Application to Dynamic Test-bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Seung Wook; Bang, Dane; Bae, Sung Won [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    We developed HANARO and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) real-time simulator for operating staff training. The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator as a dynamic test-bed to test the reactor regulating system in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator configuration is divided into hardware and software. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The simulator software is divided into three major parts: a mathematical modeling module, which executes the plant dynamic modeling program in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface (HMI) module. The developed research reactors are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by a hardware controller and the simulator and target controller were interfaced with a hard-wired and network-based interface.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics simulation for chemical looping combustion of coal in a dual circulation fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Mingze; Zhao, Haibo; Ma, Jinchen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CFD simulation of a 5 kW_t_h CLC reactor of coal was conducted. • Gas leakage, flow pattern and combustion efficiency of the reactor was analyzed. • Optimal condition was achieved based on operation characteristics understanding. - Abstract: A dual circulation fluidized bed system is widely accepted for chemical looping combustion (CLC) for enriching CO_2 from the utilization of fossil fuels. Due to the limitations of the measurement, the details of multiphase reactive flows in the interconnected fluidized bed reactors are difficult to obtain. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation provides a promising method to understand the hydrodynamics, chemical reaction, and heat and mass transfers in CLC reactors, which are very important for the rational design, optimal operation, and scaling-up of the CLC system. In this work, a 5 kW_t_h coal-fired CLC dual circulation fluidized bed system, which was developed by our research group, was first simulated for understanding gas leakage, flow pattern and combustion efficiency. The simulation results achieved good agreement with the experimental measurements, which validates the simulation model. Subsequently, to improve the combustion efficiency, a new operation condition was simulated by increasing the reactor temperature and decreasing the coal feeding. An improvement in the combustion efficiency was attained, and the simulation results for the new operation condition were also validated by the experimental measurements in the same CLC combustor. All of the above processes demonstrated the validity and usefulness of the simulation results to improve the CLC reactor operation.

  16. Radiotherapy without boost in the tumor bed after conserving surgery in the treatment of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvanova, V.; Pandova, V.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse satisfactory local control and breast preservation with particular emphasis on the importance of the microscopic negative margin in patients who not receiving tumor bed boost therapy. Authors analysed 122 consecutive patients with breast cancer in pathological stages I and II, who were treated with quadrantectomy at full axillary dissection between 1992 and 1997. The median follow up was 34 months. The radiation treatment was started 60 - 80 day in 14 patients (11.5%) with high risk for metastases, because they underwent chemotherapy. The patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy on the entire breast to a mean total dose of 48.8 Gy. A boost to a tumor bed was not delivered. Only patients with follow-up period above 24 months were evaluated for the purpose of analysis of cosmetic results. Analyzed variables were: age, size, lymph node status, two-field versus three-field technique, operating scare. The major goal of breast conserving therapy is the preservation of cosmetically acceptable breast without local relapses in all patients of our study. A 43 years old patient with liver metastases and any regional and local relapses was dead 27 months after the radiotherapy. A single significant factor impairing excellent cosmetic outcome in our study is the surgical scar. The very high percent (51) of excellent cosmetic results and low percent of post radiotherapy injury is due to precise for breast conserving therapy, the prevailing number of young patients and precise CT and dosimetric planning on three level of treatment volume (author)

  17. High resolution field study of sediment dynamics on a strongly heterogeneous bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly Du Bois, P.; Blanpain, O.; Lafite, R.; Cugier, P.; Lunven, M.

    2010-12-01

    Extensive field measurements have been carried out at several stations in a macrotidal inner continental shelf in the English Channel (around 25 m depth) during spring tide period. The strong tidal current measured (up to 1.6 m.s-1) allowed sediment dynamics on a bed characterised by a mixture of size with coarse grains to be dominant. Data acquired in such hydro-sedimentary conditions are scarce. A new instrument, the DYnamic Sediment Profile Imagery (DySPI) system, was specifically conceived and implemented in-situ to observe and measure, with a high temporal resolution, the dynamics of a strongly heterogeneous mixture of particles in a grain-size scale. The data collected covered: 1) grain size range (side scan sonar, video observations, Shipeck grab samples, DySPI images) and vertical sorting (stratigraphic sampling by divers) of sediment cover, 2) hydrodynamic features (acoustic Doppler velocimeter, acoustic Doppler profiler), 3) suspended load nature and dynamics (optical backscatter, chlorophyll fluorometer, particle size analyser, Niskin bottles, scanning electron microscopy), 4) sand and gravel bedload transport estimates (DySPI image processing), 5) transfer dynamics of fine grains within a coarse matrix and their depth of penetration (radionuclides measurements in stratigraphic samples). The four stations present different grain size vertical sorting from a quasi-permanent armouring to a homogenous distribution. The sediment cover condition is directly linked to hydrodynamic capacity and sediment availability. Fine grain ratio within deep sediment layers (up to 10 cm) is higher when the bed armouring is durable. However, fine sediments are not permanently depth trapped: deep layers are composed of few years-old radionuclide tracers fixed on fine grains and a vertical mixing coefficient has been evaluated for each sediment cover. Fine grain dynamics within a coarse matrix is inversely proportional to the robustness of the armour layer. For current

  18. Dynamic analysis and application of fuel elements pneumatic transportation in a pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hongbing; Du, Dong; Han, Zandong; Zou, Yirong; Pan, Jiluan

    2015-01-01

    Almost 10,000 spherical fuel elements are transported pneumatically one by one in the pipeline outside the core of a pebble bed reactor every day. Any failure in the transportation will lead to the shutdown of the reactor, even safety accidents. In order to ensure a stable and reliable transportation, it's of great importance to analyze the motion and force condition of the fuel element. In this paper, we focus on the dynamic analysis of the pneumatic transportation of the fuel element and derive kinetic equations. Then we introduce the design of the transportation pipeline. On this basis we calculate some important data such as the velocity of the fuel element, the force between the fuel element and the pipeline and the efficiency of the pneumatic transportation. Then we analyze these results and provide some suggestions for the design of the pipeline. The experiment was carried out on an experimental platform. The velocities of the fuel elements were measured. The experimental results were consistent with and validated the theoretical analysis. The research may offer the basis for the design of the transportation pipeline and the optimization of the fuel elements transportation in a pebble bed reactor. - Highlights: • The kinetic equations of the fuel element in pneumatic transportation are derived. • The dynamic characteristics of the fuel element are analyzed. • Some important parameters are calculated based on the kinetic equations. • The experimental results were consistent with the analysis and verified the analysis. • This paper may offer an important guide to the research of a pebble bed reactor

  19. Microbial community dynamics and biogas production from manure fractions in sludge bed anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgård, A S R; Bergland, W H; Bakke, R; Vadstein, O; Østgaard, K; Bakke, I

    2015-12-01

    To elucidate how granular sludge inoculum and particle-rich organic loading affect the structure of the microbial communities and process performance in upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors. We investigated four reactors run on dairy manure filtrate and four on pig manure supernatant for three months achieving similar methane yields. The reactors fed with less particle rich pig manure stabilized faster and had highest capacity. Microbial community dynamics analysed by a PCR/denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis approach showed that influent was a major determinant for the composition of the reactor communities. Comparisons of pre- and non-adapted inoculum in the reactors run on pig manure supernatant showed that the community structure of the nonadapted inoculum adapted in approximately two months. Microbiota variance partitioning analysis revealed that running time, organic loading rate and inoculum together explained 26 and 31% of the variance in bacterial and archaeal communities respectively. The microbial communities of UASBs adapted to the reactor conditions in treatment of particle rich manure fractions, obtaining high capacity, especially on pig manure supernatant. These findings provide relevant insight into the microbial community dynamics in startup and operation of sludge bed reactors for methane production from slurry fractions, a major potential source of biogas. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Dynamic simulation of industrial Fluidized-bed Catalytic Cracking - FCC unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secchi, Argimiro R.; Neumann, Gustavo A.; Trierweiler, Jorge O. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: arge@enq.ufrgs.br; gneumann@enq.ufrgs.br; jorge@enq.ufrgs.br; Santos, Marlova G. [PETROBRAS S.A., Canoas, RS (Brazil). Refinaria Alberto Pasqualini]. E-mail: marlova@petrobras.com.br

    2000-07-01

    In this work a mathematical model for the dynamic simulation of the Fluidized-bed Catalytic Cracking (FCC) Reactor, to be used in the analysis, control, and optimization of this system is developed. Based on the full range of published data in FCC performance and kinetic rates, and adapted to the industrial unit of the PETROBRAS' Alberto Pasqualini Refinery (REFAP), an integrated dynamic model is build up. The model is sufficiently complex to capture the major dynamics effects that occur in this system. The regenerator is modeled as emulsion and bubble phases that exchange mass and heat. The riser is modeled as an adiabatic plug flow reactor. The fluid dynamic is taking into account for the catalyst circulation, and the dynamics of the gas phase and the riser are also considered into the model. The model, represented by a non-linear system of differential-algebraic equations, was written in language C and implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK. The results are compared with the data obtained from the industrial plant of REFAP. (author)

  1. Computed tomography of liver tumors, 2. Differential diagnosis between hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic hepatic tumor by dynamic CT scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Akira; Fukuoka, Haruhito; Kashiwado, Kouzou; Ichiki, Toshio; Makidono, Yoko [Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital (Japan)

    1984-02-01

    Differential diagnosis between hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic hepatic tumor was attempted using dynamic CT scanning. Homogeneous and patchy types were peculiar to hepatocellular carcinoma, and ring-like type to metastatic hepatic tumor. However, with no enhancement, hepatocellular carcinoma could not be denied. Hepatocellular carcinoma was characterized by the enhancement shown on the early stage of dynamic CT. Ring enhancement was not visualized on dynamic CT but visualized on conventional contrast enhanced CT in hepatocellular carcinomas; it was visualized on conventional contrast enhanced CT and on dynamic CT in metastatic hepatic tumors.

  2. Scaling of Sediment Dynamics in a Reach-Scale Laboratory Model of a Sand-Bed Stream with Riparian Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrick, S.; Rodriguez, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    A movable bed physical model was designed in a laboratory flume to simulate both bed and suspended load transport in a mildly sinuous sand-bed stream. Model simulations investigated the impact of different vegetation arrangements along the outer bank to evaluate rehabilitation options. Preserving similitude in the 1:16 laboratory model was very important. In this presentation the scaling approach, as well as the successes and challenges of the strategy are outlined. Firstly a near-bankfull flow event was chosen for laboratory simulation. In nature, bankfull events at the field site deposit new in-channel features but cause only small amounts of bank erosion. Thus the fixed banks in the model were not a drastic simplification. Next, and as in other studies, the flow velocity and turbulence measurements were collected in separate fixed bed experiments. The scaling of flow in these experiments was simply maintained by matching the Froude number and roughness levels. The subsequent movable bed experiments were then conducted under similar hydrodynamic conditions. In nature, the sand-bed stream is fairly typical; in high flows most sediment transport occurs in suspension and migrating dunes cover the bed. To achieve similar dynamics in the model equivalent values of the dimensionless bed shear stress and the particle Reynolds number were important. Close values of the two dimensionless numbers were achieved with lightweight sediments (R=0.3) including coal and apricot pips with a particle size distribution similar to that of the field site. Overall the moveable bed experiments were able to replicate the dominant sediment dynamics present in the stream during a bankfull flow and yielded relevant information for the analysis of the effects of riparian vegetation. There was a potential conflict in the strategy, in that grain roughness was exaggerated with respect to nature. The advantage of this strategy is that although grain roughness is exaggerated, the similarity of

  3. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Chauviere

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of living tissues by accounting for cell density correlations, different cell types, phenotypes and cell birth/death processes, in order to provide a biophysically consistent description of processes across the scales. We present an application of this approach to tumor growth.

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Gas-Phase Radial Dispersion in Fixed Beds with Wall Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony G. Dixon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effective medium approach to radial fixed bed dispersion models, in which radial dispersion of mass is superimposed on axial plug flow, is based on a constant effective dispersion coefficient, DT. For packed beds of a small tube-to-particle diameter ratio (N, the experimentally-observed decrease in this parameter near the tube wall is accounted for by a lumped resistance located at the tube wall, the wall mass transfer coefficient km. This work presents validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations to obtain detailed radial velocity and concentration profiles for eight different computer-generated packed tubes of spheres in the range 5.04 ≤ N ≤ 9.3 and over a range of flow rates 87 ≤ Re ≤ 870 where Re is based on superficial velocity and the particle diameter dp. Initial runs with pure air gave axial velocity profiles vz(r averaged over the length of the packing. Then, simulations with the tube wall coated with methane yielded radial concentration profiles. A model with only DT could not describe the radial concentration profiles. The two-parameter model with DT and km agreed better with the bed-center concentration profiles, but not with the sharp decreases in concentration close to the tube wall. A three-parameter model based on classical two-layer mixing length theory, with a wall-function for the decrease in transverse radial convective transport in the near-wall region, showed greatly improved ability to reproduce the near-wall concentration profiles.

  5. Bacterial community dynamics during start-up of a trickle-bed bioreactor degrading aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, M; Amann, R; Ludwig, W; Hekmat, D; Schleifer, K H

    1998-03-01

    This study was performed with a laboratory-scale fixed-bed bioreactor degrading a mixture of aromatic compounds (Solvesso100). The starter culture for the bioreactor was prepared in a fermentor with a wastewater sample of a care painting facility as the inoculum and Solvesso100 as the sole carbon source. The bacterial community dynamics in the fermentor and the bioreactor were examined by a conventional isolation procedure and in situ hybridization with fluorescently labeled rRNA-targeted oligonucleotides. Two significant shifts in the bacterial community structure could be demonstrated. The original inoculum from the wastewater of the car factory was rich in proteobacteria of the alpha and beta subclasses, while the final fermentor enrichment was dominated by bacteria closely related to Pseudomonas putida or Pseudomonas mendocina, which both belong to the gamma subclass of the class Proteobacteria. A second significant shift was observed when the fermentor culture was transferred as inoculum to the trickle-bed bioreactor. The community structure in the bioreactor gradually returned to a higher complexity, with the dominance of beta and alpha subclass proteobacteria, whereas the gamma subclass proteobacteria sharply declined. Obviously, the preceded pollutant adaptant did not lead to a significant enrichment of bacteria that finally dominated in the trickle-bed bioreactor. In the course of experiments, three new 16S as well as 23S rRNA-targeted probes for beta subclass proteobacteria were designed, probe SUBU1237 for the genera Burkholderia and Sutterella, probe ALBO34a for the genera Alcaligenes and Bordetella, and probe Bcv13b for Burkholderia cepacia and Burkholderia vietnamiensis. Bacteria hybridizing with the probe Bcv13b represented the main Solvesso100-degrading population in the reactor.

  6. Usability of ECT for quantitative and qualitative characterization of trickle-bed flow dynamics experiencing filtration conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tibirna, C.; Fortin, A. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). GIREF; Edouard, D.; Larachi, F. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    The feasibility of using electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) as an imaging method for trickle-bed reaction processes was examined in this study. In particular, the advantages and disadvantages of using ECT to characterize the flow dynamics in a four-phase trickle bed reactor were investigated. This work was part of a larger study to extend the service life of catalyst beds used during the hydrotreatment of some oil fractions, such as Athabasca bitumen. A better understanding of the flow dynamics and clogging physics in trickle-bed reactors is needed in order to prevent clogging in the catalyst bed. This study focused on several aspects of the ECT as a non-intrusive imaging method for such processes. This paper described the experimental setup in detail. The ECT equipment allowed for up to 100 tomograms per second to be recorded. The clogging experiments lasted about 30 hours from a completely clean catalyst bed to a stable, non-filtering clogging state. A series of algorithms for ECT image reconstruction were presented. Truncated and filtered single value decomposition (SVD) and Landweber methods were found to be the most appropriate. ECT was shown to be faster and less expensive than nuclear ionizing, non-ionizing and other tomography methods. However, the main advantage of ECT was its non-intrusive attributes. It was also suggested that the complex technologies involved in ECT still require further refinement and better calibration methods. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Molecular markers reveal infestation dynamics of the bed bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) within apartment buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Warren; Saenz, Virna L; Santangelo, Richard G; Wang, Changlu; Schal, Coby; Vargo, Edward L

    2012-05-01

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), has experienced an extraordinary global resurgence in recent years, the reasons for which remain poorly understood. Once considered a pest of lower socioeconomic classes, bed bugs are now found extensively across all residential settings, with widespread infestations established in multiapartment buildings. Within such buildings, understanding the population genetic structure and patterns of dispersal may prove critical to the development of effective control strategies. Here, we describe the development of 24 high-resolution microsatellite markers through next generation 454 pyrosequencing and their application to elucidate infestation dynamics within three multistory apartment buildings in the United States. Results reveal contrasting characteristics potentially representative of geographic or locale differences. In Raleigh, NC, an infestation within an apartment building seemed to have started from a single introduction followed by extensive spread. In Jersey City, NJ, two or more introductions followed by spread are evident in two buildings. Populations within single apartments in all buildings were characterized by high levels of relatedness and low levels of diversity, indicative of foundation from small, genetically depauperate propagules. Regardless of the number of unique introductions, genetic data indicate that spread within buildings is extensive, supporting both active and human-mediated dispersal within and between adjacent rooms or apartments spanning multiple floors.

  8. Effects of biomass on dynamics of combustion in circulating fluidized beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourunen Antti

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed technology is very suitable for the combustion of biomass Nevertheless substitution of coal with biomass affects boiler operation and especially dynamics and controllability. Non-homogeneity of biomass and fuel feeding disturbances cause process instability, such as variations in temperatures and pressures, which reduce lifetime of equipment and structures. Because of process instability higher air coefficient must be used in order to avoid CO emissions, which is not economical. Combustion profiles for coal, wood and peat, measured at the VTT Processes Pilot circulating fluidized bed reactor, have been compared. Process stability and char inventories have been studied by the measurements and the model. Biofuel are usually very reactive and their combustion profiles are quite different compared to coals. Because of high reactivity and low char content combustion process with biofuel is very sensitive for fuel feeding. Also low char inventory effect on load changes combined with combustion profile that differs from coals. Because of different combustion profile heat transfer can be a limiting factor in load changes despite the high reactivity and fast oxygen response.

  9. Circulating fluidized bed hydrodynamics experiments for the multiphase fluid dynamics research consortium (MFDRC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelfke, John Barry; Torczynski, John Robert; O' Hern, Timothy John; Tortora, Paul Richard; Bhusarapu, Satish (; ); Trujillo, Steven Mathew

    2006-08-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study the multiphase gas-solid flow in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB). This report describes the CFB experimental facility assembled for this program, the diagnostics developed and/or applied to make measurements in the riser section of the CFB, and the data acquired for several different flow conditions. Primary data acquired included pressures around the flow loop and solids loadings at selected locations in the riser. Tomographic techniques using gamma radiation and electrical capacitance were used to determine radial profiles of solids volume fraction in the riser, and axial profiles of the integrated solids volume fraction were produced. Computer Aided Radioactive Particle Tracking was used to measure solids velocities, fluxes, and residence time distributions. In addition, a series of computational fluid dynamics simulations was performed using the commercial code Arenaflow{trademark}.

  10. 99m Tc- la bed somatostatin analogs for imaging somatostatin-receptor-positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandomkar, M.; Najafi, R.; Shafiei, A.; Sadat Ebrahimi, E.; Babaie, M.H.; Rabani, M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the least few years, 111 In-DTPA- Octreotide has found widespread clinical applicability, especially in oncology. However limitation, especially concerning availability, imaging properties, and costs, remain and have stimulated research on radiolabeling with many alternative radionuclides. The purpose of this investigation was to labeling somatostatin analogs with 99 m Tc and evaluate their suitability as an agents for in vivo use. Octreotide and Tyr-3-Octreotide were labeled by 99 mTc with direct and indirect methods. Sodium ascorbate and sodium dithionite were used for reduction of cystine bridge and HYNIC was used as bifunctional agents and different co ligands used for labeling by 99 mTc. Yield of labeling, purity, stability, internalisation, binding affinity and biodistribution of peptide conjugates were studied. Direct labeling of octreotide was simple, rapid, efficient and yield was good (%60). K d for binding affinity as high (10 -9 ) but stability was low. Labeling for HYNIC-Tyr-Octreotide had a high yield (>%90), good stability, internalisation and biodistribution. with more experimental work and some improve this peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals can be employed in all nuclear medicine centers as a useful agent for imaging of tumors

  11. Dynamics of particle loading in deep-bed filter. Transport, deposition and reentrainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przekop Rafał

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Deep bed filtration is an effective method of submicron and micron particle removal from the fluid stream. There is an extensive body of literature regarding particle deposition in filters, often using the classical continuum approach. However, the approach is not convenient for studying the influence of particle deposition on filter performance (filtration efficiency, pressure drop when non-steady state boundary conditions have to be introduced. For the purposes of this work the lattice-Boltzmann model describes fluid dynamics, while the solid particle motion is modeled by the Brownian dynamics. For aggregates the effect of their structure on displacement is taken into account. The possibility of particles rebound from the surface of collector or reentrainment of deposits to fluid stream is calculated by energy balanced oscillatory model derived from adhesion theory. The results show the evolution of filtration efficiency and pressure drop of filters with different internal structure described by the size of pores. The size of resuspended aggregates and volume distribution of deposits in filter were also analyzed. The model enables prediction of dynamic filter behavior. It can be a very useful tool for designing filter structures which optimize maximum lifetime with the acceptable values of filtration efficiency and pressure drop.

  12. Dynamical and technological consequences of multiple isolas of steady states in a catalytic fluidised-bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizon Katarzyna

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state characteristics of a catalytic fluidised bed reactor and its dynamical consequences are analyzed. The occurrence of an untypical steady-state structure manifesting in a form of multiple isolas is described. A two-phase bubbling bed model is used for a quantitative description of the bed of catalyst. The influence of heat exchange intensity and a fluidisation ratio onto the generation of isolated solution branches is presented for two kinetic schemes. Dynamical consequences of the coexistence of such untypical branches of steady states are presented. The impact of linear growth of the fluidisation ratio and step change of the cooling medium temperature onto the desired product yield is analyzed. The results presented in this study confirm that the identification of a region of the occurrence of multiple isolas is important due to their strong impact both on the process start-up and its control.

  13. Irradiation of the tumor bed alone after lumpectomy in selected patients with early stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, F.; Chen, P; Benitez, P.; Johnson, P.; Gustafson, G.; Horwitz, E.; McCarthy, K.; Lacerna, M.; Goldstein, Neil; Martinez, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We present the initial findings of our in-house protocol treating the tumor bed alone after lumpectomy with low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy in selected patients with early stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy (BCT). Materials and Methods: Since 1/1/93, 50 women with early stage breast cancer were entered into a protocol of tumor bed irradiation alone using an interstitial LDR implant. Patients were eligible if their tumor was an infiltrating ductal carcinoma ≤ 3 cm in maximum diameter, pathologic margins were clear by at least 2 mm, the tumor did not contain an extensive intraductal component, the axilla was surgically staged with ≤ 3 nodes involved with cancer, and a postoperative mammogram was performed. Implants were positioned using a template guide delivering 50 Gy over 96 hours to the lumpectomy bed plus a 1-2 cm margin. Local control, cosmetic outcome, and complications were assessed. Results: Patients ranged in age from 40 to 84 years (median 65). The median tumor size was 10 mm (range, 1-25). Seventeen patients (34%) had well differentiated tumors, 22 (4%) had moderately differentiated tumors, and in 11 (22%) the tumor was poorly differentiated. Forty-five patients (90%) were node negative while 5 (10%) had 1-3 positive nodes. A total of 23 (46%) patients were placed on tamoxifen and 3 (6%) received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy. No patient was lost to follow-up. The median follow-up is 40 months (range 29-50). No patient has experienced a local, regional, or distant failure. One patient died from colorectal carcinoma with no evidence of recurrent breast cancer. Good-to-excellent cosmetic results have been observed in all 50 patients (median cosmetic follow-up 36 months). No patient has experienced significant sequelae related to their implant. Conclusions: Early results with treatment of the tumor bed alone with a LDR interstitial implant appear promising. Long-term follow-up of these patients will be

  14. WE-E-BRE-12: Tumor Microenvironment Dynamics Following Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, D; Niles, D; Adamson, E; Torres, A; Kissick, M; Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This work aims to understand the radiation-induced interplay between tumor oxygenation and metabolic activity. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Using patient-derived xenografts of head and neck cancer we assessed tumor oxygenation via fiber-optic probe monitored hemoglobin saturation and Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) MRI. Measurements were taken before and after a 10 Gy dose of radiation. Changes in metabolic activity were measured via Fluorescence Lifetime IMaging (FLIM) with the appropriate controls following a 10 Gy dose of radiation. FLIM can non-invasively monitor changes in fluorescence in response to the microenvironment including being able to detect free and bound states of the intrinsically fluorescent metabolite NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide). With this information FLIM can accurately quantify the metabolic state of cells that have been radiated. To model the observed changes, a two-compartment, source-sink simulation relating hemoglobin saturation and metabolic activity was performed using MATLAB. Results: Hemoglobin saturation as measured by interstitial probe and BOLD-MRI decreased by 30% within 15 minutes following radiation. FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways. Simulation of radiation-induced alterations in tumor oxygenation demonstrated that these changes can be the result of changes in either vasculature or metabolic activity. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in hemoglobin saturation and metabolic activity. These alterations occur on time scales approximately the duration of common radiation treatments. Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response

  15. Subglacial bed conditions during Late Pleistocene glaciations and their impact on ice dynamics in the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, S.; Laban, C.; Mesdag, C.S.; Rijsdijk, K.F.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in subglacial bed conditions through multiple glaciations and their effect on ice dynamics are addressed through an analysis of glacigenic sequences in the Upper Pleistocene stratigraphy of the southern North Sea basin. During Elsterian (MIS 12) ice growth, till deposition was subdued when

  16. Energetic, ecologic and fluid-dynamic analysis of a fluidized bed gasifier operating with sugar cane bagasse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diniz Filho, Paulo Tasso; Silveira, Jose Luz; Tuna, Celso Eduardo; Lamas, Wendell de Queiroz

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to study the thermodynamic, ecological and fluid-dynamic aspects of a circulating fluidized bed gasifier using sugar cane bagasse as biomass, in order to estimate a model of its normal operation. In the initial stage was analysed the composition of biomass selected (sugar cane bagasse) and its lower heating value (LHV) was calculated. The energy balance of the gasifier was done, being the volumetric flow of air, synthesis gas and biomass estimated. Also the power produced by this gasifier was theoretically estimated. Then the circulating fluidized bed gasifier was designed for operation with approximately 100 kg/h of processed biomass. Cross-sectional area of the reactor, feeder size, diameter of the exit zone of the gases and minimum height of the expanded bed were selected. Some bed gasifier hydrodynamic factors were also studied. The minimum fluidization velocity, fluidization terminal velocity, and average fluidizing velocity were calculated, in order to understand the fluid-dynamic behaviour of gasification of this fuel. It was obtained a theoretical model that can support a possible prototype of circulating fluidized bed gasifier biomass. Finally, there were studied the ecological aspects of the gasifier, through an overall methodology. Ecological efficiencies were estimated for two scenarios: first considering the carbon cycle and thereafter disregarding the carbon cycle. In both cases, it can be proved the ecological viability of the project. -- Highlights: • we develop a methodology to size a fluidized bed gasifier. • we validate this methodology comparing to a fixed bed gasifier values. • we aggregate ecological efficiency to this methodology

  17. A 3-D model of tumor progression based on complex automata driven by particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wcisło, Rafał; Dzwinel, Witold; Yuen, David A; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z

    2009-12-01

    The dynamics of a growing tumor involving mechanical remodeling of healthy tissue and vasculature is neglected in most of the existing tumor models. This is due to the lack of efficient computational framework allowing for simulation of mechanical interactions. Meanwhile, just these interactions trigger critical changes in tumor growth dynamics and are responsible for its volumetric and directional progression. We describe here a novel 3-D model of tumor growth, which combines particle dynamics with cellular automata concept. The particles represent both tissue cells and fragments of the vascular network. They interact with their closest neighbors via semi-harmonic central forces simulating mechanical resistance of the cell walls. The particle dynamics is governed by both the Newtonian laws of motion and the cellular automata rules. These rules can represent cell life-cycle and other biological interactions involving smaller spatio-temporal scales. We show that our complex automata, particle based model can reproduce realistic 3-D dynamics of the entire system consisting of the tumor, normal tissue cells, blood vessels and blood flow. It can explain phenomena such as the inward cell motion in avascular tumor, stabilization of tumor growth by the external pressure, tumor vascularization due to the process of angiogenesis, trapping of healthy cells by invading tumor, and influence of external (boundary) conditions on the direction of tumor progression. We conclude that the particle model can serve as a general framework for designing advanced multiscale models of tumor dynamics and it is very competitive to the modeling approaches presented before.

  18. Skin tumor area extraction using an improved dynamic programming approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Qaisar; Celebi, M E; Fondón García, Irene

    2012-05-01

    Border (B) description of melanoma and other pigmented skin lesions is one of the most important tasks for the clinical diagnosis of dermoscopy images using the ABCD rule. For an accurate description of the border, there must be an effective skin tumor area extraction (STAE) method. However, this task is complicated due to uneven illumination, artifacts present in the lesions and smooth areas or fuzzy borders of the desired regions. In this paper, a novel STAE algorithm based on improved dynamic programming (IDP) is presented. The STAE technique consists of the following four steps: color space transform, pre-processing, rough tumor area detection and refinement of the segmented area. The procedure is performed in the CIE L(*) a(*) b(*) color space, which is approximately uniform and is therefore related to dermatologist's perception. After pre-processing the skin lesions to reduce artifacts, the DP algorithm is improved by introducing a local cost function, which is based on color and texture weights. The STAE method is tested on a total of 100 dermoscopic images. In order to compare the performance of STAE with other state-of-the-art algorithms, various statistical measures based on dermatologist-drawn borders are utilized as a ground truth. The proposed method outperforms the others with a sensitivity of 96.64%, a specificity of 98.14% and an error probability of 5.23%. The results demonstrate that this STAE method by IDP is an effective solution when compared with other state-of-the-art segmentation techniques. The proposed method can accurately extract tumor borders in dermoscopy images. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. A Multi-Institutional Study of Feasibility, Implementation, and Early Clinical Results With Noninvasive Breast Brachytherapy for Tumor Bed Boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, Subarna; Rocchio, Kathy; Arthur, Douglas; Vera, Robyn; Sha, Sandra; Jolly, Michele; Cavanaugh, Sean; Wooten, Eric; Benda, Rashmi; Greenfield, Brad; Prestidge, Bradley; Ackerman, Scot; Kuske, Robert; Quiet, Coral; Snyder, Margaret; Wazer, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, implementation, and early results of noninvasive breast brachytherapy (NIBB) for tumor bed boost with whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: NIBB is a commercially available (AccuBoost, Billerica, MA) mammography-based, brachytherapy system in which the treatment applicators are centered on the planning target volume (PTV) to direct 192 Ir emissions along orthogonal axes. A privacy-encrypted online data registry collected information from 8 independent academic and community-based institutions. Data were from 146 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer after lumpectomy and WBRT receiving boost with NIBB between July 2007 and March 2010. Toxicity and cosmesis were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (v. 3.0) and the Harvard scale. Median follow-up was 6 months (1–39 months). Results: Grade 1–2 skin toxicity was observed in 64%, 48%, and 21% during the acute (1–3 weeks), intermediate (4–26 weeks), and late-intermediate (>26 weeks) periods. There was no Grade 4 toxicity. At 6 months, for the entire cohort, cosmesis was excellent/good in 62%/38%. The subset receiving NIBB before WBRT had cosmetic scores of 32% and 63%, whereas during WBRT, 58% and 37% were rated as excellent and good, respectively. Breast compression was scored as “uncomfortable” in 12%, 29%, and 59% when NIBB was delivered before, during, or after WBRT. For each patient, the fraction-to-fraction variability in PTV was low. Skin flash was associated with a higher proportion of excellent cosmesis (58% vs. 42%) relative to having the applicator all within breast tissue. Conclusions: These data indicate that NIBB is feasible and can be consistently implemented in a broad array of practice settings. Preliminary evaluation suggests that NIBB is associated with acceptably mild normal tissue toxicity and favorable early cosmesis. The application of NIBB before WBRT may be associated with better patient tolerance at

  20. Study of Pressure Drop in Fixed Bed Reactor Using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Ahmadi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pressure drops of water and critical steam flowing in the fixed bed of mono-sized spheres are studied using SolidWorks 2017 Flow Simulation CFD code. The effects of the type of bed formation, flow velocity, density, and pebble size are evaluated. A new equation is concluded from the data, which is able to estimate pressure drop of a packed bed for high particle Reynolds number, from 15,000 to 1,000,000.

  1. An Investigation of Power Stabilization and Space-Dependent Dynamics of a Nuclear Fluidized-Bed Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pain, Christopher C.; Eaton, Matthew D.; Gomes, Jefferson L.M.A.; Oliveira, Cassiano R.E. de; Umpleby, Adrian P.; Ziver, Kemal; Ackroyd, Ron T.; Miles, Bryan; Goddard, Antony J.H.; Dam, H. van; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Lathouwers, D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous work into the space-dependent kinetics of the conceptual nuclear fluidized bed has highlighted the sensitivity of fission power to particle movements within the bed. The work presented in this paper investigates a method of stabilizing the fission power by making it less sensitive to fuel particle movement. Steady-state neutronic calculations are performed to obtain a suitable design that is stable to radial and axial fuel particle movements in the bed. Detailed spatial/temporal simulations performed using the finite element transient criticality (FETCH) code investigate the dynamics of the new reactor design. A dual requirement of the design is that it has a moderate power output of ∼300 MW(thermal)

  2. Trickle-bed root culture bioreactor design and scale-up: growth, fluid-dynamics, and oxygen mass transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Divakar; Curtis, Wayne R

    2004-10-20

    Trickle-bed root culture reactors are shown to achieve tissue concentrations as high as 36 g DW/L (752 g FW/L) at a scale of 14 L. Root growth rate in a 1.6-L reactor configuration with improved operational conditions is shown to be indistinguishable from the laboratory-scale benchmark, the shaker flask (mu=0.33 day(-1)). These results demonstrate that trickle-bed reactor systems can sustain tissue concentrations, growth rates and volumetric biomass productivities substantially higher than other reported bioreactor configurations. Mass transfer and fluid dynamics are characterized in trickle-bed root reactors to identify appropriate operating conditions and scale-up criteria. Root tissue respiration goes through a minimum with increasing liquid flow, which is qualitatively consistent with traditional trickle-bed performance. However, liquid hold-up is much higher than traditional trickle-beds and alternative correlations based on liquid hold-up per unit tissue mass are required to account for large changes in biomass volume fraction. Bioreactor characterization is sufficient to carry out preliminary design calculations that indicate scale-up feasibility to at least 10,000 liters.

  3. Fluidized bed pyrolysis of HDPE: A study of the influence of operating variables and the main fluid dynamic parameters on the composition and production of gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Lidia; Aguado, Alicia; Moral, Alberto [CARTOF Centro Tecnologico, Valladolid (Spain). Environmental Div.; Irusta, Ruben [CARTOF Centro Tecnologico, Valladolid (Spain). Environmental Div.; Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology

    2011-02-15

    In the present work, a preliminary study of the pyrolysis process of high density polyethylene (HDPE) in a fluidized bed is investigated in order to determine the influence between the fluid dynamic properties of the bed reactor and the amount and composition of the gases produced. As is known, fluidized bed technology is a very interesting option to apply in the pyrolysis field due to i) the lack of moving parts in the hot region that facilitates the maintenance of equipment, ii) the high surface area to volume ratio available in the bed, and iii) the high heat transfer coefficient reached which governs the reaction products. But, heat and mass transfer coefficients are strongly affected by the fluid dynamic properties of the bed. During the pyrolysis of HDPE, a fluid dynamic characterization of the bed particles that consist of char-coated sand of HDPE has been carried out. Parameters such as the minimum fluidizing velocity (u{sub mf}), terminal velocity (u{sub t}), bed height (h{sub f}), bed voidage ({epsilon}{sub f}), fraction of the bed occupied by bubbles ({delta}), bubble diameter (d{sub b}), bubble velocity (u{sub b}), the mass transfer coefficients between the bubble and the cloud (K{sub bc}) and between the cloud and the emulsion (K{sub ce}) were determined. Subsequently, the influence of major operating variables and the fluid dynamic parameters on the composition and the gas yield of the pyrolysis of HDPE were studied. (author)

  4. The Dynamic Behavior of Water Flowing Through Packed Bed of Different Particle Shapes and Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneen Ahmed Jasim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted on pressure drop of water flow through vertical cylindrical packed beds in turbulent region and the influence of the operating parameters on its behavior. The bed packing was made of spherical and non-spherical particles (spheres, Rasching rings and intalox saddle with aspect ratio range 3.46 D/dp 8.486 obtaining bed porosities 0.396 0.84 and Reynolds number 1217 21758. The system is consisted of 5 cm inside diameter Perspex column, 50 cm long; distilled water was pumped through the bed with flow rate 875, 1000, 1125, 1250,1375 and 1500 l/h and inlet water temperature 20, 30, 40 and 50 ˚C. The packed bed system was monitored by using LabVIEW program, were the results have been obtained from Data Acquisition Adaptor (DAQ.

  5. Facilitating in vivo tumor localization by principal component analysis based on dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Chen, Maomao; Wu, Junyu; Zhou, Yuan; Cai, Chuangjian; Wang, Daliang; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging has been used to target tumors in mice with xenograft tumors. However, tumor imaging is largely distorted by the aggregation of fluorescent probes in the liver. A principal component analysis (PCA)-based strategy was applied on the in vivo dynamic fluorescence imaging results of three mice with xenograft tumors to facilitate tumor imaging, with the help of a tumor-specific fluorescent probe. Tumor-relevant features were extracted from the original images by PCA and represented by the principal component (PC) maps. The second principal component (PC2) map represented the tumor-related features, and the first principal component (PC1) map retained the original pharmacokinetic profiles, especially of the liver. The distribution patterns of the PC2 map of the tumor-bearing mice were in good agreement with the actual tumor location. The tumor-to-liver ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher on the PC2 map than on the original images, thus distinguishing the tumor from its nearby fluorescence noise of liver. The results suggest that the PC2 map could serve as a bioimaging marker to facilitate in vivo tumor localization, and dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging with PCA could be a valuable tool for future studies of in vivo tumor metabolism and progression.

  6. Review of PSI studies on reactor physics and thermal fluid dynamics of pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Switzerland is member of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). The related work takes entirely place at PSI in the working groups of Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors and Very High Temperature Reactors. In the past, PSI has performed experimental and theoretical studies on criticality issues of pebble beds at the PROTEUS reactor, as well as a preliminary risk assessment of a prototypal HTR as an input for a comparison of energy supply options. PROTEUS was a critical assembly with an annular driver zone. The central region was filled by arrangements of fuel spheres. The reactivity effect of a water ingress was investigated by simulating the water by polyethylene rods of different diameter inserted into the gaps of a regular package. For sub-criticality measurements in pebble beds, a built-in pulsed neutron source was used. The experimental results were used to validate diffusion and higher order neutron transport models. Concerning thermal hydraulics of gas flows, the vast experience of PSI is focused on hydrogen transport, accumulation, and dispersion in containments of light water reactors. The phenomena are comparable in many aspects to the fluid dynamic issues relevant to HTR. Experiments on hydrogen flows are performed for numerous scenarios in the large-scale containment test facility PANDA. Hydrogen is substituted by helium as a model fluid. An important generic aspect is turbulent mixing in the presence of strong stratification, which is relevant for HTR as well. In a parallel project, generic small-scale mixing experiments with a high density ratio of 1:7 are carried out in a horizontal rectangular channel, where helium and nitrogen flows are brought into contact downstream of the rear edge of a splitter plate. Due to the high density ratio, turbulent mixing is affected by strong non-Boussinesq effects. The measurements taken by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Induced Fluorescence techniques are compared to RANS and LES simulations. Similar large

  7. Automated Processing of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: Correlation of Advanced Pharmacokinetic Metrics with Tumor Grade in Pediatric Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajapeyam, S; Stamoulis, C; Ricci, K; Kieran, M; Poussaint, T Young

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging have proved useful for differentiating brain tumor grades in adults. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion data from children with newly diagnosed brain tumors and analyzed the pharmacokinetic parameters correlating with tumor grade. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging data from 38 patients were analyzed by using commercially available software. Subjects were categorized into 2 groups based on pathologic analyses consisting of low-grade (World Health Organization I and II) and high-grade (World Health Organization III and IV) tumors. Pharmacokinetic parameters were compared between the 2 groups by using linear regression models. For parameters that were statistically distinct between the 2 groups, sensitivity and specificity were also estimated. Eighteen tumors were classified as low-grade, and 20, as high-grade. Transfer constant from the blood plasma into the extracellular extravascular space (K trans ), rate constant from extracellular extravascular space back into blood plasma (K ep ), and extracellular extravascular volume fraction (V e ) were all significantly correlated with tumor grade; high-grade tumors showed higher K trans , higher K ep , and lower V e . Although all 3 parameters had high specificity (range, 82%-100%), K ep had the highest specificity for both grades. Optimal sensitivity was achieved for V e , with a combined sensitivity of 76% (compared with 71% for K trans and K ep ). Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging can effectively discriminate low- and high-grade pediatric brain tumors. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  8. A Multi-Institutional Study of Feasibility, Implementation, and Early Clinical Results With Noninvasive Breast Brachytherapy for Tumor Bed Boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, Subarna, E-mail: shamid@tuftsmedicalcenter.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Rocchio, Kathy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Arthur, Douglas; Vera, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Sha, Sandra; Jolly, Michele [Central Florida Cancer Institute, Davenport, FL (United States); Cavanaugh, Sean; Wooten, Eric [Atlanta Oncology Associates, Hawkinsville, GA (United States); Benda, Rashmi; Greenfield, Brad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boca Raton Community Hospital, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Prestidge, Bradley [Texas Cancer Clinic, San Antonio, TX (United States); Ackerman, Scot [First Coast Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Kuske, Robert; Quiet, Coral; Snyder, Margaret [Arizona Breast Cancer Specialists, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, implementation, and early results of noninvasive breast brachytherapy (NIBB) for tumor bed boost with whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: NIBB is a commercially available (AccuBoost, Billerica, MA) mammography-based, brachytherapy system in which the treatment applicators are centered on the planning target volume (PTV) to direct {sup 192}Ir emissions along orthogonal axes. A privacy-encrypted online data registry collected information from 8 independent academic and community-based institutions. Data were from 146 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer after lumpectomy and WBRT receiving boost with NIBB between July 2007 and March 2010. Toxicity and cosmesis were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (v. 3.0) and the Harvard scale. Median follow-up was 6 months (1-39 months). Results: Grade 1-2 skin toxicity was observed in 64%, 48%, and 21% during the acute (1-3 weeks), intermediate (4-26 weeks), and late-intermediate (>26 weeks) periods. There was no Grade 4 toxicity. At 6 months, for the entire cohort, cosmesis was excellent/good in 62%/38%. The subset receiving NIBB before WBRT had cosmetic scores of 32% and 63%, whereas during WBRT, 58% and 37% were rated as excellent and good, respectively. Breast compression was scored as 'uncomfortable' in 12%, 29%, and 59% when NIBB was delivered before, during, or after WBRT. For each patient, the fraction-to-fraction variability in PTV was low. Skin flash was associated with a higher proportion of excellent cosmesis (58% vs. 42%) relative to having the applicator all within breast tissue. Conclusions: These data indicate that NIBB is feasible and can be consistently implemented in a broad array of practice settings. Preliminary evaluation suggests that NIBB is associated with acceptably mild normal tissue toxicity and favorable early cosmesis. The application of NIBB before WBRT may be associated with better patient tolerance

  9. Continuous monitoring bed-level dynamics on an intertidal flat: Introducing novel, stand-alone high-resolution SED-sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Z.; Lenting, W.; Van der Wal, D.; Bouma, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Tidal flat morphology is continuously shaped by hydrodynamic forces, resulting in a highly dynamic bed surface. The knowledge of short-term bed-level changes is important both for assessing sediment transport processes as well as for understanding critical ecological processes, such as vegetation

  10. Investigation of Gas Solid Fluidized Bed Dynamics with Non-Spherical Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhuri, Ahsan [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2013-06-30

    One of the largest challenges for 21st century is to fulfill global energy demand while also reducing detrimental impacts of energy generation and use on the environment. Gasification is a promising technology to meet the requirement of reduced emissions without compromising performance. Coal gasification is not an incinerating process; rather than burning coal completely a partial combustion takes place in the presence of steam and limited amounts of oxygen. In this controlled environment, a chemical reaction takes place to produce a mixture of clean synthetic gas. Gas-solid fluidized bed is one such type of gasification technology. During gasification, the mixing behavior of solid (coal) and gas and their flow patterns can be very complicated to understand. Many attempts have taken place in laboratory scale to understand bed hydrodynamics with spherical particles though in actual applications with coal, the particles are non-spherical. This issue drove the documented attempt presented here to investigate fluidized bed behavior using different ranges of non-spherical particles, as well as spherical. For this investigation, various parameters are controlled that included particle size, bed height, bed diameter and particle shape. Particles ranged from 355 µm to 1180 µm, bed diameter varied from 2 cm to 7 cm, two fluidized beds with diameters of 3.4 cm and 12.4 cm, for the spherical and non-spherical shaped particles that were taken into consideration. Pressure drop was measured with increasing superficial gas velocity. The velocity required in order to start to fluidize the particle is called the minimum fluidization velocity, which is one of the most important parameters to design and optimize within a gas-solid fluidized bed. This minimum fluidization velocity was monitored during investigation while observing variables factors and their effect on this velocity. From our investigation, it has been found that minimum fluidization velocity is independent of bed

  11. A fundamental study of dynamic CT for hemodynamics in experimental hepatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Fumiko

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic CT was performed using iodamide meglumine (2 ml/kg) to investigate hemodynamics in experimental hepatic tumors, tumor margins and in normal hepatic tissue as well in rabbits with VX 2 -induced hepatic tumors. Peak time (PT) and first moment (M1) were calculated from a time density curve prepared by eight consecutive 3-second scans over a period of 55 seconds. PT and M1 in tumors were significantly shorter than those in tumor margins and normal tissue, but were not influenced by tumor size. PT and M1 in tumor margins and normal tissue became longer with enlargement of the tumor. Ligation of the hepatic artery caused (1) no change in PT or M1 in normal tissue and tumor margins and (2) difficulty in measuring PT and M1 in tumors. Ligation of the portal vein caused (1) difficulty in measuring PT and M1 in normal tissue and tumor margins and (2) no change in PT or M1 in tumors. Pathological studies of specimens taken from each region of interest (ROI) showed that hemodynamics in the tumors reflected tumor-specific vascular structures. (author)

  12. Modeling of waste/near field interactions for a waste repository in bedded salt: the Dynamic Network (DNET) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranwell, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Analysis Division of Sandia National Laboratories has been funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a methodology for use in assessing the long-term risk from the disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations. As part of this program, the Dynamic Network (DNET) model was developed to investigate waste/near field interactions associated with the disposal of radioactive wastes in bedded salt formations. The model is a quasi-multi-dimensional network model with capabilities for simulating processes such as fluid flow, heat transport, salt dissolution, salt creep, and the effects of thermal expansion and subsedence on the rock units surrounding the repository. The use of DNET has been demonstrated in the analysis of a hypothetical disposal site containing a bedded salt formation as the host medium for the repository. An example of this demonstration analysis is discussed. Furthermore, the outcome of sensitivity analyses performed on the DNET model are presented

  13. Real-time tumor ablation simulation based on the dynamic mode decomposition method

    KAUST Repository

    Bourantas, George C.; Ghommem, Mehdi; Kagadis, George C.; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.; Loukopoulos, Vassilios C.; Burganos, Vasilis N.; Nikiforidis, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) method is used to provide a reliable forecasting of tumor ablation treatment simulation in real time, which is quite needed in medical practice. To achieve this, an extended Pennes bioheat model must

  14. Fundamental study on dynamic behaviors of fuel debris bed. Research report in 2007 (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Koji; Fukuda, Kenji; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Tohru; Yamano, Hidemasa

    2009-05-01

    It is important to make a reasonable evaluation of coolability of debris bed with decay heat source in assessing post accident heat removal of a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. In general, the coolability of fuel debris depends on coolant convection, boiling and debris bed movement. In the present study, to understand fundamental characteristics of debris movement, self-leveling behavior caused by the coolant boiling was investigated experimentally using simulant materials. The present experiments employed depressurization boiling of water to simulate void distribution in a debris bed, which consists of solid particles of alumina. A rough estimation model of self-leveling occurrence was proposed and compared with the experimental results. Its extrapolation to reactor accident conditions was also discussed. In addition, solid-liquid flow experiments, which are relevant to debris bed movement behaviors, were analyzed to verify the validity of multiphase flow models employed in a safety analysis code. In the present verification study, basic validity of the code was demonstrated by analyzing experiments of water-column sloshing with solid particles. (author)

  15. Conceptual design of a fluidized bed nuclear reactor : Statics, dynamics and safety-related aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agung, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis a conceptual design of an innovative high temperature reactor based on the fluidization principle (FLUBER) is proposed. The reactor should satisfy the following requirements: (a) modular and low power, (b)) large shutdown margin, (c) able to produce power when the bed of particles

  16. Granular dynamics simulation of segregation phenomena in bubbling gas-fluidised beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoomans, B.P.B.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2000-01-01

    A hard-sphere discrete particle model of a gas-fluidised bed was used in order to simulate segregation phenomena in systems consisting of particles of different sizes. In the model, the gas-phase hydrodynamics is described by the spatially averaged Navier¿Stokes equations for two-phase flow. For

  17. Relative Biologic Effectiveness (RBE) of 50 kV X-rays Measured in a Phantom for Intraoperative Tumor-Bed Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Schneider, Frank; Ma, Lin; Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Herskind, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.herskind@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) with low-energy x-rays is used to treat the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery. The purpose was to determine the relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of 50-kV x-rays for inactivation of cells irradiated in a tumor-bed phantom. Methods and Materials: The RBE was determined for clonogenic inactivation of human tumor and normal cells (MCF7, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, normal skin fibroblasts), and hamster V79 cells. The 50-kV x-rays from the Intrabeam machine (Carl Zeiss Surgical) with a spherical 4-cm applicator were used. Cells were irradiated in a water-equivalent phantom at defined distances (8.1-22.9 mm) from the applicator surface. The 50-kV x-rays from a surface therapy machine (Dermopan, Siemens) were included for comparison; 6-MV x-rays were used as reference radiation. Results: At 8.1-mm depth in the phantom (dose rate 15.1 Gy/h), mean RBE values of 50-kV x-rays from Intrabeam were 1.26 to 1.42 for the 4 cell types at doses yielding surviving fractions in the range of 0.01 to 0.5. Confidence intervals were in the range of 1.2 and 1.5. Similar RBE values were found for 50-kV x-rays from Dermopan for V79 (1.30, CI 1.25-1.36, P=.74) and GS4 (1.42, CI 1.30-1.54, P=.67). No significant dependence of RBE on dose was found for Intrabeam, but RBE decreased at a larger distance (12.7 mm; 9.8 Gy/h). Conclusions: An increased clinically relevant RBE was found for cell irradiation with Intrabeam at depths in the tumor bed targeted by IORT. The reduced RBE values at larger distances may be related to increased repair of sublethal damage during protracted irradiation or to hardening of the photon beam energy.

  18. Determination of the dynamics of tumor hypoxia during radiation therapy using biological imaging on mouse xenograft tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Maftei, Constantin Alin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic, acute and hypoxemic hypoxia can lead to resistance to radiation therapy. The purpose of this thesis was to shed light on the role of these three hypoxia subtypes in radiotherapy. Methods: The amount of total hypoxia and hypoxia subtypes were assessed ex-vivo in xenograft tumors via (immuno-)fluorescence and H&E staining. For the non-invasive detection of hypoxia, tumor-bearing mice were injected with 18F-FMISO and underwent a dynamic PET/CT scan. The hypoxic fraction ...

  19. Pharmacokinetic Analysis of 64Cu-ATSM Dynamic PET in Human Xenograft Tumors in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Madsen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility to perform voxel-wise kinetic modeling on datasets obtained from tumor-bearing mice that underwent dynamic PET scans with 64Cu-ATSM and extract useful physiological parameters.METHODS: Tumor-bearing mice underwent 90-min dynamic PET scans...... relevant parameters from voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis to be used for preclinical validation of 64Cu-ATSM as a hypoxia-specific PET tracer....

  20. Tumor Oxygen Dynamics: Correlation of In Vivo MRI with Histological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawen Zhao

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Tumor oxygenation has long been recognized as a significant factor influencing cancer therapy. We recently established a novel magnetic resonance in vivo approach to measuring regional tumor oxygen tension, FREDOM (Fluorocarbon Relaxometry Using Echo Planar Imaging for Dynamic Oxygen Mapping, using hexafluorobenzene (HFB as the reporter molecule. We have now investigated oxygen dynamics in the two Dunning prostate R3327 rat tumor sublines, AT1 and H. FREDOM revealed considerable intratumoral heterogeneity in the distribution of pO2 values in both sublines. The anaplastic fastergrowing AT1 tumors were more hypoxic compared with the size-matched, well-differentiated, and slower-growing H tumors. Respiratory challenge with oxygen produced significant increases in mean and median pO2 in all the H tumors (P3 cm3. Immunohistochemical studies using the hypoxia marker, pimonidazole, and the vascular endothelial cell marker, CD31, confirmed that the H tumors had more extensive vasculature and less hypoxia than the AT1 tumors. These results further validate the utilization of FREDOM to monitor tumor oxygenation and concur with the hypothesis that the level of hypoxia is related to tumor growth rate and poor vascularity.

  1. THE EFFECT OF THE THICKNESS OF A PACKED BED ON THE DYNAMIC AND THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A SOLAR DRYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S KHALDI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drying food in the sun is a safe, easy and economical way to preserve food, especially fruits. Cabinet dryers are the most popular equipment for fruit drying. Because of intermittent nature of solar energy, storage is required for uninterrupted supply in order to match the needs. The main objective of this study is to assess effectiveness of continuous solar dryer integrated with packed bed as thermal storage with natural airflow for drying figs (Ficuscarica. The cabinet dryer were envisaged theoretically (computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The distribution of the velocity and temperature of air within the solar dryer were presented during one day of August and under the climate conditions of Tlemcen (Algeria.  The effects of presence of a packed bed on the distribution of velocity and temperature of airflow and on the temperature of figs were analyzed. The results show that the solar dryer design, incorporating a packed bed enhances the capabilities and performance of the solar dryer, through increasing time of drying.

