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Sample records for dynamic tumor bed

  1. Comparison of posterior fossa and tumor bed boost in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, A C; Saw, C B; Wen, B C

    2000-10-01

    To quantify the difference between the area of brain irradiated using the posterior fossa boost (PFB) and tumor bed boost (TBB) in medulloblastoma, we studied 15 simulation radiographs of patients treated in our institution from 1990 and 1999. The PFB was compared with the TBB, which was defined as the tumor bed plus 2-cm margin as demonstrated by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. The PFB field treated a mean area of 9.43 cm2 more brain than the TBB. In 3 patients (20%), the area of the brain in the TBB was larger than the PFB. In 11 patients (73.3%), the PFB field had more than 10% more brain than the TBB. The cochlea was in the PFB and TBB field in all patients. In more than two thirds of patients, the area of brain irradiated with the PFB was at least 10% greater than the TBB. Future studies are needed to determine whether the TBB can replace the PFB in patients with medulloblastoma.

  2. Inhibition of IL-17A suppresses enhanced-tumor growth in low dose pre-irradiated tumor beds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jung Lee

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation induces modification of the tumor microenvironment such as tumor surrounding region, which is relevant to treatment outcome after radiotherapy. In this study, the effects of pre-irradiated tumor beds on the growth of subsequently implanted tumors were investigated as well as underlying mechanism. The experimental model was set up by irradiating the right thighs of C3H/HeN mice with 5 Gy, followed by the implantation of HCa-I and MIH-2. Both implanted tumors in the pre-irradiated bed showed accelerated-growth compared to the control. Tumor-infiltrated lymphocyte (TIL levels were increased, as well as pro-tumor factors such as IL-6 and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1 in the pre-irradiated group. In particular, the role of pro-tumor cytokine interleukin-17A (IL-17A was investigated as a possible target mechanism because IL-6 and TGF-β are key factors in Th17 cells differentiation from naïve T cells. IL-17A expression was increased not only in tumors, but also in CD4+ T cells isolated from the tumor draining lymph nodes. The effect of IL-17A on tumor growth was confirmed by treating tumors with IL-17A antibody, which abolished the acceleration of tumor growth. These results indicate that the upregulation of IL-17A seems to be a key factor for enhancing tumor growth in pre-irradiated tumor beds.

  3. Experimental and numerical study of spouted bed fluif dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Duarte

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Spouted beds, originally invented in Canada by Mathur and Gishler (1955 as an alternative to fluidized beds for handling coarse particles, are now widely studied in a variety of physical operations, such as drying, coating and granulation. In this work the particle velocity, minimum spouting flow rate and characteristic fluid-dynamic curves of the spouted bed were obtained using a Eulerian granular multiphase model. The computational work was significantly reduced for axisymmetric gas-solid flows. The experimental data obtained in two spouted bed configurations, conical-cylindrical and two-dimensional, were compared with the simulated results, showing good agreement

  4. Fluid-dynamic behavior of flaxseed fluidized and spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Brandão Santana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Processing of particles in a moving bed, such as a fluidized bed or a spouting bed, is commonly used in the operations of drying, coating, and granulation of particulate systems. This process has applications in the chemical, pharmaceutical and, presently, agronomical industries, especially for seed treatment/coating. This research aimed to analyze the fluid-dynamic behavior of fluidized and spouting beds with different air temperatures and loads of flaxseeds (Linum usitatissimum L., with estimates of the fluid-dynamic parameters correlated to each process. The parameters were compared with the values obtained from classical correlations in the literature, with indications of associated percentages of deviation. Influence of fluid dynamics on the physiological quality of seeds was assessed by germination tests and the germination speed index. An analysis of the results indicated that seed processing was adequate for processing in dynamically active beds; however, temperatures above 50ºC in both beds caused significant reductions in the physiological quality of the seeds. Processing in a fluidized bed presented a smaller reduction of the physiological properties of the flaxseed.

  5. Flow fields, bed shear stresses, and suspended bed sediment dynamics in bifurcations of a large river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szupiany, R. N.; Amsler, M. L.; Hernandez, J.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Fornari, E.; Trento, A.

    2012-11-01

    Channel bifurcations associated with bars and islands are important nodes in braided rivers and may control flow partitioning and thus affect downstream confluences, as well as the formation and dynamics of bars. However, the morphodynamic processes associated with bar formation are poorly understood, and previous studies have largely concerned laboratory experiments, small natural streams, or numerical analyses with large Froude numbers, high slopes, and low Shields stresses. In these cases, the morphologic changes at bifurcations are relatively rapid, with predominant bed load transport and the suspended load playing a minor role. In this paper, the evolution of the flow structure and suspended bed sediment transport along four expansion-diffluence units in the Rio Paraná, Argentina, are described. The Rio Paraná is a large multichannel river with a bed composed of medium and fine sands and possesses low Froude numbers and high suspended bed material transport. Primary and secondary flow velocity components were measured with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) along the expansion-diffluence units, and the backscatter signal of the ADCP was calibrated to allow simultaneous measurements of suspended bed sediment concentrations. The interactions between these variables show that the cores of primary flow velocity and suspended bed sediment concentration do not necessarily follow the thalweg at the bifurcation and that inertial effects on the suspended bed sediment may influence the morphodynamics of bar formation. It is suggested that changes in flow stage, as well as the presence of vegetation, may further increase the deposition of suspended bed sediment at the bar head. This study suggests that the ratio of suspended bed material to bed load is an important factor controlling the morphodynamics of bifurcations in large sand bed braided rivers.

  6. Fixed-bed Reactor Dynamics and Control - A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, S. B.

    1986-01-01

    The industrial diversity of fixed bed reactors offers a challenging and relevant set of control problems. These intricate problems arise due to the rather complex dynamics of fixed bed reactors and to the complexity of actual reactor configurations. Many of these control problems are nonlinear...... and multi-variable. During the last decade fixed bed reactor control strategies have been proposed and investigated experimentally. This paper reviews research on these complex control problems with an emphasis upon solutions which have been demon-strated to work in the laboratory and hold promise...

  7. Hypo-Fractionated Conformal Radiation Therapy to the Tumor Bed After Segmental Mastectomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Formenti, Silvia C

    2005-01-01

    ... (5 fractions in 2 weeks) directed to the original tumor bed with margins in a selected subset of post-menopausal women with breast cancer with a very low risk for local recurrence elsewhere in the breast...

  8. Modelling of dynamics of combustion of biomass in fluidized beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saastamoinen Jaakko J.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available New process concepts in energy production and biofuel, which are much more reactive than coal, call for better controllability of the combustion in circulating fluidized bed boilers. Simplified analysis describing the dynamics of combustion in fluidized bed and circulating fluidized bed boilers is presented. Simple formulas for the estimation of the responses of the burning rate and fuel inventory to changes in fuel feeding are presented. Different changes in the fuel feed, such as an impulse, step change, linear increase and cyclic variation are considered. The dynamics of the burning with a change in the feed rate depends on the fuel reactivity and particle size. The response of a fuel mixture with a wide particle size distribution can be found by summing up the effect of different fuel components and size fractions. Methods to extract reaction parameters form dynamic tests in laboratory scale reactors are discussed. The residence time of fuel particles in the bed and the resulting char inventory in the bed decrease with increasing fuel reactivity and differences between coal and biomass is studied. The char inventory affects the stability of combustion. The effect of char inventory and oscillations in the fuel feed on the oscillation of the flue gas oxygen concentration is studied by model calculation. A trend found by earlier measurements is explained by the model.

  9. A computational fluid dynamic model for fluidized bed heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf, R.; Melaaen, M.C.; Mathiesen, V.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study heat transfer from a heated wall in a gas fluidized bed using the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) approach. An Eulerian-Eulerian simulation of a two dimensional bubbling bed at ambient conditions with a heated wall is carried out on the in-house code FLOTRACS-MP-3D. An empirical as well as a mechanistic model for solid phase thermal conductivity is tested. Effect of operating parameters like velocity and particle size are also investigated. The fluid dynamic model is able to predict the qualitative trends for the influence of operating parameters as well as high heat transfer coefficients observed in gas fluidized beds. (author)

  10. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokkam, Ram [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  11. Nonlinear dynamics and control of a recycle fixed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. Primarily to describe the dynamic behaviour that can be observed in a fixed bed reactor with recycle of unconverted reactant. Secondly to describe the possibilities of model reduction in order to facilitate control design. Reactant recycle has been shown...... to introduce periodic solution to the fixed bed reactor, a phenomenon which is not seen for the system without the recycle, at least not within the Peclet number range investigated in the present work. The possibility of model reduction by the methods of modal decomposition, and by characteristics...

  12. Radiotherapy confined to the tumor bed following breast conserving surgery. Current status, controversies, and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polgar, C.; Fodor, J.; Major, T.; Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Nemeth, G. [National Institut of Oncology, Department of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Kasler, M. [Semmelweis University Budapest, Chair of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Hammer, J. [Barmherzige Schwestern Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Linz (Austria); Limbergen, E. van [University Ziekenhuizen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current status, controversies, and future prospects of tumor bed irradiation alone after breast conserving surgery. Material and Methods: Published prospective trials evaluating the feasibility and efficacy of radiotherapy confined to the tumor bed following breast conserving surgery were reviewed in order to analyze treatment results. Results: In three earlier studies, using tumor bed radiotherapy for unselected patients, the incidence of intra-breast relapse was reported in the range of 15.6-37%. However, in nine prospective phase I-II trials, sole brachytherapy (BT) with different dose rates, strict patients selection, and meticulous quality assurance, resulted in 95.6-100% local control rates. To date, only one phase III protocol has been initiated comparing the efficacy of tumor bed brachytherapy alone with conventional whole breast radiotherapy. The ideal extent of the planning target volume (PTV) for tumor bed radiotherapy alone has not been established yet. In most series, PTV was defined as the excision cavity with generous (1-3 cm) safety margins. Minimal requirement for PTV localization is the use of titanium clips to mark the walls of the excision cavity intraoperatively, but the combination of clip demarcation and three-dimensional (3-D) visual information obtained from cross-sectional images seems to be the best method to determine the target volume. 3-D virtual brachytherapy is also a promising method to minimize the chance of geographic miss. Recently developed techniques, such as intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT), as well as accelerated 3-D conformal external beam radiation therapy (3-D-CRT) were also found to be feasible for tumor bed radiotherapy alone. Conclusions: In spite of the existing arguments against limiting radiotherapy to the tumor bed after breast conserving surgery, results of phase I-II studies suggest that tumor bed radiotherapy alone might be an appropriate treatment option for selected

  13. Improving oncoplastic breast tumor bed localization for radiotherapy planning using image registration algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodzinski, Marek; Skalski, Andrzej; Ciepiela, Izabela; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Kedzierawski, Piotr; Gajda, Janusz

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about tumor bed localization and its shape analysis is a crucial factor for preventing irradiation of healthy tissues during supportive radiotherapy and as a result, cancer recurrence. The localization process is especially hard for tumors placed nearby soft tissues, which undergo complex, nonrigid deformations. Among them, breast cancer can be considered as the most representative example. A natural approach to improving tumor bed localization is the use of image registration algorithms. However, this involves two unusual aspects which are not common in typical medical image registration: the real deformation field is discontinuous, and there is no direct correspondence between the cancer and its bed in the source and the target 3D images respectively. The tumor no longer exists during radiotherapy planning. Therefore, a traditional evaluation approach based on known, smooth deformations and target registration error are not directly applicable. In this work, we propose alternative artificial deformations which model the tumor bed creation process. We perform a comprehensive evaluation of the most commonly used deformable registration algorithms: B-Splines free form deformations (B-Splines FFD), different variants of the Demons and TV-L1 optical flow. The evaluation procedure includes quantitative assessment of the dedicated artificial deformations, target registration error calculation, 3D contour propagation and medical experts visual judgment. The results demonstrate that the currently, practically applied image registration (rigid registration and B-Splines FFD) are not able to correctly reconstruct discontinuous deformation fields. We show that the symmetric Demons provide the most accurate soft tissues alignment in terms of the ability to reconstruct the deformation field, target registration error and relative tumor volume change, while B-Splines FFD and TV-L1 optical flow are not an appropriate choice for the breast tumor bed localization problem

  14. Flow and sediment dynamics in bed discordant channel confluences

    OpenAIRE

    Blanckaert, Koen; Leite Ribeiro, Marcelo; Schleiss, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Confluences between small steep tributaries with dominant supply of poorly sorted sediment and larger main channels with dominant flow supply, which are characterized by a pronounced bed discordance, have not yet been considered in the literature. The hydro-morpho-sedimentary processes in such confluences are not well described by existing conceptual models of confluence dynamics. Examples of such confluences on the Upper Rhone River, Switzerland, served as prototype for the reported laborato...

  15. Modeling stationary and dynamic pebbles in a pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xiang; Montgomery, Trent; Zhang, Sijun

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the stationary and dynamic pebbles in a pebble bed reactor (PBR) by means of discrete element method (DEM). At first, the packing structure of stationary pebbles is simulated by filling process until the settling of pebbles into PBR. The packing structural properties are obtained and analyzed. Subsequently, when the outlet of PBR is open during the operational maintenance of PBR, the stationary pebbles start to flow downward and are removed at the bottom of PBR. The dynamic behavior of pebbles is predicted and discussed. Our results indicate the DEM can offer both macroscopic and microscopic information for PBR design calculations and safety assessment. (author)

  16. Dynamics and mechanics of bed-load tracer particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Phillips

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanics of bed load at the flood scale is necessary to link hydrology to landscape evolution. Here we report on observations of the transport of coarse sediment tracer particles in a cobble-bedded alluvial river and a step-pool bedrock tributary, at the individual flood and multi-annual timescales. Tracer particle data for each survey are composed of measured displacement lengths for individual particles, and the number of tagged particles mobilized. For single floods we find that measured tracer particle displacement lengths are exponentially distributed; the number of mobile particles increases linearly with peak flood Shields stress, indicating partial bed load transport for all observed floods; and modal displacement distances scale linearly with excess shear velocity. These findings provide quantitative field support for a recently proposed modeling framework based on momentum conservation at the grain scale. Tracer displacement is weakly negatively correlated with particle size at the individual flood scale; however cumulative travel distance begins to show a stronger inverse relation to grain size when measured over many transport events. The observed spatial sorting of tracers approaches that of the river bed, and is consistent with size-selective deposition models and laboratory experiments. Tracer displacement data for the bedrock and alluvial channels collapse onto a single curve – despite more than an order of magnitude difference in channel slope – when variations of critical Shields stress and flow resistance between the two are accounted for. Results show how bed load dynamics may be predicted from a record of river stage, providing a direct link between climate and sediment transport.

  17. Optical imaging of tumor hypoxia dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Zhang, Guoqing; Hanna, Gabi; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-11-01

    The influence of the tumor microenvironment and hypoxia plays a significant role in determining cancer progression, treatment response, and treatment resistance. That the tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous with significant intratumor and intertumor variability presents a significant challenge in developing effective cancer therapies. Critical to understanding the role of the tumor microenvironment is the ability to dynamically quantify oxygen levels in the vasculature and tissue in order to elucidate the roles of oxygen supply and consumption, spatially and temporally. To this end, we describe the use of hyperspectral imaging to characterize hemoglobin absorption to quantify hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation, as well as dual emissive fluorescent/phosphorescent boron nanoparticles, which serve as ratiometric indicators of tissue oxygen tension. Applying these techniques to a window-chamber tumor model illustrates the role of fluctuations in hemoglobin saturation in driving changes in tissue oxygenation, the two being significantly correlated (r = 0.77). Finally, a green-fluorescence-protein reporter for hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) provides an endpoint for hypoxic stress in the tumor, which is used to demonstrate a significant association between tumor hypoxia dynamics and HIF-1 activity in an in vivo demonstration of the technique.

  18. An experimental study of the effect of collision properties on spout fluidized bed dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buijtenen, M.S.; Börner, Matthias; Deen, N.G.; Heinrich, Stefan; Antonyuk, Sergiy; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally study the effect of collision properties of different particle systems on the bed dynamics of a spout fluidized bed. This is done in different flow regimes: the spout-fluidization regime (case A), the jet-in-fluidized-bed regime (case B) and the spouting-with-aeration

  19. The impact of structural development on near bed flow dynamics in gravel bed rivers: coupling flume experiments with numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockelford, A.; Hardy, R. J.; Rice, S. P.; Powell, M.

    2017-12-01

    It is increasingly being recognised that gravel bed rivers develop a surface `texture' in response to changes in the flow and sediment regime. This textural response often takes the form of a bed structure which develops to ultimately stabilise the surface across a range of spatio-temporal scales and it is these topographical structures which determine the flow structures that develop over the river bed. However, our ability to measure and parameterise that structure in ways that are useful and meaningful for the prediction of flow dynamics, still remains inadequate; this paper uses a three dimensional numerical model to assess how the temporal development of structure influences the near bed flow dynamics. Using a suite of flume based experiments a unimodal grain size distribution (σg = 1.30, D50 = 8.8mm) was exposed to three different levels of constant bed shear that produced sediment transport conditions ranging from marginal transport to conditions approaching full mobility of all size fractions. Surface structuring characteristics were measured at a high spatio-temporal resolution such that the time evolution of the beds could be fully described. In total 54 surfaces were generated and run through a Reynolds averaged three dimensional numerical model with an Rng turbulence closure. The topography input included using an immersed boundary technique within a Cartesian framework. Discussion concentrates on the how the trajectory of structural evolution under the different treatments affects the near bed flow dynamics. Specifically links are made between how the scales of boundary topography influence the flow and discusses how the measured flow variability at any one point will contain both locally derived and upstream-inherited flow structures, according to the range of scales of bed topography present. Keywords: Graded, Sediment, Structure, Turbulence, Modelling

  20. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of aerosol deposition in pebble beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhosi, Margaret Msongi

    2007-12-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor is a high temperature gas cooled reactor which uses helium gas as a coolant. The reactor uses spherical graphite pebbles as fuel. The fuel design is inherently resistant to the release of the radioactive material up to high temperatures; therefore, the plant can withstand a broad spectrum of accidents with limited release of radionuclides to the environment. Despite safety features of the concepts, these reactors still contain large inventories of radioactive materials. The transport of most of the radioactive materials in an accident occurs in the form of aerosol particles. In this dissertation, the limits of applicability of existing computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT to the prediction of aerosol transport have been explored. The code was run using the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models to determine the effects of different turbulence models on the prediction of aerosol particle deposition. Analyses were performed for up to three unit cells in the orthorhombic configuration. For low flow conditions representing natural circulation driven flow, the laminar flow model was used and the results were compared with existing experimental data for packed beds. The results compares well with experimental data in the low flow regime. For conditions corresponding to normal operating of the reactor, analyses were performed using the standard k-ɛ turbulence model. From the inertial deposition results, a correlation that can be used to estimate the deposition of aerosol particles within pebble beds given inlet flow conditions has been developed. These results were converted into a dimensionless form as a function of a modified Stokes number. Based on results obtained in the laminar regime and for individual pebbles, the correlation developed for the inertial impaction component of deposition is believed to be credible. The form of the correlation developed also allows these results to be applied to pebble beds of different

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Fluidized Bed Polymerization Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Rong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Fluidized beds (FB) reactors are widely used in the polymerization industry due to their superior heat- and mass-transfer characteristics. Nevertheless, problems associated with local overheating of polymer particles and excessive agglomeration leading to FB reactors defluidization still persist and limit the range of operating temperatures that can be safely achieved in plant-scale reactors. Many people have been worked on the modeling of FB polymerization reactors, and quite a few models are available in the open literature, such as the well-mixed model developed by McAuley, Talbot, and Harris (1994), the constant bubble size model (Choi and Ray, 1985) and the heterogeneous three phase model (Fernandes and Lona, 2002). Most these research works focus on the kinetic aspects, but from industrial viewpoint, the behavior of FB reactors should be modeled by considering the particle and fluid dynamics in the reactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of fluid dynamics on chemical reactor performance. For single-phase flows, CFD models for turbulent reacting flows are now well understood and routinely applied to investigate complex flows with detailed chemistry. For multiphase flows, the state-of-the-art in CFD models is changing rapidly and it is now possible to predict reasonably well the flow characteristics of gas-solid FB reactors with mono-dispersed, non-cohesive solids. This thesis is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter 2, an overview of fluidized bed polymerization reactors is given, and a simplified two-site kinetic mechanism are discussed. Some basic theories used in our work are given in detail in Chapter 3. First, the governing equations and other constitutive equations for the multi-fluid model are summarized, and the kinetic theory for describing the solid stress tensor is discussed. The detailed derivation of DQMOM for the population balance equation is given as the second section. In this section

  2. Radiation therapy for breast cancer patients who undergo oncoplastic surgery: localization of the tumor bed for the local boost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezner, Richard D; Tan, Mark C; Clancy, Sharon L; Chen, Yi-Jen; Joseph, Thomas; Vora, Nayana L

    2013-12-01

    Oncoplastic reconstructive surgery is performed in select patients with breast cancer to allow conservation treatment when the lumpectomy would be expected to have a poor cosmetic outcome. These techniques not only rearrange the breast tissue but may also shift the position of the tumor bed. The oncoplastic incision may have no relationship to the tumor bed. Although use of whole-breast radiation therapy (RT) is straightforward, difficulties in localization of the tumor bed for the local RT boost have not been investigated. A retrospective review was performed of 25 patients with 26 cancers who received RT after breast conservation surgery with oncoplastic reconstruction. Among 11 patients with a minimum of 4 surgical clips placed at tumor resection, 8 (73%) had the final tumor bed extend beyond the original breast quadrant or be completely relocated into a different region. In 3 (27%) cases, the clinical treatment volume was 2 to 3 separated regions within the breast. For breast cancer patients who have had oncoplastic surgery, the tumor bed is frequently more extensive and possibly relocated compared with original presentation. Placement of surgical clips after tumor resection and before oncoplastic reconstruction may be the most accurate method to localize the RT local boost field.

  3. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia amin.oroji@siswa.um.edu.my, mohd@um.edu.my (Malaysia); Yarahmadian, Shantia [Mathematics Department Mississippi State University, USA Syarahmadian@math.msstate.edu (United States)

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  4. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan

  5. Dynamic MRI study for breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Tsuneaki

    1990-01-01

    Application of MRI for diagnosis of breast tumors was retrospectively examined in 103 consecutive cases. Contrast enhancement, mostly by dynamic study, was performed in 83 cases using Gd-DTPA and 0.5 T superconductive apparatus. Results were compared to those of mammography and sonography. On dynamic study, carcinoma showed abrupt rise of signal intensity with clear-cut peak formation in early phase, while benign fibroadenoma showed slow rise of signal intensity and prolonged enhancement without peak formation. In 12 of 33 carcinomas (33%), peripheral ring enhancement was noted reflecting vascular stroma of histologic sections. All fibroadenomas showed homogenous enhancement without peripheral ring. In MRI, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 86%, 96%, 91%. In mammography 82%, 95%, 87% and in ultrasonography 91%, 95%, 93%. Although MRI should not be regarded as routine diagnostic procedure because of expense and limited availability, it may afford useful additional information when standard mammographic findings are not conclusive. (author)

  6. Dynamic MRI study for breast tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Tsuneaki (Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-10-01

    Application of MRI for diagnosis of breast tumors was retrospectively examined in 103 consecutive cases. Contrast enhancement, mostly by dynamic study, was performed in 83 cases using Gd-DTPA and 0.5 T superconductive apparatus. Results were compared to those of mammography and sonography. On dynamic study, carcinoma showed abrupt rise of signal intensity with clear-cut peak formation in early phase, while benign fibroadenoma showed slow rise of signal intensity and prolonged enhancement without peak formation. In 12 of 33 carcinomas (33%), peripheral ring enhancement was noted reflecting vascular stroma of histologic sections. All fibroadenomas showed homogenous enhancement without peripheral ring. In MRI, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 86%, 96%, 91%. In mammography 82%, 95%, 87% and in ultrasonography 91%, 95%, 93%. Although MRI should not be regarded as routine diagnostic procedure because of expense and limited availability, it may afford useful additional information when standard mammographic findings are not conclusive. (author).

  7. Development of a generic engineering model for packed bed reactors using computational fluid dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinstra, B.F.

    2008-01-01

    Packed bed reactors are used in many chemical processes. With the advent of modern computers, flow simulation (Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD) can be an aid in the design of process equipment. For particulate systems like packed bed reactors, simulation of the flow around the particles is very

  8. Field driven charging dynamics of a fluidized granular bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimatsu, R; Araújo, N A M; Shinbrot, T; Herrmann, H J

    2016-07-20

    A simplified model has previously described the inductive charging of colliding identical grains in the presence of an external electric field. Here we extend that model by including heterogeneous surface charge distributions, grain rotations and electrostatic interactions between grains. We find from this more realistic model that strong heterogeneities in charging can occur in agitated granular beds, and we predict that shielding due to these heterogeneities can dramatically alter the charging rate in such beds.

  9. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Dynamic MRI of parathyroid tumors in preoperative evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiji; Takano, Hideyuki; Ito, Hisao [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    2000-08-01

    Dynamic MRI was compared to enhanced CT and Tc-99m MIBI, in detection of the parathyroid tumors. STIR MR images achieved higher detectability than enhanced CT or Tc-99m MIBI. Time intensity curves were also drawn in the dynamic MRI. A case of adenocarcinoma showed rapid increase and following gradual decrease in intensity, which pattern is considered as malignant in many tumors of the other organs. However, it was not easy to differentiate parathyroid adenomas from thyroid gland or tumors. MRI was considered as one of the useful methods in detection of the parathyroid tumors. MRI may be useful in searching of heterotopic parathyroid tumors. (author)

  11. Dynamic transition between fixed- and mobile-bed: mathematical and numerical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugliani, Daniel; Pasqualini, Matteo; Rosatti, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Free-surface flows with high sediment transport (as debris flow or hyper-concentrated flow) are composed by a mixture of fluid and solid phase, usually water and sediment. When these flows propagate over loose beds, particles constituting the mixture of water and sediments strongly interact with the ones forming the bed, leading to erosion or deposition. However, there are lots of other situations when the mixture flows over rigid bedrocks or over artificially paved transects, so there is no mass exchange between bed and mixture. The two situations are usually referred to as, respectively, mobile- and fixed-bed conditions. From a mathematical point of view, the systems of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) that describe these flows derive from mass and momentum balance of both phases, but, the two resulting PDEs systems are different. The main difference concerns the concentration: in the mobile-bed condition, the concentration is linked to the local flow conditions by means of a suitable rheological relation, while in the fixed-bed case, the concentration is an unknown of the problem. It is quite common that a free surface flow with high sediment transport, in its path, encounters both conditions. In the recent work of Rosatti & Zugliani 2015, the mathematical and numerical description of the transition between fixed- and mobile-bed was successfully resolved, for the case of low sediment transport phenomena, by the introduction of a suitable erodibility variable and satisfactory results were obtained. The main disadvantage of the approach is related to the erodibility variable, that changes in space, based on bed characteristics, but remains constant in time. However, the nature of the bed can change dynamically as result of deposition over fixed bed or high erosion over mobile bed. With this work, we extend the applicability of the mentioned approach to the more complex PDEs describing the hyper-concentrated flow. Moreover, we introduce a strategy that allows

  12. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlmayer, Felix; Rahim, Hassan B. K.; Kogelnik, H. Dieter; Menzel, Christian; Merz, Florian; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kranzinger, Manfred

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. Methods and Materials: During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Results: Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Conclusion: Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern

  13. Quality assurance in breast cancer brachytherapy: geographic miss in the interstitial boost treatment of the tumor bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmayer, F; Rahim, H B; Kogelnik, H D; Menzel, C; Merz, F; Deutschmann, H; Kranzinger, M

    1996-03-15

    To assess the role of geographic misses in the interstitial boost treatment of breast cancer patients and to evaluate methods of optimizing breast implants in design, performance, and dosimetry. During lumpectomy, the tumor excision sites of 89 patients were marked by five hemoclips. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated the clips' positions with respect to the extension of the surgical cavity, which was demarcated by air and hematoseroma. Twenty-seven selected patients received interstitial boosts to the tumor bed. The implant was first designed according to the clinical assumptions of the tumor bed's topography and then compared with the radiological findings. Prior to brachytherapy, the planning of the implant's dimension and the needle guidance was performed under simulator control. Dose distributions were first calculated following the Paris System and then electively optimized for the target volume by changing source positions and dwell times. Compared to clinical estimations, the radiological determination of the tumor bed's location revealed an overall potential of topographic errors of 51.8% (14 out of 27 patients), rising up to 78.5% in patients with large adipose breasts (11 out of 13 patients). This observation was due to a high mobility of the tissue, leading to varying tumor site projections at the time of mammography, surgery, and brachytherapy. In all patients, the presimulation of the implant resulted in an adequate coverage of the target volume. In 17 of the 27 treated patients, dose distributions were modified to achieve a higher dose delivery in zones where a higher residual tumor load was expected (boost-in-boost). Breast implants have a high potential of geographic misses that can be avoided by intraoperative clip demarcation. The delineation of the tumor bed allows for dose reports actually referring to the target volume and not to the implant system to be obtained. In addition, modern afterloading techniques offer possibilities of

  14. Field Driven Charging Dynamics of a Fluidized Granular Bed

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimatsu, R.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Shinbrot, T.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    A simplified model has previously described the inductive charging of colliding identical grains in the presence of an external electric field. Here we extend that model by including heterogeneous surface charge distributions, grain rotations and electrostatic interactions between grains. We find from this more realistic model that strong heterogeneities in charging can occur in agitated granular beds, and we predict that shielding due to these heterogeneities can dramatically alter the charg...

  15. Dynamical analysis of fractional order model of immunogenic tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Arshad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we examine the fractional order model of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to a growing tumor cell population. We investigate the long-term behavior of tumor growth and explore the conditions of tumor elimination analytically. We establish the conditions for the tumor-free equilibrium and tumor-infection equilibrium to be asymptotically stable and provide the expression of the basic reproduction number. Existence of physical significant tumor-infection equilibrium points is investigated analytically. We show that tumor growth rate, source rate of immune cells, and death rate of immune cells play vital role in tumor dynamics and system undergoes saddle-node and transcritical bifurcation based on these parameters. Furthermore, the effect of cancer treatment is discussed by varying the values of relevant parameters. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the analytical results.

  16. MRI of orbital tumors. Usefulness of dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanishi, Masayuki; Kotake, Fumio; Abe, Kimihiko

    1998-01-01

    MRI is very useful for the diagnosis of orbital tumors, bus T1 and T2-weighted images and contrast T1-weighted image are often insufficient for accurate diagnosis. In the present study, we conducted dynamic MRI for the diagnosis of orbital tumors and evaluated its usefulness. 19 patients with 20 lesions were included in the present study: vascular tumors, schwannomas, orbital lymphoid tumors, meningiomas, lacrimal tumors, metastatic orbital tumors, leukemic infiltration of the orbit and post operative granuloma. Dynamic MRIs were acquired by the SE method at TR 100/TE 26 msec at 30 sec intervals starting immediately after iv injection of 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA. Time intensity curves (TIC) were drawn after setting regions interest in tumorous areas. TICs obtained were classified into 5 types: Type 1 (rapid increase and rapid decrease), Type 2 (rapid increase and gradual decrease), Type 3 (rapid increase and no decrease), Type 4 (gradual increase), Type 5 (no changes). TIC was of Type 1 in 2 patients, Type 2 in 8, Type 3 in 3, Type 4 in 3, Type 5 in 3. The presence or absence of correlation between the TIC types and types of tumor was evaluated. TIC made it possible to make differential diagnosis of vascular tumors and schwannoma and to differentiate benign and malignant lacrimal tumors, suggesting that it is useful for qualitative diagnosis of these disease. (author)

  17. Dynamic behavior of a solid particle bed in a liquid pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping; Yasunaka, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Morita, Koji; Fukuda, Kenji; Yamano, Hidemasa; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic behavior of solid particle beds in a liquid pool against pressure transients was investigated to model the mobility of core materials in a postulated disrupted core of a liquid metal fast reactor. A series of experiments was performed with a particle bed of different bed heights, comprising different monotype solid particles, where variable initial pressures of the originally pressurized nitrogen gas were adopted as the pressure sources. Computational simulations of the experiments were performed using SIMMER-III, a fast reactor safety analysis code. Comparisons between simulated and experimental results show that the physical model for multiphase flows used in the SIMMER-III code can reasonably represent the transient behaviors of pool multiphase flows with rich solid phases, as observed in the current experiments. This demonstrates the basic validity of the SIMMER-III code on simulating the dynamic behaviors induced by pressure transients in a low-energy disrupted core of a liquid metal fast reactor with rich solid phases

  18. Application of point kinetic model in the study of fluidized bed reactor dynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio de; Streck, Elaine E.