  2. Two-compartmental population balance modeling of a pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huolong; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-11-20

    In this work a two-compartmental population balance model (TCPBM) was proposed to model a pulsed top-spray fluidized bed granulation. The proposed TCPBM considered the spatially heterogeneous granulation mechanisms of the granule growth by dividing the granulator into two perfectly mixed zones of the wetting compartment and drying compartment, in which the aggregation mechanism was assumed in the wetting compartment and the breakage mechanism was considered in the drying compartment. The sizes of the wetting and drying compartments were constant in the TCPBM, in which 30% of the bed was the wetting compartment and 70% of the bed was the drying compartment. The exchange rate of particles between the wetting and drying compartments was determined by the details of the flow properties and distribution of particles predicted by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The experimental validation has shown that the proposed TCPBM can predict evolution of the granule size and distribution within the granulator under different binder spray operating conditions accurately. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A multiplexed microfluidic system for evaluation of dynamics of immune-tumor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, N; Doty, D; Zielstorff, M; Kariv, I; Moy, L Y; Gimbel, A; Chevillet, J R; Lowry, N; Santos, J; Mott, V; Kratchman, L; Lau, T; Addona, G; Chen, H; Borenstein, J T

    2018-05-25

    Recapitulation of the tumor microenvironment is critical for probing mechanisms involved in cancer, and for evaluating the tumor-killing potential of chemotherapeutic agents, targeted therapies and immunotherapies. Microfluidic devices have emerged as valuable tools for both mechanistic studies and for preclinical evaluation of therapeutic agents, due to their ability to precisely control drug concentrations and gradients of oxygen and other species in a scalable and potentially high throughput manner. Most existing in vitro microfluidic cancer models are comprised of cultured cancer cells embedded in a physiologically relevant matrix, collocated with vascular-like structures. However, the recent emergence of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) as a powerful therapeutic modality against many cancers has created a need for preclinical in vitro models that accommodate interactions between tumors and immune cells, particularly for assessment of unprocessed tumor fragments harvested directly from patient biopsies. Here we report on a microfluidic model, termed EVIDENT (ex vivo immuno-oncology dynamic environment for tumor biopsies), that accommodates up to 12 separate tumor biopsy fragments interacting with flowing tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in a dynamic microenvironment. Flow control is achieved with a single pump in a simple and scalable configuration, and the entire system is constructed using low-sorption materials, addressing two principal concerns with existing microfluidic cancer models. The system sustains tumor fragments for multiple days, and permits real-time, high-resolution imaging of the interaction between autologous TILs and tumor fragments, enabling mapping of TIL-mediated tumor killing and testing of various ICI treatments versus tumor response. Custom image analytic algorithms based on machine learning reported here provide automated and quantitative assessment of experimental results. Initial studies indicate that the system is capable of

  4. Prospective Randomized Trial of Prone Accelerated Intensity Modulated Breast Radiation Therapy With a Daily Versus Weekly Boost to the Tumor Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Benjamin T.; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F.; Li, Xiaochun; Shin, Samuel M.; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Guth, Amber; Roses, Daniel F.; Hitchen, Christine J.; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Dewyngaert, J. Keith; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a prospective randomized trial comparing a daily versus weekly boost to the tumor cavity during the course of accelerated radiation to the breast with patients in the prone position. Methods and Materials: From 2009 to 2012, 400 patients with stage 0 to II breast cancer who had undergone segmental mastectomy participated in an institutional review board–approved trial testing prone breast radiation therapy to 40.5 Gy in 15 fractions 5 d/wk to the whole breast, after randomization to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy, on Friday. The present noninferiority trial tested the primary hypothesis that a weekly boost produced no more acute toxicity than did a daily boost. The recurrence-free survival was estimated for both treatment arms using the Kaplan-Meier method; the relative risk of recurrence or death was estimated, and the 2 arms were compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up period of 45 months, no deaths related to breast cancer had occurred. The weekly boost regimen produced no more grade ≥2 acute toxicity than did the daily boost regimen (8.1% vs 10.4%; noninferiority Z = −2.52; P=.006). No statistically significant difference was found in the cumulative incidence of long-term fibrosis or telangiectasia of grade ≥2 between the 2 arms (log-rank P=.923). Two local and two distant recurrences developed in the daily treatment arm and three local and one distant developed in the weekly arm. The 4-year recurrence-free survival rate was not different between the 2 treatment arms (98% for both arms). Conclusions: A tumor bed boost delivered either daily or weekly was tolerated similarly during accelerated prone breast radiation therapy, with excellent control of disease and comparable cosmetic results.

  5. Prospective Randomized Trial of Prone Accelerated Intensity Modulated Breast Radiation Therapy With a Daily Versus Weekly Boost to the Tumor Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Benjamin T.; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Li, Xiaochun [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Shin, Samuel M.; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Roses, Daniel F. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Hitchen, Christine J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Rosenstein, Barry S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Dewyngaert, J. Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: formenti@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a prospective randomized trial comparing a daily versus weekly boost to the tumor cavity during the course of accelerated radiation to the breast with patients in the prone position. Methods and Materials: From 2009 to 2012, 400 patients with stage 0 to II breast cancer who had undergone segmental mastectomy participated in an institutional review board–approved trial testing prone breast radiation therapy to 40.5 Gy in 15 fractions 5 d/wk to the whole breast, after randomization to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy, on Friday. The present noninferiority trial tested the primary hypothesis that a weekly boost produced no more acute toxicity than did a daily boost. The recurrence-free survival was estimated for both treatment arms using the Kaplan-Meier method; the relative risk of recurrence or death was estimated, and the 2 arms were compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up period of 45 months, no deaths related to breast cancer had occurred. The weekly boost regimen produced no more grade ≥2 acute toxicity than did the daily boost regimen (8.1% vs 10.4%; noninferiority Z = −2.52; P=.006). No statistically significant difference was found in the cumulative incidence of long-term fibrosis or telangiectasia of grade ≥2 between the 2 arms (log-rank P=.923). Two local and two distant recurrences developed in the daily treatment arm and three local and one distant developed in the weekly arm. The 4-year recurrence-free survival rate was not different between the 2 treatment arms (98% for both arms). Conclusions: A tumor bed boost delivered either daily or weekly was tolerated similarly during accelerated prone breast radiation therapy, with excellent control of disease and comparable cosmetic results.

  6. Single-level dynamic spiral CT of hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation between imaging features and tumor angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Weixia; Min Pengqiu; Song Bin; Xiao Bangliang; Liu Yan; Wang Wendong; Chen Xian; Xu Jianying

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of the enhancement imaging features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and relevant parameters revealed by single-level dynamic spiral CT scanning with tumor microvessel counting (MVC). Methods: The study included 26 histopathologically proven HCC patients. Target-slice dynamic scanning and portal venous phase scanning were performed for all patients. The time-density curves were generated with measurement of relevant parameters including: peak value (PV) and contrast enhancement ratio (CER), and the gross enhancement morphology analyzed. Histopathological slides were carefully prepared for the standard F8RA and VEGF immunohistochemical staining and tumor microvessel counting and calculation of VEGF expression percentage of tumor cells. The enhancement imaging features of HCC lesions were correlatively studied with tumor MVC and VEGF expression. Results: Peak value of HCC lesions were 7.9 to 75.2 HU, CER were 3.8% to 36.0%. MVC were 6 to 91, and the VEGF expression percentage were 32.1% to 78.3%. The PV and CER were significantly correlated with tumor tissue MVC (r = 0.508 and 0.423, P < 0.01 and 0.05 respectively). There were no correlations between PV and CER and VEGF expression percentage. Both the patterns of time-density curve and the gross enhancement morphology of HCC lesions were also correlated with tumor MVC, and reflected the distribution characteristics of tumor microvessels within HCC lesions. A close association was found between the likelihood of intrahepatic metastasis of HCC lesions with densely enhanced pseudo capsules and the presence of rich tumor microvessels within these pseudo capsules. Conclusion: The parameters and the enhancement imaging features of HCC lesions on target-slice dynamic scanning are correlated with tumor MVC, and can reflect the distribution characteristics of tumor microvessels within HCC lesions. Dynamic spiral CT scanning is a valuable means to assess the angiogenic activity and

  7. Gastric stromal tumor: two-phase dynamic CT findings with water as oral contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Se Hyo; Cho, June Sik; Shin, Kyung Sook; Jeong, Ki Ho; Park, Jin Yong; Yu, Ho Jun; Kim, Young Min; Jeon, Kwang Jin

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate two-phase dynamic CT with water as oral contrast agents in the CT diagnosis of gastric stromal tumors. We retrospectively reviewed the CT findings in 21 patients with pathologically proven gastric stromal tumors. Six were found to be benign, twelve were malignant, and there were three cases of STUMP (stromal tumor uncertain malignant potential). Two-phase dynamic CT scans with water as oral contrast agents were obtained 60-70 secs (portal phase) and 3 mins (equilibrium phase) after the start of IV contrast administration. We determined the size, growth pattern, and enhancement pattern of the tumors and overlying mucosa, the presence or absence of ulceration and necrosis, tumor extent, and lymph nod and distant metastasis. The CT and pathologic findings were correlated. All six benign tumors and three STUMP were less than 5.5 cm in size, and during the portal phase showed round endogastric masses with highly enhanced, intact overlying mucosa. Twelve malignant tumors were 4.5-15.5 cm in size (mean, 11.5 cm); an endogastric mass was seen in three cases, an exogastric mass in one, and a mixed pattern in eight. On portal phase images the tumors were not significantly enhanced, but highly enhanced feeding vessels were noted in five larger tumors (greater than 10 cm). All 12 malignant tumors showed ulceration and necrosis, and interruption of overlying mucosa was clearly seen during the portal phase. We were readily able to evaluate tumor extent during this phase, and in ten malignant tumors there was no invasion of adjacent organs. Seven malignant tumors showed air density within their necrotic portion (p less than 0.05). On equilibrium phase images, all malignant tumors showed heterogeneous enhancement due to necrosis, and poorly enhanced overlying mucosa. Dynamic CT during the portal phase with water as oral contrast agents was useful for depicting the submucosal origin of gastric stromal tumors and for evaluating the extent of malignant stromal tumors. Our

  8. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungJoon Cho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995. Magn Reson Med 33, 506– 514 derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  9. Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for submucosal palatal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Hara, Marina; Katase, Naoki; Hisatomi, Miki; Unetsubo, Teruhisa; Konouchi, Hironobu; Takenobu, Toshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) for differentiating between benign and malignant tumors in the palate. Materials and methods: 26 patients with submucosal palatal tumors were preoperatively examined using DCE-MRI. Their maximum contrast index (CImax), time of CImax (Tmax), and washout ratios (WR300 and WR600) were determined from contrast index curves. The submucosal palatal tumors were divided into two groups according to their Tmax values: the early enhancement group (Tmax 2 = 0.92, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Tmax is a useful parameter for distinguishing between benign and malignant submucosal palatal tumors.

  10. Assessment of Tumor Radioresponsiveness and Metastatic Potential by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Gulliksrud, Kristine; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide clinically useful biomarkers for personalized cancer treatment. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the radioresponsiveness and metastatic potential of tumors. Methods and Materials: R-18 melanoma xenografts growing in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as experimental tumor models. Fifty tumors were subjected to DCE-MRI, and parametric images of K trans (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v e (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The tumors were irradiated after the DCE-MRI, either with a single dose of 10 Gy for detection of radiobiological hypoxia (30 tumors) or with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h for assessment of radioresponsiveness (20 tumors). The host mice were then euthanized and examined for lymph node metastases, and the primary tumors were resected for measurement of cell survival in vitro. Results: Tumors with hypoxic cells showed significantly lower K trans values than tumors without significant hypoxia (p trans decreased with increasing cell surviving fraction for tumors given fractionated radiation treatment (p trans values than tumors in metastasis-negative mice (p e and tumor hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic potential could not be detected. Conclusions: R-18 tumors with low K trans values are likely to be resistant to radiation treatment and have a high probability of developing lymph node metastases. The general validity of these observations should be investigated further by studying preclinical tumor models with biological properties different from those of the R-18 tumors.

  11. Experimental and numerical validation of a two-region-designed pebble bed reactor with dynamic core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S.Y.; Yang, X.T.; Tang, Z.W.; Wang, W.J.; Tu, J.Y.; Liu, Z.Y.; Li, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The experimental installation has been built to investigate the pebble flow. ► The feasibility of two-region pebble bed reactor has been verified. ► The pebble flow is more uniform in a taller vessel than that in a lower vessel. ► Larger base cone angle will decrease the scale of the stagnant zone. - Abstract: The pebble flow is the principal issue for the design of the pebble bed reactor. In order to verify the feasibility of a two-region-designed pebble bed reactor, the experimental installation with a taller vessel has been built, which is proportional to the real pebble bed reactor. With the aid of the experimental installation, the stable establishment and maintenance of the two-region arrangement has been verified, at the same time, the applicability of the DEM program has been also validated. Research results show: (1) The pebble's bouncing on the free surface is an important factor for the mixing of the different colored pebbles. (2) Through the guide plates installed in the top of the pebble packing, the size of the mixing zone can be reduced from 6–7 times to 3–4 times the pebble diameter. (3) The relationship between the width of the central region and the ratio of loading pebbles is approximately linear in the taller vessel. (4) The heighten part of the pebble packing can improve the uniformity of the flowing in the lower. (5) To increase the base cone angle can decrease the scale of the stagnant zone. All of these conclusions are meaningful to the design of the real pebble reactor.

  12. Fluid dynamics of air in a packed bed: velocity profiles and the continuum model assumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEGRINI A. L.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Air flow through packed beds was analyzed experimentally under conditions ranging from those that reinforce the effect of the wall on the void fraction to those that minimize it. The packing was spherical particles, with a tube-to-particle diameter ratio (D/dp between 3 and 60. Air flow rates were maintained between 1.3 and 4.44 m3/min, and gas velocity was measured with a Pitot tube positioned above the bed exit. Measurements were made at various radial and angular coordinate values, allowing the distribution of air flow across the bed to be described in detail. Comparison of the experimentally observed radial profiles with those derived from published equations revealed that at high D/dp ratios the measured and calculated velocity profiles behaved similarly. At low ratios, oscillations in the velocity profiles agreed with those in the voidage profiles, signifying that treating the porous medium as a continuum medium is questionable in these cases.

  13. A deterministic and stochastic model for the system dynamics of tumor-immune responses to chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangdong; Li, Qingze; Pan, Jianxin

    2018-06-01

    Modern medical studies show that chemotherapy can help most cancer patients, especially for those diagnosed early, to stabilize their disease conditions from months to years, which means the population of tumor cells remained nearly unchanged in quite a long time after fighting against immune system and drugs. In order to better understand the dynamics of tumor-immune responses under chemotherapy, deterministic and stochastic differential equation models are constructed to characterize the dynamical change of tumor cells and immune cells in this paper. The basic dynamical properties, such as boundedness, existence and stability of equilibrium points, are investigated in the deterministic model. Extended stochastic models include stochastic differential equations (SDEs) model and continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) model, which accounts for the variability in cellular reproduction, growth and death, interspecific competitions, and immune response to chemotherapy. The CTMC model is harnessed to estimate the extinction probability of tumor cells. Numerical simulations are performed, which confirms the obtained theoretical results.

  14. Evolutionary Dynamics of Tumor-Stroma Interactions in Multiple Myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Salimi Sartakhti

    Full Text Available Cancer cells and stromal cells cooperate by exchanging diffusible factors that sustain tumor growth, a form of frequency-dependent selection that can be studied in the framework of evolutionary game theory. In the case of multiple myeloma, three types of cells (malignant plasma cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts exchange growth factors with different effects, and tumor-stroma interactions have been analysed using a model of cooperation with pairwise interactions. Here we show that a model in which growth factors have autocrine and paracrine effects on multiple cells, a more realistic assumption for tumor-stroma interactions, leads to different results, with implications for disease progression and treatment. In particular, the model reveals that reducing the number of malignant plasma cells below a critical threshold can lead to their extinction and thus to restore a healthy balance between osteoclast and osteoblast, a result in line with current therapies against multiple myeloma.

  15. Process Stability Identification Through Dynamic Study of Single-bed Ammonia Reactor with Feed-Effluent Heat Exchanger (FEHE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhi Tri Partono

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In ammonia reactor system, a feed-effluent heat exchanger (FEHE is typically installed to utilize reaction-generated heat to heat the reactor’s feed. Utilizing energy from exothermic reaction to the incoming feed stream is often called “autothermic operation”. Despite the advantage of FEHE, there is a risk of utilizing FEHE in a reactor system such as instability of process temperature or known as hysteresis. Hysteresis phenomena in chemical process could cause operational problems, for example it could damage the integrity of the equipment’s material. This paper aims to evaluate the dynamic behavior of a single-bed ammonia reactor with FEHE, particularly to propose a way to prevent instability within the system. The dynamic simulation of the single-bed ammonia reactor with FEHE was performed with Aspen HYSYS v8.8. The result of the simulation result shows that hysteresis phenomenon in the ammonia reactor system occurs when the feed’s temperature is below a certain value. If the feed temperature reaches that value, the temperature of the reactor’s outlet oscillates. One of the solution to keep the feed temperature above that critical value is by installing a trim heater within the system. Based on the simulation, trim heater installation within the system is able to prevent hysteresis in the system evaluated.

  16. Creating a Test Validated Structural Dynamic Finite Element Model of the Multi-Utility Technology Test Bed Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson S.

    2014-01-01

    Small modeling errors in the finite element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of Multi Utility Technology Test Bed, X-56A, aircraft is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression, and therefore in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of X-56A. The ground vibration test validated structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A is improved using a model tuning tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of the X-56A have been improved in a single optimization run.

  17. Validating Experimental Bedform Dynamics on Cohesive Sand-Mud Beds in the Dee Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Jaco H.; Baker, Megan; Hope, Julie; Malarkey, Jonathan; Rocha, Renata

    2014-05-01

    Recent laboratory experiments and field measurements have shown that small quantities of cohesive clay, and in particular 'sticky' biological polymers, within a sandy substrate dramatically reduce the development rate of sedimentary bedforms, with major implications for sediment transport rate calculations and process interpretations from the sedimentary record. FURTHER INFORMATION Flow and sediment transport predictions from sedimentary structures found in modern estuaries and within estuarine geological systems are impeded by an almost complete lack of process-based knowledge of the behaviour of natural sediments that consist of mixtures of cohesionless sand and biologically-active cohesive mud. Indeed, existing predictive models are largely based on non-organic cohesionless sands, despite the fact that mud, in pure form or mixed with sand, is the most common sediment on Earth and also the most biologically active interface across a range of Earth-surface environments, including rivers and shallow seas. The multidisciplinary COHBED project uses state-of-the-art laboratory and field technologies to measure the erosional properties of mixed cohesive sediment beds and the formation and stability of sedimentary bedforms on these beds, integrating the key physical and biological processes that govern bed evolution. The development of current ripples on cohesive mixed sediment beds was investigated as a function of physical control on bed cohesion versus biological control on bed cohesion. These investigations included laboratory flume experiments in the Hydrodynamics Laboratory (Bangor University) and field experiments in the Dee estuary (at West Kirby near Liverpool). The flume experiments showed that winnowing of fine-grained cohesive sediment, including biological stabilisers, is an important process affecting the development rate, size and shape of the cohesive bedforms. The ripples developed progressively slower as the kaolin clay fraction in the sandy substrate

  18. Quality of Life in Women Undergoing Breast Irradiation in a Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating Different Tumor Bed Boost Fractionations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkel, Morgan A.; Cooper, Benjamin T.; Li, Xiaochun; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in breast cancer patient-reported quality of life (QOL) between 2 radiation tumor bed boost dose regimens. Methods and Materials: Four hundred patients with stage 0, I, or II breast cancer who underwent segmental mastectomy with sentinel node biopsy and/or axillary node dissection were treated with either a daily or weekly boost. Patients were treated prone to 40.5 Gy/15 fractions to the whole breast, 5 days per week. Patients were randomized to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy on Friday. Patients completed 6 validated QOL survey instruments at baseline, last week of treatment (3 weeks), 45-60 days from the completion of radiation treatment, and at 2-year follow-up. Results: There were no statistically significance differences in responses to the 6 QOL instruments between the daily and weekly radiation boost regimens, even after adjustment for important covariates. However, several changes in responses over time occurred in both arms, including worsening functional status, cosmetic status, and breast-specific pain at the end of treatment as compared with before and 45 to 60 days after the conclusion of treatment. Conclusions: Whole-breast, prone intensity modulated radiation has similar outcomes in QOL measures whether given with a daily or weekly boost. This trial has generated the foundation for a current study of weekly versus daily radiation boost in women with early breast cancer in which 3-dimensional conformal radiation is allowed as a prospective stratification factor.

  19. Quality of Life in Women Undergoing Breast Irradiation in a Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating Different Tumor Bed Boost Fractionations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkel, Morgan A.; Cooper, Benjamin T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Li, Xiaochun [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton-Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: formenti@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in breast cancer patient-reported quality of life (QOL) between 2 radiation tumor bed boost dose regimens. Methods and Materials: Four hundred patients with stage 0, I, or II breast cancer who underwent segmental mastectomy with sentinel node biopsy and/or axillary node dissection were treated with either a daily or weekly boost. Patients were treated prone to 40.5 Gy/15 fractions to the whole breast, 5 days per week. Patients were randomized to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy on Friday. Patients completed 6 validated QOL survey instruments at baseline, last week of treatment (3 weeks), 45-60 days from the completion of radiation treatment, and at 2-year follow-up. Results: There were no statistically significance differences in responses to the 6 QOL instruments between the daily and weekly radiation boost regimens, even after adjustment for important covariates. However, several changes in responses over time occurred in both arms, including worsening functional status, cosmetic status, and breast-specific pain at the end of treatment as compared with before and 45 to 60 days after the conclusion of treatment. Conclusions: Whole-breast, prone intensity modulated radiation has similar outcomes in QOL measures whether given with a daily or weekly boost. This trial has generated the foundation for a current study of weekly versus daily radiation boost in women with early breast cancer in which 3-dimensional conformal radiation is allowed as a prospective stratification factor.

  20. Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Early Response to a Vascular-Disrupting Agent with Dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Guo, Jinxia; Lang, Lixin; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Niu, Gang; Li, Quanzheng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the early response of tumors to a vascular-disrupting agent (VDA) VEGF121/recombinant toxin gelonin (rGel) using dynamic [(18)F]FPPRGD2 positron emission tomography (PET) and kinetic parameter estimation. Two tumor xenograft models: U87MG (highly vascularized) and A549 (moderately vascularized), were selected, and both were randomized into treatment and control groups. Sixty-minute dynamic PET scans with [(18)F]FPPRGD2 that targets to integrin αvβ3 were performed at days 0 (baseline), 1, and 3 since VEGF121/rGel treatment started. Dynamic PET-derived binding potential (BPND) and parametric maps were compared with tumor uptake (%ID/g) and the static PET image at 1 h after the tracer administration. The growth of U87MG tumor was obviously delayed upon VEGF121/rGel treatment. A549 tumor was not responsive to the same treatment. BPND of treated U87MG tumors decreased significantly at day 1 (p dynamic PET with [(18)F]FPPRGD2 shows advantages in distinguishing effective from ineffective treatment during the course of VEGF121/rGel therapy at early stage and is therefore more sensitive in assessing therapy response than static PET.

  1. Dynamics of Tumor Heterogeneity Derived from Clonal Karyotypic Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M. Laughney

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerical chromosomal instability is a ubiquitous feature of human neoplasms. Due to experimental limitations, fundamental characteristics of karyotypic changes in cancer are poorly understood. Using an experimentally inspired stochastic model, based on the potency and chromosomal distribution of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, we show that cancer cells have evolved to exist within a narrow range of chromosome missegregation rates that optimizes phenotypic heterogeneity and clonal survival. Departure from this range reduces clonal fitness and limits subclonal diversity. Mapping of the aneuploid fitness landscape reveals a highly favorable, commonly observed, near-triploid state onto which evolving diploid- and tetraploid-derived populations spontaneously converge, albeit at a much lower fitness cost for the latter. Finally, by analyzing 1,368 chromosomal translocation events in five human cancers, we find that karyotypic evolution also shapes chromosomal translocation patterns by selecting for more oncogenic derivative chromosomes. Thus, chromosomal instability can generate the heterogeneity required for Darwinian tumor evolution.

  2. Experimental study of vertical stress profiles of a confined granular bed under static and dynamic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandato, S; Cuq, B; Ruiz, T

    2012-07-01

    In a wet agglomeration process inside a low shear mixer, the blade function is to induce i) homogenization of the liquid sprayed on the powder surface and ii) a stress field able to transfer the mechanical energy at the particle scale. In this work we study the mechanical state of a confined powder bed through the analysis of stress distributions (by force measurements) in a rectangular cell in two cases: for a classical model powder (i.e. glass beads) and a complex powder (i.e. wheat semolina). Two types of vertical stress profiles are obtained according to the type of measurements carried out in the powder bed, either locally (at different positions in the cell) or globally (at the entire base). The global vertical stress profile follows Janssen's model and the local vertical stress profile highlights a critical length, identified as the percolation threshold of the force network, and a shielding length near the bottom, which is similar to an influence length of the side walls. In the context of wet agglomeration, the results allow to consider the role of the characteristic lengths in the mixing bowl under vertical mechanical solicitation.

  3. Dynamic interplay between the collagen scaffold and tumor evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Mikala; Rasch, Morten G; Weaver, Valerie M

    2010-01-01

    and remodeling of the ECM network regulate tissue tension, generate pathways for migration, and release ECM protein fragments to direct normal developmental processes such as branching morphogenesis. Collagens are major components of the ECM of which basement membrane type IV and interstitial matrix type I...... are the most prevalent. Here we discuss how abnormal expression, proteolysis and structure of these collagens influence cellular functions to elicit multiple effects on tumors, including proliferation, initiation, invasion, metastasis, and therapy response....

  4. A scaled experimental study of control blade insertion dynamics in Pebble-Bed Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buster, Grant C., E-mail: grant.buster@gmail.com; Laufer, Michael R.; Peterson, Per F.

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • A granular dynamics scaling methodology is discussed. • Control blade insertion in a representative pebble-bed core is experimentally studied. • Control blade insertion forces and pebble displacements are experimentally measured. • X-ray tomography techniques are used to observe pebble displacement distributions. - Abstract: Direct control element insertion into a pebble-bed reactor core is proposed as a viable control system in molten-salt-cooled pebble-bed reactors. Unlike helium-cooled pebble-bed reactors, this reactor type uses spherical fuel elements with near-neutral buoyancy in the molten-salt coolant, thus reducing contact forces on the fuel elements. This study uses the X-ray Pebble Bed Recirculation Experiment facility to measure the force required to insert a control element directly into a scaled pebble-bed. The required control element insertion force, and therefore the contact force on fuel elements, is measured to be well below recommended limits. Additionally, X-ray tomography is used to observe how the direct insertion of a control element physically displaces spherical fuel elements. The tomography results further support the viability of direct control element insertion into molten-salt-cooled pebble-bed reactor cores.

  5. Modeling wood dynamics, jam formation, and sediment storage in a gravel-bed stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, B. C.; Hassan, M. A.; Davidson, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    In small and intermediate sized streams, the interaction between wood and bed material transport often determines the nature of the physical habitat, which in turn influences the health of the stream's ecosystem. We present a stochastic model that can be used to simulate the effects on physical habitat of forest fires, climate change, and other environmental disturbances that alter wood recruitment. The model predicts large wood (LW) loads in a stream as well as the volume of sediment stored by the wood; while it is parameterized to describe gravel bed streams similar to a well-studied field prototype, Fishtrap Creek, British Columbia, it can be calibrated to other systems as well. In the model, LW pieces are produced and modified over time as a result of random tree-fall, LW breakage, LW movement, and piece interaction to form LW jams. Each LW piece traps a portion of the annual bed material transport entering the reach and releases the stored sediment when the LW piece is entrained and moved. The equations governing sediment storage are based on a set of flume experiments also scaled to the field prototype. The model predicts wood loads ranging from 70 m3/ha to more than 300 m3/ha, with a mean value of 178 m3/ha: both the range and the mean value are consistent with field data from streams with similar riparian forest types and climate. The model also predicts an LW jam spacing that is consistent with field data. Furthermore, our modeling results demonstrate that the high spatial and temporal variability in sediment storage, sediment transport, and channel morphology associated with LW-dominated streams occurs only when LW pieces interact and form jams. Model runs that do not include jam formation are much less variable. These results suggest that river restoration efforts using engineered LW pieces that are fixed in place and not permitted to interact will be less successful at restoring the geomorphic processes responsible for producing diverse, productive

  6. Dynamic Study of Feed-Effluent Heat Exchanger Addition on Double Bed Configuration Ammonia Reactor System within Varied Quenching Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhi Tri Partono

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is one of the most important industrial commodity due to its wide function. Ammonia synthesis reaction is an exotermic reaction. Therefore, Feed-Effluent Heat Exchanger (FEHE is added to increase thermal efficiency. However, FEHE could lead the process to experience hysteresis phenomenon due to interaction between equipments as one steady state T feed could result several T outlet. Hysteresis phenomenon may result asset losses like explosion, leakage, and loosing material integrity. Double bed reactor configuration allows us to use several operating parameters as variation to overcome hysteresis. In this review, quenching ratio was chosen to be that varied parameter. This study aims to determine how quenching ratio affects hysteresis zone by utilizing Aspen Hysys® V8.8 as simulation tool. Simulation showed that quenching ratio would narrow hysteresis zone yet increased extinction temperature that lower the conversion. Conversion profile showed that 0.2 quenching ratio got the highest conversion for system with bed volume ratio 2:1 while total volume was 30 m3. However, the feed temperature was fallen at hysteresis zone. Dynamic simulation showed that highest conversion feed temperature (10%ΔTf above extinct temperature was still able to preserve stability with descending temperature approach. Hysteresis itself started to occur at 1.7%ΔTf above extinct temperature

  7. DSNP models used in the pebble-bed HTGR dynamic simulation. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saphier, D.

    1984-04-01

    A detailed description is given of the components that were used in the DSNP simulation of the PNP-500 high temperature gas-cooled pebble-bed reactor. Each component presented in this report describes in detail the mathematical model that was used, and the assumptions that were made in developing the model. Most of the models were developed using basic physical principles with the simplication that could be justified on the basis of the requested accuracy. Most of the models were developed as either one dimensional or lumped parameter models. The heat transfer and flow correlations, which are mostly based on semiempirical correlations were either provided by KFA or were adapted from the available literature. A short description of DSNP is also given, with a comprehensive list of all the statements available in Rev. 4.1 of DSNP. (H.K.)

  8. Future Antarctic Bed Topography and Its Implications for Ice Sheet Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Surendra; Ivins, Erik R.; Larour, Eric Y.; Seroussi, Helene L.; Morlighem, Mathieu; Nowicki, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic bedrock is evolving as the solid Earth responds to the past and ongoing evolution of the ice sheet. A recently improved ice loading history suggests that the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) has generally been losing its mass since the Last Glacial Maximum. In a sustained warming climate, the AIS is predicted to retreat at a greater pace, primarily via melting beneath the ice shelves.We employ the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) capability of the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) to combine these past and future ice loadings and provide the new solid Earth computations for the AIS.We find that past loading is relatively less important than future loading for the evolution of the future bed topography. Our computations predict that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) may uplift by a few meters and a few tens of meters at years AD 2100 and 2500, respectively, and that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is likely to remain unchanged or subside minimally except around the Amery Ice Shelf. The Amundsen Sea Sector in particular is predicted to rise at the greatest rate; one hundred years of ice evolution in this region, for example, predicts that the coastline of Pine Island Bay will approach roughly 45mmyr-1 in viscoelastic vertical motion. Of particular importance, we systematically demonstrate that the effect of a pervasive and large GIA uplift in the WAIS is generally associated with the flattening of reverse bed slope, reduction of local sea depth, and thus the extension of grounding line (GL) towards the continental shelf. Using the 3-D higher-order ice flow capability of ISSM, such a migration of GL is shown to inhibit the ice flow. This negative feedback between the ice sheet and the solid Earth may promote stability in marine portions of the ice sheet in the future.

  9. Future Antarctic bed topography and its implications for ice sheet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, S.; Ivins, E. R.; Larour, E.; Seroussi, H.; Morlighem, M.; Nowicki, S.

    2014-06-01

    The Antarctic bedrock is evolving as the solid Earth responds to the past and ongoing evolution of the ice sheet. A recently improved ice loading history suggests that the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) has generally been losing its mass since the Last Glacial Maximum. In a sustained warming climate, the AIS is predicted to retreat at a greater pace, primarily via melting beneath the ice shelves. We employ the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) capability of the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) to combine these past and future ice loadings and provide the new solid Earth computations for the AIS. We find that past loading is relatively less important than future loading for the evolution of the future bed topography. Our computations predict that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) may uplift by a few meters and a few tens of meters at years AD 2100 and 2500, respectively, and that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is likely to remain unchanged or subside minimally except around the Amery Ice Shelf. The Amundsen Sea Sector in particular is predicted to rise at the greatest rate; one hundred years of ice evolution in this region, for example, predicts that the coastline of Pine Island Bay will approach roughly 45 mm yr-1 in viscoelastic vertical motion. Of particular importance, we systematically demonstrate that the effect of a pervasive and large GIA uplift in the WAIS is generally associated with the flattening of reverse bed slope, reduction of local sea depth, and thus the extension of grounding line (GL) towards the continental shelf. Using the 3-D higher-order ice flow capability of ISSM, such a migration of GL is shown to inhibit the ice flow. This negative feedback between the ice sheet and the solid Earth may promote stability in marine portions of the ice sheet in the future.

  10. Population dynamics of biofilm development during start-up of a butyrate-degrading fluidized-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zellner, G.; Geveke, M.; Diekmann, H. (Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mikrobiologie); Conway de Macario, E. (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research)

    1991-12-01

    Population dynamics during start-up of a fluidized-bed reactor with butyrate or butyrate plus acetate as sole substrates as well as biofilm development on the sand substratum were studied microbiologically, immunologically and by scanning electron microscopy. An adapted syntrophic consortium consisting of Syntrophospora sp., Methanothrix soehngenii, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus or Methanogenium sp. achieved high-rate butyrate degradation to methane and carbon dioxide. Desulfovibrio sp., Methanocorpusculum sp., and Methanobacterium sp. were also present in lower numbers. Immunological analysis demonstrated methanogens antigenically related to Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1, Methanosarcina mazei S6, M. thermophila TM1, Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus AZ and Methanothrix soehngenii Opfikon in the biofilm. Immunological analysis also showed that the organisms isolated from the butyrate-degrading culture used as a source of inoculum were related to M. soehngenii Opfikon, Methanobacterium formicium MF and Methanospirillum hungatei JF1. (orig.).

  11. Characterization of fluidization regime in circulating fluidized bed reactor with high solid particle concentration using computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalermsinsuwan, Benjapon; Thummakul, Theeranan; Piumsomboon, Pornpote [Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Gidaspow, Dimitri [Armour College of Engineering, Chicago (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The hydrodynamics inside a high solid particle concentration circulating fluidized bed reactor was investigated using computational fluid dynamics simulation. Compared to a low solid particle reactor, all the conventional fluidization regimes were observed. In addition, two unconventional fluidization regimes, circulating-turbulent and dense suspension bypassing regimes, were found with only primary gas injection. The circulating-turbulent fluidization regime showed uniformly dense solid particle distribution in all the system directions, while the dense suspension bypassing fluidization regime exhibited the flow of solid particles at only one side system wall. Then, comprehensive fluidization regime clarification and mapping were evaluated using in-depth system parameters. In the circulating-turbulent fluidization regime, the total granular temperature was low compared to the adjacent fluidization regimes. In the dense suspension bypassing fluidization regime, the highest total granular temperature was obtained. The circulating-turbulent and dense suspension bypassing fluidization regimes are suitable for sorption and transportation applications, respectively.

  12. Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevent, identify, and treat bed bug infestations using EPA’s step-by-step guides, based on IPM principles. Find pesticides approved for bed bug control, check out the information clearinghouse, and dispel bed bug myths.

  13. Minor salivary gland tumors in the oral cavity: Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Hara, Marina; Katase, Naoki; Asaumi, Jun-ichi; Hisatomi, Miki; Unetsubo, Teruhisa; Konouchi, Hironobu; Takenobu, Toshihiko; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for minor salivary gland tumors in the oral cavity. Materials and methods: Thirty-two patients with minor salivary gland tumors were examined preoperatively using DCE-MRI. Their maximum contrast index (CImax), time of CImax (Tmax), Tpeak; i.e., the time that corresponded to the CImax × 0.90, and washout ratios (WR300 and WR600) were determined from contrast index (CI) curves. We compared these parameters between benign and malignant tumors and among the different histopathological types of minor salivary gland tumors. Then, we categorized the patients’ CI curves into four patterns (gradual increase, rapid increase with high washout ratio, rapid increase with low washout, and flat). Results: Statistically significant differences in Tmax (P = 0.004) and Tpeak (P = 0.002) were observed between the benign and malignant tumors. Regarding each histopathological tumor type, significant differences in Tmax (P < 0.001), Tpeak (P < 0.001), and WR600 (P = 0.026) were observed between the pleomorphic adenomas and mucoepidermoid carcinomas. It was difficult to distinguish between benign and malignant tumors using our CI curve classification because that two-thirds of the cases were classified into the same type (gradual increase). Conclusion: The DCE-MRI parameters of minor salivary gland tumors contributed little to their differential diagnosis compared with those for major salivary gland tumors. During the diagnosis of minor salivary gland tumors, Tmax is useful for distinguishing between benign and malignant tumors

  14. Preliminary experience using dynamic MRI at 3.0 Tesla for evaluation of soft tissue tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Michael Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, So-Yeon; Jung, Joon-Yong

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the use of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) at 3.0 T for differentiating the benign from malignant soft tissue tumors. Also we aimed to assess whether the shorter length of DCE-MRI protocols are adequate, and to evaluate the effect of temporal resolution. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, at 3.0 T with a 1 second temporal resolution in 13 patients with pathologically confirmed soft tissue tumors, was analyzed. Visual assessment of time-signal curves, subtraction images, maximal relative enhancement at the first (maximal peak enhancement [Emax]/1) and second (Emax/2) minutes, Emax, steepest slope calculated by using various time intervals (5, 30, 60 seconds), and the start of dynamic enhancement were analyzed. The 13 tumors were comprised of seven benign and six malignant soft tissue neoplasms. Washout on time-signal curves was seen on three (50%) malignant tumors and one (14%) benign one. The most discriminating DCE-MRI parameter was the steepest slope calculated, by using at 5-second intervals, followed by Emax/1 and Emax/2. All of the steepest slope values occurred within 2 minutes of the dynamic study. Start of dynamic enhancement did not show a significant difference, but no malignant tumor rendered a value greater than 14 seconds. The steepest slope and early relative enhancement have the potential for differentiating benign from malignant soft tissue tumors. Short-length rather than long-length DCE-MRI protocol may be adequate for our purpose. The steepest slope parameters require a short temporal resolution, while maximal peak enhancement parameter may be more optimal for a longer temporal resolution.

  15. Application of ELJ to create and maintain side channels in a dynamic gravel bed river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabbe, E.; Crowe Curran, J.; Ockelford, A.

    2017-12-01

    Braided and anastomosing rivers create and maintain a large amount of side channel habitat. Unfortunately, many rivers that were once multi-channel rivers have been constrained to single thread channels as a consequence of land use changes that occurred in the 19th and 20th centuries or earlier. An increasingly common management goal today is the re-creation of self-maintaining side and tributary habitat through as natural means as possible. This work examines the geomorphic history of one such channel and the success of recent rehabilitation efforts. Our case study comes from the South Fork Nooksack River in the Cascades Range in Washington State. The Nooksack River is a gravel and sand bed channel with a snowmelt dominated hydrograph. Engineered log jams (ELJ) have been employed to direct flow into side and chute channels with the larger goals of increasing overall channel complexity and salmon spawning opportunities. ELJs have been constructed on the channel since the 2000s, and the ELJs in the study reaches range in age up to 10 years. The size and design of individual jams within the reach vary, enabling a comparison between jam types. ELJs are evaluated for their ability to maintain gravel bar locations and open tributary channels through the snowmelt season over the reach scale. Additional goals of trapping wood onto the jams and existing bars, stabilizing channel banks, and allowing for the growth of bar vegetation are also examined.

  16. Microbial community composition and dynamics of moving bed biofilm reactor systems treating municipal sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kristi; Turner, Susan J

    2012-02-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems are increasingly used for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, yet in contrast to activated sludge (AS) systems, little is known about their constituent microbial communities. This study investigated the community composition of two municipal MBBR wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Wellington, New Zealand. Monthly samples comprising biofilm and suspended biomass were collected over a 12-month period. Bacterial and archaeal community composition was determined using a full-cycle community approach, including analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA). Differences in microbial community structure and abundance were observed between the two WWTPs and between biofilm and suspended biomass. Biofilms from both plants were dominated by Clostridia and sulfate-reducing members of the Deltaproteobacteria (SRBs). FISH analyses indicated morphological differences in the Deltaproteobacteria detected at the two plants and also revealed distinctive clustering between SRBs and members of the Methanosarcinales, which were the only Archaea detected and were present in low abundance (<5%). Biovolume estimates of the SRBs were higher in biofilm samples from one of the WWTPs which receives both domestic and industrial waste and is influenced by seawater infiltration. The suspended communities from both plants were diverse and dominated by aerobic members of the Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. This study represents the first detailed analysis of microbial communities in full-scale MBBR systems and indicates that this process selects for distinctive biofilm and planktonic communities, both of which differ from those found in conventional AS systems.

  17. Ultimate dynamics of the Kirschner-Panetta model: Tumor eradication and related problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, Konstantin E.; Krishchenko, Alexander P.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we consider the ultimate dynamics of the Kirschner-Panetta model which was created for studying the immune response to tumors under special types of immunotherapy. New ultimate upper bounds for compact invariant sets of this model are given, as well as sufficient conditions for the existence of a positively invariant polytope. We establish three types of conditions for the nonexistence of compact invariant sets in the domain of the tumor-cell population. Our main results are two types of conditions for global tumor elimination depending on the ratio between the proliferation rate of the immune cells and their mortality rate. These conditions are described in terms of simple algebraic inequalities imposed on model parameters and treatment parameters. Our theoretical studies of ultimate dynamics are complemented by numerical simulation results.

  18. Dynamic iodide trapping by tumor cells expressing the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingli, David; Bergert, Elizabeth R.; Bajzer, Zeljko; O'Connor, Michael K.; Russell, Stephen J.; Morris, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in combination with various radioactive isotopes has shown promise as a therapeutic gene in various tumor models. Therapy depends on adequate retention of the isotope in the tumor. We hypothesized that in the absence of iodide organification, isotope trapping is a dynamic process either due to slow efflux or re-uptake of the isotope by cells expressing NIS. Iodide efflux is slower in ARH-77 and K-562 cells expressing NIS compared to a thyroid cell line. Isotope retention half times varied linearly with the number of cells expressing NIS. With sufficient NIS expression, iodide efflux is a zero-order process. Efflux kinetics in the presence or absence of perchlorate also supports the hypothesis that iodide re-uptake occurs and contributes to the retention of the isotope in tumor cells. Iodide organification was insignificant. In vivo studies in tumors composed of mixed cell populations confirmed these observations

  19. Highly-sensitive and large-dynamic diffuse optical tomography system for breast tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenwen; Zhang, Limin; Yin, Guoyan; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) as a new functional imaging has important clinical applications in many aspects such as benign and malignant breast tumor detection, tumor staging and so on. For quantitative detection of breast tumor, a three-wavelength continuous-wave DOT prototype system combined the ultra-high sensitivity of the photon-counting detection and the measurement parallelism of the lock-in technique was developed to provide high temporal resolution, high sensitivity, large dynamic detection range and signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally, a CT-analogous scanning mode was proposed to cost-effectively increase the detection data. To evaluate the feasibility of the system, a series of assessments were conducted. The results demonstrate that the system can obtain high linearity, stability and negligible inter-wavelength crosstalk. The preliminary phantom experiments show the absorption coefficient is able to be successfully reconstructed, indicating that the system is one of the ideal platforms for optical breast tumor detection.

  20. Metabolic and microbial community dynamics during the hydrolytic and acidogenic fermentation in a leach-bed process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straeuber, Heike; Kleinsteuber, Sabine [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Bioenergy; UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Environmental Microbiology; Schroeder, Martina [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Bioenergy

    2012-12-15

    Biogas production from lignocellulosic feedstock not competing with food production can contribute to a sustainable bioenergy system. The hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step in the anaerobic digestion of solid substrates such as straw. Hence, a detailed understanding of the metabolic processes during the steps of hydrolysis and acidogenesis is required to improve process control strategies. The fermentation products formed during the acidogenic fermentation of maize silage as a model substrate in a leach-bed process were determined by gas and liquid chromatography. The bacterial community dynamics was monitored by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The community profiles were correlated with the process data using multivariate statistics. The batch process comprised three metabolic phases characterized by different fermentation products. The bacterial community dynamics correlated with the production of the respective metabolites. In phase 1, lactic and acetic acid fermentations dominated. Accordingly, bacteria of the genera Lactobacillus and Acetobacter were detected. In phase 2, the metabolic pathways shifted to butyric acid fermentation, accompanied by the production of hydrogen and carbon dioxide and a dominance of the genus Clostridium. In phase 3, phylotypes affiliated with Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae prevailed, accompanied by the formation of caproic and acetic acids, and a high gas production rate. A clostridial butyric type of fermentation was predominant in the acidogenic fermentation of maize silage, whereas propionic-type fermentation was marginal. As the metabolite composition resulting from acidogenesis affects the subsequent methanogenic performance, process control should focus on hydrolysis/acidogenesis when solid substrates are digested. (orig.)

  1. Dynamic model of organic pollutant degradation in three dimensional packed bed electrode reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Tianting; Wang, Yan; Yang, Hui; Wang, Tianlei; Cai, Wangfeng

    2018-04-21

    A dynamic model of semi-batch three-dimensional electrode reactor was established based on the limiting current density, Faraday's law, mass balance and a series of assumptions. Semi-batch experiments of phenol degradation were carried out in a three-dimensional electrode reactor packed with activated carbon under different conditions to verify the model. The factors such as the current density, the electrolyte concentration, the initial pH value, the flow rate of organic and the initial organic concentration were examined to know about the pollutant degradation in the three-dimensional electrode reactor. The various concentrations and logarithm of concentration of phenol with time were compared with the dynamic model. It was shown that the calculated data were in good agreement with experimental data in most cases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modulator Dynamics Shape the Design Space for Stepwise-Elution Simulated Moving Bed Chromatographic Separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Chris J; Velayudhan, Ajoy

    2018-03-31

    For proteins and other biological macromolecules, SMB chromatography is best operated non-isocratically. However, traditional modes of non-isocratic SMB operation generate significant mobile-phase modulator dynamics. The mechanisms by which these modulator dynamics affect a separation's success, and thus frame the design space, have yet to be explained quantitatively. Here, the dynamics of the modulator (e.g., salts in ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography) are explicitly accounted for. This leads to the elucidation of two new design constraints, presented as dimensionless numbers, which quantify the effects of the modulator phenomena and thus predict the success of a non-isocratic SMB separation. Consequently, these two new design constraints re-define the SMB design space. Computational and experimental studies at the boundaries of this design space corroborate the theoretical predictions. The design of efficient and robust operating conditions through use of the new design space is also demonstrated. © 2018 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Interplay between spatially explicit sediment sourcing, hierarchical river-network structure, and in-channel bed material sediment transport and storage dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Gran, Karen B.; Belmont, Patrick; Wilcock, Peter R.

    2017-05-01

    Understanding how sediment moves along source to sink pathways through watersheds—from hillslopes to channels and in and out of floodplains—is a fundamental problem in geomorphology. We contribute to advancing this understanding by modeling the transport and in-channel storage dynamics of bed material sediment on a river network over a 600 year time period. Specifically, we present spatiotemporal changes in bed sediment thickness along an entire river network to elucidate how river networks organize and process sediment supply. We apply our model to sand transport in the agricultural Greater Blue Earth River Basin in Minnesota. By casting the arrival of sediment to links of the network as a Poisson process, we derive analytically (under supply-limited conditions) the time-averaged probability distribution function of bed sediment thickness for each link of the river network for any spatial distribution of inputs. Under transport-limited conditions, the analytical assumptions of the Poisson arrival process are violated (due to in-channel storage dynamics) where we find large fluctuations and periodicity in the time series of bed sediment thickness. The time series of bed sediment thickness is the result of dynamics on a network in propagating, altering, and amalgamating sediment inputs in sometimes unexpected ways. One key insight gleaned from the model is that there can be a small fraction of reaches with relatively low-transport capacity within a nonequilibrium river network acting as "bottlenecks" that control sediment to downstream reaches, whereby fluctuations in bed elevation can dissociate from signals in sediment supply.

  4. [A review of progress of real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy technology based on dynamic multi-leaf collimator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fubo; Li, Guangjun; Shen, Jiuling; Li, Ligin; Bai, Sen

    2017-02-01

    While radiation treatment to patients with tumors in thorax and abdomen is being performed, further improvement of radiation accuracy is restricted by the tumor intra-fractional motion due to respiration. Real-time tumor tracking radiation is an optimal solution to tumor intra-fractional motion. A review of the progress of real-time dynamic multi-leaf collimator(DMLC) tracking is provided in the present review, including DMLC tracking method, time lag of DMLC tracking system, and dosimetric verification.

  5. Contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging of parasellar tumor using fast spin-echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Katsusuke; Ohue, Shiro; Ichikawa, Haruhisa; Saito, Masahiro; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Sakaki, Saburo; Miki, Hitoshi.

    1995-01-01

    We have applied a new dynamic MRI technique that uses a fast spin-echo sequence to parasellar tumors. This sequence has less susceptible effect and better spatial resolution than a gradient echo sequence, providing faster images than a short spin-echo sequence does. Image was obtained in the coronal or sagittal plane using a 1.5T clinical MRI system, and then, dynamic MR images were acquired every 10 to 20 sec after administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). The subjects were 12 patients (5 microadenomas, 5 macroadenomas and 2 Rathke's cleft cysts) and 5 normal volunteers. As for volunteers, the cavernous sinus, pituitary stalk and posterior pituitary gland were contrasted on the first image, followed by visualization of the proximal portion adjacent to the junction of the infundibulum and the anterior pituitary gland, and finally by contrasting the distal portion of the anterior pituitary gland. There was a difference with respect to tumor contrast between microadenomas and macroadenomas. In the case of the macroadenomas, the tumor was contrasted at the same time as, or faster than the anterior pituitary gland, while with the microadenomas the tumor was enhanced later than the anterior pituitary gland. No enhancement with contrast medium was seen in Rathke's cleft cysts. In addition, it was possible to differentiate a recurrent tumor from a piece of muscle placed at surgery since the images obtained by the fast spin-echo sequence were clearer than those obtained by gradient echo sequence. (author)

  6. Center of cancer systems biology second annual workshop--tumor metronomics: timing and dose level dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Klement, Giannoula Lakka

    2013-05-15

    Metronomic chemotherapy, the delivery of doses in a low, regular manner so as to avoid toxic side effects, was introduced over 12 years ago in the face of substantial clinical and preclinical evidence supporting its tumor-suppressive capability. It constituted a marked departure from the classic maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) strategy, which, given its goal of rapid eradication, uses dosing sufficiently intense to require rest periods between cycles to limit toxicity. Even so, upfront tumor eradication is frequently not achieved with MTD, whereupon a de facto goal of longer-term tumor control is often pursued. As metronomic dosing has shown tumor control capability, even for cancers that have become resistant to the same drug delivered under MTD, the question arises whether it may be a preferable alternative dosing approach from the outset. To date, however, our knowledge of the coupled dynamics underlying metronomic dosing is neither sufficiently well developed nor widely enough disseminated to establish its actual potential. Meeting organizers thus felt the time was right, armed with new quantitative approaches, to call a workshop on "Tumor Metronomics: Timing and Dose Level Dynamics" to explore prospects for gaining a deeper, systems-level appreciation of the metronomics concept. The workshop proved to be a forum in which experts from the clinical, biologic, mathematical, and computational realms could work together to clarify the principles and underpinnings of metronomics. Among other things, the need for significant shifts in thinking regarding endpoints to be used as clinical standards of therapeutic progress was recognized. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Numerical Simulation of a Tumor Growth Dynamics Model Using Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Qing

    Tumor cell growth models involve high-dimensional parameter spaces that require computationally tractable methods to solve. To address a proposed tumor growth dynamics mathematical model, an instance of the particle swarm optimization method was implemented to speed up the search process in the multi-dimensional parameter space to find optimal parameter values that fit experimental data from mice cancel cells. The fitness function, which measures the difference between calculated results and experimental data, was minimized in the numerical simulation process. The results and search efficiency of the particle swarm optimization method were compared to those from other evolutional methods such as genetic algorithms.

  8. Scaling dynamic response and destructive metabolism in an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system modulated by different external periodic interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzhi Shao

    Full Text Available On the basis of two universal power-law scaling laws, i.e. the scaling dynamic hysteresis in physics and the allometric scaling metabolism in biosystem, we studied the dynamic response and the evolution of an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system subjected to a periodic external intervention, which is equivalent to the scheme of a radiotherapy or chemotherapy, within the framework of the growth dynamics of tumor. Under the modulation of either an abrupt or a gradual change external intervention, the population density of tumors exhibits a dynamic hysteresis to the intervention. The area of dynamic hysteresis loop characterizes a sort of dissipative-therapeutic relationship of the dynamic responding of treated tumors with the dose consumption of accumulated external intervention per cycle of therapy. Scaling the area of dynamic hysteresis loops against the intensity of an external intervention, we deduced a characteristic quantity which was defined as the theoretical therapeutic effectiveness of treated tumor and related with the destructive metabolism of tumor under treatment. The calculated dose-effectiveness profiles, namely the dose cumulant per cycle of intervention versus the therapeutic effectiveness, could be well scaled into a universal quadratic formula regardless of either an abrupt or a gradual change intervention involved. We present a new concept, i.e., the therapy-effect matrix and the dose cumulant matrix, to expound the new finding observed in the growth and regression dynamics of a modulated anti-tumor system.

  9. Simultaneous tumor and surrogate motion tracking with dynamic MRI for radiation therapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyoun; Farah, Rana; Shea, Steven M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Hales, Russell; Lee, Junghoon

    2018-01-01

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is a major obstacle for achieving high-precision radiotherapy of cancers in the thoracic and abdominal regions. Surrogate-based estimation and tracking methods are commonly used in radiotherapy, but with limited understanding of quantified correlation to tumor motion. In this study, we propose a method to simultaneously track the lung tumor and external surrogates to evaluate their spatial correlation in a quantitative way using dynamic MRI, which allows real-time acquisition without ionizing radiation exposure. To capture the lung and whole tumor, four MRI-compatible fiducials are placed on the patient’s chest and upper abdomen. Two different types of acquisitions are performed in the sagittal orientation including multi-slice 2D cine MRIs to reconstruct 4D-MRI and two-slice 2D cine MRIs to simultaneously track the tumor and fiducials. A phase-binned 4D-MRI is first reconstructed from multi-slice MR images using body area as a respiratory surrogate and groupwise registration. The 4D-MRI provides 3D template volumes for different breathing phases. 3D tumor position is calculated by 3D-2D template matching in which 3D tumor templates in the 4D-MRI reconstruction and the 2D cine MRIs from the two-slice tracking dataset are registered. 3D trajectories of the external surrogates are derived via matching a 3D geometrical model of the fiducials to their segmentations on the 2D cine MRIs. We tested our method on ten lung cancer patients. Using a correlation analysis, the 3D tumor trajectory demonstrates a noticeable phase mismatch and significant cycle-to-cycle motion variation, while the external surrogate was not sensitive enough to capture such variations. Additionally, there was significant phase mismatch between surrogate signals obtained from the fiducials at different locations.

  10. Influence of bed material entrainment and non-Newtonian rheology on turbulent geophysical flows dynamics. Numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglit, M. E.; Yakubenko, A. E.; Yakubenko, T. A.

    2017-10-01

    This paper deals with the mathematical and numerical modeling of the propagation stage of geophysical gravity-driven flows, such as snow avalanches, mudflows, and rapid landslides. New mathematical models are presented which are based on full, not-depth-averaged equations of mechanics of continuous media. The models account for three important issues: non-Newtonian rheology of the moving material, entrainment of the bed material by the flow, and turbulence. The main objective is to investigate the effect of these three factors on the flow dynamics and on the value of the entrainment rate. To exclude the influence of many other factors, e.g., the complicated slope topography, only the motion down a long uniform slope with a constant inclination angle is studied numerically. Moreover, the entire flow from the front to the rear area was not modeled, but only its middle part where the flow is approximately uniform in length. One of the qualitative results is that in motion along homogeneous slope the mass entrainment increases the flow velocity and depth while the entrainment rate at large time tends to become constant which depends on the physical properties of the flow and the underlying material but not on the current values of the flow velocity and depth.

  11. Consistency and diversity of spike dynamics in the neurons of bed nucleus of stria terminalis of the rat: a dynamic clamp study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Szücs

    Full Text Available Neurons display a high degree of variability and diversity in the expression and regulation of their voltage-dependent ionic channels. Under low level of synaptic background a number of physiologically distinct cell types can be identified in most brain areas that display different responses to standard forms of intracellular current stimulation. Nevertheless, it is not well understood how biophysically different neurons process synaptic inputs in natural conditions, i.e., when experiencing intense synaptic bombardment in vivo. While distinct cell types might process synaptic inputs into different patterns of action potentials representing specific "motifs" of network activity, standard methods of electrophysiology are not well suited to resolve such questions. In the current paper we performed dynamic clamp experiments with simulated synaptic inputs that were presented to three types of neurons in the juxtacapsular bed nucleus of stria terminalis (jcBNST of the rat. Our analysis on the temporal structure of firing showed that the three types of jcBNST neurons did not produce qualitatively different spike responses under identical patterns of input. However, we observed consistent, cell type dependent variations in the fine structure of firing, at the level of single spikes. At the millisecond resolution structure of firing we found high degree of diversity across the entire spectrum of neurons irrespective of their type. Additionally, we identified a new cell type with intrinsic oscillatory properties that produced a rhythmic and regular firing under synaptic stimulation that distinguishes it from the previously described jcBNST cell types. Our findings suggest a sophisticated, cell type dependent regulation of spike dynamics of neurons when experiencing a complex synaptic background. The high degree of their dynamical diversity has implications to their cooperative dynamics and synchronization.

  12. Analysis of mice tumor models using dynamic MRI data and a dedicated software platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfke, H.; Maurer, E.; Klose, K.J. [Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Kohle, S.; Rascher-Friesenhausen, R.; Behrens, S.; Peitgen, H.O. [MeVis - Center for Medical Diagnostic Systems and Visualization, Bremen (Germany); Celik, I. [Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Surgery; Heverhagen, J.T. [Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: To implement a software platform (DynaVision) dedicated to analyze data from functional imaging of tumors with different mathematical approaches, and to test the software platform in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). Materials and Methods: A software program was developed for extraction and visualization of tissue perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced images. This includes regional parameter calculation from enhancement curves, parametric images (e.g., blood flow), animation, 3D visualization, two-compartment modeling a mode for comparing different datasets (e.g., therapy monitoring), and motion correction. We analyzed xenograft tumors from two pancreatic carcinoma cell lines (B x PC3 and ASPC1) implanted in 14 SCID mice after injection of Gd-DTPA into the tail vein. These data were correlated with histopathological findings. Results: Image analysis was completed in approximately 15 minutes per data set. The possibility of drawing and editing ROIs within the whole data set makes it easy to obtain quantitative data from the intensity-time curves. In one animal, motion artifacts reduced the image quality to a greater extent but data analysis was still possible after motion correction. Dynamic MRI of mice tumor models revealed a highly heterogeneous distribution of the contrast-enhancement curves and derived parameters, which correlated with differences in histopathology. ASPc1 tumors showed a more hypervascular type of curves with faster and higher signal enhancement rate (wash-in) and a faster signal decrease (wash-out). BXPC3 tumors showed a more hypovascular type with slower wash-in and wash-out. This correlated with the biological properties of the tumors. (orig.)

  13. Analysis of mice tumor models using dynamic MRI data and a dedicated software platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfke, H.; Maurer, E.; Klose, K.J.; Celik, I.; Heverhagen, J.T.; Ohio State Univ., Columbus

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To implement a software platform (DynaVision) dedicated to analyze data from functional imaging of tumors with different mathematical approaches, and to test the software platform in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). Materials and Methods: A software program was developed for extraction and visualization of tissue perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced images. This includes regional parameter calculation from enhancement curves, parametric images (e.g., blood flow), animation, 3D visualization, two-compartment modeling a mode for comparing different datasets (e.g., therapy monitoring), and motion correction. We analyzed xenograft tumors from two pancreatic carcinoma cell lines (B x PC3 and ASPC1) implanted in 14 SCID mice after injection of Gd-DTPA into the tail vein. These data were correlated with histopathological findings. Results: Image analysis was completed in approximately 15 minutes per data set. The possibility of drawing and editing ROIs within the whole data set makes it easy to obtain quantitative data from the intensity-time curves. In one animal, motion artifacts reduced the image quality to a greater extent but data analysis was still possible after motion correction. Dynamic MRI of mice tumor models revealed a highly heterogeneous distribution of the contrast-enhancement curves and derived parameters, which correlated with differences in histopathology. ASPc1 tumors showed a more hypervascular type of curves with faster and higher signal enhancement rate (wash-in) and a faster signal decrease (wash-out). BXPC3 tumors showed a more hypovascular type with slower wash-in and wash-out. This correlated with the biological properties of the tumors. (orig.)

  14. Real-time tumor ablation simulation based on the dynamic mode decomposition method

    KAUST Repository

    Bourantas, George C.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: The dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) method is used to provide a reliable forecasting of tumor ablation treatment simulation in real time, which is quite needed in medical practice. To achieve this, an extended Pennes bioheat model must be employed, taking into account both the water evaporation phenomenon and the tissue damage during tumor ablation. Methods: A meshless point collocation solver is used for the numerical solution of the governing equations. The results obtained are used by the DMD method for forecasting the numerical solution faster than the meshless solver. The procedure is first validated against analytical and numerical predictions for simple problems. The DMD method is then applied to three-dimensional simulations that involve modeling of tumor ablation and account for metabolic heat generation, blood perfusion, and heat ablation using realistic values for the various parameters. Results: The present method offers very fast numerical solution to bioheat transfer, which is of clinical significance in medical practice. It also sidesteps the mathematical treatment of boundaries between tumor and healthy tissue, which is usually a tedious procedure with some inevitable degree of approximation. The DMD method provides excellent predictions of the temperature profile in tumors and in the healthy parts of the tissue, for linear and nonlinear thermal properties of the tissue. Conclusions: The low computational cost renders the use of DMD suitable forin situ real time tumor ablation simulations without sacrificing accuracy. In such a way, the tumor ablation treatment planning is feasible using just a personal computer thanks to the simplicity of the numerical procedure used. The geometrical data can be provided directly by medical image modalities used in everyday practice. © 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Early circulating tumor DNA dynamics and clonal selection with palbociclib and fulvestrant for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Ben; Hrebien, Sarah; Morden, James P; Beaney, Matthew; Fribbens, Charlotte; Huang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Koehler, Maria; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Bliss, Judith M; Turner, Nicholas C

    2018-03-01

    CDK4/6 inhibition substantially improves progression-free survival (PFS) for women with advanced estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, although there are no predictive biomarkers. Early changes in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) level may provide early response prediction, but the impact of tumor heterogeneity is unknown. Here we use plasma samples from patients in the randomized phase III PALOMA-3 study of CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib and fulvestrant for women with advanced breast cancer and show that relative change in PIK3CA ctDNA level after 15 days treatment strongly predicts PFS on palbociclib and fulvestrant (hazard ratio 3.94, log-rank p = 0.0013). ESR1 mutations selected by prior hormone therapy are shown to be frequently sub clonal, with ESR1 ctDNA dynamics offering limited prediction of clinical outcome. These results suggest that early ctDNA dynamics may provide a robust biomarker for CDK4/6 inhibitors, with early ctDNA dynamics demonstrating divergent response of tumor sub clones to treatment.

  16. Islet Cell Tumors of the Pancreas: A Variety of Multiphase Dynamic Imaging Findings with Pathologic Correlations Focusing on Nonfunctioning Tumors and Insulinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yoo Jin; Yu, Jeong Sik; Park, Chan Il; Kwon, Ji Eun; Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Joo Hee; Kim, Ki Whang

    2010-01-01

    Islet cell tumors (ICTs) are rare pancreatic neoplasms of neuroendocrine origin, posing a diagnostic challenge to radiologists. We illustrated a spectrum of features of pancreatic ICTs that could be found on multiphase dynamic CT or MRI, and elucidated the histopathologic characteristics by determining the contrast enhancement pattern of the lesions. Various enhancement patterns were dependant on the internal composition of the tumor, that is, the proportion of vascular densities for early enhancement and non-hypervascular interstitial tissue for late enhancement regardless of the size or functional behavior. This knowledge of the imaging-pathologic spectrum of ICTs could be helpful for the proper differential diagnosis from other pancreatic tumors

  17. Toward the development of intrafraction tumor deformation tracking using a dynamic multi-leaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Yuanyuan; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Booth, Jeremy T. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intrafraction deformation limits targeting accuracy in radiotherapy. Studies show tumor deformation of over 10 mm for both single tumor deformation and system deformation (due to differential motion between primary tumors and involved lymph nodes). Such deformation cannot be adapted to with current radiotherapy methods. The objective of this study was to develop and experimentally investigate the ability of a dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) tracking system to account for tumor deformation. Methods: To compensate for tumor deformation, the DMLC tracking strategy is to warp the planned beam aperture directly to conform to the new tumor shape based on real time tumor deformation input. Two deformable phantoms that correspond to a single tumor and a tumor system were developed. The planar deformations derived from the phantom images in beam's eye view were used to guide the aperture warping. An in-house deformable image registration software was developed to automatically trigger the registration once new target image was acquired and send the computed deformation to the DMLC tracking software. Because the registration speed is not fast enough to implement the experiment in real-time manner, the phantom deformation only proceeded to the next position until registration of the current deformation position was completed. The deformation tracking accuracy was evaluated by a geometric target coverage metric defined as the sum of the area incorrectly outside and inside the ideal aperture. The individual contributions from the deformable registration algorithm and the finite leaf width to the tracking uncertainty were analyzed. Clinical proof-of-principle experiment of deformation tracking using previously acquired MR images of a lung cancer patient was implemented to represent the MRI-Linac environment. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment delivered with enabled deformation tracking was simulated and demonstrated. Results: The first

  18. Comparison between model-predicted tumor oxygenation dynamics and vascular-/flow-related Doppler indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfatto, Antonella; Vidal Urbinati, Ailyn M; Ciardo, Delia; Franchi, Dorella; Cattani, Federica; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2017-05-01

    Mathematical modeling is a powerful and flexible method to investigate complex phenomena. It discloses the possibility of reproducing expensive as well as invasive experiments in a safe environment with limited costs. This makes it suitable to mimic tumor evolution and response to radiotherapy although the reliability of the results remains an issue. Complexity reduction is therefore a critical aspect in order to be able to compare model outcomes to clinical data. Among the factors affecting treatment efficacy, tumor oxygenation is known to play a key role in radiotherapy response. In this work, we aim at relating the oxygenation dynamics, predicted by a macroscale model trained on tumor volumetric data of uterine cervical cancer patients, to vascularization and blood flux indices assessed on Ultrasound Doppler images. We propose a macroscale model of tumor evolution based on three dynamics, namely active portion, necrotic portion, and oxygenation. The model parameters were assessed on the volume size of seven cervical cancer patients administered with 28 fractions of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (1.8 Gy/fraction). For each patient, five Doppler ultrasound tests were acquired before, during, and after the treatment. The lesion was manually contoured by an expert physician using 4D View ® (General Electric Company - Fairfield, Connecticut, United States), which automatically provided the overall tumor volume size along with three vascularization and/or blood flow indices. Volume data only were fed to the model for training purpose, while the predicted oxygenation was compared a posteriori to the measured Doppler indices. The model was able to fit the tumor volume evolution within 8% error (range: 3-8%). A strong correlation between the intrapatient longitudinal indices from Doppler measurements and oxygen predicted by the model (about 90% or above) was found in three cases. Two patients showed an average correlation value (50-70%) and the remaining

  19. Fluid dynamic simulation of the fluidized bed using propane-air fuel; Simulacao dinamica de um combustor de leito fluidizado utilizando como combustivel o ar-propanado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Junior, L.P.; Lucena, S.; Silva, D.J. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: limajun@br.inter.net

    2004-07-01

    This paper has for purpose to present the modeling and simulation of the homogeneous combustion of the mixture of propane-air in a combustor of fluidized bed with inert particles, basing on a stationary model with phases in series, being taken into account the thermal changes and mass changes among the phases and it changes thermal with the wall for radiation. Computational methods are used for such simulation and CFX 4.4 as dynamic flowing computation software (CFD), kindred of more proximity with the real aspects. Being studied like this dynamic and kinetic flowing parameters of the involved components. (author)

  20. Differentiation between benign and malignant colon tumors using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR colonography; a feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Andersen, L P H; Klein, M

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer will present itself as a bowel obstruction in 16-23% of all cases. However, not all obstructing tumors are malignant and the differentiation between a benign and a malignant tumor can be difficult. The purpose of our study was to determine whether fast dynamic gadolinium...

  1. Differentiation between benign and malignant colon tumors using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR colonography; a feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Andersen, L P H; Klein, M

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer will present itself as a bowel obstruction in 16-23% of all cases. However, not all obstructing tumors are malignant and the differentiation between a benign and a malignant tumor can be difficult. The purpose of our study was to determine whether fast dynamic gadolinium-enhance...

  2. Dynamic respiratory gated 18FDG-PET of lung tumors - a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjei Knudtsen, Ingerid; Skretting, Arne; Roedal, Jan; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Aaslaug; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Background. 18 FDG-PET/CT imaging is well established for diagnosis and staging of lung tumors. However, more detailed information regarding the distribution of FDG within the tumor, also as a function of time after injection may be relevant. In this study we explore the feasibility of a combined dynamic and respiratory gated (DR) PET protocol. Material and methods. A DR FDG-PET protocol for a Siemens Biograph 16 PET/CT scanner was set up, allowing data acquisition from the time of FDG injection. Breath-hold (BH) respiratory gating was performed at four intervals over a total acquisition time of 50 minutes. Thus, the PET protocol provides both motion-free images and a spatiotemporal characterization of the glucose distribution in lung tumors. Software tools were developed in-house for tentative tumor segmentation and for extracting standard uptake values (SUVs) voxel by voxel, tumor volumes and SUV gradients in all directions. Results. Four pilot patients have been investigated with the DR PET protocol. The procedure was well tolerated by the patients. The BH images appeared sharper, and SUV max /SUV mean was higher, compared to free breathing (FB) images. Also, SUV gradients in the periphery of the tumor in the BH images were in general greater than or equal to the gradients in the FB PET images. Conclusion. The DR FDG-PET protocol is feasible and the BH images have a superior quality compared to the FB images. The protocol may also provide information of relevance for radiotherapy planning and follow-up. A patient trial is needed for assessing the clinical value of the imaging protocol

  3. Probability dynamics of a repopulating tumor in case of fractionated external radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavreva, Nadia; Stavrev, Pavel; Fallone, B Gino

    2009-12-01

    In this work two analytical methods are developed for computing the probability distribution of the number of surviving cells of a repopulating tumor during a fractionated external radio-treatment. Both methods are developed for the case of pure birth processes. They both allow the description of the tumor dynamics in case of cell radiosensitivity changing in time and for treatment schedules with variable dose per fraction and variable time intervals between fractions. The first method is based on a direct solution of the set of differential equations describing the tumor dynamics. The second method is based on the works of Hanin et al. [Hanin LG, Zaider M, Yakovlev AY. Distribution of the number of clonogens surviving fractionated radiotherapy: a long-standing problem revisited. Int J Radiat Biol 2001;77:205-13; Hanin LG. Iterated birth and death process as a model of radiation cell survival. Math Biosci 2001;169:89-107; Hanin LG. A stochastic model of tumor response to fractionated radiation: limit theorems and rate of convergence. Math Biosci 2004;191:1-17], where probability generating functions are used. In addition a Monte Carlo algorithm for simulating the probability distributions is developed for the same treatment conditions as for the analytical methods. The probability distributions predicted by the three methods are compared graphically for a certain set of values of the model parameters and an excellent agreement is found to exist between all three results, thus proving the correct implementation of the methods. However, numerical difficulties have been encountered with both analytical methods depending on the values of the model parameters. Therefore, the Poisson approximation is also studied and it is compared to the exact methods for several different combinations of the model parameter values. It is concluded that the Poisson approximation works sufficiently well only for slowly repopulating tumors and a low cell survival probability and that it

  4. Targeted microbubbles for imaging tumor angiogenesis: assessment of whole-body biodistribution with dynamic micro-PET in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Cheng, Zhen; Davis, Corrine

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice.......To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice....

  5. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI study of primary primitive neuroectodermal tumor in the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yu; Xu Jianmin; Li Ying; Zhang Jingzhong; Zhu Jing

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging in the diagnosis and differentiation of primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in the thoracic spine. Methods: The dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of 2 patients (3 times) with PNET in the thoracic spine proved by surgery and pathology were prospectively studied. Results: In the curves of SI-time and CER-time, PNET in the thoracic spine showed a rapid rise to the peak between 60 s and 120 s, then the flat level was kept and no obvious decline was detected after about 3.5 minute. Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI can help to make the diagnosis and differential diagnosis for PNET in the thoracic spine, offer reliable information for the choice of clinical management, and predict the prognosis

  6. Functioning islet cell tumor of the pancreas. Localization with dynamic spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.J.; Choi, B.I.; Han, J.K.; Chung, J.W.; Han, M.C.; Bae, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic spiral CT, including multidimensional reformation, in the detection and localization of islet cell tumors of the pancreas. Material and Methods: Seven patients with histopathologically proven functioning islet cell tumors of the pancreas were studied with 2-phase contrast-enhanced spiral CT. Scanning of the arterial phase and late phase was started 30 s and 180 s, respectively, after injection of 100 ml of contrast medium at a rate of 3 ml/s. Results: Axial images in the arterial phase depicted the lesions in 5 patients, but in the late phase in only one patient. Multiplanar reformatted images of the arterial phase depicted the lesions in all 7 patients. Maximal intensity projection images demonstrated all lesions with information of their relationship to the vascular structure. Conclusion: Dynamic spiral CT with scanning during the arterial phase and retrospective multidimensional reformation is useful for preoperative detection and localization of small islet cell tumors of the pancreas. (orig.)

  7. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Tumor Heterogeneity Defined by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick G. Costouros

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of studying angiogenesis are limited in their ability to serially evaluate in vivo function throughout a target tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and pharmacokinetic modeling provide a useful method for evaluating tissue vasculature based on contrast accumulation and washout. While it is often assumed that areas of high contrast enhancement and washout comprise areas of increased angiogenesis and tumor activity, the actual molecular pathways that are active in such areas are poorly understood. Using DCE-MRI in a murine subcutaneous tumor model, we were able to perform pharmacokinetic functional analysis of a tumor, coregistration of MRI images with histological cross-sections, immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, and genetic profiling of tumor heterogeneity based on pharmacokinetic parameters. Using imaging as a template for biologic investigation, we have not found evidence of increased expression of proangiogenic modulators at the transcriptional level in either distinct pharmacokinetic region. Furthermore, these regions show no difference on histology and CD31 immunohistochemistry. However, the expression of ribosomal proteins was greatly increased in high enhancement and washout regions, implying increased protein translation and consequent increased cellular activity. Together, these findings point to the potential importance of posttranscriptional regulation in angiogenesis and the need for the development of angiogenesis-specific contrast agents to evaluate in vivo angiogenesis at a molecular level.

  8. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardee, Matthew E.; Raza, Shahzad; Becker, Stewart J.; Jozsef, Gabor; Lymberis, Stella C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Hochman, Tsivia; Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); DeWyngaert, Keith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-03-01

    but confirmed benefit in terms of toxicities. If a concurrent boost to the tumor bed is not required, a conformal 3D-CRT approach can adequately deliver prone whole-breast hypofractionation radiotherapy.

  9. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D; Wolden, S; Yeh, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm"3 of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  10. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Wolden, S [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yeh, B [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm{sup 3} of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  11. Ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to detect breast tumors. Comparison with ultrasonography and mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, Eri; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Iwamura, Akira; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Harada, Junta; Tada, Shinpei

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to accurately detect breast tumors. Sixty-five breast carcinomas and 24 fibroadenomas were examined by an SE pulse sequence using a 0.2 Tesla unit. Subtraction MR images were obtained every minute during dynamic study with Gd-DTPA. Almost all breast tumors were seen as very bright masses, and the margin of the mass was clearly demonstrated on subtraction MR images. Breast carcinomas and fibroadenomas showed characteristic time-intensity curves on dynamic study. Time-intensity curves of the early peak type and plateau type were seen in 97% of breast carcinomas, while the gradually increasing type was seen in 92% of fibroadenomas. The detectability of breast carcinoma was 98% by MRI, 98% by ultrasonography, and 87% by mammography. That of fibroadenoma was 95% by MRI, 91% by ultrasonography and 60% by mammography. Sensitivity and specificity for breast carcinoma were 98% and 92% for MRI and 97% and 71% for ultrasonography. For fibroadenoma, they were 96% and 98% for MRI and 89% and 92% for ultrasonography. (author)

  12. Ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to detect breast tumors. Comparison with ultrasonography and mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terao, Eri; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Iwamura, Akira; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Harada, Junta; Tada, Shinpei (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-09-01

    We evaluated the ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to accurately detect breast tumors. Sixty-five breast carcinomas and 24 fibroadenomas were examined by an SE pulse sequence using a 0.2 Tesla unit. Subtraction MR images were obtained every minute during dynamic study with Gd-DTPA. Almost all breast tumors were seen as very bright masses, and the margin of the mass was clearly demonstrated on subtraction MR images. Breast carcinomas and fibroadenomas showed characteristic time-intensity curves on dynamic study. Time-intensity curves of the early peak type and plateau type were seen in 97% of breast carcinomas, while the gradually increasing type was seen in 92% of fibroadenomas. The detectability of breast carcinoma was 98% by MRI, 98% by ultrasonography, and 87% by mammography. That of fibroadenoma was 95% by MRI, 91% by ultrasonography and 60% by mammography. Sensitivity and specificity for breast carcinoma were 98% and 92% for MRI and 97% and 71% for ultrasonography. For fibroadenoma, they were 96% and 98% for MRI and 89% and 92% for ultrasonography. (author).

  13. Batch top-spray fluid bed coating: Scale-up insight using dynamic heat- and mass-transfer modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, P.; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for batch top-spray fluid bed coating processes based on Ronsse et al. [2007a.b. Combined population balance and thermodynamic modelling of the batch top-spray fluidised bed coating process. Part I-model development and validation. journal of Food Engineering 78......, 296-307; Combined population balance and thermodynamic modelling of the batch top-spray fluidised bed coating process. Part II-model and process analysis. journal of Food Engineering 78, 308-322]. The model is based on one-dimensional discretisation of the fluid bed into a number of well-mixed control......-up principles by comparing simulation results with experimental temperature and humidity data obtained from inorganic salt coating of placebo cores in three pilot fluid bed scales being a 0.5kg small-scale (GEA Aeromatic-Fielder Strea-1), 4kg medium-scale (GEA Niro MP-1) and 24kg large-scale (GEA MP-2...

  14. Paleoecology of the Late Pennsylvanian-age Calhoun coal bed and implications for long-term dynamics of wetland ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, Debra A. [US Geological Survey, 926A National Center, Reston (VA 20192 USA); Phillips, Tom L. [Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana (IL 61801 USA); Lesnikowska, Alicia D. [Box 24, Rt. 2, Vineyard Haven (MA 02568 USA); DiMichele, William A. [Department of Paleobiology, NMNH, Smithsonian Institution, Washington (DC 20560 USA)

    2007-01-02

    Quantitative plant assemblage data from coal balls, miospores, megaspores, and compression floras from the Calhoun coal bed (Missourian) of the Illinois Basin (USA) are used to interpret spatial and temporal changes in plant communities in the paleo-peat swamp. Coal-ball and miospore floras from the Calhoun coal bed are dominated strongly by tree ferns, and pteridosperms and sigillarian lycopsids are subdominant, depending on geographic location within the coal bed. Although the overall composition of Calhoun peat-swamp assemblages is consistent both temporally and spatially, site-to-site differences and short-term shifts in species dominance indicate local topographic and hydrologic control on species composition within the broader context of the swamp. Statistical comparison of the Calhoun miospore assemblages with those from other Late Pennsylvanian coal beds suggests that the same basic species pool was represented in each peat-swamp landscape and that the relative patterns of dominance and diversity were persistent from site to site. Therefore, it appears that the relative patterns of proportional dominance stayed roughly the same from one coal bed to the next during Late Pennsylvanian glacially-driven climatic oscillations. (author)

  15. Dynamically accumulated dose and 4D accumulated dose for moving tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Heng; Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Xiaoqiang; Liu Wei; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between dynamically accumulated dose (dynamic dose) and 4D accumulated dose (4D dose) for irradiation of moving tumors, and to quantify the dose uncertainty induced by tumor motion. Methods: The authors established that regardless of treatment modality and delivery properties, the dynamic dose will converge to the 4D dose, instead of the 3D static dose, after multiple deliveries. The bounds of dynamic dose, or the maximum estimation error using 4D or static dose, were established for the 4D and static doses, respectively. Numerical simulations were performed (1) to prove the principle that for each phase, after multiple deliveries, the average number of deliveries for any given time converges to the total number of fractions (K) over the number of phases (N); (2) to investigate the dose difference between the 4D and dynamic doses as a function of the number of deliveries for deliveries of a “pulsed beam”; and (3) to investigate the dose difference between 4D dose and dynamic doses as a function of delivery time for deliveries of a “continuous beam.” A Poisson model was developed to estimate the mean dose error as a function of number of deliveries or delivered time for both pulsed beam and continuous beam. Results: The numerical simulations confirmed that the number of deliveries for each phase converges to K/N, assuming a random starting phase. Simulations for the pulsed beam and continuous beam also suggested that the dose error is a strong function of the number of deliveries and/or total deliver time and could be a function of the breathing cycle, depending on the mode of delivery. The Poisson model agrees well with the simulation. Conclusions: Dynamically accumulated dose will converge to the 4D accumulated dose after multiple deliveries, regardless of treatment modality. Bounds of the dynamic dose could be determined using quantities derived from 4D doses, and the mean dose

  16. Evaluation of a compartmental model for estimating tumor hypoxia via FMISO dynamic PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenli; Nehmeh, Sadek A; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Zanzonico, Pat B; Schmidtlein, C Ross; Lee, Nancy Y; Humm, John L; Georgi, Jens-Christoph; Paulus, Timo; Narayanan, Manoj; Bal, Matthieu

    2009-01-01

    This paper systematically evaluates a pharmacokinetic compartmental model for identifying tumor hypoxia using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). A generic irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartmental model was used. A dynamic PET image dataset was simulated with three tumor regions-normoxic, hypoxic and necrotic-embedded in a normal-tissue background, and with an image-based arterial input function. Each voxelized tissue's time activity curve (TAC) was simulated with typical values of kinetic parameters, as deduced from FMISO-PET data from nine head-and-neck cancer patients. The dynamic dataset was first produced without any statistical noise to ensure that correct kinetic parameters were reproducible. Next, to investigate the stability of kinetic parameter estimation in the presence of noise, 1000 noisy samples of the dynamic dataset were generated, from which 1000 noisy estimates of kinetic parameters were calculated and used to estimate the sample mean and covariance matrix. It is found that a more peaked input function gave less variation in various kinetic parameters, and the variation of kinetic parameters could also be reduced by two region-of-interest averaging techniques. To further investigate how bias in the arterial input function affected the kinetic parameter estimation, a shift error was introduced in the peak amplitude and peak location of the input TAC, and the bias of various kinetic parameters calculated. In summary, mathematical phantom studies have been used to determine the statistical accuracy and precision of model-based kinetic analysis, which helps to validate this analysis and provides guidance in planning clinical dynamic FMISO-PET studies.

  17. Using multiple bed load measurements: Toward the identification of bed dilation and contraction in gravel-bed rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, G. A.; Roy, A. G.

    2012-02-01

    This study examines bed load transport processes in a small gravel-bed river (Béard Creek, Québec) using three complementary methods: bed elevation changes between successive floods, bed activity surveys using tags inserted into the bed, and bed load transport rates from bed load traps. The analysis of 20 flood events capable of mobilizing bed material led to the identification of divergent results among the methods. In particular, bed elevation changes were not consistent with the bed activity surveys. In many cases, bed elevation changes were significant (1 to 2 times the D50) even if the bed surface had not been activated during the flood, leading to the identification of processes of bed dilation and contraction that occurred over 10% to 40% of the bed surface. These dynamics of the river bed prevent accurate derivation of bed load transport rates from topographic changes, especially for low magnitude floods. This paper discusses the mechanisms that could explain the dilation and contraction of particles within the bed and their implications in fluvial dynamics. Bed contraction seems to be the result of the winnowing of the fine sediments under very low gravel transport. Bed dilation seems to occur on patches of the bed at the threshold of motion where various processes such as fine sediment infiltration lead to the maintenance of a larger sediment framework volume. Both processes are also influenced by flood history and the initial local bed state and in turn may have a significant impact on sediment transport and morphological changes in gravel-bed rivers.

  18. Metabolic 19F MRI an dynamic 18F PET for chemotherapy monitoring in experimental tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Haberkorn, U.; Bellemann, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    The efficient clinical use of chemotherapeutic agents requires the assessment of the uptake and metabolism of the drugs in the tumor as well as in the various organs of the body by using noninvasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). In this overview, we present different metabolic 19 F MRI and dynamic 18 F PET techniques for noninvasive monitoring of fluorine-containing anticancer drugs and evaluate their potentials and limitations within the framework of experimental animal studies. (orig.) [de

  19. Therapy monitoring using dynamic MRI: Analysis of lung motion and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plathow, Christian [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Hof, Holger; Kuhn, Sabine [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); Puderbach, Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Biederer, Juergen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Claussen, Claus D.; Schaefer, Juergen [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Tuengerthal, Siegfried [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    A frequent side effect after radiotherapy of lung tumors is a decrease of pulmonary function accompanied by dyspnea due to developing lung fibrosis. The aim of this study was to monitor lung motion as a correlate of pulmonary function and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy (RT) using dynamic MRI (dMRI). Thirty-five patients with stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma were examined using dMRI (trueFISP; three images/s). Tumors were divided into T1 and T2 tumors of the upper, middle and lower lung region (LR). Maximum craniocaudal (CC) lung dimensions and tumor mobility in three dimensions were monitored. Vital capacity (VC) was measured and correlated using spirometry. Before RT, the maximum CC motion of the tumor-bearing hemithorax was 5.2{+-}0.9 cm if the tumor was located in the lower LR (middle LR: 5.5{+-}0.8 cm; upper LR: 6.0{+-}0.6 cm). After RT, lung motion was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.05). Before RT, the maximum CC tumor mobility was significantly higher in tumors of the lower LR 2.5{+-}0.6 vs. 2.0{+-}0.3 cm (middle LR; P<0.05) vs. 0.7{+-}0.2 cm (upper LR; P<0.01). After RT, tumor mobility was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.01) and in T2 tumor patients (P<0.05). VC showed no significant changes. dMRI is capable of monitoring changes in lung motion that were not suspected from spirometry. This might make the treatment of side effects possible at a very early stage. Changes of lung motion and tumor mobility are highly dependent on the tumor localization and tumor diameter. (orig.)

  20. Therapy monitoring using dynamic MRI: Analysis of lung motion and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plathow, Christian; Hof, Holger; Kuhn, Sabine; Puderbach, Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Biederer, Juergen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Claussen, Claus D.; Schaefer, Juergen; Huber, Peter E.; Tuengerthal, Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    A frequent side effect after radiotherapy of lung tumors is a decrease of pulmonary function accompanied by dyspnea due to developing lung fibrosis. The aim of this study was to monitor lung motion as a correlate of pulmonary function and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy (RT) using dynamic MRI (dMRI). Thirty-five patients with stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma were examined using dMRI (trueFISP; three images/s). Tumors were divided into T1 and T2 tumors of the upper, middle and lower lung region (LR). Maximum craniocaudal (CC) lung dimensions and tumor mobility in three dimensions were monitored. Vital capacity (VC) was measured and correlated using spirometry. Before RT, the maximum CC motion of the tumor-bearing hemithorax was 5.2±0.9 cm if the tumor was located in the lower LR (middle LR: 5.5±0.8 cm; upper LR: 6.0±0.6 cm). After RT, lung motion was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.05). Before RT, the maximum CC tumor mobility was significantly higher in tumors of the lower LR 2.5±0.6 vs. 2.0±0.3 cm (middle LR; P<0.05) vs. 0.7±0.2 cm (upper LR; P<0.01). After RT, tumor mobility was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.01) and in T2 tumor patients (P<0.05). VC showed no significant changes. dMRI is capable of monitoring changes in lung motion that were not suspected from spirometry. This might make the treatment of side effects possible at a very early stage. Changes of lung motion and tumor mobility are highly dependent on the tumor localization and tumor diameter. (orig.)

  1. Dynamics of melanoma tumor therapy with vesicular stomatitis virus: explaining the variability in outcomes using mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelfanger, D M; Offord, C P; Dev, J; Bajzer, Z; Vile, R G; Dingli, D

    2012-05-01

    Tumor selective, replication competent viruses are being tested for cancer gene therapy. This approach introduces a new therapeutic paradigm due to potential replication of the therapeutic agent and induction of a tumor-specific immune response. However, the experimental outcomes are quite variable, even when studies utilize highly inbred strains of mice and the same cell line and virus. Recognizing that virotherapy is an exercise in population dynamics, we utilize mathematical modeling to understand the variable outcomes observed when B16ova malignant melanoma tumors are treated with vesicular stomatitis virus in syngeneic, fully immunocompetent mice. We show how variability in the initial tumor size and the actual amount of virus delivered to the tumor have critical roles on the outcome of therapy. Virotherapy works best when tumors are small, and a robust innate immune response can lead to superior tumor control. Strategies that reduce tumor burden without suppressing the immune response and methods that maximize the amount of virus delivered to the tumor should optimize tumor control in this model system.

  2. Six-color intravital two-photon imaging of brain tumors and their dynamic microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément eRicard

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The majority of intravital studies on brain tumor in living animal so far rely on dual color imaging. We describe here a multiphoton imaging protocol to dynamically characterize the interactions between six cellular components in a living mouse. We applied this methodology to a clinically relevant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM model designed in reporter mice with targeted cell populations labeled by fluorescent proteins of different colors. This model permitted us to make non-invasive longitudinal and multi-scale observations of cell-to-cell interactions. We provide examples of such 5D (x,y,z,t,color images acquired on a daily basis from volumes of interest, covering most of the mouse parietal cortex at subcellular resolution. Spectral deconvolution allowed us to accurately separate of each cell population as well as some components of the extracellular matrix. The technique represents a powerful tool for investigating how tumor progression is influenced by the interactions of tumor cells with host cells and the extracellular matrix micro-environment. It will be especially valuable for evaluating neuro-oncological drug efficacy and target specificity. The imaging protocol provided here can be easily translated to other mouse models of neuropathologies, and should also be of fundamental interest for investigations in other areas of systems biology.

  3. Six-color intravital two-photon imaging of brain tumors and their dynamic microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Clément; Debarbieux, Franck Christian

    2014-01-01

    The majority of intravital studies on brain tumor in living animal so far rely on dual color imaging. We describe here a multiphoton imaging protocol to dynamically characterize the interactions between six cellular components in a living mouse. We applied this methodology to a clinically relevant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) model designed in reporter mice with targeted cell populations labeled by fluorescent proteins of different colors. This model permitted us to make non-invasive longitudinal and multi-scale observations of cell-to-cell interactions. We provide examples of such 5D (x,y,z,t,color) images acquired on a daily basis from volumes of interest, covering most of the mouse parietal cortex at subcellular resolution. Spectral deconvolution allowed us to accurately separate each cell population as well as some components of the extracellular matrix. The technique represents a powerful tool for investigating how tumor progression is influenced by the interactions of tumor cells with host cells and the extracellular matrix micro-environment. It will be especially valuable for evaluating neuro-oncological drug efficacy and target specificity. The imaging protocol provided here can be easily translated to other mouse models of neuropathologies, and should also be of fundamental interest for investigations in other areas of systems biology.

  4. Correlation of Dynamic PET and Gene Array Data in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig G. Strauss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The results obtained with dynamic PET (dPET were compared to gene expression data obtained in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST. The primary aim was to assess the association of the dPET results and gene expression data. Material and Methods. dPET was performed following the injection of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG in 22 patients with GIST. All patients were examined prior to surgery for staging purpose. Compartment and noncompartment models were used for the quantitative evaluation of the dPET examinations. Gene array data were based on tumor specimen obtained by surgery after the PET examinations. Results. The data analysis revealed significant correlations for the dPET parameters and the expression of zinc finger genes (znf43, znf85, znf91, znf189. Furthermore, the transport of FDG (k1 was associated with VEGF-A. The cell cycle gene cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C was correlated with the maximum tracer uptake (SUVmax in the tumors. Conclusions. The data demonstrate a dependency of the tracer kinetics on genes associated with prognosis in GIST. Furthermore, angiogenesis and cell proliferation have an impact on the tracer uptake.

  5. Investigation of flow dynamics of liquid phase in a pilot-scale trickle bed reactor using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, H.J.; Sharma, V.K.

    2016-01-01

    A radiotracer investigation was carried out to measure residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase in a trickle bed reactor (TBR). The main objectives of the investigation were to investigate radial and axial mixing of the liquid phase, and evaluate performance of the liquid distributor/redistributor at different operating conditions. Mean residence times (MRTs), holdups (H) and fraction of flow flowing along different quadrants were estimated. The analysis of the measured RTD curves indicated radial non-uniform distribution of liquid phase across the beds. The overall RTD of the liquid phase, measured at the exit of the reactor was simulated using a multi-parameter axial dispersion with exchange model (ADEM), and model parameters were obtained. The results of model simulations indicated that the TBR behaved as a plug flow reactor at most of the operating conditions used in the investigation. The results of the investigation helped to improve the existing design as well as to design a full-scale industrial TBR for petroleum refining applications. - Highlights: • Residence time distributions of liquid phase were measured in a trickle bed reactor. • Bromine-82 as ammonium bromide was used as a radiotracer. • Mean residence times, holdups and radial distribution of liquid phase were quantified. • Axial dispersion with exchange model was used to simulate the measured data. • The trickle bed reactor behaved as a plug flow reactor.

  6. Dynamic Modeling and Control Studies of a Two-Stage Bubbling Fluidized Bed Adsorber-Reactor for Solid-Sorbent CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modekurti, Srinivasarao; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2013-07-31

    A one-dimensional, non-isothermal, pressure-driven dynamic model has been developed for a two-stage bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) adsorber-reactor for solid-sorbent carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture using Aspen Custom Modeler® (ACM). The BFB model for the flow of gas through a continuous phase of downward moving solids considers three regions: emulsion, bubble, and cloud-wake. Both the upper and lower reactor stages are of overflow-type configuration, i.e., the solids leave from the top of each stage. In addition, dynamic models have been developed for the downcomer that transfers solids between the stages and the exit hopper that removes solids from the bottom of the bed. The models of all auxiliary equipment such as valves and gas distributor have been integrated with the main model of the two-stage adsorber reactor. Using the developed dynamic model, the transient responses of various process variables such as CO{sub 2} capture rate and flue gas outlet temperatures have been studied by simulating typical disturbances such as change in the temperature, flowrate, and composition of the incoming flue gas from pulverized coal-fired power plants. In control studies, the performance of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, feedback-augmented feedforward controller, and linear model predictive controller (LMPC) are evaluated for maintaining the overall CO{sub 2} capture rate at a desired level in the face of typical disturbances.

  7. Detection and quantitation of circulating tumor cell dynamics by bioluminescence imaging in an orthotopic mammary carcinoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sarah Sasportas

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs have been detected in the bloodstream of both early-stage and advanced cancer patients. However, very little is know about the dynamics of CTCs during cancer progression and the clinical relevance of longitudinal CTC enumeration. To address this, we developed a simple bioluminescence imaging assay to detect CTCs in mouse models of metastasis. In a 4T1 orthotopic metastatic mammary carcinoma mouse model, we demonstrated that this quantitative method offers sensitivity down to 2 CTCs in 0.1-1mL blood samples and high specificity for CTCs originating from the primary tumor, independently of their epithelial status. In this model, we simultaneously monitored blood CTC dynamics, primary tumor growth, and lung metastasis progression over the course of 24 days. Early in tumor development, we observed low numbers of CTCs in blood samples (10-15 cells/100 µL and demonstrated that CTC dynamics correlate with viable primary tumor growth. To our knowledge, these data represent the first reported use of bioluminescence imaging to detect CTCs and quantify their dynamics in any cancer mouse model. This new assay is opening the door to the study of CTC dynamics in a variety of animal models. These studies may inform clinical decision on the appropriate timing of blood sampling and value of longitudinal CTC enumeration in cancer patients.

  8. Factors affecting the growth of Didymosphenia geminata in New Zealand rivers: Flow, bed disturbance, nutrients, light, and seasonal dynamics. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullis, J. D.; Gillis, C.; Drummond, J. D.; Garcia, T.; Kilroy, C.; Larned, S.; Hassan, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Didymosphenia geminata (didymo) was introduced into a New Zealand river in 2004, and since then has dramatically spread to cover the beds of many rivers with extremely dense and extensive mats. Successful management is hampered by the fact that much is still unknown about the factors affecting the growth of this nuisance species. We synthesized available data on the distribution of D. geminata in New Zealand rivers to determine how physical and chemical system conditions (flow, bed disturbance, nutrients, and light) affect the growth and persistence of this organism. Here we assess results from bi-weekly surveys performed over a full year on two rivers where didymo was first observed in New Zealand; the Oreti and Mararoa. We used the data to test the hypotheses that the development of thick, dense mats requires high light levels but is inversely proportional to nutrient levels, and that mat persistence is controlled by the frequency of flow events that produce bed sediment transport. Observed regrowth between disturbance events was found to be inversely correlated with nutrient availability. The seasonal availability of light did not correlate with variations in growth rate, but this did not account for specific characteristics of the different sites such as aspect, shading, flow depth and turbidity that will all impact on the amount of available light reaching the streambed. The results clearly indicate that the time-history of flow and nutrient levels is critical to evaluating the growth and persistence of D. geminata and that additional site specific information is necessary to determine the role of bed stability and the amount of available light reaching the streambed.

  9. Implications of tidally-varying bed stress and intermittent estuarine stratification on fine-sediment dynamics through the Mekong's tidal river to estuarine reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, R. L.; Ogston, A. S.; Allison, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    River gauging stations are often located upriver of tidal propagation where sediment transport processes and storage are impacted by widely varying ratios of marine to freshwater influence. These impacts are not yet thoroughly understood. Therefore, sediment fluxes measured at these stations may not be suitable for predicting changes to coastal morphology. To characterize sediment transport dynamics in this understudied zone, flow velocity, salinity, and suspended-sediment properties (concentration, size, and settling velocity) were measured within the tidal Sông Hậu distributary of the lower Mekong River, Vietnam. Fine-sediment aggregation, settling, and trapping rates were promoted by seasonal and tidal fluctuations in near-bed shear stress as well as the intermittent presence of a salt wedge and estuary turbidity maximum. Beginning in the tidal river, fine-grained particles were aggregated in freshwater. Then, in the interface zone between the tidal river and estuary, impeded near-bed shear stress and particle flux convergence promoted settling and trapping. Finally, in the estuary, sediment retention was further encouraged by stratification and estuarine circulation which protected the bed against particle resuspension and enhanced particle aggregation. These patterns promote mud export ( 1.7 t s-1) from the entire study area in the high-discharge season when fluvial processes dominate and mud import ( 0.25 t s-1) into the estuary and interface zone in the low-discharge season when estuarine processes dominate. Within the lower region of the distributaries, morphological change in the form of channel abandonment was found to be promoted within minor distributaries by feedbacks between channel depth, vertical mixing, and aggregate trapping. In effect, this field study sheds light on the sediment trapping capabilities of the tidal river - estuary interface zone, a relatively understudied region upstream of where traditional concepts place sites of deposition

  10. Quantitative evaluation of skeletal tumors with dynamic 18F-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hua; Heichel, T.O.; Lehner, B.; Bernd, L.; Ewerbeck, V.; Burger, C.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate bone lesions using fluorodeoxyglucose (FIX;) PET and explore if dynamic and quantitative PET data may help to differentiate benign lesions from malignant masses. Methods: A group of forty patients with primary bone lesions were studied. The final diagnosis was confirmed with histopathology. A dynamic acquisition of FDG PET with the duration over 60 min was undertaken in all subjects. From the dynamic PET images the indexes such as average and maximal standardized uptake value ( SUV ), tumor SUV-to-muscle SUV ratios ( T/M ), and SUV at 60 min-to-SUV at 30 min ratio (SUV aver60/30main and SUV max60/30min ) were produced. Patlak graphical analysis were used to obtain influx constant ( K i ) and metabolic rate of FDG (MR-FDG) was thus calculated. Based on the receiver operation characteristic curve the sensitivity and specificity for each parameter in differentiation between malignant and benign lesions was evaluated. Results: The histologic results revealed there were 21 cases with malignant tumors and 19 with benign lesions in this group. The MRFDG and SUV indexes in malignant lesions were significantly higher than those in benign lesions. However, each index showed a considerable overlap between benign and malignant type. Average SUV positively correlated with MR-FDG (r = 0.67). When use of a 1.8 cutoff for average SUV, the sensitivity and specificity for discrimination of malignancy from benignity were 85.0% and 82.4%, respectively. MRFDG showed a similar sensitivity (82.4%) and a better specificity (92.9%). When evaluated with a cutoff from the combination of average SUV (1.8) and SUV aver60/3Omin (1.1), the specificity was improved to 93.3% with a small reduction of sensitivity (81.3%) compared with using SUV exclusively. Conclusions: The results indicate that detectable difference in glucose metabolism exists between malignant and benign skeletal lesions. It may not be feasible to use exclusively the static FDG uptake indexes to achieve a

  11. Permeability to macromolecular contrast media quantified by dynamic MRI correlates with tumor tissue assays of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyran, Clemens C.; Sennino, Barbara; Fu, Yanjun; Rogut, Victor; Shames, David M.; Chaopathomkul, Bundit; Wendland, Michael F.; McDonald, Donald M.; Brasch, Robert C.; Raatschen, Hans-Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate dynamic MRI assays of macromolecular endothelial permeability with microscopic area–density measurements of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in tumors. Methods and material: This study compared tumor xenografts from two different human cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 tumors (n = 5), and MDA-MB-435 (n = 8), reported to express respectively higher and lower levels of VEGF. Dynamic MRI was enhanced by a prototype macromolecular contrast medium (MMCM), albumin-(Gd-DTPA)35. Quantitative estimates of tumor microvascular permeability (K PS ; μl/min × 100 cm 3 ), obtained using a two-compartment kinetic model, were correlated with immunohistochemical measurements of VEGF in each tumor. Results: Mean K PS was 2.4 times greater in MDA-MB-231 tumors (K PS = 58 ± 30.9 μl/min × 100 cm 3 ) than in MDA-MB-435 tumors (K PS = 24 ± 8.4 μl/min × 100 cm 3 ) (p < 0.05). Correspondingly, the area–density of VEGF in MDA-MB-231 tumors was 2.6 times greater (27.3 ± 2.2%, p < 0.05) than in MDA-MB-435 cancers (10.5 ± 0.5%, p < 0.05). Considering all tumors without regard to cell type, a significant positive correlation (r = 0.67, p < 0.05) was observed between MRI-estimated endothelial permeability and VEGF immunoreactivity. Conclusion: Correlation of MRI assays of endothelial permeability to a MMCM and VEGF immunoreactivity of tumors support the hypothesis that VEGF is a major contributor to increased macromolecular permeability in cancers. When applied clinically, the MMCM-enhanced MRI approach could help to optimize the appropriate application of VEGF-inhibiting therapy on an individual patient basis.

  12. Use of the Concept of Equivalent Biologically Effective Dose (BED) to Quantify the Contribution of Hyperthermia to Local Tumor Control in Radiohyperthermia Cervical Cancer Trials, and Comparison With Radiochemotherapy Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plataniotis, George A.; Dale, Roger G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To express the magnitude of contribution of hyperthermia to local tumor control in radiohyperthermia (RT/HT) cervical cancer trials, in terms of the radiation-equivalent biologically effective dose (BED) and to explore the potential of the combined modalities in the treatment of this neoplasm. Materials and Methods: Local control rates of both arms of each study (RT vs. RT+HT) reported from randomized controlled trials (RCT) on concurrent RT/HT for cervical cancer were reviewed. By comparing the two tumor control probabilities (TCPs) from each study, we calculated the HT-related log cell-kill and then expressed it in terms of the number of 2 Gy fraction equivalents, for a range of tumor volumes and radiosensitivities. We have compared the contribution of each modality and made some exploratory calculations on the TCPs that might be expected from a combined trimodality treatment (RT+CT+HT). Results: The HT-equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions ranges from 0.6 to 4.8 depending on radiosensitivity. Opportunities for clinically detectable improvement by the addition of HT are only available in tumors with an alpha value in the approximate range of 0.22-0.28 Gy -1 . A combined treatment (RT+CT+HT) is not expected to improve prognosis in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: The most significant improvements in TCP, which may result from the combination of RT/CT/HT for locally advanced cervical carcinomas, are likely to be limited only to those patients with tumors of relatively low-intermediate radiosensitivity.

  13. Storage capacity assessment of liquid fuels production by solar gasification in a packed bed reactor using a dynamic process model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniyal, Ashok A.; Eyk, Philip J. van; Nathan, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • First analysis to assess storage requirements of a stand-alone packed bed, batch process solar gasifier. • 35 days of storage required for stand-alone solar system, whereas 8 h of storage required for hybrid system. • Sensitivity of storage requirement to reactor operation, solar region and solar multiple evaluated. - Abstract: The first multi-day performance analysis of the feasibility of integrating a packed bed, indirectly irradiated solar gasification reactor with a downstream FT liquids production facility is reported. Two fuel-loading scenarios were assessed. In one, the residual unconverted fuel at the end of a day is reused, while in the second, the residual fuel is discarded. To estimate a full year time-series of operation, a simplified statistical model was developed from short-period simulations of the 1-D heat transfer, devolatilisation and gasification chemistry model of a 150 kW th packed bed reactor (based on the authors’ earlier work). The short time-series cover a variety of solar conditions to represent seasonal, diurnal and cloud-induced solar transience. Also assessed was the influence of increasing the solar flux incident at the emitter plate of the packed bed reactor on syngas production. The combination of the annual time-series and daily model of syngas production was found to represent reasonably the seasonal transience in syngas production. It was then used to estimate the minimum syngas storage volume required to maintain a stable flow-rate and composition of syngas to a FT reactor over a full year of operation. This found that, for an assumed heliostat field collection area of 1000 m 2 , at least 64 days of storage is required, under both the Residual Fuel Re-Use and Discard scenarios. This figure was not sensitive to the two solar sites assessed, Farmington, New Mexico or Tonopah Airport, Nevada. Increasing the heliostat field collection area from 1000 to 1500 m 2 , led to an increase in the calculated daily rate

  14. Effects of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate on skeletal muscle mitochondrial content and dynamics, and lipids after 10 days of bed rest in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Robert A; Distefano, Giovanna; Pereira, Suzette L; Tian, Min; Kelly, Owen J; Coen, Paul M; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Wolfe, Robert R; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2017-11-01

    Loss of muscle mass during periods of disuse likely has negative health consequences for older adults. We have previously shown that β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) supplementation during 10 days of strict bed rest (BR) attenuates the loss of lean mass in older adults. To elucidate potential molecular mechanisms of HMB effects on muscle during BR and resistance training rehabilitation (RT), we examined mediators of skeletal muscle mitochondrial dynamics, autophagy and atrophy, and intramyocellular lipids. Nineteen older adults (60-76 yr) completed 10 days BR followed by 8-wk RT rehabilitation. Subjects were randomized to either HMB (3 g/day HMB; n = 11) or control (CON; n = 8) groups. Skeletal muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was determined by histology from percutaneous vastus lateralis biopsies. We measured protein markers of mitochondrial content [oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)], fusion and fission (MFN2, OPA1, FIS1, and DRP1), autophagy (Beclin1, LC3B, and BNIP3), and atrophy [poly-ubiquinated proteins (poly-ub)] by Western blot. Fatty acid composition of several lipid classes in skeletal muscle was measured by infusion-MS analysis. Poly-ub proteins and OXPHOS complex I increased in both groups following BR ( P HMB group ( P = 0.055). RT rehabilitation increased OXPHOS complex II protein ( P HMB group. In addition, higher levels of DRP1 and MFN2 were maintained in the HMB group after RT ( P HMB influences mitochondrial dynamics and lipid metabolism during disuse atrophy and rehabilitation. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Mitochondrial content and dynamics remained unchanged over 10 days of BR in older adults. HMB stimulated intramuscular lipid storage as triacylglycerol following 10 days of bed rest (BR) and maintained higher mitochondrial OXPHOS content and dynamics during the 8-wk resistance exercise rehabilitation program. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. The potential of positron emission tomography for intratreatment dynamic lung tumor tracking: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jaewon; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Mazin, Samuel R.; Graves, Edward E.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to evaluate the potential and feasibility of positron emission tomography for dynamic lung tumor tracking during radiation treatment. The authors propose a center of mass (CoM) tumor tracking algorithm using gated-PET images combined with a respiratory monitor and investigate the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Methods: The proposed PET dynamic lung tumor tracking algorithm estimated the target position information through the CoM of the segmented target volume on gated PET images reconstructed from accumulated coincidence events. The information was continuously updated throughout a scan based on the assumption that real-time processing was supported (actual processing time at each frame ≈10 s). External respiratory motion and list-mode PET data were acquired from a phantom programmed to move with measured respiratory traces (external respiratory motion and internal target motion) from human subjects, for which the ground truth target position was known as a function of time. The phantom was cylindrical with six hollow sphere targets (10, 13, 17, 22, 28, and 37 mm in diameter). The measured respiratory traces consisted of two sets: (1) 1D-measured motion from ten healthy volunteers and (2) 3D-measured motion from four lung cancer patients. The authors evaluated the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm by quantifying estimation errors (Euclidean distance) between the actual motion of targets (1D-motion and 3D-motion traces) and CoM trajectories estimated by the proposed algorithm as a function of time. Results: The time-averaged error of 1D-motion traces over all trajectories of all targets was 1.6 mm. The error trajectories decreased with time as coincidence events were accumulated. The overall error trajectory of 1D-motion traces converged to within 2 mm in approximately 90 s. As expected, more accurate results were obtained for larger targets. For example, for the 37 mm target, the average error over all 1D

  16. Comparison of first-pass and second-bolus dynamic susceptibility perfusion MRI in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, M.V.; Besenski, Nada; Rumboldt, Zoran; Wooten, Caroline; Dorlon, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate whether the T1 shortening effect caused by contrast leakage into brain tumors, a well-known confounding effect in the quantification of relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) measurements, may be corrected by the administration of a predose of gadolinium-DTPA. As part of their presurgical imaging protocol, 25 patients with primary brain tumors underwent two consecutive dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion MR studies. Intratumoral rCBV measurements and normalized rCBV values obtained during the first-pass and second-bolus studies were compared (Wilcoxon signed-ranks test). The frequency of relatively increased rCBV ratios on the second-bolus study was compared between enhancing and non-enhancing neoplasms (Fisher's exact test). Postprocessing perfusion studies were evaluated for image quality on a scale of 0-3 (Wilcoxon signed-ranks test). Four studies were excluded due to unacceptable image quality. Mean normalized rCBVs were 9.04 (SD 4.64) for the first-pass and 7.99 (SD 3.84) for the second-bolus study. There was no statistically significant difference between the two perfusion studies in either intratumoral rCBV (P=0.237) or rCBV ratio (P=0.181). Five enhancing and four non-enhancing tumors showed a relative increase in rCBV ratio on the second-bolus study, without a significant difference between the groups. Image quality was not significantly different between perfusion studies. Our results did not demonstrate a significant difference between first-pass and second-bolus rCBV measurements in DSC perfusion MR imaging. The administration of a predose of gadolinium-DTPA does not appear to be an efficient way of compensating for the underestimation of intratumoral rCBV values due to the T1 shortening effect. (orig.)

  17. Isolation of nucleoli from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells and dynamics of nascent RNA within isolated nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, Marc; Ploton, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Here we describe a new, rapid method for isolating nucleoli from Ehrlich tumor cells that preserves their morphological integrity and high transcriptional activity. Until now, methods for isolation of nucleoli were generally assumed to empty one of their three main compartments, the fibrillar center, of its contents. This new method consists of sonicating cells in an isotonic medium containing MgSO(4), spermidine, and spermine, followed by separation of nucleoli through a Percoll density gradient. Using the nonisotopic approach of labelling with BrUTP, we have further investigated the dynamics of nascent ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) within morphologically intact isolated nucleoli at the electron microscope level. We show that ribosomal transcripts are elongated in the cortex of the fibrillar center and then enter the surrounding dense fibrillar component.