    1995-01-01

    In this work the dynamical behavior of the fluidized bed nuclear reactor is analysed. The main goal consist to study the effect of the acceleration term in the point kinetic equations. Numerical simulations are reported considering constant acceleration. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs

  19. Dispersed plug flow model for upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors with focus on granular sludge dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalyuzhnyi, S.V.; Fedorovich, V.V.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A new approach to model upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB)-reactors, referred to as a one-dimensional dispersed plug flow model, was developed. This model focusses on the granular sludge dynamics along the reactor height, based on the balance between dispersion, sedimentation and convection using

  20. Diagnóstico do tumor glômico pela dermatoscopia do leito e da matriz ungueal Diagnosis of glomus tumor by nail bed and matrix dermoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura de Sena Nogueir Maehara

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A cirurgia é o tratamento definitivo para os tumores glômicos. Algumas vezes, esse procedimento pode representar um desafio, pois, apesar de ser um tumor bem delimitado, a sua visualização pode ser difícil. O uso da dermatoscopia do leito e da matriz ungueal facilita o diagnóstico e auxilia a localização e delimitação do tumor. Trata-se de método simples e de baixo custo que não implica risco adicional ao paciente que irá se submeter a um procedimento cirúrgico.Surgery is the best treatment for glomus tumors. Sometimes this can be a challenging procedure because, despite being a well-defined tumor, its visualization can be difficult. The use of nail bed and matrix dermoscopy facilitates the diagnosis and aids in the localization and demarcation of the tumor. It is a simple and low-cost procedure that does not involve additional risks to the patient who will undergo surgery.

  1. International Workshop on Mathematical Modeling of Tumor-Immune Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Peter; Mallet, Dann

    2014-01-01

    This collection of papers offers a broad synopsis of state-of-the-art mathematical methods used in modeling the interaction between tumors and the immune system. These papers were presented at the four-day workshop on Mathematical Models of Tumor-Immune System Dynamics held in Sydney, Australia from January 7th to January 10th, 2013. The workshop brought together applied mathematicians, biologists, and clinicians actively working in the field of cancer immunology to share their current research and to increase awareness of the innovative mathematical tools that are applicable to the growing field of cancer immunology. Recent progress in cancer immunology and advances in immunotherapy suggest that the immune system plays a fundamental role in host defense against tumors and could be utilized to prevent or cure cancer. Although theoretical and experimental studies of tumor-immune system dynamics have a long history, there are still many unanswered questions about the mechanisms that govern the interaction betwe...

  2. Development of a vibrofluidized bed and fluid-dynamic study with dry and wet adipic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Moris V.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibrofluidized bed developed in this work, consisting of a transparent plexiglass tube with an inner diameter of 0.1 m and a height of 0.5 m, was designed for the fluidization of adipic acid. The fluidization behavior of dry adipic acid with particle diameters in the range of 75 - 600 mm and a density of 1340kg/m³ was studied using mechanical vibration for different sample loads. Variables studied for the wet material include frequency and amplitude of vibration and moisture content of the particles. On the basis of the quantitative flow curve data and visual observations, it is concluded that the fluid dynamics of the bed with wet sticky particles, both vibrating and not vibrating, is different from that of the bed with dry particles.

  3. Plasma dynamics in a packed bed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) operated in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujahid, Zaka-ul-Islam; Hala, Ahmed

    2018-03-01

    Packed bed dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are very promising for several applications including remediation of environmental pollutants and greenhouse gas conversion. In this work, we have investigated the space and time-resolved emission from a packed bed DBD operated in helium, to understand the plasma dynamics. We have chosen a simple planar DBD arrangement with a patterned dielectric, which mimics the spherical boundaries between the dielectric pellets and allows the optical access to the plasma. The results show that plasma is sustained in a packed bed DBD by three mechanisms: filamentary discharge in the void (between the center of dielectric structures and the opposite electrode), microdischarges at the contact points and surface ionization waves over the dielectric surface. It is observed that for most of the duration plasma is generated at the contact points between the dielectric structures.

  4. Temporal and spatial dynamics of ephemeral drift-algae in eelgrass, Zostera marina, beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jonas; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Olesen, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    by the eelgrass leaves. This highly dynamic nature of filamentous macroalgal aggregations in eelgrass beds should be considered when evaluating implications of macroalgal blooms for seagrass growth and survival. A frequent relocation of drift-algae at small spatial scale may moderate the formation of poor oxygen......Aggregations of unattached, filamentous macroalgae showed high temporal and spatial dynamics in two shallow and relatively sheltered eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds in Aarhus Bay and Isefjord, Denmark. The changes in algal abundance were followed in permanent plots at 1-3 days intervals during three......) suggesting that variability in algal cover may go by undetected in monthly assessments. The changes in cover were caused either by algal growth or by physical forces moving large aggregations of algae into or out of the study area. Within plots (1 m2) variability was even higher and algal cover changed...

  5. Modeling Fluid Dynamics and Growth Kinetics in Fluidized Bed Spray Granulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed spray granulation is used to produce spherical granules from suspensions, solutions and melts. Experimental investigations revealed that fluid dynamics in the granulator plays a crucial role, in particular in the jet. The jet causes the particle movement as well as drop propagation and deposition on the particles. In this work the “Two Fluid Model” (TFM is used to simulate the multiphase fluid dynamics in the fluidized bed. The results of simulations were validated by measuring the particle velocity using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV. From the TFM-simulations with implemented growth mechanisms the growth kinetics is obtained and is used to describe the transient states of various granulation processes by solving the appropriate population balances.

  6. The assessment of tumor blood flow factors using dynamic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakawa, Emiko

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic computed tomography (CT) was performed by using rapid-sequence scanning following an intravenous bolus injection of contrast material. Time-density curve was applied for gamma variate curve fitting and CT attenuation values were applied for two compartment model. The value of 1/CM, k 1 and k 2 were defined as the blood flow factors in this study. The inhalation of C 15 O 2 using positron emission tomography (PET) can be useful for determining regional tumor blood flow (rBF). CT and PET were performed in 12 patients. The diagnosis was malignant lymphoma in four, and others; two liver metastases, one focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver, one dermatofibrosarcoma, one hepatocellular carcinoma, one malignant melanoma, one malignant meningioma, one bone metastasis. The correlations among rBF, 1/CM, and k 1 were good, and better correlations were obtained among tumor blood flow factors and rBF in the case of the tumors which existed far from air way and/or had low blood flow. The distance from air way effected both the value of rBF and tumor blood flow factors. Both the distance from air way and pathology caused conflicting results between rBF and tumor blood flow factors. Dynamic CT was particularly useful for evaluating the blood flow of tumors that had contact with air way. (author)

  7. Dynamic Fluctuation of Circulating Tumor Cells during Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen A. Juratli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are a promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that CTCs’ diagnostic value might be increased through real-time monitoring of CTC dynamics. Using preclinical animal models of breast cancer and melanoma and in vivo flow cytometry with photoacoustic and fluorescence detection schematics, we show that CTC count does not always correlate with the primary tumor size. Individual analysis elucidated many cases where the highest level of CTCs was detected before the primary tumor starts progressing. This phenomenon could be attributed to aggressive tumors developing from cancer stem cells. Furthermore, real-time continuous monitoring of CTCs reveals that they occur at highly variable rates in a detection point over a period of time (e.g., a range of 0–54 CTCs per 5 min. These same fluctuations in CTC numbers were observed in vivo in epithelial and non-epithelial metastatic tumors, in different stages of tumor progression, and in different vessels. These temporal CTC fluctuations can explain false negative results of a one-time snapshot test in humans. Indeed, we observed wide variations in the number of CTCs in subsequent blood samples taken from the same metastatic melanoma patient, with some samples being CTC-free. If these phenomena are confirmed in our ongoing in vivo clinical trials, this could support a personalized strategy of CTC monitoring for cancer patients.

  8. Can initial diagnostic PET-CT aid to localize tumor bed in breast cancer radiotherapy: feasibility study using deformable image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Oyeon; Chun, Mison; Oh, Young-Taek; Kim, Mi-Hwa; Park, Hae-Jin; Heo, Jae-Sung; Noh, O Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Localization of the tumor bed of breast cancer is crucial for accurate planning of boost irradiation. Lumpectomy cavity and surgical clips provide localizing information about tumor bed. However, defining the tumor bed is often difficult because of presence of unclear lumpectomy cavity and lack of certain information such as absence of surgical clips. In the present study, we evaluated the feasibility of initial diagnostic PET-CT in localization of the tumor bed using deformable image registration (DIR). We selected twenty-five patients who had an initial diagnostic PET-CT performed and underwent breast-conserving surgery with surgical clips in tumor bed. In every individual patient, two target volumes were separately delineated on planning CT; 1) target volume based on surgical clips with a margin of 1 cm (TV clip ) and 2) tumor volume based on 90% of maximum SUV on PET-CT registered by DIR (TV PET ). The percent of TV PET in TV clip (V in ) was calculated and distance between center points of two volumes (D center ) was also measured. Mean D center between two volumes was 1.4 cm (range, 0.33 – 2.53). Mean V in was 94.8% (range, 60.9-100) and 100% in 18 out of 25 patients. When compared to the center of TV clip , the center of TV PET tended to be located posteriorly (mean 0.3 cm, standard deviation 0.6), laterally (mean 0.3 cm, standard deviation 0.8) and inferiorly (mean 0.4 cm, standard deviation 0.9). Initial diagnostic PET-CT can be one of the possible references to localize the tumor bed in breast cancer radiotherapy

  9. Temporal and spatial dynamics of ephemeral drift-algae in eelgrass, Zostera marina, beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jonas Ribergaard; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Olesen, Birgit; Nielsen, Søren Laurentius; Pedersen, Troels Møller

    2013-03-01

    Aggregations of unattached, filamentous macroalgae showed high temporal and spatial dynamics in two shallow and relatively sheltered eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds in Aarhus Bay and the Isefjord, Denmark. The changes in algal abundance were followed in permanent plots at 1-3 days intervals during three different periods of the growth season (May-September). Drift-algal assemblages were present within the 3000 m2 study areas in relatively high and constant abundance (>47% cover) throughout the study period. However, significant changes in average site cover did occur on short timescales (days) suggesting that variability in algal cover may be undetected in monthly assessments. The changes in cover were caused either by algal growth or by physical forces moving large aggregations of algae into or out of the study area. Within plots (1 m2) variability was even higher and algal cover changed regularly between observations (days). Hence, the algae were continuously rearranged within the eelgrass beds; also during periods with no change in average algal cover. The variability in cover of individual plots was negatively correlated to eelgrass cover, suggesting that algae were retained by the eelgrass leaves. This highly dynamic nature of filamentous macroalgal aggregations in eelgrass beds should be considered when evaluating implications of macroalgal blooms for seagrass growth and survival. A frequent relocation of drift-algae at small spatial scale may moderate the formation of poor oxygen conditions within mats and shorten the duration of exposure experienced by individual shoots.

  10. Modeling evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic mutations in hierarchically organized tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sottoriva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC concept is a highly debated topic in cancer research. While experimental evidence in favor of the cancer stem cell theory is apparently abundant, the results are often criticized as being difficult to interpret. An important reason for this is that most experimental data that support this model rely on transplantation studies. In this study we use a novel cellular Potts model to elucidate the dynamics of established malignancies that are driven by a small subset of CSCs. Our results demonstrate that epigenetic mutations that occur during mitosis display highly altered dynamics in CSC-driven malignancies compared to a classical, non-hierarchical model of growth. In particular, the heterogeneity observed in CSC-driven tumors is considerably higher. We speculate that this feature could be used in combination with epigenetic (methylation sequencing studies of human malignancies to prove or refute the CSC hypothesis in established tumors without the need for transplantation. Moreover our tumor growth simulations indicate that CSC-driven tumors display evolutionary features that can be considered beneficial during tumor progression. Besides an increased heterogeneity they also exhibit properties that allow the escape of clones from local fitness peaks. This leads to more aggressive phenotypes in the long run and makes the neoplasm more adaptable to stringent selective forces such as cancer treatment. Indeed when therapy is applied the clone landscape of the regrown tumor is more aggressive with respect to the primary tumor, whereas the classical model demonstrated similar patterns before and after therapy. Understanding these often counter-intuitive fundamental properties of (non-hierarchically organized malignancies is a crucial step in validating the CSC concept as well as providing insight into the therapeutical consequences of this model.

  11. Coupled dynamics of the co-evolution of gravel bed topography, flow turbulence and sediment transport in an experimental channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvind; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Porté-Agel, Fernando; Wilcock, Peter R.

    2012-12-01

    A series of flume experiments were conducted in a large experimental channel at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory to understand the coupled dynamics of flow and bed forms above the sediment-water interface. Simultaneous high resolution measurements of velocity fluctuations, bed elevations and sediment flux at the downstream end of the channel, were made for a range of discharges. The probability density functions (pdfs) of bed elevation increments and instantaneous Reynolds stress reveal a power law tail behavior and a wavelet cross-correlation analysis depicts a strong dependence of these series across a range of scales, indicating a feedback between bed form dynamics and near-bed turbulence. These results complement our previous findings in which the signature of bed form evolution on the near-bed velocity fluctuations was confirmed via the presence of a spectral gap and two distinct power law scaling regimes in the spectral density of velocity fluctuations. We report herein a strong asymmetry in the probability distribution of bed elevation increments and instantaneous Reynolds stresses, the latter being further analyzed and interpreted via a quadrant analysis of velocity fluctuations in the longitudinal and vertical directions. We also report the presence of intermittency (multifractality) in bed elevation increments and interpret it, in view of the asymmetric nature of the pdfs, as the result of scale coupling. In other words, the geometric asymmetry at the bed form scale gets transferred down to a probabilistic asymmetry at all smaller scales indicating a local anisotropy in the energy transfer. Finally, we propose a predictive relationship between bed form averaged sediment transport rates and bed form averaged instantaneous Reynolds stress and validate it using our experimental data.

  12. Spectrally based bathymetric mapping of a dynamic, sand‐bedded channel: Niobrara River, Nebraska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilbone, Elizabeth; Legleiter, Carl; Alexander, Jason S.; McElroy, Brandon

    2018-01-01

    Methods for spectrally based mapping of river bathymetry have been developed and tested in clear‐flowing, gravel‐bed channels, with limited application to turbid, sand‐bed rivers. This study used hyperspectral images and field surveys from the dynamic, sandy Niobrara River to evaluate three depth retrieval methods. The first regression‐based approach, optimal band ratio analysis (OBRA), paired in situ depth measurements with image pixel values to estimate depth. The second approach used ground‐based field spectra to calibrate an OBRA relationship. The third technique, image‐to‐depth quantile transformation (IDQT), estimated depth by linking the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of depth to the CDF of an image‐derived variable. OBRA yielded the lowest depth retrieval mean error (0.005 m) and highest observed versus predicted R2 (0.817). Although misalignment between field and image data did not compromise the performance of OBRA in this study, poor georeferencing could limit regression‐based approaches such as OBRA in dynamic, sand‐bedded rivers. Field spectroscopy‐based depth maps exhibited a mean error with a slight shallow bias (0.068 m) but provided reliable estimates for most of the study reach. IDQT had a strong deep bias but provided informative relative depth maps. Overprediction of depth by IDQT highlights the need for an unbiased sampling strategy to define the depth CDF. Although each of the techniques we tested demonstrated potential to provide accurate depth estimates in sand‐bed rivers, each method also was subject to certain constraints and limitations.

  13. Tumor evolution in space: the effects of competition colonization tradeoffs on tumor invasion dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Orlando

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We apply competition colonization tradeoff models to tumor growth and invasion dynamics to explore the hypothesis that varying selection forces will result in predictable phenotypic differences in cells at the tumor invasive front compared to those in the core. Spatially, ecologically, and evolutionarily explicit partial differential equation models of tumor growth confirm that spatial invasion produces selection pressure for motile phenotypes. The effects of the invasive phenotype on normal adjacent tissue determine the patterns of growth and phenotype distribution. If tumor cells do not destroy their environment, colonizer and competitive phenotypes coexist with the former localized at the invasion front and the latter, to the tumor interior. If tumors cells do destroy their environment, then cell motility is strongly selected resulting in accelerated invasion speed with time. Our results suggest that the widely observed genetic heterogeneity within cancers may not be the stochastic effect of random mutations. Rather, it may be the consequence of predictable variations in environmental selection forces and corresponding phenotypic adaptations.

  14. Scale-up of an electrical capacitance tomography sensor for imaging pharmaceutical fluidized beds and validation by computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haigang; Yang, Wuqiang

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this research is to apply electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) in pharmaceutical fluidized beds and scale up the application of ECT from a lab-scale fluidized bed to a production-scale fluidized bed. The objective is to optimize the design of the production-scale fluidized bed and to improve the operation efficiency of the fluidization processes. This is the first time that ECT has been scaled up to a production-scale fluidized bed of 1.0 m diameter and batch process capacity of 100 kg in a real industrial environment. With a large-scale fluidized bed in a real industrial environment, some key issues on the ECT sensor design must be addressed. To validate ECT measurement results, a two-phase flow model has been used to simulate the process in a lab-scale and pilot-scale fluidized bed. The key process parameters include solid concentration, average concentration profiles, the frequency spectrum of signal fluctuation obtained by the fast Fourier transfer (FFT) and multi-level wavelet decomposition in the time domain. The results show different hydrodynamic behaviour of fluidized beds of different scales. The time-averaged parameters from ECT and computational fluid dynamics are compared. Future work on the ECT sensor design for large-scale fluidized beds are given in the end of the paper.

  15. Assessing Tumor Angiogenesis with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Coss, Emilio; Jackson, Edward F.

    2006-09-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a method able of assessing microvascular changes at high spatial resolution and without ionizing radiation. The microcirculation and structure of tumors are fundamentally chaotic in that tumor-derived factors stimulate the endothelial cells to form new small vessels (angiogenesis) and this vasculature deviates markedly from normal hierarchical branching patterns. The tumor-induced microvascular changes lead to blood flow that is both spatially and temporally more heterogeneous than the efficient and uniform perfusion of normal organs and tissues. DCE-MRI allows for the assessment of perfusion and permeability of the tumor microvasculature, including the network of vessels with diameters less than 100 μm, which are beyond the resolution of conventional angiograms. The microvessel permeability to small molecular weight contrast media as well as measures of tumor response can be assessed with different analysis techniques ranging from simple measures of enhancement to pharmacokinetic models. In this work, such DCE-MRI analysis techniques are discussed.

  16. High resolution field study of sediment dynamics on a strongly heterogeneous bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly Du Bois, P.; Blanpain, O.; Lafite, R.; Cugier, P.; Lunven, M.

    2010-12-01

    Extensive field measurements have been carried out at several stations in a macrotidal inner continental shelf in the English Channel (around 25 m depth) during spring tide period. The strong tidal current measured (up to 1.6 m.s-1) allowed sediment dynamics on a bed characterised by a mixture of size with coarse grains to be dominant. Data acquired in such hydro-sedimentary conditions are scarce. A new instrument, the DYnamic Sediment Profile Imagery (DySPI) system, was specifically conceived and implemented in-situ to observe and measure, with a high temporal resolution, the dynamics of a strongly heterogeneous mixture of particles in a grain-size scale. The data collected covered: 1) grain size range (side scan sonar, video observations, Shipeck grab samples, DySPI images) and vertical sorting (stratigraphic sampling by divers) of sediment cover, 2) hydrodynamic features (acoustic Doppler velocimeter, acoustic Doppler profiler), 3) suspended load nature and dynamics (optical backscatter, chlorophyll fluorometer, particle size analyser, Niskin bottles, scanning electron microscopy), 4) sand and gravel bedload transport estimates (DySPI image processing), 5) transfer dynamics of fine grains within a coarse matrix and their depth of penetration (radionuclides measurements in stratigraphic samples). The four stations present different grain size vertical sorting from a quasi-permanent armouring to a homogenous distribution. The sediment cover condition is directly linked to hydrodynamic capacity and sediment availability. Fine grain ratio within deep sediment layers (up to 10 cm) is higher when the bed armouring is durable. However, fine sediments are not permanently depth trapped: deep layers are composed of few years-old radionuclide tracers fixed on fine grains and a vertical mixing coefficient has been evaluated for each sediment cover. Fine grain dynamics within a coarse matrix is inversely proportional to the robustness of the armour layer. For current

  17. Dynamic behavior and control requirements of an atmospheric fluidized-bed coal combustion power plant: A conceptual study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, O.L.

    1987-06-01

    A first-principles model of a nominal 20-MW atmospheric-pressure fluidized-bed coal combustion (AFBC) power plant was developed to provide insight into fundamental dynamic behavior of fluidized-bed systems. The control system included major loops for firing rate, steam pressure and temperature, forced and induced draft air flow, SO/sub 2/ emission, drum water level, evaporator recirculation, and bed level. The model was used to investigate system sensitivity to design features such as the distribution of heat transfer surface among the bed boiler and superheater and the out-of-bed superheater. Also calculated were the sensitivities of temperatures, pressures, and flow rates to changes in throttle, attemperator, and feedwater valve settings and forced and induced draft damper settings. The large bed mass, accounting for approx.40% of the active heat capacity, may vary under load change and could impact controller tuning. Model analysis indicated, however, that for the design studied, the change in bed mass does not appear to significantly affect controller tuning even if the bed mass varies appreciably under load-following conditions. Several bed designs are being considered for AFBC plants, some with partitions between bed sections and some without, and these differences may significantly affect the load-following capability of the plant. The results indicated that the slumping mode of operation can cause distortion of the heat source/sink distribution in the bed such that the load-following capability (rate of load change) of the plant may be reduced by as much as a factor of 5 compared with the mode in which tube surface is exposed. 9 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. A Framework for Dynamic Modeling of Surface-Structure Patches on Bed Load Transport in Coarse Grained Reaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, K. B.

    2010-12-01

    Mountain streams are the first link in the fluvial system and often have complex bed morphologies which make it difficult to develop simple quantitative expressions for sediment mass flux and stream flow resistance. Such expressions are important for landscape evolution modeling as well as stream management and restoration practices and efforts. Part of the difficulty lies in the fact that stream beds can have large variations in particle size and structural organization - both of which lead to variations in bed strength that can change as a function of time. This study presents a mathematical framework to account for the dynamic impact of surface-structure patches on bed strength and bed load transport under simplified conditions. The framework is based on conservation principles for tracking the exchange of mass between structured and unstructured surface patches in the bed during structure formation and breakup. Two main transport equations are solved for the mobile and stationary phases, and the exchange between the two is modeled using particle collision theory and a simple breakup model (figure 1). The experiments of Strom et al. (2004) are used to parameterize the model initial conditions, and calculated and experimentally observed transport rates are compared as a function of time. Conceptual sketch of the modeling framework for: (A) a gravel bed, and (B) an idealized bed of uniform spherical particles. Mass conservation equations are written for each phase (structured and unstructured) and then solved with time under varying conditions.

  19. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Chauviere

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of living tissues by accounting for cell density correlations, different cell types, phenotypes and cell birth/death processes, in order to provide a biophysically consistent description of processes across the scales. We present an application of this approach to tumor growth.

  20. Dynamic modeling of lung tumor motion during respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyriakou, E; McKenzie, D R, E-mail: e.kyriakou@physics.usyd.edu.au, E-mail: d.mckenzie@physics.usyd.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-05-21

    A dynamic finite element model of the lung that incorporates a simplified geometry with realistic lung material properties has been developed. Observations of lung motion from respiratory-gated computed tomography were used to provide a database against which the predictions of the model are assessed. Data from six patients presenting with lung tumors were processed to give sagittal sections of the lung containing the tumor as a function of the breathing phase. Statistical shape modeling was used to outline the diaphragm, the tumor volume and the thoracic wall at each breathing phase. The motion of the tumor in the superior-inferior direction was plotted against the diaphragm displacement. The finite element model employed a simplified geometry in which the lung material fills a rectangular volume enabling two-dimensional coordinates to be used. The diaphragm is represented as a piston, driving the motion. Plots of lung displacement against diaphragm displacement form hysteresis loops that are a sensitive indicator of the characteristics of the motion. The key parameters of lung material that determine the motion are the density and elastic properties of lung material and the airway permeability. The model predictions of the hysteresis behavior agreed well with observation only when lung material is modeled as viscoelastic. The key material parameters are suggested for use as prognostic indicators of the progression of disease and of changes arising from the response of the lung to radiation treatment.

  1. Deterministic and stochastic dynamics of bed load tracer particles in a coarse grained river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. B.; Martin, R. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the mechanics of a single coarse sediment particle, and the mechanics of sediment transport at the flood scale, is critical to linking event scale bed load transport rates to annual bed load fluxes. We present research on the dynamics of coarse sediment tracer particles tagged with passive radio transponder tags, observing motion resulting from individual floods and the cumulative transport over many floods spanning two years, in the Mameyes River in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. This region presents an ideal study area due to the high frequency of coarse sediment mobilizing events, which allows us to field test the applicability of recently-proposed deterministic and stochastic theories for particle motion. Data for each flood are composed of (1) measured 'flight' lengths for each transported particle, (2) the fraction of tagged particles mobilized, and (3) high-resolution river stage measurements. At the single flood scale, measured tracer particle flight lengths are exponentially distributed, and modal flight lengths scale linearly with excess shear velocity. This is in quantitative agreement with recent theory and laboratory experiments, suggesting that moving particles' velocity is determined by momentum balance with the fluid. The fraction of mobile particles per event increases rapidly with flood stage, creating a logistic-like curve whose inflection point is used to empirically define the threshold of motion. This finding is in contrast to the linear relation observed in small-scale experiments and predicted from momentum balance between sediment and fluid; we use a particle Stokes number argument to suggest that a collision cascade from grain-grain interactions is responsible for the nonlinear relation between mobile fraction and fluid stress, in dynamical equivalence with aeolian sand transport. To examine particle dispersion and relate it to transport mechanics, it is necessary to remove the time over which the fluid stress is

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Gas-Phase Radial Dispersion in Fixed Beds with Wall Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony G. Dixon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effective medium approach to radial fixed bed dispersion models, in which radial dispersion of mass is superimposed on axial plug flow, is based on a constant effective dispersion coefficient, DT. For packed beds of a small tube-to-particle diameter ratio (N, the experimentally-observed decrease in this parameter near the tube wall is accounted for by a lumped resistance located at the tube wall, the wall mass transfer coefficient km. This work presents validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations to obtain detailed radial velocity and concentration profiles for eight different computer-generated packed tubes of spheres in the range 5.04 ≤ N ≤ 9.3 and over a range of flow rates 87 ≤ Re ≤ 870 where Re is based on superficial velocity and the particle diameter dp. Initial runs with pure air gave axial velocity profiles vz(r averaged over the length of the packing. Then, simulations with the tube wall coated with methane yielded radial concentration profiles. A model with only DT could not describe the radial concentration profiles. The two-parameter model with DT and km agreed better with the bed-center concentration profiles, but not with the sharp decreases in concentration close to the tube wall. A three-parameter model based on classical two-layer mixing length theory, with a wall-function for the decrease in transverse radial convective transport in the near-wall region, showed greatly improved ability to reproduce the near-wall concentration profiles.

  3. Molecular markers reveal infestation dynamics of the bed bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) within apartment buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Warren; Saenz, Virna L; Santangelo, Richard G; Wang, Changlu; Schal, Coby; Vargo, Edward L

    2012-05-01

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), has experienced an extraordinary global resurgence in recent years, the reasons for which remain poorly understood. Once considered a pest of lower socioeconomic classes, bed bugs are now found extensively across all residential settings, with widespread infestations established in multiapartment buildings. Within such buildings, understanding the population genetic structure and patterns of dispersal may prove critical to the development of effective control strategies. Here, we describe the development of 24 high-resolution microsatellite markers through next generation 454 pyrosequencing and their application to elucidate infestation dynamics within three multistory apartment buildings in the United States. Results reveal contrasting characteristics potentially representative of geographic or locale differences. In Raleigh, NC, an infestation within an apartment building seemed to have started from a single introduction followed by extensive spread. In Jersey City, NJ, two or more introductions followed by spread are evident in two buildings. Populations within single apartments in all buildings were characterized by high levels of relatedness and low levels of diversity, indicative of foundation from small, genetically depauperate propagules. Regardless of the number of unique introductions, genetic data indicate that spread within buildings is extensive, supporting both active and human-mediated dispersal within and between adjacent rooms or apartments spanning multiple floors.

  4. Dynamic modeling of a solar receiver/thermal energy storage system based on a compartmented dense gas fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimene, Roberto; Chirone, Roberto; Chirone, Riccardo; Salatino, Piero

    2017-06-01

    Fluidized beds may be considered a promising option to collection and storage of thermal energy of solar radiation in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) systems thanks to their excellent thermal properties in terms of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient and thermal diffusivity and to the possibility to operate at much higher temperature. A novel concept of solar receiver for combined heat and power (CHP) generation consisting of a compartmented dense gas fluidized bed has been proposed to effectively accomplish three complementary tasks: collection of incident solar radiation, heat transfer to the working fluid of the thermodynamic cycle and thermal energy storage. A dynamical model of the system laid the basis for optimizing collection of incident radiative power, heat transfer to the steam cycle, storage of energy as sensible heat of bed solids providing the ground for the basic design of a 700kWth demonstration CSP plant.

  5. 99m Tc- la bed somatostatin analogs for imaging somatostatin-receptor-positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandomkar, M.; Najafi, R.; Shafiei, A.; Sadat Ebrahimi, E.; Babaie, M.H.; Rabani, M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the least few years, 111 In-DTPA- Octreotide has found widespread clinical applicability, especially in oncology. However limitation, especially concerning availability, imaging properties, and costs, remain and have stimulated research on radiolabeling with many alternative radionuclides. The purpose of this investigation was to labeling somatostatin analogs with 99 m Tc and evaluate their suitability as an agents for in vivo use. Octreotide and Tyr-3-Octreotide were labeled by 99 mTc with direct and indirect methods. Sodium ascorbate and sodium dithionite were used for reduction of cystine bridge and HYNIC was used as bifunctional agents and different co ligands used for labeling by 99 mTc. Yield of labeling, purity, stability, internalisation, binding affinity and biodistribution of peptide conjugates were studied. Direct labeling of octreotide was simple, rapid, efficient and yield was good (%60). K d for binding affinity as high (10 -9 ) but stability was low. Labeling for HYNIC-Tyr-Octreotide had a high yield (>%90), good stability, internalisation and biodistribution. with more experimental work and some improve this peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals can be employed in all nuclear medicine centers as a useful agent for imaging of tumors

  6. Circulating fluidized bed hydrodynamics experiments for the multiphase fluid dynamics research consortium (MFDRC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelfke, John Barry; Torczynski, John Robert; O' Hern, Timothy John; Tortora, Paul Richard; Bhusarapu, Satish (; ); Trujillo, Steven Mathew

    2006-08-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study the multiphase gas-solid flow in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB). This report describes the CFB experimental facility assembled for this program, the diagnostics developed and/or applied to make measurements in the riser section of the CFB, and the data acquired for several different flow conditions. Primary data acquired included pressures around the flow loop and solids loadings at selected locations in the riser. Tomographic techniques using gamma radiation and electrical capacitance were used to determine radial profiles of solids volume fraction in the riser, and axial profiles of the integrated solids volume fraction were produced. Computer Aided Radioactive Particle Tracking was used to measure solids velocities, fluxes, and residence time distributions. In addition, a series of computational fluid dynamics simulations was performed using the commercial code Arenaflow{trademark}.

  7. Improving the Definition of Tumor Bed Boost With the Use of Surgical Clips and Image Registration in Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Castro Pena, Pablo; Hijal, Tarek; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Laki, Fatima; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of a boost technique. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients underwent tumorectomy with placement of two or more clips in the surgical cavity before breast remodeling. Preoperative and postoperative computed tomography scans, with match-point registration, were performed on all patients. The relationship between the location of the gross tumor volume (GTV), defined on the preoperative scan, and clip clinical target volume (CTV) (clips with a 5-mm margin on the postoperative scan) was then studied, by use of commercial volume analysis software. Results: Of the patients, 4 had two clips, 2 had three clips, 8 had four clips, and 8 had five clips. The median GTV was 1.06 mL (range, 0.2-5.3 mL); clip CTV ranged from 2.4 to 21.5 mL. Volumetric analysis showed that in 7 cases (32%), there was no intersection between the GTV and the clip CTV, with the following distribution: 4 patients with two clips, 1 patient with three clips, 1 patient with four clips, and 1 patient with five clips. The common contoured volume was defined as the percent ratio between the intersection of the GTV and clip CTV and the GTV. It was found to be significantly increased if three or more clips were used vs. only two clips (common contoured volume, 35.45% vs. 0.73%; p = 0.028). Finally, the GTV and clip CTV volume relationship can be presented as follows: 12.5% to 33% overlap in 8 patients (36.4%), 50% to 75% in 5 patients (22.7%), and greater than 90% in 2 patients (9%). Conclusions: The use of three or more clips during tumorectomy increases the accuracy of tumor bed delineation.