  18. Correlative study of dynamic MRI and tumor angiogenesis in gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qunfeng; Shen Junkang; Feng Yizhong; Qian Minghui; Chai Yuhai

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between the dynamic MRI enhancement characteristics and tumor angiogenesis in gastric carcinoma. Methods: Histopathological slides of 30 patients underwent CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunohistochemical staining. Microvessel density (MVD) and VEGF protein expression were analyzed with their relationship to pathological features. The dynamic MRI characteristics, including the maximum contrast enhancement ratio (CERmax), were correlatively studied with MVD and VEGF expression. Results: In 30 cases, MVD was 13.00 to 68.25 per vision field with an average of 42.95 ±14.79. The low expression rate of VEGF was 30% (9/30), while the high expression rate of VEGF was 70% (21/30). MVD and VEGF expression correlated with lymph node metastasis (P>0.05), but their relationships to the degree of differentiation and depth of invasion were not significant (P>0.05). MVD was related to TNM-staging of gastric carcinoma (P>0.05). The expression of VEGF between the stage I and IV had significant differences (P>0.05). MVD was higher in VEGF-high expression than in VEGF-low expression [(47.30 ± 14.16) per vision versus (32.81 ± 11.25) per vision]. CERmax was significantly correlated with MVD (r=0.556, P=0.0014). The distribution features and shape of microvessels within gastric carcinoma were related to the enhancement characteristics such as irregular enhancement and delaminated enhancement. The correlation between CERmax and expression of VEGF was not significant (t=-0.847, P=0.404). Conclusion: The manifestations on dynamic MR images can reflect the distribution features and shape of microvessels within gastric carcinoma. Dynamic MR imaging may prove to be a valuable means in estimating the MVD of gastric carcinoma noninvasively, and further predicting the biological behavior of gastric carcinoma and judging the prognosis. (authors)

  19. Dynamic model development and validation for a nitrifying moving bed biofilter: Effect of temperature and influent load on the performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sin, Gürkan; Weijma, Jan; Spanjers, Henri

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model with adequate complexity integrating hydraulics, biofilm and microbial conversion processes is successfully developed for a continuously moving bed biofilter performing tertiary nitrification. The model was calibrated and validated using data from Nether Stowey pilot plant...... on the ammonium removal efficiency, doubling nitrification capacity every 5 degrees C increase. However, at temperatures higher than 20 degrees C, the biofilm thickness starts to decrease due to increased decay rate. The influent nitrogen load was also found to be influential on the filter performance, while...... the hydraulic loading had relatively negligible impact. Overall, the calibrated model can now reliably be used for design and process optimization purposes....

  20. Differentiation between benign and malignant colon tumors using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR colonography; a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achiam, M.P., E-mail: achiam1@dadlnet.d [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev Ringvej, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Department of Surgical Gastroenterology D, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev Ringvej, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3C, DK-2200 Copenhagen (Denmark); Andersen, L.P.H.; Klein, M. [Department of Surgical Gastroenterology D, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev Ringvej, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3C, DK-2200 Copenhagen (Denmark); Logager, V.; Chabanova, E.; Thomsen, H.S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev Ringvej, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3C, DK-2200 Copenhagen (Denmark); Rosenberg, J. [Department of Surgical Gastroenterology D, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev Ringvej, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3C, DK-2200 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2010-06-15

    Background: Colorectal cancer will present itself as a bowel obstruction in 16-23% of all cases. However, not all obstructing tumors are malignant and the differentiation between a benign and a malignant tumor can be difficult. The purpose of our study was to determine whether fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging combined with MR colonography could be used to differentiate a benign from a malignant obstructing colon tumor. Methods: Patients with benign colon tumor stenosis, based on diverticulitis, were asked to participate in the study. The same number of patients with verified colorectal cancer was included. Both groups had to be scheduled for surgery to be included. Two blinded observers analyzed the tumors on MR by placing a region of interest in the tumor and a series of parameters were evaluated, e.g. wash-in, wash-out and time-to-peak. Results: 14 patients were included. The wash-in and wash-out rates were significantly different between the benign and malignant tumors, and a clear distinction between benign and malignant disease was therefore possible by looking only at the MR data. Furthermore, MR colography evaluating the rest of the colon past the stenosis was possible with all patients. Conclusion: The results showed the feasibility of using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging to differentiate between benign and malignant colonic tumors. With a high intra-class correlation and significant differences found on independent segments of the tumor, the method appears to be reproducible. Furthermore, the potential is big in performing a full preoperative colon evaluation even in patients with obstructing cancer. Trial number: (NCT00114829).

  1. Differentiation between benign and malignant colon tumors using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR colonography; a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achiam, M.P.; Andersen, L.P.H.; Klein, M.; Logager, V.; Chabanova, E.; Thomsen, H.S.; Rosenberg, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer will present itself as a bowel obstruction in 16-23% of all cases. However, not all obstructing tumors are malignant and the differentiation between a benign and a malignant tumor can be difficult. The purpose of our study was to determine whether fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging combined with MR colonography could be used to differentiate a benign from a malignant obstructing colon tumor. Methods: Patients with benign colon tumor stenosis, based on diverticulitis, were asked to participate in the study. The same number of patients with verified colorectal cancer was included. Both groups had to be scheduled for surgery to be included. Two blinded observers analyzed the tumors on MR by placing a region of interest in the tumor and a series of parameters were evaluated, e.g. wash-in, wash-out and time-to-peak. Results: 14 patients were included. The wash-in and wash-out rates were significantly different between the benign and malignant tumors, and a clear distinction between benign and malignant disease was therefore possible by looking only at the MR data. Furthermore, MR colography evaluating the rest of the colon past the stenosis was possible with all patients. Conclusion: The results showed the feasibility of using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging to differentiate between benign and malignant colonic tumors. With a high intra-class correlation and significant differences found on independent segments of the tumor, the method appears to be reproducible. Furthermore, the potential is big in performing a full preoperative colon evaluation even in patients with obstructing cancer. Trial number: (NCT00114829).

  2. Investigation of flow dynamics of liquid phase in a pilot-scale trickle bed reactor using radiotracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, H J; Sharma, V K

    2016-10-01

    A radiotracer investigation was carried out to measure residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase in a trickle bed reactor (TBR). The main objectives of the investigation were to investigate radial and axial mixing of the liquid phase, and evaluate performance of the liquid distributor/redistributor at different operating conditions. Mean residence times (MRTs), holdups (H) and fraction of flow flowing along different quadrants were estimated. The analysis of the measured RTD curves indicated radial non-uniform distribution of liquid phase across the beds. The overall RTD of the liquid phase, measured at the exit of the reactor was simulated using a multi-parameter axial dispersion with exchange model (ADEM), and model parameters were obtained. The results of model simulations indicated that the TBR behaved as a plug flow reactor at most of the operating conditions used in the investigation. The results of the investigation helped to improve the existing design as well as to design a full-scale industrial TBR for petroleum refining applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modelling dynamic transport and adsorption of arsenic in soil-bed filters for long-term performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sourav; Mondal, Raka; de, Sirshendu; Griffiths, Ian

    2017-11-01

    Purification of contaminated water following the safe water guidelines while generating sufficiently large throughput is a crucial requirement for the steady supply of safe water to large populations. Adsorption-based filtration processes using a multilayer soil bed has been posed as a viable method to achieve this goal. This work describes the theory of operation and prediction of the long-term behaviour of such a system. The fixed-bed column has a single input of contaminated water from the top and an output from the bottom. As the contaminant passes through the column, it is adsorbed by the medium. Like any other adsorption medium, the filter has a certain lifespan, beyond which the filtrate does not meet the safe limit of drinking water, which is defined as `breakthrough'. A mathematical model is developed that couples the fluid flow through the porous medium to the convective, diffusive and adsorptive transport of the contaminant. The results are validated with experimental observations and the model is then used to predict the breakthrough and lifetime of the filter. The key advantage of this model is that it can predict the long-term behaviour of any adsorption column system for any set of physical characteristics of the system. This worked was supported by the EPSRC Global Challenge Research Fund Institutional Sponsorship 2016.

  4. Assessing pharmacokinetics of indocyanine green-loaded nanoparticle in tumor with a dynamic diffuse fluorescence tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanqi; Yin, Guoyan; Zhao, Huijuan; Ma, Wenjuan; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Limin

    2018-02-01

    Real-time and continuous monitoring of drug release in vivo is an important task in pharmaceutical development. Here, we devoted to explore a real-time continuous study of the pharmacokinetics of free indocyanine green (ICG) and ICG loaded in the shell-sheddable nanoparticles in tumor based on a dynamic diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) system: A highly-sensitive dynamic DFT system of CT-scanning mode generates informative and instantaneous sampling datasets; An analysis procedure extracts the pharmacokinetic parameters from the reconstructed time curves of the mean ICG concentration in tumor, using the Gauss-Newton scheme based on two-compartment model. Compared with the pharmacokinetic parameters of free ICG in tumor, the ICG loaded in the shell-sheddable nanoparticles shows efficient accumulation in tumor. The results demonstrate our proposed dynamic-DFT can provide an integrated and continuous view of the drug delivery of the injected agents in different formulations, which is helpful for the development of diagnosis and therapy for tumors.

  5. Tumor aggressiveness and patient outcome in cancer of the pancreas assessed by dynamic 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelbaum, Ron; Frenkel, Alex; Haddad, Riad; Sikorski, Natalia; Strauss, Ludwig G; Israel, Ora; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of a quantitative dynamic PET model in pancreatic cancer as a potential index of tumor aggressiveness and predictor of survival. Seventy-one patients with (18)F-FDG-avid adenocarcinoma of the pancreas before treatment were recruited, including 27 with localized tumors (11 underwent pancreatectomy, and 16 had localized nonresectable tumors) and 44 with metastatic disease. Dynamic (18)F-FDG PET images were acquired over a 60-min period, followed by a whole-body PET/CT study. Quantitative data measurements were based on a 2-compartment model, and the following variables were calculated: VB (fractional blood volume in target area), K(1) and k(2) (kinetic membrane transport parameters), k(3) and k(4) (intracellular (18)F-FDG phosphorylation and dephosphorylation parameters, respectively), and (18)F-FDG INF (global (18)F-FDG influx). The single significant variable for overall survival (OS) in patients with localized disease was (18)F-FDG INF. Patients with a high (18)F-FDG INF (>0.033 min(-1)) had a median OS of 6 and 5 mo for nonresectable and resected tumors, respectively, versus 15 and 19 mo for a low (18)F-FDG INF in nonresectable and resected tumors, respectively (P measured by dynamic PET in newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer correlated with the aggressiveness of disease. The (18)F-FDG INF was the single most significant variable for OS in patients with localized disease, whether resectable or not.

  6. Characteristics of time-activity curves obtained from dynamic 11C-methionine PET in common primary brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yuichi; Asano, Yoshitaka; Shinoda, Jun; Yano, Hirohito; Ikegame, Yuka; Kawasaki, Tomohiro; Nakayama, Noriyuki; Maruyama, Takashi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Iwama, Toru

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether dynamic PET with 11 C-methionine (MET) (MET-PET) is useful in the diagnosis of brain tumors. One hundred sixty patients with brain tumors (139 gliomas, 9 meningiomas, 4 hemangioblastomas and 8 primary central nervous system lymphomas [PCNSL]) underwent dynamic MET-PET with a 3-dimensional acquisition mode, and the maximum tumor MET-standardized uptake value (MET-SUV) was measured consecutively to construct a time-activity curve (TAC). Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated from the time-to-peak (TTP) and the slope of the curve in the late phase (SLOPE). The TAC patterns of MET-SUVs (MET-TACs) could be divided into four characteristic types when MET dynamics were analyzed by dividing the MET-TAC into three phases. MET-SUVs were significantly higher in early and late phases in glioblastoma compared to anaplastic astrocytoma, diffuse astrocytoma and the normal frontal cortex (P dynamic MET-PET study could be helpful in the non-invasive discrimination of brain tumor subtypes, in particular gliomas.

  7. Characterization of tumor heterogeneity using dynamic contrast enhanced CT and FDG-PET in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmpt, Wouter van; Das, Marco; Hüllner, Martin; Sharifi, Hoda; Zegers, Catharina M.L.; Reymen, Bart; Lambin, Philippe; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) quantifies vasculature properties of tumors, whereas static FDG-PET/CT defines metabolic activity. Both imaging modalities are capable of showing intra-tumor heterogeneity. We investigated differences in vasculature properties within primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors measured by DCE-CT and metabolic activity from FDG-PET/CT. Methods: Thirty three NSCLC patients were analyzed prior to treatment. FDG-PET/CT and DCE-CT were co-registered. The tumor was delineated and metabolic activity was segmented on the FDG-PET/CT in two regions: low (<50% maximum SUV) and high (⩾50% maximum SUV) metabolic uptake. Blood flow, blood volume and permeability were calculated using a maximum slope, deconvolution algorithm and a Patlak model. Correlations were assessed between perfusion parameters for the regions of interest. Results: DCE-CT provided additional information on vasculature and tumor heterogeneity that was not correlated to metabolic tumor activity. There was no significant difference between low and high metabolic active regions for any of the DCE-CT parameters. Furthermore, only moderate correlations between maximum SUV and DCE-CT parameters were observed. Conclusions: No direct correlation was observed between FDG-uptake and parameters extracted from DCE-CT. DCE-CT may provide complementary information to the characterization of primary NSCLC tumors over FDG-PET/CT imaging

  8. Dynamics of yeast immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactors systems in ethanol fermentation from lactose-hydrolyzed whey and whey permeate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardo, Sabrina; Pereira, Gabriela Feix; Klein, Manuela P; Rech, Rosane; Hertz, Plinho F; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of ethanol production on lactose-hydrolyzed whey (LHW) and lactose-hydrolyzed whey permeate (LHWP) in batch fluidized-bed bioreactors using single and co-cultures of immobilized cells of industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-industrial strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus. Although the co-culture of S. cerevisiae CAT-1 and K. marxianus CCT 4086 produced two- to fourfold the ethanol productivity of single cultures of S. cerevisiae, the single cultures of the K. marxianus CCT 4086 produced the best results in both media (Y EtOH/S = 0.47-0.49 g g(-1) and Q P = 1.39-1.68 g L(-1) h(-1), in LHW and LHWP, respectively). Ethanol production on concentrated LHWP (180 g L(-1)) reached 79.1 g L(-1), with yields of 0.46 g g(-1) for K. marxianus CCT 4086 cultures. Repeated batches of fluidized-bed bioreactor on concentrated LHWP led to increased ethanol productivity, reaching 2.8 g L(-1) h(-1).

  9. Application of computational fluid dynamics for the simulation of cryogenic molecular sieve bed absorber of hydrogen isotopes recovery system for Indian LLCB-TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayathri Devi, V.; Sircar, A.; Sarkar, B. [Institute of Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarar (India)

    2015-03-15

    One of the most challenging tasks in the design of the fuel cycle system lies in the effective design of Tritium Extraction System (TES) which involves proper extraction and purification of tritium in the fuel cycle of the fusion reactor. Indian Lead Lithium cooled Ceramic Breeder Test Blanket Module (LLCB-TBM) would extract hydrogen isotopes through Cryogenic Molecular Sieve Bed (CMSB) adsorber system. A prototype Hydrogen Isotopes Recovery System (HIRS) is being developed to validate the concepts for tritium extraction by adsorption mass transfer mechanism. In this study, a design model has been developed and analyzed to simulate the adsorption mass transfer kinetics in a fixed bed adsorption column. The simulation leads primarily to effective design of HIRS, which is a state-of-the-art technology. The paper describes the process simulation approach and the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. The effects of different operating conditions are studied to investigate their influence on the hydrogen isotopes adsorption capacity. The results of the present simulation study would be used to understand the best optimized transport phenomenon before realizing the TES as a system for LLCB-TBM. (authors)

  10. Steady-state and dynamic evaluation of the electric propulsion system test bed vehicle on a road load simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustin, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    The propulsion system of the Lewis Research Center's electric propulsion system test bed vehicle was tested on the road load simulator under the DOE Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program. This propulsion system, consisting of a series-wound dc motor controlled by an infinitely variable SCR chopper and an 84-V battery pack, is typical of those used in electric vehicles made in 1976. Steady-state tests were conducted over a wide range of differential output torques and vehicle speeds. Efficiencies of all of the components were determined. Effects of temperature and voltage variations on the motor and the effect of voltage changes on the controller were examined. Energy consumption and energy efficiency for the system were determined over the B and C driving schedules of the SAE J227a test procedure.

  11. Quantifying the dynamics of flow within a permeable bed using time-resolved endoscopic particle imaging velocimetry (EPIV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blois, G. [University of Birmingham, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Birmingham (United Kingdom); University of Illinois, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Urbana, IL (United States); Sambrook Smith, G.H.; Lead, J.R. [University of Birmingham, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Best, J.L. [University of Illinois, Departments of Geology, Geography, Mechanical Science and Engineering, and Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory, Urbana, IL (United States); Hardy, R.J. [Durham University, Department of Geography, Science Laboratories, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents results of an experimental study investigating the mean and temporal evolution of flow within the pore space of a packed bed overlain by a free-surface flow. Data were collected by an endoscopic PIV (EPIV) technique. EPIV allows the instantaneous velocity field within the pore space to be quantified at a high spatio-temporal resolution, thus permitting investigation of the structure of turbulent subsurface flow produced by a high Reynolds number freestream flow (Re{sub s} in the range 9.8 x 10{sup 3}-9.7 x 10{sup 4}). Evolution of coherent flow structures within the pore space is shown to be driven by jet flow, with the interaction of this jet with the pore flow generating distinct coherent flow structures. The effects of freestream water depth, Reynolds and Froude numbers are investigated. (orig.)

  12. Soil application of ash produced by low-temperature fluidized bed gasification: effects on soil nutrient dynamics and crop response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Stöver, Dorette Sophie; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Holm, Jens Kai

    2012-01-01

    not significantly altered after ash application. SA was generally able to increase the levels of Olsen-P and of the ammonium acetate/acetic acid-extractable K in soil as well as to improve the yield of barley and maize, whereas faba bean did not react positively to ash amendment. CP did not show beneficial effects......Recycling of residual products of bioenergy conversion processes is important for adding value to the technologies and as a potential beneficial soil fertility amendment. In this study, two different ash materials originating from low temperature circulating fluidized bed (LT-CFB) gasification...... of either wheat straw (SA) or residue fibers mainly from citrus peels (CP) were tested regarding their potential to be used as fertilizer on agricultural soils. A soil incubation study, a greenhouse experiment with barley and faba bean, and an accompanying outdoor experiment with maize were carried out...

  13. Dynamic Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) and Diffusion Weighted MR Imaging (DWI) for Differentiation between Benign and Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Assili, S.; Fathi Kazerooni, A.; Aghaghazvini, L.; Saligheh Rad, H.R.; Pirayesh Islamian, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Salivary gland tumors form nearly 3% of head and neck tumors. Due to their large histological variety and vicinity to facial nerves, pre-operative diagnosis and differentiation of benign and malignant parotid tumors are a major challenge for radiologists. Objective: The majority of these tumors are benign; however, sometimes they tend to transform into a malignant form. Functional MRI techniques, namely dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-) MRI and diffusion-weighted ...

  14. The expression of VE-cadherin in breast cancer cells modulates cell dynamics as a function of tumor differentiation and promotes tumor-endothelial cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Maryam; Cao, Jiahui; Friedrich, Katrin; Kemper, Björn; Brendel, Oliver; Grosser, Marianne; Adrian, Manuela; Baretton, Gustavo; Breier, Georg; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim

    2018-01-01

    The cadherin switch has profound consequences on cancer invasion and metastasis. The endothelial-specific vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) has been demonstrated in diverse cancer types including breast cancer and is supposed to modulate tumor progression and metastasis, but underlying mechanisms need to be better understood. First, we evaluated VE-cadherin expression by tissue microarray in 392 cases of breast cancer tumors and found a diverse expression and distribution of VE-cadherin. Experimental expression of fluorescence-tagged VE-cadherin (VE-EGFP) in undifferentiated, fibroblastoid and E-cadherin-negative MDA-231 (MDA-VE-EGFP) as well as in differentiated E-cadherin-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-VE-EGFP), respectively, displayed differentiation-dependent functional differences. VE-EGFP expression reversed the fibroblastoid MDA-231 cells to an epithelial-like phenotype accompanied by increased β-catenin expression, actin and vimentin remodeling, increased cell spreading and barrier function and a reduced migration ability due to formation of VE-cadherin-mediated cell junctions. The effects were largely absent in both MDA-VE-EGFP and in control MCF-EGFP cell lines. However, MCF-7 cells displayed a VE-cadherin-independent planar cell polarity and directed cell migration that both developed in MDA-231 only after VE-EGFP expression. Furthermore, VE-cadherin expression had no effect on tumor cell proliferation in monocultures while co-culturing with endothelial cells enhanced tumor cell proliferation due to integration of the tumor cells into monolayer where they form VE-cadherin-mediated cell contacts with the endothelium. We propose an interactive VE-cadherin-based crosstalk that might activate proliferation-promoting signals. Together, our study shows a VE-cadherin-mediated cell dynamics and an endothelial-dependent proliferation in a differentiation-dependent manner.

  15. SU-E-T-183: Clinical Quality Assurance Workflow for Dynamic Tumor Tracking Radiation Dose Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamalui-Hunter, M; Su, Z; Li, Z

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: One of the most important aspects of implementation of new treatment modalities is an ‘end-to-end’ verification of the treatment process. Radiation treatment based on dynamic tracking of a tumor is highly patient-specific, therefore, special attention should be paid to quality assurance of the treatment delivery. Our goal was to design the clinical workflow that ensures accurate delivery of the planned dose using the Dynamic Target Tracking option of VeroTM (BrainLab,MHI) linac. Methods: A patient simulation is designed to include a pre-treatment session to verify whether the system can reliably track the motion of the implanted marker and build the 4D model of the target motion. The external surrogate and target motion patterns are recorded in the ExactracTM log files. In this work, a spectrum of custom marker and external surrogate motion trajectories closely resembling the patient specific motion patterns was used. 1mm thick/11mm long VisicoilTM marker was placed 15 and 20mm from the center of the spherical tissue equivalent target (centroid to centroid distance) in the 4D motion phantom (CIRSTM). 3D conformal (3 mm block margin) SBRT plans were delivered to 2 moving targets in the phantom: 1) 20mm diameter target that allows ion chamber dose measurement and 2) 25mm target that allows using film to measure CAX dose (GafchromicTM EBT3 used). The measured dose was compared to the iPlanTM TPS results using MonteCarlo algorithm (1% variance, Dose-to-water). Results: On average, film shows 98.9% pass using gamma criterion for 2% and 2mm DTA, 94.3% match for 2% and 1 mm DTA, 98% pass for 1% and 2 mm DTA however only 88% points passing for 1% and 1 mm DTA. Ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculation within 1.5%. Conclusion: The clinical QA workflow was designed for SBRT delivery using real-time tumor tracking on VeroTM linac

  16. Non-palpable incidentally found testicular tumors: Differentiation between benign, malignant, and burned-out tumors using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanharawi, Imane El; Correas, Jean-Michel; Glas, Ludivine; Ferlicot, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate qualitative, semi-quantitative, and quantitative parameters obtained by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI for the characterization of histologically proven, non-palpable, incidentally found intratesticular tumors. Materials and methods: From 2006 to 2014, we included men with non-palpable, incidentally found testicular tumors on ultrasound, normal tumoral marker levels,referred for surgery. DCE-MRI data were analyzed retrospectively and independently by two radiologists blinded to the histological diagnosis. The visual enhancement patterns, time-signal intensity curves, shape of the curves (type 0–3), maximal relative enhancement (Peak), initial enhancement slope (IS), time to peak (TTP), as well as transfer constants Ktrans and Kep were compared between the tumors. The interobserver correlation was evaluated. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves and areas under the curve (AUC) were extracted. Results: Thirty-one patients (mean age of 37.3 years) were included. Tumor mean size was 1.2 ± 0.77 cm (min = 0.3 cm, max = 2.8 cm). Regarding the histology results, three groups were defined: Twelve stromal “benign tumors” (BT) exhibited more type 2 and type 3 curves than 12 “malignant tumors” (MT) and 7 “burned-out tumors” (BOT) (p < 0.0001). BT had a higher peak (96 vs. 54 and 17%), shorter TTP (215 vs. 412 and 692 sec), higher IS (73 vs. 12 and 2 arbitrary units), higher Ktrans (255 vs. 88 and 14 min −1 *1000) and higher Kep (554 vs. 159 and 48 min −1 *1000) than MT and BOT, respectively (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0003, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The agreement coefficient values and the AUC extracted after gathering MT with BOT varied from 0.83 to 0.96 and from 0.868 to 0.978, respectively. Conclusion: DCE-MRI may assist in differentiating between benign intratesticular stromal tumors,malignant and burned-out tumors.

  17. Non-palpable incidentally found testicular tumors: Differentiation between benign, malignant, and burned-out tumors using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanharawi, Imane El [Service de Radiologie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle Adulte, Groupe Hospitalier Paris Sud, Hôpital de Bicêtre, APHP, 78 avenue du Général Leclerc, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicêtre (France); Correas, Jean-Michel [Service de Radiologie Adultes, Hôpital Necker, APHP, Faculté Paris 5, 149 rue de Sèvres 75015 Paris (France); Institut Langevin, ESPCI Paris, PSL Research University CNRS UMR 7587, INSERM ERL U-979, 35, 17 rue Moreau, 75012 Paris (France); Glas, Ludivine [Service de Radiologie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle Adulte, Groupe Hospitalier Paris Sud, Hôpital de Bicêtre, APHP, 78 avenue du Général Leclerc, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicêtre (France); Ferlicot, Sophie [Service d ’ anatomo-pathologie, Groupe Hospitalier Paris Sud, Hôpital de Bicêtre, APHP, 78 avenue du Général Leclerc, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicêtre (France); Faculté de Médecine Paris-Saclay, 63 rue Gabriel Péri, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre (France); and others

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate qualitative, semi-quantitative, and quantitative parameters obtained by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI for the characterization of histologically proven, non-palpable, incidentally found intratesticular tumors. Materials and methods: From 2006 to 2014, we included men with non-palpable, incidentally found testicular tumors on ultrasound, normal tumoral marker levels,referred for surgery. DCE-MRI data were analyzed retrospectively and independently by two radiologists blinded to the histological diagnosis. The visual enhancement patterns, time-signal intensity curves, shape of the curves (type 0–3), maximal relative enhancement (Peak), initial enhancement slope (IS), time to peak (TTP), as well as transfer constants Ktrans and Kep were compared between the tumors. The interobserver correlation was evaluated. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves and areas under the curve (AUC) were extracted. Results: Thirty-one patients (mean age of 37.3 years) were included. Tumor mean size was 1.2 ± 0.77 cm (min = 0.3 cm, max = 2.8 cm). Regarding the histology results, three groups were defined: Twelve stromal “benign tumors” (BT) exhibited more type 2 and type 3 curves than 12 “malignant tumors” (MT) and 7 “burned-out tumors” (BOT) (p < 0.0001). BT had a higher peak (96 vs. 54 and 17%), shorter TTP (215 vs. 412 and 692 sec), higher IS (73 vs. 12 and 2 arbitrary units), higher Ktrans (255 vs. 88 and 14 min{sup −1}*1000) and higher Kep (554 vs. 159 and 48 min{sup −1}*1000) than MT and BOT, respectively (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0003, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The agreement coefficient values and the AUC extracted after gathering MT with BOT varied from 0.83 to 0.96 and from 0.868 to 0.978, respectively. Conclusion: DCE-MRI may assist in differentiating between benign intratesticular stromal tumors,malignant and burned-out tumors.

  18. Clinical value of dynamic scintigraphy of salivary glands with 99mTcO4- for differentiating Warthin's tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weiguo

    1989-01-01

    The results of dynamic scintigraphy of salivary glands with 99m TcO 4 - in 15 patients with pathologically proved Warthin's tumor (papillary cystadenoma lyphomatosum) were reported. Among them, 14 cases showed very high uptake of 99m TcO 4 - ('hot nodule'), 1 case showed 'cold nodule'. The positive rate was 93.3%, specificity was 98%, accuracy was 97.3%. The authors believe that this method is a simple, safe noninvasive way of differentiating Warthin's tumor and is of important significance for the surgical treatment of patients

  19. Dynamic Analyses of Alternative Polyadenylation from RNA-Seq Reveal 3′-UTR Landscape Across 7 Tumor Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zheng; Donehower, Lawrence A; Cooper, Thomas A.; Neilson, Joel R.; Wheeler, David A.; Wagner, Eric J.; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a pervasive mechanism in the regulation of most human genes, and its implication in diseases including cancer is only beginning to be appreciated. Since conventional APA profiling has not been widely adopted, global cancer APA studies are very limited. Here we develop a novel bioinformatics algorithm (DaPars) for the de novo identification of dynamic APAs from standard RNA-seq. When applied to 358 TCGA Pan-Cancer tumor/normal pairs across 7 tumor types, DaPars reveals 1,346 genes with recurrent and tumor-specific APAs. Most APA genes (91%) have shorter 3′ UTRs in tumors that can avoid miRNA-mediated repression, including glutaminase (GLS), a key metabolic enzyme for tumor proliferation. Interestingly, selected APA events add strong prognostic power beyond common clinical and molecular variables, suggesting their potential as novel prognostic biomarkers. Finally, our results implicate CstF64, an essential polyadenylation factor, as a master regulator of 3′ UTR shortening across multiple tumor types. PMID:25409906

  20. EG-07CELL CYCLE SIGNATURE AND TUMOR PHYLOGENY ARE ENCODED IN THE EVOLUTIONARY DYNAMICS OF DNA METHYLATION IN GLIOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Tali; Pankov, Aleksandr; Johnson, Brett E.; Hong, Chibo; Bell, Robert J.A.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Reis, Gerald F.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Barnes, Michael; Bollen, Andrew W.; Taylor, Barry S.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Olshen, Adam B.; Song, Jun S.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Chang, Susan M.; Costello, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    The clonal evolution of tumor cell populations can be reconstructed from patterns of genetic alterations. In contrast, tumor epigenetic states, including DNA methylation, are reversible and sensitive to the tumor microenvironment, presumably precluding the use of epigenetics to discover tumor phylogeny. Here we examined the spatial and temporal dynamics of DNA methylation in a clinically and genetically characterized cohort of IDH1-mutant low-grade gliomas and their patient-matched recurrences. WHO grade II gliomas are diffuse, infiltrative tumors that frequently recur and may undergo malignant progression to a higher grade with a worse prognosis. The extent to which epigenetic alterations contribute to the evolution of low-grade gliomas, including malignant progression, is unknown. While all gliomas in the cohort exhibited the hypermethylation signature associated with IDH1 mutation, low-grade gliomas that underwent malignant progression to high-grade glioblastoma (GBM) had a unique signature of DNA hypomethylation enriched for active enhancers, as well as sites of age-related hypermethylation in the brain. Genes with promoter hypomethylation and concordant transcriptional upregulation during evolution to GBM were enriched in cell cycle function, evolving in concert with genetic alterations that deregulate the G1/S cell cycle checkpoint. Despite the plasticity of tumor epigenetic states, phyloepigenetic trees robustly recapitulated phylogenetic trees derived from somatic mutations in the same patients. These findings highlight widespread co-dependency of genetic and epigenetic events throughout the clonal evolution of initial and recurrent glioma.

  1. Dynamic cultivation of human mesenchymal stem cells in a rotating bed bioreactor system based on the Z RP platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichs, Solvig; Röker, Stefanie; Marten, Dana; Peterbauer, Anja; Scheper, Thomas; van Griensven, Martijn; Kasper, Cornelia

    2009-01-01

    Because the regeneration of large bone defects is limited by quantitative restrictions and risks of infections, the development of bioartificial bone substitutes is of great importance. To obtain a three-dimensional functional tissue-like graft, static cultivation is inexpedient due to limitations in cell density, nutrition and oxygen support. Dynamic cultivation in a bioreactor system can overcome these restrictions and furthermore provide the possibility to control the environment with regard to pH, oxygen content, and temperature. In this study, a three-dimensional bone construct was engineered by the use of dynamic bioreactor technology. Human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultivated on a macroporous zirconium dioxide based ceramic disc called Sponceram. Furthermore, hydroxyapatite coated Sponceram was used. The cells were cultivated under dynamic conditions and compared with statically cultivated cells. The differentiation into osteoblasts was initiated by osteogenic supplements. Cellular proliferation during static and dynamic cultivation was compared measuring glucose and lactate concentration. The differentiation process was analysed determining AP-expression and using different specific staining methods. Our results demonstrate much higher proliferation rates during dynamic conditions in the bioreactor system compared to static cultivation measured by glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell densities on the scaffolds indicated higher proliferation on native Sponceram compared to hydroxyapatite coated Sponceram. With this study, we present an excellent method to enhance cellular proliferation and bone lineage specific growth of tissue like structures comprising fibrous (collagen) and globular (mineral) extracellular components. (c) 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2009.

  2. Surprisal analysis of Glioblastoma Multiform (GBM) microRNA dynamics unveils tumor specific phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadran, Sohila; Remacle, Francoise; Levine, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Gliomablastoma multiform (GBM) is the most fatal form of all brain cancers in humans. Currently there are limited diagnostic tools for GBM detection. Here, we applied surprisal analysis, a theory grounded in thermodynamics, to unveil how biomolecule energetics, specifically a redistribution of free energy amongst microRNAs (miRNAs), results in a system deviating from a non-cancer state to the GBM cancer -specific phenotypic state. Utilizing global miRNA microarray expression data of normal and GBM patients tumors, surprisal analysis characterizes a miRNA system response capable of distinguishing GBM samples from normal tissue biopsy samples. We indicate that the miRNAs contributing to this system behavior is a disease phenotypic state specific to GBM and is therefore a unique GBM-specific thermodynamic signature. MiRNAs implicated in the regulation of stochastic signaling processes crucial in the hallmarks of human cancer, dominate this GBM-cancer phenotypic state. With this theory, we were able to distinguish with high fidelity GBM patients solely by monitoring the dynamics of miRNAs present in patients' biopsy samples. We anticipate that the GBM-specific thermodynamic signature will provide a critical translational tool in better characterizing cancer types and in the development of future therapeutics for GBM.

  3. Inflammasomes and Cancer: The Dynamic Role of the Inflammasome in Tumor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin Kantono

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Inflammation in tumor microenvironments is not only associated with various stages of tumor development, but also has significant impacts on tumor immunity and immunotherapy. Inflammasome are an important innate immune pathway critical for the production of active IL-1β and interleukin 18, as well as the induction of pyroptosis. Although extensive studies have demonstrated that inflammasomes play a vital role in infectious and autoimmune diseases, their role in tumor progression remains elusive. Multiple studies using a colitis-associated colon cancer model show that inflammasome components provide protection against the development of colon cancer. However, very recent studies demonstrate that inflammasomes promote tumor progression in skin and breast cancer. These results indicate that inflammasomes can promote and suppress tumor development depending on types of tumors, specific inflammasomes involved, and downstream effector molecules. The complicated role of inflammasomes raises new opportunities and challenges to manipulate inflammasome pathways in the treatment of cancer.

  4. Dynamic-thresholding level set: a novel computer-aided volumetry method for liver tumors in hepatic CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenli; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Harris, Gordon J.

    2007-03-01

    Measurement of the volume of focal liver tumors, called liver tumor volumetry, is indispensable for assessing the growth of tumors and for monitoring the response of tumors to oncology treatments. Traditional edge models, such as the maximum gradient and zero-crossing methods, often fail to detect the accurate boundary of a fuzzy object such as a liver tumor. As a result, the computerized volumetry based on these edge models tends to differ from manual segmentation results performed by physicians. In this study, we developed a novel computerized volumetry method for fuzzy objects, called dynamic-thresholding level set (DT level set). An optimal threshold value computed from a histogram tends to shift, relative to the theoretical threshold value obtained from a normal distribution model, toward a smaller region in the histogram. We thus designed a mobile shell structure, called a propagating shell, which is a thick region encompassing the level set front. The optimal threshold calculated from the histogram of the shell drives the level set front toward the boundary of a liver tumor. When the volume ratio between the object and the background in the shell approaches one, the optimal threshold value best fits the theoretical threshold value and the shell stops propagating. Application of the DT level set to 26 hepatic CT cases with 63 biopsy-confirmed hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and metastases showed that the computer measured volumes were highly correlated with those of tumors measured manually by physicians. Our preliminary results showed that DT level set was effective and accurate in estimating the volumes of liver tumors detected in hepatic CT images.

  5. WE-G-BRF-06: Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-Guided Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Cancer Radiotherapy: First Patient Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Loo, B; Graves, E; Yamamoto, T; Keall, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: PET-guided dynamic tumor tracking is a novel concept of biologically targeted image guidance for radiotherapy. A dynamic tumor tracking algorithm based on list-mode PET data has been developed and previously tested on dynamic phantom data. In this study, we investigate if dynamic tumor tracking is clinically feasible by applying the method to lung cancer patient PET data. Methods: PET-guided tumor tracking estimates the target position of a segmented volume in PET images reconstructed continuously from accumulated coincidence events correlated with external respiratory motion, simulating real-time applications, i.e., only data up to the current time point is used to estimate the target position. A target volume is segmented with a 50% threshold, consistently, of the maximum intensity in the predetermined volume of interest. Through this algorithm, the PET-estimated trajectories are quantified from four lung cancer patients who have distinct tumor location and size. The accuracy of the PET-estimated trajectories is evaluated by comparing to external respiratory motion because the ground-truth of tumor motion is not known in patients; however, previous phantom studies demonstrated sub-2mm accuracy using clinically derived 3D tumor motion. Results: The overall similarity of motion patterns between the PET-estimated trajectories and the external respiratory traces implies that the PET-guided tracking algorithm can provide an acceptable level of targeting accuracy. However, there are variations in the tracking accuracy between tumors due to the quality of the segmentation which depends on target-to-background ratio, tumor location and size. Conclusion: For the first time, a dynamic tumor tracking algorithm has been applied to lung cancer patient PET data, demonstrating clinical feasibility of real-time tumor tracking for integrated PET-linacs. The target-to-background ratio is a significant factor determining accuracy: screening during treatment planning would

  6. Improved combustion performance of waste-fired FB-boilers -The influence of the dynamics of the bed on the air-/fuel interaction; Foerbaettrad foerbraenningsprestanda vid avfallsfoerbraenning i FB-pannor -Baeddynamikens inverkan paa luft-/braensleomblandningen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Johanna (Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); Pallares, David; Thunman, Henrik; Johnsson, Filip (Chalmers (Sweden)); Andersson, Bengt-Aake (E.on/Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); Victoren, Anders (Metso Power AB (Sweden)); Johansson, Andreas (SP, Boraas (Sweden))

    2010-07-01

    One of the key benefits of fluidized bed combustion is that the bed - through mixing of fuel and air and accumulated heat - facilitates combustion at low stoichiometry and with low emissions. Even so, it is not unusual that waste-fired FB-boilers are operated at 6-8% oxygen that corresponds to 30-40% higher flows of gas than theoretically needed. In addition to that and in comparison to grate furnaces, FB-boiler can cause high pressure drop losses because of the fluidization of the bottom bed, which in turn are associated with high costs for power (fans). This work aims therefore at increasing the knowledge for how the dynamics of the bed affects the air and fuel mixture. Methods to explain and characterize the phenomenon have been derived within this work showing: - Distribution of air in a bed for various cases and the influence of pressure drop, bed height and fluidization velocity - A semi-empiric method to calculate an even bubble distribution - The relation between fluidization and fuel distribution for various fluidization flows and fuels - Dispersion rates for various fuels - Volatilization rates for waste in relation to biomass The result can be useful when optimizing units, for instance through finding as low pressure drops as possible with an even bubble distribution, low risk for sintering and unwanted emissions. The work has thereby reached its ultimate goal of increasing the generic knowledge about waste combustion in FB-boiler

  7. Model of rough bed for numerical simulation of saltation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kharlamova, Irina; Vlasák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 3 (2015), s. 366-385 ISSN 1964-8189 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/09/1718; GA ČR GAP105/10/1574 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : saltation * bed load transport * rough bed * armoured bed * bed roughness Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.636, year: 2015

  8. Functional and morphological effects of diazepam and midazolam on tumor vasculature in the 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor model using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan N

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nuo Yan,1 Yuzhen Zheng,2 Cheng Yang1 1Second Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital to Logistics University of PAP, Tianjin, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital, Tianjin, China Abstract: Antiangiogenic therapy attenuates tumor growth by reducing vascularization. Diazepam (DZP and midazolam (MZL have antiangiogenic properties in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Thus, we investigated the antiangiogenic activity of DZP and MZL in the rat 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor model. The effect on tumor vasculature was evaluated using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging with gradient-echo (GE and spin-echo (SE to assess perfusion parameters, including cerebral blood volume (CBV, cerebral blood flow (CBF, mean transit time (MTT, and mean vessel diameter. The GE-normalized CBF (nCBF in the tumors of untreated controls was significantly lower than that in normal brain tissue, whereas the CBV and MTT were higher. DZP- and MZL-treated rats had higher CBF and lower CBV and MTT values than did untreated controls. The tumor size decreased significantly to 33.5% in DZP-treated rats (P<0.001 and 22.5% in MZL-treated rats (P<0.01 relative to controls. The SE-normalized CBV was lower in DZP-treated (32.9% and MZL-treated (10.6% rats compared with controls. The mean vessel diameter decreased significantly by 32.5% in DPZ-treated and by 24.9% in MZL-treated rats compared with controls (P<0.01. The GE and SE nCBF values were higher in DZP-treated (49.9% and 40.1%, respectively and MZL-treated (41.2% and 32.1%, respectively rats than in controls. The GE- and SE-normalized MTTs were lower in DZP-treated (48.2% and 59.8%, respectively and MZL-treated (40.5% and 51.2%, respectively rats than in controls. Both DZP and MZL had antiangiogenic effects on tumor perfusion and vasculature; however, the antiangiogenic activity of DZP is more promising than that of MZL. Keywords: diazepam, midazolam, 9L gliosarcoma

  9. Dynamic changes in oxygenation of intracranial tumor and contralateral brain during tumor growth and carbogen breathing: A multisite EPR oximetry with implantable resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huagang; Dong, Ruhong; Li, Hongbin; Williams, Benjamin; Lariviere, Jean P.; Hekmatyar, S.K.; Kauppinen, Risto A.; Khan, Nadeem; Swartz, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several techniques currently exist for measuring tissue oxygen; however technical difficulties have limited their usefulness and general application. We report a recently developed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry approach with multiple probe implantable resonators (IRs) that allow repeated measurements of oxygen in tissue at depths of greater than 10 mm. Methods The EPR signal to noise (S/N) ratio of two probe IRs was compared with that of LiPc deposits. The feasibility of intracranial tissue pO2 measurements by EPR oximetry using IRs was tested in normal rats and rats bearing intracerebral F98 tumors. The dynamic changes in the tissue pO2 were assessed during repeated hyperoxia with carbogen breathing. Results A 6–10 times increase in the S/N ratio was observed with IRs as compared to LiPc deposits. The mean brain pO2 of normal rats was stable and increased significantly during carbogen inhalation in experiments repeated for 3 months. The pO2 of F98 glioma declined gradually, while the pO2 of contralateral brain essentially remained the same. Although a significant increase in the glioma pO2 was observed during carbogen inhalation, this effect declined in experiments repeated over days. Conclusion EPR oximetry with IRs provides a significant increase in S/N ratio. The ability to repeatedly assess orthotopic glioma pO2 is likely to play a vital role in understanding the dynamics of tissue pO2 during tumor growth and therapies designed to modulate tumor hypoxia. This information could then be used to optimize chemoradiation by scheduling treatments at times of increased glioma oxygenation. PMID:22033225

  10. Chemotherapy in conjoint aging-tumor systems: some simple models for addressing coupled aging-cancer dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witten Tarynn M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper we consider two approaches to examining the complex dynamics of conjoint aging-cancer cellular systems undergoing chemotherapeutic intervention. In particular, we focus on the effect of cells growing conjointly in a culture plate as a precursor to considering the larger multi-dimensional models of such systems. Tumor cell growth is considered from both the logistic and the Gompertzian case, while normal cell growth of fibroblasts (WI-38 human diploid fibroblasts is considered as logistic only. Results We demonstrate, in a simple approach, how the interdependency of different cell types in a tumor, together with specifications of for treatment, can lead to different evolutionary patterns for normal and tumor cells during a course of therapy. Conclusions These results have significance for understanding appropriate pharmacotherapy for elderly patients who are also undergoing chemotherapy.

  11. Preclinical dynamic 18F-FDG PET - tumor characterization and radiotherapy response assessment by kinetic compartment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roee, Kathrine; Aleksandersen, Thomas B.; Nilsen, Line B.; Hong Qu; Ree, Anne H.; Malinen, Eirik; Kristian, Alexandr; Seierstad, Therese; Olsen, Dag R.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Non-invasive visualization of tumor biological and molecular processes of importance to diagnosis and treatment response is likely to be critical in individualized cancer therapy. Since conventional static 18 F-FDG PET with calculation of the semi-quantitative parameter standardized uptake value (SUV) may be subject to many sources of variability, we here present an approach of quantifying the 18 F-FDG uptake by analytic two-tissue compartment modeling, extracting kinetic tumor parameters from dynamic 18 F-FDG PET. Further, we evaluate the potential of such parameters in radiotherapy response assessment. Material and methods. Male, athymic mice with prostate carcinoma xenografts were subjected to dynamic PET either untreated (n=8) or 24 h post-irradiation (7.5 Gy single dose, n=8). After 10 h of fasting, intravenous bolus injections of 10-15 MBq 18 F-FDG were administered and a 1 h dynamic PET scan was performed. 4D emission data were reconstructed using OSEM-MAP, before remote post-processing. Individual arterial input functions were extracted from the image series. Subsequently, tumor 18 F-FDG uptake was fitted voxel-by-voxel to a compartment model, producing kinetic parameter maps. Results. The kinetic model separated the 18 F-FDG uptake into free and bound tracer and quantified three parameters; forward tracer diffusion (k1), backward tracer diffusion (k2), and rate of 18 F-FDG phosphorylation, i.e. the glucose metabolism (k3). The fitted kinetic model gave a goodness of fit (r2) to the observed data ranging from 0.91 to 0.99, and produced parametrical images of all tumors included in the study. Untreated tumors showed homogeneous intra-group median values of all three parameters (k1, k2 and k3), whereas the parameters significantly increased in the tumors irradiated 24 h prior to 18 F-FDG PET. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a two-tissue compartment kinetic analysis of dynamic 18 F-FDG PET images. If validated, extracted

  12. Chaotic hydrodynamics of fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Stappen, M.L.M. [Unit Process and Systems Engineering, Advanced Manufacturing Technology Group, Unilever Research Laboratorium, Vlaardingen (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31

    The major goals of this thesis are: (1) to develop and evaluate an analysis method based on techniques from non-linear chaos theory to characterize the nonlinear hydrodynamics of gas-solids fluidized beds quantitatively; and (2) to determine the dependence of the chaotic invariants on the operating conditions and investigate how the chaos analysis method can be profitably applied to improve scale-up and design of gas-solids fluidized bed reactors. Chaos theory is introduced in chapter 2 with emphasis on analysis techniques for (experimental) time series, known from literature at the start of this work (1990-1991). In chapter 3, the testing of existing and newly developed techniques on both model and fluidized bed data is described. This leads to the development of the chaos analysis method to analyze measured pressure fluctuations time series of a fluidized bed. Following, in chapter 4, this method is tested and all choices for the parameters are evaluated. The influence of the experimental parameters and external disturbances on the measurements and analysis results is discussed and quantified. The result is a chaos measurement and analysis protocol, which is further used in this work. In chapter 5, the applications to fluidized beds are discussed. It is shown that the entropy is a good measure for the characterization of the dynamical behavior of gas-solids bubbling/slugging fluidized beds. Entropy is applied to characterize the influence of the operating conditions, to assess regime transitions and to analyze dimensionless similar beds of different scale. Quantitative design correlations that relate entropy to the operating parameters (including the bed diameter) are described. Finally, it is discussed how the results of this work might be used in scaling up the chaotic dynamics of fluidized beds. The overall conclusions and outlook from this work are presented in chapter 6. 182 refs.

  13. Hemodynamic analysis of bladder tumors using T1-dynamic contrast-enhanced fast spin-echo MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Yuki; Miyati, Tosiaki; Sato, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the hemodynamics of bladder tumors, we developed a method to calculate change in R 1 value (ΔR 1 ) from T 1 -dynamic contrast-enhanced fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging (T 1 DCE-FSE-MRI). Materials and methods: On a 1.5-T MR system, T 1 DCE-FSE-MRI was performed. This study was applied to 12 patients with urinary bladder tumor, i.e. urothelial carcinoma. We compared ΔR 1 –time and ΔSI–time between a peak in the ΔR 1 –time and ΔSI–time curve occurred during the first pass within 60 s. Next, we assessed the slope of increase for 180 s after CA injection (Slope 0–180 ). Results: The mean slope of the first pass was significantly higher for bladder tumors on both the ΔR 1 –time and the ΔSI–time curve compared with normal bladder walls. Moreover, a significant difference was apparent between bladder tumors and normal bladder walls on the mean Slope 0–180 in the ΔR 1 -time curve. However, no significant difference in the mean Slope 0–180 was observed on the ΔSI-time curve between bladder tumors and normal bladder walls. Conclusion: T 1 DCE-FSE-MRI offers three advantages: quantitative analysis; high-quality (i.e., artifact-free) images; and high temporal resolution even for SE images. Use of ΔR 1 analysis with T 1 DCE-FSE-MRI allows more detailed information on the hemodynamics of bladder tumors to be obtained and assists in differentiation between bladder tumors and the normal bladder wall.

  14. WE-G-18C-08: Real Time Tumor Imaging Using a Novel Dynamic Keyhole MRI Reconstruction Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Whelan, B; Keall, P; Greer, P; Kim, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the novel Dynamic Keyhole MRI reconstruction technique can accelerate image acquisition whilst maintaining high image quality for lung cancer patients. Methods: 18 MRI datasets from 5 lung cancer patients were acquired using a 3T MRI scanner. These datasets were retrospectively reconstructed using (A) The novel Dynamic Keyhole technique, (B) The conventional keyhole technique and (C) the conventional zero filling technique. The dynamic keyhole technique in MRI refers to techniques in which previously acquired k-space data is used to supplement under sampled data obtained in real time. The novel Dynamic Keyhole technique utilizes a previously acquired a library of kspace datasets in conjunction with central k-space datasets acquired in realtime. A simultaneously acquired respiratory signal is utilized to sort, match and combine the two k-space streams with respect to respiratory displacement. Reconstruction performance was quantified by (1) comparing the keyhole size (which corresponds to imaging speed) required to achieve the same image quality, and (2) maintaining a constant keyhole size across the three reconstruction methods to compare the resulting image quality to the ground truth image. Results: (1) The dynamic keyhole method required a mean keyhole size which was 48% smaller than the conventional keyhole technique and 60% smaller than the zero filling technique to achieve the same image quality. This directly corresponds to faster imaging. (2) When a constant keyhole size was utilized, the Dynamic Keyhole technique resulted in the smallest difference of the tumor region compared to the ground truth. Conclusion: The dynamic keyhole is a simple and adaptable technique for clinical applications requiring real-time imaging and tumor monitoring such as MRI guided radiotherapy. Based on the results from this study, the dynamic keyhole method could increase the imaging frequency by a factor of five compared with full k

  15. The role of CT in diagnosing small hepatic tumors; Usefulness of table incremental dynamic CT (ICT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usuki, Noriaki; Daikokuya, Hideo; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Saiwai, Shigeo; Nakajima, Hideyuki; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Kudo, Masatoshi (Kobe General Hospital, Hyogo (Japan))

    1992-11-01

    Twenty-seven cases of small hepatic tumors were examined by MRI and CT (ICT). MRI was more sensitive than plain and contrast CT. But ICT could detect more small lesions than MRI. CT is not more superior modality than MRI untill ICT is performed. It is concluded ICT should be done when diagnosing small hepatic tumors by CT. (author).

  16. Dynamics of tumor growth and combination of anti-angiogenic and cytotoxic therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohandel, M.; Kardar, M.; Milosevic, M.; Sivaloganathan, S.

    2007-07-01

    Tumors cannot grow beyond a certain size (about 1-2 mm in diameter) through simple diffusion of oxygen and other essential nutrients into the tumor. Angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, is a crucial and observed step, through which a tumor obtains its own blood supply. Thus, strategies that interfere with the development of this tumor vasculature, known as anti-angiogenic therapy, represent a novel approach to controlling tumor growth. Several pre-clinical studies have suggested that currently available angiogenesis inhibitors are unlikely to yield significant sustained improvements in tumor control on their own, but rather will need to be used in combination with conventional treatments to achieve maximal benefit. Optimal sequencing of anti-angiogenic treatment and radiotherapy or chemotherapy is essential to the success of these combined treatment strategies. Hence, a major challenge to mathematical modeling and computer simulations is to find appropriate dosages, schedules and sequencing of combination therapies to control or eliminate tumor growth. Here, we present a mathematical model that incorporates tumor cells and the vascular network, as well as their interplay. We can then include the effects of two different treatments, conventional cytotoxic therapy and anti-angiogenic therapy. The results are compared with available experimental and clinical data.

  17. Phase 2 Trial of Accelerated, Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation of 39 Gy in 13 Fractions Followed by a Tumor Bed Boost Sequentially Delivering 9 Gy in 3 Fractions in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ja Young; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Nam Kwon; Shin, Kyung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report a phase 2 trial of accelerated, hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (AH-WBI) delivered as a daily dose of 3 Gy to the whole breast followed by a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-six patients diagnosed with breast cancer (pT1-2 and pN0-1a) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery in which the operative margins were negative were treated with AH-WBI delivered as 39 Gy in 13 fractions of 3 Gy to the whole breast once daily over 5 consecutive working days, and 9 Gy in 3 sequential fractions of 3 Gy to a lumpectomy cavity, all within 3.2 weeks. Results: After a median follow-up period of 57 months (range: 27-75 months), the rate of 5-year locoregional recurrence was 1.4% (n=4), whereas that of disease-free survival was 97.4%. No grade 3 skin toxicity was reported during the follow-up period. Qualitative physician cosmetic assessments of good or excellent were noted in 82% of the patients at 2 months after the completion of AH-WBI. The global cosmetic outcome did not worsen over time, and a good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 82% of the patients at 3 years. The mean pretreatment percentage breast retraction assessment was 12.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.14-12.86). The mean value of percentage breast retraction assessment increased to 13.99 (95% CI: 12.17-15.96) after 1 year and decreased to 13.54 (95% CI: 11.84-15.46) after 3 years but was not significant (P>.05). Conclusions: AH-WBI consisting of 39 Gy in 13 fractions followed by a tumor bed boost sequentially delivering 9 Gy in 3 fractions can be delivered with excellent disease control and tolerable skin toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery

  18. Dynamic simulation of a circulating fluidized bed boiler system part I: Description of the dynamic system and transient behavior of sub-models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Il; Choi, Sang Min; Yang, Jong In [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Dynamic performance simulation of a CFB boiler in a commercial-scale power plant is reported. The boiler system was modeled by a finite number of heat exchanger units, which are sub-grouped into the gas-solid circulation loop, the water-steam circulation loop, and the inter-connected heat exchangers blocks of the boiler. This dynamic model is an extension from the previously reported performance simulation model, which was designed to simulate static performance of the same power plant, where heat and mass for each of the heat exchanger units were balanced for the inter-connected heat exchanger network among the fuel combustion system and the water-steam system. Dynamic performance simulation was achieved by calculating the incremental difference from the previous time step, and progressing for the next time step. Additional discretization of the heat exchanger blocks was necessary to accommodate the dynamic response of the water evaporation and natural circulation as well as the transient response of the metal temperature of the heat exchanger elements. Presentation of the simulation modeling is organized into two parts; system configuration of the model plant and the general approach of the simulation are presented along with the transient behavior of the sub-models in Part I. Dynamic sub-models were integrated in terms of the mass flow and the heat transfer for simulating the CFB boiler system. Dynamic simulation for the open loop response was performed to check the integrated system of the water-steam loop and the solid-gas loop of the total boiler system. Simulation of the total boiler system which includes the closed-loop control system blocks is presented in the following Part II.

  19. Dynamic simulation of a circulating fluidized bed boiler system part I: Description of the dynamic system and transient behavior of sub-models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Il; Choi, Sang Min; Yang, Jong In

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic performance simulation of a CFB boiler in a commercial-scale power plant is reported. The boiler system was modeled by a finite number of heat exchanger units, which are sub-grouped into the gas-solid circulation loop, the water-steam circulation loop, and the inter-connected heat exchangers blocks of the boiler. This dynamic model is an extension from the previously reported performance simulation model, which was designed to simulate static performance of the same power plant, where heat and mass for each of the heat exchanger units were balanced for the inter-connected heat exchanger network among the fuel combustion system and the water-steam system. Dynamic performance simulation was achieved by calculating the incremental difference from the previous time step, and progressing for the next time step. Additional discretization of the heat exchanger blocks was necessary to accommodate the dynamic response of the water evaporation and natural circulation as well as the transient response of the metal temperature of the heat exchanger elements. Presentation of the simulation modeling is organized into two parts; system configuration of the model plant and the general approach of the simulation are presented along with the transient behavior of the sub-models in Part I. Dynamic sub-models were integrated in terms of the mass flow and the heat transfer for simulating the CFB boiler system. Dynamic simulation for the open loop response was performed to check the integrated system of the water-steam loop and the solid-gas loop of the total boiler system. Simulation of the total boiler system which includes the closed-loop control system blocks is presented in the following Part II

  20. The correlation between the rise of the tumor temperature during the hyperthermia treatment and the tumor blood flow measured by dynamic CT and 15O gas-positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Hideyuki

    1993-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the correlation between the rise of tumor temperature during hyperthermia treatment and the blood flow of the tumors measured by dynamic CT (DCT) and 15 O gas-positron emission tomography. In this report, we observed 20 patients with malignant tumors which underwent hyperthermia treatment. In each case, the temperature of the tumor was monitored with a photofiber sensor. DCT's and 15 O gas-positron emission tomographies were applied before the hyperthermia treatment. During the DCT, the tumor blood flow of each tumor was estimated by analyzing the time-dependent activity curve after a bolus injection. During the 15 O gas-positron emission tomography, the tumor blood flow was estimated by the C 15 O 2 -steady-state method. The value of the tumor blood flow estimated by DCT were proportional to those calculated by the 15 O gas-positron emission tomography. These values were inversely proportional to the rise of the temperature of the tumors during hyperthermia treatment. Our results imply that DCT as well as the 15 O gas-positron emission tomography can be used for the prediction of the tumor temperature rise during the hyperthermia treatment. (author)

  1. Biofilm population dynamics in a trickle-bed bioreactor used for the biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons from waste gas under transient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, D; Feuchtinger, A; Stephan, M; Vortmeyer, D

    2004-04-01

    The dynamics of a multispecies biofilm population in a laboratory-scale trickle-bed bioreactor for the treatment of waste gas was examined. The model pollutant was a VOC-mixture of polyalkylated benzenes called Solvesso 100. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was applied in order to characterise the population composition. The bioreactor was operated under transient conditions by applying pollutant concentration shifts and a starvation phase. Only about 10% of the biofilm mass were cells, the rest consisted of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The average fraction of Solvesso 100-degrading cells during pollutant supply periods was less than 10%. About 60% of the cells were saprophytes and about 30% were inactive cells. During pollutant concentration shift experiments, the bioreactor performance adapted within a few hours. The biofilm population exhibited a dependency upon the direction of the shifts. The population reacted within days after a shift-down and within weeks after a shift-up. The pollutant-degraders reacted significantly faster compared to the other cells. During the long-term starvation phase, a shift of the population composition took place. However, this change of composition as well as the degree of metabolic activity was completely reversible. A direct correlation between the biodegradation rate of the bioreactor and the number of pollutant-degrading cells present in the biofilm could not be obtained due to insufficient experimental evidence.

  2. Dynamic Measurement of Tumor Vascular Permeability and Perfusion using a Hybrid System for Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wuwei; Elmer, Andreas; Buehlmann, David; Augath, Mark-Aurel; Vats, Divya; Ripoll, Jorge; Rudin, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Assessing tumor vascular features including permeability and perfusion is essential for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The aim of this study was to compare fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based vascular readouts in subcutaneously implanted tumors in mice by simultaneous dynamic measurement of tracer uptake using a hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT)/MRI system. Vascular permeability was measured using a mixture of extravascular imaging agents, GdDOTA and the dye Cy5.5, and perfusion using a mixture of intravascular agents, Endorem and a fluorescent probe (Angiosense). Dynamic fluorescence reflectance imaging (dFRI) was integrated into the hybrid system for high temporal resolution. Excellent correspondence between uptake curves of Cy5.5/GdDOTA and Endorem/Angiosense has been found with correlation coefficients R > 0.98. The two modalities revealed good agreement regarding permeability coefficients and centers-of-gravity of the imaging agent distribution. The FMT/dFRI protocol presented is able to accurately map physiological processes and poses an attractive alternative to MRI for characterizing tumor neoangiogenesis.

  3. Differential oxygen dynamics in two diverse Dunning prostate R3327 rat tumor sublines (MAT-Lu and HI) with respect to growth and respiratory challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Dawen; Constantinescu, Anca; Hahn, Eric W.; Mason, Ralph P.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Since hypoxia may influence tumor response to therapy and prognosis, we have compared oxygenation of tumors known to exhibit differential growth rate and tissue differentiation. Methods and Materials: Regional tumor oxygen tension was measured using 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance echo planar imaging relaxometry of hexafluorobenzene, which provided dynamic maps with respect to respiratory intervention. Investigations used two Dunning prostate R3327 rat tumor sublines: the fast growing, highly metastatic MAT-Lu and the moderately well-differentiated, slower growing HI. Results: Both sublines showed significantly higher oxygen tension in smaller tumors ( 3 ) than in larger tumors (>3.5 cm 3 ). Pooled data showed that MAT-Lu tumors exhibited greater hypoxia compared with the size-matched HI tumors (p 2 for tumors of both sublines (p 2 , while those in the MAT-Lu tumors showed little response to respiratory intervention. Conclusions: These results concur with hypotheses that hypoxia is related to tumor growth rate and degree of differentiation. Under baseline conditions, the differences were subtle. However, response to respiratory intervention revealed highly significant differences, which, if held valid in the clinic, could have prognostic value

  4. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging allows monitoring the effect of combretastatin A4 phosphate on rabbit implanted VX2 tumor model: 12-Day dynamic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Haibo; Ni Yicheng; Dai Xu; Zhang Jian; Chen Feng; Fan, Guoguang; Sun Ziping; Li Yaming; Zhou Hongxu; Xu Ke

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the 12-day dynamic characteristics of tumor response to intravenous administration of CA4P in rabbit VX2 tumor models. Methods: Study protocol was approved by local ethical committee for animal care and use. Sixteen rabbits with 32 tumors on bilateral legs were randomly divided into treated and control groups. Conventional and DWI images were acquired before and 24 h, 4 days, 8 days and 12 days after treatment. The dynamic changes of tumor on images were correlated with histological results. ADCs were compared among and between groups at different time points. Results: The tumors in treated group grew slower than those in control group. In treaded group, the mean ADC decreased slightly at 24 h point due to cell edema caused by ischemia. Then, it increased significantly at 4 days and 8 days because of progressive central necrosis. Finally, peripheral tumor proliferation caused a second decrease of ADC at 12 days. The significant difference of ΔADC% between the two groups at 24 h, 4 days and 8 days indicated that the change of ADC in treated group was really caused by CA4P. Conclusion: The dynamic histological changes of tumor caused by CA4P as reflected exactly by diffusion-weighted MR imaging indicate a noninvasive measure for monitoring tumor vascular targeting treatment.

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the rectum: Correlations between single-section and whole-tumor histogram analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M H; Oh, S N; Park, G E; Yeo, D-M; Jung, S E

    2018-05-10

    To evaluate the interobserver and intermethod correlations of histogram metrics of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters acquired by multiple readers using the single-section and whole-tumor volume methods. Four DCE parameters (K trans , K ep , V e , V p ) were evaluated in 45 patients (31 men and 14 women; mean age, 61±11 years [range, 29-83 years]) with locally advanced rectal cancer using pre-chemoradiotherapy (CRT) MRI. Ten histogram metrics were extracted using two methods of lesion selection performed by three radiologists: the whole-tumor volume method for the whole tumor on axial section-by-section images and the single-section method for the entire area of the tumor on one axial image. The interobserver and intermethod correlations were evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). The ICCs showed excellent interobserver and intermethod correlations in most of histogram metrics of the DCE parameters. The ICCs among the three readers were > 0.7 (Phistogram metrics, except for the minimum and maximum. The intermethod correlations for most of the histogram metrics were excellent for each radiologist, regardless of the differences in the radiologists' experience. The interobserver and intermethod correlations for most of the histogram metrics of the DCE parameters are excellent in rectal cancer. Therefore, the single-section method may be a potential alternative to the whole-tumor volume method using pre-CRT MRI, despite the fact that the high agreement between the two methods cannot be extrapolated to post-CRT MRI. Copyright © 2018 Société française de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Predictive value of modeled AUC(AFP-hCG), a dynamic kinetic parameter characterizing serum tumor marker decline in patients with nonseminomatous germ cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Benoit; Fronton, Ludivine; Boyle, Helen; Droz, Jean-Pierre; Girard, Pascal; Tranchand, Brigitte; Ribba, Benjamin; Tod, Michel; Chabaud, Sylvie; Coquelin, Henri; Fléchon, Aude

    2010-08-01

    The early decline profile of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in patients with nonseminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCT) treated with chemotherapy may be related to the risk of relapse. We assessed the predictive values of areas under the curve of hCG (AUC(hCG)) and AFP (AUC(AFP)) of modeled concentration-time equations on progression-free survival (PFS). Single-center retrospective analysis of hCG and AFP time-points from 65 patients with IGCCCG intermediate-poor risk NSGCT treated with 4 cycles of bleomycin-etoposide-cisplatin (BEP). To determine AUC(hCG) and AUC(AFP) for D0-D42, AUCs for D0-D7 were calculated using the trapezoid rule and AUCs for D7-D42 were calculated using the mathematic integrals of equations modeled with NONMEM. Combining AUC(AFP) and AUC(hCG) enabled us to define 2 predictive groups: namely, patients with favorable and unfavorable AUC(AFP-hCG). Survival analyses and ROC curves assessed the predictive values of AUC(AFP-hCG) groups regarding progression-free survival (PFS) and compared them with those of half-life (HL) and time-to-normalization (TTN). Mono-exponential models best fit the patterns of marker decreases. Patients with a favorable AUC(AFP-hCG) had a significantly better PFS (100% vs 71.5%, P = .014). ROC curves confirmed the encouraging predictive accuracy of AUC(AFP-hCG) against HL or TTN regarding progression risk (ROC AUCs = 79.6 vs 71.9 and 70.2 respectively). Because of the large number of patients with missing data, multivariate analysis could not be performed. AUC(AFP-hCG) is a dynamic parameter characterizing tumor marker decline in patients with NSGCT during BEP treatment. Its value as a promising predictive factor should be validated. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamic {sup 11}C-methionine PET analysis has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas: an experimental study using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Songji; Zhao, Yan [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Tracer Kinetics and Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji; Hatano, Toshiyuki [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan); Yi, Min; Kohanawa, Masashi [Hokkaido University, Department of Advanced Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Magota, Keiichi; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Nishijima, Ken-ichi [Hokkaido University, Department of Molecular Imaging, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    We evaluated whether the dynamic profile of L-{sup 11}C-methionine ({sup 11}C-MET) may have an additional value in differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas in experimental rat models by small animal positron emission tomography (PET). Rhodococcus aurantiacus and allogenic rat C6 glioma cells were inoculated, respectively, into the right and left calf muscles to generate a rat model bearing both granulomas and tumors (n = 6). Ten days after the inoculations, dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET was performed by small animal PET up to 120 min after injection of {sup 11}C-MET. The next day, after overnight fasting, the rats were injected with {sup 18}F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG), and dynamic {sup 18}F-FDG PET was performed up to 180 min. The time-activity curves, static images, and mean standardized uptake value (SUV) in the lesions were calculated. {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma showed a slow exponential clearance after an initial distribution, while the uptake in the tumor gradually increased with time. The dynamic pattern of {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma was significantly different from that in the tumor (p < 0.001). In the static analysis of {sup 11}C-MET, visual assessment and SUV analysis could not differentiate the tumor from the granuloma in all cases, although the mean SUV in the granuloma (1.48 {+-} 0.09) was significantly lower than that in the tumor (1.72 {+-} 0.18, p < 0.01). The dynamic patterns, static images, and mean SUVs of {sup 18}F-FDG in the granuloma were similar to those in the tumor (p = NS). Dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomatous lesions, which deserves further elucidation in clinical settings. (orig.)

  8. Dynamic Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) and Diffusion Weighted MR Imaging (DWI) for Differentiation between Benign and Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assili, S.; Fathi Kazerooni, A.; Aghaghazvini, L.; Saligheh Rad, H.R.; Pirayesh Islamian, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Salivary gland tumors form nearly 3% of head and neck tumors. Due to their large histological variety and vicinity to facial nerves, pre-operative diagnosis and differentiation of benign and malignant parotid tumors are a major challenge for radiologists. Objective The majority of these tumors are benign; however, sometimes they tend to transform into a malignant form. Functional MRI techniques, namely dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-) MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) can indicate the characteristics of tumor tissue. Methods DCE-MRI analysis is based on the parameters of time intensity curve (TIC) before and after contrast agent injection. This method has the potential to identify the angiogenesis of tumors. DWI analysis is performed according to diffusion of water molecules in a tissue for determination of the cellularity of tumors. Conclusion According to the literature, these methods cannot be used individually to differentiate benign from malignant salivary gland tumors. An effective approach could be to combine the aforementioned methods to increase the accuracy of discrimination between different tumor types. The main objective of this study is to explore the application of DCE-MRI and DWI for assessment of salivary gland tumor types. PMID:26688794

  9. Dynamic Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI and Diffusion Weighted MR Imaging (DWI for Differentiation between Benign and Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assili S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salivary gland tumors form nearly 3% of head and neck tumors. Due to their large histological variety and vicinity to facial nerves, pre-operative diagnosis and differentiation of benign and malignant parotid tumors are a major challenge for radiologists. Objective: The majority of these tumors are benign; however, sometimes they tend to transform into a malignant form. Functional MRI techniques, namely dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE- MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI can indicate the characteristics of tumor tissue. Methods: DCE-MRI analysis is based on the parameters of time intensity curve (TIC before and after contrast agent injection. This method has the potential to identify the angiogenesis of tumors. DWI analysis is performed according to diffusion of water molecules in a tissue for determination of the cellularity of tumors. Conclusion: According to the literature, these methods cannot be used individually to differentiate benign from malignant salivary gland tumors. An effective approach could be to combine the aforementioned methods to increase the accuracy of discrimination between different tumor types. The main objective of this study is to explore the application of DCE-MRI and DWI for assessment of salivary gland tumor types.

  10. Dynamic Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) and Diffusion Weighted MR Imaging (DWI) for Differentiation between Benign and Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assili, S; Fathi Kazerooni, A; Aghaghazvini, L; Saligheh Rad, H R; Pirayesh Islamian, J

    2015-12-01

    Salivary gland tumors form nearly 3% of head and neck tumors. Due to their large histological variety and vicinity to facial nerves, pre-operative diagnosis and differentiation of benign and malignant parotid tumors are a major challenge for radiologists. The majority of these tumors are benign; however, sometimes they tend to transform into a malignant form. Functional MRI techniques, namely dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-) MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) can indicate the characteristics of tumor tissue. DCE-MRI analysis is based on the parameters of time intensity curve (TIC) before and after contrast agent injection. This method has the potential to identify the angiogenesis of tumors. DWI analysis is performed according to diffusion of water molecules in a tissue for determination of the cellularity of tumors. According to the literature, these methods cannot be used individually to differentiate benign from malignant salivary gland tumors. An effective approach could be to combine the aforementioned methods to increase the accuracy of discrimination between different tumor types. The main objective of this study is to explore the application of DCE-MRI and DWI for assessment of salivary gland tumor types.

  11. [Development of a Computer-aided Diagnosis System to Distinguish between Benign and Malignant Mammary Tumors in Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Images: Automatic Detection of the Position with the Strongest Washout Effect in the Tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yoshiaki; Tabata, Nobuyuki; Taroura, Tomomi; Shinozaki, Kenji; Kubo, Yuichiro; Tokunaga, Eriko; Taguchi, Kenichi

    We propose a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system that uses time-intensity curves to distinguish between benign and malignant mammary tumors. Many malignant tumors show a washout pattern in time-intensity curves. Therefore, we designed a program that automatically detects the position with the strongest washout effect using the technique, such as the subtraction technique, which extracts only the washout area in the tumor, and by scanning data in 2×2 pixel region of interest (ROI). Operation of this independently developed program was verified using a phantom system that simulated tumors. In three cases of malignant tumors, the washout pattern detection rate in images with manually set ROI was ≤6%, whereas the detection rate with our novel method was 100%. In one case of a benign tumor, when the same method was used, we checked that there was no washout effect and detected the persistent pattern. Thus, the distinction between benign and malignant tumors using our method was completely consistent with the pathological diagnoses made. Our novel method is therefore effective for differentiating between benign and malignant mammary tumors in dynamic magnetic resonance images.

  12. Dynamical properties of a tumor growth system in the presence of immunization and colored cross-correlated noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Zhenglin; Mei Dongcheng

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the noise parameters and immunization strength β on the dynamical properties of a tumor growth system with both immunization and colored cross-correlated noises. The analytical expressions for the associated relaxation time T C and the normalized correlation function C(s) are derived by means of the projection operator method. The results indicate that: (i) T C as a function of the multiplicative noise intensity α shows resonance-like behavior, i.e. the curves of T C versus α exhibit a single-peak structure and its peak position changes with increasing correlation strength between noises λ, the autocorrelation time of multiplicative noise τ 1 , the autocorrelation time of additive noise τ 2 and the cross-correlation time τ 3 . This behavior can be understood in terms of the noise-enhanced stability effect and the influence of the memory effects on it. (ii) The increasing λ, τ 1 , τ 2 and the additive noise intensity D slow down the fluctuation decay of the tumor population, whereas the increasing τ 3 and β speed it up. (iii) C(s) increases as λ, τ 1 , τ 2 and β increase, while it decreases with τ 3 increasing. Our study shows that the effects of some noise parameters on tumor growth can be modified due to the presence of the immunization effect.

  13. Dynamical properties of a tumor growth system in the presence of immunization and colored cross-correlated noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zheng-Lin; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the effects of the noise parameters and immunization strength β on the dynamical properties of a tumor growth system with both immunization and colored cross-correlated noises. The analytical expressions for the associated relaxation time TC and the normalized correlation function C(s) are derived by means of the projection operator method. The results indicate that: (i) TC as a function of the multiplicative noise intensity α shows resonance-like behavior, i.e. the curves of TC versus α exhibit a single-peak structure and its peak position changes with increasing correlation strength between noises λ, the autocorrelation time of multiplicative noise τ1, the autocorrelation time of additive noise τ2 and the cross-correlation time τ3. This behavior can be understood in terms of the noise-enhanced stability effect and the influence of the memory effects on it. (ii) The increasing λ, τ1, τ2 and the additive noise intensity D slow down the fluctuation decay of the tumor population, whereas the increasing τ3 and β speed it up. (iii) C(s) increases as λ, τ1, τ2 and β increase, while it decreases with τ3 increasing. Our study shows that the effects of some noise parameters on tumor growth can be modified due to the presence of the immunization effect.

  14. Dynamic 11C-methionine PET analysis has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas: an experimental study using small animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Songji; Zhao, Yan; Kuge, Yuji; Hatano, Toshiyuki; Yi, Min; Kohanawa, Masashi; Magota, Keiichi; Tamaki, Nagara; Nishijima, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated whether the dynamic profile of L- 11 C-methionine ( 11 C-MET) may have an additional value in differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas in experimental rat models by small animal positron emission tomography (PET). Rhodococcus aurantiacus and allogenic rat C6 glioma cells were inoculated, respectively, into the right and left calf muscles to generate a rat model bearing both granulomas and tumors (n = 6). Ten days after the inoculations, dynamic 11 C-MET PET was performed by small animal PET up to 120 min after injection of 11 C-MET. The next day, after overnight fasting, the rats were injected with 18 F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG), and dynamic 18 F-FDG PET was performed up to 180 min. The time-activity curves, static images, and mean standardized uptake value (SUV) in the lesions were calculated. 11 C-MET uptake in the granuloma showed a slow exponential clearance after an initial distribution, while the uptake in the tumor gradually increased with time. The dynamic pattern of 11 C-MET uptake in the granuloma was significantly different from that in the tumor (p 11 C-MET, visual assessment and SUV analysis could not differentiate the tumor from the granuloma in all cases, although the mean SUV in the granuloma (1.48 ± 0.09) was significantly lower than that in the tumor (1.72 ± 0.18, p 18 F-FDG in the granuloma were similar to those in the tumor (p = NS). Dynamic 11 C-MET PET has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomatous lesions, which deserves further elucidation in clinical settings. (orig.)

  15. Quantifying the accuracy of the tumor motion and area as a function of acceleration factor for the simulation of the dynamic keyhole magnetic resonance imaging method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Danny; Pollock, Sean; Keall, Paul, E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW 2298 (Australia); Kim, Taeho [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23219 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The dynamic keyhole is a new MR image reconstruction method for thoracic and abdominal MR imaging. To date, this method has not been investigated with cancer patient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The goal of this study was to assess the dynamic keyhole method for the task of lung tumor localization using cine-MR images reconstructed in the presence of respiratory motion. Methods: The dynamic keyhole method utilizes a previously acquired a library of peripheral k-space datasets at similar displacement and phase (where phase is simply used to determine whether the breathing is inhale to exhale or exhale to inhale) respiratory bins in conjunction with central k-space datasets (keyhole) acquired. External respiratory signals drive the process of sorting, matching, and combining the two k-space streams for each respiratory bin, thereby achieving faster image acquisition without substantial motion artifacts. This study was the first that investigates the impact of k-space undersampling on lung tumor motion and area assessment across clinically available techniques (zero-filling and conventional keyhole). In this study, the dynamic keyhole, conventional keyhole and zero-filling methods were compared to full k-space dataset acquisition by quantifying (1) the keyhole size required for central k-space datasets for constant image quality across sixty four cine-MRI datasets from nine lung cancer patients, (2) the intensity difference between the original and reconstructed images in a constant keyhole size, and (3) the accuracy of tumor motion and area directly measured by tumor autocontouring. Results: For constant image quality, the dynamic keyhole method, conventional keyhole, and zero-filling methods required 22%, 34%, and 49% of the keyhole size (P < 0.0001), respectively, compared to the full k-space image acquisition method. Compared to the conventional keyhole and zero-filling reconstructed images with the keyhole size utilized in the dynamic keyhole

  16. Dynamic Changes in Numbers and Properties of Circulating Tumor Cells and Their Potential Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Ju-Yu; Yang, Chih-Yung; Liang, Shu-Ching; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Lin, Chi-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of different types of early or advanced cancer using immunology-based assays or nucleic acid methods. The detection and quantification of CTCs has significant clinical utility in the prognosis of metastatic breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. CTCs are a heterogeneous population of cells and often different from those of their respective primary tumor. Understanding the biology of CTCs may provide useful predictive information for the selection of the most appropriate treatment. Therefore, CTC detection and characterization could become a valuable tool to refine prognosis and serve as a “real-time biopsy” and has the potential to guide precision cancer therapies, monitor cancer treatment, and investigate the process of metastasis

  17. Dynamic Changes in Numbers and Properties of Circulating Tumor Cells and Their Potential Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Ju-Yu [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Life Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chih-Yung [Department of Education and Research, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei 10629, Taiwan (China); Liang, Shu-Ching [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Life Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Liu, Ren-Shyan [Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core/Taiwan Mouse Clinic, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Jeng-Kai, E-mail: jkjiang@vghtpe.gov.tw [Division of Colon & Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Hung, E-mail: jkjiang@vghtpe.gov.tw [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Life Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); VGH Yang-Ming Genome Research Center, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-16

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of different types of early or advanced cancer using immunology-based assays or nucleic acid methods. The detection and quantification of CTCs has significant clinical utility in the prognosis of metastatic breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. CTCs are a heterogeneous population of cells and often different from those of their respective primary tumor. Understanding the biology of CTCs may provide useful predictive information for the selection of the most appropriate treatment. Therefore, CTC detection and characterization could become a valuable tool to refine prognosis and serve as a “real-time biopsy” and has the potential to guide precision cancer therapies, monitor cancer treatment, and investigate the process of metastasis.

  18. [Dynamic investigation of nutritional risk in patients with malignant tumor during hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M W; Wei, J M; Chen, W; Yang, X; Cui, H Y; Zhu, S N; Zhang, P P; Xiong, J; Zheng, D F; Song, H J; Liang, X Y; Zhang, L; Xu, W Y; Wang, H B; Su, G Q; Feng, L J; Chen, T; Wu, Y D; Li, H; Sun, J Q; Shi, Y; Tong, B D; Zhou, S M; Wang, X Y; Huang, Y H; Zhang, B M; Xu, J; Zhang, H Y; Chang, G L; Jia, Z Y; Chen, S F; Hu, J; Zhang, X W; Wang, H; Li, Z D; Gao, Y Y; Gui, B

    2018-04-10

    Objective: To prospectively investigate the changes in nutritional status of patients with malignant tumors during hospitalization by using nutritional risk screening (NRS2002), and to analyze the correlation between the nutritional status and clinical outcomes . Methods: This was a prospective and parallel research done by multi-center collaboration from 34 hospitals in China from June to September 2014.Hospitalized patients with malignant tumors inthese departments (Department of Gastroenterology, respiratory medicine, oncology, general surgery, thoracic surgery and geriatrics)were investigated. Only the patients with age≥ 18 years and hospitalization time between 7-30 days were included. During hospitalization, the physical indexes of human bodywere measured, and the NRS 2002 scores, and monitored the nutritional support at the time points of admission and 24 hours before discharge were recorded.And whether there was a nutritional risk in hospitalized patients and its association with clinical outcomes were investigated. Results: A total of 2 402 patients with malignancies were enrolled in this study. Seventy fourpatients who did not complete NRS2002 were eliminated, and 2 328 patients were included. The number of the main diseases was the top five, including 587 cases of colorectal cancer, 567 cases of lung cancer, 564 cases of gastric cancer, 146 cases of esophageal cancer, and 119 cases of liver tumor. At the time of discharge, compared with admission, the BMI, body weight, grip and calf circumferences of patients with malignant tumor were significantly decreased ( P nutritional risk screening, the rate of malnutrition at admission was 11.1% (BMI =18.5, 258/2 328) and the rate of malnutrition at discharge was 10.9% (BMI =18.5, 254/2 328), there were no significant differences (χ(2)=0.019 7, P =0.888). There were 1 204 patients with nutritional risk at admission (51.7%, NRS2002 score≥3)and 1 352 patients with nutritional risk at discharge (58.1%, NRS2002

  19. Investigation of the change in marker geometry during respiration motion: a preliminary study for dynamic-multi-leaf real-time tumor tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Rie; Nishioka, Seiko; Date, Hiroyuki; Shirato, Hiroki; Koike, Takao; Nishioka, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is rapidly increasing. Presently, the most accurate method uses fiducial markers implanted near the tumor. A shortcoming of this method is that the beams turn off during the majority of the respiratory cycle, resulting in a prolonged treatment time. Recent advances in collimation technology have enabled continuous irradiation to a moving tumor. However, the lung is a dynamic organ characterized by inhalation exhalation cycles, during which marker/tumor geometry may change (i.e., misalignment), resulting in under-dosing to the tumor. Eight patients with lung cancer who were candidates for stereotactic radiotherapy were examined with 4D high-resolution CT. As a marker surrogate, virtual bronchoscopy using the pulmonary artery (VBPA) was conducted. To detect possible marker/tumor misalignment during the respiration cycle, the distance between the peripheral bronchus, where a marker could be implanted, and the center of gravity of a tumor were calculated for each respiratory phase. When the respiration cycle was divided into 10 phases, the median value was significantly larger for the 30%-70% respiratory phases compared to that for the 10% respiratory phase (P<0.05, Mann–Whitney U-test). These results demonstrate that physiological aspect must be considered when continuous tumor tracking is applied to a moving tumor. To minimize an “additional” internal target volume (ITV) margin, a marker should be placed approximately 2.5 cm from the tumor

  20. Characterizing spatiotemporal information loss in sparse-sampling-based dynamic MRI for monitoring respiration-induced tumor motion in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Tatsuya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Nofiele, Joris; Yuan, Qing [Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Madhuranthakam, Ananth J.; Pedrosa, Ivan; Chopra, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Advanced Imaging Research Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Sawant, Amit, E-mail: amit.sawant@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, 21201 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    .4 mm, which was smaller than the reconstructed pixel resolution of 0.67 mm. In the patient study, the dynamic 2D MRI enabled the monitoring of cycle-to-cycle respiratory variability present in the tumor position. It was seen that the range of centroid motion as well as the area covered due to target motion during each individual respiratory cycle was underestimated compared to the entire motion range observed over multiple breathing cycles. Conclusions: The authors’ initial results demonstrate that sparse-sampling- and reconstruction-based dynamic MRI can be used to achieve adequate image acquisition speeds without significant information loss for the task of radiotherapy guidance. Such monitoring can yield spatial and temporal information superior to conventional offline and online motion capture methods used in thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy.

  1. Can visual assessment of blood flow patterns by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography distinguish between malignant and benign lung tumors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harders, Stefan Walbom; Madsen, Hans Henrik; Nellemann, Hanne Marie

    2017-01-01

    with suspected lung cancer and a lung tumor on their chest radiograph were included for DCE-CT. The tumors were categorized using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns. Histopathology was used as reference standard. RESULTS: Using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow...... using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns is accurate as well as somewhat reproducible. However, there are significant limitations to DCE-CT.......BACKGROUND: Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is a tool, which, in theory, can quantify the blood flow and blood volume of tissues. In structured qualitative analysis, parametric color maps yield a visual impression of the blood flow and blood volume within the tissue being...

  2. Variability of bed mobility in natural, gravel-bed channels and adjustments to sediment load at local and reach scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas E. Lisle; Jonathan M. Nelson; John Pitlick; Mary Ann Madej; Brent L. Barkett

    2000-01-01

    Abstract - Local variations in boundary shear stress acting on bed-surface particles control patterns of bed load transport and channel evolution during varying stream discharges. At the reach scale a channel adjusts to imposed water and sediment supply through mutual interactions among channel form, local grain size, and local flow dynamics that govern bed mobility...

  3. Vatuximab(Trademark): Optimizing Therapeutic Strategies for Prostate Cancer Based on Dynamic MR Tumor Oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    159: 621-631, 2003. 37. Bourke , V. A., Zhao, D., Gilio, J., Chang, C.-H., Jiang, L., Hahn, E. W., and Mason, R. P. Correlation of Radiation...probe: comparison with a paired survival assay. Radiat Res, 158, 167-73 (2002) 27. Gu, Y. Q., V. A. Bourke , J. G. Kim, A. Constantinescu, R. P. Mason...Res. 1998; 150: 549–556. 10. Bourke VA, Zhao D, Gilio J, Chang C-H, Jiang L, Hahn EW, Mason RP. Correlation of radiation response with tumor oxygen

  4. Fluidised bed cereal cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, Simon Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Man has been cooking food for thousands of years for a number of reasons: to improve flavour and palatability, sterilise, increase digestibility, improve texture and colour. Increasingly more advanced techniques are employed today in food production plants to engineer foods with many different properties. With this in mind manufacturers are constantly seeking to improve processing techniques and apply new or different technologies (such as microwaves, RF and extrusion) to develop foods with new properties (like puffed texture starches) and to increase process efficiencies (energy efficiency, water reduction). This thesis reports on work undertaken to demonstrate the potential to achieve high temperature starch conversion of whole wheat grains in a fluidised bed, thereby reducing the amount of water required and processing time. Specifically, wheat from the farm at 14% water content is cooked in a fluidised bed. The fluidised bed heats the wheat quickly by convective heating. In addition, energy can be delivered directly to the grain by microwave heating during fluidisation. Degree of starch conversion is determined by measuring the reduction in size of endotherm of reaction as observed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The fluidising gas, processing temperature and starting moisture content were varied in order to investigate their effect on the cooking process. A mathematical model based on energy and species concentration equations was developed to help understand the internal grain processes. The model coupled the thermal energy equation with water diffusion. The effect of water evaporation was represented as a thermal sink in the energy equation. Popular kinetic models from literature were adapted to predict the degree of starch conversion. The model gives solutions consistent with experimental data and physical intuition. A commercial computational fluid dynamics package was used to study simple airflow and particle tracks in the fluidisation column. A

  5. Dependence of saltation characteristics on bed organisation in numerical simulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kharlamova, Irina; Vlasák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 1 (2015), s. 177-184 ISSN 1226-4806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/09/1718; GA ČR GAP105/10/1574 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : saltation parameters * bed roughness * bed structure * bed load transport * armoured bed Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.922, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs12303-014-0029-3.pdf

  6. 2D numerical model of particle-bed collision in fluid-particle flows over bed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukerchenko, Nikolay; Chára, Zdeněk; Vlasák, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2006), s. 70-78 ISSN 0022-1686 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : saltation * particle-bed collision * collision angle * bed roughness Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.527, year: 2006

  7. Multimodality functional imaging of spontaneous canine tumors using 64CU-ATSM and 18FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders E; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Law, Ian

    2012-01-01

    To compare the distribution and uptake of the hypoxia tracer (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) PET/CT, FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT (DCE-pCT) in spontaneous canine tumors. In addition (64)Cu-ATSM distribution over time was evaluated.......To compare the distribution and uptake of the hypoxia tracer (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) PET/CT, FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT (DCE-pCT) in spontaneous canine tumors. In addition (64)Cu-ATSM distribution over time was evaluated....

  8. Evaluation of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI in the differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Vibeke Andrée; Simonsen, Helle J; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To investigate if perfusion measured with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) can be used to differentiate radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence in patients with high-grade glioma. METHODS: The study was approved by the institutional review board...... to measure cerebral blood volume (CBV), blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cerebral blood flow (CBF). Subjects also underwent FDG-PET and lesions were classified as either metabolically active or inactive. Follow-up clinical MRI and lesion histology in case of additional tissue resection was used...... to determine whether lesions were regressing or progressing. RESULTS: Fourteen enhancing lesions could be classified as progressing (11) or regressing (three). An empirical threshold of 2.0 ml/100 g for CBV allowed detection of regressing lesions with a sensitivity of 100 % and specificity of 100 %. FDG-PET...

  9. Neural - levelset shape detection segmentation of brain tumors in dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, C.; Bhargava, Sunil; Gharpure, Damayanti Chandrashekhar

    2008-01-01

    A novel Neuro - level set shape detection algorithm is proposed and evaluated for segmentation and grading of brain tumours. The algorithm evaluates vascular and cellular information provided by dynamic contrast susceptibility magnetic resonance images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps. The proposed neural shape detection algorithm is based on the levels at algorithm (shape detection algorithm) and utilizes a neural block to provide the speed image for the level set methods. In this study, two different architectures of level set method have been implemented and their results are compared. The results show that the proposed Neuro-shape detection performs better in differentiating the tumor, edema, necrosis in reconstructed images of perfusion and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images. (author)

  10. Response characteristics of probe-transducer systems for pressure measurements in gas-solid fluidized beds: how to prevent pitfalls in dynamic pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ommen, van J.R.; Schouten, J.C.; Stappen, van der M.L.M.; Bleek, van den C.M.

    1999-01-01

    It is long known already that the pressure probe–transducer systems applied in gas–solid fluidized beds can distort the measured pressure fluctuations. Several rules of thumb have been proposed to determine probe length and internal diameter required to prevent this. Recently, Xie and Geldart [H.-Y.

  11. Predicting bed shear stress and its role in sediment dynamics and restoration potential of the Everglades and other vegetated flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Laurel G.; Harvey, Judson; Crimaldi, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Entrainment of sediment by flowing water affects topography, habitat suitability, and nutrient cycling in vegetated floodplains and wetlands, impacting ecosystem evolution and the success of restoration projects. Nonetheless, restoration managers lack simple decision-support tools for predicting shear stresses and sediment redistribution potential in different vegetation communities. Using a field-validated numerical model, we developed state-space diagrams that provide these predictions over a range of water-surface slopes, depths, and associated velocities in Everglades ridge and slough vegetation communities. Diminished bed shear stresses and a consequent decrease in bed sediment redistribution are hypothesized causes of a recent reduction in the topographic and vegetation heterogeneity of this ecosystem. Results confirmed the inability of present-day flows to entrain bed sediment. Further, our diagrams showed bed shear stresses to be highly sensitive to emergent vegetation density and water-surface slope but less sensitive to water depth and periphyton or floating vegetation abundance. These findings suggested that instituting a pulsing flow regime could be the most effective means to restore sediment redistribution to the Everglades. However, pulsing flows will not be sufficient to erode sediment from sloughs with abundant spikerush, unless spikerush density first decreases by natural or managed processes. Our methods provide a novel tool for identifying restoration parameters and performance measures in many types of vegetated aquatic environments where sediment erosion and deposition are involved.

  12. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Practice Hospital Bed Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... It depends on the complexity of the bed." Safety Tips CDRH offers the following safety tips for ...

  13. Bed Bugs and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bed bugs have long been a pest – feeding on blood, causing itchy bites and generally irritating their human hosts. They are successful hitchhikers, and can move from an infested site to furniture, bedding, baggage, boxes, and clothing.

  14. Efficacy of dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI using echo-planar imaging in differential diagnosis of breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Ayako

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that T1-weighted dynamic MR imaging is a useful method in differentiating malignant breast tumors from benign lesions. Invasive breast carcinomas enhance more rapidly than benign lesions such as fibroadenomas, papillomas, and proliferative fibrocystic diseases. However, significant overlap in the dynamic profile of benign and malignant lesions may occur, resulting in relatively low specificity, which is an inherent limitation of this technique. The author attempted to improve diagnostic accuracy by utilizing dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC-MRI) with a single-shot echo-planar imaging sequence. Twenty-two patients underwent DSC-MRI using a 1.5-T unit (Magnetom Vision, Siemens). Images were obtained before, during and after the bolus injection of 20 mL of gadopentetate dimeglumine. The signal reduction rate within the first 30 seconds (ΔRT2) was calculated by the following equation: ΔRT2 = (postcontrast signal intensity-precontrast signal intensity) /precontrast signal intensity. A rapid, strong decrease in signal intensity was observed on the first pass of the contrast material in all cases of carcinoma, whereas no or only a minimal decrease in signal intensity was observed in all but one of the benign lesions. This method seems to be more accurate than T1-weighted dynamic MR imaging in the differentiation benign and malignant breast lesions. Since DSC-MRI can be performed quickly, subsequent conventional T1-weighted imaging can provide additional information about the morphologic features of lesions, to further support the diagnosis. In conclusion, DSC-MRI seems to be a promising method for the accurate preoperative assessment of breast lesions. (author)

  15. Efficacy of dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI using echo-planar imaging in differential diagnosis of breast tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Ayako [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-07-01

    It has been shown that T1-weighted dynamic MR imaging is a useful method in differentiating malignant breast tumors from benign lesions. Invasive breast carcinomas enhance more rapidly than benign lesions such as fibroadenomas, papillomas, and proliferative fibrocystic diseases. However, significant overlap in the dynamic profile of benign and malignant lesions may occur, resulting in relatively low specificity, which is an inherent limitation of this technique. The author attempted to improve diagnostic accuracy by utilizing dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging (DSC-MRI) with a single-shot echo-planar imaging sequence. Twenty-two patients underwent DSC-MRI using a 1.5-T unit (Magnetom Vision, Siemens). Images were obtained before, during and after the bolus injection of 20 mL of gadopentetate dimeglumine. The signal reduction rate within the first 30 seconds ({Delta}RT2) was calculated by the following equation: {Delta}RT2 (postcontrast signal intensity-precontrast signal intensity) /precontrast signal intensity. A rapid, strong decrease in signal intensity was observed on the first pass of the contrast material in all cases of carcinoma, whereas no or only a minimal decrease in signal intensity was observed in all but one of the benign lesions. This method seems to be more accurate than T1-weighted dynamic MR imaging in the differentiation benign and malignant breast lesions. Since DSC-MRI can be performed quickly, subsequent conventional T1-weighted imaging can provide additional information about the morphologic features of lesions, to further support the diagnosis. In conclusion, DSC-MRI seems to be a promising method for the accurate preoperative assessment of breast lesions. (author)

  16. Rat Tumor Response to the Vascular-Disrupting Agent 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-Acetic Acid as Measured by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Plasma 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid Levels, and Tumor Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley D. McPhail

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The dose-dependent effects of 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA on rat GH3 prolactinomas were investigated in vivo. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI was used to assess tumor blood flow/permeability pretreatment and 24 hours posttreatment with 0, 100, 200, or 350 mg/kg DMXAA. DCE-MRI data were analyzed using Ktrans and the integrated area under the gadolinium time curve (IAUGC as response biomarkers. Highperformance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used to determine the plasma concentration of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA following treatment to provide an index of increased vessel permeability and vascular damage. Finally, tumor necrosis was assessed by grading hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections cut from the same tumors investigated by MRI. Both tumor Ktrans and IAUGC were significantly reduced 24 hours posttreatment with 350 mg/kg DMXAA only, with no evidence of dose response. HPLC demonstrated a significant increase in plasma 5-HIAA 24 hours posttreatment with 200 and 350 mg/kg DMXAA. Histologic analysis revealed some evidence of tumor necrosis following treatment with 100 or 200 mg/kg DMXAA, reaching significance with 350 mg/kg DMXAA. The absence of any reduction in Ktrans or IAUGC following treatment with 200 mg/kg, despite a significant increase in 5-HIAA, raises concerns about the utility of established DCE-MRI biomarkers to assess tumor response to DMXAA.

  17. Estimation of Pulmonary Motion in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Intrathoracic Tumors Using 3D-Dynamic MRI: Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plathow, Christian; Schoebinger, Max; Meinzer, Heinz Peter [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Herth, Felix; Tuengerthal, Siegfried [Clinic of Thoracic Disease, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans Ulrich [University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    To estimate a new technique for quantifying regional lung motion using 3D-MRI in healthy volunteers and to apply the technique in patients with intra- or extrapulmonary tumors. Intraparenchymal lung motion during a whole breathing cycle was quantified in 30 healthy volunteers using 3D-dynamic MRI (FLASH [fast low angle shot] 3D, TRICKS [time-resolved interpolated contrast kinetics]). Qualitative and quantitative vector color maps and cumulative histograms were performed using an introduced semiautomatic algorithm. An analysis of lung motion was performed and correlated with an established 2D-MRI technique for verification. As a proof of concept, the technique was applied in five patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 5 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). The correlation between intraparenchymal lung motion of the basal lung parts and the 2D-MRI technique was significant (r = 0.89, p < 0.05). Also, the vector color maps quantitatively illustrated regional lung motion in all healthy volunteers. No differences were observed between both hemithoraces, which was verified by cumulative histograms. The patients with NSCLC showed a local lack of lung motion in the area of the tumor. In the patients with MPM, there was global diminished motion of the tumor bearing hemithorax, which improved significantly after chemotherapy (CHT) (assessed by the 2D- and 3D-techniques) (p < 0.01). Using global spirometry, an improvement could also be shown (vital capacity 2.9 {+-} 0.5 versus 3.4 L {+-} 0.6, FEV1 0.9 {+-} 0.2 versus 1.4 {+-} 0.2 L) after CHT, but this improvement was not significant. A 3D-dynamic MRI is able to quantify intraparenchymal lung motion. Local and global parenchymal pathologies can be precisely located and might be a new tool used to quantify even slight changes in lung motion (e.g. in therapy monitoring, follow-up studies or even benign lung diseases)

  18. Topography on a subcellular scale modulates cellular adhesions and actin stress fiber dynamics in tumor associated fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatov, Mikheil; Sun, Xiaoyu; Suberi, Alexandra; Fourkas, John T.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2017-12-01

    Cells can sense and adapt to mechanical properties of their environment. The local geometry of the extracellular matrix, such as its topography, has been shown to modulate cell morphology, migration, and proliferation. Here we investigate the effect of micro/nanotopography on the morphology and cytoskeletal dynamics of human pancreatic tumor-associated fibroblast cells (TAFs). We use arrays of parallel nanoridges with variable spacings on a subcellular scale to investigate the response of TAFs to the topography of their environment. We find that cell shape and stress fiber organization both align along the direction of the nanoridges. Our analysis reveals a strong bimodal relationship between the degree of alignment and the spacing of the nanoridges. Furthermore, focal adhesions align along ridges and form preferentially on top of the ridges. Tracking actin stress fiber movement reveals enhanced dynamics of stress fibers on topographically patterned surfaces. We find that components of the actin cytoskeleton move preferentially along the ridges with a significantly higher velocity along the ridges than on a flat surface. Our results suggest that a complex interplay between the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions coordinates the cellular response to micro/nanotopography.

  19. Delineation and segmentation of cerebral tumors by mapping blood-brain barrier disruption with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT and tracer kinetics modeling-a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisdas, S.; Vogl, T.J.; Yang, X.; Koh, T.S.; Lim, C.C.T.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging is a promising approach for in vivo assessment of tissue microcirculation. Twenty patients with clinical and routine computed tomography (CT) evidence of intracerebral neoplasm were examined with DCE-CT imaging. Using a distributed-parameter model for tracer kinetics modeling of DCE-CT data, voxel-level maps of cerebral blood flow (F), intravascular blood volume (v i ) and intravascular mean transit time (t 1 ) were generated. Permeability-surface area product (PS), extravascular extracellular blood volume (v e ) and extraction ratio (E) maps were also calculated to reveal pathologic locations of tracer extravasation, which are indicative of disruptions in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). All maps were visually assessed for quality of tumor delineation and measurement of tumor extent by two radiologists. Kappa (κ) coefficients and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to determine the interobserver agreement for each DCE-CT map. There was a substantial agreement for the tumor delineation quality in the F, v e and t 1 maps. The agreement for the quality of the tumor delineation was excellent for the v i , PS and E maps. Concerning the measurement of tumor extent, excellent and nearly excellent agreement was achieved only for E and PS maps, respectively. According to these results, we performed a segmentation of the cerebral tumors on the base of the E maps. The interobserver agreement for the tumor extent quantification based on manual segmentation of tumor in the E maps vs. the computer-assisted segmentation was excellent (κ = 0.96, CI: 0.93-0.99). The interobserver agreement for the tumor extent quantification based on computer segmentation in the mean images and the E maps was substantial (κ = 0.52, CI: 0.42-0.59). This study illustrates the diagnostic usefulness of parametric maps associated with BBB disruption on a physiology-based approach and highlights the feasibility for automatic segmentation of

  20. The Dynamical Behaviors for a Class of Immunogenic Tumor Model with Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Bi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at studying the model proposed by Kuznetsov and Taylor in 1994. Inspired by Mayer et al., time delay is introduced in the general model. The dynamic behaviors of this model are studied, which include the existence and stability of the equilibria and Hopf bifurcation of the model with discrete delays. The properties of the bifurcated periodic solutions are studied by using the normal form on the center manifold. Numerical examples and simulations are given to illustrate the bifurcation analysis and the obtained results.

  1. Can visual assessment of blood flow patterns by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography distinguish between malignant and benign lung tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harders, Stefan Walbom; Madsen, Hans Henrik; Nellemann, Hanne Marie; Rasmussen, Torben Riis; Thygesen, Jesper; Hager, Henrik; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Rasmussen, Finn

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is a tool, which, in theory, can quantify the blood flow and blood volume of tissues. In structured qualitative analysis, parametric color maps yield a visual impression of the blood flow and blood volume within the tissue being studied, allowing for quick identification of the areas with the highest or lowest blood flow and blood volume. To examine whether DCE-CT could be used to distinguish between malignant and benign lung tumors in patients with suspected lung cancer. Fifty-nine patients with suspected lung cancer and a lung tumor on their chest radiograph were included for DCE-CT. The tumors were categorized using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns. Histopathology was used as reference standard. Using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns, it was possible to distinguish between malignant and benign lung tumors (Fisher-Freeman-Halton exact test, P  = 0.022). The inter-reader agreement of this method of analysis was slight to moderate (kappa = 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.13-0.46). DCE-CT in suspected lung cancer using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns is accurate as well as somewhat reproducible. However, there are significant limitations to DCE-CT.

  2. Quantifying the accuracy of the tumor motion and area as a function of acceleration factor for the simulation of the dynamic keyhole magnetic resonance imaging method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Danny; Greer, Peter B; Pollock, Sean; Kim, Taeho; Keall, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The dynamic keyhole is a new MR image reconstruction method for thoracic and abdominal MR imaging. To date, this method has not been investigated with cancer patient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The goal of this study was to assess the dynamic keyhole method for the task of lung tumor localization using cine-MR images reconstructed in the presence of respiratory motion. The dynamic keyhole method utilizes a previously acquired a library of peripheral k-space datasets at similar displacement and phase (where phase is simply used to determine whether the breathing is inhale to exhale or exhale to inhale) respiratory bins in conjunction with central k-space datasets (keyhole) acquired. External respiratory signals drive the process of sorting, matching, and combining the two k-space streams for each respiratory bin, thereby achieving faster image acquisition without substantial motion artifacts. This study was the first that investigates the impact of k-space undersampling on lung tumor motion and area assessment across clinically available techniques (zero-filling and conventional keyhole). In this study, the dynamic keyhole, conventional keyhole and zero-filling methods were compared to full k-space dataset acquisition by quantifying (1) the keyhole size required for central k-space datasets for constant image quality across sixty four cine-MRI datasets from nine lung cancer patients, (2) the intensity difference between the original and reconstructed images in a constant keyhole size, and (3) the accuracy of tumor motion and area directly measured by tumor autocontouring. For constant image quality, the dynamic keyhole method, conventional keyhole, and zero-filling methods required 22%, 34%, and 49% of the keyhole size (P lung tumor monitoring applications. This study demonstrates that the dynamic keyhole method is a promising technique for clinical applications such as image-guided radiation therapy requiring the MR monitoring of thoracic tumors. Based

  3. Long term dynamics of charophytes meadows and cut-sedge beds in the wetland of Las Tablas de Daimiel (Ciudad Real, Spain: relationship with environmental disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cirujano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses surface variations on charophyte meadows and cut-sedge beds in Las Tablas de Daimiel National Park (Ciudad Real, Spain from the 1950s to the present, and its relationship with the changes that have occurred in the wetland meanwhile (e.g. droughts, fires, pollution episodes. Therefore, the role of these two parameters as environmental indicators at this continental wetland has been assessed.

  4. The anatomy of effective discharge: the dynamics of coarse sediment transport revealed using continuous bedload monitoring in a gravel-bed river during a very wet year

    OpenAIRE

    Downs, Peter W.; Soar, Philip J.; Taylor, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Indirect, passive approaches for monitoring coarse bedload transport could allow cheaper, safer, higher-resolution, longer-term data that revolutionises bedload understanding and informs river management. Here, insights provided by seismic impact plates in a downstream reach of a flashy gravel-bed river (River Avon, Devon, UK) are explored in the context of plate performance. Monitoring of a centrally-situated plate (IP1) during an extremely wet 12-month period demonstrated that impacts were ...

  5. Recent advances in fluidized bed drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, N. S.; Zakaria, J. H.; Mohideen Batcha, M. F.

    2017-09-01

    Fluidized bed drying are very well known to yield high heat and mass transfer and hence adopted to many industrial drying processes particularly agricultural products. In this paper, recent advances in fluidized bed drying were reviewed and focus is given to the drying related to the usage of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). It can be seen that usage of modern computational tools such as CFD helps to optimize the fluidized bed dryer design and operation for lower energy consumption and thus better thermal efficiency. Among agricultural products that were reviewed in this paper were oil palm frond, wheat grains, olive pomace, coconut, pepper corn and millet.

  6. 77 FR 18793 - Spectrum Sharing Innovation Test-Bed Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    .... 120322212-2212-01] Spectrum Sharing Innovation Test-Bed Pilot Program AGENCY: National Telecommunications... Innovation Test-Bed pilot program to assess whether devices employing Dynamic Spectrum Access techniques can... Spectrum Sharing Innovation Test-Bed (Test-Bed) pilot program to examine the feasibility of increased...

  7. Assessing Tumor Response to Treatment in Patients with Lung Cancer Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strauch, Louise S; Eriksen, Rie Ø; Sandgaard, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Only original research articles concerning treatment response in patients with lung cancer assessed with DCE-CT were included. To assess the validity of each study we implemented Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2). The initial search......The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the literature available on dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) as a tool to evaluate treatment response in patients with lung cancer. This systematic review was compiled according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic...... yielded 651 publications, and 16 articles were included in this study. The articles were divided into groups of treatment. In studies where patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy with or without anti-angiogenic drugs, four out of the seven studies found a significant decrease in permeability...

  8. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Galiè

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 μm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI. Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes.

  9. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiè, Mirco; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Calderan, Laura; Marzola, Pasquina; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia; Marchini, Cristina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 µm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes. PMID:15967105

  10. Fluidized-bed reactors processes and operating conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, John G

    2016-01-01

    The fluidized-bed reactor is the centerpiece of industrial fluidization processes. This book focuses on the design and operation of fluidized beds in many different industrial processes, emphasizing the rationale for choosing fluidized beds for each particular process. The book starts with a brief history of fluidization from its inception in the 1940’s. The authors present both the fluid dynamics of gas-solid fluidized beds and the extensive experimental studies of operating systems and they set them in the context of operating processes that use fluid-bed reactors. Chemical engineering students and postdocs as well as practicing engineers will find great interest in this book.

  11. (18)F-alfatide II and (18)F-FDG dual-tracer dynamic PET for parametric, early prediction of tumor response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinxia; Guo, Ning; Lang, Lixin; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Xie, Qingguo; Li, Quanzheng; Eden, Henry S; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    A single dynamic PET acquisition using multiple tracers administered closely in time could provide valuable complementary information about a tumor's status under quasiconstant conditions. This study aimed to investigate the utility of dual-tracer dynamic PET imaging with (18)F-alfatide II ((18)F-AlF-NOTA-E[PEG4-c(RGDfk)]2) and (18)F-FDG for parametric monitoring of tumor responses to therapy. We administered doxorubicin to one group of athymic nude mice with U87MG tumors and paclitaxel protein-bound particles to another group of mice with MDA-MB-435 tumors. To monitor therapeutic responses, we performed dual-tracer dynamic imaging, in sessions that lasted 90 min, starting with injection via the tail vein catheters with (18)F-alfatide II, followed 40 min later by (18)F-FDG. To achieve signal separation of the 2 tracers, we fit a 3-compartment reversible model to the time-activity curve of (18)F-alfatide II for the 40 min before (18)F-FDG injection and then extrapolated to 90 min. The (18)F-FDG tumor time-activity curve was isolated from the 90-min dual-tracer tumor time-activity curve by subtracting the fitted (18)F-alfatide II tumor time-activity curve. With separated tumor time-activity curves, the (18)F-alfatide II binding potential (Bp = k3/k4) and volume of distribution (VD) and (18)F-FDG influx rate ((K1 × k3)/(k2 + k3)) based on the Patlak method were calculated to validate the signal recovery in a comparison with 60-min single-tracer imaging and to monitor therapeutic response. The transport and binding rate parameters K1-k3 of (18)F-alfatide II, calculated from the first 40 min of the dual-tracer dynamic scan, as well as Bp and VD correlated well with the parameters from the 60-min single-tracer scan (R(2) > 0.95). Compared with the results of single-tracer PET imaging, (18)F-FDG tumor uptake and influx were recovered well from dual-tracer imaging. On doxorubicin treatment, whereas no significant changes in static tracer uptake values of (18)F-alfatide II

  12. Correlation of Tumor Immunohistochemistry with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and DSC-MRI Parameters in Patients with Gliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.B.; Cron, G.O.; Bezzina, K.; Perdrizet, K.; Torres, C.H.; Chakraborty, S.; Woulfe, J.; Jansen, G.H.; Thornhill, R.E.; Zanette, B.; Cameron, I.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Tumor CBV is a prognostic and predictive marker for patients with gliomas. Tumor CBV can be measured noninvasively with different MR imaging techniques; however, it is not clear which of these techniques most closely reflects histologically-measured tumor CBV. Our aim was to

  13. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors containing areas of iso- or hypoattenuation in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: Spectrum of imaging findings and pathological grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Ryota; Suzuki, Kojiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Komada, Tomohiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) features of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) containing areas of iso- or hypoattenuation and the relationship with pathological grading. Between June 2006 and March 2014, 61 PNETs in 58 consecutive patients (29 male, 29 female; median-age 55 years), which were surgically diagnosed, underwent preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced CT. PNETs were classified based on contrast enhancement patterns in the pancreatic phase: iso/hypo-PNETs were defined as tumors containing areas of iso- or hypoattenuation except for cystic components, and hyper-PNETs were tumors showing hyperattenuation over the whole area. CT findings and contrast-enhancement patterns of the tumors were evaluated retrospectively by two radiologists and compared with the pathological grading. Iso/hypo-PNETs comprised 26 tumors, and hyper-PNETs comprised 35 tumors. Not only hyper-PNETs but also most iso/hypo-PNETs showed peak enhancement in the pancreatic phase and a washout from the portal venous phase to the delayed phase. Iso/hypo-PNETs showed larger tumor size than the hyper-PNETs (mean, 3.7 cm vs. 1.6 cm; PIso/hypo-PNETs also showed significantly higher pathological grading (WHO 2010 classification; iso/hypo, G1=14, G2=11, G3=1; hyper, G1=34, G2=1; Piso/hypo-areas showed a rapid enhancement pattern as well as hyper-PNETs, various radiological features and higher malignant potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Morphology and dynamics of tumor cell colonies propagating in epidermal growth factor supplemented media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzio, N. E.; Carballido, M.; Pasquale, M. A.; González, P. H.; Azzaroni, O.; Arvia, A. J.