  8. Dispersed plug flow model for upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors with focus on granular sludge dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhnyi, Sergey V; Fedorovich, Vyacheslav V; Lens, Piet

    2006-03-01

    A new approach to model upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB)-reactors, referred to as a one-dimensional dispersed plug flow model, was developed. This model focusses on the granular sludge dynamics along the reactor height, based on the balance between dispersion, sedimentation and convection using one-dimensional (with regard to reactor height) equations. A universal description of both the fluid hydrodynamics and granular sludge dynamics was elaborated by applying known physical laws and empirical relations derived from experimental observations. In addition, the developed model includes: (1) multiple-reaction stoichiometry, (2) microbial growth kinetics, (3) equilibrium chemistry in the liquid phase, (4) major solid-liquid-gas interactions, and (5) material balances for dissolved and solid components along the reactor height. The integrated model has been validated with a set of experimental data on the start-up, operation performance, sludge dynamics, and solute intermediate concentration profiles of a UASB reactor treating cheese whey [Yan et al. (1989) Biol Wastes 27:289-305; Yan et al. (1993) Biotechnol Bioeng 41:700-706]. A sensitivity analysis of the model, performed with regard to the seed sludge characteristics and the key model parameters, showed that the output of the dispersed plug flow model was most influenced by the sludge settleability characteristics and the growth properties (especially mu(m)) of both protein-degrading bacteria and acetotrophic methanogens.

  9. WE-E-BRE-12: Tumor Microenvironment Dynamics Following Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, D; Niles, D; Adamson, E; Torres, A; Kissick, M; Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This work aims to understand the radiation-induced interplay between tumor oxygenation and metabolic activity. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Using patient-derived xenografts of head and neck cancer we assessed tumor oxygenation via fiber-optic probe monitored hemoglobin saturation and Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) MRI. Measurements were taken before and after a 10 Gy dose of radiation. Changes in metabolic activity were measured via Fluorescence Lifetime IMaging (FLIM) with the appropriate controls following a 10 Gy dose of radiation. FLIM can non-invasively monitor changes in fluorescence in response to the microenvironment including being able to detect free and bound states of the intrinsically fluorescent metabolite NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide). With this information FLIM can accurately quantify the metabolic state of cells that have been radiated. To model the observed changes, a two-compartment, source-sink simulation relating hemoglobin saturation and metabolic activity was performed using MATLAB. Results: Hemoglobin saturation as measured by interstitial probe and BOLD-MRI decreased by 30% within 15 minutes following radiation. FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways. Simulation of radiation-induced alterations in tumor oxygenation demonstrated that these changes can be the result of changes in either vasculature or metabolic activity. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in hemoglobin saturation and metabolic activity. These alterations occur on time scales approximately the duration of common radiation treatments. Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response

  10. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  11. Dynamical and technological consequences of multiple isolas of steady states in a catalytic fluidised-bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizon Katarzyna

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state characteristics of a catalytic fluidised bed reactor and its dynamical consequences are analyzed. The occurrence of an untypical steady-state structure manifesting in a form of multiple isolas is described. A two-phase bubbling bed model is used for a quantitative description of the bed of catalyst. The influence of heat exchange intensity and a fluidisation ratio onto the generation of isolated solution branches is presented for two kinetic schemes. Dynamical consequences of the coexistence of such untypical branches of steady states are presented. The impact of linear growth of the fluidisation ratio and step change of the cooling medium temperature onto the desired product yield is analyzed. The results presented in this study confirm that the identification of a region of the occurrence of multiple isolas is important due to their strong impact both on the process start-up and its control.

  12. Experimental validation of granular dynamics simulations of gas-fluidised beds with homogeneous inflow conditions using Positron Emission Particle Tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoomans, B.P.B.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Mohd Salleh, M.; Seville, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    A hard-sphere granular dynamics model of a two-dimensional gas-fluidised bed was experimentally validated using Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT). In the model the Newtonian equations of motion are solved for each solid particle while taking into account the particle¿particle and

  13. Pattern transition, microstructure, and dynamics in a two-dimensional vibrofluidized granular bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Istafaul H.; Alam, Meheboob

    2016-05-01

    Experiments are conducted in a two-dimensional monolayer vibrofluidized bed of glass beads, with a goal to understand the transition scenario and the underlying microstructure and dynamics in different patterned states. At small shaking accelerations (Γ =A ω2/g Leidenfrost state") to "2-roll convection" to "1-roll convection" and finally to a gas-like state. For a given length of the container, the coarsening of multiple convection rolls leading to the genesis of a "single-roll" structure (dubbed the multiroll transition) and its subsequent transition to a granular gas are two findings of this work. We show that the critical shaking intensity (ΓBBLS) for the BB→LS transition has a power-law dependence on the particle loading (F =h0/d , where h0 is the number of particle layers at rest and d is the particle diameter) and the shaking amplitude (A /d ). The characteristics of BB and LS states are studied by calculating (i) the coarse-grained density and temperature profiles and (ii) the pair correlation function. It is shown that while the contact network of particles in the BB state represents a hexagonal-packed structure, the contact network within the "floating cluster" of the LS resembles a liquid-like state. An unsteadiness of the Leidenfrost state has been uncovered wherein the interface (between the floating cluster and the dilute collisional layer underneath) and the top of the bed are found to oscillate sinusoidally, with the oscillation frequency closely matching the frequency of external shaking. Therefore, the granular Leidenfrost state is a period-1 wave as is the case for the BB state.

  14. Bedform dynamics in a large sand-bedded river using multibeam echo sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, C. M.; Jacobson, R. B.; Erwin, S.; Eric, A. B.; DeLonay, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution repeat multibeam Echo Sounder (MBES) surveys of the Lower Missouri River in Missouri, USA demonstrate sand bedform movement at a variety of scales over a range of discharges. Understanding dune transport rates and the temporal and spatial variability in sizes across the channel has implications for how sediment transport measurements are made and for understanding the dynamics of habitats utilized by benthic organisms over a range of life stages. Nearly 800 miles of the Lower Missouri River has been altered through channelization and bank stabilization that began in the early 1900's for navigation purposes. Channelization of the Lower Missouri River has created a self-scouring navigation channel with large dunes that migrate downstream over a wide range of discharges. Until the use of MBES surveys on the Missouri River the spatial variability of dune forms in the Missouri River navigation channel was poorly understood. MBES surveys allow for visualization of a range of sand bedforms and repeat measurements demonstrate that dunes are moving over a wide range of discharges on the river. Understanding the spatial variability of dunes and dune movement across the channel and in different channel settings (bends, channel cross-overs, near channel structures) will inform emerging methods in sediment transport measurement that use bedform differencing calculations and provide context for physical bedload sediment sampling on large sand-bedded rivers. Multiple benthic fish species of interest including the endangered pallid sturgeon utilize Missouri River dune fields and adjacent regions for migration, feeding, spawning, early development and dispersal. Surveys using MBES and other hydroacoustic tools provide fisheries biologists with broad new insights into the functionality of bedforms as habitat for critical life stages of large river fish species in the Missouri River, and similar sand-bedded systems.

  15. Skin tumor area extraction using an improved dynamic programming approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Qaisar; Celebi, M E; Fondón García, Irene

    2012-05-01

    Border (B) description of melanoma and other pigmented skin lesions is one of the most important tasks for the clinical diagnosis of dermoscopy images using the ABCD rule. For an accurate description of the border, there must be an effective skin tumor area extraction (STAE) method. However, this task is complicated due to uneven illumination, artifacts present in the lesions and smooth areas or fuzzy borders of the desired regions. In this paper, a novel STAE algorithm based on improved dynamic programming (IDP) is presented. The STAE technique consists of the following four steps: color space transform, pre-processing, rough tumor area detection and refinement of the segmented area. The procedure is performed in the CIE L(*) a(*) b(*) color space, which is approximately uniform and is therefore related to dermatologist's perception. After pre-processing the skin lesions to reduce artifacts, the DP algorithm is improved by introducing a local cost function, which is based on color and texture weights. The STAE method is tested on a total of 100 dermoscopic images. In order to compare the performance of STAE with other state-of-the-art algorithms, various statistical measures based on dermatologist-drawn borders are utilized as a ground truth. The proposed method outperforms the others with a sensitivity of 96.64%, a specificity of 98.14% and an error probability of 5.23%. The results demonstrate that this STAE method by IDP is an effective solution when compared with other state-of-the-art segmentation techniques. The proposed method can accurately extract tumor borders in dermoscopy images. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Dynamics of shallow lateral shear layers: Experimental study in a river with a sandy bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhodolov, Alexander N.; Schnauder, Ingo; Uijttewaal, Wim S. J.

    2010-11-01

    Shallow lateral shear layers forming between flows with different velocities, though essential for mixing processes in natural streams, have been examined only in laboratory settings using smooth, fixed-bed channels. This paper reports the results of an experimental study of a shear layer in a straight reach of a natural river where the layer, in contrast to the two-dimensional structure observed in the laboratory, is highly three-dimensional. The study included pronounced transverse pressure gradients, which influenced shear layer structure compared to flume experiments. It also introduces an analysis that complements conventional theory on mixing layers. The lateral velocity gradient between the flows downstream from a splitter plate placed in the river, the principal controlling factor, was adjusted for three experimental runs to determine the influence of different gradients on shear-layer dynamics. In each run, detailed three-dimensional measurements of mean and turbulent characteristics were obtained at five cross sections downstream from the splitter plate. Although experimental results agreed with conventional mixing-layer theories with respect to turbulence, the dynamics of the shear layers were dominated by the mean lateral fluxes of momentum. After re-examining the governing equations, we developed a parabolic equation describing the shear layer evolution and several scaling relations for essential terms of the energy budget: mean and turbulent lateral fluxes of momentum, turbulent kinetic energy, and dissipation rates. The study also provides insight into the spectral dynamics of turbulence in the shear layer and clarifies previous observations reported for confluences in natural streams.

  17. An Investigation of Power Stabilization and Space-Dependent Dynamics of a Nuclear Fluidized-Bed Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pain, Christopher C.; Eaton, Matthew D.; Gomes, Jefferson L.M.A.; Oliveira, Cassiano R.E. de; Umpleby, Adrian P.; Ziver, Kemal; Ackroyd, Ron T.; Miles, Bryan; Goddard, Antony J.H.; Dam, H. van; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Lathouwers, D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous work into the space-dependent kinetics of the conceptual nuclear fluidized bed has highlighted the sensitivity of fission power to particle movements within the bed. The work presented in this paper investigates a method of stabilizing the fission power by making it less sensitive to fuel particle movement. Steady-state neutronic calculations are performed to obtain a suitable design that is stable to radial and axial fuel particle movements in the bed. Detailed spatial/temporal simulations performed using the finite element transient criticality (FETCH) code investigate the dynamics of the new reactor design. A dual requirement of the design is that it has a moderate power output of ∼300 MW(thermal)

  18. Dynamic Flow Behavior Measurements in Gas-Solid Fluidized Beds Using Different Non-Intrusive Techniques and Polyethylene Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bangyou; Yu, Guang; Bellehumeur, Celine; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2007-06-01

    Pressure fluctuations and X-ray computed tomography (CT) measurements were utilized to characterize the flow behavior of gas-solid fluidized beds using polyethylene particles in three Plexiglas columns with diameters of 10cm, 20cm, and 30cm. Air was used as the gas phase. Gas-solids flow dynamic under ambient conditions was characterized from statistical analysis of pressure fluctuation data and CT images. The time-averaged voidage distribution, bubble phase area fraction, bubble diameter and bubble number distribution varying with the bed heights were extracted from all the three columns. Bed scales had significant effect on the hydrodynamics. Scale up effects on the gas-solids two-phase flow behavior were discussed.

  19. Mimicking pestcide percolation dynamics in ditches bed by successive column infltration experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dages, Cecile; Samouelian, Anatja; Storck, Veronika; Negro, Sandrine; Huttel, Olivier; Voltz, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Soil layers underlying ditch beds acquire specific characteristics due to ii) hydrological and erosion/deposition processes occurring within the ditch and ii) management practices (burning, dredging, mowing, …). For example, organic matter contents of the ditch beds can be larger than those in neighboring fields, since ditches act as buffer zones. Besides, in Mediterranean catchments, farmed ditches are known to be zones of groundwater recharge and thereby may contribute to groundwater pollution. The role of farmed ditches in groundwater contamination needs therefore to be clarified. The purpose of this study was to determine the dynamic of pesticide percolation in infiltrating farmed ditches bed during a sequence of flood events. A complementary aim was to determine to which extent pesticide percolation from the ditches is correlated to surface flow water contamination. A succession of 9 flood simulations were performed on an undisturbed soil column sampled in the a ditch of the Roujan catchment (Hérault, France), which belongs to the long term Mediterranean hydrological observatory OMERE (Voltz and Albergel, 2002). The soil column was 15 cm long with a 15 cm inner-diameter. For the first 5 flood simulations, injected water was doped with 14C-diuron, an herbicide used in vineyards; uncontaminated water was injected for the last 4 simulations. Free drainage was imposed at the bottom of the column. Diuron concentration was kept constant during a simulated infiltration experiment, but it was progressively decreased from 1000 to 0 µg/L along the succession of the 9 events to mimic the observed seasonal variation of mean diuron concentration in surface flow at the study site (Louchart et al., 2001). Additionally, the first flood simulation was performed with tritium water to assess references on conservative transport within the soil column. For each simulation, the inflow and outflow hydrogram and chemogram were monitored. Extractable (water and solvent) and non

  20. Dynamics and pattern transition in a two-dimensional vibrofluidized granular bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mohammed Istafaul Haque; Alam, Meheboob

    2017-11-01

    Experiments are conducted in a two-dimensional monolayer vibrofluidized bed of glass beads, with an aim to study the dynamics and the transition scenario in different patterned states. At small shaking accelerations (Γ = Aω2 / g Leidenfrost state'') to ``2-roll convection'' to ``1-roll convection'' and finally to a gas-like state. For a given length of the container, the coarsening of multiple convection rolls leading to the genesis of a ``single-roll'' structure (dubbed the ``multiroll transition'') and its subsequent transition to a granular gas are two findings of this work. We show that the critical shaking intensity ΓBBLS for the BB -> LS transition has a power-law dependence on the particle loading (F) and the shaking amplitude (A / d). This work has been generously funded by the Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India, via ``DAE-Science Research Council (SRC) Outstanding Research Investigator Award'' to M.A. (Project No. 2010/21/06-BRNS).

  1. Facilitating in vivo tumor localization by principal component analysis based on dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Chen, Maomao; Wu, Junyu; Zhou, Yuan; Cai, Chuangjian; Wang, Daliang; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging has been used to target tumors in mice with xenograft tumors. However, tumor imaging is largely distorted by the aggregation of fluorescent probes in the liver. A principal component analysis (PCA)-based strategy was applied on the in vivo dynamic fluorescence imaging results of three mice with xenograft tumors to facilitate tumor imaging, with the help of a tumor-specific fluorescent probe. Tumor-relevant features were extracted from the original images by PCA and represented by the principal component (PC) maps. The second principal component (PC2) map represented the tumor-related features, and the first principal component (PC1) map retained the original pharmacokinetic profiles, especially of the liver. The distribution patterns of the PC2 map of the tumor-bearing mice were in good agreement with the actual tumor location. The tumor-to-liver ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher on the PC2 map than on the original images, thus distinguishing the tumor from its nearby fluorescence noise of liver. The results suggest that the PC2 map could serve as a bioimaging marker to facilitate in vivo tumor localization, and dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging with PCA could be a valuable tool for future studies of in vivo tumor metabolism and progression.

  2. The Dynamic Behavior of Water Flowing Through Packed Bed of Different Particle Shapes and Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneen Ahmed Jasim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted on pressure drop of water flow through vertical cylindrical packed beds in turbulent region and the influence of the operating parameters on its behavior. The bed packing was made of spherical and non-spherical particles (spheres, Rasching rings and intalox saddle with aspect ratio range 3.46 D/dp 8.486 obtaining bed porosities 0.396 0.84 and Reynolds number 1217 21758. The system is consisted of 5 cm inside diameter Perspex column, 50 cm long; distilled water was pumped through the bed with flow rate 875, 1000, 1125, 1250,1375 and 1500 l/h and inlet water temperature 20, 30, 40 and 50 ˚C. The packed bed system was monitored by using LabVIEW program, were the results have been obtained from Data Acquisition Adaptor (DAQ.

  3. Review of PSI studies on reactor physics and thermal fluid dynamics of pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Switzerland is member of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). The related work takes entirely place at PSI in the working groups of Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors and Very High Temperature Reactors. In the past, PSI has performed experimental and theoretical studies on criticality issues of pebble beds at the PROTEUS reactor, as well as a preliminary risk assessment of a prototypal HTR as an input for a comparison of energy supply options. PROTEUS was a critical assembly with an annular driver zone. The central region was filled by arrangements of fuel spheres. The reactivity effect of a water ingress was investigated by simulating the water by polyethylene rods of different diameter inserted into the gaps of a regular package. For sub-criticality measurements in pebble beds, a built-in pulsed neutron source was used. The experimental results were used to validate diffusion and higher order neutron transport models. Concerning thermal hydraulics of gas flows, the vast experience of PSI is focused on hydrogen transport, accumulation, and dispersion in containments of light water reactors. The phenomena are comparable in many aspects to the fluid dynamic issues relevant to HTR. Experiments on hydrogen flows are performed for numerous scenarios in the large-scale containment test facility PANDA. Hydrogen is substituted by helium as a model fluid. An important generic aspect is turbulent mixing in the presence of strong stratification, which is relevant for HTR as well. In a parallel project, generic small-scale mixing experiments with a high density ratio of 1:7 are carried out in a horizontal rectangular channel, where helium and nitrogen flows are brought into contact downstream of the rear edge of a splitter plate. Due to the high density ratio, turbulent mixing is affected by strong non-Boussinesq effects. The measurements taken by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Induced Fluorescence techniques are compared to RANS and LES simulations. Similar large

  4. A Multi-Institutional Study of Feasibility, Implementation, and Early Clinical Results With Noninvasive Breast Brachytherapy for Tumor Bed Boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, Subarna, E-mail: shamid@tuftsmedicalcenter.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Rocchio, Kathy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Arthur, Douglas; Vera, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Sha, Sandra; Jolly, Michele [Central Florida Cancer Institute, Davenport, FL (United States); Cavanaugh, Sean; Wooten, Eric [Atlanta Oncology Associates, Hawkinsville, GA (United States); Benda, Rashmi; Greenfield, Brad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boca Raton Community Hospital, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Prestidge, Bradley [Texas Cancer Clinic, San Antonio, TX (United States); Ackerman, Scot [First Coast Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Kuske, Robert; Quiet, Coral; Snyder, Margaret [Arizona Breast Cancer Specialists, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, implementation, and early results of noninvasive breast brachytherapy (NIBB) for tumor bed boost with whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: NIBB is a commercially available (AccuBoost, Billerica, MA) mammography-based, brachytherapy system in which the treatment applicators are centered on the planning target volume (PTV) to direct {sup 192}Ir emissions along orthogonal axes. A privacy-encrypted online data registry collected information from 8 independent academic and community-based institutions. Data were from 146 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer after lumpectomy and WBRT receiving boost with NIBB between July 2007 and March 2010. Toxicity and cosmesis were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (v. 3.0) and the Harvard scale. Median follow-up was 6 months (1-39 months). Results: Grade 1-2 skin toxicity was observed in 64%, 48%, and 21% during the acute (1-3 weeks), intermediate (4-26 weeks), and late-intermediate (>26 weeks) periods. There was no Grade 4 toxicity. At 6 months, for the entire cohort, cosmesis was excellent/good in 62%/38%. The subset receiving NIBB before WBRT had cosmetic scores of 32% and 63%, whereas during WBRT, 58% and 37% were rated as excellent and good, respectively. Breast compression was scored as 'uncomfortable' in 12%, 29%, and 59% when NIBB was delivered before, during, or after WBRT. For each patient, the fraction-to-fraction variability in PTV was low. Skin flash was associated with a higher proportion of excellent cosmesis (58% vs. 42%) relative to having the applicator all within breast tissue. Conclusions: These data indicate that NIBB is feasible and can be consistently implemented in a broad array of practice settings. Preliminary evaluation suggests that NIBB is associated with acceptably mild normal tissue toxicity and favorable early cosmesis. The application of NIBB before WBRT may be associated with better patient tolerance

  5. Fluidized bed spray granulation: analysis of heat and mass transfers and dynamic particle populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Heinrich

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A model was developed taking into consideration the heat and mass transfer processes in liquid-sprayed fluidized beds. Such fluidized beds (FB are used for granulation, coating and agglomeration. Conclusions are drawn on the relevance of particle dispersion, spraying and drying to temperature and concentrations distributions. In extension, the model was coupled with a population balance model to describe the particle size distribution and the seeds formation for continuous external FBSG (fluidized bed spray granulation with non-classifying product discharge and a screening and milling unit in the seeds recycle. The effects of seeds formation on the stability of the process is discussed.

  6. Continuous monitoring bed-level dynamics on an intertidal flat: Introducing novel, stand-alone high-resolution SED-sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Z.; Lenting, W.; Van der Wal, D.; Bouma, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Tidal flat morphology is continuously shaped by hydrodynamic forces, resulting in a highly dynamic bed surface. The knowledge of short-term bed-level changes is important both for assessing sediment transport processes as well as for understanding critical ecological processes, such as vegetation

  7. SU-C-BRE-02: BED Vs. Local Control: Radiobiological Effect of Tumor Volume in Monte Carlo (MC) Lung SBRT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Estes, C; Park, J; Kumar, P; Wang, F [UniversityKansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT with hypofractionated dose schemata has emerged a compelling treatment modality for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer patients. It requires more accurate dose calculation and treatment delivery technique. This report presents the relationship between tumor control probability(TCP) and size-adjusted biological effective dose(sBED) of tumor volume for MC lung SBRT patients. Methods: Fifteen patients who were treated with MC-based lung SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions to PTVV100%=95% were studied. ITVs were delineated on MIP images of 4DCT-scans. PTVs diameter(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 2.7–4.9cm (mean 3.7cm). Plans were generated using non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVMC algorithm (BrainLABiPlan ver.4.1.2) for Novalis-TX with HD-MLCs and 6MVSRS(1000MU/min) mode, following RTOG-0813 dosimetric guidelines. To understand the known uncertainties of conventional heterogeneities-corrected/uncorrected pencil beam (PBhete/ PB-homo) algorithms, dose distributions were re-calculated with PBhete/ PB-homo using same beam configurations, MLCs and monitor units. Biologically effective dose(BED10) was computed using LQ-model with α/β=10Gy for meanPTV and meanITV. BED10-c*L, gave size-adjusted BED(sBED), where c=10Gy/cm and L=PTV diameter in centimeter. The TCP model was adopted from Ohri et al.(IJROBP, 2012): TCP = exp[sBEDTCD50]/ k /(1.0 + exp[sBED-TCD50]/k), where k=31Gy corresponding to TCD50=0Gy; and more realistic MC-based TCP was computed for PTV(V99%). Results: Mean PTV PB-hete TCP value was 6% higher, but, mean PTV PB-homo TCP value was 4% lower compared to mean PTV MC TCP. Mean ITV PB-hete/PB-homo TCP values were comparable (within ±3.0%) to mean ITV MC TCP. The mean PTV(V99%)had BED10=90.9±3.7%(median=92.2%),sBED=54.1±8.2%(median=53.5%) corresponding to mean MC TCP value of 84.8±3.3%(median=84.9%) at 2- year local control. Conclusion: The TCP model which incorporates BED10 and tumor diameter indicates that radiobiological

  8. Dynamic simulation of a pebble bed high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodnizki, J.

    1988-09-01

    A safety analysis of the PNP 500 High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) was performed. The fuel is embedded in a matrix of graphite spheres containing UO 2 particles - Pebble Bed Reactor, and the output power of the plant is 500 MW (t). The safety analysis is aimed at describing the system behavior following perturbations in its state variables. Anticipated transients were studied using full-scale simulation of the PNP 500, and the resulting temperatures, pressures and mass flows were compared with their permitted values. The analysis was performed in a modular form in which each module stands for a physical component. The computer code was written using DSNP - Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants - and the modules developed for HTGR were introduced into the DSNP libraries. The results obtained by simulation of the modules were compared with those derived from analytical calculations. The Gear integration method was included in the DSNP and a new integration method was developed for stiff equations (using the second order Runge - Kutta method with exponential fitting). These integration methods were compared with older ones, and Gear's was found to give the best performance. The following transients were studied: (a) a loss of coolent accident, (b) a step perturbation in reactivity, (c) a step reduction in turbine power, (d) coastdown of the main cooling system. The PNP was found to have a slow reaction time due to its high graphite heat capacity. The consequences of the studied accidents were shown to be limited due to the inherent safety features of the HTGR. The results were compared and found to be in good agreement with those obtained from the COROX and SHOVAV-JUL codes. (author)

  9. The value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in characterizing complex ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Ming; Qiang, Jin-Wei; Ma, Feng-Hua; Zhao, Shu-Hui

    2017-01-14

    The study aimed to investigate the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in the differentiation of malignant, borderline, and benign complex ovarian tumors. DCE-MRI data of 102 consecutive complex ovarian tumors (benign 15, borderline 16, and malignant 71), confirmed by surgery and histopathology, were analyzed retrospectively. The patterns (I, II, and III) of time-signal intensity curve (TIC) and three semi-quantitative parameters, including enhancement amplitude (EA), maximal slope (MS), and time of half rising (THR), were evaluated and compared among benign, borderline, and malignant ovarian tumors. The types of TIC were compared by Pearson Chi-square χ 2 between malignant and benign, borderline tumors. The mean values of EA, MS, and THR were compared using one-way ANOVA or nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Fifty-nine of 71 (83%) malignant tumors showed a type-III TIC; 9 of 16 (56%) borderline tumors showed a type-II TIC, and 10 of 15 (67%) benign tumors showed a type-II TIC, with a statistically significant difference between malignant and benign tumors (P tumors (P tumors than in benign tumors and in borderline than in benign tumors (P tumors than in benign tumors and in borderline than in benign tumors (P tumors in MS and THR (P = 0.19, 0.153) or among malignant, borderline, and benign tumors in EA (all P > 0.05). DCE-MRI is helpful for characterizing complex ovarian tumors; however, semi-quantitative parameters perform poorly when distinguishing malignant from borderline tumors.

  10. Investigation of Gas Solid Fluidized Bed Dynamics with Non-Spherical Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhuri, Ahsan [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2013-06-30

    One of the largest challenges for 21st century is to fulfill global energy demand while also reducing detrimental impacts of energy generation and use on the environment. Gasification is a promising technology to meet the requirement of reduced emissions without compromising performance. Coal gasification is not an incinerating process; rather than burning coal completely a partial combustion takes place in the presence of steam and limited amounts of oxygen. In this controlled environment, a chemical reaction takes place to produce a mixture of clean synthetic gas. Gas-solid fluidized bed is one such type of gasification technology. During gasification, the mixing behavior of solid (coal) and gas and their flow patterns can be very complicated to understand. Many attempts have taken place in laboratory scale to understand bed hydrodynamics with spherical particles though in actual applications with coal, the particles are non-spherical. This issue drove the documented attempt presented here to investigate fluidized bed behavior using different ranges of non-spherical particles, as well as spherical. For this investigation, various parameters are controlled that included particle size, bed height, bed diameter and particle shape. Particles ranged from 355 µm to 1180 µm, bed diameter varied from 2 cm to 7 cm, two fluidized beds with diameters of 3.4 cm and 12.4 cm, for the spherical and non-spherical shaped particles that were taken into consideration. Pressure drop was measured with increasing superficial gas velocity. The velocity required in order to start to fluidize the particle is called the minimum fluidization velocity, which is one of the most important parameters to design and optimize within a gas-solid fluidized bed. This minimum fluidization velocity was monitored during investigation while observing variables factors and their effect on this velocity. From our investigation, it has been found that minimum fluidization velocity is independent of bed

  11. Significant bed elevation changes related to Gulf Stream dynamics on the South Carolina continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfenbaum, G.; Noble, M.

    1993-01-01

    Photographs of the seabed taken from an instrumented bottom tripod located approximately 100 km east of Charleston, South Carolina, reveal bed elevation changes of over 20 cm between July and November 1978. The tripod was in 85 m of water and was equipped with two current meters at 38.7 and 100 cm from the bed, a pressure sensor, a transmissometer, which fouled early during the deployment, a temperature sensor and a camera. The sediment under the tripod was composed of poorly sorted sand, some shell debris and numerous small biological tubes. Bed roughness varied throughout the deployment from biologically-produced mounds (2-5 cm high and 5-20 cm diameter) to streaks to a smooth bed, depending upon the frequency and magnitude of the sediment transporting events. Even though these events were common, especially during the later part of the deployment, the bed was rarely rippled, and there was no evidence of large bedforms such as dunes or sand waves migrating through the field of view of the camera. Photographs did clearly show, however, a gradual net deposition of the bed of nearly 20 cm, followed by erosion of approximately 5 cm. The flow field near the bed was dominated by sub-tidal period currents. Hourly-averaged currents at 100 cm from the bed typically varied between 10 and 30 cm s-1 and occasionally were as high as 60 cm s-1. The large flow events were predominantly toward the southwest along the shelf in the opposite direction of the northeast flowing Gulf Stream. The cross-shore component of the flow near the bed was predominantly directed offshore due to a local topographic steering effect. Current, temperature and satellite data suggest that the largest flow events were associated with the advection of Gulf Stream filaments past the tripod. Erosion events, as seen from the photographs, were highly correlated with the passage of these Gulf Stream filaments past the tripod. Gradual deposition of sediment, which occurred during the first half of the

  12. Modeling of waste/near field interactions for a waste repository in bedded salt: the Dynamic Network (DNET) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranwell, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Analysis Division of Sandia National Laboratories has been funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a methodology for use in assessing the long-term risk from the disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations. As part of this program, the Dynamic Network (DNET) model was developed to investigate waste/near field interactions associated with the disposal of radioactive wastes in bedded salt formations. The model is a quasi-multi-dimensional network model with capabilities for simulating processes such as fluid flow, heat transport, salt dissolution, salt creep, and the effects of thermal expansion and subsedence on the rock units surrounding the repository. The use of DNET has been demonstrated in the analysis of a hypothetical disposal site containing a bedded salt formation as the host medium for the repository. An example of this demonstration analysis is discussed. Furthermore, the outcome of sensitivity analyses performed on the DNET model are presented

  13. Optimization and scale-up of oligonucleotide synthesis in packed bed reactors using computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrum, Christian; Josten, Andre; Götz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the analysis of oligonucleotide synthesis in packed bed reactors was developed and used to optimize the scale up of the process. The model includes reaction kinetics data obtained under well defined conditions comparable to the situation in the packed bed. The model was validated in terms of flow conditions and reaction kinetics by comparison with experimental data. Experimental validation and the following model parameter studies by simulation were performed on the basis of a column with 0.3 g oligonucleotide capacity. The scale-up studies based on CFD modelling were calculated on a 440 g scale (oligonucleotide capacity). © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  14. Dynamic evaluation of a fixed bed anaerobic digestion process in response to organic overloads and toxicant shock loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupla, M; Conte, T; Bouvier, J C; Bernet, N; Steyer, J P

    2004-01-01

    This paper details a dynamic evaluation of a 1 m3 fixed bed anaerobic digestion reactor in response to organic overloads and toxicant shock loads. Raw industrial wine distillery wastewater was used as a reference substrate and several disturbances were applied to the process: (i) organic overloads with and without pH regulation in the feeding line, (ii) adding of ammonia in the input wastewater. The purpose of this study was to assess, using on-line instrumentation, the robustness of a fixed bed anaerobic digester. Anaerobic digestion processes have the reputation of being difficult to operate and prone to process instability due to external disturbances and the objective of this study was to demonstrate the possibility of such a reactor configuration for industrial use.

  15. Batch top-spray fluid bed coating: Scale-up insight using dynamic heat- and mass-transfer modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, P.; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2009-01-01

    volumes. In each control volume, dynamic heat and mass balances were set up allowing the simulation of the contents of water vapour, water on core particles and deposited coating mass as well as fluidisation gas, particle and chamber wall temperature. The model was used to test different scale....../3). Results show good agreement between simulated and experimental outlet fluidisation air temperature and humidity as well as bed temperature. Simulations reveal that vertical temperature and humidity gradients increase significantly with increasing scale and that in fluid beds as the simulated 900kg (RICA......-TEC Anhydro) production-scale, the gradients become too large to use the simple combined drying force/relative droplet size scale-up approach without also increasing the inlet fluidisation air temperature significantly. Instead, scale-up in terms of combinations of the viscous Stokes theory with simulated...