    2018-07-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a key role in physiological and pathological processes. This work reports on the influence of EGF concentration (c EGF) on the modulation of individual cell phenotype and cell colony kinetics with the aim of perturbing the colony front roughness fluctuations. For this purpose, HeLa cell colonies that remain confluent along the whole expansion process with initial quasi-radial geometry and different initial cell populations, as well as colonies with initial quasi-linear geometry and large cell population, are employed. Cell size and morphology as well as its adhesive characteristics depend on c EGF. Quasi-radial colonies (QRC) expansion kinetics in EGF-containing medium exhibits a complex behavior. Namely, at the first stages of growth, the average QRC radius evolution can be described by a t 1/2 diffusion term coupled with exponential growth kinetics up to a critical time, and afterwards a growth regime approaching constant velocity. The extension of each regime depends on c EGF and colony history. In the presence of EGF, the initial expansion of quasi-linear colonies (QLCs) also exhibits morphological changes at both the cell and the colony levels. In these cases, the cell density at the colony border region becomes smaller than in the absence of EGF and consequently, the extension of the effective rim where cell duplication and motility contribute to the colony expansion increases. QLC front displacement velocity increases with c EGF up to a maximum value in the 2–10 ng ml‑1 range. Individual cell velocity is increased by EGF, and an enhancement in both the persistence and the ballistic characteristics of cell trajectories can be distinguished. For an intermediate c EGF, collective cell displacements contribute to the roughening of the colony contours. This global dynamics becomes compatible with the standard Kardar–Parisi–Zhang growth model, although a faster colony roughness saturation in EGF-containing medium

  15. Enhancement pattern analysis of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma on dynamic MR imaging with histopathological correlation: Validity of portal phase imaging for predicting tumor grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Daisuke; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Nishie, Akihiro; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Asayama, Yoshiki; Ishigami, Kousei; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Kakihara, Daisuke; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Nishihara, Yunosuke; Aishima, Shinichi; Taketomi, Akinobu; Kishimoto, Junji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To elucidate the correlation between hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) enhancement patterns on dynamic MR imaging and histological findings. Materials and methods: Surgically proven 46 hypervascular HCCs of forty-one patients were enrolled. For each HCC, the signal intensity in the portal phase (SIPP) was evaluated. In this study, high, iso-, or low intensity in the portal phase was hypothesized as late, moderate, or early washout pattern, respectively. The SIPP of each HCC was correlated to histological grade and architectural subtypes that represent degrees of trabecular structure. For the trabecular HCCs, the thickness of tumor plate was also correlated for indirect estimation of tumor sinusoid. Results: There was a significant correlation between the SIPP vs. histological grade and also vs. architectural subtypes, namely the degree of trabecular structure. Washout of hypervascular HCC occurred earlier as the histological grade advanced and the histological architecture got closer to pure trabecular HCC. For the trabecular HCCs, the thickness of tumor plate correlated significantly with SIPP or histological grade. Hypervascular HCCs with thicker tumor plates showed worse histological grade and earlier washout pattern. Conclusions: Histological grade of hypervascular HCC may be predicted using SIPP. The thickness of tumor plate, resultantly the size of sinusoid between tumor plates, can account for the relationship between washout pattern and histological grade in the trabecular HCCs.

  16. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  17. The Dynamics of Glutathione Species and Ophthalmate Concentrations in Plasma from the VX2 Rabbit Model of Secondary Liver Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Available tumor markers have low sensitivity/specificity for the diagnosis of liver tumors. The present study was designed to evaluate the oxidoreductive status of the liver as surrogates of tumor subsistence and growth. Methods. Glutathione species (GSH:GSSG, ophthalmate (OA concentrations, and their turnover were measured in plasma of rabbits (n=6 in their healthy state and in the state of tumor growth after implantation of the VX2 carcinoma in their liver. Tumors were allowed to grow for a period of 14 days when rabbits were sacrificed. Livers were removed and cysteine concentration was measured in liver tissue. Results. Tumor growth was found in 100% of the rabbits. Concentration and labeling of GSH/GSSG were similar in experimental animals before and after tumor implantation and to sham animals. In contrast, OA concentration increased significantly in experimental animals after tumor implantation when compared to same animals prior to tumor implantation and to sham animals (P<.05. The concentration of cysteine, a precursor of GSH, was found to be significantly lower in the liver tissue adjacent to the tumor (P<.05. Conclusion. Disturbances in the oxidoreductive state of livers appear to be a surrogate of early tumor growth.

  18. Fluidised bed combustion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion systems that facilitates the maintenance of the depth of the bed are described. A discharge pipe projects upwardly into the bed so that bed material can flow into its upper end and escape downwardly. The end of the pipe is surrounded by an enclosure and air is discharged into the enclosure so that material will enter the pipe from within the enclosure and have been cooled in the enclosure by the air discharged into it. The walls of the enclosure may themselves be cooled

  19. 3D discrete angiogenesis dynamic model and stochastic simulation for the assessment of blood perfusion coefficient and impact on heat transfer between nanoparticles and malignant tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yifat, Jonathan; Gannot, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of malignant tumors plays a crucial role in the survivability chances of the patient. Therefore, new and innovative tumor detection methods are constantly searched for. Tumor-specific magnetic-core nano-particles can be used with an alternating magnetic field to detect and treat tumors by hyperthermia. For the analysis of the method effectiveness, the bio-heat transfer between the nanoparticles and the tissue must be carefully studied. Heat diffusion in biological tissue is usually analyzed using the Pennes Bio-Heat Equation, where blood perfusion plays an important role. Malignant tumors are known to initiate an angiogenesis process, where endothelial cell migration from neighboring vasculature eventually leads to the formation of a thick blood capillary network around them. This process allows the tumor to receive its extensive nutrition demands and evolve into a more progressive and potentially fatal tumor. In order to assess the effect of angiogenesis on the bio-heat transfer problem, we have developed a discrete stochastic 3D model & simulation of tumor-induced angiogenesis. The model elaborates other angiogenesis models by providing high resolution 3D stochastic simulation, capturing of fine angiogenesis morphological features, effects of dynamic sprout thickness functions, and stochastic parent vessel generator. We show that the angiogenesis realizations produced are well suited for numerical bio-heat transfer analysis. Statistical study on the angiogenesis characteristics was derived using Monte Carlo simulations. According to the statistical analysis, we provide analytical expression for the blood perfusion coefficient in the Pennes equation, as a function of several parameters. This updated form of the Pennes equation could be used for numerical and analytical analyses of the proposed detection and treatment method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intratumor partitioning and texture analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI identifies relevant tumor subregions to predict pathological response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia; Gong, Guanghua; Cui, Yi; Li, Ruijiang

    2016-11-01

    To predict pathological response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) based on quantitative, multiregion analysis of dynamic contrast enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). In this Institutional Review Board-approved study, 35 patients diagnosed with stage II/III breast cancer were retrospectively investigated using 3T DCE-MR images acquired before and after the first cycle of NAC. First, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimensionality of the DCE-MRI data with high temporal resolution. We then partitioned the whole tumor into multiple subregions using k-means clustering based on the PCA-defined eigenmaps. Within each tumor subregion, we extracted four quantitative Haralick texture features based on the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The change in texture features in each tumor subregion between pre- and during-NAC was used to predict pathological complete response after NAC. Three tumor subregions were identified through clustering, each with distinct enhancement characteristics. In univariate analysis, all imaging predictors except one extracted from the tumor subregion associated with fast washout were statistically significant (P < 0.05) after correcting for multiple testing, with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) or AUCs between 0.75 and 0.80. In multivariate analysis, the proposed imaging predictors achieved an AUC of 0.79 (P = 0.002) in leave-one-out cross-validation. This improved upon conventional imaging predictors such as tumor volume (AUC = 0.53) and texture features based on whole-tumor analysis (AUC = 0.65). The heterogeneity of the tumor subregion associated with fast washout on DCE-MRI predicted pathological response to NAC in breast cancer. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1107-1115. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. Detection of Local Tumor Recurrence After Definitive Treatment of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Histogram Analysis of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced T1-Weighted Perfusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Young Jun; Park, Ji Eun; Sung, Yu Sub; Kim, Namkug; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the added value of histogram analysis of the ratio of initial to final 90-second time-signal intensity AUC (AUCR) for differentiating local tumor recurrence from contrast-enhancing scar on follow-up dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI of patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). AUCR histogram parameters were assessed among tumor recurrence (n = 19) and contrast-enhancing scar (n = 27) at primary sites and compared using the t test. ROC analysis was used to determine the best differentiating parameters. The added value of AUCR histogram parameters was assessed when they were added to inconclusive conventional MRI results. Histogram analysis showed statistically significant differences in the 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles of the AUCR values between the two groups (p Histogram analysis of AUCR can improve the diagnostic yield for local tumor recurrence during surveillance after treatment for HNSCC.

  2. Dynamics of tumor oxygenation, CD31 staining and transforming growth factor-β levels after treatment with radiation or cyclophosphamide in the rat 13762 mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Ikebe, Masahiko; Teicher, Beverly A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Tumors are dynamic tissues that undergo marked molecular, biochemical, and physiologic changes in response to cytotoxic anticancer therapies. Understanding the changes in tumor oxygenation and transforming growth factor-β expression may allow improved treatment regimens to be developed. Methods and Materials: The effects of a single dose of radiation therapy (20 Gy) or a single dose of chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, 250 mg/kg) on several molecular and physiologic parameters of the rat 13762 mammary carcinoma growing subcutaneously in female Fischer 344 rats were explored. Results: Treatment of the tumor-bearing animals with 20 Gy of radiation killed about two logs (99%) of the 13762 tumor cells, and treatment with cyclophosphamide (250 mg/kg) killed about 1.5 logs (95%) of the 13762 tumor cells. Hypoxia, as determined by a pO 2 electrode, initially decreased in the tumors of treated animals until 6 h. posttreatment and then increased, so that 24 h. after administration of the radiation therapy or the chemotherapy the number of intratumoral vessels as determined by CD31 staining increased until about 24 h after cytotoxic therapy. Transforming growth factor-β1, measured by radioimmunoassay, peaked in the serum between 6 h and 18 h and again between 72 h and 96 h after radiation therapy and peaked in the tumor at 24 h and again at 72 h after radiation therapy. The first serum peak after cyclophosphamide was 3 h after drug injection, with second peaks at 36 h and 48 h after drug administration. In the tumor, transforming growth factor-β1 peaked between 6 h and 8 h after drug administration and again 36 h and 72 h after drug. Apoptosis was maximal 6 h after 20 Gy and 24 h after cyclophosphamide. Vascular endothelial growth factor was also increased in tumors after cytotoxic therapy. Conclusions: These changes in the tumor physiologic status are sufficient to protect the tumor from a second cytotoxic insult administered days afterwards and to result in a

  3. WE-AB-202-11: Radiobiological Modeling of Tumor Response During Radiotherapy Based On Pre-Treatment Dynamic PET Imaging Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crispin-Ortuzar, M; Grkovski, M; Beattie, B; Lee, N; Riaz, N; Humm, J; Jeong, J; Fontanella, A; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of a multiscale radiobiological model of tumor response to predict mid-treatment hypoxia images, based on pretreatment imaging of perfusion and hypoxia with [18-F]FMISO dynamic PET and glucose metabolism with [18-F]FDG PET. Methods: A mechanistic tumor control probability (TCP) radiobiological model describing the interplay between tumor cell proliferation and hypoxia (Jeong et al., PMB 2013) was extended to account for intra-tumor nutrient heterogeneity, dynamic cell migration due to nutrient gradients, and stromal cells. This extended model was tested on 10 head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy, randomly drawn from a larger MSKCC protocol involving baseline and mid-therapy dynamic PET scans. For each voxel, initial fractions of proliferative and hypoxic tumor cells were obtained by finding an approximate solution to a system of linear equations relating cell fractions to voxel-level FDG uptake, perfusion (FMISO K{sub 1}) and hypoxia (FMISO k{sub 3}). The TCP model then predicted their evolution over time up until the mid treatment scan. Finally, the linear model was reapplied to predict each lesion’s median hypoxia level (k{sub 3}[med,sim]) which in turn was compared to the FMISO k{sub 3}[med] measured at mid-therapy. Results: The average k3[med] of the tumors in pre-treatment scans was 0.0035 min{sup −1}, with an inter-tumor standard deviation of σ[pre]=0.0034 min{sup −1}. The initial simulated k{sub 3}[med,sim] of each tumor agreed with the corresponding measurements within 0.1σ[pre]. In 7 out of 10 lesions, the mid-treatment k{sub 3}[med,sim] prediction agreed with the data within 0.3σ[pre]. The remaining cases corresponded to the most extreme relative changes in k{sub 3}[med]. Conclusion: This work presents a method to personalize the prediction of a TCP model using pre-treatment kinetic imaging data, and validates the modeling of radiotherapy response by predicting changes in median hypoxia

  4. Spectral Clustering Predicts Tumor Tissue Heterogeneity Using Dynamic 18F-FDG PET: A Complement to the Standard Compartmental Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Prateek; Divine, Mathew R; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Pichler, Bernd J; Disselhorst, Jonathan A

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we described and validated an unsupervised segmentation algorithm for the assessment of tumor heterogeneity using dynamic 18 F-FDG PET. The aim of our study was to objectively evaluate the proposed method and make comparisons with compartmental modeling parametric maps and SUV segmentations using simulations of clinically relevant tumor tissue types. Methods: An irreversible 2-tissue-compartmental model was implemented to simulate clinical and preclinical 18 F-FDG PET time-activity curves using population-based arterial input functions (80 clinical and 12 preclinical) and the kinetic parameter values of 3 tumor tissue types. The simulated time-activity curves were corrupted with different levels of noise and used to calculate the tissue-type misclassification errors of spectral clustering (SC), parametric maps, and SUV segmentation. The utility of the inverse noise variance- and Laplacian score-derived frame weighting schemes before SC was also investigated. Finally, the SC scheme with the best results was tested on a dynamic 18 F-FDG measurement of a mouse bearing subcutaneous colon cancer and validated using histology. Results: In the preclinical setup, the inverse noise variance-weighted SC exhibited the lowest misclassification errors (8.09%-28.53%) at all noise levels in contrast to the Laplacian score-weighted SC (16.12%-31.23%), unweighted SC (25.73%-40.03%), parametric maps (28.02%-61.45%), and SUV (45.49%-45.63%) segmentation. The classification efficacy of both weighted SC schemes in the clinical case was comparable to the unweighted SC. When applied to the dynamic 18 F-FDG measurement of colon cancer, the proposed algorithm accurately identified densely vascularized regions from the rest of the tumor. In addition, the segmented regions and clusterwise average time-activity curves showed excellent correlation with the tumor histology. Conclusion: The promising results of SC mark its position as a robust tool for quantification of tumor

  5. Matching the reaction-diffusion simulation to dynamic [18F]FMISO PET measurements in tumors: extension to a flow-limited oxygen-dependent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kuangyu; Bayer, Christine; Gaertner, Florian C; Astner, Sabrina T; Wilkens, Jan J; Nüsslin, Fridtjof; Vaupel, Peter; Ziegler, Sibylle I

    2017-02-01

    Positron-emission tomography (PET) with hypoxia specific tracers provides a noninvasive method to assess the tumor oxygenation status. Reaction-diffusion models have advantages in revealing the quantitative relation between in vivo imaging and the tumor microenvironment. However, there is no quantitative comparison of the simulation results with the real PET measurements yet. The lack of experimental support hampers further applications of computational simulation models. This study aims to compare the simulation results with a preclinical [ 18 F]FMISO PET study and to optimize the reaction-diffusion model accordingly. Nude mice with xenografted human squamous cell carcinomas (CAL33) were investigated with a 2 h dynamic [ 18 F]FMISO PET followed by immunofluorescence staining using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole and the endothelium marker CD 31. A large data pool of tumor time-activity curves (TAC) was simulated for each mouse by feeding the arterial input function (AIF) extracted from experiments into the model with different configurations of the tumor microenvironment. A measured TAC was considered to match a simulated TAC when the difference metric was below a certain, noise-dependent threshold. As an extension to the well-established Kelly model, a flow-limited oxygen-dependent (FLOD) model was developed to improve the matching between measurements and simulations. The matching rate between the simulated TACs of the Kelly model and the mouse PET data ranged from 0 to 28.1% (on average 9.8%). By modifying the Kelly model to an FLOD model, the matching rate between the simulation and the PET measurements could be improved to 41.2-84.8% (on average 64.4%). Using a simulation data pool and a matching strategy, we were able to compare the simulated temporal course of dynamic PET with in vivo measurements. By modifying the Kelly model to a FLOD model, the computational simulation was able to approach the dynamic [ 18 F]FMISO measurements in the investigated

  6. Fluidized bed incinerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.; Johnson, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A fluidized bed incinerator is being developed for burning rad contaminated solid and liquid waste materials. In situ neutralization of acid gases by the bed material, catalytic afterburning, and gas filtration are used to produce a clean flue gas without the use of aqueous scrubbing

  7. Correlation between the quantifiable parameters of blood flow pattern derived with dynamic CT in maliagnant solitary pulmonary nodules and tumor size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenshi ZHANG

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective The solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs is one of the most common findings on chest radiographs. It becomes possible to provide more accurately quantitative information about blood flow patterns of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs with multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT. The aim of this study is to evaluate the correlation between the quantifiable parameters of blood flow pattern derived with dynamic CT in maliagnant solitary pulmonary nodules and tumor size. Methods 68 patients with maliagnant solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs (diameter <=4 cmunderwent multi-location dynamic contrast material-enhanced (nonionic contrast material was administrated via the antecubital vein at a rate of 4mL/s by an autoinjector, 4*5mm or 4*2.5mm scanning mode with stable table were performed. serial CT. Precontrast and postcontrast attenuation on every scan was recorded. Perfusion (PSPN, peak height (PHSPNratio of peak height of the SPN to that of the aorta (SPN-to-A ratioand mean transit time(MTT were calculated. The correlation between the quantifiable parameters of blood flow pattern derived with dynamic CT in maliagnant solitary pulmonary nodules and tumor size were assessed by means of linear regression analysis. Results No significant correlations were found between the tumor size and each of the peak height (PHSPN ratio of peak height of the SPN to that of the aorta (SPN-to-A ratio perfusion(PSPNand mean transit time (r=0.18, P=0.14; r=0.20,P=0.09; r=0.01, P=0.95; r=0.01, P=0.93. Conclusion No significant correlation is found between the tumor size and each of the quantifiable parameters of blood flow pattern derived with dynamic CT in maliagnant solitary pulmonary nodules.

  8. Dynamic microbubble contrast-enhanced US to measure tumor response to targeted therapy: a proposed clinical protocol with results from renal cell carcinoma patients receiving antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ross; Hudson, John M; Lloyd, Brendan A; Sureshkumar, Ahthavan R; Lueck, Gordon; Milot, Laurent; Atri, Mostafa; Bjarnason, Georg A; Burns, Peter N

    2011-08-01

    To develop and implement an evidence-based protocol for characterizing vascular response of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to targeted therapy by using dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) ultrasonography (US). The study was approved by the institutional research ethics board; written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Seventeen patients (four women; median age, 58 years; range, 42-72 years; 13 men, median age, 62 years; range, 45-81 years) with metastatic RCC were examined by using DCE US before and after 2 weeks of treatment with sunitinib (May 2007 to October 2009). Two contrast agent techniques--bolus injection and disruption-replenishment infusion of microbubbles--were compared. Changes in tumor blood velocity and fractional blood volume were measured with both methods, together with reproducibility and effect of compensation for respiratory motion. Tumor changes were assessed with computed tomography, by using the best response with the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and progression-free survival (PFS). Follow-up RECIST measurements were performed at 6-week intervals until progressive disease was detected. In response to treatment, median tumor fractional blood volume measured with the disruption-replenishment infusion method decreased by 73.2% (interquartile range, 46%-87%) (P protocol is a flexible method suitable for many tumor types, but further studies are needed to assess whether this protocol may be predictive of patient outcome. © RSNA, 2011.

  9. Early quantification of the therapeutic efficacy of the vascular disrupting agent, CKD-516, using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in rabbit VX2 liver tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Ijin; Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jeong Min; Choi, Jin Woo; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (DCE-US) in the early quantification of hemodynamic change following administration of the vascular disrupting agent (VDA) CKD-516 using a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. This study was approved by our institutional animal care and use committee. Eight VX2 liver-tumor-bearing rabbits were treated with intravenous CKD-516, and all underwent DCE-US using SonoVue before and again 2, 4, 6, and 24 hours following their treatment. The tumor perfusion parameters were obtained from the time-intensity curve of the DCE-US data. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to assess any significant change in tumor perfusion over time. Relative changes in the DCE-US parameters between the baseline and follow-up assessments were correlated with the relative changes in tumor size over the course of seven days using Pearson correlation. CKD-516 treatment resulted in significant changes in the DCE-US parameters, including the peak intensity, total area under the time-intensity curve (AUCtotal), and AUC during wash-out (AUCout) over time (P<0.05). Pairwise comparison tests revealed that the AUCtotal and AUC during wash-in (AUCin) seen on the two-hour follow-up were significantly lower than the baseline values (P<0.05). However, none of early changes in the DCE-US parameters until 24-hour follow-up showed a significant correlation with the relative changes in tumor size during seven days after CKD-516 treatment. Our results suggest that a novel VDA (CKD-516) can cause disruption of tumor perfusion as early as two hours after treatment and that the therapeutic effect of CKD-516 treatment can be effectively quantified using DCE-US.

  10. Detecting early response to cyclophosphamide treatment of RIF-1 tumors using selective multiple quantum spectroscopy (SelMQC) and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poptani, Harish; Bansal, Navin; Graham, Robert A; Mancuso, Anthony; Nelson, David S; Glickson, Jerry D

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable, noninvasive method for early detection of tumor response to therapy that would facilitate optimization of treatment regimens to the needs of the individual patient. In the present study, the effects of cyclophosphamide (Cp, a widely used alkylating agent) were monitored in a murine radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) using in vivo (1)H NMR spectroscopy and imaging to evaluate the potential of these techniques towards early detection of treatment response. Steady-state lactate levels and Gd-DTPA uptake kinetics were measured using selective multiple quantum coherence (Sel-MQC) transfer spectroscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging, respectively in RIF-1 tumors before, 24 and 72 h after 300 mg/kg of Cp administration. High-resolution (1)H NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts of the tumor were correlated with lactate and glucose concentrations determined enzymatically. In vivo NMR experiments showed a decrease in steady-state lactate to water ratios (5.4 +/- 1.6 to 0.6 +/- 0.5, p < 0.05) and an increase in Gd-DTPA uptake kinetics following treatment response. The data indicate that decreases in lactate result from decreased glycolytic metabolism and an increase in tumor perfusion/permeability. Perchloric acid extracts confirmed the lower lactate levels seen in vivo in treated tumors and also indicated a higher glycerophosphocholine/phosphocholine (GPC/PC) integrated intensity ratio (1.39 +/- 0.09 vs 0.97 +/- 0.04, p < 0.01), indicative of increased membrane degradation following Cp treatment. Steady-state lactate levels provide metabolic information that correlates with changes in tumor physiology measured by Gd-DTPA uptake kinetics with high spatial and temporal resolution. Both of these parameters may be useful for monitoring early tumor response to therapy. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Comparative dosimetric study of three-dimensional conformal, dynamic conformal arc, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for brain tumor treatment using Novalis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Meisong; Newman, Francis M.S.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Stuhr, Kelly M.S.; Johnson, Tim K.; Gaspar, Laurie E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric differences among three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for brain tumor treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients treated with Novalis were selected. We performed 3D-CRT, DCAT, and IMRT plans for all patients. The margin for the planning target volume (PTV) was 1 mm, and the specific prescription dose was 90% for all plans. The target coverage at the prescription dose, conformity index (CI), and heterogeneity index were analyzed for all plans. Results: For small tumors (PTV ≤2 cm 3 ), the three dosimetric parameters had approximate values for both 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. The CI for the IMRT plans was high. For medium tumors (PTV >2 to ≤100 cm 3 ), the three plans were competitive with each other. The IMRT plans had a greater CI, better target coverage at the prescription dose, and a better heterogeneity index. For large tumors (PTV >100 cm 3 ), the IMRT plan had good target coverage at the prescription dose and heterogeneity index and approximate CI values as those in the 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that DCAT is suitable for most cases in the treatment of brain tumors. For a small target, 3D-CRT is useful, and IMRT is not recommended. For larger tumors, IMRT is superior to 3D-CRT and very competitive in sparing critical structures, especially for big tumors

  12. Impact of sampling interval in training data acquisition on intrafractional predictive accuracy of indirect dynamic tumor-tracking radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Akimoto, Mami; Miyabe, Yuki; Yokota, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-08-01

    To explore the effect of sampling interval of training data acquisition on the intrafractional prediction error of surrogate signal-based dynamic tumor-tracking using a gimbal-mounted linac. Twenty pairs of respiratory motions were acquired from 20 patients (ten lung, five liver, and five pancreatic cancer patients) who underwent dynamic tumor-tracking with the Vero4DRT. First, respiratory motions were acquired as training data for an initial construction of the prediction model before the irradiation. Next, additional respiratory motions were acquired for an update of the prediction model due to the change of the respiratory pattern during the irradiation. The time elapsed prior to the second acquisition of the respiratory motion was 12.6 ± 3.1 min. A four-axis moving phantom reproduced patients' three dimensional (3D) target motions and one dimensional surrogate motions. To predict the future internal target motion from the external surrogate motion, prediction models were constructed by minimizing residual prediction errors for training data acquired at 80 and 320 ms sampling intervals for 20 s, and at 500, 1,000, and 2,000 ms sampling intervals for 60 s using orthogonal kV x-ray imaging systems. The accuracies of prediction models trained with various sampling intervals were estimated based on training data with each sampling interval during the training process. The intrafractional prediction errors for various prediction models were then calculated on intrafractional monitoring images taken for 30 s at the constant sampling interval of a 500 ms fairly to evaluate the prediction accuracy for the same motion pattern. In addition, the first respiratory motion was used for the training and the second respiratory motion was used for the evaluation of the intrafractional prediction errors for the changed respiratory motion to evaluate the robustness of the prediction models. The training error of the prediction model was 1.7 ± 0.7 mm in 3D for all sampling

  13. Evaluation of Tumor Angiogenesis Using Dynamic Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Comparison of Plasma Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Hemodynamic, and Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, O.; Nishimura, R.; Miyayama, H.; Yasunaga, T.; Ozaki, Y.; Tuji, A.; Yamashita, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether tumor angiogenesis of breast cancers can be predicted on the basis of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: Seventy-one patients with 71 breast cancers underwent Gd-DTPA enhanced dynamic MRI. Two regions of interest measurements were obtained in the periphery and in the center of the breast cancers. Hemodynamic parameters obtained by dynamic MRI included peak time, contrast enhancement ratio (CE ratio), and washout ratio. The triexponential concentration curve of Gd-DTPA was fitted to a theoretical model based on compartmental analysis. The transfer constant (or permeability surface product per unit volume of compartment 'k') was obtained using this method. Tumor angiogenesis was assessed by plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (P-VEGF). Results: The P-VEGF was positive in 28 of 71 tumors (39%). The CE ratio, washout ratio, and k in the periphery in P-VEGF positive breast cancers (mean 178%, 18%, and 1.5x10 -2 (s-1)) were significantly greater (P -2 (s-1)). The peak time in the periphery in P-VEGF positive breast cancers was more marked than for P-VEGF negative breast cancers, but this difference was not significant. Conclusion: The hemodynamic and pharmacokinetic analysis of MRI provides valuable information about angiogenesis of breast cancers

  14. An Evolutionary Explanation for the Perturbation of the Dynamics of Metastatic Tumors Induced by Surgery and Acute Inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayonas, Alberto Carmona

    2011-01-01

    Surgery has contributed to unveil a tumor behavior that is difficult to reconcile with the models of tumorigenesis based on gradualism. The postsurgical patterns of progression include unexpected features such as distant interactions and variable rhythms. The underlying evidence can be summarized as follows: (1) the resection of the primary tumor is able to accelerate the evolution of micrometastasis in early stages, and (2) the outcome is transiently opposed in advanced tumors. The objective of this paper is to give some insight into tumorigenesis and surgery-related effects, by applying the concepts of the evolutionary theory in those tumor behaviors that gompertzian and tissular-centered models are unable to explain. According to this view, tumors are the consequence of natural selection operating at the somatic level, which is the basic mechanism of tumorigenesis, notwithstanding the complementary role of the intrinsic constrictions of complex networks. A tumor is a complicated phenomenon that entails growth, evolution and development simultaneously. So, an evo-devo perspective can explain how and why tumor subclones are able to translate competition from a metabolic level into neoangiogenesis and the immune response. The paper proposes that distant interactions are an extension of the ecological events at the local level. This notion explains the evolutionary basis for tumor dormancy, and warns against the teleological view of tumorigenesis as a process directed towards the maximization of a concrete trait such as aggressiveness

  15. An Evolutionary Explanation for the Perturbation of the Dynamics of Metastatic Tumors Induced by Surgery and Acute Inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayonas, Alberto Carmona [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia (Spain)

    2011-03-02

    Surgery has contributed to unveil a tumor behavior that is difficult to reconcile with the models of tumorigenesis based on gradualism. The postsurgical patterns of progression include unexpected features such as distant interactions and variable rhythms. The underlying evidence can be summarized as follows: (1) the resection of the primary tumor is able to accelerate the evolution of micrometastasis in early stages, and (2) the outcome is transiently opposed in advanced tumors. The objective of this paper is to give some insight into tumorigenesis and surgery-related effects, by applying the concepts of the evolutionary theory in those tumor behaviors that gompertzian and tissular-centered models are unable to explain. According to this view, tumors are the consequence of natural selection operating at the somatic level, which is the basic mechanism of tumorigenesis, notwithstanding the complementary role of the intrinsic constrictions of complex networks. A tumor is a complicated phenomenon that entails growth, evolution and development simultaneously. So, an evo-devo perspective can explain how and why tumor subclones are able to translate competition from a metabolic level into neoangiogenesis and the immune response. The paper proposes that distant interactions are an extension of the ecological events at the local level. This notion explains the evolutionary basis for tumor dormancy, and warns against the teleological view of tumorigenesis as a process directed towards the maximization of a concrete trait such as aggressiveness.

  16. An Evolutionary Explanation for the Perturbation of the Dynamics of Metastatic Tumors Induced by Surgery and Acute Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Carmona Bayonas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgery has contributed to unveil a tumor behavior that is difficult to reconcile with the models of tumorigenesis based on gradualism. The postsurgical patterns of progression include unexpected features such as distant interactions and variable rhythms. The underlying evidence can be summarized as follows: (1 the resection of the primary tumor is able to accelerate the evolution of micrometastasis in early stages, and (2 the outcome is transiently opposed in advanced tumors. The objective of this paper is to give some insight into tumorigenesis and surgery-related effects, by applying the concepts of the evolutionary theory in those tumor behaviors that gompertzian and tissular-centered models are unable to explain. According to this view, tumors are the consequence of natural selection operating at the somatic level, which is the basic mechanism of tumorigenesis, notwithstanding the complementary role of the intrinsic constrictions of complex networks. A tumor is a complicated phenomenon that entails growth, evolution and development simultaneously. So, an evo-devo perspective can explain how and why tumor subclones are able to translate competition from a metabolic level into neoangiogenesis and the immune response. The paper proposes that distant interactions are an extension of the ecological events at the local level. This notion explains the evolutionary basis for tumor dormancy, and warns against the teleological view of tumorigenesis as a process directed towards the maximization of a concrete trait such as aggressiveness.

  17. Rat Tumor Response to the Vascular-Disrupting Agent 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-Acetic Acid as Measured by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Plasma 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid Levels, and Tumor Necrosis1

    OpenAIRE

    McPhail, Lesley D; McIntyre, Dominick J O; Ludwig, Christian; Kestell, Philip; Griffiths, John R; Kelland, Lloyd R; Robinson, Simon P

    2006-01-01

    The dose-dependent effects of 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) on rat GH3 prolactinomas were investigated in vivo. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to assess tumor blood flow/permeability pretreatment and 24 hours posttreatment with 0, 100, 200, or 350 mg/kg DMXAA. DCE-MRI data were analyzed using Ktrans and the integrated area under the gadolinium time curve (IAUGC) as response biomarkers. Highperformance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was use...

  18. The mechanism of char ignition in fluidized bed combustors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemons, R.V.

    1987-01-01

    Knowledge about ignition processes of coal in fluidized beds is of importance for the start-up and dynamic control of these combustors. Initial experiments in a transparent fluidized bed scale model showed the existence of a considerable induction period for the ignition of char, especially at low

  19. Modelling of Devolatilization in Fluidized Bed Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenseng, Mette; Lin, Weigang; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the devolatilization process in a circulating fluidized bed combustor. The model is a combination of two submodels: single particle devolatilization and fluid dynamics. The single particle model includes the influence of both chemical kinetics and hea...

  20. High contrast enhancement aspect of dynamic computed tomography with arterial infusion - DCT-AI. Its clinical applications on hepatic tumors and basic experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Seishi; Iwasaki, Naoya; Matsumura, Yoshimitsu; Kuramae, Shigeru; Mishiro, Tadashi

    1983-06-01

    Dynamic computed tomography was performed on 112 cases possibly having hepatic tumors with intraarterial infusion of undiluted contrast into a selectively placed catheter following angiographies. Our dynamic program could evaluate not only early phase of enhancement but also late phase up to 120 sec. Reconstructed views from early scans and magnified views were very useful to evaluate minute sequential changes. Hepatic masses less than 5 cm in size were found in thirty-one cases. Patterns of tumor enhancement and time-density curves have been analysed to correlate them with histology. Four types of tumor enhancement were noted: (1) homogeneous (2) patchy (3) mottled (4) ringed. Characteristic changes were observed in hepatocellular carcinoma - HCC - (mostly mottled) and haemangioma (mostly patchy). The former was divided in two groups reflecting the cellular maturity. The metastatic tumor could be enhanced in a ringed form with dendritic pattern of supplying vascularities in some cases. To support the use of undiluted contrast and to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of high contrast enhancement, experiments were performed by taking transaxial views of an acrylic phantom immersed in different concentrations of contrast. Analysis of CT images taken at different HU values ranging from 0 to 450 demonstrated that the higher the concentration of contrast, the better the spatial resolution was. Also larger magnification could be expected by using higher concentration of contrast. Although our Dynamic Computed Tomography with Arterial Infusion of Contrast still has drawbacks and limited indications, we advocate it as a better way of enhancement to detect and evaluate the hepatic masses, which sometimes elude the examiner's grasp with conventional way of enhancement. (author).

  1. Dynamics of Archaeal and Bacterial Communities in Response to Variations of Hydraulic Retention Time in an Integrated Anaerobic Fluidized-Bed Membrane Bioreactor Treating Benzothiazole Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated anaerobic fluidized-bed membrane bioreactor (IAFMBR was investigated to treat synthetic high-strength benzothiazole wastewater (50 mg/L at a hydraulic retention time (HRT of 24, 18, and 12 h. The chemical oxygen demand (COD removal efficiency (from 93.6% to 90.9%, the methane percentage (from 70.9% to 69.27%, and the methane yield (from 0.309 m3 CH4/kg·CODremoved to 0.316 m3 CH4/kg·CODremoved were not affected by decreasing HRTs. However, it had an adverse effect on membrane fouling (decreasing service period from 5.3 d to 3.2 d and benzothiazole removal efficiency (reducing it from 97.5% to 82.3%. Three sludge samples that were collected on day 185, day 240, and day 297 were analyzed using an Illumina® MiSeq platform. It is striking that the dominant genus of archaea was always Methanosaeta despite of HRTs. The proportions of Methanosaeta were 80.6% (HRT 24, 91.9% (HRT 18, and 91.2% (HRT 12. The dominant bacterial genera were Clostridium in proportions of 23.9% (HRT 24, 16.4% (HRT 18, and 15.3% (HRT 12, respectively.

  2. Dynamic observation on changes of serum tumor markers levels after implantation of 125I radioactive seeds as treatment for several malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qihe; Yang Jiali; Gao Mingzhong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the dynamic changes of serum levels of several tumor markers after implantation of 125 I seeds as treatment for breast, prostate and lung malignancies. Methods: Serum CA15-3 (in 48 cases of breast cancer), PSA (in 59 cases of prostate cancer) and CYFRA21-1 (in 59 cases of lung cancer) levels were measured with RIA both before and after implantation of 125 I seeds as treatment. Furthermore, dynamic observation on the serum markers levels was carried out every 3 months in ten patients in each category. Results: After treatment, levels of these markers dropped significantly. Dynamic observation revealed that in the 10 cases of breast cancer, the levels of CA15-3 dropped continually. However, in the 10 cases of prostatic cancer, the disease got worse and the PSA levels kept increasing. In the lung cancer group, the CYFRA21-1 levels rose markedly and all patients expired before 9 months. Conclusion: Dynamic observation on changes of serum tumor markers (CA15-3, PSA, CYFRA21-1) levels after 125 I seed implantation treatment was of definite prognostic value. (authors)

  3. Bed Bugs FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Europe. Bed bugs have been found in five-star hotels and resorts and their presence is not ... Health – Division of Parasitic Diseases Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  4. Bed Bug Information Clearinghouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Its purpose is to help states, communities, and consumers in efforts to prevent and control bed bug infestations. Currently includes only reviewed material from federal/state/local government agencies, extension services, and universities.

  5. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Savino, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H 2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  6. MIT pebble bed reactor project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadak, Andrew C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2007-03-15

    The conceptual design of the MIT modular pebble bed reactor is described. This reactor plant is a 250 Mwth, 120 Mwe indirect cycle plant that is designed to be deployed in the near term using demonstrated helium system components. The primary system is a conventional pebble bed reactor with a dynamic central column with an outlet temperature of 900 C providing helium to an intermediate helium to helium heat exchanger (IHX). The outlet of the IHX is input to a three shaft horizontal Brayton Cycle power conversion system. The design constraint used in sizing the plant is based on a factory modularity principle which allows the plant to be assembled 'Lego' style instead of constructed piece by piece. This principle employs space frames which contain the power conversion system that permits the Lego-like modules to be shipped by truck or train to sites. This paper also describes the research that has been conducted at MIT since 1998 on fuel modeling, silver leakage from coated fuel particles, dynamic simulation, MCNP reactor physics modeling and air ingress analysis.

  7. MIT pebble bed reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadak, Andrew C.

    2007-01-01

    The conceptual design of the MIT modular pebble bed reactor is described. This reactor plant is a 250 Mwth, 120 Mwe indirect cycle plant that is designed to be deployed in the near term using demonstrated helium system components. The primary system is a conventional pebble bed reactor with a dynamic central column with an outlet temperature of 900 C providing helium to an intermediate helium to helium heat exchanger (IHX). The outlet of the IHX is input to a three shaft horizontal Brayton Cycle power conversion system. The design constraint used in sizing the plant is based on a factory modularity principle which allows the plant to be assembled 'Lego' style instead of constructed piece by piece. This principle employs space frames which contain the power conversion system that permits the Lego-like modules to be shipped by truck or train to sites. This paper also describes the research that has been conducted at MIT since 1998 on fuel modeling, silver leakage from coated fuel particles, dynamic simulation, MCNP reactor physics modeling and air ingress analysis

  8. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  9. Validation of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound in predicting outcomes of antiangiogenic therapy for solid tumors: the French multicenter support for innovative and expensive techniques study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassau, Nathalie; Bonastre, Julia; Kind, Michèle; Vilgrain, Valérie; Lacroix, Joëlle; Cuinet, Marie; Taieb, Sophie; Aziza, Richard; Sarran, Antony; Labbe-Devilliers, Catherine; Gallix, Benoit; Lucidarme, Olivier; Ptak, Yvette; Rocher, Laurence; Caquot, Louis-Michel; Chagnon, Sophie; Marion, Denis; Luciani, Alain; Feutray, Sylvaine; Uzan-Augui, Joëlle; Coiffier, Benedicte; Benastou, Baya; Koscielny, Serge

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) has been used in single-center studies to evaluate tumor response to antiangiogenic treatments: the change of area under the perfusion curve (AUC), a criterion linked to blood volume, was consistently correlated with the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors response. The main objective here was to do a multicentric validation of the use of DCE-US to evaluate tumor response in different solid tumor types treated by several antiangiogenic agents. A secondary objective was to evaluate the costs of the procedure. This prospective study included patients from 2007 to 2010 in 19 centers (8 teaching hospitals and 11 comprehensive cancer centers). All patients treated with antiangiogenic therapy were eligible. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations were performed at baseline as well as on days 7, 15, 30, and 60. For each examination, a perfusion curve was recorded during 3 minutes after injection of a contrast agent. Change from baseline at each time point was estimated for each of 7 fitted criteria. The main end point was freedom from progression (FFP). Criterion/time-point combinations with the strongest correlation with FFP were analyzed further to estimate an optimal cutoff point. A total of 1968 DCE-US examinations in 539 patients were analyzed. The median follow-up was 1.65 years. Variations from baseline were significant at day 30 for several criteria, with AUC having the most significant association with FFP (P = 0.00002). Patients with a greater than 40% decrease in AUC at day 30 had better FFP (P = 0.005) and overall survival (P = 0.05). The mean cost of each DCE-US was 180&OV0556;, which corresponds to $250 using the current exchange rate. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a new functional imaging technique that provides a validated criterion, namely, the change of AUC from baseline to day 30, which is predictive of tumor progression in a large multicenter cohort. Because of its low cost, it

  10. Dynamic simulation of a circulating fluidized bed boiler system part II: Simulation of a boiler system operating in a power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Il; Choi, Sang Min; Yang, Jong In

    2016-01-01

    A case of dynamic performance simulation model of a CFB boiler is presented in this study. The dynamic system of a CFB boiler in an operating power plant and the transient behavior of sub-models is described in the accompanying paper, Part I. The current paper, Part II, describes the model extension for the CFB boiler system in a power plant. The open loop model in Paper I was expanded by applying a set of PID (Proportional-integral-differential) control loops. In the control loop, pressure, temperature, mass flow rate of the main steam, the drum water level and the oxygen level at the stack were controlled. Dynamic performance was simulated to check the response of the closed control loop. Finally, performance of the total boiler system for a range of operation load of the power plant was simulated, where the parameters were calculated and control variables were maintained at the set values by PID control. Dynamic performance of a boiler at a selected load variation case was simulated and compared with actual measurements and their transient response characteristics were discussed. The simulation can also directly produce useful operation parameters, which are not measurable, but could be used for engineering evaluation

  11. Dynamic simulation of a circulating fluidized bed boiler system part II: Simulation of a boiler system operating in a power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Il; Choi, Sang Min; Yang, Jong In [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    A case of dynamic performance simulation model of a CFB boiler is presented in this study. The dynamic system of a CFB boiler in an operating power plant and the transient behavior of sub-models is described in the accompanying paper, Part I. The current paper, Part II, describes the model extension for the CFB boiler system in a power plant. The open loop model in Paper I was expanded by applying a set of PID (Proportional-integral-differential) control loops. In the control loop, pressure, temperature, mass flow rate of the main steam, the drum water level and the oxygen level at the stack were controlled. Dynamic performance was simulated to check the response of the closed control loop. Finally, performance of the total boiler system for a range of operation load of the power plant was simulated, where the parameters were calculated and control variables were maintained at the set values by PID control. Dynamic performance of a boiler at a selected load variation case was simulated and compared with actual measurements and their transient response characteristics were discussed. The simulation can also directly produce useful operation parameters, which are not measurable, but could be used for engineering evaluation.

  12. Early Dynamic 68Ga-DOTA-D-Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide PET/CT in Patients With Hepatic Metastases of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sänger, Philipp Wilhelm; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Whole-body PET with Ga-DOTA-D-Phe-Tyr-octreotide (Ga-DOTATOC) and contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) are considered a standard for the staging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). This study sought to verify whether early dynamic (ed) Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT can reliably detect liver metastases of NETs (hypervascular, nonhypervascular; positive or negative for somatostatin receptors) and to verify if the receptor positivity has a significant impact on the detection of tumor hypervascularization. Twenty-seven patients with NET were studied by ceCT and standard whole-body PET according to established Ga-DOTATOC protocols. In addition, edPET data were obtained by continuous scanning during the first 300 seconds after bolus injections of the radiotracer. Early dynamic PET required an additional low-dose, native CT image of the liver for the purpose of attenuation correction. Time-activity and time-contrast curves were obtained, the latter being calculated by the difference between tumor and reference regions. Early dynamic PET/CT proved comparable with ceCT in readily identifying hypervascular lesions, irrespective of the receptor status, with activities rising within 16 to 40 seconds. Early dynamic PET/CT also readily identified nonhypervascular, receptor-positive lesions. Positive image contrasts were obtained for hypervascular, receptor-positive lesions, whereas early negative contrasts were obtained for nonhypervascular, receptor-negative lesions. The high image contrast of hypervascular NET metastases in early arterial phases suggests that edPET/CT can become a useful alternative in patients with contraindications to ceCT. The high density of somatostatin receptors did not seem to interfere with the detection of the lesion's hypervascularization.

  13. Light exposure at night disrupts host/cancer circadian regulatory dynamics: impact on the Warburg effect, lipid signaling and tumor growth prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Blask

    Full Text Available The central circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN plays an important role in temporally organizing and coordinating many of the processes governing cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth in synchrony with the daily light/dark cycle which may contribute to endogenous cancer prevention. Bioenergetic substrates and molecular intermediates required for building tumor biomass each day are derived from both aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect and lipid metabolism. Using tissue-isolated human breast cancer xenografts grown in nude rats, we determined that circulating systemic factors in the host and the Warburg effect, linoleic acid uptake/metabolism and growth signaling activities in the tumor are dynamically regulated, coordinated and integrated within circadian time structure over a 24-hour light/dark cycle by SCN-driven nocturnal pineal production of the anticancer hormone melatonin. Dim light at night (LAN-induced melatonin suppression disrupts this circadian-regulated host/cancer balance among several important cancer preventative signaling mechanisms, leading to hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia in the host and runaway aerobic glycolysis, lipid signaling and proliferative activity in the tumor.

  14. Highly dynamic biological seabed alterations revealed by side scan sonar tracking of Lanice conchilega beds offshore the island of Sylt (German Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, C.; Feldens, P.; Schwarzer, K.

    2017-06-01

    Hydroacoustic surveys are common tools for habitat investigation and monitoring that aid in the realisation of the aims of the EU Marine Directives. However, the creation of habitat maps is difficult, especially when benthic organisms densely populate the seafloor. This study assesses the sensitivity of entropy and homogeneity image texture parameters derived from backscatter strength data to benthic habitats dominated by the tubeworm Lanice conchilega. Side scan sonar backscatter surveys were carried out in 2010 and 2011 in the German Bight (southern North Sea) at two sites approx. 20 km offshore of the island of Sylt. Abiotic and biotic seabed facies, such as sorted bedforms, areas of fine to medium sand and L. conchilega beds with different tube densities, were identified and characterised based on manual expert analysis and image texture analysis. Ground truthing was performed by grab sampling and underwater video observations. Compared to the manual expert analysis, the k- means classification of image textures proves to be a semi-automated method to investigate small-scale differences in a biologically altered seabed from backscatter data. The texture parameters entropy and homogeneity appear linearly interrelated with tube density, the former positively and the latter negatively. Reinvestigation of one site after 1 year showed an extensive change in the distribution of the L. conchilega-altered seabed. Such marked annual fluctuations in L. conchilega tube cover demonstrate the need for dense time series and high spatial coverage to meaningfully monitor ecological patterns on the seafloor with acoustic backscatter methods in the study region and similar settings worldwide, particularly because the sand mason plays a pivotal role in promoting biodiversity. In this context, image texture analysis provides a cost-effective and reproducible method to track biologically altered seabeds from side scan sonar backscatter signatures.

  15. Dynamic contrast-enhanced case-control analysis in 3T MRI of prostate cancer can help to characterize tumor aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz-Requena, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.sanz@quironsalud.es [Biomedical Engineering, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); GIBI230, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Martí-Bonmatí, Luis [Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); GIBI230, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Pérez-Martínez, Rosario [Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); García-Martí, Gracián [Biomedical Engineering, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); GIBI230, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); CIBER-SAM, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Curve types showed no statistical association with healthy/tumor peripheral areas. • K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, upslope and AUC showed significant differences in controls vs. tumors. • The global diagnostic performance of standard MRI perfusion parameters is poor. • Normalized K{sup trans}, upslope and AUC had good diagnostic accuracy for tumor grading. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this work is to establish normality and tumor tissue ranges for perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR of the peripheral prostate at 3T and to compare the diagnostic performance of quantitative and semi-quantitative parameters. Materials and methods: Thirty-six patients with prostate carcinomas (18 Gleason-6, 15 Gleason-7, and 3 Gleason-8) and 33 healthy subjects were included. Image analysis workflow comprised four steps: manual segmentation of whole prostate and lesions, series registration, voxelwise T1 mapping and calculation of pharmacokinetic and semi-quantitative parameters. Results: K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, upslope and AUC60 showed statistically significant differences between healthy peripheral areas and tumors. Curve type showed no association with healthy/tumor peripheral areas (chi-square = 0.702). Areas under the ROC curves were 0.64 (95% CI: 0.54–0.75), 0.70 (0.60–0.80), 0.62 (0.51–0.72) and 0.63 (0.52–0.74) for K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, upslope and AUC60, respectively. The optimal cutoff values were: K{sup trans} = 0.21 min{sup −1} (sensitivity = 0.61, specificity = 0.64), v{sub e} = 0.36 (0.63, 0.71), upslope = 0.59 (0.59, 0.59) and AUC60 = 2.4 (0.63, 0.64). Significant differences were found between Gleason scores 6 and 7 for normalized K{sup trans}, upslope and AUC60, with good diagnostic accuracy (area under ROC curve 0.80, 95% CI: 0.60–1.00). Conclusion: Quantitative (K{sup trans} and v{sub e}) and semi-quantitative (upslope and AUC60) perfusion parameters showed significant differences between tumors and control

  16. Estimation of error in maximal intensity projection-based internal target volume of lung tumors: a simulation and comparison study using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Read, Paul W; Baisden, Joseph M; Larner, James M; Benedict, Stanley H; Sheng, Ke

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)-based lung tumor internal target volume determination using a simulation method based on dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI). Eight healthy volunteers and six lung tumor patients underwent a 5-min MRI scan in the sagittal plane to acquire dynamic images of lung motion. A MATLAB program was written to generate re-sorted dMRI using 4D-CT acquisition methods (RedCAM) by segmenting and rebinning the MRI scans. The maximal intensity projection images were generated from RedCAM and dMRI, and the errors in the MIP-based internal target area (ITA) from RedCAM (epsilon), compared with those from dMRI, were determined and correlated with the subjects' respiratory variability (nu). Maximal intensity projection-based ITAs from RedCAM were comparatively smaller than those from dMRI in both phantom studies (epsilon = -21.64% +/- 8.23%) and lung tumor patient studies (epsilon = -20.31% +/- 11.36%). The errors in MIP-based ITA from RedCAM correlated linearly (epsilon = -5.13nu - 6.71, r(2) = 0.76) with the subjects' respiratory variability. Because of the low temporal resolution and retrospective re-sorting, 4D-CT might not accurately depict the excursion of a moving tumor. Using a 4D-CT MIP image to define the internal target volume might therefore cause underdosing and an increased risk of subsequent treatment failure. Patient-specific respiratory variability might also be a useful predictor of the 4D-CT-induced error in MIP-based internal target volume determination.

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using a macromolecular MR contrast agent (P792): Evaluation of antivascular drug effect in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Sun [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Jeong Min; Woo, Sung Min; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Il [Dept. of Radiology, Sheikh Khalifa Specialty Hospital, Ras Al Khaimah (United Arab Emirates); Choi, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using macromolecular contrast agent (P792) for assessment of vascular disrupting drug effect in rabbit VX2 liver tumor models. This study was approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. DCE-MRI was performed with 3-T scanner in 13 VX2 liver tumor-bearing rabbits, before, 4 hours after, and 24 hours after administration of vascular disrupting agent (VDA), using gadomelitol (P792, n = 7) or low molecular weight contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine [Gd-DOTA], n = 6). P792 was injected at a of dose 0.05 mmol/kg, while that of Gd-DOTA was 0.2 mmol/kg. DCE-MRI parameters including volume transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve until 60 seconds (iAUC) of tumors were compared between the 2 groups at each time point. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with tumor histopathology. Reproducibility in measurement of DCE-MRI parameters and image quality of source MR were compared between groups. P792 group showed a more prominent decrease in Ktrans and iAUC at 4 hours and 24 hours, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Changes in DCE-MRI parameters showed a weak correlation with histologic parameters (necrotic fraction and microvessel density) in both groups. Reproducibility of DCE-MRI parameters and overall image quality was not significantly better in the P792 group, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a macromolecular contrast agent shows changes of hepatic perfusion more clearly after administration of the VDA. Gadolinium was required at smaller doses than a low molecular contrast agent.

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using a macromolecular MR contrast agent (P792): Evaluation of antivascular drug effect in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Sun; Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Jeong Min; Woo, Sung Min; Choi, Byung Ihn; Kim, Young Il; Choi, Jin Young

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using macromolecular contrast agent (P792) for assessment of vascular disrupting drug effect in rabbit VX2 liver tumor models. This study was approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. DCE-MRI was performed with 3-T scanner in 13 VX2 liver tumor-bearing rabbits, before, 4 hours after, and 24 hours after administration of vascular disrupting agent (VDA), using gadomelitol (P792, n = 7) or low molecular weight contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine [Gd-DOTA], n = 6). P792 was injected at a of dose 0.05 mmol/kg, while that of Gd-DOTA was 0.2 mmol/kg. DCE-MRI parameters including volume transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve until 60 seconds (iAUC) of tumors were compared between the 2 groups at each time point. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with tumor histopathology. Reproducibility in measurement of DCE-MRI parameters and image quality of source MR were compared between groups. P792 group showed a more prominent decrease in Ktrans and iAUC at 4 hours and 24 hours, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Changes in DCE-MRI parameters showed a weak correlation with histologic parameters (necrotic fraction and microvessel density) in both groups. Reproducibility of DCE-MRI parameters and overall image quality was not significantly better in the P792 group, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a macromolecular contrast agent shows changes of hepatic perfusion more clearly after administration of the VDA. Gadolinium was required at smaller doses than a low molecular contrast agent

  19. Ultrasonic three-dimensional on-chip cell culture for dynamic studies of tumor immune surveillance by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakou, Athanasia E; Ohlin, Mathias; Önfelt, Björn; Wiklund, Martin

    2015-08-07

    We demonstrate a simple method for three-dimensional (3D) cell culture controlled by ultrasonic standing waves in a multi-well microplate. The method gently arranges cells in a suspension into a single aggregate in each well of the microplate and, by this, nucleates 3D tissue-like cell growth for culture times between two and seven days. The microplate device is compatible with both high-resolution optical microscopy and maintenance in a standard cell incubator. The result is a scaffold- and coating-free method for 3D cell culture that can be used for controlling the cellular architecture, as well as the cellular and molecular composition of the microenvironment in and around the formed cell structures. We demonstrate the parallel production of one hundred synthetic 3D solid tumors comprising up to thousands of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells, we characterize the tumor structure by high-resolution optical microscopy, and we monitor the functional behavior of natural killer (NK) cells migrating, docking and interacting with the tumor model during culture. Our results show that the method can be used for determining the collective ability of a given number of NK cells to defeat a solid tumor having a certain size, shape and composition. The ultrasound-based method itself is generic and can meet any demand from applications where it is advantageous to monitor cell culture from production to analysis of 3D tissue or tumor models using microscopy in one single microplate device.

  20. Astronomical cycle origin of bedded chert: A middle Triassic bedded chert sequence, Inuyama, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masayuki; Tada, Ryuji; Sakuma, Hironobu

    2010-09-01

    Astronomical forcing is one of the main drivers of climate change, and astronomical cyclicity recorded in sediments provides a clue to understand the dynamics of the global climate system. Bedded cherts consist of rhythmic alternations of chert and shale beds. Although previous studies have hypothesized that the origin of bedded chert is related to astronomical cycles (e.g. Fischer, 1976; Hori et al., 1993), conclusive proof remains elusive. To explore this possibility, we established a continuous, high-resolution lithostratigraphy of middle Triassic bedded chert in Central Japan. The average duration of each chert-shale couplet is 20 kyr, similar to that of the precession cycle. Spectral analysis of a bed number series of thickness variations in chert beds was performed assuming that each chert-shale couplet represents a 20-kyr precession cycle. The results reveal cycles involving approximately 200, 20, 5, and 2-3 beds, corresponding to periodicities of approximately 4000, 400, 100, and 40-60 kyr, respectively. By further assuming that the 20-bed cycle represents a 405-kyr eccentricity cycle of constant and stable periodicity, we converted the bed number series to a time series. Spectral analysis of the time series revealed distinct periodicities of 3600, 117, 97, and 38 kyr, in addition to 405 kyr. Besides 3600 kyr, these periodicities agree well with the 120, 95, and 37 kyr periodicities for eccentricity cycles and the obliquity cycle during the Triassic. Moreover, we detected amplitude modulation of the approximately 100-kyr cycle of thickness variations in chert beds with a 405-kyr periodicity, which may correspond to amplitude modulation of 100-kyr climatic precession cycle with the 405-kyr periodicity. The approximately 3600-kyr periodicity described above and 1800-kyr periodicity manifested as the amplitude modulation of the 405-kyr cycle are correlated to present-day long-term eccentricity cycles of 2400 and 4800 kyr evolved by chaotic behavior of solar

  1. Utility of bolus dynamic CT for the detection of hypervascular malignant hepatic tumors. Mainly referring to the comparison with delayed phase contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiromichi; Abe, Kimihiko; Freeny, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    In order to analyze the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, 84 patients who had hepatocellular carcinoma or suspected hypervascular metastases were studied with conventional incremental dynamic CT (CID-CT) or double helical CT (DH-CT). Delayed phase contrast-enhanced CT studies were consecutively performed in all patients. Thirty-six of 84 patients had malignant hepatic neoplasms; six had hepatocellular carcinoma and 30 had metastatic tumors. At first, the detectability of hepatic lesions was evaluated with bolus dynamic CT and delayed phase CT. Dynamic CT has detected more lesions than delayed CT. Some hepatic lesions described as isodensity were missed on CID-CT. Therefore, delayed phase CT cannot be eliminated when CID-CT is performed. Secondly, hepatic lesion detectability with CID-CT was compared with that of DH-CT. DH-CT did not miss the hepatic lesions picked up by delayed phase CT and was expected to provide excellent detectability of hypervascular hepatic neoplasms. In addition, first helical CT showed most hepatic lesions as areas of obvious hyperdensity, while CID-CT did not show their correct vascularities. So-called hypervascular hepatic tumors, however, were not always hypervascular and were demonstrated as areas of iso-hypodensity even on initial helical scanning. Second helical CT was useful to detect these so-called hypervascular, but actually hypovascular lesions. In conclusion, dynamic CT was helpful in detecting hypervascular hepatic malignant neoplasms, and DH-CT was more accurate than-CID-CT for the detection of hepatic lesions and the evaluation of vascular lesion. (author)

  2. Pebble-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohnert, G.; Mueller-Frank, U.; Heil, J.

    1976-01-01

    A pebble-bed nuclear reactor of large power rating comprises a container having a funnel-shaped bottom forming a pebble run-out having a centrally positioned outlet. A bed of downwardly-flowing substantially spherical nuclear fuel pebbles is positioned in the container and forms a reactive nuclear core maintained by feeding unused pebbles to the bed's top surface while used or burned-out pebbles run out and discharge through the outlet. A substantially conical body with its apex pointing upwardly and its periphery spaced from the periphery of the container spreads the bottom of the bed outwardly to provide an annular flow down the funnel-shaped bottom forming the runout, to the discharge outlet. This provides a largely constant downward velocity of the spheres throughout the diameter of the bed throughout a substantial portion of the down travel, so that all spheres reach about the same burned-out condition when they leave the core, after a single pass through the core area

  3. Fluidised bed heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, D.E.; Healey, E.M.; Roberts, A.G.

    1974-01-01

    Problems that have arisen during the initial stages of development of fluidised bed boilers in which heat transfer surfaces are immersed in fluidised solids are discussed. The very high heat transfer coefficients that are obtained under these conditions can be exploited to reduce the total heat transfer surface to a fraction of that in normal boilers. However, with the high heat flux levels involved, tube stressing becomes more important and it is advantageous to use smaller diameter tubes. One of the initial problems was that the pumping power absorbed by the fluidised bed appeared to be high. The relative influence of the fluidising velocity (and the corresponding bed area), tube diameter, tube spacing, heat transfer coefficient and bed temperature on pumping power and overall cost was determined. This showed the importance of close tube packing and research was undertaken to see if this would adversely affect the heat transfer coefficient. Pressure operation also reduces the pumping power. Fouling and corrosion tests in beds burning coal suggest that higher temperatures could be reached reliably and cost studies show that, provided the better refractory metals are used, the cost of achieving higher temperatures is not unduly high. It now remains to demonstrate at large scale that the proposed systems are viable and that the methods incorporated to overcome start up and part lead running problems are satisfactory. The promising role of these heat transfer techniques in other applications is briefly discussed

  4. Utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for differentiating glioblastoma, primary central nervous system lymphoma and brain metastatic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shanshan, E-mail: lushan1118@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Gao, Qianqian, E-mail: gaoqian123011@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Yu, Jing, E-mail: yujing0303@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Yang, E-mail: yuhao040511@163.com [Department of Pathology,The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Cao, Peng, E-mail: peng.cao@ge.com [GE healthcare, Shanghai (China); Shi, Haibin, E-mail: hbshi346@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Hong, Xunning, E-mail: hongxunning@sina.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: The study aimed to investigate the use of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived permeability parameters for the differentiation of glioblastoma multiformes (GBMs), primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs), and brain metastatic tumors (MTs). Materials and methods: Seventy-five patients with histopathologically confirmed GBMs (n = 38), PCNSLs (n = 16) and MTs (n = 21) underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRIs before surgery. The volume transfer constant K{sup trans}, the flux rate constant between extravascular extracellular space and plasma K{sub ep}, the extravascular extracellular volume V{sub e} and the fractional plasma volume V{sub p} were measured within the entire contrast-enhancing tumor by extended Tofts model. A one-way analysis of variance was used to compare all of the parameters among these three tumors, followed by the post-hoc test. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the permeability parameters. Results: Mean K{sup trans} value and V{sub e} value were significantly higher in PCNSLs than in GBMs (P < 0.001 and P = 0.011) and MTs (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in all of the permeability parameters between GBMs and MTs. According to the receiver operating characteristic analyses, both K{sup trans} and V{sub e} had good diagnostic performance for discriminating between PCNSLs and GBMs (the area under the curve: 0.847 and 0.785, respectively), as well as between PCNSLs and MTs (the area under the curve: 0.851 and 0.884, respectively). Conclusions: The K{sup trans} and V{sub e} derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI facilitate the differentiation of PCNSLs from GBMs and MTs.

  5. Assessment of MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the differential diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaumi, Jun-ichi; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Konouchi, Hironobu; Hisatomi, Miki; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Shigehara, Hiroshi; Kishi, Kanji

    2004-01-01

    The radiographical differentiation of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) from dentigerous cysts, calcifying odontogenic cysts, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors, odontogenic keratocysts and amelobastomas is sometimes difficult. We attempted to differentiate AOT from other lesions similar to AOT in radiographic findings using MRI. The MRI features of AOT in our three cases included homogeneous low SI in the cystic portion and homogeneous intermediate SI in the solid portion on T1WI, homogeneous high SI in the cystic portion and intermediate to slightly high SI in the solid portion on T2WI and enhancement of only the solid portion on CE-T1WI although none of the sequences included SI of calcifications. The contrast index curves in the three cases of AOT showed a gradual increase to 300 s, which signified a benign tumor. These MRI features were characteristic features of AOT and might be a basis for differentiating AOT from the above possible lesions in radiographic examinations

  6. Predicting tumor hypoxia in non-small cell lung cancer by combining CT, FDG PET and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Aniek J G; Reymen, Bart; La Fontaine, Matthew D; Das, Marco; Jochems, Arthur; Mottaghy, Felix M; Belderbos, José S A; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Philippe; van Elmpt, Wouter

    2017-11-01

    Most solid tumors contain inadequately oxygenated (i.e., hypoxic) regions, which tend to be more aggressive and treatment resistant. Hypoxia PET allows visualization of hypoxia and may enable treatment adaptation. However, hypoxia PET imaging is expensive, time-consuming and not widely available. We aimed to predict hypoxia levels in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using more easily available imaging modalities: FDG-PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT). For 34 NSCLC patients, included in two clinical trials, hypoxia HX4-PET/CT, planning FDG-PET/CT and DCE-CT scans were acquired before radiotherapy. Scans were non-rigidly registered to the planning CT. Tumor blood flow (BF) and blood volume (BV) were calculated by kinetic analysis of DCE-CT images. Within the gross tumor volume, independent clusters, i.e., supervoxels, were created based on FDG-PET/CT. For each supervoxel, tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated (median SUV/aorta SUV mean ) for HX4-PET/CT and supervoxel features (median, SD, entropy) for the other modalities. Two random forest models (cross-validated: 10 folds, five repeats) were trained to predict the hypoxia TBR; one based on CT, FDG, BF and BV, and one with only CT and FDG features. Patients were split in a training (trial NCT01024829) and independent test set (trial NCT01210378). For each patient, predicted, and observed hypoxic volumes (HV) (TBR > 1.2) were compared. Fifteen patients (3291 supervoxels) were used for training and 19 patients (1502 supervoxels) for testing. The model with all features (RMSE training: 0.19 ± 0.01, test: 0.27) outperformed the model with only CT and FDG-PET features (RMSE training: 0.20 ± 0.01, test: 0.29). All tumors of the test set were correctly classified as normoxic or hypoxic (HV > 1 cm 3 ) by the best performing model. We created a data-driven methodology to predict hypoxia levels and hypoxia spatial patterns using CT, FDG-PET and DCE-CT features in NSCLC. The

  7. in Spouted Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw Buczek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of active coke, fresh and spent after cleaning flue gases from communal waste incinerators, were investigated. The outer layers of both coke particles were separately removed by comminution in a spouted bed. The samples of both active cokes were analysed by means of densities, mercury porosimetry, and adsorption technique. Remaining cores were examined to determine the degree of consumption of coke by the sorption of hazardous emissions (SO2, HCl, and heavy metals through its bed. Differences in contamination levels within the porous structure of the particles were estimated. The study demonstrated the effectiveness of commercial active coke in the cleaning of flue gases.

  8. The Safety of Hospital Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Pierre; Pooler, Charlotte; Merryweather, Andrew; Doig, Alexa K.; Bloswick, Donald

    2015-01-01

    To explore the safety of the standard and the low hospital bed, we report on a microanalysis of 15 patients’ ability to ingress, move about the bed, and egress. The 15 participants were purposefully selected with various disabilities. Bed conditions were randomized with side rails up or down and one low bed with side rails down. We explored the patients’ use of the side rails, bed height, ability to lift their legs onto the mattress, and ability to turn, egress, and walk back to the chair. The standard bed was too high for some participants, both for ingress and egress. Side rails were used by most participants when entering, turning in bed, and exiting. We recommend that side rails be reconsidered as a means to facilitate in-bed movement, ingress, and egress. Furthermore, single deck height settings for all patients are not optimal. Low beds as a safety measure must be re-evaluated. PMID:28462302

  9. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unni, K.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on bone tumors. Topics covered include: Bone tumor imaging: Contribution of CT and MRI, staging of bone tumors, perind cell tumors of bone, and metastatic bone disease

  10. Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmat, A.G.; Patel, J.G.

    1987-05-12

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance. 2 figs.

  11. Development of a video image-based QA system for the positional accuracy of dynamic tumor tracking irradiation in the Vero4DRT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebe, Kazuyu, E-mail: nrr24490@nifty.com; Tokuyama, Katsuichi; Baba, Ryuta; Ogihara, Yoshisada; Ichikawa, Kosuke; Toyama, Joji [Joetsu General Hospital, 616 Daido-Fukuda, Joetsu-shi, Niigata 943-8507 (Japan); Sugimoto, Satoru [Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Utsunomiya, Satoru; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Hidefumi [Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Court, Laurence [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new video image-based QA system, including in-house software, that can display a tracking state visually and quantify the positional accuracy of dynamic tumor tracking irradiation in the Vero4DRT system. Methods: Sixteen trajectories in six patients with pulmonary cancer were obtained with the ExacTrac in the Vero4DRT system. Motion data in the cranio–caudal direction (Y direction) were used as the input for a programmable motion table (Quasar). A target phantom was placed on the motion table, which was placed on the 2D ionization chamber array (MatriXX). Then, the 4D modeling procedure was performed on the target phantom during a reproduction of the patient’s tumor motion. A substitute target with the patient’s tumor motion was irradiated with 6-MV x-rays under the surrogate infrared system. The 2D dose images obtained from the MatriXX (33 frames/s; 40 s) were exported to in-house video-image analyzing software. The absolute differences in the Y direction between the center of the exposed target and the center of the exposed field were calculated. Positional errors were observed. The authors’ QA results were compared to 4D modeling function errors and gimbal motion errors obtained from log analyses in the ExacTrac to verify the accuracy of their QA system. The patients’ tumor motions were evaluated in the wave forms, and the peak-to-peak distances were also measured to verify their reproducibility. Results: Thirteen of sixteen trajectories (81.3%) were successfully reproduced with Quasar. The peak-to-peak distances ranged from 2.7 to 29.0 mm. Three trajectories (18.7%) were not successfully reproduced due to the limited motions of the Quasar. Thus, 13 of 16 trajectories were summarized. The mean number of video images used for analysis was 1156. The positional errors (absolute mean difference + 2 standard deviation) ranged from 0.54 to 1.55 mm. The error values differed by less than 1 mm from 4D modeling function errors

  12. Development of a video image-based QA system for the positional accuracy of dynamic tumor tracking irradiation in the Vero4DRT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebe, Kazuyu; Tokuyama, Katsuichi; Baba, Ryuta; Ogihara, Yoshisada; Ichikawa, Kosuke; Toyama, Joji; Sugimoto, Satoru; Utsunomiya, Satoru; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Court, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new video image-based QA system, including in-house software, that can display a tracking state visually and quantify the positional accuracy of dynamic tumor tracking irradiation in the Vero4DRT system. Methods: Sixteen trajectories in six patients with pulmonary cancer were obtained with the ExacTrac in the Vero4DRT system. Motion data in the cranio–caudal direction (Y direction) were used as the input for a programmable motion table (Quasar). A target phantom was placed on the motion table, which was placed on the 2D ionization chamber array (MatriXX). Then, the 4D modeling procedure was performed on the target phantom during a reproduction of the patient’s tumor motion. A substitute target with the patient’s tumor motion was irradiated with 6-MV x-rays under the surrogate infrared system. The 2D dose images obtained from the MatriXX (33 frames/s; 40 s) were exported to in-house video-image analyzing software. The absolute differences in the Y direction between the center of the exposed target and the center of the exposed field were calculated. Positional errors were observed. The authors’ QA results were compared to 4D modeling function errors and gimbal motion errors obtained from log analyses in the ExacTrac to verify the accuracy of their QA system. The patients’ tumor motions were evaluated in the wave forms, and the peak-to-peak distances were also measured to verify their reproducibility. Results: Thirteen of sixteen trajectories (81.3%) were successfully reproduced with Quasar. The peak-to-peak distances ranged from 2.7 to 29.0 mm. Three trajectories (18.7%) were not successfully reproduced due to the limited motions of the Quasar. Thus, 13 of 16 trajectories were summarized. The mean number of video images used for analysis was 1156. The positional errors (absolute mean difference + 2 standard deviation) ranged from 0.54 to 1.55 mm. The error values differed by less than 1 mm from 4D modeling function errors

  13. Fluidized bed calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    A unique way to convert radioactive scrap into useful nuclear fuel products was developed for the Department of Energy at Hanford. An advanced, fluidized bed calciner is used to convert metallic nitrate scrap or waste solutions into benign, solid and gaseous products. There are broad potential applications of this concept beyond those in the nuclear industry

  14. Nail Bed Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Nail Bed Injuries Email to a friend * required ...

  15. Bed Bug Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn the truth about bed bugs, such as how easy they are to see with the naked eye, their preferred habitat, whether they transmit diseases, their public health effects, and whether pesticides are the best way to deal with an infestation.

  16. Tumor Delineation and Quantitative Assessment of Glucose Metabolic Rate within Histologic Subtypes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by Using Dynamic 18F Fluorodeoxyglucose PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Tineke W H; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Visser, Eric P; Oyen, Wim J G; Looijen-Salamon, Monika G; Visvikis, Dimitris; Verhagen, Ad F T M; Bussink, Johan; Vriens, Dennis

    2017-05-01

    Purpose To assess whether dynamic fluorine 18 ( 18 F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has added value over static 18 F-FDG PET for tumor delineation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) radiation therapy planning by using pathology volumes as the reference standard and to compare pharmacokinetic rate constants of 18 F-FDG metabolism, including regional variation, between NSCLC histologic subtypes. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the institutional review board. Patients gave written informed consent. In this prospective observational study, 1-hour dynamic 18 F-FDG PET/computed tomographic examinations were performed in 35 patients (36 resectable NSCLCs) between 2009 and 2014. Static and parametric images of glucose metabolic rate were obtained to determine lesion volumes by using three delineation strategies. Pathology volume was calculated from three orthogonal dimensions (n = 32). Whole tumor and regional rate constants and blood volume fraction (V B ) were computed by using compartment modeling. Results Pathology volumes were larger than PET volumes (median difference, 8.7-25.2 cm 3 ; Wilcoxon signed rank test, P PET images is in best agreement with pathology volume and could be useful for NSCLC autocontouring. Differences in glycolytic rate and V B between SCC and AC are relevant for research in targeting agents and radiation therapy dose escalation. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  17. Dynamic tumor modeling of the dose–response relationship for everolimus in metastatic renal cell carcinoma using data from the phase 3 RECORD-1 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, Andrew; Wang, Wenping; Carter, Alison A; Chiparus, Ovidiu; Hollaender, Norbert; Kim, Hyewon; Motzer, Robert J; Sarr, Celine

    2012-01-01

    The phase 3 RECORD-1 trial (NCT00410124) established the efficacy and safety of everolimus in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) who progress on sunitinib or sorafenib. In RECORD-1, patients received 10 mg everolimus daily, with dose reduction to 5 mg daily allowed for toxicity. We have developed a model of tumor growth dynamics utilizing serial measurements of the sum of the longest tumor diameters (SLD) from individual RECORD-1 patients to define the dose–response relationship of everolimus. The model predicts that after 1 year of continuous dosing, the change in SLD of target lesions will be +142.1% ± 98.3%, +22.4% ± 17.2%, and –15.7% ± 11.5% in the average patient treated with placebo, 5 mg everolimus, and 10 mg everolimus, respectively. This nonlinear, mixed-effects modeling approach can be used to describe the dynamics of each individual patient, as well as the overall population. This allows evaluation of how an actual dosing history and individual covariates impact on the observed drug effect, and offers the possibility of predicting clinical observations as a function of time. In this pharmacodynamic model of tumor response, everolimus more effectively shrinks target lesions in mRCC when dosed 10 mg daily versus 5 mg daily, although a 5-mg dose still shows an antitumor effect. These data support earlier studies that established 10 mg daily as the preferred clinical dose of everolimus, and improve our understanding of the everolimus dose–response relationship

  18. 7 CFR 2902.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels. (a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that... minimum biobased content is 12 percent and shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in..., and silk are not qualifying biobased feedstocks for the purpose of determining the biobased content of...

  19. VA National Bed Control System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA National Bed Control System records the levels of operating, unavailable and authorized beds at each VAMC, and it tracks requests for changes in these levels....

  20. Getting Rid of Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Directory Planning, Budget and Results Jobs and Internships Headquarters Offices Regional Offices Labs and Research Centers Bed ... to be careful in how you select a company. Related Information Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs - highlights ...

  1. Geomechanics of bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serata, S.; Milnor, S.W.

    1979-01-01

    Creep data from the literature search is reinterpreted by SGI, resulting in a better understanding of the temperature and stress state dependence of the octahedral creep rate and the octahedral shear strength. The concept of a transition strength between the elastic and the plastic states is in agreement with the data. The elastic and rheological properties of salt are described, and a set of constitutive equations is presented. The dependence of material properties on parameters such as temperature is considered. Findings on the permeability of salt are summarized, and the in-situ behavior of openings in bedded salt is described based on extensive engineering experience. A stress measuring system utilizing a finite element computer code is discussed. Geological factors affecting the stability of salt openings are considered, and the Stress Control Technique for designing stable openings in bedded salt formations is explained

  2. Erucin, the major isothiocyanate in arugula (Eruca sativa, inhibits proliferation of MCF7 tumor cells by suppressing microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Azarenko

    Full Text Available Consumption of cruciferous vegetables is associated with reduced risk of various types of cancer. Isothiocyanates including sulforaphane and erucin are believed to be responsible for this activity. Erucin [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylthiobutane], which is metabolically and structurally related to sulforaphane, is present in large quantities in arugula (Eruca sativa, Mill., kohlrabi and Chinese cabbage. However, its cancer preventive mechanisms remain poorly understood. We found that erucin inhibits proliferation of MCF7 breast cancer cells (IC50 = 28 µM in parallel with cell cycle arrest at mitosis (IC50 = 13 µM and apoptosis, by a mechanism consistent with impairment of microtubule dynamics. Concentrations of 5-15 µM erucin suppressed the dynamic instability of microtubules during interphase in the cells. Most dynamic instability parameters were inhibited, including the rates and extents of growing and shortening, the switching frequencies between growing and shortening, and the overall dynamicity. Much higher erucin concentrations were required to reduce the microtubule polymer mass. In addition, erucin suppressed dynamic instability of microtubules reassembled from purified tubulin in similar fashion. The effects of erucin on microtubule dynamics, like those of sulforaphane, are similar qualitatively to those of much more powerful clinically-used microtubule-targeting anticancer drugs, including taxanes and the vinca alkaloids. The results suggest that suppression of microtubule dynamics by erucin and the resulting impairment of critically important microtubule-dependent cell functions such as mitosis, cell migration and microtubule-based transport may be important in its cancer preventive activities.

  3. Discriminating between benign and malignant breast tumors using 3D convolutional neural network in dynamic contrast enhanced-MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Li, Lihua

    2017-03-01

    Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are the state-of-the-art deep learning network architectures that can be used in a range of applications, including computer vision and medical image analysis. It exhibits a powerful representation learning mechanism with an automated design to learn features directly from the data. However, the common 2D CNNs only use the two dimension spatial information without evaluating the correlation between the adjoin slices. In this study, we established a method of 3D CNNs to discriminate between malignant and benign breast tumors. To this end, 143 patients were enrolled which include 66 benign and 77 malignant instances. The MRI images were pre-processed for noise reduction and breast tumor region segmentation. Data augmentation by spatial translating, rotating and vertical and horizontal flipping is applied to the cases to reduce possible over-fitting. A region-of-interest (ROI) and a volume-of-interest (VOI) were segmented in 2D and 3D DCE-MRI, respectively. The enhancement ratio for each MR series was calculated for the 2D and 3D images. The results for the enhancement ratio images in the two series are integrated for classification. The results of the area under the ROC curve(AUC) values are 0.739 and 0.801 for 2D and 3D methods, respectively. The results for 3D CNN which combined 5 slices for each enhancement ratio images achieved a high accuracy(Acc), sensitivity(Sens) and specificity(Spec) of 0.781, 0.744 and 0.823, respectively. This study indicates that 3D CNN deep learning methods can be a promising technology for breast tumor classification without manual feature extraction.

  4. Differentiating Tumor Progression from Pseudoprogression in Patients with Glioblastomas Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Martinez-Lage, M; Sakai, Y; Chawla, S; Kim, S G; Alonso-Basanta, M; Lustig, R A; Brem, S; Mohan, S; Wolf, R L; Desai, A; Poptani, H

    2016-01-01

    Early assessment of treatment response is critical in patients with glioblastomas. A combination of DTI and DSC perfusion imaging parameters was evaluated to distinguish glioblastomas with true progression from mixed response and pseudoprogression. Forty-one patients with glioblastomas exhibiting enhancing lesions within 6 months after completion of chemoradiation therapy were retrospectively studied. All patients underwent surgery after MR imaging and were histologically classified as having true progression (>75% tumor), mixed response (25%-75% tumor), or pseudoprogression (<25% tumor). Mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, linear anisotropy coefficient, planar anisotropy coefficient, spheric anisotropy coefficient, and maximum relative cerebral blood volume values were measured from the enhancing tissue. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the best model for classification of true progression from mixed response or pseudoprogression. Significantly elevated maximum relative cerebral blood volume, fractional anisotropy, linear anisotropy coefficient, and planar anisotropy coefficient and decreased spheric anisotropy coefficient were observed in true progression compared with pseudoprogression (P < .05). There were also significant differences in maximum relative cerebral blood volume, fractional anisotropy, planar anisotropy coefficient, and spheric anisotropy coefficient measurements between mixed response and true progression groups. The best model to distinguish true progression from non-true progression (pseudoprogression and mixed) consisted of fractional anisotropy, linear anisotropy coefficient, and maximum relative cerebral blood volume, resulting in an area under the curve of 0.905. This model also differentiated true progression from mixed response with an area under the curve of 0.901. A combination of fractional anisotropy and maximum relative cerebral blood volume differentiated pseudoprogression from

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluates the early response of human head and neck tumor xenografts following anti-EMMPRIN therapy with cisplatin or irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunki; Hartman, Yolanda E; Zhai, Guihua; Chung, Thomas K; Korb, Melissa L; Beasley, Timothy M; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2015-10-01

    To assess the early therapeutic effects of anti-EMMPRIN (extracellular matrix metalloprotease inducer) antibody with/without cisplatin or X-ray radiation in head and neck cancer mouse models using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Mice bearing SCC1 (or OSC19) tumor xenografts were treated with anti-EMMPRIN antibody, radiation, cisplatin, or anti-EMMPRIN antibody plus cisplatin (or radiation) for a week (n = 4-5 per group). DCE-MRI was carried out on a 9.4T small animal MR scanner on days 0, 3, and 7, and K(trans) values were averaged in a 0.5-mm-thick peripheral tumor region. Ki67 and CD31 staining were implemented for all tumors after imaging. The K(trans) changes of SCC1 and OSC19 tumors treated with anti-EMMPRIN antibody for 3 days were -18 ± 8% and 4 ± 7%, respectively, which were significantly lower than those of control groups (39 ± 5% and 45 ± 7%; P = 0.0025 and 0.0220, respectively). When cisplatin was added, those were -42 ± 9% and -44 ± 9%, respectively, and with radiation, -45 ± 9% and -27 ± 10%, respectively, which were also significantly lower than those of control groups (P EMMPRIN antibody with/without cisplatin or radiation, the mean K(trans) change for 3 days was significantly correlated with the mean tumor volume change for 7 days (r = 0.74, P = 0.0346), Ki67-expressing cell density (r = 0.96, P = 0.0001), and CD31 density (r = 0.84, P = 0.0084). DCE-MRI might be utilized to assess the early therapeutic effects of anti-EMMPRIN antibody with/without chemotherapy or radiotherapy in head and neck cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Bedding material affects mechanical thresholds, heat thresholds and texture preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehring, Francie; O’Hara, Crystal L.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that the bedding type animals are housed on can affect breeding behavior and cage environment. Yet little is known about its effects on evoked behavior responses or non-reflexive behaviors. C57BL/6 mice were housed for two weeks on one of five bedding types: Aspen Sani Chips® (standard bedding for our institute), ALPHA-Dri®, Cellu-Dri™, Pure-o’Cel™ or TEK-Fresh. Mice housed on Aspen exhibited the lowest (most sensitive) mechanical thresholds while those on TEK-Fresh exhibited 3-fold higher thresholds. While bedding type had no effect on responses to punctate or dynamic light touch stimuli, TEK-Fresh housed animals exhibited greater responsiveness in a noxious needle assay, than those housed on the other bedding types. Heat sensitivity was also affected by bedding as animals housed on Aspen exhibited the shortest (most sensitive) latencies to withdrawal whereas those housed on TEK-Fresh had the longest (least sensitive) latencies to response. Slight differences between bedding types were also seen in a moderate cold temperature preference assay. A modified tactile conditioned place preference chamber assay revealed that animals preferred TEK-Fresh to Aspen bedding. Bedding type had no effect in a non-reflexive wheel running assay. In both acute (two day) and chronic (5 week) inflammation induced by injection of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant in the hindpaw, mechanical thresholds were reduced in all groups regardless of bedding type, but TEK-Fresh and Pure-o’Cel™ groups exhibited a greater dynamic range between controls and inflamed cohorts than Aspen housed mice. PMID:26456764

  7. CFD analysis of hydrodynamic studies of a bubbling fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. J. M.; Rao, K. V. N. S.; Ranga Janardhana, G.

    2018-03-01

    Fluidization velocity is one of the most important parameter to characterize the hydrodynamic studies of fluidized bed asit determines different flow regimes. Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations are carriedfor a cylindrical bubbling fluidized bed with a static bed height 1m with 0.150m diameter of gasification chamber. The parameter investigated is fluidization velocity in range of 0.05m/s to 0.7m/s. Sand with density 2600kg/m3 and with a constant particle diameter of sand 385μm is employed for all the simulations. Simulations are conducted using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics software, ANSYS-FLUENT.The bubbling flow regime is appeared above the air inlet velocity of 0.2m/s. Bubbling character is increased with increase in inlet air velocities indicated by asymmetrical fluctuations of volume fractions in radial directions at different bed heights

  8. Intercomparison of two dynamic treatment techniques, ring scan and spot scan, for head and neck tumors with the Piotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, M.; Blattmann, H.; Pedroni, E.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation of the ring scan and the spot scan was made for the pion irradiation of head and neck tumors with the Piotron. For the geometry of the Piotron, with its 60 radially converging beams, two scanning techniques have been developed, ring scan and spot scan. They have different characteristics concerning achievable dose distributions and sensitivity to tissue inhomogenities. The optimized 3-dimensional dose distributions for the treatment with ring scan and spot scan techniques were calculated for two examples of the target volume. The comparison of the dose distributions has shown that the ring scan is better in sparing normal tissues than the spot scan for a simple shape target volume but not for an irregular shape target volume with the present status of the technique. The irradiation time needed for the ring scan is longer, for the present examples three times, than for the spot scan. From the practical view point the spot scan is preferable to the ring scan for the treatment of head and neck tumors with the Piotron

  9. Dynamic changes of tumor gene expression during repeated pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy (PIPAC) in women with peritoneal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezniczek, Günther A.; Jüngst, Friederike; Jütte, Hendrik; Tannapfel, Andrea; Hilal, Ziad; Hefler, Lukas A.; Reymond, Marc-André; Tempfer, Clemens B.

    2016-01-01

    Intraperitoneal chemotherapy is used to treat peritoneal cancer. The pattern of gene expression changes of peritoneal cancer during intraperitoneal chemotherapy has not been studied before. Pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy is a new form of intraperitoneal chemotherapy using repeated applications and allowing repeated tumor sampling during chemotherapy. Here, we present the analysis of gene expression changes during pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy with doxorubicin and cisplatin using a 22-gene panel. Total RNA was extracted from 152 PC samples obtained from 63 patients in up to six cycles of intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the gene expression levels. For select genes, immunohistochemistry was used to verify gene expression changes observed on the transcript level on the protein level. Observed (changes in) expression levels were correlated with clinical outcomes. Gene expression profiles differed significantly between peritoneal cancer and non- peritoneal cancer samples and between ascites-producing and non ascites-producing peritoneal cancers. Changes of gene expression patterns during repeated intraperitoneal chemotherapy cycles were prognostic of overall survival, suggesting a molecular tumor response of peritoneal cancer. Specifically, downregulation of the whole gene panel during intraperitoneal chemotherapy was associated with better treatment response and survival. In summary, molecular changes of peritoneal cancer during pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy can be documented and may be used to refine individual treatment and prognostic estimations. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2668-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  10. Results of surgical treatment of glomus tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubilay Ersin Turkmen

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Glomus tumors are often diagnosed by their characteristic clinical symptoms; pain, tenderness and cold intolerance. Given the considerably delayed time to diagnosis, glomus tumors should be taken into consideration in the presence of severe finger tip pain of unknown origin. These patients are usually operated for other reasons because of difficulties in diagnosis. After the exploration of the tumors on nail bed, was repaired properly observed. [Hand Microsurg 2014; 3(3.000: 66-69

  11. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hak, Sjoerd; Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only...... because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution...... kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging...

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in advanced lung cancer after chemotherapy with/within radiation therapy: Can it predict treatment responsiveness of the tumor?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Mi Ri; Whang, Sung Ho; Park, Chul Hwan; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    To evaluate the contrast enhancement patterns of lung cancer after chemotherapy using a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT and to determine whether the enhancement patterns of tumors at early stages of treatment can predict treatment responses. Forty-two patients with advanced lung cancers underwent DCE-CT and follow-up CT after chemotherapy. We evaluated peak and net enhancement (PE and NE, respectively) and time-density curves (TDCs) (type A, B, C, and D) on DCE-CT images. Treatment responses were evaluated using revised Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor criteria. NE and PE values were significantly higher in the progressive disease (PD) groups than in the stable disease (SD) or partial response (PR) groups (p < 0.05). Types B, C, and D on TDCs were observed mostly in the PR and SD groups (96.0%), whereas type A was most frequent in the SD and PD groups (97.2%), which were significantly different in terms of PE and NE. Contrast enhancement pattern regarding the response of treatment on DCE-CT images could be helpful in predicting treatment response of advanced lung cancer after treatment.

  13. Technical innovation in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal tumors: an MR angiographic sequence using a sparse k-space sampling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, Laura M; Mugera, Charles; Soldatos, Theodoros; Flammang, Aaron; del Grande, Filippo

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the clinical use of an MR angiography sequence performed with sparse k-space sampling (MRA), as a method for dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, and apply it to the assessment of sarcomas for treatment response. Three subjects with sarcomas (2 with osteosarcoma, 1 with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas) underwent MRI after neoadjuvant therapy/prior to surgery, with conventional MRI (T1-weighted, fluid-sensitive, static post-contrast T1-weighted sequences) and DCE-MRI (MRA, time resolution = 7-10 s, TR/TE 2.4/0.9 ms, FOV 40 cm(2)). Images were reviewed by two observers in consensus who recorded image quality (1 = diagnostic, no significant artifacts, 2 = diagnostic, 75 % with good response, >75 % with poor response). DCE-MRI findings were concordant with histological response (arterial enhancement with poor response, no arterial enhancement with good response). Unlike conventional DCE-MRI sequences, an MRA sequence with sparse k-space sampling is easily integrated into a routine musculoskeletal tumor MRI protocol, with high diagnostic quality. In this preliminary work, tumor enhancement characteristics by DCE-MRI were used to assess treatment response.

  14. Technical innovation in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal tumors: an MR angiographic sequence using a sparse k-space sampling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Laura M.; Mugera, Charles; Grande, Filippo del; Soldatos, Theodoros; Flammang, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the clinical use of an MR angiography sequence performed with sparse k-space sampling (MRA), as a method for dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, and apply it to the assessment of sarcomas for treatment response. Three subjects with sarcomas (2 with osteosarcoma, 1 with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas) underwent MRI after neoadjuvant therapy/prior to surgery, with conventional MRI (T1-weighted, fluid-sensitive, static post-contrast T1-weighted sequences) and DCE-MRI (MRA, time resolution = 7-10 s, TR/TE 2.4/0.9 ms, FOV 40 cm 2 ). Images were reviewed by two observers in consensus who recorded image quality (1 = diagnostic, no significant artifacts, 2 = diagnostic, 75 % with good response, >75 % with poor response). DCE-MRI findings were concordant with histological response (arterial enhancement with poor response, no arterial enhancement with good response). Unlike conventional DCE-MRI sequences, an MRA sequence with sparse k-space sampling is easily integrated into a routine musculoskeletal tumor MRI protocol, with high diagnostic quality. In this preliminary work, tumor enhancement characteristics by DCE-MRI were used to assess treatment response. (orig.)

  15. Statistical description of flume experiments on mixed-size bed-load transport and bed armoring processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the statistical properties of experiments on non-uniform bed-load transport as well as the mechanism of bed armoring processes. Despite substantial effort made over the last two decades, the ability to compute the bed-load flux in a turbulent system remains poor. The major obstacles include the poor understanding of the formation of armor lays on bed surfaces. Such a layer is much flow-resistible than the underlying material and therefore significantly inhibits sediment transport from the reach. To study the problem, we conducted a flume study for mixed sand/gravel sediments. We observed that aggregated sediment blocks were the most common characters in armor layers - the largest sizes resist hydraulic forces, while the smaller sizes add interlocking support and prevent loss of fine material through gaps between the larger particles. Fractional transport rates with the existing of armor layers were measured with time by sediment trapping method at the end of flume. To address the intermittent and time-varying behavior of bed-load transport during bed armoring processes, we investigated the probability distribution of the fractional bed-load transport rates, and the underlying dynamic model derived from the continuous time random walk framework. Results indicate that it is critical to consider the impact of armor layers when a flow is sufficient to move some of the finer particles and yet insufficient to move all the larger particles on a channel bed.

  16. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  17. Infant's bed climate and bedding in the Japanese home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura Ikeda, Rie; Fukai, Kiyoko; Okamoto Mizuno, Kazue

    2012-06-01

    to assess the bed climate of infants in their homes in Japan. descriptive, exploratory, non-experimental research design. the data were collected at the participants' homes under normal circumstances. nineteen healthy infants between the ages of two and five months. Their mothers, who joined a parenting class organised by a maternity clinic in Okayama, Japan, consented to participate in this study. we visited the infants' homes and interviewed their mothers concerning the types and use of bedding. The temperature and relative humidity of the bed climate at the back and foot of the bedding, and in the room were measured every minute for four consecutive days. Differences among the bed climates measured during three seasons (spring, summer, and autumn) were assessed by one-way analysis of variance. The bed temperature was higher for infants than for adults. No significant difference in temperature was noted among the three seasons. The bed temperature was about 36.0°C when waterproof sheets and futon mattresses for children or adult were used. The average relative humidity of the bed climate at the back was highest in summer, followed by that in spring and autumn; the differences were significant. The use of waterproof sheets and futon mattresses for children in summer increased the relative humidity to 80% or more. The use of infant beds, sunoko drainboards, and cotton futon mattresses in summer was effective in reducing the bed humidity. these results suggest that nurse-midwives should advise the parents on comfortable bed climates for their infants, as well as how to select and use bedding for them. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Automated Voxel-Based Analysis of Volumetric Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT Data Improves Measurement of Serial Changes in Tumor Vascular Biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coolens, Catherine; Driscoll, Brandon; Chung, Caroline; Shek, Tina; Gorjizadeh, Alborz; Ménard, Cynthia; Jaffray, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Development of perfusion imaging as a biomarker requires more robust methodologies for quantification of tumor physiology that allow assessment of volumetric tumor heterogeneity over time. This study proposes a parametric method for automatically analyzing perfused tissue from volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) computed tomography (CT) scans and assesses whether this 4-dimensional (4D) DCE approach is more robust and accurate than conventional, region-of-interest (ROI)-based CT methods in quantifying tumor perfusion with preliminary evaluation in metastatic brain cancer. Methods and Materials: Functional parameter reproducibility and analysis of sensitivity to imaging resolution and arterial input function were evaluated in image sets acquired from a 320-slice CT with a controlled flow phantom and patients with brain metastases, whose treatments were planned for stereotactic radiation surgery and who consented to a research ethics board-approved prospective imaging biomarker study. A voxel-based temporal dynamic analysis (TDA) methodology was used at baseline, at day 7, and at day 20 after treatment. The ability to detect changes in kinetic parameter maps in clinical data sets was investigated for both 4D TDA and conventional 2D ROI-based analysis methods. Results: A total of 7 brain metastases in 3 patients were evaluated over the 3 time points. The 4D TDA method showed improved spatial efficacy and accuracy of perfusion parameters compared to ROI-based DCE analysis (P<.005), with a reproducibility error of less than 2% when tested with DCE phantom data. Clinically, changes in transfer constant from the blood plasma into the extracellular extravascular space (K trans ) were seen when using TDA, with substantially smaller errors than the 2D method on both day 7 post radiation surgery (±13%; P<.05) and by day 20 (±12%; P<.04). Standard methods showed a decrease in K trans but with large uncertainty (111.6 ± 150.5) %. Conclusions: Parametric

  19. Automated Voxel-Based Analysis of Volumetric Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT Data Improves Measurement of Serial Changes in Tumor Vascular Biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coolens, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.coolens@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Driscoll, Brandon [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Shek, Tina; Gorjizadeh, Alborz [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ménard, Cynthia [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Development of perfusion imaging as a biomarker requires more robust methodologies for quantification of tumor physiology that allow assessment of volumetric tumor heterogeneity over time. This study proposes a parametric method for automatically analyzing perfused tissue from volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) computed tomography (CT) scans and assesses whether this 4-dimensional (4D) DCE approach is more robust and accurate than conventional, region-of-interest (ROI)-based CT methods in quantifying tumor perfusion with preliminary evaluation in metastatic brain cancer. Methods and Materials: Functional parameter reproducibility and analysis of sensitivity to imaging resolution and arterial input function were evaluated in image sets acquired from a 320-slice CT with a controlled flow phantom and patients with brain metastases, whose treatments were planned for stereotactic radiation surgery and who consented to a research ethics board-approved prospective imaging biomarker study. A voxel-based temporal dynamic analysis (TDA) methodology was used at baseline, at day 7, and at day 20 after treatment. The ability to detect changes in kinetic parameter maps in clinical data sets was investigated for both 4D TDA and conventional 2D ROI-based analysis methods. Results: A total of 7 brain metastases in 3 patients were evaluated over the 3 time points. The 4D TDA method showed improved spatial efficacy and accuracy of perfusion parameters compared to ROI-based DCE analysis (P<.005), with a reproducibility error of less than 2% when tested with DCE phantom data. Clinically, changes in transfer constant from the blood plasma into the extracellular extravascular space (K{sub trans}) were seen when using TDA, with substantially smaller errors than the 2D method on both day 7 post radiation surgery (±13%; P<.05) and by day 20 (±12%; P<.04). Standard methods showed a decrease in K{sub trans} but with large uncertainty (111.6 ± 150.5) %. Conclusions

  20. Particle bed reactor modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  1. Tumor Heterogeneity and Drug Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucerova, L.; Skolekova, S.; Kozovska, Z.

    2015-01-01

    New generation of sequencing methodologies revealed unexpected complexity and genomic alterations linked with the tumor subtypes. This diversity exists across the tumor types, histologic tumor subtypes and subsets of the tumor cells within the same tumor. This phenomenon is termed tumor heterogeneity. Regardless of its origin and mechanisms of development it has a major impact in the clinical setting. Genetic, phenotypic and expression pattern diversity of tumors plays critical role in the selection of suitable treatment and also in the prognosis prediction. Intratumoral heterogeneity plays a key role in the intrinsic and acquired chemoresistance to cytotoxic and targeted therapies. In this review we focus on the mechanisms of intratumoral and inter tumoral heterogeneity and their relationship to the drug resistance. Understanding of the mechanisms and spatiotemporal dynamics of tumor heterogeneity development before and during the therapy is important for the ability to design individual treatment protocols suitable in the given molecular context. (author)

  2. Improving the performance of neutral network in differentiation of breast tumors using wavelet transformation on dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdolmaleki, P.; Abrishami-Moghddam, H.; Gity, M.; Mokhtari- Dizaji, M.; Mostafa, A.

    2005-01-01

    A computer aided diagnosis system was established using the wavelet transform and neural network to differentiate malignant from benign in a group of patients with histo-pathologically proved breast lesions based on the data derived independently from time-intensity profile. Materials and Methods: The performance of the artificial neural network was evaluated using a database with 105 patients' records each of which consisted of 8 quantitative parameters mostly derived from time- intensity profile using wavelet transform. These findings were encoded as features for a three-layered neural network to predict the outcome of biopsy. The network was trained and tested using the jackknife method and its performance was then compared to that of the radiologists in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy using receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Results: The network was able to classify correctly the 84 original cases and yielded a comparable diagnostic accuracy (80%), compared to that of the radiologist (85%) by performing a constructive association between extracted quantitative data and corresponding pathological results (r=0.63, p<0.001). Conclusion: An artificial neural network supported by wavelet transform can be trained to differentiate malignant from benign breast tumors with a reasonable degree of accuracy

  3. Fluidized bed boiler feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian C.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed boiler feed system for the combustion of pulverized coal. Coal is first screened to separate large from small particles. Large particles of coal are fed directly to the top of the fluidized bed while fine particles are first mixed with recycled char, preheated, and then fed into the interior of the fluidized bed to promote char burnout and to avoid elutriation and carryover.

  4. Intraluminal filling defects of the bile ducts: differentiation of stones from tumors-the value of magnetic resonance cholangiography in conjunction with a 3D spoiled gradient echo gadolinium enhanced dynamic sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Suk; Kim, Chang Won [Busan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-05-15

    We wanted to determinate the value of a dynamic volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) as a supplement to MR cholangiography for differentiating biliary stones from tumors when patient are suspected of having intraluminal filling defects on direct cholangiography. A retrospective analysis was performed for 49 patients who underwent MRI among all the patients who showed intraluminal filling defects on direct cholangiography for evaluating the cause of their jaundice from June 2002 to June 2003. After dividing these patients into two groups; i.e., the group with stones and the group wth tumors, we analyzed and compared each MR patterns of 1) signal intensity, 2) shape, and 3) enhancement. High signal intensity on T1-weighted images ({rho} < 0.001, X{sup 2} test), dark signal intensity on T2-weighted images ({rho} < 0.01, Fisher' s exact test) or smooth contour of intraluminal filling defects ({rho} < 0.001, X{sup 2} test) could be significantly suggestive findings of stone rather than a tumor mass. Dynamic VIBE is the most specific sequence for differentiating non-enhancing stone from an enhancing mass ({rho} < 0.001, Fisher' s exact test). We showed that MR cholangiography, when added to the dynamic VIBE sequences, could be an important imaging technique for patients who are suspected of having intraluminal filling defects on direct cholangiography to differentiate stones from tumors. Especially, the addition of dynamic VIBE images can provide the increased level of confidence in the diagnosis.

  5. Management bedding : vrijloopstal met composterende bedding van houtsnippers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de H.C.; Wiersma, M.; Galama, P.J.; Szanto, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    In de vrijloopstal liggen de koeien meestal op een organische bedding en scheiden daar mest (feces en urine) uit. Om de bedding voldoende droog en schoon te houden wordt er regelmatig nieuw strooisel aangevoerd en wordt de toplaag bewerkt. Op basis van onderzoek- en praktijkervaringen tot nu toe

  6. The effect of interstitial pressure on tumor growth: coupling with the blood and lymphatic vascular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B.; McDougall, Steven R.; Chaplain, Mark A.J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John

    2013-01-01

    The flow of interstitial fluid and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in solid tumors and surrounding host tissues have been identified as critical elements in cancer growth and vascularization. Both experimental and theoretical studies have shown that tumors may present elevated IFP, which can be a formidable physical barrier for delivery of cell nutrients and small molecules into the tumor. Elevated IFP may also exacerbate gradients of biochemical signals such as angiogenic factors released by tumors into the surrounding tissues. These studies have helped to understand both biochemical signaling and treatment prognosis. Building upon previous work, here we develop a vascular tumor growth model by coupling a continuous growth model with a discrete angiogenesis model. We include fluid/oxygen extravasation as well as a continuous lymphatic field, and study the micro-environmental fluid dynamics and their effect on tumor growth by accounting for blood flow, transcapillary fluid flux, interstitial fluid flow, and lymphatic drainage. We thus elucidate further the non-trivial relationship between the key elements contributing to the effects of interstitial pressure in solid tumors. In particular, we study the effect of IFP on oxygen extravasation and show that small blood/lymphatic vessel resistance and collapse may contribute to lower transcapillary fluid/oxygen flux, thus decreasing the rate of tumor growth. We also investigate the effect of tumor vascular pathologies, including elevated vascular and interstitial hydraulic conductivities inside the tumor as well as diminished osmotic pressure differences, on the fluid flow across the tumor capillary bed, the lymphatic drainage, and the IFP. Our results reveal that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity together with poor lymphatic function is the root cause of the development of plateau profiles of the IFP in the tumor, which have been observed in experiments, and contributes to a more uniform

  7. Comparative study of pulsed-continuous arterial spin labeling and dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging by histogram analysis in evaluation of glial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisawa, Atsuko; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi; Takahashi, Hiroto; Matsuo, Chisato; Fujiwara, Takuya; Fujiwara, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2018-06-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive perfusion technique that may be an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) for assessment of brain tumors. To our knowledge, there have been no reports on histogram analysis of ASL. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ASL is comparable with DSC-MRI in terms of differentiating high-grade and low-grade gliomas by evaluating the histogram analysis of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the entire tumor. Thirty-four patients with pathologically proven glioma underwent ASL and DSC-MRI. High-signal areas on contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted images or high-intensity areas on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images were designated as the volumes of interest (VOIs). ASL-CBF, DSC-CBF, and DSC-cerebral blood volume maps were constructed and co-registered to the VOI. Perfusion histogram analyses of the whole VOI and statistical analyses were performed to compare the ASL and DSC images. There was no significant difference in the mean values for any of the histogram metrics in both of the low-grade gliomas (n = 15) and the high-grade gliomas (n = 19). Strong correlations were seen in the 75th percentile, mean, median, and standard deviation values between the ASL and DSC images. The area under the curve values tended to be greater for the DSC images than for the ASL images. DSC-MRI is superior to ASL for distinguishing high-grade from low-grade glioma. ASL could be an alternative evaluation method when DSC-MRI cannot be used, e.g., in patients with renal failure, those in whom repeated examination is required, and in children.

  8. Multimodality functional imaging of spontaneous canine tumors using 64Cu-ATSM and 18FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Anders E.; Kristensen, Annemarie T.; Law, Ian; McEvoy, Fintan J.; Kjær, Andreas; Engelholm, Svend A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the distribution and uptake of the hypoxia tracer 64 Cu-diacetyl-bis(N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazone) ( 64 Cu-ATSM) PET/CT, FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT (DCE-pCT) in spontaneous canine tumors. In addition 64 Cu-ATSM distribution over time was evaluated. Methods and materials: Nine spontaneous cancer-bearing dogs were prospectively enrolled. FDG (1 h pi.) and 64 Cu-ATSM (3 and 24 h pi.) PET/CT were performed over three consecutive days. DCE-pCT was performed on day 2. Tumor uptake of FDG and 64 Cu-ATSM was assessed semi-quantitatively and the distribution of FDG, 64 Cu-ATSM and CT perfusion parameters correlated. Results: 64 Cu-ATSM distribution on scans performed 24 h apart displayed moderate to strong correlation; however, temporal changes were observed. The spatial distribution pattern of 64 Cu-ATSM between scans was moderately to strongly positively correlated to FDG, whereas the correlation of CT perfusion parameters to FDG and to 64 Cu-ATSM yielded more varying results. Conclusions: 64 Cu-ATSM uptake was positively correlated to FDG. 64 Cu-ATSM was found to be relatively stable between PET scans performed at different time points, important temporal changes were however observed in hypo-perfused regions. These findings potentially indicate that prolonged uptake periods for 64 Cu-ATSM imaging may be needed. Although a moderate to strong correlation between 64 Cu-ATSM and FDG PET/CT is observed, the two tracers provide different biological information with an overlapping spatial distribution.

  9. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: II. Task-oriented statistical estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    In the context of oncology, dynamic PET imaging coupled with standard graphical linear analysis has been previously employed to enable quantitative estimation of tracer kinetic parameters of physiological interest at the voxel level, thus, enabling quantitative PET parametric imaging. However, dynamic PET acquisition protocols have been confined to the limited axial field-of-view (~15-20 cm) of a single-bed position and have not been translated to the whole-body clinical imaging domain. On the contrary, standardized uptake value (SUV) PET imaging, considered as the routine approach in clinical oncology, commonly involves multi-bed acquisitions, but is performed statically, thus not allowing for dynamic tracking of the tracer distribution. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. In a companion study, we presented a novel clinically feasible dynamic (4D) multi-bed PET acquisition protocol as well as the concept of whole-body PET parametric imaging employing Patlak ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to estimate the quantitative parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V. In the present study, we propose an advanced hybrid linear regression framework, driven by Patlak kinetic voxel correlations, to achieve superior trade-off between contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean squared error (MSE) than provided by OLS for the final Ki parametric images, enabling task-based performance optimization. Overall, whether the observer's task is to detect a tumor or quantitatively assess treatment response, the proposed statistical estimation framework can be adapted to satisfy the specific task performance criteria, by adjusting the Patlak correlation-coefficient (WR) reference value. The multi-bed dynamic acquisition protocol, as optimized in the preceding companion study

  10. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: II. Task-oriented statistical estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    In the context of oncology, dynamic PET imaging coupled with standard graphical linear analysis has been previously employed to enable quantitative estimation of tracer kinetic parameters of physiological interest at the voxel level, thus, enabling quantitative PET parametric imaging. However, dynamic PET acquisition protocols have been confined to the limited axial field-of-view (∼15–20 cm) of a single-bed position and have not been translated to the whole-body clinical imaging domain. On the contrary, standardized uptake value (SUV) PET imaging, considered as the routine approach in clinical oncology, commonly involves multi-bed acquisitions, but is performed statically, thus not allowing for dynamic tracking of the tracer distribution. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. In a companion study, we presented a novel clinically feasible dynamic (4D) multi-bed PET acquisition protocol as well as the concept of whole-body PET parametric imaging employing Patlak ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to estimate the quantitative parameters of tracer uptake rate K i and total blood distribution volume V. In the present study, we propose an advanced hybrid linear regression framework, driven by Patlak kinetic voxel correlations, to achieve superior trade-off between contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean squared error (MSE) than provided by OLS for the final K i parametric images, enabling task-based performance optimization. Overall, whether the observer's task is to detect a tumor or quantitatively assess treatment response, the proposed statistical estimation framework can be adapted to satisfy the specific task performance criteria, by adjusting the Patlak correlation-coefficient (WR) reference value. The multi-bed dynamic acquisition protocol, as optimized in the preceding companion

  11. Glomus Tumor of Thumb Occurring at Unusual Location

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diagnosis of glomus tumour. Although rare, glomus tumour should be considered as differential diagnosis for fingertip ... Figure 1: Radiograph-anteropsterior and lateral view ... nail bed is carefully dissected from the bone until the tumor.