  16. Relative Biologic Effectiveness (RBE) of 50 kV X-rays Measured in a Phantom for Intraoperative Tumor-Bed Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Schneider, Frank; Ma, Lin; Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Herskind, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.herskind@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) with low-energy x-rays is used to treat the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery. The purpose was to determine the relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of 50-kV x-rays for inactivation of cells irradiated in a tumor-bed phantom. Methods and Materials: The RBE was determined for clonogenic inactivation of human tumor and normal cells (MCF7, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, normal skin fibroblasts), and hamster V79 cells. The 50-kV x-rays from the Intrabeam machine (Carl Zeiss Surgical) with a spherical 4-cm applicator were used. Cells were irradiated in a water-equivalent phantom at defined distances (8.1-22.9 mm) from the applicator surface. The 50-kV x-rays from a surface therapy machine (Dermopan, Siemens) were included for comparison; 6-MV x-rays were used as reference radiation. Results: At 8.1-mm depth in the phantom (dose rate 15.1 Gy/h), mean RBE values of 50-kV x-rays from Intrabeam were 1.26 to 1.42 for the 4 cell types at doses yielding surviving fractions in the range of 0.01 to 0.5. Confidence intervals were in the range of 1.2 and 1.5. Similar RBE values were found for 50-kV x-rays from Dermopan for V79 (1.30, CI 1.25-1.36, P=.74) and GS4 (1.42, CI 1.30-1.54, P=.67). No significant dependence of RBE on dose was found for Intrabeam, but RBE decreased at a larger distance (12.7 mm; 9.8 Gy/h). Conclusions: An increased clinically relevant RBE was found for cell irradiation with Intrabeam at depths in the tumor bed targeted by IORT. The reduced RBE values at larger distances may be related to increased repair of sublethal damage during protracted irradiation or to hardening of the photon beam energy.

  17. Conceptual design of a fluidized bed nuclear reactor : Statics, dynamics and safety-related aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agung, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis a conceptual design of an innovative high temperature reactor based on the fluidization principle (FLUBER) is proposed. The reactor should satisfy the following requirements: (a) modular and low power, (b)) large shutdown margin, (c) able to produce power when the bed of particles

  18. A discrete particle simulation study on the influence of restitution coefficient on spout fluidized bed dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buijtenen, M.S.; Deen, N.G.; Heinrich, Stefan; Antonyuk, Sergiy; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Spout fluidized beds find widespread application in the process industry in granulation processes, in which efficient contacting between large particles, droplets and gas is of paramount importance. However, detailed understanding of the complex behavior of these systems is lacking. In this paper,

  19. Granular dynamics simulation of segregation phenomena in bubbling gas-fluidised beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoomans, B.P.B.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2000-01-01

    A hard-sphere discrete particle model of a gas-fluidised bed was used in order to simulate segregation phenomena in systems consisting of particles of different sizes. In the model, the gas-phase hydrodynamics is described by the spatially averaged Navier¿Stokes equations for two-phase flow. For

  20. Bar dynamics and bifurcation evolution in a modelled braided sand-bed river

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, Filip; Kleinhans, Maarten G.

    2015-01-01

    Morphodynamics in sand-bed braided rivers are associated with simultaneous evolution of mid-channel bars and channels on the braidplain. Bifurcations around mid-channel bars are key elements that divide discharge and sediment. This, in turn, may control the evolution of connected branches, with

  1. Field Observation and Numerical Modeling of Bed-Material Transport Dynamics in the Lower Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, M. T.; Allison, M. A.; Meselhe, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding specific pathways for sand transport through the lower reaches of large rivers like the Mississippi is a key to addressing (1) significant source-to-sink geologic problems for sediment and particulate organic carbon and (2) environmental restoration efforts in deltas under threat from climate change. Five field studies were performed in the Mississippi River 75-100 km upstream of the Gulf of Mexico outlet in 2010 and 2011 at discharges ranging from 18,500 to 32,000 m3 s-1 to examine sand transport phenomena in the river channel. These studies utilized multibeam sonar bathymetric surveys, acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements of current velocity and acoustic backscatter, point-integrated isokinetic suspended sediment sampling, and channel-bed grab sampling to examine fluid flow and suspended/bedload sediment transport. Substantial interaction was observed between flow conditions in the river (boundary shear stress, turbulence intensity), channel-bed morphology (size and extent of sandy bedforms), and bed-material sand transport (quantity, transport mode, and spatial distribution). A lateral shift was observed in the region of maximum dune size and water column turbulence intensity from deep to shallow areas of lateral sand bars as water discharge increased, and is associated with the expansion of the bar top area experiencing critical shear stress conditions. Bed material was transported both in traction and in suspension at these water discharges, with the highest suspended mass flux rates associated with the part of the channel cross-section where the largest dunes were present, as a result of a relationship between bed shear stress, dune size, and turbulence intensity. We posit that the downriver flux of sand grains alternates between these two modes over relatively short spatial (up to a few km) and temporal scales. These results complicate the task of using cross-sectional flux measurements taken in lower reaches of large river channels

  2. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungJoon Cho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995. Magn Reson Med 33, 506– 514 derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  3. Two-compartmental population balance modeling of a pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huolong; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-11-20

    In this work a two-compartmental population balance model (TCPBM) was proposed to model a pulsed top-spray fluidized bed granulation. The proposed TCPBM considered the spatially heterogeneous granulation mechanisms of the granule growth by dividing the granulator into two perfectly mixed zones of the wetting compartment and drying compartment, in which the aggregation mechanism was assumed in the wetting compartment and the breakage mechanism was considered in the drying compartment. The sizes of the wetting and drying compartments were constant in the TCPBM, in which 30% of the bed was the wetting compartment and 70% of the bed was the drying compartment. The exchange rate of particles between the wetting and drying compartments was determined by the details of the flow properties and distribution of particles predicted by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The experimental validation has shown that the proposed TCPBM can predict evolution of the granule size and distribution within the granulator under different binder spray operating conditions accurately. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. THE EFFECT OF THE THICKNESS OF A PACKED BED ON THE DYNAMIC AND THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A SOLAR DRYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S KHALDI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drying food in the sun is a safe, easy and economical way to preserve food, especially fruits. Cabinet dryers are the most popular equipment for fruit drying. Because of intermittent nature of solar energy, storage is required for uninterrupted supply in order to match the needs. The main objective of this study is to assess effectiveness of continuous solar dryer integrated with packed bed as thermal storage with natural airflow for drying figs (Ficuscarica. The cabinet dryer were envisaged theoretically (computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The distribution of the velocity and temperature of air within the solar dryer were presented during one day of August and under the climate conditions of Tlemcen (Algeria.  The effects of presence of a packed bed on the distribution of velocity and temperature of airflow and on the temperature of figs were analyzed. The results show that the solar dryer design, incorporating a packed bed enhances the capabilities and performance of the solar dryer, through increasing time of drying.

  5. Prospective Randomized Trial of Prone Accelerated Intensity Modulated Breast Radiation Therapy With a Daily Versus Weekly Boost to the Tumor Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Benjamin T.; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Li, Xiaochun [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Shin, Samuel M.; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Roses, Daniel F. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Hitchen, Christine J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Rosenstein, Barry S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Dewyngaert, J. Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: formenti@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a prospective randomized trial comparing a daily versus weekly boost to the tumor cavity during the course of accelerated radiation to the breast with patients in the prone position. Methods and Materials: From 2009 to 2012, 400 patients with stage 0 to II breast cancer who had undergone segmental mastectomy participated in an institutional review board–approved trial testing prone breast radiation therapy to 40.5 Gy in 15 fractions 5 d/wk to the whole breast, after randomization to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy, on Friday. The present noninferiority trial tested the primary hypothesis that a weekly boost produced no more acute toxicity than did a daily boost. The recurrence-free survival was estimated for both treatment arms using the Kaplan-Meier method; the relative risk of recurrence or death was estimated, and the 2 arms were compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up period of 45 months, no deaths related to breast cancer had occurred. The weekly boost regimen produced no more grade ≥2 acute toxicity than did the daily boost regimen (8.1% vs 10.4%; noninferiority Z = −2.52; P=.006). No statistically significant difference was found in the cumulative incidence of long-term fibrosis or telangiectasia of grade ≥2 between the 2 arms (log-rank P=.923). Two local and two distant recurrences developed in the daily treatment arm and three local and one distant developed in the weekly arm. The 4-year recurrence-free survival rate was not different between the 2 treatment arms (98% for both arms). Conclusions: A tumor bed boost delivered either daily or weekly was tolerated similarly during accelerated prone breast radiation therapy, with excellent control of disease and comparable cosmetic results.

  6. Dynamic education of macrophages in different areas of human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Zheng, Limin

    2012-12-01

    Human tumor tissues can often be anatomically classified into areas of cancer nest, invading edge, and peritumoral stroma, each with distinct compositions and functional properties. Macrophages (Mφ) constitute a major component of the leukocyte infiltrate in tumors. These cells are derived from circulating monocytes, and in response to environmental signals, they exhibit distinct phenotypes with diverse functions. Soluble factors derived from cancer cells can alter the normal developmental process of Mφ that is intended to trigger transient early activation of monocytes in the peritumoral region, which in turn induces formation of suppressive Mφ in cancer nests. The activated monocytes in the peritumoral region attenuated the T-cell response by expressing B7-H1, and were superior to the suppressive tumor Mφ in inducing Th17 expansion, and thus repurpose the inflammatory response away from anti-tumor immunity (the sword) and towards tissue remodeling and proangiogenic pathways (a plowshare). In contrast, the suppressive Mφ can induce the production of Tregs in cancer nest. Accordingly, angiogenesis was most active at the invading edge, which was situated close to the peritumoral stroma with activated Mφ and the density of these activated monocytes is selectively associated with vascular invasion and metastasis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. These data reveal an intriguing mechanism in which human Th17 cells are generated and regulated by a fine-tuned collaborative action between different types of immune cells in distinct tumor microenvironments. These results give important new insights into the distinct role of macrophages in human tumor progression which would be helpful for the rational design of novel immune-based anticancer therapies.

  7. On dynamic tumor eradication conditions under combined chemical/anti-angiogenic therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, Konstantin E.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper ultimate dynamics of the five-dimensional cancer tumor growth model at the angiogenesis phase is studied. This model elaborated by Pinho et al. in 2014 describes interactions between normal/cancer/endothelial cells under chemotherapy/anti-angiogenic agents in tumor growth process. The author derives ultimate upper bounds for normal/tumor/endothelial cells concentrations and ultimate upper and lower bounds for chemical/anti-angiogenic concentrations. Global asymptotic tumor clearance conditions are obtained for two versions: the use of only chemotherapy and the combined application of chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic therapy. These conditions are established as the attraction conditions to the maximum invariant set in the tumor free plane, and furthermore, the case is examined when this set consists only of tumor free equilibrium points.

  8. Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics of Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor Systems Treating Municipal Sewage

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Kristi; Turner, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems are increasingly used for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, yet in contrast to activated sludge (AS) systems, little is known about their constituent microbial communities. This study investigated the community composition of two municipal MBBR wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Wellington, New Zealand. Monthly samples comprising biofilm and suspended biomass were collected over a 12-month period. Bacterial and archaeal community comp...

  9. Conceptual design of a fluidized bed nuclear reactor: Statics, dynamics and safety-related aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Agung, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis a conceptual design of an innovative high temperature reactor based on the fluidization principle (FLUBER) is proposed. The reactor should satisfy the following requirements: (a) modular and low power, (b)) large shutdown margin, (c) able to produce power when the bed of particles expands and stop as soon as the coolant flow is lost, (d) stable from the reactivity point of view, (e) resistant to inherent fluctuations in the fluidization regime, and (f) able to remove post-shutd...

  10. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE DYNAMICS OF TRANSFER PROCESSES DEHYDRATION AND GRANULATION IN A FLUIDIZED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Б.Я. Корнієнко

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  An approach to the description of multivariate process of dehydration and granulation in a fluidized bed, which is accompanied by a phase transition is complicated by the formation of liquid phase on the surface of the pellet, followed by removal of the liquid phase and the formation of a mass crystallization by a layer of microcrystals. Presents a mathematical model of two-phase Euler-Euler.

  11. Experimental and numerical validation of a two-region-designed pebble bed reactor with dynamic core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S.Y.; Yang, X.T.; Tang, Z.W.; Wang, W.J.; Tu, J.Y.; Liu, Z.Y.; Li, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The experimental installation has been built to investigate the pebble flow. ► The feasibility of two-region pebble bed reactor has been verified. ► The pebble flow is more uniform in a taller vessel than that in a lower vessel. ► Larger base cone angle will decrease the scale of the stagnant zone. - Abstract: The pebble flow is the principal issue for the design of the pebble bed reactor. In order to verify the feasibility of a two-region-designed pebble bed reactor, the experimental installation with a taller vessel has been built, which is proportional to the real pebble bed reactor. With the aid of the experimental installation, the stable establishment and maintenance of the two-region arrangement has been verified, at the same time, the applicability of the DEM program has been also validated. Research results show: (1) The pebble's bouncing on the free surface is an important factor for the mixing of the different colored pebbles. (2) Through the guide plates installed in the top of the pebble packing, the size of the mixing zone can be reduced from 6–7 times to 3–4 times the pebble diameter. (3) The relationship between the width of the central region and the ratio of loading pebbles is approximately linear in the taller vessel. (4) The heighten part of the pebble packing can improve the uniformity of the flowing in the lower. (5) To increase the base cone angle can decrease the scale of the stagnant zone. All of these conclusions are meaningful to the design of the real pebble reactor.

  12. Creating a Test Validated Structural Dynamic Finite Element Model of the Multi-Utility Technology Test Bed Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson S.

    2014-01-01

    Small modeling errors in the finite element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of Multi Utility Technology Test Bed, X-56A, aircraft is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression, and therefore in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of X-56A. The ground vibration test validated structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A is improved using a model tuning tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of the X-56A have been improved in a single optimization run.

  13. Value of dynamic enhanced MR imaging in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant ovarian tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan Jun; Xu Jianmin; Gong Jingshan; Wang Xiaomei; Xu Hongli; Feng Xiaofeng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of early phase dynamic enhanced MRI in the differential diagnosis of ovarian tumors. Methods: Early phase dynamic enhanced MRI findings in 68 patients with histopathologically proved ovarian tumors were analyzed. There were 19 cases of benign tumors, 5 cases of low malignant tumors, and 44 cases of malignant tumors. The signal intensity of the solid component of tumor was measured. Peak and the slope value of enhancement were determined from time-signal intensity curve (TIC). The TIC of tumors were divided into three types according to their enhancement manner. In type I, the signal intensity increased rapidly and reached a platform soon. In type II, the signal intensity increased continuously at a slope. In type III, the signal intensity increased slowly. The TIC index of early phase, the time to peak of enhancement, and the slope value of TIC were also evaluated. Results: The TIC of the 19 benign tumors included type III in 13 cases (13/19), type II in 3 cases (3/19), and type I in 3 cases (3/19). There were 41 type I TIC (41/44) and 3 type II TIC (3/44) in the 44 case of malignant tumors. The enhancement index, the time to peak, and the slope value of the benign tumors were (68 ±27)%, (163.53±58.54) s, and (3.56±3.42) during the early phase respectively, while those of malignant ovarian tumors were(128±15)%, (72.89±10.84) s, and (9.69±1.41), respectively. The difference of the enhancement index, the time to peak, and the slope value between benign and malignant ovarian tumors was statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusion: The benign tumors mainly showed type III enhancement curve, with low and delay enhancement, while the malignant ovarian tumors mostly showed type I enhancement curve, with high and early enhancement. The early phase dynamic enhanced MR imaging was helpful in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant ovarian tumors

  14. Dynamic interplay between the collagen scaffold and tumor evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Mikala; Rasch, Morten G; Weaver, Valerie M

    2010-01-01

    and remodeling of the ECM network regulate tissue tension, generate pathways for migration, and release ECM protein fragments to direct normal developmental processes such as branching morphogenesis. Collagens are major components of the ECM of which basement membrane type IV and interstitial matrix type I...... are the most prevalent. Here we discuss how abnormal expression, proteolysis and structure of these collagens influence cellular functions to elicit multiple effects on tumors, including proliferation, initiation, invasion, metastasis, and therapy response....

  15. Quality of Life in Women Undergoing Breast Irradiation in a Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating Different Tumor Bed Boost Fractionations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkel, Morgan A.; Cooper, Benjamin T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Li, Xiaochun [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton-Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: formenti@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in breast cancer patient-reported quality of life (QOL) between 2 radiation tumor bed boost dose regimens. Methods and Materials: Four hundred patients with stage 0, I, or II breast cancer who underwent segmental mastectomy with sentinel node biopsy and/or axillary node dissection were treated with either a daily or weekly boost. Patients were treated prone to 40.5 Gy/15 fractions to the whole breast, 5 days per week. Patients were randomized to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy on Friday. Patients completed 6 validated QOL survey instruments at baseline, last week of treatment (3 weeks), 45-60 days from the completion of radiation treatment, and at 2-year follow-up. Results: There were no statistically significance differences in responses to the 6 QOL instruments between the daily and weekly radiation boost regimens, even after adjustment for important covariates. However, several changes in responses over time occurred in both arms, including worsening functional status, cosmetic status, and breast-specific pain at the end of treatment as compared with before and 45 to 60 days after the conclusion of treatment. Conclusions: Whole-breast, prone intensity modulated radiation has similar outcomes in QOL measures whether given with a daily or weekly boost. This trial has generated the foundation for a current study of weekly versus daily radiation boost in women with early breast cancer in which 3-dimensional conformal radiation is allowed as a prospective stratification factor.

  16. Quality of Life in Women Undergoing Breast Irradiation in a Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating Different Tumor Bed Boost Fractionations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkel, Morgan A.; Cooper, Benjamin T.; Li, Xiaochun; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in breast cancer patient-reported quality of life (QOL) between 2 radiation tumor bed boost dose regimens. Methods and Materials: Four hundred patients with stage 0, I, or II breast cancer who underwent segmental mastectomy with sentinel node biopsy and/or axillary node dissection were treated with either a daily or weekly boost. Patients were treated prone to 40.5 Gy/15 fractions to the whole breast, 5 days per week. Patients were randomized to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy on Friday. Patients completed 6 validated QOL survey instruments at baseline, last week of treatment (3 weeks), 45-60 days from the completion of radiation treatment, and at 2-year follow-up. Results: There were no statistically significance differences in responses to the 6 QOL instruments between the daily and weekly radiation boost regimens, even after adjustment for important covariates. However, several changes in responses over time occurred in both arms, including worsening functional status, cosmetic status, and breast-specific pain at the end of treatment as compared with before and 45 to 60 days after the conclusion of treatment. Conclusions: Whole-breast, prone intensity modulated radiation has similar outcomes in QOL measures whether given with a daily or weekly boost. This trial has generated the foundation for a current study of weekly versus daily radiation boost in women with early breast cancer in which 3-dimensional conformal radiation is allowed as a prospective stratification factor.

  17. Multi-phasic CT versus dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in characterization of parotid gland tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Metwally Abo El Atta; Talal Ahmed Amer; Ghada Mohamed Gaballa; Nehal Tharwat Mohammed El-Sayed

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Salivary gland tumors are challenging as regards preoperative diagnosis. The aim of our study was to highlight the value of multiphasic CT and contrast enhanced dynamic MRI in characterization of benign and malignant parotid tumors as well as to compare diagnostic accuracy of both modalities. Patients and methods: Study group included 45 patients (54 lesions), 26 males and 19 females, their age ranged from 24 to 78 years. All patients underwent both CT and MRI examinations. Time...

  18. Fluid dynamic study of a new type of solid-gas contactor: the fluidized/fixed or fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Bilbao, R.

    1982-10-01

    A fluid dynamic study of a new type of solid-gas contactor has been realized. This contactor consists of a fluidized bed with a considerable enlargement of the cross section of its upper zone. This enlargement of section results in a reduction of the gas velocity in the upper zone, with a subsequent bubbling diminution. Experiments have been performed varying the scale of the contactor, its geometry, the relation between the cross sections of the upper and lower zones of the contactor, the solid height in the upper zone, and the density and size of the solid. The study has been centered on the contactor behavior with variation of the inlet gas velocity, on the bubble size distribution along the contactor, on the determination of the gas pressure drop in the whole contactor and in each zone of the bed, and on the calculation of the gas velocities modifying the state of the contactor (u /SUB r/, u /SUB c/, u /SUB mf/).

  19. Dynamic Study of Feed-Effluent Heat Exchanger Addition on Double Bed Configuration Ammonia Reactor System within Varied Quenching Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhi Tri Partono

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is one of the most important industrial commodity due to its wide function. Ammonia synthesis reaction is an exotermic reaction. Therefore, Feed-Effluent Heat Exchanger (FEHE is added to increase thermal efficiency. However, FEHE could lead the process to experience hysteresis phenomenon due to interaction between equipments as one steady state T feed could result several T outlet. Hysteresis phenomenon may result asset losses like explosion, leakage, and loosing material integrity. Double bed reactor configuration allows us to use several operating parameters as variation to overcome hysteresis. In this review, quenching ratio was chosen to be that varied parameter. This study aims to determine how quenching ratio affects hysteresis zone by utilizing Aspen Hysys® V8.8 as simulation tool. Simulation showed that quenching ratio would narrow hysteresis zone yet increased extinction temperature that lower the conversion. Conversion profile showed that 0.2 quenching ratio got the highest conversion for system with bed volume ratio 2:1 while total volume was 30 m3. However, the feed temperature was fallen at hysteresis zone. Dynamic simulation showed that highest conversion feed temperature (10%ΔTf above extinct temperature was still able to preserve stability with descending temperature approach. Hysteresis itself started to occur at 1.7%ΔTf above extinct temperature

  20. A scaled experimental study of control blade insertion dynamics in Pebble-Bed Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buster, Grant C., E-mail: grant.buster@gmail.com; Laufer, Michael R.; Peterson, Per F.

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • A granular dynamics scaling methodology is discussed. • Control blade insertion in a representative pebble-bed core is experimentally studied. • Control blade insertion forces and pebble displacements are experimentally measured. • X-ray tomography techniques are used to observe pebble displacement distributions. - Abstract: Direct control element insertion into a pebble-bed reactor core is proposed as a viable control system in molten-salt-cooled pebble-bed reactors. Unlike helium-cooled pebble-bed reactors, this reactor type uses spherical fuel elements with near-neutral buoyancy in the molten-salt coolant, thus reducing contact forces on the fuel elements. This study uses the X-ray Pebble Bed Recirculation Experiment facility to measure the force required to insert a control element directly into a scaled pebble-bed. The required control element insertion force, and therefore the contact force on fuel elements, is measured to be well below recommended limits. Additionally, X-ray tomography is used to observe how the direct insertion of a control element physically displaces spherical fuel elements. The tomography results further support the viability of direct control element insertion into molten-salt-cooled pebble-bed reactor cores.

  1. Future Antarctic bed topography and its implications for ice sheet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, S.; Ivins, E. R.; Larour, E.; Seroussi, H.; Morlighem, M.; Nowicki, S.

    2014-06-01

    The Antarctic bedrock is evolving as the solid Earth responds to the past and ongoing evolution of the ice sheet. A recently improved ice loading history suggests that the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) has generally been losing its mass since the Last Glacial Maximum. In a sustained warming climate, the AIS is predicted to retreat at a greater pace, primarily via melting beneath the ice shelves. We employ the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) capability of the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) to combine these past and future ice loadings and provide the new solid Earth computations for the AIS. We find that past loading is relatively less important than future loading for the evolution of the future bed topography. Our computations predict that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) may uplift by a few meters and a few tens of meters at years AD 2100 and 2500, respectively, and that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is likely to remain unchanged or subside minimally except around the Amery Ice Shelf. The Amundsen Sea Sector in particular is predicted to rise at the greatest rate; one hundred years of ice evolution in this region, for example, predicts that the coastline of Pine Island Bay will approach roughly 45 mm yr-1 in viscoelastic vertical motion. Of particular importance, we systematically demonstrate that the effect of a pervasive and large GIA uplift in the WAIS is generally associated with the flattening of reverse bed slope, reduction of local sea depth, and thus the extension of grounding line (GL) towards the continental shelf. Using the 3-D higher-order ice flow capability of ISSM, such a migration of GL is shown to inhibit the ice flow. This negative feedback between the ice sheet and the solid Earth may promote stability in marine portions of the ice sheet in the future.

  2. Future Antarctic Bed Topography and Its Implications for Ice Sheet Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Surendra; Ivins, Erik R.; Larour, Eric Y.; Seroussi, Helene L.; Morlighem, Mathieu; Nowicki, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic bedrock is evolving as the solid Earth responds to the past and ongoing evolution of the ice sheet. A recently improved ice loading history suggests that the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) has generally been losing its mass since the Last Glacial Maximum. In a sustained warming climate, the AIS is predicted to retreat at a greater pace, primarily via melting beneath the ice shelves.We employ the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) capability of the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) to combine these past and future ice loadings and provide the new solid Earth computations for the AIS.We find that past loading is relatively less important than future loading for the evolution of the future bed topography. Our computations predict that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) may uplift by a few meters and a few tens of meters at years AD 2100 and 2500, respectively, and that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is likely to remain unchanged or subside minimally except around the Amery Ice Shelf. The Amundsen Sea Sector in particular is predicted to rise at the greatest rate; one hundred years of ice evolution in this region, for example, predicts that the coastline of Pine Island Bay will approach roughly 45mmyr-1 in viscoelastic vertical motion. Of particular importance, we systematically demonstrate that the effect of a pervasive and large GIA uplift in the WAIS is generally associated with the flattening of reverse bed slope, reduction of local sea depth, and thus the extension of grounding line (GL) towards the continental shelf. Using the 3-D higher-order ice flow capability of ISSM, such a migration of GL is shown to inhibit the ice flow. This negative feedback between the ice sheet and the solid Earth may promote stability in marine portions of the ice sheet in the future.

  3. Minor salivary gland tumors in the oral cavity: Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Hara, Marina; Katase, Naoki; Asaumi, Jun-ichi; Hisatomi, Miki; Unetsubo, Teruhisa; Konouchi, Hironobu; Takenobu, Toshihiko; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for minor salivary gland tumors in the oral cavity. Materials and methods: Thirty-two patients with minor salivary gland tumors were examined preoperatively using DCE-MRI. Their maximum contrast index (CImax), time of CImax (Tmax), Tpeak; i.e., the time that corresponded to the CImax × 0.90, and washout ratios (WR300 and WR600) were determined from contrast index (CI) curves. We compared these parameters between benign and malignant tumors and among the different histopathological types of minor salivary gland tumors. Then, we categorized the patients’ CI curves into four patterns (gradual increase, rapid increase with high washout ratio, rapid increase with low washout, and flat). Results: Statistically significant differences in Tmax (P = 0.004) and Tpeak (P = 0.002) were observed between the benign and malignant tumors. Regarding each histopathological tumor type, significant differences in Tmax (P < 0.001), Tpeak (P < 0.001), and WR600 (P = 0.026) were observed between the pleomorphic adenomas and mucoepidermoid carcinomas. It was difficult to distinguish between benign and malignant tumors using our CI curve classification because that two-thirds of the cases were classified into the same type (gradual increase). Conclusion: The DCE-MRI parameters of minor salivary gland tumors contributed little to their differential diagnosis compared with those for major salivary gland tumors. During the diagnosis of minor salivary gland tumors, Tmax is useful for distinguishing between benign and malignant tumors

  4. Minor salivary gland tumors in the oral cavity: Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Yanagi, Yoshinobu [Department of Oral Diagnosis and Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Okayama University Hospital, 5-1 Shikata-cho, 2-chome, Okayama 700-8525 (Japan); Hara, Marina [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 5-1 Shikata-cho, 2-chome, Okayama 700-8525 (Japan); Katase, Naoki [Department of Oral Pathology and Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 5-1 Shikata-cho, 2-chome, Okayama 700-8525 (Japan); Asaumi, Jun-ichi, E-mail: asaumi@md.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 5-1 Shikata-cho, 2-chome, Okayama 700-8525 (Japan); Hisatomi, Miki; Unetsubo, Teruhisa [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 5-1 Shikata-cho, 2-chome, Okayama 700-8525 (Japan); Konouchi, Hironobu [Department of Oral Diagnosis and Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Okayama University Hospital, 5-1 Shikata-cho, 2-chome, Okayama 700-8525 (Japan); Takenobu, Toshihiko [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 5-1 Shikata-cho, 2-chome, Okayama 700-8525 (Japan); Nagatsuka, Hitoshi [Department of Oral Pathology and Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 5-1 Shikata-cho, 2-chome, Okayama 700-8525 (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for minor salivary gland tumors in the oral cavity. Materials and methods: Thirty-two patients with minor salivary gland tumors were examined preoperatively using DCE-MRI. Their maximum contrast index (CImax), time of CImax (Tmax), Tpeak; i.e., the time that corresponded to the CImax × 0.90, and washout ratios (WR300 and WR600) were determined from contrast index (CI) curves. We compared these parameters between benign and malignant tumors and among the different histopathological types of minor salivary gland tumors. Then, we categorized the patients’ CI curves into four patterns (gradual increase, rapid increase with high washout ratio, rapid increase with low washout, and flat). Results: Statistically significant differences in Tmax (P = 0.004) and Tpeak (P = 0.002) were observed between the benign and malignant tumors. Regarding each histopathological tumor type, significant differences in Tmax (P < 0.001), Tpeak (P < 0.001), and WR600 (P = 0.026) were observed between the pleomorphic adenomas and mucoepidermoid carcinomas. It was difficult to distinguish between benign and malignant tumors using our CI curve classification because that two-thirds of the cases were classified into the same type (gradual increase). Conclusion: The DCE-MRI parameters of minor salivary gland tumors contributed little to their differential diagnosis compared with those for major salivary gland tumors. During the diagnosis of minor salivary gland tumors, Tmax is useful for distinguishing between benign and malignant tumors.

  5. Characterization of fluidization regime in circulating fluidized bed reactor with high solid particle concentration using computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalermsinsuwan, Benjapon; Thummakul, Theeranan; Piumsomboon, Pornpote [Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Gidaspow, Dimitri [Armour College of Engineering, Chicago (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The hydrodynamics inside a high solid particle concentration circulating fluidized bed reactor was investigated using computational fluid dynamics simulation. Compared to a low solid particle reactor, all the conventional fluidization regimes were observed. In addition, two unconventional fluidization regimes, circulating-turbulent and dense suspension bypassing regimes, were found with only primary gas injection. The circulating-turbulent fluidization regime showed uniformly dense solid particle distribution in all the system directions, while the dense suspension bypassing fluidization regime exhibited the flow of solid particles at only one side system wall. Then, comprehensive fluidization regime clarification and mapping were evaluated using in-depth system parameters. In the circulating-turbulent fluidization regime, the total granular temperature was low compared to the adjacent fluidization regimes. In the dense suspension bypassing fluidization regime, the highest total granular temperature was obtained. The circulating-turbulent and dense suspension bypassing fluidization regimes are suitable for sorption and transportation applications, respectively.

  6. The assessment of tumor blood flow factors using dynamic CT; Comparison with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakawa, Emiko (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-03-01

    The dynamic computed tomography (CT) was performed by using rapid-sequence scanning following an intravenous bolus injection of contrast material. Time-density curve was applied for gamma variate curve fitting and CT attenuation values were applied for two compartment model. The value of 1/CM, k[sub 1] and k[sub 2] were defined as the blood flow factors in this study. The inhalation of C[sup 15]O[sub 2] using positron emission tomography (PET) can be useful for determining regional tumor blood flow (rBF). CT and PET were performed in 12 patients. The diagnosis was malignant lymphoma in four, and others; two liver metastases, one focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver, one dermatofibrosarcoma, one hepatocellular carcinoma, one malignant melanoma, one malignant meningioma, one bone metastasis. The correlations among rBF, 1/CM, and k[sub 1] were good, and better correlations were obtained among tumor blood flow factors and rBF in the case of the tumors which existed far from air way and/or had low blood flow. The distance from air way effected both the value of rBF and tumor blood flow factors. Both the distance from air way and pathology caused conflicting results between rBF and tumor blood flow factors. Dynamic CT was particularly useful for evaluating the blood flow of tumors that had contact with air way. (author).

  7. Dynamic visualization the whole process of cytotoxic T lymphocytes killing the B16 tumor cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shuhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) played a key role in the immune system to destroy the tumor cells. Although some mechanisms of CTLs killing the tumor cells are revealed already, the dynamic information of CTLs interaction with tumor cells are still not known very clearly. Here we used confocal microscopy to visualize the whole process of CTLs killing the tumor cells in vitro. The imaging data showed that CTLs destroyed the target tumor cells rapidly and efficiently. Several CTLs surrounded one or some tumor cells and the average time for CTLs destroying one tumor cell is just a few minutes in vitro. The study displayed the temporal events of CTLs interacting with tumor cells at the beginning and finally killing them and directly presented the efficient tumor cell cytotoxicity of the CTLs. The results helped us to deeply understand the mechanism of the CTLs destroying the tumor cells and to develop the cancer immunotherapy.

  8. A novel xenograft model in zebrafish for high-resolution investigating dynamics of neovascularization in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjian Zhao

    Full Text Available Tumor neovascularization is a highly complex process including multiple steps. Understanding this process, especially the initial stage, has been limited by the difficulties of real-time visualizing the neovascularization embedded in tumor tissues in living animal models. In the present study, we have established a xenograft model in zebrafish by implanting mammalian tumor cells into the perivitelline space of 48 hours old Tg(Flk1:EGFP transgenic zebrafish embryos. With this model, we dynamically visualized the process of tumor neovascularization, with unprecedented high-resolution, including new sprouts from the host vessels and the origination from VEGFR2(+ individual endothelial cells. Moreover, we quantified their contributions during the formation of vascular network in tumor. Real-time observations revealed that angiogenic sprouts in tumors preferred to connect each other to form endothelial loops, and more and more endothelial loops accumulated into the irregular and chaotic vascular network. The over-expression of VEGF165 in tumor cells significantly affected the vascularization in xenografts, not only the number and size of neo-vessels but the abnormalities of tumor vascular architecture. The specific inhibitor of VEGFR2, SU5416, significantly inhibited the vascularization and the growth of melanoma xenografts, but had little affects to normal vessels in zebrafish. Thus, this zebrafish/tumor xenograft model not only provides a unique window to investigate the earliest events of tumoral neoangiogenesis, but is sensitive to be used as an experimental platform to rapidly and visually evaluate functions of angiogenic-related genes. Finally, it also offers an efficient and cost-effective means for the rapid evaluation of anti-angiogenic chemicals.

  9. Modulator Dynamics Shape the Design Space for Stepwise-Elution Simulated Moving Bed Chromatographic Separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Chris J; Velayudhan, Ajoy

    2018-03-31

    For proteins and other biological macromolecules, SMB chromatography is best operated non-isocratically. However, traditional modes of non-isocratic SMB operation generate significant mobile-phase modulator dynamics. The mechanisms by which these modulator dynamics affect a separation's success, and thus frame the design space, have yet to be explained quantitatively. Here, the dynamics of the modulator (e.g. salts in ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography) are explicitly accounted for. This leads to the elucidation of two new design constraints, presented as dimensionless numbers, which quantify the effects of the modulator phenomena and thus predict the success of a non-isocratic SMB separation. Consequently, these two new design constraints re-define the SMB design space. Computational and experimental studies at the boundaries of this design space corroborate the theoretical predictions. The design of efficient and robust operating conditions through use of the new design space is also demonstrated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Orbital lymphoid tumors; Comparison of features of dynamic MRI with pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Hiroko; Ueno, Hisayuki (Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan))

    1994-03-01

    We examined 13 cases of orbital lymphoid tumors (OLT) and 1 of orbital hemangioma (OH), using dynamic MRI, to determine the biological behavior of the tumors before surgery. We measured time-dependent changes in the contrast enhancement of tumors and described time intensity curves (TIC), dividing the cases into 3 architectural types: completes septum (CS), incomplete septum (IS), and diffuse types. The TICs of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH, 2 cases) of CS type and idiopathic orbital inflamation (1), RLH (5) of IS type, atypical lymphoid hyperplasia (4), and malignant lymphoma (1) and OH (1) showed rapid increase with low peak and gradual decrease, rapid increase with high peak and gradual decrease, rapid increase and plateau, and gradual increase type, respectively. In order words, OLT showed various TIC, roughly correlating with pathological findings. These results indicate that dynamic MRI may be useful in the preoperative clinical diagnosis of OLT. (author).

  11. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging for tumor delineation in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korporaal, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging is frequently used for the detection and localization of prostate tumors. After injection of a bolus of contrast agent into the blood circulation, the behavior of the contrast agent in the prostate can be measured by repetitive imaging of the prostate.

  12. Microbial community composition and dynamics of moving bed biofilm reactor systems treating municipal sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kristi; Turner, Susan J

    2012-02-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems are increasingly used for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, yet in contrast to activated sludge (AS) systems, little is known about their constituent microbial communities. This study investigated the community composition of two municipal MBBR wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Wellington, New Zealand. Monthly samples comprising biofilm and suspended biomass were collected over a 12-month period. Bacterial and archaeal community composition was determined using a full-cycle community approach, including analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA). Differences in microbial community structure and abundance were observed between the two WWTPs and between biofilm and suspended biomass. Biofilms from both plants were dominated by Clostridia and sulfate-reducing members of the Deltaproteobacteria (SRBs). FISH analyses indicated morphological differences in the Deltaproteobacteria detected at the two plants and also revealed distinctive clustering between SRBs and members of the Methanosarcinales, which were the only Archaea detected and were present in low abundance (suspended communities from both plants were diverse and dominated by aerobic members of the Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. This study represents the first detailed analysis of microbial communities in full-scale MBBR systems and indicates that this process selects for distinctive biofilm and planktonic communities, both of which differ from those found in conventional AS systems.

  13. Metabolic and microbial community dynamics during the hydrolytic and acidogenic fermentation in a leach-bed process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straeuber, Heike; Kleinsteuber, Sabine [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Bioenergy; UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Environmental Microbiology; Schroeder, Martina [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Bioenergy

    2012-12-15

    Biogas production from lignocellulosic feedstock not competing with food production can contribute to a sustainable bioenergy system. The hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step in the anaerobic digestion of solid substrates such as straw. Hence, a detailed understanding of the metabolic processes during the steps of hydrolysis and acidogenesis is required to improve process control strategies. The fermentation products formed during the acidogenic fermentation of maize silage as a model substrate in a leach-bed process were determined by gas and liquid chromatography. The bacterial community dynamics was monitored by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The community profiles were correlated with the process data using multivariate statistics. The batch process comprised three metabolic phases characterized by different fermentation products. The bacterial community dynamics correlated with the production of the respective metabolites. In phase 1, lactic and acetic acid fermentations dominated. Accordingly, bacteria of the genera Lactobacillus and Acetobacter were detected. In phase 2, the metabolic pathways shifted to butyric acid fermentation, accompanied by the production of hydrogen and carbon dioxide and a dominance of the genus Clostridium. In phase 3, phylotypes affiliated with Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae prevailed, accompanied by the formation of caproic and acetic acids, and a high gas production rate. A clostridial butyric type of fermentation was predominant in the acidogenic fermentation of maize silage, whereas propionic-type fermentation was marginal. As the metabolite composition resulting from acidogenesis affects the subsequent methanogenic performance, process control should focus on hydrolysis/acidogenesis when solid substrates are digested. (orig.)

  14. Contrast-enhancing tumor growth dynamics of preoperative, treatment-naive human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Benjamin M; Nguyen, Huytram N; Lai, Albert; Nechifor, Ruben E; Zaw, Okkar; Pope, Whitney B; Yong, William H; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Liau, Linda M; Cloughesy, Timothy F

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about the natural growth characteristics of untreated glioblastoma before surgical or therapeutic intervention, because patients are rapidly treated after preliminary radiographic diagnosis. Understanding the growth characteristics of uninhibited human glioblastoma may be useful for characterizing changes in response to therapy. Thus, the objective of the current study was to explore tumor growth dynamics in a cohort of patients with untreated glioblastoma before surgical or therapeutic intervention. Ninety-five patients with glioblastoma who had measurable enhancing disease on >2 magnetic resonance imaging scans before surgery were identified. Tumor growth rates were quantified in 4 different ways (the percentage change per day, the absolute rate of change per day, the estimated volumetric doubling time, and the radial expansion rate) using 3 different approaches (bidirectional product, enhancing disease, and total lesion volume). The median volumetric doubling time was 21.1 days, the percentage change in tumor volume was 2.1% per day, and the rate of change in total lesion volume was 0.18 cc per day. The length of follow-up between magnetic resonance imaging examinations should be >28 days to detect progressive disease with high specificity. Small initial tumor sizes (variety of ways with similar results. The percentage changes in tumor size and volume depend on baseline tumor size and the time interval between scans. Cancer 2016;122:1718-27. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  15. Scaling dynamic response and destructive metabolism in an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system modulated by different external periodic interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzhi Shao

    Full Text Available On the basis of two universal power-law scaling laws, i.e. the scaling dynamic hysteresis in physics and the allometric scaling metabolism in biosystem, we studied the dynamic response and the evolution of an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system subjected to a periodic external intervention, which is equivalent to the scheme of a radiotherapy or chemotherapy, within the framework of the growth dynamics of tumor. Under the modulation of either an abrupt or a gradual change external intervention, the population density of tumors exhibits a dynamic hysteresis to the intervention. The area of dynamic hysteresis loop characterizes a sort of dissipative-therapeutic relationship of the dynamic responding of treated tumors with the dose consumption of accumulated external intervention per cycle of therapy. Scaling the area of dynamic hysteresis loops against the intensity of an external intervention, we deduced a characteristic quantity which was defined as the theoretical therapeutic effectiveness of treated tumor and related with the destructive metabolism of tumor under treatment. The calculated dose-effectiveness profiles, namely the dose cumulant per cycle of intervention versus the therapeutic effectiveness, could be well scaled into a universal quadratic formula regardless of either an abrupt or a gradual change intervention involved. We present a new concept, i.e., the therapy-effect matrix and the dose cumulant matrix, to expound the new finding observed in the growth and regression dynamics of a modulated anti-tumor system.

  16. Characteristic Dynamic Enhancement Pattern of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Malignant Thyroid Tumor: A Preliminary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Nam; Hwang, Hee Young; Shim, Young Sup; Byun, Sung Su; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Hyung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Gil Hospital, Gachon University College of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine the characteristic dynamic enhancement pattern of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for malignant thyroid tumor. Eight patients who were pathology proven to have a malignant thyroid tumor, preoperatively. There are 5 papillary carcinomas, 1 medullary carcinoma, 1 follicular carcinoma, and 1 fine needle aspiration biopsy proven atypical cell. Based on preoperative MR imaging, we compared the dynamic MR enhancement pattern relating to the pathologic type. On contrast agent-enhanced dynamic T1-weighted image (T1WI), 5 papillary carcinoma and one medullary carcinoma showed delayed enhancement compared to normal parenchyma. In addition, one follicular carcinoma shows stronger enhancement than normal parenchyma, with one papillary carcinoma showing a persistent decrease in enhancement compared to normal parenchyma. Although this study is limited by a small patients population, the data suggests that delayed enhancement on enhanced dynamic T1WI is a possible characteristic MR finding of a malignant thyroid tumor. I think that the comparison of MR imaging between benign and malignant nodules is required for a correct characterization.

  17. Simultaneous tumor and surrogate motion tracking with dynamic MRI for radiation therapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyoun; Farah, Rana; Shea, Steven M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Hales, Russell; Lee, Junghoon

    2018-01-01

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is a major obstacle for achieving high-precision radiotherapy of cancers in the thoracic and abdominal regions. Surrogate-based estimation and tracking methods are commonly used in radiotherapy, but with limited understanding of quantified correlation to tumor motion. In this study, we propose a method to simultaneously track the lung tumor and external surrogates to evaluate their spatial correlation in a quantitative way using dynamic MRI, which allows real-time acquisition without ionizing radiation exposure. To capture the lung and whole tumor, four MRI-compatible fiducials are placed on the patient’s chest and upper abdomen. Two different types of acquisitions are performed in the sagittal orientation including multi-slice 2D cine MRIs to reconstruct 4D-MRI and two-slice 2D cine MRIs to simultaneously track the tumor and fiducials. A phase-binned 4D-MRI is first reconstructed from multi-slice MR images using body area as a respiratory surrogate and groupwise registration. The 4D-MRI provides 3D template volumes for different breathing phases. 3D tumor position is calculated by 3D-2D template matching in which 3D tumor templates in the 4D-MRI reconstruction and the 2D cine MRIs from the two-slice tracking dataset are registered. 3D trajectories of the external surrogates are derived via matching a 3D geometrical model of the fiducials to their segmentations on the 2D cine MRIs. We tested our method on ten lung cancer patients. Using a correlation analysis, the 3D tumor trajectory demonstrates a noticeable phase mismatch and significant cycle-to-cycle motion variation, while the external surrogate was not sensitive enough to capture such variations. Additionally, there was significant phase mismatch between surrogate signals obtained from the fiducials at different locations.

  18. Analysis of mice tumor models using dynamic MRI data and a dedicated software platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfke, H.; Maurer, E.; Klose, K.J. [Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Kohle, S.; Rascher-Friesenhausen, R.; Behrens, S.; Peitgen, H.O. [MeVis - Center for Medical Diagnostic Systems and Visualization, Bremen (Germany); Celik, I. [Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Surgery; Heverhagen, J.T. [Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: To implement a software platform (DynaVision) dedicated to analyze data from functional imaging of tumors with different mathematical approaches, and to test the software platform in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). Materials and Methods: A software program was developed for extraction and visualization of tissue perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced images. This includes regional parameter calculation from enhancement curves, parametric images (e.g., blood flow), animation, 3D visualization, two-compartment modeling a mode for comparing different datasets (e.g., therapy monitoring), and motion correction. We analyzed xenograft tumors from two pancreatic carcinoma cell lines (B x PC3 and ASPC1) implanted in 14 SCID mice after injection of Gd-DTPA into the tail vein. These data were correlated with histopathological findings. Results: Image analysis was completed in approximately 15 minutes per data set. The possibility of drawing and editing ROIs within the whole data set makes it easy to obtain quantitative data from the intensity-time curves. In one animal, motion artifacts reduced the image quality to a greater extent but data analysis was still possible after motion correction. Dynamic MRI of mice tumor models revealed a highly heterogeneous distribution of the contrast-enhancement curves and derived parameters, which correlated with differences in histopathology. ASPc1 tumors showed a more hypervascular type of curves with faster and higher signal enhancement rate (wash-in) and a faster signal decrease (wash-out). BXPC3 tumors showed a more hypovascular type with slower wash-in and wash-out. This correlated with the biological properties of the tumors. (orig.)

  19. Analysis of mice tumor models using dynamic MRI data and a dedicated software platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfke, H.; Maurer, E.; Klose, K.J.; Celik, I.; Heverhagen, J.T.; Ohio State Univ., Columbus

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To implement a software platform (DynaVision) dedicated to analyze data from functional imaging of tumors with different mathematical approaches, and to test the software platform in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). Materials and Methods: A software program was developed for extraction and visualization of tissue perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced images. This includes regional parameter calculation from enhancement curves, parametric images (e.g., blood flow), animation, 3D visualization, two-compartment modeling a mode for comparing different datasets (e.g., therapy monitoring), and motion correction. We analyzed xenograft tumors from two pancreatic carcinoma cell lines (B x PC3 and ASPC1) implanted in 14 SCID mice after injection of Gd-DTPA into the tail vein. These data were correlated with histopathological findings. Results: Image analysis was completed in approximately 15 minutes per data set. The possibility of drawing and editing ROIs within the whole data set makes it easy to obtain quantitative data from the intensity-time curves. In one animal, motion artifacts reduced the image quality to a greater extent but data analysis was still possible after motion correction. Dynamic MRI of mice tumor models revealed a highly heterogeneous distribution of the contrast-enhancement curves and derived parameters, which correlated with differences in histopathology. ASPc1 tumors showed a more hypervascular type of curves with faster and higher signal enhancement rate (wash-in) and a faster signal decrease (wash-out). BXPC3 tumors showed a more hypovascular type with slower wash-in and wash-out. This correlated with the biological properties of the tumors. (orig.)

  20. Influence of bed material entrainment and non-Newtonian rheology on turbulent geophysical flows dynamics. Numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglit, M. E.; Yakubenko, A. E.; Yakubenko, T. A.

    2017-10-01

    This paper deals with the mathematical and numerical modeling of the propagation stage of geophysical gravity-driven flows, such as snow avalanches, mudflows, and rapid landslides. New mathematical models are presented which are based on full, not-depth-averaged equations of mechanics of continuous media. The models account for three important issues: non-Newtonian rheology of the moving material, entrainment of the bed material by the flow, and turbulence. The main objective is to investigate the effect of these three factors on the flow dynamics and on the value of the entrainment rate. To exclude the influence of many other factors, e.g., the complicated slope topography, only the motion down a long uniform slope with a constant inclination angle is studied numerically. Moreover, the entire flow from the front to the rear area was not modeled, but only its middle part where the flow is approximately uniform in length. One of the qualitative results is that in motion along homogeneous slope the mass entrainment increases the flow velocity and depth while the entrainment rate at large time tends to become constant which depends on the physical properties of the flow and the underlying material but not on the current values of the flow velocity and depth.

  1. Dynamic Test Bed Analysis of Gas Energy Balance for a Diesel Exhaust System Fit with a Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuc, Pawel; Lijewski, Piotr; Ziolkowski, Andrzej; Dobrzyński, Michal

    2017-05-01

    Analysis of the energy balance for an exhaust system of a diesel engine fit with an automotive thermoelectric generator (ATEG) of our own design has been carried out. A special measurement system and dedicated software were developed to measure the power generated by the modules. The research object was a 1.3-l small diesel engine with power output of 66 kW. The tests were carried out on a dynamic engine test bed that allows reproduction of an actual driving cycle expressed as a function V = f( t), simulating drivetrain (clutch, transmission) operating characteristics, vehicle geometrical parameters, and driver behavior. Measurements of exhaust gas thermodynamic parameters (temperature, pressure, and mass flow) as well as the voltage and current generated by the thermoelectric modules were performed during tests of our own design. Based on the results obtained, the flow of exhaust gas energy in the entire exhaust system was determined along with the ATEG power output. The ideal area of the exhaust system for location of the ATEG was defined to ensure the highest thermal energy recovery efficiency.

  2. Slope effects on the fluid dynamics of a fire spreading across a fuel bed: PIV measurements and OH* chemiluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandini, F.; Silvani, X.; Honoré, D.; Boutin, G.; Susset, A.; Vernet, R.

    2014-08-01

    Slope is among the most influencing factor affecting the spread of wildfires. A contribution to the understanding of the fluid dynamics of a fire spreading in these terrain conditions is provided in the present paper. Coupled optical diagnostics are used to study the slope effects on the flow induced by a fire at laboratory scale. Optical diagnostics consist of particle image velocimetry, for investigating the 2D (vertical) velocity field of the reacting flow and chemiluminescence imaging, for visualizing the region of spontaneous emission of OH radical occurring during gaseous combustion processes. The coupling of these two techniques allows locating accurately the contour of the reaction zone within the computed velocity field. The series of experiments are performed across a bed of vegetative fuel, under both no-slope and 30° upslope conditions. The increase in the rate of fire spread with increasing slope is attributed to a significant change in fluid dynamics surrounding the flame. For horizontal fire spread, flame fronts exhibit quasi-vertical plume resulting in the buoyancy forces generated by the fire. These buoyancy effects induce an influx of ambient fresh air which is entrained laterally into the fire, equitably from both sides. For upward flame spread, the induced flow is strongly influenced by air entrainment on the burnt side of the fire and fire plume is tilted toward unburned vegetation. A particular attention is paid to the induced air flow ahead of the spreading flame. With increasing the slope angle beyond a threshold, highly dangerous conditions arise because this configuration induces wind blows away from the fire rather than toward it, suggesting the presence of convective heat transfers ahead of the fire front.

  3. Real-time tumor ablation simulation based on the dynamic mode decomposition method

    KAUST Repository

    Bourantas, George C.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: The dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) method is used to provide a reliable forecasting of tumor ablation treatment simulation in real time, which is quite needed in medical practice. To achieve this, an extended Pennes bioheat model must be employed, taking into account both the water evaporation phenomenon and the tissue damage during tumor ablation. Methods: A meshless point collocation solver is used for the numerical solution of the governing equations. The results obtained are used by the DMD method for forecasting the numerical solution faster than the meshless solver. The procedure is first validated against analytical and numerical predictions for simple problems. The DMD method is then applied to three-dimensional simulations that involve modeling of tumor ablation and account for metabolic heat generation, blood perfusion, and heat ablation using realistic values for the various parameters. Results: The present method offers very fast numerical solution to bioheat transfer, which is of clinical significance in medical practice. It also sidesteps the mathematical treatment of boundaries between tumor and healthy tissue, which is usually a tedious procedure with some inevitable degree of approximation. The DMD method provides excellent predictions of the temperature profile in tumors and in the healthy parts of the tissue, for linear and nonlinear thermal properties of the tissue. Conclusions: The low computational cost renders the use of DMD suitable forin situ real time tumor ablation simulations without sacrificing accuracy. In such a way, the tumor ablation treatment planning is feasible using just a personal computer thanks to the simplicity of the numerical procedure used. The geometrical data can be provided directly by medical image modalities used in everyday practice. © 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Early circulating tumor DNA dynamics and clonal selection with palbociclib and fulvestrant for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Ben; Hrebien, Sarah; Morden, James P; Beaney, Matthew; Fribbens, Charlotte; Huang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Koehler, Maria; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Bliss, Judith M; Turner, Nicholas C

    2018-03-01

    CDK4/6 inhibition substantially improves progression-free survival (PFS) for women with advanced estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, although there are no predictive biomarkers. Early changes in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) level may provide early response prediction, but the impact of tumor heterogeneity is unknown. Here we use plasma samples from patients in the randomized phase III PALOMA-3 study of CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib and fulvestrant for women with advanced breast cancer and show that relative change in PIK3CA ctDNA level after 15 days treatment strongly predicts PFS on palbociclib and fulvestrant (hazard ratio 3.94, log-rank p = 0.0013). ESR1 mutations selected by prior hormone therapy are shown to be frequently sub clonal, with ESR1 ctDNA dynamics offering limited prediction of clinical outcome. These results suggest that early ctDNA dynamics may provide a robust biomarker for CDK4/6 inhibitors, with early ctDNA dynamics demonstrating divergent response of tumor sub clones to treatment.

  5. Islet Cell Tumors of the Pancreas: A Variety of Multiphase Dynamic Imaging Findings with Pathologic Correlations Focusing on Nonfunctioning Tumors and Insulinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Yoo Jin; Yu, Jeong Sik; Park, Chan Il; Kwon, Ji Eun; Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Joo Hee; Kim, Ki Whang [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Islet cell tumors (ICTs) are rare pancreatic neoplasms of neuroendocrine origin, posing a diagnostic challenge to radiologists. We illustrated a spectrum of features of pancreatic ICTs that could be found on multiphase dynamic CT or MRI, and elucidated the histopathologic characteristics by determining the contrast enhancement pattern of the lesions. Various enhancement patterns were dependant on the internal composition of the tumor, that is, the proportion of vascular densities for early enhancement and non-hypervascular interstitial tissue for late enhancement regardless of the size or functional behavior. This knowledge of the imaging-pathologic spectrum of ICTs could be helpful for the proper differential diagnosis from other pancreatic tumors

  6. Comparison between model-predicted tumor oxygenation dynamics and vascular-/flow-related Doppler indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfatto, Antonella; Vidal Urbinati, Ailyn M; Ciardo, Delia; Franchi, Dorella; Cattani, Federica; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2017-05-01

    Mathematical modeling is a powerful and flexible method to investigate complex phenomena. It discloses the possibility of reproducing expensive as well as invasive experiments in a safe environment with limited costs. This makes it suitable to mimic tumor evolution and response to radiotherapy although the reliability of the results remains an issue. Complexity reduction is therefore a critical aspect in order to be able to compare model outcomes to clinical data. Among the factors affecting treatment efficacy, tumor oxygenation is known to play a key role in radiotherapy response. In this work, we aim at relating the oxygenation dynamics, predicted by a macroscale model trained on tumor volumetric data of uterine cervical cancer patients, to vascularization and blood flux indices assessed on Ultrasound Doppler images. We propose a macroscale model of tumor evolution based on three dynamics, namely active portion, necrotic portion, and oxygenation. The model parameters were assessed on the volume size of seven cervical cancer patients administered with 28 fractions of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (1.8 Gy/fraction). For each patient, five Doppler ultrasound tests were acquired before, during, and after the treatment. The lesion was manually contoured by an expert physician using 4D View ® (General Electric Company - Fairfield, Connecticut, United States), which automatically provided the overall tumor volume size along with three vascularization and/or blood flow indices. Volume data only were fed to the model for training purpose, while the predicted oxygenation was compared a posteriori to the measured Doppler indices. The model was able to fit the tumor volume evolution within 8% error (range: 3-8%). A strong correlation between the intrapatient longitudinal indices from Doppler measurements and oxygen predicted by the model (about 90% or above) was found in three cases. Two patients showed an average correlation value (50-70%) and the remaining

  7. Differentiation between benign and malignant colon tumors using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR colonography; a feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Andersen, L P H; Klein, M

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer will present itself as a bowel obstruction in 16-23% of all cases. However, not all obstructing tumors are malignant and the differentiation between a benign and a malignant tumor can be difficult. The purpose of our study was to determine whether fast dynamic gadolinium-enhance......-enhanced MR imaging combined with MR colonography could be used to differentiate a benign from a malignant obstructing colon tumor....

  8. Targeted microbubbles for imaging tumor angiogenesis: assessment of whole-body biodistribution with dynamic micro-PET in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Cheng, Zhen; Davis, Corrine

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice....

  9. Dynamic respiratory gated 18FDG-PET of lung tumors - a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjei Knudtsen, Ingerid; Skretting, Arne; Roedal, Jan; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Aaslaug; Malinen, Eirik

    2011-01-01

    Background. 18 FDG-PET/CT imaging is well established for diagnosis and staging of lung tumors. However, more detailed information regarding the distribution of FDG within the tumor, also as a function of time after injection may be relevant. In this study we explore the feasibility of a combined dynamic and respiratory gated (DR) PET protocol. Material and methods. A DR FDG-PET protocol for a Siemens Biograph 16 PET/CT scanner was set up, allowing data acquisition from the time of FDG injection. Breath-hold (BH) respiratory gating was performed at four intervals over a total acquisition time of 50 minutes. Thus, the PET protocol provides both motion-free images and a spatiotemporal characterization of the glucose distribution in lung tumors. Software tools were developed in-house for tentative tumor segmentation and for extracting standard uptake values (SUVs) voxel by voxel, tumor volumes and SUV gradients in all directions. Results. Four pilot patients have been investigated with the DR PET protocol. The procedure was well tolerated by the patients. The BH images appeared sharper, and SUV max /SUV mean was higher, compared to free breathing (FB) images. Also, SUV gradients in the periphery of the tumor in the BH images were in general greater than or equal to the gradients in the FB PET images. Conclusion. The DR FDG-PET protocol is feasible and the BH images have a superior quality compared to the FB images. The protocol may also provide information of relevance for radiotherapy planning and follow-up. A patient trial is needed for assessing the clinical value of the imaging protocol

  10. Probability dynamics of a repopulating tumor in case of fractionated external radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavreva, Nadia; Stavrev, Pavel; Fallone, B Gino

    2009-12-01

    In this work two analytical methods are developed for computing the probability distribution of the number of surviving cells of a repopulating tumor during a fractionated external radio-treatment. Both methods are developed for the case of pure birth processes. They both allow the description of the tumor dynamics in case of cell radiosensitivity changing in time and for treatment schedules with variable dose per fraction and variable time intervals between fractions. The first method is based on a direct solution of the set of differential equations describing the tumor dynamics. The second method is based on the works of Hanin et al. [Hanin LG, Zaider M, Yakovlev AY. Distribution of the number of clonogens surviving fractionated radiotherapy: a long-standing problem revisited. Int J Radiat Biol 2001;77:205-13; Hanin LG. Iterated birth and death process as a model of radiation cell survival. Math Biosci 2001;169:89-107; Hanin LG. A stochastic model of tumor response to fractionated radiation: limit theorems and rate of convergence. Math Biosci 2004;191:1-17], where probability generating functions are used. In addition a Monte Carlo algorithm for simulating the probability distributions is developed for the same treatment conditions as for the analytical methods. The probability distributions predicted by the three methods are compared graphically for a certain set of values of the model parameters and an excellent agreement is found to exist between all three results, thus proving the correct implementation of the methods. However, numerical difficulties have been encountered with both analytical methods depending on the values of the model parameters. Therefore, the Poisson approximation is also studied and it is compared to the exact methods for several different combinations of the model parameter values. It is concluded that the Poisson approximation works sufficiently well only for slowly repopulating tumors and a low cell survival probability and that it

  11. The Impact of Ozone Treatment in Dynamic Bed Parameters on Changes in Biologically Active Substances of Juniper Berries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Joanna Brodowska

    Full Text Available The development of the parameters of ozone decontamination method assuring the least possible losses of biologically active substances (essential oils and polyphenols and their activity in common juniper (Juniperus communis (L. berries was studied. Ozone treatment in dynamic bed was conducted 9 times. The process was conducted under different ozone concentrations (100.0; 130.0; 160.0 g O3/m3 and times (30, 60, 90 min. After each decontamination, the microbiological profile of the juniper berries was studied, and the contaminating microflora was identified. Next to the microbiological profile, the phenolic profile, as well as antioxidant activity of extracts and essential oils were determined. The total polyphenol content (TPC, composition of essential oils, free radical-scavenging capacity, total antioxidant capacity, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP, beta-carotene bleaching test (BCB and LC-MS polyphenol analysis were carried out. The study reveals that during short ozone contact times, higher amounts of TPC, 15.47 and 12.91 mg CE/g of extract, for samples 100/30 and 130/30, respectively, were demonstrated. Whereas samples 100/60, 130/60, 100/90, and 160/90 exhibited the lowest amount of phenolics. The highest antioxidant activity was found in the methanol extract obtained from ozonated berries which exhibited the lowest IC50 in all the antioxidant assays, such as DPPH, FRAP, and BCB assays. Ozone treatment showed noteworthy potential and its usage in food manufacturing and as an alternative decontamination method should be considered.

  12. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Tumor Heterogeneity Defined by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick G. Costouros

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of studying angiogenesis are limited in their ability to serially evaluate in vivo function throughout a target tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and pharmacokinetic modeling provide a useful method for evaluating tissue vasculature based on contrast accumulation and washout. While it is often assumed that areas of high contrast enhancement and washout comprise areas of increased angiogenesis and tumor activity, the actual molecular pathways that are active in such areas are poorly understood. Using DCE-MRI in a murine subcutaneous tumor model, we were able to perform pharmacokinetic functional analysis of a tumor, coregistration of MRI images with histological cross-sections, immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, and genetic profiling of tumor heterogeneity based on pharmacokinetic parameters. Using imaging as a template for biologic investigation, we have not found evidence of increased expression of proangiogenic modulators at the transcriptional level in either distinct pharmacokinetic region. Furthermore, these regions show no difference on histology and CD31 immunohistochemistry. However, the expression of ribosomal proteins was greatly increased in high enhancement and washout regions, implying increased protein translation and consequent increased cellular activity. Together, these findings point to the potential importance of posttranscriptional regulation in angiogenesis and the need for the development of angiogenesis-specific contrast agents to evaluate in vivo angiogenesis at a molecular level.

  13. Fluid dynamic simulation of the fluidized bed using propane-air fuel; Simulacao dinamica de um combustor de leito fluidizado utilizando como combustivel o ar-propanado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Junior, L.P.; Lucena, S.; Silva, D.J. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: limajun@br.inter.net

    2004-07-01

    This paper has for purpose to present the modeling and simulation of the homogeneous combustion of the mixture of propane-air in a combustor of fluidized bed with inert particles, basing on a stationary model with phases in series, being taken into account the thermal changes and mass changes among the phases and it changes thermal with the wall for radiation. Computational methods are used for such simulation and CFX 4.4 as dynamic flowing computation software (CFD), kindred of more proximity with the real aspects. Being studied like this dynamic and kinetic flowing parameters of the involved components. (author)

  14. Dynamic model development and validation for a nitrifying moving bed biofilter: Effect of temperature and influent load on the performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sin, Gürkan; Weijma, Jan; Spanjers, Henri

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model with adequate complexity integrating hydraulics, biofilm and microbial conversion processes is successfully developed for a continuously moving bed biofilter performing tertiary nitrification. The model was calibrated and validated using data from Nether Stowey pilot plant...

  15. Ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to detect breast tumors. Comparison with ultrasonography and mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, Eri; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Iwamura, Akira; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Harada, Junta; Tada, Shinpei

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to accurately detect breast tumors. Sixty-five breast carcinomas and 24 fibroadenomas were examined by an SE pulse sequence using a 0.2 Tesla unit. Subtraction MR images were obtained every minute during dynamic study with Gd-DTPA. Almost all breast tumors were seen as very bright masses, and the margin of the mass was clearly demonstrated on subtraction MR images. Breast carcinomas and fibroadenomas showed characteristic time-intensity curves on dynamic study. Time-intensity curves of the early peak type and plateau type were seen in 97% of breast carcinomas, while the gradually increasing type was seen in 92% of fibroadenomas. The detectability of breast carcinoma was 98% by MRI, 98% by ultrasonography, and 87% by mammography. That of fibroadenoma was 95% by MRI, 91% by ultrasonography and 60% by mammography. Sensitivity and specificity for breast carcinoma were 98% and 92% for MRI and 97% and 71% for ultrasonography. For fibroadenoma, they were 96% and 98% for MRI and 89% and 92% for ultrasonography. (author)

  16. Ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to detect breast tumors. Comparison with ultrasonography and mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terao, Eri; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Iwamura, Akira; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Harada, Junta; Tada, Shinpei (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-09-01

    We evaluated the ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to accurately detect breast tumors. Sixty-five breast carcinomas and 24 fibroadenomas were examined by an SE pulse sequence using a 0.2 Tesla unit. Subtraction MR images were obtained every minute during dynamic study with Gd-DTPA. Almost all breast tumors were seen as very bright masses, and the margin of the mass was clearly demonstrated on subtraction MR images. Breast carcinomas and fibroadenomas showed characteristic time-intensity curves on dynamic study. Time-intensity curves of the early peak type and plateau type were seen in 97% of breast carcinomas, while the gradually increasing type was seen in 92% of fibroadenomas. The detectability of breast carcinoma was 98% by MRI, 98% by ultrasonography, and 87% by mammography. That of fibroadenoma was 95% by MRI, 91% by ultrasonography and 60% by mammography. Sensitivity and specificity for breast carcinoma were 98% and 92% for MRI and 97% and 71% for ultrasonography. For fibroadenoma, they were 96% and 98% for MRI and 89% and 92% for ultrasonography. (author).

  17. Dynamically accumulated dose and 4D accumulated dose for moving tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Heng; Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Xiaoqiang; Liu Wei; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between dynamically accumulated dose (dynamic dose) and 4D accumulated dose (4D dose) for irradiation of moving tumors, and to quantify the dose uncertainty induced by tumor motion. Methods: The authors established that regardless of treatment modality and delivery properties, the dynamic dose will converge to the 4D dose, instead of the 3D static dose, after multiple deliveries. The bounds of dynamic dose, or the maximum estimation error using 4D or static dose, were established for the 4D and static doses, respectively. Numerical simulations were performed (1) to prove the principle that for each phase, after multiple deliveries, the average number of deliveries for any given time converges to the total number of fractions (K) over the number of phases (N); (2) to investigate the dose difference between the 4D and dynamic doses as a function of the number of deliveries for deliveries of a “pulsed beam”; and (3) to investigate the dose difference between 4D dose and dynamic doses as a function of delivery time for deliveries of a “continuous beam.” A Poisson model was developed to estimate the mean dose error as a function of number of deliveries or delivered time for both pulsed beam and continuous beam. Results: The numerical simulations confirmed that the number of deliveries for each phase converges to K/N, assuming a random starting phase. Simulations for the pulsed beam and continuous beam also suggested that the dose error is a strong function of the number of deliveries and/or total deliver time and could be a function of the breathing cycle, depending on the mode of delivery. The Poisson model agrees well with the simulation. Conclusions: Dynamically accumulated dose will converge to the 4D accumulated dose after multiple deliveries, regardless of treatment modality. Bounds of the dynamic dose could be determined using quantities derived from 4D doses, and the mean dose

  18. Markerless EPID image guided dynamic multi-leaf collimator tracking for lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottmann, J.; Keall, P.; Berbeco, R.

    2013-06-01

    Compensation of target motion during the delivery of radiotherapy has the potential to improve treatment accuracy, dose conformity and sparing of healthy tissue. We implement an online image guided therapy system based on soft tissue localization (STiL) of the target from electronic portal images and treatment aperture adaptation with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC). The treatment aperture is moved synchronously and in real time with the tumor during the entire breathing cycle. The system is implemented and tested on a Varian TX clinical linear accelerator featuring an AS-1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquiring images at a frame rate of 12.86 Hz throughout the treatment. A position update cycle for the treatment aperture consists of four steps: in the first step at time t = t0 a frame is grabbed, in the second step the frame is processed with the STiL algorithm to get the tumor position at t = t0, in a third step the tumor position at t = ti + δt is predicted to overcome system latencies and in the fourth step, the DMLC control software calculates the required leaf motions and applies them at time t = ti + δt. The prediction model is trained before the start of the treatment with data representing the tumor motion. We analyze the system latency with a dynamic chest phantom (4D motion phantom, Washington University). We estimate the average planar position deviation between target and treatment aperture in a clinical setting by driving the phantom with several lung tumor trajectories (recorded from fiducial tracking during radiotherapy delivery to the lung). DMLC tracking for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy without fiducial markers was successfully demonstrated. The inherent system latency is found to be δt = (230 ± 11) ms for a MV portal image acquisition frame rate of 12.86 Hz. The root mean square deviation between tumor and aperture position is smaller than 1 mm. We demonstrate the feasibility of real-time markerless DMLC

  19. Evaluation of a compartmental model for estimating tumor hypoxia via FMISO dynamic PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenli; Nehmeh, Sadek A; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Zanzonico, Pat B; Schmidtlein, C Ross; Lee, Nancy Y; Humm, John L; Georgi, Jens-Christoph; Paulus, Timo; Narayanan, Manoj; Bal, Matthieu

    2009-01-01

    This paper systematically evaluates a pharmacokinetic compartmental model for identifying tumor hypoxia using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). A generic irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartmental model was used. A dynamic PET image dataset was simulated with three tumor regions-normoxic, hypoxic and necrotic-embedded in a normal-tissue background, and with an image-based arterial input function. Each voxelized tissue's time activity curve (TAC) was simulated with typical values of kinetic parameters, as deduced from FMISO-PET data from nine head-and-neck cancer patients. The dynamic dataset was first produced without any statistical noise to ensure that correct kinetic parameters were reproducible. Next, to investigate the stability of kinetic parameter estimation in the presence of noise, 1000 noisy samples of the dynamic dataset were generated, from which 1000 noisy estimates of kinetic parameters were calculated and used to estimate the sample mean and covariance matrix. It is found that a more peaked input function gave less variation in various kinetic parameters, and the variation of kinetic parameters could also be reduced by two region-of-interest averaging techniques. To further investigate how bias in the arterial input function affected the kinetic parameter estimation, a shift error was introduced in the peak amplitude and peak location of the input TAC, and the bias of various kinetic parameters calculated. In summary, mathematical phantom studies have been used to determine the statistical accuracy and precision of model-based kinetic analysis, which helps to validate this analysis and provides guidance in planning clinical dynamic FMISO-PET studies.

  20. Post-lumpectomy CT-guided tumor bed delineation for breast boost and partial breast irradiation: Can additional pre- and postoperative imaging reduce interobserver variability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEN Hartogh, Mariska D; Philippens, Marielle E P; VAN Dam, Iris E; Kleynen, Catharina E; Tersteeg, Robbert J H A; Kotte, Alexis N T J; VAN Vulpen, Marco; VAN Asselen, Bram; VAN DEN Bongard, Desirée H J G

    2015-11-01

    For breast boost radiotherapy or accelerated partial breast irradiation, the tumor bed (TB) is delineated by the radiation oncologist on a planning computed tomography (CT) scan. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the interobserver variability (IOV) of the TB delineation is reduced by providing the radiation oncologist with additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT scans. A total of 14 T1-T2 breast cancer patients underwent a standard planning CT in the supine treatment position following lumpectomy, as well as additional pre- and postoperative imaging in the same position. Post-lumpectomy TBs were independently delineated by four breast radiation oncologists on standard postoperative CT and on CT registered to an additional imaging modality. The additional imaging modalities used were postoperative MRI, preoperative contrast-enhanced (CE)-CT and preoperative CE-MRI. A cavity visualization score (CVS) was assigned to each standard postoperative CT by each observer. In addition, the conformity index (CI), volume and distance between centers of mass (dCOM) of the TB delineations were calculated. On CT, the median CI was 0.57, with a median volume of 22 cm 3 and dCOM of 5.1 mm. The addition of postoperative MRI increased the median TB volume significantly to 28 cm 3 (P<0.001), while the CI (P=0.176) and dCOM (P=0.110) were not affected. The addition of preoperative CT or MRI increased the TB volume to 26 and 25 cm 3 , respectively (both P<0.001), while the CI increased to 0.58 and 0.59 (both P<0.001) and the dCOM decreased to 4.7 mm (P=0.004) and 4.6 mm (P=0.001), respectively. In patients with CVS≤3, the median CI was 0.40 on CT, which was significantly increased by all additional imaging modalities, up to 0.52, and was accompanied by a median volume increase up to 6 cm 3 . In conclusion, the addition of postoperative MRI, preoperative CE-CT or preoperative CE-MRI did not result in a considerable reduction in the IOV in postoperative CT

  1. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardee, Matthew E.; Raza, Shahzad; Becker, Stewart J.; Jozsef, Gabor; Lymberis, Stella C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Hochman, Tsivia; Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); DeWyngaert, Keith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-03-01

    but confirmed benefit in terms of toxicities. If a concurrent boost to the tumor bed is not required, a conformal 3D-CRT approach can adequately deliver prone whole-breast hypofractionation radiotherapy.

  2. SU-F-T-208: An Efficient Planning Approach to Posterior Fossa Tumor Bed Boosts Using Proton Pencil Beam Scanning in Fixed-Beam Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, N; Chen, C; Gans, S; Hug, E; Cahlon, O; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Sine, K; Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Wolden, S [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yeh, B [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A fixed-beam room could be underutilized in a multi-room proton center. We investigated the use of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) on a fixed-beam as an alternative for posterior fossa tumor bed (PF-TB) boost treatments which were usually treating on a gantry with uniform scanning. Methods: Five patients were treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI, 23.4 or 36.0 Gy(RBE)) followed by a PF-TB boost to 54 Gy(RBE) with proton beams. Three PF-TB boost plans were generated for each patient: (1) a uniform scanning (US) gantry plan with 4–7 posterior fields shaped with apertures and compensators (2) a PBS plan using bi-lateral and vertex fields with a 3-mm planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) expansion around the brainstem and (3) PBS fields using same beam arrangement but replacing the PRV with robust optimization considering a 3-mm setup uncertainty. Results: A concave 54-Gy(RBE) isodose line surrounding the brainstem could be achieved using all three techniques. The mean V95% of the PTV was 99.7% (range: 97.6% to 100%) while the V100% of the PTV ranged from 56.3% to 93.1% depending on the involvement of the brainstem with the PTV. The mean doses received by 0.05 cm{sup 3} of the brainstem were effectively identical: 54.0 Gy(RBE), 53.4 Gy(RBE) and 53.3 Gy(RBE) for US, PBS optimized with PRV, and PBS optimized with robustness plans respectively. The cochlea mean dose increased by 23% of the prescribed boost dose in average from the bi-lateral fields used in the PBS plan. Planning time for the PBS plan with PRV was 5–10 times less than the US plan and the robustly optimized PBS plan. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that a fixed-beam with PBS can deliver a dose distribution comparable to a gantry plan using uniform scanning. Planning time can be reduced substantially using a PRV around the brainstem instead of robust optimization.

  3. Paleoecology of the Late Pennsylvanian-age Calhoun coal bed and implications for long-term dynamics of wetland ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, Debra A. [US Geological Survey, 926A National Center, Reston (VA 20192 USA); Phillips, Tom L. [Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana (IL 61801 USA); Lesnikowska, Alicia D. [Box 24, Rt. 2, Vineyard Haven (MA 02568 USA); DiMichele, William A. [Department of Paleobiology, NMNH, Smithsonian Institution, Washington (DC 20560 USA)

    2007-01-02

    Quantitative plant assemblage data from coal balls, miospores, megaspores, and compression floras from the Calhoun coal bed (Missourian) of the Illinois Basin (USA) are used to interpret spatial and temporal changes in plant communities in the paleo-peat swamp. Coal-ball and miospore floras from the Calhoun coal bed are dominated strongly by tree ferns, and pteridosperms and sigillarian lycopsids are subdominant, depending on geographic location within the coal bed. Although the overall composition of Calhoun peat-swamp assemblages is consistent both temporally and spatially, site-to-site differences and short-term shifts in species dominance indicate local topographic and hydrologic control on species composition within the broader context of the swamp. Statistical comparison of the Calhoun miospore assemblages with those from other Late Pennsylvanian coal beds suggests that the same basic species pool was represented in each peat-swamp landscape and that the relative patterns of dominance and diversity were persistent from site to site. Therefore, it appears that the relative patterns of proportional dominance stayed roughly the same from one coal bed to the next during Late Pennsylvanian glacially-driven climatic oscillations. (author)

  4. Therapy monitoring using dynamic MRI: Analysis of lung motion and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plathow, Christian [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Hof, Holger; Kuhn, Sabine [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); Puderbach, Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Biederer, Juergen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Claussen, Claus D.; Schaefer, Juergen [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Tuengerthal, Siegfried [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    A frequent side effect after radiotherapy of lung tumors is a decrease of pulmonary function accompanied by dyspnea due to developing lung fibrosis. The aim of this study was to monitor lung motion as a correlate of pulmonary function and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy (RT) using dynamic MRI (dMRI). Thirty-five patients with stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma were examined using dMRI (trueFISP; three images/s). Tumors were divided into T1 and T2 tumors of the upper, middle and lower lung region (LR). Maximum craniocaudal (CC) lung dimensions and tumor mobility in three dimensions were monitored. Vital capacity (VC) was measured and correlated using spirometry. Before RT, the maximum CC motion of the tumor-bearing hemithorax was 5.2{+-}0.9 cm if the tumor was located in the lower LR (middle LR: 5.5{+-}0.8 cm; upper LR: 6.0{+-}0.6 cm). After RT, lung motion was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.05). Before RT, the maximum CC tumor mobility was significantly higher in tumors of the lower LR 2.5{+-}0.6 vs. 2.0{+-}0.3 cm (middle LR; P<0.05) vs. 0.7{+-}0.2 cm (upper LR; P<0.01). After RT, tumor mobility was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.01) and in T2 tumor patients (P<0.05). VC showed no significant changes. dMRI is capable of monitoring changes in lung motion that were not suspected from spirometry. This might make the treatment of side effects possible at a very early stage. Changes of lung motion and tumor mobility are highly dependent on the tumor localization and tumor diameter. (orig.)

  5. Therapy monitoring using dynamic MRI: Analysis of lung motion and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plathow, Christian; Hof, Holger; Kuhn, Sabine; Puderbach, Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Biederer, Juergen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Claussen, Claus D.; Schaefer, Juergen; Huber, Peter E.; Tuengerthal, Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    A frequent side effect after radiotherapy of lung tumors is a decrease of pulmonary function accompanied by dyspnea due to developing lung fibrosis. The aim of this study was to monitor lung motion as a correlate of pulmonary function and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy (RT) using dynamic MRI (dMRI). Thirty-five patients with stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma were examined using dMRI (trueFISP; three images/s). Tumors were divided into T1 and T2 tumors of the upper, middle and lower lung region (LR). Maximum craniocaudal (CC) lung dimensions and tumor mobility in three dimensions were monitored. Vital capacity (VC) was measured and correlated using spirometry. Before RT, the maximum CC motion of the tumor-bearing hemithorax was 5.2±0.9 cm if the tumor was located in the lower LR (middle LR: 5.5±0.8 cm; upper LR: 6.0±0.6 cm). After RT, lung motion was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.05). Before RT, the maximum CC tumor mobility was significantly higher in tumors of the lower LR 2.5±0.6 vs. 2.0±0.3 cm (middle LR; P<0.05) vs. 0.7±0.2 cm (upper LR; P<0.01). After RT, tumor mobility was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.01) and in T2 tumor patients (P<0.05). VC showed no significant changes. dMRI is capable of monitoring changes in lung motion that were not suspected from spirometry. This might make the treatment of side effects possible at a very early stage. Changes of lung motion and tumor mobility are highly dependent on the tumor localization and tumor diameter. (orig.)

  6. Dynamics of melanoma tumor therapy with vesicular stomatitis virus: explaining the variability in outcomes using mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelfanger, D M; Offord, C P; Dev, J; Bajzer, Z; Vile, R G; Dingli, D

    2012-05-01

    Tumor selective, replication competent viruses are being tested for cancer gene therapy. This approach introduces a new therapeutic paradigm due to potential replication of the therapeutic agent and induction of a tumor-specific immune response. However, the experimental outcomes are quite variable, even when studies utilize highly inbred strains of mice and the same cell line and virus. Recognizing that virotherapy is an exercise in population dynamics, we utilize mathematical modeling to understand the variable outcomes observed when B16ova malignant melanoma tumors are treated with vesicular stomatitis virus in syngeneic, fully immunocompetent mice. We show how variability in the initial tumor size and the actual amount of virus delivered to the tumor have critical roles on the outcome of therapy. Virotherapy works best when tumors are small, and a robust innate immune response can lead to superior tumor control. Strategies that reduce tumor burden without suppressing the immune response and methods that maximize the amount of virus delivered to the tumor should optimize tumor control in this model system.

  7. Assessing tumor vascularization as a potential biomarker of imatinib resistance in gastrointestinal stromal tumors by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolino, Lorena; Longo, Dario Livio; Sciortino, Marianna; Dastrù, Walter; Cabodi, Sara; Giovenzana, Giovanni Battista; Aime, Silvio

    2017-07-01

    Most metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) develop resistance to the first-line imatinib treatment. Recently, increased vessel density and angiogenic markers were reported in GISTs with a poor prognosis, suggesting that angiogenesis is implicated in GIST tumor progression and resistance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between tumor vasculature and imatinib resistance in different GIST mouse models using a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) functional approach. Immunodeficient mice (n = 8 for each cell line) were grafted with imatinib-sensitive (GIST882 and GIST-T1) and imatinib-resistant (GIST430) human cell lines. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) was performed on GIST xenografts to quantify tumor vessel permeability (K trans ) and vascular volume fraction (v p ). Microvessel density (MVD), permeability (mean dextran density, MDD), and angiogenic markers were evaluated by immunofluorescence and western blot assays. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed significantly increased vessel density (P < 0.0001) and permeability (P = 0.0002) in imatinib-resistant tumors compared to imatinib-sensitive ones. Strong positive correlations were observed between MRI estimates, K trans and v p , and their related ex vivo values, MVD (r = 0.78 for K trans and r = 0.82 for v p ) and MDD (r = 0.77 for K trans and r = 0.94 for v p ). In addition, higher expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR2 and VEFGR3) was seen in GIST430. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging highlighted marked differences in tumor vasculature and microenvironment properties between imatinib-resistant and imatinib-sensitive GISTs, as also confirmed by ex vivo assays. These results provide new insights into the role that DCE-MRI could play in GIST characterization and response to GIST treatment. Validation studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  8. Dynamic Modeling and Control Studies of a Two-Stage Bubbling Fluidized Bed Adsorber-Reactor for Solid-Sorbent CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modekurti, Srinivasarao; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2013-07-31

    A one-dimensional, non-isothermal, pressure-driven dynamic model has been developed for a two-stage bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) adsorber-reactor for solid-sorbent carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture using Aspen Custom Modeler® (ACM). The BFB model for the flow of gas through a continuous phase of downward moving solids considers three regions: emulsion, bubble, and cloud-wake. Both the upper and lower reactor stages are of overflow-type configuration, i.e., the solids leave from the top of each stage. In addition, dynamic models have been developed for the downcomer that transfers solids between the stages and the exit hopper that removes solids from the bottom of the bed. The models of all auxiliary equipment such as valves and gas distributor have been integrated with the main model of the two-stage adsorber reactor. Using the developed dynamic model, the transient responses of various process variables such as CO{sub 2} capture rate and flue gas outlet temperatures have been studied by simulating typical disturbances such as change in the temperature, flowrate, and composition of the incoming flue gas from pulverized coal-fired power plants. In control studies, the performance of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, feedback-augmented feedforward controller, and linear model predictive controller (LMPC) are evaluated for maintaining the overall CO{sub 2} capture rate at a desired level in the face of typical disturbances.

  9. Experimental investigation of pebble flow dynamics using radioactive particle tracking technique in a scaled-down Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khane, Vaibhav; Said, I.A.; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H., E-mail: aldahhanm@mst.edu

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Pebble Flow fields at Pebble Bed Modular Reactor was investigated. • Radioactive Particle Tracking (RPT) technique has been used. • Plug flow type velocity profile is suggested at upper cylindrical region. - Abstract: The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a type of very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) that is conceptually very similar to moving bed reactors used in the chemical and petrochemical industries. In a PBMR core, nuclear fuel is in the form of pebbles and moves slowly under the influence of gravity. In this work, an integrated experimental and computational study of granular flow in a scaled-down cold flow PBMR was performed. A continuous pebble re-circulation experimental set-up, mimicking the flow of pebbles in a PBMR was designed and developed. An experimental investigation of pebble flow dynamics in a scaled down test reactor was carried out using a non-invasive radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique that used a cobalt-60 based tracer to mimic pebbles in terms of shape, size and density. A cross-correlation based position reconstruction algorithm and RPT calibration data were used to obtain results about Lagrangian trajectories, the velocity field, and residence time distributions. The RPT technique results a serve as a benchmark data for assessing contact force models used in the discrete element method (DEM) simulations.

  10. The potential of positron emission tomography for intratreatment dynamic lung tumor tracking: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jaewon; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Mazin, Samuel R.; Graves, Edward E.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to evaluate the potential and feasibility of positron emission tomography for dynamic lung tumor tracking during radiation treatment. The authors propose a center of mass (CoM) tumor tracking algorithm using gated-PET images combined with a respiratory monitor and investigate the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Methods: The proposed PET dynamic lung tumor tracking algorithm estimated the target position information through the CoM of the segmented target volume on gated PET images reconstructed from accumulated coincidence events. The information was continuously updated throughout a scan based on the assumption that real-time processing was supported (actual processing time at each frame ≈10 s). External respiratory motion and list-mode PET data were acquired from a phantom programmed to move with measured respiratory traces (external respiratory motion and internal target motion) from human subjects, for which the ground truth target position was known as a function of time. The phantom was cylindrical with six hollow sphere targets (10, 13, 17, 22, 28, and 37 mm in diameter). The measured respiratory traces consisted of two sets: (1) 1D-measured motion from ten healthy volunteers and (2) 3D-measured motion from four lung cancer patients. The authors evaluated the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm by quantifying estimation errors (Euclidean distance) between the actual motion of targets (1D-motion and 3D-motion traces) and CoM trajectories estimated by the proposed algorithm as a function of time. Results: The time-averaged error of 1D-motion traces over all trajectories of all targets was 1.6 mm. The error trajectories decreased with time as coincidence events were accumulated. The overall error trajectory of 1D-motion traces converged to within 2 mm in approximately 90 s. As expected, more accurate results were obtained for larger targets. For example, for the 37 mm target, the average error over all 1D

  11. Factors affecting the growth of Didymosphenia geminata in New Zealand rivers: Flow, bed disturbance, nutrients, light, and seasonal dynamics. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullis, J. D.; Gillis, C.; Drummond, J. D.; Garcia, T.; Kilroy, C.; Larned, S.; Hassan, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Didymosphenia geminata (didymo) was introduced into a New Zealand river in 2004, and since then has dramatically spread to cover the beds of many rivers with extremely dense and extensive mats. Successful management is hampered by the fact that much is still unknown about the factors affecting the growth of this nuisance species. We synthesized available data on the distribution of D. geminata in New Zealand rivers to determine how physical and chemical system conditions (flow, bed disturbance, nutrients, and light) affect the growth and persistence of this organism. Here we assess results from bi-weekly surveys performed over a full year on two rivers where didymo was first observed in New Zealand; the Oreti and Mararoa. We used the data to test the hypotheses that the development of thick, dense mats requires high light levels but is inversely proportional to nutrient levels, and that mat persistence is controlled by the frequency of flow events that produce bed sediment transport. Observed regrowth between disturbance events was found to be inversely correlated with nutrient availability. The seasonal availability of light did not correlate with variations in growth rate, but this did not account for specific characteristics of the different sites such as aspect, shading, flow depth and turbidity that will all impact on the amount of available light reaching the streambed. The results clearly indicate that the time-history of flow and nutrient levels is critical to evaluating the growth and persistence of D. geminata and that additional site specific information is necessary to determine the role of bed stability and the amount of available light reaching the streambed.

  12. Successful Flexible Bronchoscopic Management of Dynamic Central Airway Obstruction by a Large Tracheal Carcinoid Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Hadda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Typical carcinoid of the trachea presenting as an endoluminal polypoidal mass is a rare occurrence. Herein, we report a case of a 34-year-old female patient who presented with features of central airway obstruction. Flexible bronchoscopy demonstrated a large pedunculated growth arising from the lower end of the trachea near carina which was flopping in and out of the main tracheal lumen and the proximal right bronchus leading to dynamic airway obstruction. Successful electrosurgical excision (using a snare loop of the polypoidal growth was performed using the flexible bronchoscope itself. The patient had immediate relief of airway obstruction and histopathological examination of the polyp demonstrated features of typical carcinoid (WHO Grade I neuroendocrine tumor.

  13. Successful Flexible Bronchoscopic Management of Dynamic Central Airway Obstruction by a Large Tracheal Carcinoid Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Karan; Mohan, Anant; Kalai, Umasankar; Guleria, Randeep

    2014-01-01

    Typical carcinoid of the trachea presenting as an endoluminal polypoidal mass is a rare occurrence. Herein, we report a case of a 34-year-old female patient who presented with features of central airway obstruction. Flexible bronchoscopy demonstrated a large pedunculated growth arising from the lower end of the trachea near carina which was flopping in and out of the main tracheal lumen and the proximal right bronchus leading to dynamic airway obstruction. Successful electrosurgical excision (using a snare loop) of the polypoidal growth was performed using the flexible bronchoscope itself. The patient had immediate relief of airway obstruction and histopathological examination of the polyp demonstrated features of typical carcinoid (WHO Grade I neuroendocrine tumor). PMID:25478275

  14. Use of the Concept of Equivalent Biologically Effective Dose (BED) to Quantify the Contribution of Hyperthermia to Local Tumor Control in Radiohyperthermia Cervical Cancer Trials, and Comparison With Radiochemotherapy Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plataniotis, George A.; Dale, Roger G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To express the magnitude of contribution of hyperthermia to local tumor control in radiohyperthermia (RT/HT) cervical cancer trials, in terms of the radiation-equivalent biologically effective dose (BED) and to explore the potential of the combined modalities in the treatment of this neoplasm. Materials and Methods: Local control rates of both arms of each study (RT vs. RT+HT) reported from randomized controlled trials (RCT) on concurrent RT/HT for cervical cancer were reviewed. By comparing the two tumor control probabilities (TCPs) from each study, we calculated the HT-related log cell-kill and then expressed it in terms of the number of 2 Gy fraction equivalents, for a range of tumor volumes and radiosensitivities. We have compared the contribution of each modality and made some exploratory calculations on the TCPs that might be expected from a combined trimodality treatment (RT+CT+HT). Results: The HT-equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions ranges from 0.6 to 4.8 depending on radiosensitivity. Opportunities for clinically detectable improvement by the addition of HT are only available in tumors with an alpha value in the approximate range of 0.22-0.28 Gy -1 . A combined treatment (RT+CT+HT) is not expected to improve prognosis in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: The most significant improvements in TCP, which may result from the combination of RT/CT/HT for locally advanced cervical carcinomas, are likely to be limited only to those patients with tumors of relatively low-intermediate radiosensitivity.

  15. Cancer systems biology in the genome sequencing era: part 2, evolutionary dynamics of tumor clonal networks and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Edwin; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Beitel, Lenore K; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2013-08-01

    A tumor often consists of multiple cell subpopulations (clones). Current chemo-treatments often target one clone of a tumor. Although the drug kills that clone, other clones overtake it and the tumor recurs. Genome sequencing and computational analysis allows to computational dissection of clones from tumors, while singe-cell genome sequencing including RNA-Seq allows profiling of these clones. This opens a new window for treating a tumor as a system in which clones are evolving. Future cancer systems biology studies should consider a tumor as an evolving system with multiple clones. Therefore, topics discussed in Part 2 of this review include evolutionary dynamics of clonal networks, early-warning signals (e.g., genome duplication events) for formation of fast-growing clones, dissecting tumor heterogeneity, and modeling of clone-clone-stroma interactions for drug resistance. The ultimate goal of the future systems biology analysis is to obtain a 'whole-system' understanding of a tumor and therefore provides a more efficient and personalized management strategies for cancer patients. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Storage capacity assessment of liquid fuels production by solar gasification in a packed bed reactor using a dynamic process model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniyal, Ashok A.; Eyk, Philip J. van; Nathan, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • First analysis to assess storage requirements of a stand-alone packed bed, batch process solar gasifier. • 35 days of storage required for stand-alone solar system, whereas 8 h of storage required for hybrid system. • Sensitivity of storage requirement to reactor operation, solar region and solar multiple evaluated. - Abstract: The first multi-day performance analysis of the feasibility of integrating a packed bed, indirectly irradiated solar gasification reactor with a downstream FT liquids production facility is reported. Two fuel-loading scenarios were assessed. In one, the residual unconverted fuel at the end of a day is reused, while in the second, the residual fuel is discarded. To estimate a full year time-series of operation, a simplified statistical model was developed from short-period simulations of the 1-D heat transfer, devolatilisation and gasification chemistry model of a 150 kW th packed bed reactor (based on the authors’ earlier work). The short time-series cover a variety of solar conditions to represent seasonal, diurnal and cloud-induced solar transience. Also assessed was the influence of increasing the solar flux incident at the emitter plate of the packed bed reactor on syngas production. The combination of the annual time-series and daily model of syngas production was found to represent reasonably the seasonal transience in syngas production. It was then used to estimate the minimum syngas storage volume required to maintain a stable flow-rate and composition of syngas to a FT reactor over a full year of operation. This found that, for an assumed heliostat field collection area of 1000 m 2 , at least 64 days of storage is required, under both the Residual Fuel Re-Use and Discard scenarios. This figure was not sensitive to the two solar sites assessed, Farmington, New Mexico or Tonopah Airport, Nevada. Increasing the heliostat field collection area from 1000 to 1500 m 2 , led to an increase in the calculated daily rate

  17. Differentiation between benign and malignant colon tumors using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR colonography; a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achiam, M.P., E-mail: achiam1@dadlnet.d [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev Ringvej, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Department of Surgical Gastroenterology D, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev Ringvej, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3C, DK-2200 Copenhagen (Denmark); Andersen, L.P.H.; Klein, M. [Department of Surgical Gastroenterology D, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev Ringvej, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3C, DK-2200 Copenhagen (Denmark); Logager, V.; Chabanova, E.; Thomsen, H.S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev Ringvej, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3C, DK-2200 Copenhagen (Denmark); Rosenberg, J. [Department of Surgical Gastroenterology D, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev Ringvej, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3C, DK-2200 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2010-06-15

    Background: Colorectal cancer will present itself as a bowel obstruction in 16-23% of all cases. However, not all obstructing tumors are malignant and the differentiation between a benign and a malignant tumor can be difficult. The purpose of our study was to determine whether fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging combined with MR colonography could be used to differentiate a benign from a malignant obstructing colon tumor. Methods: Patients with benign colon tumor stenosis, based on diverticulitis, were asked to participate in the study. The same number of patients with verified colorectal cancer was included. Both groups had to be scheduled for surgery to be included. Two blinded observers analyzed the tumors on MR by placing a region of interest in the tumor and a series of parameters were evaluated, e.g. wash-in, wash-out and time-to-peak. Results: 14 patients were included. The wash-in and wash-out rates were significantly different between the benign and malignant tumors, and a clear distinction between benign and malignant disease was therefore possible by looking only at the MR data. Furthermore, MR colography evaluating the rest of the colon past the stenosis was possible with all patients. Conclusion: The results showed the feasibility of using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging to differentiate between benign and malignant colonic tumors. With a high intra-class correlation and significant differences found on independent segments of the tumor, the method appears to be reproducible. Furthermore, the potential is big in performing a full preoperative colon evaluation even in patients with obstructing cancer. Trial number: (NCT00114829).

  18. Differentiation between benign and malignant colon tumors using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR colonography; a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achiam, M.P.; Andersen, L.P.H.; Klein, M.; Logager, V.; Chabanova, E.; Thomsen, H.S.; Rosenberg, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer will present itself as a bowel obstruction in 16-23% of all cases. However, not all obstructing tumors are malignant and the differentiation between a benign and a malignant tumor can be difficult. The purpose of our study was to determine whether fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging combined with MR colonography could be used to differentiate a benign from a malignant obstructing colon tumor. Methods: Patients with benign colon tumor stenosis, based on diverticulitis, were asked to participate in the study. The same number of patients with verified colorectal cancer was included. Both groups had to be scheduled for surgery to be included. Two blinded observers analyzed the tumors on MR by placing a region of interest in the tumor and a series of parameters were evaluated, e.g. wash-in, wash-out and time-to-peak. Results: 14 patients were included. The wash-in and wash-out rates were significantly different between the benign and malignant tumors, and a clear distinction between benign and malignant disease was therefore possible by looking only at the MR data. Furthermore, MR colography evaluating the rest of the colon past the stenosis was possible with all patients. Conclusion: The results showed the feasibility of using fast dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging to differentiate between benign and malignant colonic tumors. With a high intra-class correlation and significant differences found on independent segments of the tumor, the method appears to be reproducible. Furthermore, the potential is big in performing a full preoperative colon evaluation even in patients with obstructing cancer. Trial number: (NCT00114829).

  19. Modelling dynamic transport and adsorption of arsenic in soil-bed filters for long-term performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sourav; Mondal, Raka; de, Sirshendu; Griffiths, Ian

    2017-11-01

    Purification of contaminated water following the safe water guidelines while generating sufficiently large throughput is a crucial requirement for the steady supply of safe water to large populations. Adsorption-based filtration processes using a multilayer soil bed has been posed as a viable method to achieve this goal. This work describes the theory of operation and prediction of the long-term behaviour of such a system. The fixed-bed column has a single input of contaminated water from the top and an output from the bottom. As the contaminant passes through the column, it is adsorbed by the medium. Like any other adsorption medium, the filter has a certain lifespan, beyond which the filtrate does not meet the safe limit of drinking water, which is defined as `breakthrough'. A mathematical model is developed that couples the fluid flow through the porous medium to the convective, diffusive and adsorptive transport of the contaminant. The results are validated with experimental observations and the model is then used to predict the breakthrough and lifetime of the filter. The key advantage of this model is that it can predict the long-term behaviour of any adsorption column system for any set of physical characteristics of the system. This worked was supported by the EPSRC Global Challenge Research Fund Institutional Sponsorship 2016.

  20. Investigation of flow dynamics of liquid phase in a pilot-scale trickle bed reactor using radiotracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, H J; Sharma, V K

    2016-10-01

    A radiotracer investigation was carried out to measure residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase in a trickle bed reactor (TBR). The main objectives of the investigation were to investigate radial and axial mixing of the liquid phase, and evaluate performance of the liquid distributor/redistributor at different operating conditions. Mean residence times (MRTs), holdups (H) and fraction of flow flowing along different quadrants were estimated. The analysis of the measured RTD curves indicated radial non-uniform distribution of liquid phase across the beds. The overall RTD of the liquid phase, measured at the exit of the reactor was simulated using a multi-parameter axial dispersion with exchange model (ADEM), and model parameters were obtained. The results of model simulations indicated that the TBR behaved as a plug flow reactor at most of the operating conditions used in the investigation. The results of the investigation helped to improve the existing design as well as to design a full-scale industrial TBR for petroleum refining applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Redox dynamics of arsenic species in the root-near environment of juncus effusus investigated in a Macro-gradient-free rooted gravel bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, K.Z. [UFZ - Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung GmbH, Umweltbiotechnologisches Zentrum (UbZ), Leipzig (Germany)]|[Institut fuer Siedlungswasserbau, Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft, Arbeitsbereich Wasserguetewirtschaft und Wasserversorgung (ISWA), Stuttgart (Germany); Wiessner, A.; Offelder, A.; Kaestner, M. [UFZ - Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung GmbH, Department Bioremediation (Germany); Mattusch, J. [Department Analytische Umweltchemie, UFZ - Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Mueller, R.A. [UFZ - Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung GmbH, Umweltbiotechnologisches Zentrum (UbZ), Leipzig (Germany); Kuschk, P.

    2008-12-15

    In the framework of investigating the dynamics of As species within the planted soil beds of treatment wetlands, the redox dynamics of As species particularly in the root-near environment of the rhizosphere were investigated. For this purpose, long-term experiments were carried out using a specially designed macro-gradient-free rooted gravel bed reactor, planted with Juncus effusus to treat an artificial wastewater containing As (200 {mu}g As/L). The exceptional quality of the biofilm processes at the helophyte root-surfaces in treatment wetlands were of special importance in this investigation. The results showed that under C-deficient conditions, a highly efficient As immobilization (>85 %), obviously due to adsorption and/or co-precipitation, was attained. The addition of organic carbon immediately caused an elevated As concentration and enrichment of As(III) (nearly 80% of total As) in the reactor. Increasing the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentration in the artificial wastewater inflow facilitated a high As immobilization (>82%) under sulfate reducing condition. In principle, a highly efficient microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction contributed to S{sup 2-} formation and a greater As immobilization (most likely as As{sub 2}S{sub 3}) under C surplus and reducing conditions. Significant differences in As immobilization were observed by varying the inflow of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentration (0.2, 5, 10, 25 S/L) under C surplus conditions. More As(III) precipitates (15% less in the outflow) when the inflow of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentration was decreased from 25 mg S/L to 10 mg S/L. Immobilized As showed greater instability by releasing As(V) (up to 85 % of total As) due to changes in the dynamic redox conditions inside the reactor. Re-oxidation of reduced sulfur into other S species (e.g. S{sup 0}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) due to plant-root mediated O{sub 2} release probably caused an oxidative dissolution of already precipitated insoluble As (e.g. As{sub 2}S{sub 3

  2. The expression of VE-cadherin in breast cancer cells modulates cell dynamics as a function of tumor differentiation and promotes tumor-endothelial cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Maryam; Cao, Jiahui; Friedrich, Katrin; Kemper, Björn; Brendel, Oliver; Grosser, Marianne; Adrian, Manuela; Baretton, Gustavo; Breier, Georg; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim

    2018-01-01

    The cadherin switch has profound consequences on cancer invasion and metastasis. The endothelial-specific vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) has been demonstrated in diverse cancer types including breast cancer and is supposed to modulate tumor progression and metastasis, but underlying mechanisms need to be better understood. First, we evaluated VE-cadherin expression by tissue microarray in 392 cases of breast cancer tumors and found a diverse expression and distribution of VE-cadherin. Experimental expression of fluorescence-tagged VE-cadherin (VE-EGFP) in undifferentiated, fibroblastoid and E-cadherin-negative MDA-231 (MDA-VE-EGFP) as well as in differentiated E-cadherin-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-VE-EGFP), respectively, displayed differentiation-dependent functional differences. VE-EGFP expression reversed the fibroblastoid MDA-231 cells to an epithelial-like phenotype accompanied by increased β-catenin expression, actin and vimentin remodeling, increased cell spreading and barrier function and a reduced migration ability due to formation of VE-cadherin-mediated cell junctions. The effects were largely absent in both MDA-VE-EGFP and in control MCF-EGFP cell lines. However, MCF-7 cells displayed a VE-cadherin-independent planar cell polarity and directed cell migration that both developed in MDA-231 only after VE-EGFP expression. Furthermore, VE-cadherin expression had no effect on tumor cell proliferation in monocultures while co-culturing with endothelial cells enhanced tumor cell proliferation due to integration of the tumor cells into monolayer where they form VE-cadherin-mediated cell contacts with the endothelium. We propose an interactive VE-cadherin-based crosstalk that might activate proliferation-promoting signals. Together, our study shows a VE-cadherin-mediated cell dynamics and an endothelial-dependent proliferation in a differentiation-dependent manner.

  3. Dynamics of yeast immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactors systems in ethanol fermentation from lactose-hydrolyzed whey and whey permeate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardo, Sabrina; Pereira, Gabriela Feix; Klein, Manuela P; Rech, Rosane; Hertz, Plinho F; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of ethanol production on lactose-hydrolyzed whey (LHW) and lactose-hydrolyzed whey permeate (LHWP) in batch fluidized-bed bioreactors using single and co-cultures of immobilized cells of industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-industrial strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus. Although the co-culture of S. cerevisiae CAT-1 and K. marxianus CCT 4086 produced two- to fourfold the ethanol productivity of single cultures of S. cerevisiae, the single cultures of the K. marxianus CCT 4086 produced the best results in both media (Y EtOH/S = 0.47-0.49 g g(-1) and Q P = 1.39-1.68 g L(-1) h(-1), in LHW and LHWP, respectively). Ethanol production on concentrated LHWP (180 g L(-1)) reached 79.1 g L(-1), with yields of 0.46 g g(-1) for K. marxianus CCT 4086 cultures. Repeated batches of fluidized-bed bioreactor on concentrated LHWP led to increased ethanol productivity, reaching 2.8 g L(-1) h(-1).

  4. Tumor Oxygen Dynamics as a Prognostic Indicator of Effective Antiangiogenic Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Dawen

    2002-01-01

    ...) MR, our results showed that significantly better oxygenation was found in the well differentiated and slower growing H and HI tumors, compared with anaplastic or metastatic, faster growing ATl and MAT-Lu tumors...

  5. Steady-state and dynamic evaluation of the electric propulsion system test bed vehicle on a road load simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustin, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    The propulsion system of the Lewis Research Center's electric propulsion system test bed vehicle was tested on the road load simulator under the DOE Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program. This propulsion system, consisting of a series-wound dc motor controlled by an infinitely variable SCR chopper and an 84-V battery pack, is typical of those used in electric vehicles made in 1976. Steady-state tests were conducted over a wide range of differential output torques and vehicle speeds. Efficiencies of all of the components were determined. Effects of temperature and voltage variations on the motor and the effect of voltage changes on the controller were examined. Energy consumption and energy efficiency for the system were determined over the B and C driving schedules of the SAE J227a test procedure.

  6. Soil application of ash produced by low-temperature fluidized bed gasification: effects on soil nutrient dynamics and crop response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Stöver, Dorette Sophie; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Holm, Jens Kai

    2012-01-01

    on soil nutrient levels or on crop biomass. We conclude from the results of this study, that—depending on the feedstock used—ashes from LT-CFB gasification of plant biomass can be used to replace mineral fertilizers if they are applied according to their nutrient content, the crop demand, and soil......Recycling of residual products of bioenergy conversion processes is important for adding value to the technologies and as a potential beneficial soil fertility amendment. In this study, two different ash materials originating from low temperature circulating fluidized bed (LT-CFB) gasification...... of either wheat straw (SA) or residue fibers mainly from citrus peels (CP) were tested regarding their potential to be used as fertilizer on agricultural soils. A soil incubation study, a greenhouse experiment with barley and faba bean, and an accompanying outdoor experiment with maize were carried out...

  7. Nail bed onychomatricoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Gao, Tianwen; Wang, Gang

    2014-10-01

    Onychomatricoma is a rare tumor originating from the nail matrix, and, in rare conditions, from the ventral aspect of the proximal nailfold. Here we report a rare case of a 51-year-old man presenting with melanonychia mainly involving the distal nail plate. Histopathologic examination showed typical findings of onychomatricoma mainly involving the nail bed, while the nail matrix was largely uninvolved. We also identified fungal infection in a focal area of the distal nail plate. Our findings indicate that onychomatricoma can develop in the surrounding epithelial tissue of the nail unit, including the nail bed, and suggest that fungal infection may represent a secondary phenomenon of onychomatricoma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Non-palpable incidentally found testicular tumors: Differentiation between benign, malignant, and burned-out tumors using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanharawi, Imane El [Service de Radiologie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle Adulte, Groupe Hospitalier Paris Sud, Hôpital de Bicêtre, APHP, 78 avenue du Général Leclerc, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicêtre (France); Correas, Jean-Michel [Service de Radiologie Adultes, Hôpital Necker, APHP, Faculté Paris 5, 149 rue de Sèvres 75015 Paris (France); Institut Langevin, ESPCI Paris, PSL Research University CNRS UMR 7587, INSERM ERL U-979, 35, 17 rue Moreau, 75012 Paris (France); Glas, Ludivine [Service de Radiologie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle Adulte, Groupe Hospitalier Paris Sud, Hôpital de Bicêtre, APHP, 78 avenue du Général Leclerc, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicêtre (France); Ferlicot, Sophie [Service d ’ anatomo-pathologie, Groupe Hospitalier Paris Sud, Hôpital de Bicêtre, APHP, 78 avenue du Général Leclerc, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicêtre (France); Faculté de Médecine Paris-Saclay, 63 rue Gabriel Péri, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre (France); and others

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate qualitative, semi-quantitative, and quantitative parameters obtained by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI for the characterization of histologically proven, non-palpable, incidentally found intratesticular tumors. Materials and methods: From 2006 to 2014, we included men with non-palpable, incidentally found testicular tumors on ultrasound, normal tumoral marker levels,referred for surgery. DCE-MRI data were analyzed retrospectively and independently by two radiologists blinded to the histological diagnosis. The visual enhancement patterns, time-signal intensity curves, shape of the curves (type 0–3), maximal relative enhancement (Peak), initial enhancement slope (IS), time to peak (TTP), as well as transfer constants Ktrans and Kep were compared between the tumors. The interobserver correlation was evaluated. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves and areas under the curve (AUC) were extracted. Results: Thirty-one patients (mean age of 37.3 years) were included. Tumor mean size was 1.2 ± 0.77 cm (min = 0.3 cm, max = 2.8 cm). Regarding the histology results, three groups were defined: Twelve stromal “benign tumors” (BT) exhibited more type 2 and type 3 curves than 12 “malignant tumors” (MT) and 7 “burned-out tumors” (BOT) (p < 0.0001). BT had a higher peak (96 vs. 54 and 17%), shorter TTP (215 vs. 412 and 692 sec), higher IS (73 vs. 12 and 2 arbitrary units), higher Ktrans (255 vs. 88 and 14 min{sup −1}*1000) and higher Kep (554 vs. 159 and 48 min{sup −1}*1000) than MT and BOT, respectively (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0003, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The agreement coefficient values and the AUC extracted after gathering MT with BOT varied from 0.83 to 0.96 and from 0.868 to 0.978, respectively. Conclusion: DCE-MRI may assist in differentiating between benign intratesticular stromal tumors,malignant and burned-out tumors.

  9. Heat and mass transfer enforcement of vibrating fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhide; Yang, Junhong; Li, Xuhui; Song, Yang

    1994-12-01

    This paper briefly introduces the development of vibrating fluidized bed at home and abroad, elaborates the vibration properties of vibrating fluidized bed, the fluidizing velocity and pressure drop of the bed layer. It also deduces the non-steady state drying dynamic equations of vibrating fluidized bed, analyzes main factors which influence the drying rate and inquires into drying rules of fixed bed and vibrating fluidized bed.

  10. Evaluation of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI in the differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Vibeke Andrée; Simonsen, Helle J; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To investigate if perfusion measured with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) can be used to differentiate radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence in patients with high-grade glioma. METHODS: The study was approved by the institutional review board......-PET and DCE-MRI agreed in classification of tumor status in 13 out of the 16 cases where an FDG-PET classification was obtained. In two of the remaining three patients, MRI follow-up and histology was available and both indicated that the DCE-MRI answer was correct. CONCLUSION: CBV measurements using DCE...

  11. Dynamic Analyses of Alternative Polyadenylation from RNA-Seq Reveal 3′-UTR Landscape Across 7 Tumor Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zheng; Donehower, Lawrence A; Cooper, Thomas A.; Neilson, Joel R.; Wheeler, David A.; Wagner, Eric J.; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a pervasive mechanism in the regulation of most human genes, and its implication in diseases including cancer is only beginning to be appreciated. Since conventional APA profiling has not been widely adopted, global cancer APA studies are very limited. Here we develop a novel bioinformatics algorithm (DaPars) for the de novo identification of dynamic APAs from standard RNA-seq. When applied to 358 TCGA Pan-Cancer tumor/normal pairs across 7 tumor types, DaPars reveals 1,346 genes with recurrent and tumor-specific APAs. Most APA genes (91%) have shorter 3′ UTRs in tumors that can avoid miRNA-mediated repression, including glutaminase (GLS), a key metabolic enzyme for tumor proliferation. Interestingly, selected APA events add strong prognostic power beyond common clinical and molecular variables, suggesting their potential as novel prognostic biomarkers. Finally, our results implicate CstF64, an essential polyadenylation factor, as a master regulator of 3′ UTR shortening across multiple tumor types. PMID:25409906

  12. Self-Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles Shows Microenvironment-Mediated Dynamic Switching and Enhanced Brain Tumor Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qishuai; Shen, Yajing; Fu, Yingjie; Muroski, Megan E; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Qiaoyue; Xu, Chang; Lesniak, Maciej S; Li, Gang; Cheng, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles with unique physical properties have been explored as nanomedicines for brain tumor treatment. However, the clinical applications of the inorganic formulations are often hindered by the biological barriers and failure to be bioeliminated. The size of the nanoparticle is an essential design parameter which plays a significant role to affect the tumor targeting and biodistribution. Here, we report a feasible approach for the assembly of gold nanoparticles into ~80 nm nanospheres as a drug delivery platform for enhanced retention in brain tumors with the ability to be dynamically switched into the single formulation for excretion. These nanoassemblies can target epidermal growth factor receptors on cancer cells and are responsive to tumor microenvironmental characteristics, including high vascular permeability and acidic and redox conditions. Anticancer drug release was controlled by a pH-responsive mechanism. Intracellular L-glutathione (GSH) triggered the complete breakdown of nanoassemblies to single gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, in vivo studies have shown that nanospheres display enhanced tumor-targeting efficiency and therapeutic effects relative to single-nanoparticle formulations. Hence, gold nanoassemblies present an effective targeting strategy for brain tumor treatment.

  13. Studies of Adsorption of Heavy Metals onto Spent Coffee Ground: Equilibrium, Regeneration, and Dynamic Performance in a Fixed-Bed Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Davila-Guzman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Equilibrium and dynamic adsorption of heavy metals onto spent coffee ground (SCG were studied. The equilibrium adsorption of Cd2+, Cu2+, and Pb2+ in a batch system was modeled by an ion-exchange model (IEM based on an ion-exchange of heavy metals with calcium and protons bonded to active sites on SCG surface. The maximum amount of adsorbed metal ions obtained using the IEM was 0.12, 0.21, and 0.32 mmol/g of Cd2+, Cu2+, and Pb2+, respectively. Regeneration of SCG was evaluated using citric acid, calcium chloride, and nitric acid. The observed trend of desorption efficiency through four adsorption-desorption cycles was HNO3 > CaCl2 > C6H8O7. The effect of process variables such as flow rate and bed height during the dynamic adsorption was evaluated. Moreover, the applicability of a mass transfer model based on external mass transfer resistance, axial dispersion, and ion-exchange isotherm was evaluated, and the results were in good agreement with the experimental data for the adsorption in SCG packed column. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters showed that axial dispersion coefficient is the most significant parameter in the dynamic simulation. The results obtained showed the potential of SCG as a low-cost material for wastewater metal removal in continuous systems.

  14. Phytomedicine polypharmacology: Cancer therapy through modulating the tumor microenvironment and oxylipin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaya, Maria Karmella; Chang, Meng-Ting; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2016-06-01

    Integrative approaches in cancer therapy have recently been extended beyond the induction of cytotoxicity to controlling the tumor microenvironment and modulating inflammatory cascades and pathways such as lipid mediator biosynthesis and their dynamics. Profiling of important lipid messengers, such as oxylipins, produced as part of the physiological response to pharmacological stimuli, provides a unique opportunity to explore drug pharmacology and the possibilities for molecular management of cancer physiopathology. Whereas single targeted chemotherapeutic drugs commonly lack efficacy and invoke drug resistance and/or adverse effects in cancer patients, traditional herbal medicines are seen as bright prospects for treating complex diseases, such as cancers, in a systematic and holistic manner. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of traditional medicine and its bioactive chemical constituents may aid the modernization of herbal remedies and the discovery of novel phytoagents for cancer management. In this review, systems-based polypharmacology and studies to develop multi-target drugs or leads from phytomedicines and their derived natural products that may overcome the problems of current anti-cancer drugs, are proposed and summarized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of tumor volumes derived from glucose metabolic rate maps and SUV maps in dynamic 18F-FDG PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Eric P; Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Kienhorst, Laura; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Corstens, Frans H M; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Oyen, Wim J G

    2008-06-01

    Tumor delineation using noninvasive medical imaging modalities is important to determine the target volume in radiation treatment planning and to evaluate treatment response. It is expected that combined use of CT and functional information from 18F-FDG PET will improve tumor delineation. However, until now, tumor delineation using PET has been based on static images of 18F-FDG standardized uptake values (SUVs). 18F-FDG uptake depends not only on tumor physiology but also on blood supply, distribution volume, and competitive uptake processes in other tissues. Moreover, 18F-FDG uptake in tumor tissue and in surrounding healthy tissue depends on the time after injection. Therefore, it is expected that the glucose metabolic rate (MRglu) derived from dynamic PET scans gives a better representation of the tumor activity than does SUV. The aim of this study was to determine tumor volumes in MRglu maps and to compare them with the values from SUV maps. Twenty-nine lesions in 16 dynamic 18F-FDG PET scans in 13 patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma were analyzed. MRglu values were calculated on a voxel-by-voxel basis using the standard 2-compartment 18F-FDG model with trapping in the linear approximation (Patlak analysis). The blood input function was obtained by arterial sampling. Tumor volumes were determined in SUV maps of the last time frame and in MRglu maps using 3-dimensional isocontours at 50% of the maximum SUV and the maximum MRglu, respectively. Tumor volumes based on SUV contouring ranged from 1.31 to 52.16 cm3, with a median of 8.57 cm3. Volumes based on MRglu ranged from 0.95 to 37.29 cm3, with a median of 3.14 cm3. For all lesions, the MRglu volumes were significantly smaller than the SUV volumes. The percentage differences (defined as 100% x (V MRglu - V SUV)/V SUV, where V is volume) ranged from -12.8% to -84.8%, with a median of -32.8%. Tumor volumes from MRglu maps were significantly smaller than SUV-based volumes. These findings can be of

  16. Inflammasomes and Cancer: The Dynamic Role of the Inflammasome in Tumor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin Kantono

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Inflammation in tumor microenvironments is not only associated with various stages of tumor development, but also has significant impacts on tumor immunity and immunotherapy. Inflammasome are an important innate immune pathway critical for the production of active IL-1β and interleukin 18, as well as the induction of pyroptosis. Although extensive studies have demonstrated that inflammasomes play a vital role in infectious and autoimmune diseases, their role in tumor progression remains elusive. Multiple studies using a colitis-associated colon cancer model show that inflammasome components provide protection against the development of colon cancer. However, very recent studies demonstrate that inflammasomes promote tumor progression in skin and breast cancer. These results indicate that inflammasomes can promote and suppress tumor development depending on types of tumors, specific inflammasomes involved, and downstream effector molecules. The complicated role of inflammasomes raises new opportunities and challenges to manipulate inflammasome pathways in the treatment of cancer.

  17. Dynamic cultivation of human mesenchymal stem cells in a rotating bed bioreactor system based on the Z RP platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichs, Solvig; Röker, Stefanie; Marten, Dana; Peterbauer, Anja; Scheper, Thomas; van Griensven, Martijn; Kasper, Cornelia

    2009-01-01

    Because the regeneration of large bone defects is limited by quantitative restrictions and risks of infections, the development of bioartificial bone substitutes is of great importance. To obtain a three-dimensional functional tissue-like graft, static cultivation is inexpedient due to limitations in cell density, nutrition and oxygen support. Dynamic cultivation in a bioreactor system can overcome these restrictions and furthermore provide the possibility to control the environment with regard to pH, oxygen content, and temperature. In this study, a three-dimensional bone construct was engineered by the use of dynamic bioreactor technology. Human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultivated on a macroporous zirconium dioxide based ceramic disc called Sponceram. Furthermore, hydroxyapatite coated Sponceram was used. The cells were cultivated under dynamic conditions and compared with statically cultivated cells. The differentiation into osteoblasts was initiated by osteogenic supplements. Cellular proliferation during static and dynamic cultivation was compared measuring glucose and lactate concentration. The differentiation process was analysed determining AP-expression and using different specific staining methods. Our results demonstrate much higher proliferation rates during dynamic conditions in the bioreactor system compared to static cultivation measured by glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell densities on the scaffolds indicated higher proliferation on native Sponceram compared to hydroxyapatite coated Sponceram. With this study, we present an excellent method to enhance cellular proliferation and bone lineage specific growth of tissue like structures comprising fibrous (collagen) and globular (mineral) extracellular components. (c) 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2009.

  18. WE-G-BRF-06: Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-Guided Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Cancer Radiotherapy: First Patient Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Loo, B; Graves, E; Yamamoto, T; Keall, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: PET-guided dynamic tumor tracking is a novel concept of biologically targeted image guidance for radiotherapy. A dynamic tumor tracking algorithm based on list-mode PET data has been developed and previously tested on dynamic phantom data. In this study, we investigate if dynamic tumor tracking is clinically feasible by applying the method to lung cancer patient PET data. Methods: PET-guided tumor tracking estimates the target position of a segmented volume in PET images reconstructed continuously from accumulated coincidence events correlated with external respiratory motion, simulating real-time applications, i.e., only data up to the current time point is used to estimate the target position. A target volume is segmented with a 50% threshold, consistently, of the maximum intensity in the predetermined volume of interest. Through this algorithm, the PET-estimated trajectories are quantified from four lung cancer patients who have distinct tumor location and size. The accuracy of the PET-estimated trajectories is evaluated by comparing to external respiratory motion because the ground-truth of tumor motion is not known in patients; however, previous phantom studies demonstrated sub-2mm accuracy using clinically derived 3D tumor motion. Results: The overall similarity of motion patterns between the PET-estimated trajectories and the external respiratory traces implies that the PET-guided tracking algorithm can provide an acceptable level of targeting accuracy. However, there are variations in the tracking accuracy between tumors due to the quality of the segmentation which depends on target-to-background ratio, tumor location and size. Conclusion: For the first time, a dynamic tumor tracking algorithm has been applied to lung cancer patient PET data, demonstrating clinical feasibility of real-time tumor tracking for integrated PET-linacs. The target-to-background ratio is a significant factor determining accuracy: screening during treatment planning would

  19. Chemotherapy in conjoint aging-tumor systems: some simple models for addressing coupled aging-cancer dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witten Tarynn M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper we consider two approaches to examining the complex dynamics of conjoint aging-cancer cellular systems undergoing chemotherapeutic intervention. In particular, we focus on the effect of cells growing conjointly in a culture plate as a precursor to considering the larger multi-dimensional models of such systems. Tumor cell growth is considered from both the logistic and the Gompertzian case, while normal cell growth of fibroblasts (WI-38 human diploid fibroblasts is considered as logistic only. Results We demonstrate, in a simple approach, how the interdependency of different cell types in a tumor, together with specifications of for treatment, can lead to different evolutionary patterns for normal and tumor cells during a course of therapy. Conclusions These results have significance for understanding appropriate pharmacotherapy for elderly patients who are also undergoing chemotherapy.

  20. Improved combustion performance of waste-fired FB-boilers -The influence of the dynamics of the bed on the air-/fuel interaction; Foerbaettrad foerbraenningsprestanda vid avfallsfoerbraenning i FB-pannor -Baeddynamikens inverkan paa luft-/braensleomblandningen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Johanna (Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); Pallares, David; Thunman, Henrik; Johnsson, Filip (Chalmers (Sweden)); Andersson, Bengt-Aake (E.on/Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); Victoren, Anders (Metso Power AB (Sweden)); Johansson, Andreas (SP, Boraas (Sweden))

    2010-07-01

    One of the key benefits of fluidized bed combustion is that the bed - through mixing of fuel and air and accumulated heat - facilitates combustion at low stoichiometry and with low emissions. Even so, it is not unusual that waste-fired FB-boilers are operated at 6-8% oxygen that corresponds to 30-40% higher flows of gas than theoretically needed. In addition to that and in comparison to grate furnaces, FB-boiler can cause high pressure drop losses because of the fluidization of the bottom bed, which in turn are associated with high costs for power (fans). This work aims therefore at increasing the knowledge for how the dynamics of the bed affects the air and fuel mixture. Methods to explain and characterize the phenomenon have been derived within this work showing: - Distribution of air in a bed for various cases and the influence of pressure drop, bed height and fluidization velocity - A semi-empiric method to calculate an even bubble distribution - The relation between fluidization and fuel distribution for various fluidization flows and fuels - Dispersion rates for various fuels - Volatilization rates for waste in relation to biomass The result can be useful when optimizing units, for instance through finding as low pressure drops as possible with an even bubble distribution, low risk for sintering and unwanted emissions. The work has thereby reached its ultimate goal of increasing the generic knowledge about waste combustion in FB-boiler

  1. Grain-size analysis and sediment dynamics of hurricane-induced event beds in a coastal New England pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagno, K. A.; Ruehr, S. A.; Donnelly, J. P.; Woodruff, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    Coastal populations have grown increasingly susceptible to the impacts of tropical cyclone events as they grow in size, wealth, and infrastructure. Changes in tropical cyclone frequency and intensity, augmented by a changing climate, pose an increasing threat of property damage and loss of life. Reconstructions of intense-hurricane landfalls from a series of southeastern New England sediment cores identify a series of events spanning the past 2,000 years. Though the frequency of these landfalls is well constrained, the intensity of these storms, particularly those for which no historical record exists, is not. This study analyzes the grain-size distribution of major storm event beds along a transect of sediment cores from a kettle pond in Falmouth, MA. The grain-size distribution of each event is determined using an image processing, size, and shape analyzer. The depositional patterns and changes in grain-size distribution in these fine-grained systems may both spatially and temporally reveal characteristics of both storm intensity and the nature of sediment deposition. An inverse-modeling technique using this kind of grain-size analysis to determine past storm intensity has been explored in back-barrier lagoon systems in the Caribbean, but limited research has assessed its utility to assess deposits from back-barrier ponds in the northeastern United States. Increases in hurricane intensity may be closely tied to increases in sea surface temperature. As such, research into these prehistoric intervals of increased frequency and/or intensity provides important insight into the current and future hurricane risks facing coastal communities in New England.

  2. Model of rough bed for numerical simulation of saltation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kharlamova, Irina; Vlasák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 3 (2015), s. 366-385 ISSN 1964-8189 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/09/1718; GA ČR GAP105/10/1574 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : saltation * bed load transport * rough bed * armoured bed * bed roughness Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.636, year: 2015

  3. The diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for thyroid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Ying; Yue, Xiu-Hui; Tao, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The exact place for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in the diagnosis and management of thyroid tumors is still under debate. We performed the study to analyze and compare the parameters generated from DCE-MRI for thyroid lesions. Materials and methods: For each thyroid lesion, time intensity curves (TIC), time of peak enhancement (T peak ), maximum enhancement ratio (ER max ) and maximum rise slope (Slope max ) were plotted and calculated. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis was conducted to assess the diagnostic ability and appropriate cut-off value. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) and the confidence intervals (CIs) were also assessed. Results: Forty-two patients were consecutively included. All 21 lesions demonstrated the rapid inflow and washout pattern (type-I) were benign. The 12 cases with delayed inflow pattern (type-III) were all malignant. When compared with the benign lesions, the thyroid carcinoma showed significantly lower Slope max and higher T peak (P max was found between malignant and benign ones (P = 0.15). The AUC of ER max , Slope max and T peak in differentiating benign thyroid lesions from malignant ones were 0.63, 0.93and 1, respectively. The ER max cut-off value of 73.86 (sensitivity, 71.4%; specificity, 64.3%), Slope max cut-off value of 2.4126 (sensitivity, 92.9%; specificity, 82.1%) and T peak value of 28 (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 100%) offered the best diagnostic performances. Conclusions: DCE-MRI, especially the pattern of TIC and the value of Slope max and T peak , could be helpful in differentiating thyroid carcinoma from benign thyroid lesions.

  4. The correlation between the rise of the tumor temperature during the hyperthermia treatment and the tumor blood flow measured by dynamic CT and 15O gas-positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Hideyuki

    1993-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the correlation between the rise of tumor temperature during hyperthermia treatment and the blood flow of the tumors measured by dynamic CT (DCT) and 15 O gas-positron emission tomography. In this report, we observed 20 patients with malignant tumors which underwent hyperthermia treatment. In each case, the temperature of the tumor was monitored with a photofiber sensor. DCT's and 15 O gas-positron emission tomographies were applied before the hyperthermia treatment. During the DCT, the tumor blood flow of each tumor was estimated by analyzing the time-dependent activity curve after a bolus injection. During the 15 O gas-positron emission tomography, the tumor blood flow was estimated by the C 15 O 2 -steady-state method. The value of the tumor blood flow estimated by DCT were proportional to those calculated by the 15 O gas-positron emission tomography. These values were inversely proportional to the rise of the temperature of the tumors during hyperthermia treatment. Our results imply that DCT as well as the 15 O gas-positron emission tomography can be used for the prediction of the tumor temperature rise during the hyperthermia treatment. (author)

  5. Dynamic simulation of a circulating fluidized bed boiler system part I: Description of the dynamic system and transient behavior of sub-models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Il; Choi, Sang Min; Yang, Jong In

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic performance simulation of a CFB boiler in a commercial-scale power plant is reported. The boiler system was modeled by a finite number of heat exchanger units, which are sub-grouped into the gas-solid circulation loop, the water-steam circulation loop, and the inter-connected heat exchangers blocks of the boiler. This dynamic model is an extension from the previously reported performance simulation model, which was designed to simulate static performance of the same power plant, where heat and mass for each of the heat exchanger units were balanced for the inter-connected heat exchanger network among the fuel combustion system and the water-steam system. Dynamic performance simulation was achieved by calculating the incremental difference from the previous time step, and progressing for the next time step. Additional discretization of the heat exchanger blocks was necessary to accommodate the dynamic response of the water evaporation and natural circulation as well as the transient response of the metal temperature of the heat exchanger elements. Presentation of the simulation modeling is organized into two parts; system configuration of the model plant and the general approach of the simulation are presented along with the transient behavior of the sub-models in Part I. Dynamic sub-models were integrated in terms of the mass flow and the heat transfer for simulating the CFB boiler system. Dynamic simulation for the open loop response was performed to check the integrated system of the water-steam loop and the solid-gas loop of the total boiler system. Simulation of the total boiler system which includes the closed-loop control system blocks is presented in the following Part II

  6. Phase 2 Trial of Accelerated, Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation of 39 Gy in 13 Fractions Followed by a Tumor Bed Boost Sequentially Delivering 9 Gy in 3 Fractions in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ja Young; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Nam Kwon; Shin, Kyung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report a phase 2 trial of accelerated, hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (AH-WBI) delivered as a daily dose of 3 Gy to the whole breast followed by a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-six patients diagnosed with breast cancer (pT1-2 and pN0-1a) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery in which the operative margins were negative were treated with AH-WBI delivered as 39 Gy in 13 fractions of 3 Gy to the whole breast once daily over 5 consecutive working days, and 9 Gy in 3 sequential fractions of 3 Gy to a lumpectomy cavity, all within 3.2 weeks. Results: After a median follow-up period of 57 months (range: 27-75 months), the rate of 5-year locoregional recurrence was 1.4% (n=4), whereas that of disease-free survival was 97.4%. No grade 3 skin toxicity was reported during the follow-up period. Qualitative physician cosmetic assessments of good or excellent were noted in 82% of the patients at 2 months after the completion of AH-WBI. The global cosmetic outcome did not worsen over time, and a good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 82% of the patients at 3 years. The mean pretreatment percentage breast retraction assessment was 12.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.14-12.86). The mean value of percentage breast retraction assessment increased to 13.99 (95% CI: 12.17-15.96) after 1 year and decreased to 13.54 (95% CI: 11.84-15.46) after 3 years but was not significant (P>.05). Conclusions: AH-WBI consisting of 39 Gy in 13 fractions followed by a tumor bed boost sequentially delivering 9 Gy in 3 fractions can be delivered with excellent disease control and tolerable skin toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery

  7. Phase 2 Trial of Accelerated, Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation of 39 Gy in 13 Fractions Followed by a Tumor Bed Boost Sequentially Delivering 9 Gy in 3 Fractions in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Nam Kwon [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Medical Center, Collage of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan, E-mail: radiat@ncc.re.kr [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Medical Center, Collage of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report a phase 2 trial of accelerated, hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (AH-WBI) delivered as a daily dose of 3 Gy to the whole breast followed by a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-six patients diagnosed with breast cancer (pT1-2 and pN0-1a) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery in which the operative margins were negative were treated with AH-WBI delivered as 39 Gy in 13 fractions of 3 Gy to the whole breast once daily over 5 consecutive working days, and 9 Gy in 3 sequential fractions of 3 Gy to a lumpectomy cavity, all within 3.2 weeks. Results: After a median follow-up period of 57 months (range: 27-75 months), the rate of 5-year locoregional recurrence was 1.4% (n=4), whereas that of disease-free survival was 97.4%. No grade 3 skin toxicity was reported during the follow-up period. Qualitative physician cosmetic assessments of good or excellent were noted in 82% of the patients at 2 months after the completion of AH-WBI. The global cosmetic outcome did not worsen over time, and a good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 82% of the patients at 3 years. The mean pretreatment percentage breast retraction assessment was 12.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.14-12.86). The mean value of percentage breast retraction assessment increased to 13.99 (95% CI: 12.17-15.96) after 1 year and decreased to 13.54 (95% CI: 11.84-15.46) after 3 years but was not significant (P>.05). Conclusions: AH-WBI consisting of 39 Gy in 13 fractions followed by a tumor bed boost sequentially delivering 9 Gy in 3 fractions can be delivered with excellent disease control and tolerable skin toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery.

  8. Protein activation dynamics in cells and tumor micro arrays assessed by time resolved Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, Véronique; Leboucher, Pierre; Larijani, Banafshé

    2012-01-01

    Analytical time resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be exploited for assessing, in cells and tumor micro arrays, the activation status and dynamics of oncoproteins such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR1) and their downstream effectors such as protein kinase B (PKB) and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1). The outcome of our research involving the application of quantitative imaging for investigating molecular mechanisms of phosphoinositide-dependant enzymes, such as PKB and PDK1, has resulted in a refined model describing the dynamics and regulation of these two oncoproteins in live cells. Our translational research exploits a quantitative FRET method for establishing the activation status of predictive biomarkers in tumor micro arrays. We developed a two-site FRET assay monitored by automated frequency domain Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). As a proof of principle, we tested our methodology by assessing EGFR1 activation status in tumor micro arrays from head and neck patients. Our two-site FRET assay, by high-throughput frequency domain FLIM, has great potential to provide prognostic and perhaps predictive biomarkers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vatuximab(Trademark): Optimizing Therapeutic Strategies for Prostate Cancer Based on Dynamic MR Tumor Oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    therapeutic efficacy in experimental diabetic retinopathy . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci, 42, 2964-9 (2001) 141. Berkowitz, B. A., C. McDonald, Y. Ito, P...tumors measured over a period of 11 weeks of thrice weekly treatment with bavituximab (2.5 mg/kg IP). A predicted mean growth rate for untreated... predicted control tumor in Figure 18. However, R1L1 and R0L0 both show growth rates considerably slower than control and greatly increased DCE

  10. [Dynamics of functional MRI and speech function in patients after resection of frontal and temporal lobe tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buklina, S B; Batalov, A I; Smirnov, A S; Poddubskaya, A A; Pitskhelauri, D I; Kobyakov, G L; Zhukov, V Yu; Goryaynov, S A; Kulikov, A S; Ogurtsova, A A; Golanov, A V; Varyukhina, M D; Pronin, I N

    2017-01-01

    There are no studies on application of functional MRI (fMRI) for long-term monitoring of the condition of patients after resection of frontal and temporal lobe tumors. The study purpose was to correlate, using fMRI, reorganization of the speech system and dynamics of speech disorders in patients with left hemisphere gliomas before surgery and in the early and late postoperative periods. A total of 20 patients with left hemisphere gliomas were dynamically monitored using fMRI and comprehensive neuropsychological testing. The tumor was located in the frontal lobe in 12 patients and in the temporal lobe in 8 patients. Fifteen patients underwent primary surgery; 5 patients had repeated surgery. Sixteen patients had WHO Grade II and Grade III gliomas; the others had WHO Grade IV gliomas. Nineteen patients were examined preoperatively; 20 patients were examined at different times after surgery. Speech functions were assessed by a Luria's test; the dominant hand was determined using the Annette questionnaire; a family history of left-handedness was investigated. Functional MRI was performed on an HDtx 3.0 T scanner using BrainWavePA 2.0, Z software for fMRI data processing program for all calculations >7, pfrontal lobe tumors than in those with temporal lobe tumors. No additional activation foci in the left hemisphere were found at the thresholds used to process fMRI data. Recovery of the speech function, to a certain degree, occurred in all patients, but no clear correlation with fMRI data was found. Complex fMRI and neuropsychological studies in 20 patients after resection of frontal and temporal lobe tumors revealed individual features of speech system reorganization within one year follow-up. Probably, activation of right-sided homologues of the speech areas in the presence of left hemisphere tumors depends not only on the severity of speech disorder but also reflects individual involvement of the right hemisphere in enabling speech function. This is confirmed by

  11. Continuous Dynamic Registration of Microvascularization of Liver Tumors with Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Philipp Beyer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the diagnostic value of quantification of liver tumor microvascularization using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS measured continuously from the arterial phase to the late phase (3 minutes. Material and Methods. We present a retrospective analysis of 20 patients with malignant (n=13 or benign (n=7 liver tumors. The tumors had histopathologically been proven or clearly identified using contrast-enhanced reference imaging with either 1.5 T MRI (liver specific contrast medium or triphase CT and follow-up. CEUS was performed using a multifrequency transducer (1–5 MHz and a bolus injection of 2.4 mL sulphur hexafluoride microbubbles. A retrospective perfusion analysis was performed to determine TTP (time-to-peak, RBV (regional blood volume, RBF (regional blood flow, and Peak. Results. Statistics revealed a significant difference (P<0.05 between benign and malignant tumors in the RBV, RBF, and Peak but not in TTP (P=0.07. Receiver operating curves (ROC were generated for RBV, RBF, Peak, and TTP with estimated ROC areas of 0.97, 0.96, 0.98, and 0.76, respectively. Conclusion. RBV, RBF, and Peak continuously measured over a determined time period of 3 minutes could be of valuable support in differentiating malignant from benign liver tumors.

  12. The time-intensity curve of dynamic MR imaging for discrimination of benign and malignancy in musculoskeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing; Liang Wei; Li Xiaosong; Zhang Wei; Liu Wei; Zhang Jingxiu; Feng Suchen; Cheng Xiaoguang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of time-intensity curve of dynamic contrast enhancement MR imaging in the discrimination of benign and malignancy in musculoskeletal tumors. Methods: Ninety patients were examined with fast acquisition with multiphase enhanced fast GRE series. The TIC of lesions were obtained using slope images in which pixel intensity reflected the slope value. The curves were classified according to their shapes as type I, washout enhancement; type II, plateau enhancement; type III, gradual enhancement. Taking pathological diagnosis as gold standard, the power of the maximal enhancement slope and curve types in discriminating benign and malignant lesions was evaluated by appropriate statistic analysis. Results: There were 49 malignant and 44 benign lesions. The distribution of curve types for malignant tumors was type I 75.5% (37/49), type II 24.5% (12/49). While the numbers for benign tumors was type I 59.1% (26/44), type II 15.9% (7/44) and type III 25.0% (11/44), respectively. The patterns of curve types in malignant lesions were different from benign lesions significantly (X 2 = 14.008, P 0.05). Thye I and type II ( excluding lesions with typical benign morphology) were suggestive of malignant tumors. Type III was indicator of a benign lesion. The diagnostic indices for the shape of TIC criterion were: sensitivity 100%, specificity 50%, positive predictive value 78%, negative predictive value 100% and accuracy 82%, respectively. Conclusion: Combined with the characteristic of morphology, the TIC improves the power of MR imaging in discriminating benign from malignant musculoskeletal tumors. (authors)

  13. Preirradiation endocrinopathies in pediatric brain tumor patients determined by dynamic tests of endocrine function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Williams, Tani; Smith, Julie M.; Rose, Susan R.; Danish, Robert K.; Burghen, George A.; Kun, Larry E.; Lustig, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate pediatric patients with localized primary brain tumors for evidence of endocrinopathy before radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-five pediatric patients were evaluated with the arginine tolerance test and L-dopa test for growth hormone secretory capacity and activity; thyroid-stimulating hormone surge and thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test for the hypothalamic-thyroid axis; the 1-μg adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) and metyrapone test for ACTH reserve; and, depending on age, a gonadotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test to determine gonadotropin response. The study included 38 male and 37 female patients, age 1-21 years with ependymoma (n=35), World Health Organization (WHO) Grade I-II astrocytoma (n=18), WHO Grade III-IV astrocytoma (n=10), craniopharyngioma (n=7), optic pathway tumor (n=4), and germinoma (n=1). Seven patients receiving dexamethasone at the time of the evaluation were excluded from the final analysis. Results: Of 68 assessable patient, 45 (66%) had evidence of endocrinopathy before RT, including 15 of 32 patients (47%) with posterior fossa tumors. Of the 45 patients, 38% had growth hormone deficiency, 43% had thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion abnormality, 22% had an abnormality in ACTH reserve, and 13% had an abnormality in age-dependent gonadotropin secretion. Conclusion: The incidence of pre-RT endocrinopathy in pediatric brain tumor patients is high, including patients with tumors not adjacent to the hypothalamic-pituitary unit. These data suggest an overestimation in the incidence of radiation-induced endocrinopathy. Baseline endocrine function should be determined for brain tumor patients before therapy. The potential for radiation-induced endocrinopathy alone cannot be used as an argument for alternatives to RT for most patients. Pre-RT endocrinopathy may be an early indicator of central nervous system damage that will influence the functional outcome unrelated to RT

  14. Dynamic {sup 11}C-methionine PET analysis has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas: an experimental study using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Songji; Zhao, Yan [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Tracer Kinetics and Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji; Hatano, Toshiyuki [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan); Yi, Min; Kohanawa, Masashi [Hokkaido University, Department of Advanced Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Magota, Keiichi; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Nishijima, Ken-ichi [Hokkaido University, Department of Molecular Imaging, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    We evaluated whether the dynamic profile of L-{sup 11}C-methionine ({sup 11}C-MET) may have an additional value in differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas in experimental rat models by small animal positron emission tomography (PET). Rhodococcus aurantiacus and allogenic rat C6 glioma cells were inoculated, respectively, into the right and left calf muscles to generate a rat model bearing both granulomas and tumors (n = 6). Ten days after the inoculations, dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET was performed by small animal PET up to 120 min after injection of {sup 11}C-MET. The next day, after overnight fasting, the rats were injected with {sup 18}F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG), and dynamic {sup 18}F-FDG PET was performed up to 180 min. The time-activity curves, static images, and mean standardized uptake value (SUV) in the lesions were calculated. {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma showed a slow exponential clearance after an initial distribution, while the uptake in the tumor gradually increased with time. The dynamic pattern of {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma was significantly different from that in the tumor (p < 0.001). In the static analysis of {sup 11}C-MET, visual assessment and SUV analysis could not differentiate the tumor from the granuloma in all cases, although the mean SUV in the granuloma (1.48 {+-} 0.09) was significantly lower than that in the tumor (1.72 {+-} 0.18, p < 0.01). The dynamic patterns, static images, and mean SUVs of {sup 18}F-FDG in the granuloma were similar to those in the tumor (p = NS). Dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomatous lesions, which deserves further elucidation in clinical settings. (orig.)

  15. Region of interest and pixel-by-pixel analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging parameters and time-intensity curve shapes: a comparison in chondroid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavini, Cristina; Pikaart, Branko P.; de Jonge, Milko C.; Schaap, Gerard R.; Maas, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI is widely acknowledged to be a helpful tool in the diagnosis and differentiation of tumors. In common clinical settings, the dynamic changes described by the time-intensity curves (TICs) are evaluated to find patterns of atypical tissue behavior, i.e., areas

  16. Dynamic Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI and Diffusion Weighted MR Imaging (DWI for Differentiation between Benign and Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assili S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salivary gland tumors form nearly 3% of head and neck tumors. Due to their large histological variety and vicinity to facial nerves, pre-operative diagnosis and differentiation of benign and malignant parotid tumors are a major challenge for radiologists. Objective: The majority of these tumors are benign; however, sometimes they tend to transform into a malignant form. Functional MRI techniques, namely dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE- MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI can indicate the characteristics of tumor tissue. Methods: DCE-MRI analysis is based on the parameters of time intensity curve (TIC before and after contrast agent injection. This method has the potential to identify the angiogenesis of tumors. DWI analysis is performed according to diffusion of water molecules in a tissue for determination of the cellularity of tumors. Conclusion: According to the literature, these methods cannot be used individually to differentiate benign from malignant salivary gland tumors. An effective approach could be to combine the aforementioned methods to increase the accuracy of discrimination between different tumor types. The main objective of this study is to explore the application of DCE-MRI and DWI for assessment of salivary gland tumor types.

  17. Dynamic Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) and Diffusion Weighted MR Imaging (DWI) for Differentiation between Benign and Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assili, S; Fathi Kazerooni, A; Aghaghazvini, L; Saligheh Rad, H R; Pirayesh Islamian, J

    2015-12-01

    Salivary gland tumors form nearly 3% of head and neck tumors. Due to their large histological variety and vicinity to facial nerves, pre-operative diagnosis and differentiation of benign and malignant parotid tumors are a major challenge for radiologists. The majority of these tumors are benign; however, sometimes they tend to transform into a malignant form. Functional MRI techniques, namely dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-) MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) can indicate the characteristics of tumor tissue. DCE-MRI analysis is based on the parameters of time intensity curve (TIC) before and after contrast agent injection. This method has the potential to identify the angiogenesis of tumors. DWI analysis is performed according to diffusion of water molecules in a tissue for determination of the cellularity of tumors. According to the literature, these methods cannot be used individually to differentiate benign from malignant salivary gland tumors. An effective approach could be to combine the aforementioned methods to increase the accuracy of discrimination between different tumor types. The main objective of this study is to explore the application of DCE-MRI and DWI for assessment of salivary gland tumor types.

  18. Dynamical properties of a tumor growth system in the presence of immunization and colored cross-correlated noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Zhenglin; Mei Dongcheng

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the noise parameters and immunization strength β on the dynamical properties of a tumor growth system with both immunization and colored cross-correlated noises. The analytical expressions for the associated relaxation time T C and the normalized correlation function C(s) are derived by means of the projection operator method. The results indicate that: (i) T C as a function of the multiplicative noise intensity α shows resonance-like behavior, i.e. the curves of T C versus α exhibit a single-peak structure and its peak position changes with increasing correlation strength between noises λ, the autocorrelation time of multiplicative noise τ 1 , the autocorrelation time of additive noise τ 2 and the cross-correlation time τ 3 . This behavior can be understood in terms of the noise-enhanced stability effect and the influence of the memory effects on it. (ii) The increasing λ, τ 1 , τ 2 and the additive noise intensity D slow down the fluctuation decay of the tumor population, whereas the increasing τ 3 and β speed it up. (iii) C(s) increases as λ, τ 1 , τ 2 and β increase, while it decreases with τ 3 increasing. Our study shows that the effects of some noise parameters on tumor growth can be modified due to the presence of the immunization effect.

  19. Dynamical properties of a tumor growth system in the presence of immunization and colored cross-correlated noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zheng-Lin; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the effects of the noise parameters and immunization strength β on the dynamical properties of a tumor growth system with both immunization and colored cross-correlated noises. The analytical expressions for the associated relaxation time TC and the normalized correlation function C(s) are derived by means of the projection operator method. The results indicate that: (i) TC as a function of the multiplicative noise intensity α shows resonance-like behavior, i.e. the curves of TC versus α exhibit a single-peak structure and its peak position changes with increasing correlation strength between noises λ, the autocorrelation time of multiplicative noise τ1, the autocorrelation time of additive noise τ2 and the cross-correlation time τ3. This behavior can be understood in terms of the noise-enhanced stability effect and the influence of the memory effects on it. (ii) The increasing λ, τ1, τ2 and the additive noise intensity D slow down the fluctuation decay of the tumor population, whereas the increasing τ3 and β speed it up. (iii) C(s) increases as λ, τ1, τ2 and β increase, while it decreases with τ3 increasing. Our study shows that the effects of some noise parameters on tumor growth can be modified due to the presence of the immunization effect.

  20. Emerging patterns in tumor systems: simulating the dynamics of multicellular clusters with an agent-based spatial agglomeration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansury, Yuri; Kimura, Mark; Lobo, Jose; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2002-12-07

    Brain cancer cells invade early on surrounding parenchyma, which makes it impossible to surgically remove all tumor cells and thus significantly worsens the prognosis of the patient. Specific structural elements such as multicellular clusters have been seen in experimental settings to emerge within the invasive cell system and are believed to express the systems' guidance toward nutritive sites in a heterogeneous environment. Based on these observations, we developed a novel agent-based model of spatio-temporal search and agglomeration to investigate the dynamics of cell motility and aggregation with the assumption that tumors behave as complex dynamic self-organizing biosystems. In this model, virtual cells migrate because they are attracted by higher nutrient concentrations and to avoid overpopulated areas with high levels of toxic metabolites. A specific feature of our model is the capability of cells to search both globally and locally. This concept is applied to simulate cell-surface receptor-mediated information processing of tumor cells such that a cell searching for a more growth-permissive place "learns" the information content of a brain tissue region within a two-dimensional lattice in two stages, processing first the global and then the local input. In both stages, differences in microenvironment characteristics define distinctions in energy expenditure for a moving cell and thus influence cell migration, proliferation, agglomeration, and cell death. Numerical results of our model show a phase transition leading to the emergence of two distinct spatio-temporal patterns depending on the dominant search mechanism. If global search is dominant, the result is a small number of large clusters exhibiting rapid spatial expansion but shorter lifetime of the tumor system. By contrast, if local search is dominant, the trade-off is many small clusters with longer lifetime but much slower velocity of expansion. Furthermore, in the case of such dominant local search

  1. WE-G-213CD-03: A Dual Complementary Verification Method for Dynamic Tumor Tracking on Vero SBRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poels, K; Depuydt, T; Verellen, D; De Ridder, M

    2012-06-01

    to use complementary cine EPID and gimbals log file analysis for in-vivo tracking accuracy monitoring. A clinical prototype of dynamic tracking (DT) was installed on the Vero SBRT system. This prototype version allowed tumor tracking by gimballed linac rotations using an internal-external correspondence model. The DT prototype software allowed the detailed logging of all applied gimbals rotations during tracking. The integration of an EPID on the vero system allowed the acquisition of cine EPID images during DT. We quantified the tracking error on cine EPID (E-EPID) by subtracting the target center (fiducial marker detection) and the field centroid. Dynamic gimbals log file information was combined with orthogonal x-ray verification images to calculate the in-vivo tracking error (E-kVLog). The correlation between E-kVLog and E-EPID was calculated for validation of the gimbals log file. Further, we investigated the sensitivity of the log file tracking error by introducing predefined systematic tracking errors. As an application we calculate gimbals log file tracking error for dynamic hidden target tests to investigate gravity effects and decoupled gimbals rotation from gantry rotation. Finally, calculating complementary cine EPID and log file tracking errors evaluated the clinical accuracy of dynamic tracking. A strong correlation was found between log file and cine EPID tracking error distribution during concurrent measurements (R=0.98). We found sensitivity in the gimbals log files to detect a systematic tracking error up to 0.5 mm. Dynamic hidden target tests showed no gravity influence on tracking performance and high degree of decoupled gimbals and gantry rotation during dynamic arc dynamic tracking. A submillimetric agreement between clinical complementary tracking error measurements was found. Redundancy of the internal gimbals log file with x-ray verification images with complementary independent cine EPID images was implemented to monitor the accuracy of

  2. Quantifying the accuracy of the tumor motion and area as a function of acceleration factor for the simulation of the dynamic keyhole magnetic resonance imaging method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Danny; Pollock, Sean; Keall, Paul, E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW 2298 (Australia); Kim, Taeho [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23219 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The dynamic keyhole is a new MR image reconstruction method for thoracic and abdominal MR imaging. To date, this method has not been investigated with cancer patient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The goal of this study was to assess the dynamic keyhole method for the task of lung tumor localization using cine-MR images reconstructed in the presence of respiratory motion. Methods: The dynamic keyhole method utilizes a previously acquired a library of peripheral k-space datasets at similar displacement and phase (where phase is simply used to determine whether the breathing is inhale to exhale or exhale to inhale) respiratory bins in conjunction with central k-space datasets (keyhole) acquired. External respiratory signals drive the process of sorting, matching, and combining the two k-space streams for each respiratory bin, thereby achieving faster image acquisition without substantial motion artifacts. This study was the first that investigates the impact of k-space undersampling on lung tumor motion and area assessment across clinically available techniques (zero-filling and conventional keyhole). In this study, the dynamic keyhole, conventional keyhole and zero-filling methods were compared to full k-space dataset acquisition by quantifying (1) the keyhole size required for central k-space datasets for constant image quality across sixty four cine-MRI datasets from nine lung cancer patients, (2) the intensity difference between the original and reconstructed images in a constant keyhole size, and (3) the accuracy of tumor motion and area directly measured by tumor autocontouring. Results: For constant image quality, the dynamic keyhole method, conventional keyhole, and zero-filling methods required 22%, 34%, and 49% of the keyhole size (P < 0.0001), respectively, compared to the full k-space image acquisition method. Compared to the conventional keyhole and zero-filling reconstructed images with the keyhole size utilized in the dynamic keyhole

  3. Optimized time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in small animal tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeck, Joost; Bol, Karin; Bison, Sander; van Tiel, Sandra; Koelewijn, Stuart; de Jong, Marion; Veenland, Jifke; Bernsen, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor efficacy of targeted peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) relies on several factors, including functional tumor vasculature. Little is known about the effect of PRRT on tumor vasculature. With dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI, functional vasculature is imaged and quantified using contrast agents. In small animals DCE-MRI is a challenging application. We optimized a clinical sequence for fast hemodynamic acquisitions, time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS), to obtain DCE-MRI images at both high spatial and high temporal resolution in mice and rats. Using TRICKS, functional vasculature was measured prior to PRRT and longitudinally to investigate the effect of treatment on tumor vascular characteristics. Nude mice bearing H69 tumor xenografts and rats bearing syngeneic CA20948 tumors were used to study perfusion following PRRT administration with (177) lutetium octreotate. Both semi-quantitative and quantitative parameters were calculated. Treatment efficacy was measured by tumor-size reduction. Optimized TRICKS enabled MRI at 0.032 mm(3) voxel size with a temporal resolution of less than 5 s and large volume coverage, a substantial improvement over routine pre-clinical DCE-MRI studies. Tumor response to therapy was reflected in changes in tumor perfusion/permeability parameters. The H69 tumor model showed pronounced changes in DCE-derived parameters following PRRT. The rat CA20948 tumor model showed more heterogeneity in both treatment outcome and perfusion parameters. TRICKS enabled the acquisition of DCE-MRI at both high temporal resolution (Tres ) and spatial resolutions relevant for small animal tumor models. With the high Tres enabled by TRICKS, accurate pharmacokinetic data modeling was feasible. DCE-MRI parameters revealed changes over time and showed a clear relationship between tumor size and Ktrans . Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Dynamic Changes in Numbers and Properties of Circulating Tumor Cells and Their Potential Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Ju-Yu [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Life Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Yang, Chih-Yung [Department of Education and Research, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei 10629, Taiwan (China); Liang, Shu-Ching [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Life Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Liu, Ren-Shyan [Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core/Taiwan Mouse Clinic, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 11217, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Jeng-Kai, E-mail: jkjiang@vghtpe.gov.tw [Division of Colon & Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Hung, E-mail: jkjiang@vghtpe.gov.tw [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Life Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); VGH Yang-Ming Genome Research Center, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-16

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of different types of early or advanced cancer using immunology-based assays or nucleic acid methods. The detection and quantification of CTCs has significant clinical utility in the prognosis of metastatic breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. CTCs are a heterogeneous population of cells and often different from those of their respective primary tumor. Understanding the biology of CTCs may provide useful predictive information for the selection of the most appropriate treatment. Therefore, CTC detection and characterization could become a valuable tool to refine prognosis and serve as a “real-time biopsy” and has the potential to guide precision cancer therapies, monitor cancer treatment, and investigate the process of metastasis.

  5. Tumor Oxygen Dynamics as a Prognostic Indicator of Effective Antiangiogenic Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Dawen

    2003-01-01

    ...: so called angiogenesis. One major goal of this project is to fully understand and precisely assess the dynamic changes in blood perfusion and oxygenation, both during normal growth and following anti-angiogenic therapy...

  6. Tumor Oxygen Dynamics as a Prognostic Indicator of Effective Antiangiogenic Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Dawen

    2002-01-01

    ...: so called angiogenesis. One major goal of this project is to fully understand and precisely assess the dynamic changes in blood perfusion and oxygenation, both during normal growth and following anti-angiogenic therapy...

  7. Investigation of the change in marker geometry during respiration motion: a preliminary study for dynamic-multi-leaf real-time tumor tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Rie; Nishioka, Seiko; Date, Hiroyuki; Shirato, Hiroki; Koike, Takao; Nishioka, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is rapidly increasing. Presently, the most accurate method uses fiducial markers implanted near the tumor. A shortcoming of this method is that the beams turn off during the majority of the respiratory cycle, resulting in a prolonged treatment time. Recent advances in collimation technology have enabled continuous irradiation to a moving tumor. However, the lung is a dynamic organ characterized by inhalation exhalation cycles, during which marker/tumor geometry may change (i.e., misalignment), resulting in under-dosing to the tumor. Eight patients with lung cancer who were candidates for stereotactic radiotherapy were examined with 4D high-resolution CT. As a marker surrogate, virtual bronchoscopy using the pulmonary artery (VBPA) was conducted. To detect possible marker/tumor misalignment during the respiration cycle, the distance between the peripheral bronchus, where a marker could be implanted, and the center of gravity of a tumor were calculated for each respiratory phase. When the respiration cycle was divided into 10 phases, the median value was significantly larger for the 30%-70% respiratory phases compared to that for the 10% respiratory phase (P<0.05, Mann–Whitney U-test). These results demonstrate that physiological aspect must be considered when continuous tumor tracking is applied to a moving tumor. To minimize an “additional” internal target volume (ITV) margin, a marker should be placed approximately 2.5 cm from the tumor

  8. Can visual assessment of blood flow patterns by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography distinguish between malignant and benign lung tumors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harders, Stefan Walbom; Madsen, Hans Henrik; Nellemann, Hanne Marie

    2017-01-01

    with suspected lung cancer and a lung tumor on their chest radiograph were included for DCE-CT. The tumors were categorized using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns. Histopathology was used as reference standard. RESULTS: Using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow...... using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns is accurate as well as somewhat reproducible. However, there are significant limitations to DCE-CT.......BACKGROUND: Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is a tool, which, in theory, can quantify the blood flow and blood volume of tissues. In structured qualitative analysis, parametric color maps yield a visual impression of the blood flow and blood volume within the tissue being...

  9. Coincidence Planar Imaging for Dynamic [18F]FDG Uptake in Nude Mice with Tumors and Inflammation: Correlated With Histopathology and Micro-autoradiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ling Sun

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research of Taiwan has developed a dynamic coincidence detection device for positron emitted radiotracer pharmacodynamic study in small mice models. In this study, we set up an experimental paradigm by determining [fluorine-18]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG dynamic uptake in tumors and inflammations in nude mice as the foundation for future applications in therapy development. Histopathology and micro-autoradiography of these tumors and inflammations were obtained for confirmation. Dynamic coincidence planar images of six tumors and two inflammations in nude mice were acquired over 4 hours immediately after injection of 25.9 MBq of [18F]FDG into the right thigh of each animal. After image reconstruction, the lesion-to-background ratios were calculated in regions of interest over the lesion and contralateral thigh to determine the equilibrium status of the radiotracer. All mice were sacrificed for histopathologic examination and six of the mice were examined with micro-autoradiography. [18F]FDG uptake in tumors and inflammations both reached equilibrium about 3 hours after injection. At equilibrium, [18F]FDG uptake into tumors was two to four times higher than the background. Uptake into the 4-day and 8-day inflammations was 2.3 and 5.5 times higher than the background, respectively. Histopathology showed macrophage and neutrophil infiltration around the tumors and in the inflammations. Micro-autoradiography showed dense silver grains in the granulation tissue surrounding the tumors and inflammations. The preliminary results suggested that dynamic [18F]FDG coincidence planar imaging can help in determining the suitable time for static [18F]FDG imaging in nude mice models. The optimal time for static [18F]FDG positron emission tomography imaging was around 3 hours after injection. The paradigm for determining a dynamic [18F]FDG uptake pattern was demonstrated for future new therapeutic drug experimental use.

  10. Multimodality functional imaging of spontaneous canine tumors using 64CU-ATSM and 18FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders E; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Law, Ian

    2012-01-01

    To compare the distribution and uptake of the hypoxia tracer (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) PET/CT, FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT (DCE-pCT) in spontaneous canine tumors. In addition (64)Cu-ATSM distribution over time was evaluated.......To compare the distribution and uptake of the hypoxia tracer (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) PET/CT, FDG PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion CT (DCE-pCT) in spontaneous canine tumors. In addition (64)Cu-ATSM distribution over time was evaluated....

  11. Water Dynamics in Living Cells and Tumor Cell Migration in Confined Microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sean

    More than 70% of the total mass in living cells is water. In most biological scenarios water serves as a passive medium responsible for solvation and proper functioning of proteins. However, it has been long recognized that there are situations where dynamic transport of water in cells is important. First, cells actively transport water in order to maintain its volume, and because cell volume directly influences cell shape and internal hydrostatic pressure, it is a critical aspect of cell mechanics. Furthermore, cell volume is coupled to protein synthesis which ultimately determines the cell size. Therefore water transport and cell volume dynamics ultimately impact cell growth and division. Second, epithelial cells in organs such as the eye and kidney actively transport water across the cell membrane and the epithelial layer. Indeed, water channels such as aquaporins increase water permeability of the membrane and facilitate this transport. Recent, we have shown that in confined microenvironments, active transport of water is responsible for actin-independent cell movement in confined spaces, especially for cancer cells. These results suggest that cells actively control its water content. The active regulation of water content is a crucial aspect of cell dynamics. We will discuss a theoretical model of cell pressure/volume control. Implications of this model for active cell dynamics in multi-cellular epithelial sheets will be discussed.

  12. Neural - levelset shape detection segmentation of brain tumors in dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, C.; Bhargava, Sunil; Gharpure, Damayanti Chandrashekhar

    2008-01-01

    A novel Neuro - level set shape detection algorithm is proposed and evaluated for segmentation and grading of brain tumours. The algorithm evaluates vascular and cellular information provided by dynamic contrast susceptibility magnetic resonance images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps. The proposed neural shape detection algorithm is based on the levels at