  12. Effectiveness of Bed Bug Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before EPA allows a bed bug claim on a label, the product must be supported by data showing it will kill bed bugs when applied according to the label. Also consider factors such as extent of infestation, site preparation, and insect life stages.

  13. Real-time dynamic MR image reconstruction using compressed sensing and principal component analysis (CS-PCA): Demonstration in lung tumor tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Bryson; Yip, Eugene; Yun, Jihyun; Fallone, B Gino; Wachowicz, Keith

    2017-08-01

    This work presents a real-time dynamic image reconstruction technique, which combines compressed sensing and principal component analysis (CS-PCA), to achieve real-time adaptive radiotherapy with the use of a linac-magnetic resonance imaging system. Six retrospective fully sampled dynamic data sets of patients diagnosed with non-small-cell lung cancer were used to investigate the CS-PCA algorithm. Using a database of fully sampled k-space, principal components (PC's) were calculated to aid in the reconstruction of undersampled images. Missing k-space data were calculated by projecting the current undersampled k-space data onto the PC's to generate the corresponding PC weights. The weighted PC's were summed together, and the missing k-space was iteratively updated. To gain insight into how the reconstruction might proceed at lower fields, 6× noise was added to the 3T data to investigate how the algorithm handles noisy data. Acceleration factors ranging from 2 to 10× were investigated using CS-PCA and Split Bregman CS for comparison. Metrics to determine the reconstruction quality included the normalized mean square error (NMSE), as well as the dice coefficients (DC) and centroid displacement of the tumor segmentations. Our results demonstrate that CS-PCA performed superior than CS alone. The CS-PCA patient averaged DC for 3T and 6× noise added data remained above 0.9 for acceleration factors up to 10×. The patient averaged NMSE gradually increased with increasing acceleration; however, it remained below 0.06 up to an acceleration factor of 10× for both 3T and 6× noise added data. The CS-PCA reconstruction speed ranged from 5 to 20 ms (Intel i7-4710HQ CPU @ 2.5 GHz), depending on the chosen parameters. A real-time reconstruction technique was developed for adaptive radiotherapy using a Linac-MRI system. Our CS-PCA algorithm can achieve tumor contours with DC greater than 0.9 and NMSE less than 0.06 at acceleration factors of up to, and including, 10×. The

  14. Pituitary gland tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesser, J.; Schlamp, K.; Bendszus, M.

    2014-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15 % of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65 % of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50 % secrete prolactin, 10 % secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6 % secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10 % of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland. (orig.) [de

  15. [Pituitary gland tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesser, J; Schlamp, K; Bendszus, M

    2014-10-01

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15% of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65% of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50% secrete prolactin, 10% secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6% secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10% of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland.

  16. Dual turn-on fluorescence signal-based controlled release system for real-time monitoring of drug release dynamics in living cells and tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiuqi; Dong, Baoli; Song, Xuezhen; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Nan; Lin, Weiying

    2018-01-01

    Controlled release systems with capabilities for direct and real-time monitoring of the release and dynamics of drugs in living systems are of great value for cancer chemotherapy. Herein, we describe a novel dual turn-on fluorescence signal-based controlled release system ( CDox ), in which the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin ( Dox ) and the fluorescent dye ( CH ) are conjugated by a hydrazone moiety, a pH-responsive cleavable linker. CDox itself shows nearly no fluorescence as the fluorescence of CH and Dox is essentially quenched by the C=N isomerization and N-N free rotation. However, when activated under acidic conditions, CDox could be hydrolyzed to afford Dox and CH , resulting in dual turn-on signals with emission peaks at 595 nm and 488 nm, respectively. Notably, CDox exhibits a desirable controlled release feature as the hydrolysis rate is limited by the steric hindrance effect from both the Dox and CH moieties. Cytotoxicity assays indicate that CDox shows much lower cytotoxicity relative to Dox , and displays higher cell inhibition rate to cancer than normal cells. With the aid of the dual turn-on fluorescence at different wavelengths, the drug release dynamics of CDox in living HepG2 and 4T-1 cells was monitored in double channels in a real-time fashion. Importantly, two-photon fluorescence imaging of CDox in living tumor tissues was also successfully performed by high-definition 3D imaging. We expect that the unique controlled release system illustrated herein could provide a powerful means to investigate modes of action of drugs, which is critical for development of much more robust and effective chemotherapy drugs.

  17. Protecting Your Home from Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your home: Inspect the luggage rack in your hotel room for bed bugs. Check secondhand furniture, beds, ... with Bed Bug Problems Discover. Accessibility EPA Administrator Budget & Performance Contracting Grants January 19, 2017 Web Snapshot ...

  18. Sinus Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RESOURCES Medical Societies Patient Education About this Website Font Size + - Home > CONDITIONS > Sinus Tumors Adult Sinusitis Pediatric ... and they vary greatly in location, size and type. Care for these tumors is individualized to each ...

  19. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  20. Wilms tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... suggested. Alternative Names Nephroblastoma; Kidney tumor - Wilms Images Kidney anatomy Wilms tumor References Babaian KN, Delacroix SE, Wood CG, Jonasch E. Kidney cancer. In: Skorecki K, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, ...

  1. Gas fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardelli, H. da C.

    1976-03-01

    The equations of motion for both gas and particles in a gas fluidised system are stablished through general assumptions which are generally accepted on physical grounds. The resulting model is used to study the velocity fields of each phase in the case of an isolated bubble rising close to the flat distributor plate. A well posed problem results for the solution of Laplace's equation of the potential flow of the particles when consideration is given to the presence of the distributor as a boundary condition. The corresponding stream functions are also obtained which enable the drawing of the motion patterns using numerical techniques. The following two dimensional cases are analysed: S/b=1; S/b=1,5; S/b=2,5; S/b=5 and the limiting case S/b→αinfinite. The results for the interphase exchange between bubbles and particulate phases are applied to a gas fluidised bed reactor and its effect on the chemical conversion is studied for the simplest cases of piston flow and perfect mixing in the particulate phase [pt

  2. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  3. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  4. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Bed retained products in swept fixed bed (SFB) coal hydropyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastral, A.M.; Perez-Surio, M.J. [CSIC, Zaragosa (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica

    1997-12-31

    The hydropyrolysis of a low rank coal in a swept fixed bed (SFB) reactor is carried out by fixing the hydrogen pressure (40 kg/cm{sup 2}), the hydrogen flow (2 l/min) and the residence time (10 min) at increasing temperatures (400 C, 500 C and 600 C) and coal bed heights (h, 1.5h, 2h, 2.5h and 3h). It is shown that the percentages of tars and char directly depend on the coal bed height and that there is not only a quantitative dependence, but also the height of the coal bed is very important and plays a relevant role on the nature of the conversion products. (orig.)

  6. Bed diameter effects and incipient slugging in gas fluidized beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, P.K.

    1986-01-01

    The coalescence and growth of bubble swarms formed at the distributor of a fluidized bed gives rise to lateral as well as vertical distributions of bubble properties. However, existing models employ average bubble properties obtained largely from semi-empirical considerations. In a recent Paper, the author developed a bubble growth model based on a population balance approach. Analytical expressions were derived for the bubble characteristic distributions and averages. However, the model, developed for unconstrained growth, did not take into account the effect of the bed diameter and the possibility of slugging. In this Paper, the model is extended to take these aspects into account. A slugging criterion is also developed which is expected to be valid for the regime where incipient slugging depends on the bed height as well as the region where bed height does not significantly affect minimum slugging conditions

  7. Tumors of the upper urothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafla, S.

    1975-01-01

    Forty-two cases of malignant tumors of renal pelvis were reviewed: 28 were transitional cell carcinomas; and 14 were squamous cell carcinomas. The natural history and spread of the disease is discussed in detail. Transitional cell carcinomas spread primarily to the ureter (40 percent), followed closely by the renal bed (33 percent) and bladder (30 percent). Squamous cell carcinomas spread primarily through the renal bed (60 percent), followed by the draining lymph nodes (28 percent). The spread to other regions (bones, splanchnic organs, chest, etc.), occurred with relatively less frequency, but more in squamous than transitional cell carcinomas. Transitional cell carcinomas seem to have a longer natural history than squamous cell carcinomas. Recurrences in bladder and the remainder of the urothelium seem to be controlled for relatively long periods of time, while those in lymph nodes and renal bed seem to be rapidly fatal. The results of treatment and factors influencing them are discussed. Patients suffering from transitional cell carcinomas faired better than those with squamous cell carcinomas at the 5 year mark (25 and 15 percent, respectively), but the 10 year results are poor in both. The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of these tumors and the influencing factors are also discussed in detail. The response of these tumors to radiotherapy seems to be akin to that of the lower urothelium (bladder), provided adequate dosage is delivered to the relevant volume at the proper moment in time. (U.S.)

  8. An examination of flame shape related to convection heat transfer in deep-fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara M. Yedinak; Jack D. Cohen; Jason M. Forthofer; Mark A. Finney

    2010-01-01

    Fire spread through a fuel bed produces an observable curved combustion interface. This shape has been schematically represented largely without consideration for fire spread processes. The shape and dynamics of the flame profile within the fuel bed likely reflect the mechanisms of heat transfer necessary for the pre-heating and ignition of the fuel during fire spread....

  9. Characterization of the pneumatic behavior of a novel spouted bed apparatus with two adjustable gas inlets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gryczka, O.; Heinrich, S.; Miteva, V.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Jacob, M.; Morl, L.

    2008-01-01

    Recently the importance of spouted bed technology has significantly increased in the context of drying processes as well as granulation, agglomeration or coating processes. Within this work the fluid dynamics of a novel spouted bed plant with two adjustable gas inlets is investigated. By analysis of

  10. Packed Bed Reactor Technology for Chemical-Looping Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, S.; Sint Annaland, van M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has emerged as an alternative for conventional power production processes to intrinsically integrate power production and CO2 capture. In this work a new reactor concept for CLC is proposed, based on dynamically operated packed bed reactors. With analytical

  11. Interaction of slurry pipe flow with a stationary bed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Václav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 6 (2007), s. 365-372 ISSN 0038-223X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/06/0428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : sheet flow * particle dispersion * suspension * concentration profile * bed shear stress Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.108, year: 2007

  12. Gas-particle interactions in dense gas-fluidised beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of heterogeneous flow structures in gas-particle flows seriously affects gas¿solid contacting and transport processes in dense gas-fluidized beds. A computational study, using a discrete particle method based on Molecular Dynamics techniques, has been carried out to explore the

  13. On equivalent roughness of mobile bed at high shear stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Václav; Krupička, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2009), s. 191-199 ISSN 0042-790X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/06/0428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : bed shear * experiment * hydraulic transport * sediment transport Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2009

  14. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  15. Better backs by better beds?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, Kim; Fabricius, Rasmus N; Bendix, Tom

    2008-01-01

    mattresses have a positive effect on LBP, and especially a hard mattress is commonly believed to have a positive effect. METHODS: One hundred sixty CLBP patients were randomized to 1 of 3 groups, having a mattress/bed mounted in their sleeping room for 1 month. The beds were: (1) waterbed (Akva), (2) body......-conforming foam mattress (Tempur), and (3) a hard mattress (Innovation Futon). At baseline and after 4 weeks, a blinded observer interviewed the patients on LBP levels (0-10), daily function (activities of daily living, 0-30), and on the amount of sleeping hours/night. RESULTS: Because of dropout of 19 patients...... using the probably most relevant "worst case" data. There were no relevant difference between the effects of the water bed and the foam bed. CONCLUSION: The Waterbed and foam mattress' did influence back symptoms, function and sleep more positively as apposed to the hard mattress, but the differences...

  16. Top Ten Bed Bug Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Directory Planning, Budget and Results Jobs and Internships Headquarters Offices Regional Offices Labs and Research Centers Bed ... you hire an expert, be sure it’s a company with a good reputation and request that it ...

  17. Torsion testing of bed joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klavs Feilberg; Pedersen, Carsten Mørk

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple test method for determining the torsion strength of a single bed joint between two bricks and presents results from testing using this test method. The setup for the torsion test is well defined, require minimal preparation of the test specimen and the test can...... be carried out directly in a normal testing machine. The torsion strength is believed to be the most important parameter in out-of-plane resistance of masonry walls subjected to bending about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints. The paper also contains a few test results from bending of small walls about...... an axis perpendicular to the bed joints, which indicate the close connection between these results and results from torsion tests. These characteristics make the torsion strength well suited to act as substitute parameter for the bending strength of masonry about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints....

  18. Sea bed mapping and inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The conference has 24 presentations on the topics: Sea bed mapping, inspection, positioning, hydrography, marine archaeology, remote operation vehicles and computerized simulation technologies, oil field activities and plans, technological experiences and problems. (tk)

  19. Fluid-bed methane proposed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The first full scale plant for the production of methane from organic waste could be built in the next few years believes M.J. Nyns of the University of Louvain, Belgium, utilizing either expanded bed or fluidised bed systems, with more than one stage, in a continuous flow arrangement. Up to 8.0 m cubed gas/m cubed digester/day could be produced with residence times reduced to 34 hours.

  20. Dispersion of Bed Load Particles

    OpenAIRE

    SAWAI, Kenji

    1987-01-01

    The motion of bed load particles is so irregular that they disperse remarkably with time.In this study, some flume tests using painted tracer particles were carried out, in which thedispersive property of tracers changed variously with sediment feed rate.In analysing this process, a stochastic simulation model is proposed where it is discussedabout the degree of exposure of individual particle near the bed surface and about the variationof its pick up rate. The exponential distribution of ste...

  1. Glacier seismology: eavesdropping on the ice-bed interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, F.; Röösli, C.

    2015-12-01

    Glacier sliding plays a central role in ice dynamics. A number of remote sensing and deep drilling initiatives have therefore focused on the ice-bed interface. Although these techniques have provided valuable insights into bed properties, they do not supply theorists with data of sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to rigorously test mathematical sliding laws. As an alternative, passive seismic techniques have gained popularity in glacier monitoring. Analysis of glacier-related seismic sources ('icequakes') has become a useful technique to study inaccessible regions of the cryosphere, including the ice-bed interface. Seismic monitoring networks on the polar ice sheets have shown that ice sliding is not only a smooth process involving viscous deformation and regelation of basal ice layers. Instead, ice streams exhibit sudden slip episodes over their beds and intermittent phases of partial or complete stagnation. Here we discuss new and recently published discoveries of basal seismic sources beneath various glacial bodies. We revisit basal seismicity of hard-bedded Alpine glaciers, which is not the result of pure stick-slip motion. Sudden changes in seismicity suggest that the local configuration of the subglacial drainage system undergoes changes on sub daily time scales. Accordingly, such observations place constraints on basal resistance and sliding of hard-bedded glaciers. In contrast, certain clusters of stick-slip dislocations associated with micro seismicity beneath the Greenland ice sheet undergo diurnal variations in magnitudes and inter event times. This is best explained with a soft till bed, which hosts the shear dislocations and whose strength varies in response to changes in subglacial water pressure. These results suggest that analysis of basal icequakes is well suited for characterizing glacier and ice sheet beds. Future studies should address the relative importance between "smooth" and seismogenic sliding in different glacial environments.

  2. Numerical Simulations of the Effects of a Tidal Turbine Array on Near-Bed Velocity and Local Bed Shear Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Gillibrand

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We apply a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to consider the potential effects of energy extraction by an array of tidal turbines on the ambient near-bed velocity field and local bed shear stress in a coastal channel with strong tidal currents. Local bed shear stress plays a key role in local sediment dynamics. The model solves the Reynold-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations on an unstructured mesh using mixed finite element and finite volume techniques. Tidal turbines are represented through an additional form drag in the momentum balance equation, with the thrust imparted and power generated by the turbines being velocity dependent with appropriate cut-in and cut-out velocities. Arrays of 1, 4 and 57 tidal turbines, each of 1.5 MW capacity, were simulated. Effects due to a single turbine and an array of four turbines were negligible. The main effect of the array of 57 turbines was to cause a shift in position of the jet through the tidal channel, as the flow was diverted around the tidal array. The net effect of this shift was to increase near-bed velocities and bed shear stress along the northern perimeter of the array by up to 0.8 m·s−1 and 5 Pa respectively. Within the array and directly downstream, near-bed velocities and bed shear stress were reduced by similar amounts. Changes of this magnitude have the potential to modify the known sand and shell banks in the region. Continued monitoring of the sediment distributions in the region will provide a valuable dataset on the impacts of tidal energy extraction on local sediment dynamics. Finally, the mean power generated per turbine is shown to decrease as the turbine array increased in size.

  3. Theoretical Benefits of Dynamic Collimation in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Brain Tumors: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moignier, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra-moignier@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Gelover, Edgar; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake; Flynn, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Solberg, Timothy; Lin, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hyer, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric benefit of using a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for penumbra reduction during the treatment of brain tumors by pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBS PT). Methods and Materials: Collimated and uncollimated brain treatment plans were created for 5 patients previously treated with PBS PT and retrospectively enrolled in an institutional review board–approved study. The in-house treatment planning system, RDX, was used to generate the plans because it is capable of modeling both collimated and uncollimated beamlets. The clinically delivered plans were reproduced with uncollimated plans in terms of target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing to ensure a clinically relevant starting point, and collimated plans were generated to improve the OAR sparing while maintaining target coverage. Physical and biological comparison metrics, such as dose distribution conformity, mean and maximum doses, normal tissue complication probability, and risk of secondary brain cancer, were used to evaluate the plans. Results: The DCS systematically improved the dose distribution conformity while preserving the target coverage. The average reduction of the mean dose to the 10-mm ring surrounding the target and the healthy brain were 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.6%-15.7%; P<.0001) and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001), respectively. This yielded an average reduction of 24.8% (95% CI 0.8%-48.8%; P<.05) for the brain necrosis normal tissue complication probability using the Flickinger model, and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001) for the risk of secondary brain cancer. A general improvement of the OAR sparing was also observed. Conclusion: The lateral penumbra reduction afforded by the DCS increases the normal tissue sparing capabilities of PBS PT for brain cancer treatment while preserving target coverage.

  4. Theoretical Benefits of Dynamic Collimation in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Brain Tumors: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moignier, Alexandra; Gelover, Edgar; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake; Flynn, Ryan; Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Solberg, Timothy; Lin, Alexander; Hyer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric benefit of using a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for penumbra reduction during the treatment of brain tumors by pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBS PT). Methods and Materials: Collimated and uncollimated brain treatment plans were created for 5 patients previously treated with PBS PT and retrospectively enrolled in an institutional review board–approved study. The in-house treatment planning system, RDX, was used to generate the plans because it is capable of modeling both collimated and uncollimated beamlets. The clinically delivered plans were reproduced with uncollimated plans in terms of target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing to ensure a clinically relevant starting point, and collimated plans were generated to improve the OAR sparing while maintaining target coverage. Physical and biological comparison metrics, such as dose distribution conformity, mean and maximum doses, normal tissue complication probability, and risk of secondary brain cancer, were used to evaluate the plans. Results: The DCS systematically improved the dose distribution conformity while preserving the target coverage. The average reduction of the mean dose to the 10-mm ring surrounding the target and the healthy brain were 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.6%-15.7%; P<.0001) and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001), respectively. This yielded an average reduction of 24.8% (95% CI 0.8%-48.8%; P<.05) for the brain necrosis normal tissue complication probability using the Flickinger model, and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001) for the risk of secondary brain cancer. A general improvement of the OAR sparing was also observed. Conclusion: The lateral penumbra reduction afforded by the DCS increases the normal tissue sparing capabilities of PBS PT for brain cancer treatment while preserving target coverage.

  5. Dynamic distributions of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and its receptors in the red nucleus of rats with spared nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Ding, Cui-Ping; Yu, Jing; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Han, Shui-Ping; Wang, Jun-Yang

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the red nucleus (RN) plays a facilitated role in the development of neuropathic pain, and its effect is transmitted through TNF-α receptor (TNFR) subtypes 1 and 2. Here, the dynamic distributions of TNF-α and TNFRs in the RN of rats with spared nerve injury (SNI) were investigated. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining indicated that TNF-α was hardly expressed in the RN of normal rats but significantly increased at 1 week and peaked at 2 weeks after SNI. Neurons and oligodendrocytes showed TNF-α expression at both 1 week and 2 weeks after SNI, while astrocytes and microglia produced TNF-α later than neurons and oligodendrocytes starting at 2 weeks after SNI. TNFR1 was constitutively expressed in the RN of normal rats and significantly enhanced at 2 weeks but not 1 week after SNI; it was mainly localized in neurons, oligodendrocytes and microglia. Astrocytes were not immunopositive for TNFR1 under normal conditions and at 1 week after injury, but small amounts of astrocytes showed TNFR1 expression at 2 weeks after SNI. A low level of TNFR2 was expressed in the RN of normal rats, but it was significantly increased at 1 week and 2 weeks after SNI and localized in neurons and all three types of glia. These findings suggest that neurons and three types of glia in the RN all contribute to TNF-α production and participate in the initiation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by SNI. TNF-α exerts its effects in different types of cells maybe through different receptors, TNFR1 and/or TNFR2, in the different stages of neuropathic pain. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  6. Role of FDG-PET/MRI, FDG-PET/CT, and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MRI in Differentiating Radiation Necrosis from Tumor Recurrence in Glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Badve, Chaitra; Garg, Vasant; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Rogers, Lisa; Sloan, Andrew; Faulhaber, Peter; Ros, Pablo R; Wolansky, Leo J

    2018-01-01

    To compare the utility of quantitative PET/MRI, dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI (pMRI), and PET/CT in differentiating radiation necrosis (RN) from tumor recurrence (TR) in patients with treated glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The study included 24 patients with GBM treated with surgery, radiotherapy, and temozolomide who presented with progression on imaging follow-up. All patients underwent PET/MRI and pMRI during a single examination. Additionally, 19 of 24 patients underwent PET/CT on the same day. Diagnosis was established by pathology in 17 of 24 and by clinical/radiologic consensus in 7 of 24. For the quantitative PET/MRI and PET/CT analysis, a region of interest (ROI) was drawn around each lesion and within the contralateral white matter. Lesion to contralateral white matter ratios for relative maximum, mean, and median were calculated. For pMRI, lesion ROI was drawn on the cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps and histogram metrics were calculated. Diagnostic performance for each metric was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and area under curve (AUC) was calculated. In 24 patients, 28 lesions were identified. For PET/MRI, relative mean ≥ 1.31 resulted in AUC of .94 with both sensitivity and negative predictive values (NPVs) of 100%. For pMRI, CBV max ≥3.32 yielded an AUC of .94 with both sensitivity and NPV measuring 100%. The joint model utilizing r-mean (PET/MRI) and CBV mode (pMRI) resulted in AUC of 1.0. Our study demonstrates that quantitative PET/MRI parameters in combination with DSC pMRI provide the best diagnostic utility in distinguishing RN from TR in treated GBMs. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Neuroimaging.

  7. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  8. Utility of Recycled Bedding for Laboratory Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Miyamoto, Toru; Li, Zhixia; Kibushi, Tomomi; Okano, Shinya; Yamasaki, Nakamichi; Kasai, Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    Animal facilities generate a large amount of used bedding containing excrement as medical waste. We developed a recycling system for used bedding that involves soft hydrothermal processing. In this study, we examined the effects of bedding type on growth, hematologic and serum biochemical values, and organ weights of female and male mice reared on either recycled or fresh bedding from 3 to 33 wk of age. Neither growth nor physiology differed between mice housed on recycled bedding compared wi...

  9. Fluid bed porosity equation for an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with particles growing biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos-Diaz, K. E.; Limas-Ballesteros, R.

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Bed Bioreactor performance is strongly affected by bed void fraction or bed porosity fluctuations. Particle size enlargement due to biofilm growth is an important factor that is involved in these variations and until now there are no mathematical equations that consider biofilm growth. In this work a mathematical equation is proposed to calculate bed void fraction in an inverse fluid bed bioreactor. (Author)

  10. Clinical physiology of bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Maintenance of optimal health in humans requires the proper balance between exercise, rest, and sleep as well as time in the upright position. About one-third of a lifetime is spent sleeping; and it is no coincidence that sleeping is performed in the horizontal position, the position in which gravitational influence on the body is minimal. Although enforced bed rest is necessary for the treatment of some ailments, in some cases it has probably been used unwisely. In addition to the lower hydrostatic pressure with the normally dependent regions of the cardiovascular system, body fuid compartments during bed rest in the horizontal body position, and virtual elimination of compression on the long bones of the skeletal system during bed rest (hypogravia), there is often reduction in energy metabolism due to the relative confinement (hypodynamia) and alteration of ambulatory circadian variations in metabolism, body temperature, and many hormonal systems. If patients are also moved to unfamiliar surroundings, they probably experience some feelings of anxiety and some sociopsychological problems. Adaptive physiological responses during bed rest are normal for that environment. They are attempts by the body to reduce unnecessary energy expenditure, to optimize its function, and to enhance its survival potential. Many of the deconditioning responses begin within the first day or two of bed rest; these early responses have prompted physicians to insist upon early resumption of the upright posture and ambulation of bedridden patients.

  11. MRI diagnosis of tongue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minowa, Kazuyuki; Abe, Satoru; Ohmori, Keiichi; Hosokawa, Yoichirou; Yamasaki, Michio; Hirano, Masayasu.

    1992-01-01

    MRI studies were performed on 29 patients with tongue tumors. Twenty-six cases were fresh, others were recurrent. Signal intensity of tongue tumor was not characteristic and specific, and it was a low∼iso signal on T1 weighted image (WI), heterogeneously iso∼high signal intensity on T2 WI, heterogeneous enhancement on gadolinium-DTPA enhanced image compared to muscle signal intensity. In 3 of 29 patients, the tongue tumor invaded to the mandible. With regard to the grasping tumor invasion to the mandible, the STIR method was superior to T1, T2 WI of the spin echo method. Dynamic enhanced MR images were performed in 6 of 29 patients. Dynamic change of signal intensity after gadolinium-DTPA administration were assessed with fast low angle shot imaging. On dynamic study at about 20 seconds after gadolinium-DTPA injection, the first signal intensity in the periphery of the tumor gradually began to increase. Maximum signal intensity of the tumor showed at about 70 seconds after gadolinium-DTPA injection. In search from 0 to 5 minutes, after the tongue tumor showed maximum signal intensity, its signal maintain the maximum. Necrotic and peritumorous edema showed a significantly lower and more gradual increase in signal intensity than adjacent neoplastic tissue on dynamic enhanced MRI. (author)

  12. Tumoral tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    Direct tumor tracers are subdivided in the following categories:metabolite tracers, antitumoral tracers, radioactive proteins and cations. Use of 67 Ga-citrate as a clinically important tumoral tracer is emphasized and gallium-67 whole-body scintigraphy is discussed in detail. (M.A.) [pt

  13. A new bed elevation dataset for Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Bamber

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new bed elevation dataset for Greenland derived from a combination of multiple airborne ice thickness surveys undertaken between the 1970s and 2012. Around 420 000 line kilometres of airborne data were used, with roughly 70% of this having been collected since the year 2000, when the last comprehensive compilation was undertaken. The airborne data were combined with satellite-derived elevations for non-glaciated terrain to produce a consistent bed digital elevation model (DEM over the entire island including across the glaciated–ice free boundary. The DEM was extended to the continental margin with the aid of bathymetric data, primarily from a compilation for the Arctic. Ice thickness was determined where an ice shelf exists from a combination of surface elevation and radar soundings. The across-track spacing between flight lines warranted interpolation at 1 km postings for significant sectors of the ice sheet. Grids of ice surface elevation, error estimates for the DEM, ice thickness and data sampling density were also produced alongside a mask of land/ocean/grounded ice/floating ice. Errors in bed elevation range from a minimum of ±10 m to about ±300 m, as a function of distance from an observation and local topographic variability. A comparison with the compilation published in 2001 highlights the improvement in resolution afforded by the new datasets, particularly along the ice sheet margin, where ice velocity is highest and changes in ice dynamics most marked. We estimate that the volume of ice included in our land-ice mask would raise mean sea level by 7.36 m, excluding any solid earth effects that would take place during ice sheet decay.

  14. Modeling and Simulation of a lab-scale Fluidised Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt Halvorsen

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The flow behaviour of a lab-scale fluidised bed with a central jet has been simulated. The study has been performed with an in-house computational fluid dynamics (CFD model named FLOTRACS-MP-3D. The CFD model is based on a multi-fluid Eulerian description of the phases, where the kinetic theory for granular flow forms the basis for turbulence modelling of the solid phases. A two-dimensional Cartesian co-ordinate system is used to describe the geometry. This paper discusses whether bubble formation and bed height are influenced by coefficient of restitution, drag model and number of solid phases. Measurements of the same fluidised bed with a digital video camera are performed. Computational results are compared with the experimental results, and the discrepancies are discussed.

  15. Energy Saving by Novel Bed-Integrated Local Exhaust Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bivolarova, Mariya Petrova; Kehayova, Nushka; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2016-01-01

    High quality indoor environment in hospitals is important for patients’ healing and performance of the personnel. A novel method for minimizing spread of bio-effluents generated from hospitalized patients lying in bed was developed. The method consists of ventilated mattress (VM) which is able...... respectively with 55%, 71.1% and 85.9% and in the double room with 39.3%, 60.0%, and 80.4%. The use of the VM with reduced background CAV ventilation is an effective energy saving strategy for both double and single patient hospital rooms.......-bed hospital patient room (1.3 air changes per hour (ACH)) and double-bed patient room (1.6 ACH) was assessed by means of dynamic computer simulations. The estimated annual energy consumption for the rooms using the VM combined with CAV was compared to the annual energy consumption when the CAV ventilation...

  16. The SSM/PMAD automated test bed project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lollar, Louis F.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Station Module/Power Management and Distribution (SSM/PMAD) autonomous subsystem project was initiated in 1984. The project's goal has been to design and develop an autonomous, user-supportive PMAD test bed simulating the SSF Hab/Lab module(s). An eighteen kilowatt SSM/PMAD test bed model with a high degree of automated operation has been developed. This advanced automation test bed contains three expert/knowledge based systems that interact with one another and with other more conventional software residing in up to eight distributed 386-based microcomputers to perform the necessary tasks of real-time and near real-time load scheduling, dynamic load prioritizing, and fault detection, isolation, and recovery (FDIR).

  17. Animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    There are few trained veterinary radiation oncologists and the expense of facilities has limited the extent to which this modality is used. In recent years, a few cobalt teletherapy units and megavoltage x-ray units have been employed in larger veterinary institutions. In addition, some radiation oncologists of human medical institutions are interested and willing to cooperate with veterinarians in the treatment of animal tumors. Carefully designed studies of the response of animal tumors to new modalities serve two valuable purposes. First, these studies may lead to improved tumor control in companion animals. Second, these studies may have important implications to the improvement of therapy of human tumors. Much remains to be learned of animal tumor biology so that appropriate model systems can be described for such studies. Many of the latter studies can be sponsored by agencies interested in the improvement of cancer management

  18. Particle Bed Reactor scaling relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovik, G.; Araj, K.; Horn, F.L.; Ludewig, H.; Benenati, R.

    1987-01-01

    Scaling relationships for Particle Bed Reactors (PBRs) are discussed. The particular applications are short duration systems, i.e., for propulsion or burst power. Particle Bed Reactors can use a wide selection of different moderators and reflectors and be designed for such a wide range of power and bed power densities. Additional design considerations include the effect of varying the number of fuel elements, outlet Mach number in hot gas channel, etc. All of these variables and options result in a wide range of reactor weights and performance. Extremely light weight reactors (approximately 1 kg/MW) are possible with the appropriate choice of moderator/reflector and power density. Such systems are very attractive for propulsion systems where parasitic weight has to be minimized

  19. Fluidized-bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimmett, E.S.; Kunze, J.F.

    1975-01-01

    A reactor vessel containing a fluidized-bed region of particulate material including both a neutron-moderating and a fertile substance is described. A gas flow including fissile material passes through the vessel at a sufficient rate to fluidize the particulate material and at a sufficient density to support a thermal fission reaction within the fluidized-bed region. The high-temperature portion of a heat transfer system is located within the fluidized-bed region of the reactor vessel in direct contact with the fluidized particles. Heat released by fission is thereby transferred at an enhanced rate to a coolant circulating within the heat transfer system. Fission products are continuously removed from the gas flow and supplemental fissile material added during the reactor operation. (U.S.)

  20. Physiological and Functional Alterations after Spaceflight and Bed Rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Peters, Brian T; Miller, Chris A; Kofman, Igor S; Reschke, Millard F; Taylor, Laura C; Lawrence, Emily L; Wood, Scott J; Laurie, Steven S; Lee, Stuart M C; Buxton, Roxanne E; May-Phillips, Tiffany R; Stenger, Michael B; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L; Ryder, Jeffrey W; Feiveson, Alan H; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2018-04-03

    Exposure to microgravity causes alterations in multiple physiological systems, potentially impacting the ability of astronauts to perform critical mission tasks. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of spaceflight on functional task performance and to identify the key physiological factors contributing to their deficits. A test battery comprised of 7 functional tests and 15 physiological measures was used to investigate the sensorimotor, cardiovascular and neuromuscular adaptations to spaceflight. Astronauts were tested before and after 6-month spaceflights. Subjects were also tested before and after 70 days of 6° head-down bed rest, a spaceflight analog, to examine the role of axial body unloading on the spaceflight results. These subjects included Control and Exercise groups to examine the effects of exercise during bed rest. Spaceflight subjects showed the greatest decrement in performance during functional tasks that required the greatest demand for dynamic control of postural equilibrium which was paralleled by similar decrements in sensorimotor tests that assessed postural and dynamic gait control. Other changes included reduced lower limb muscle performance and increased heart rate to maintain blood pressure. Exercise performed during bed rest prevented detrimental change in neuromuscular and cardiovascular function, however, both bed rest groups experienced functional and balance deficits similar to spaceflight subjects. Bed rest data indicates that body support unloading experienced during spaceflight contributes to postflight postural control dysfunction. Further, the bed rest results in the Exercise group of subjects confirm that resistance and aerobic exercises performed during spaceflight can play an integral role in maintaining neuromuscular and cardiovascular function, which can help in reducing decrements in functional performance. These results indicate that a countermeasure to mitigate postflight postural control dysfunction is

  1. Prediction of bed level variations in nonuniform sediment bed channel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B R Andharia

    2018-04-12

    Apr 12, 2018 ... A fully-coupled 1D mobile-bed model (CAR-. ICHAR) was introduced ...... for sediment trap, water level sensor, tail gate operated by lever arm at .... materials were brought back to upstream to feed the same through sediment ...

  2. MARKETING STRATEGY TO INCREASE BED OCCUPANCY RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwaningsih Purwaningsih

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A hospital is an institution for health care providing treatment by specialized staff and equipment, more often but not always providing for longer-term patient stays. Today, hospitals are very complex institution, not only survive in dynamic environment but also make a profit based on their services. The aimed of this research was to know marketing mix concept (product, price, place, promotion, people, process and provision of customer service in formulating marketing strategy to increased Bed Occupancy Rate of Obstetric Gynecology Ward 2. Method: The population are health care personnel including midwife, midwife associate, administrator and also client or consumer. The variable were product, price, place, promotion, people, process and provision of customer service. Data were collected by using structured questionnaire. Result: The result showed that product (type of services, infrastructure and facility, relative price, comfortable and safe place, targeted promotion, trained human resources, standard process and provision of customer service are an important aspect to implement strategy marketing to increase Bed Occupancy Rate. Analysis: The result of this study has enlightened the importance of strategy marketing in health care services based on seven principle of marketing mix. Discussion: Implementation of marketing mix in obstetric gynecology ward 2 need to be considered.

  3. SU-E-J-182: A Feasibility Study Evaluating Automatic Identification of Gross Tumor Volume for Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R; Palta, M; Chang, Z

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a computerized pharmacokinetic model-free Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) segmentation method based on dynamic contrastenhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data that can improve physician GTV contouring efficiency. Methods: 12 patients with biopsy-proven early stage breast cancer with post-contrast enhanced DCE-MRI images were analyzed in this study. A fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering-based method was applied to segment 3D GTV from pre-operative DCE-MRI data. A region of interest (ROI) is selected by a clinician/physicist, and the normalized signal evolution curves were calculated by dividing the signal intensity enhancement value at each voxel by the pre-contrast signal intensity value at the corresponding voxel. Three semi-quantitative metrics were analyzed based on normalized signal evolution curves: initial Area Under signal evolution Curve (iAUC), Immediate Enhancement Ratio (IER), and Variance of Enhancement Slope (VES). The FCM algorithm wass applied to partition ROI voxels into GTV voxels and non-GTV voxels by using three analyzed metrics. The partition map for the smaller cluster is then generated and binarized with an automatically calculated threshold. To reduce spurious structures resulting from background, a labeling operation was performed to keep the largest three-dimensional connected component as the identified target. Basic morphological operations including hole-filling and spur removal were useutilized to improve the target smoothness. Each segmented GTV was compared to that drawn by experienced radiation oncologists. An agreement index was proposed to quantify the overlap between the GTVs identified using two approaches and a thershold value of 0.4 is regarded as acceptable. Results: The GTVs identified by the proposed method were overlapped with the ones drawn by radiation oncologists in all cases, and in 10 out of 12 cases, the agreement indices were above the threshold of 0.4. Conclusion: The proposed automatic segmentation method was shown to

  4. SU-E-J-182: A Feasibility Study Evaluating Automatic Identification of Gross Tumor Volume for Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R; Palta, M; Chang, Z [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a computerized pharmacokinetic model-free Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) segmentation method based on dynamic contrastenhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data that can improve physician GTV contouring efficiency. Methods: 12 patients with biopsy-proven early stage breast cancer with post-contrast enhanced DCE-MRI images were analyzed in this study. A fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering-based method was applied to segment 3D GTV from pre-operative DCE-MRI data. A region of interest (ROI) is selected by a clinician/physicist, and the normalized signal evolution curves were calculated by dividing the signal intensity enhancement value at each voxel by the pre-contrast signal intensity value at the corresponding voxel. Three semi-quantitative metrics were analyzed based on normalized signal evolution curves: initial Area Under signal evolution Curve (iAUC), Immediate Enhancement Ratio (IER), and Variance of Enhancement Slope (VES). The FCM algorithm wass applied to partition ROI voxels into GTV voxels and non-GTV voxels by using three analyzed metrics. The partition map for the smaller cluster is then generated and binarized with an automatically calculated threshold. To reduce spurious structures resulting from background, a labeling operation was performed to keep the largest three-dimensional connected component as the identified target. Basic morphological operations including hole-filling and spur removal were useutilized to improve the target smoothness. Each segmented GTV was compared to that drawn by experienced radiation oncologists. An agreement index was proposed to quantify the overlap between the GTVs identified using two approaches and a thershold value of 0.4 is regarded as acceptable. Results: The GTVs identified by the proposed method were overlapped with the ones drawn by radiation oncologists in all cases, and in 10 out of 12 cases, the agreement indices were above the threshold of 0.4. Conclusion: The proposed automatic segmentation method was shown to

  5. [Regression and therapy-resistance of primary liver tumors and liver metastases after regional chemotherapy and local tumor ablation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, H-P

    2005-05-01

    High dosage regional chemotherapy, chemoembolization and other methods of regional treatment are commonly used to treat unresectable primary liver malignancies and liver metastases. In liver malignancies of childhood neoadjuvant chemotherapy is successfully combined with surgical treatment. Chemotherapy and local tumor ablation lead to characteristic histomorphologic changes: Complete destruction of the tumor tissue and its vascular bed is followed by encapsulated necroses. After selective eradication of the tumor cells under preservation of the fibrovasular bed the tumor is replaced by hypocellular edematous and fibrotic tissue. If completely damaged tumor tissue is absorbed quickly, the tumor area is replaced by regenerating liver tissue. Obliterating fibrohyalinosis of tumor vessels, and perivascular edema or necrosis indicate tissue damage along the vascular bed. Degenerative pleomorphism of tumor cells, steatosis, hydropic swelling and Malloryhyalin in HCC can represent cytologic findings of cytotoxic cellular damage. Macroscopic type of HCC influences significantly the response to treatment. Multinodular HCC often contain viable tumor nodules close to destroyed nodules after treatment. Encapsulated uninodular tumors undergo complete necrosis much easier. Large size and a tumor capsule limitate the effect of percutaneous injection of ethanol into HCC. In carcinomas with an infiltrating border, especially in metastases of adenocarcinomas and hepatic cholangiocarcinoma cytostatic treatment damages the tumor tissue mainly in the periphery. Nevertheless the infiltrating rim, portal veins, lymphatic spaces and bile ducts as well as the angle between liver capsule, tumor nodule and bordering parenchyma are the main refugees of viable tumor tissue even after high dosage regional chemotherapy. This local resistance is caused by special local conditions of vascularization and perfusion. These residues are the source of local tumor progression and distant metastases

  6. STUCTURE OF PULSED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Bokun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of pulsed layer is proposed which can be suggested as a state of particulates that is blown by intermittent gas flow with speed which has the force to start material moving. Layer during one cycle is in a suspension, falling down and immobile state resulting in changes of particles arrangement as well as ways of gas flowing through layer. Moreover, it allows carrying out effective interphase heat exchange even adamant real granulation.The process of formation of impact flows is considered aw well as their influence on formation of air bubbles in pulsed layer. At startup of air blast the balance between the force of hydro-dynamic resistance is broken, on one side, and forces of gravity, particles inertia and their links with walls on the other side. The layer is transferred in the state of pulsed pseudo-fluidization, and presents gas-disperse mixture, inside of which impulse of pressure increasing is spreading to all sides as pressure waves (compression. These waves are the sources of impact flows’ formation, the force of which is two times more than during the stationary flow.The waves of pressure are divided into weak and strong ones depending on movement velocity within gas-disperse system. Weak waves are moving with a sound speed and strong ones in active phase of pulsed layer are moving over the speed of sound limit within gas-disperse system. The peculiarity of strong wave is that parameters of system (pressure, density and others are changing in discrete steps.The article describes the regime of layer’s falling down in the passive stage of cycle, which begins after finishing of gas impulse action. And suspension layer of moving up granular material is transferred in the state of falling resulting in change of the layer structure.

  7. BedMachine v3: Complete Bed Topography and Ocean Bathymetry Mapping of Greenland From Multibeam Echo Sounding Combined With Mass Conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morlighem, M.; Williams, C. N.; Rignot, E.

    2017-01-01

    Greenland's bed topography is a primary control on ice flow, grounding line migration, calving dynamics, and subglacial drainage. Moreover, fjord bathymetry regulates the penetration of warm Atlantic water (AW) that rapidly melts and undercuts Greenland's marine‐terminating glaciers. Here we...... present a new compilation of Greenland bed topography that assimilates seafloor bathymetry and ice thickness data through a mass conservation approach. A new 150 m horizontal resolution bed topography/bathymetric map of Greenland is constructed with seamless transitions at the ice/ocean interface...

  8. Apparatus and process for controlling fluidized beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmat, Amirali G.; Patel, Jitendra G.

    1985-10-01

    An apparatus and process for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance.

  9. Coupling Solute and Fine Particle Transport with Sand Bed Morphodynamics within a Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. B.; Ortiz, C. P.; Schumer, R.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Packman, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    Fine suspended particles are typically considered to pass through streams and rivers as wash load without interacting with the bed, however experiments have demonstrated that hyporheic flow causes advective exchange of fine particles with the stream bed, yielding accumulation of fine particle deposits within the bed. Ultimately, understanding river morphodynamics and ecosystem dynamics requires coupling both fine particle and solute transport with bed morphodynamics. To better understand the coupling between these processes we analyze a novel dataset from a controlled field experiment conducted on Clear Run, a 2nd order sand bed stream located within the North Carolina coastal plain. Data include concentrations of continuously injected conservative solutes and fine particulate tracers measured at various depths within the stream bed, overhead time lapse images of bed forms, stream discharge, and geomorphological surveys of the stream. We use image analysis of bed morphodynamics to assess exchange, retention, and remobilization of solutes and fine particles during constant discharge and a short duration experimental flood. From the images, we extract a time series of bedform elevations and scour depths for the duration of the experiment. The high-resolution timeseries of bed elevation enables us to assess coupling of bed morphodynamics with both the solute and fine particle flux during steady state mobile bedforms prior to the flood and to changing bedforms during the flood. These data allow the application of a stochastic modeling framework relating bed elevation fluctuations to fine particle residence times. This combined experimental and modeling approach ultimately informs our ability to predict not only the fate of fine particulate matter but also associated nutrient and carbon dynamics within streams and rivers.

  10. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  11. How to Find Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find and correctly identify an infestation early before it becomes widespread. Look for rusty or reddish stains and pinpoint dark spots on bed sheets or mattresses, and search for bugs near the piping, seams and tags of the mattress and box spring.

  12. Propagation of a Strong Shock Over a Random Bed of Spherical Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Y. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Neal, C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Salari, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jackson, T. L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Balachandar, S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Thakur, S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-04-11

    Propagation of a strong shock through a bed of particles results in complex wave dynamics such as a reflected shock, a transmitted shock, and highly unsteady flow inside the particle bed. In this paper we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of shock propagation in air over a random bed of particles. We assume the flow is inviscid and governed by the Euler equations of gas dynamics. Simulations are carried out by varying the volume fraction of the particle bed at a fixed shock Mach number. We compute the unsteady inviscid streamwise and transverse drag coefficients as a function of time for each particle in the random bed as a function of volume fraction. We show that (i) there are significant variations in the peak drag for the particles in the bed, (ii) the mean peak drag as a function of streamwise distance through the bed decreases with a slope that increases as the volume fraction increases, and (iii) the deviation from the mean peak drag does not correlate with local volume fraction. We also present the local Mach number and pressure contours for the different volume fractions to explain the various observed complex physical mechanisms occurring during the shock-particle interactions. Since the shock interaction with the random bed of particles leads to transmitted and reflected waves, we compute the average flow properties to characterize the strength of the transmitted and reflected shock waves and quantify the energy dissipation inside the particle bed. Finally, to better understand the complex wave dynamics in a random bed, we consider a simpler approximation of a planar shock propagating in a duct with a sudden area change. We obtain Riemann solutions to this problem, which are used to compare with fully resolved numerical simulations.

  13. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Association (ABTA) International RadioSurgery Association National Brain Tumor Society National Institute of Child Health and Human Development ... Definition The pituitary is a small, bean-sized gland ...

  14. Hypothalamic tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the brain to reduce spinal fluid pressure. Risks of radiation therapy include damage to healthy brain cells when tumor cells are destroyed. Common side effects from chemotherapy include loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, and fatigue.

  15. The NASA Bed Rest Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Bradley; Meck, Janice

    2005-01-01

    NASA s National Vision for Space Exploration includes human travel beyond low earth orbit and the ultimate safe return of the crews. Crucial to fulfilling the vision is the successful and timely development of countermeasures for the adverse physiological effects on human systems caused by long term exposure to the microgravity environment. Limited access to in-flight resources for the foreseeable future increases NASA s reliance on ground-based analogs to simulate these effects of microgravity. The primary analog for human based research will be head-down bed rest. By this approach NASA will be able to evaluate countermeasures in large sample sizes, perform preliminary evaluations of proposed in-flight protocols and assess the utility of individual or combined strategies before flight resources are requested. In response to this critical need, NASA has created the Bed Rest Project at the Johnson Space Center. The Project establishes the infrastructure and processes to provide a long term capability for standardized domestic bed rest studies and countermeasure development. The Bed Rest Project design takes a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, integrated approach that reduces the resource overhead of one investigator for one campaign. In addition to integrating studies operationally relevant for exploration, the Project addresses other new Vision objectives, namely: 1) interagency cooperation with the NIH allows for Clinical Research Center (CRC) facility sharing to the benefit of both agencies, 2) collaboration with our International Partners expands countermeasure development opportunities for foreign and domestic investigators as well as promotes consistency in approach and results, 3) to the greatest degree possible, the Project also advances research by clinicians and academia alike to encourage return to earth benefits. This paper will describe the Project s top level goals, organization and relationship to other Exploration Vision Projects, implementation

  16. Facing Contrast-Enhancing Gliomas: Perfusion MRI in Grade III and Grade IV Gliomas according to Tumor Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Luisa Di Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumoral neoangiogenesis characterizes high grade gliomas. Relative Cerebral Blood Volume (rCBV, calculated with Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC Perfusion-Weighted Imaging (PWI, allows for the estimation of vascular density over the tumor bed. The aim of the study was to characterize putative tumoral neoangiogenesis via the study of maximal rCBV with a Region of Interest (ROI approach in three tumor areas—the contrast-enhancing area, the nonenhancing tumor, and the high perfusion area on CBV map—in patients affected by contrast-enhancing glioma (grades III and IV. Twenty-one patients were included: 15 were affected by grade IV and 6 by grade III glioma. Maximal rCBV values for each patient were averaged according to glioma grade. Although rCBV from contrast-enhancement and from nonenhancing tumor areas was higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (5.58 and 2.68; 3.01 and 2.2, resp., the differences were not significant. Instead, rCBV recorded in the high perfusion area on CBV map, independently of tumor compartment, was significantly higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (7.51 versus 3.78, P=0.036. In conclusion, neoangiogenesis encompasses different tumor compartments and CBV maps appear capable of best characterizing the degree of neovascularization. Facing contrast-enhancing brain tumors, areas of high perfusion on CBV maps should be considered as the reference areas to be targeted for glioma grading.

  17. Dynamic interaction of 111indium-labeled monoclonal antibodies with surface antigens of solid tumors visualized in vivo by external scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, K.M.; Keenan, A.M.; Frincke, J.; David, G.; Pearson, J.; Oldham, R.K.; Morgan, A.C. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Two 111 indium-labeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), D3 and 9.2.27, directed to tumor antigens of L-10 hepatocarcinoma and human melanoma, respectively, selectively localized antigen-positive target cells in guinea pigs and nude mice. The fate of MoAb differed in the two antigen-antibody systems after reacting with their corresponding tumor antigens in vivo as reflected by patterns of distribution and turnover in vivo. The 9.2.27 localized in melanoma xenograft in nude mice after intravenous administration with slow loss from tumor but more rapid loss from normal tissues and thus demonstrated optimal imaging of small tumors (approximately equal to 5 mm) between 3 and 6 days after injection of the radiolabeled antibody. In contrast, D3 demonstrated a biphasic localization in guinea pig L-10 hepatocarcinoma with a maximal activity on the 2d day after administration and showed rapid loss from both tumor and normal tissues. Nonspecific localization of antibodies in liver and in kidney was found both in syngeneic (nude mice) and xenogeneic (guinea pig) hosts but was more pronounced in the xenogeneic species. These results indicate that the nature of the antigen-antibody interaction may be of importance in selecting MoAb for both diagnosis and therapy of malignant diseases

  18. SU-D-207A-02: Possible Characterization of the Brain Tumor Vascular Environment by a Novel Strategy of Quantitative Analysis in Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MR Imaging: A Combination of Both Patlak and Logan Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, S; Chinnaiyan, P; Wloch, J; Pirkola, M; Yan, D [Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The majority of quantitative analyses involving dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI have been performed to obtain kinetic parameters such as Ktrans and ve. Such analyses are generally performed assuming a “reversible” tissue compartment, where the tracer is assumed to be rapidly equilibrated between the plasma and tissue compartments. However, some tumor vascular environments may be more suited for a “non-reversible” tissue compartment, where, as with FDG PET imaging, the tracer is continuously deposited into the tissue compartment (or the return back to the plasma compartment is very slow in the imaging time scale). Therefore, Patlak and Logan analyses, which represent tools for the “non-reversible” and “reversible” modeling, respectively, were performed to better characterize the brain tumor vascular environment. Methods: A voxel-by-voxel analysis was performed to generate both Patlak and Logan plots in two brain tumor patients, one with grade III astrocytoma and the other with grade IV astrocytoma or glioblastoma. The slopes of plots and the r-square were then obtained by linear fitting and compared for each voxel. Results: The 2-dimensional scatter plots of Logan (Y-axis) vs. Patlak slopes (X-axis) clearly showed increased Logan slopes for glioblastoma (Figure 3A). The scatter plots of goodness-of-fit (Figure 3B) also suggested glioblastoma, relative to grade III astrocytoma, might consist of more voxels that are kinetically Logan-like (i.e. rapidly equilibrated extravascular space and active vascular environment). Therefore, the enhanced Logan-like behavior (and the Logan slope) in glioblastoma may imply an increased fraction of active vascular environment, while the enhanced Patlak-like behavior implies the vascular environment permitting a relatively slower washout of the tracer. Conclusion: Although further verification is required, the combination of Patlak and Logan analyses in DCE MRI may be useful in characterizing the tumor

  19. Computed tomography of liver tumors, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Akira; Fukuoka, Haruhito; Kashiwado, Kouzou; Ichiki, Toshio; Makidono, Yoko

    1984-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic hepatic tumor was attempted using dynamic CT scanning. Homogeneous and patchy types were peculiar to hepatocellular carcinoma, and ring-like type to metastatic hepatic tumor. However, with no enhancement, hepatocellular carcinoma could not be denied. Hepatocellular carcinoma was characterized by the enhancement shown on the early stage of dynamic CT. Ring enhancement was not visualized on dynamic CT but visualized on conventional contrast enhanced CT in hepatocellular carcinomas; it was visualized on conventional contrast enhanced CT and on dynamic CT in metastatic hepatic tumors. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Adult Bed-Wetting: A Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult bed-wetting: A concern? My 24-year-old husband has started to wet the bed at ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  1. Find a Bed Bug Pesticide Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduces the Bed Bug Product Search Tool, to help consumers find EPA-registered pesticides for bed bug infestation control. Inclusion in this database is not an endorsement. Always follow label directions carefully.

  2. EPA-Registered Bed Bug Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rest or hide in hampers, bed frames, even furniture); Failing to treat adjacent areas where bed bugs ... to work (some pesticides, such as desiccators or growth regulators, may be very effective but take some ...

  3. Bed Bug Guidance for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    School nurses are often called upon to provide vital information to students, parents, teachers, and administrators. These tips on identifying, managing and preventing bed bugs will help you to effectively respond if bed bugs appear in your school.

  4. Bacillus cereus in free-stall bedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, M; Svensson, B; Kolstrup, C; Christiansson, A

    2007-12-01

    To increase the understanding of how different factors affect the bacterial growth in deep sawdust beds for dairy cattle, the microbiological status of Bacillus cereus and coliforms in deep sawdust-bedded free stalls was investigated over two 14-d periods on one farm. High counts of B. cereus and coliforms were found in the entire beds. On average, 4.1 log(10) B. cereus spores, 5.5 log(10) B. cereus, and 6.7 log(10) coliforms per gram of bedding could be found in the upper layers of the sawdust likely to be in contact with the cows' udders. The highest counts of B. cereus spores, B. cereus, and coliforms were found in the bedding before fresh bedding was added, and the lowest immediately afterwards. Different factors of importance for the growth of B. cereus in the bedding material were explored in laboratory tests. These were found to be the type of bedding, pH, and the type and availability of nutrients. Alternative bedding material such as peat and mixtures of peat and sawdust inhibited the bacterial growth of B. cereus. The extent of growth of B. cereus in the sawdust was increased in a dose-dependent manner by the availability of feces. Urine added to different bedding material raised the pH and also led to bacterial growth of B. cereus in the peat. In sawdust, a dry matter content greater than 70% was needed to lower the water activity to 0.95, which is needed to inhibit the growth of B. cereus. In an attempt to reduce the bacterial growth of B. cereus and coliforms in deep sawdust beds on the farm, the effect of giving bedding daily or a full replacement of the beds was studied. The spore count of B. cereus in the back part of the free stalls before fresh bedding was added was 0.9 log units lower in stalls given daily bedding than in stalls given bedding twice weekly. No effect on coliform counts was found. Replacement of the entire sawdust bedding had an effect for a short period, but by 1 to 2 mo after replacement, the counts of B. cereus spores in the

  5. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... May cause excessive secretion of hormones Common among men and women in their 50s-80s Accounts for about 13 percent of all brain tumors Symptoms Headache Depression Vision loss Nausea or vomiting Behavioral and cognitive ...

  6. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas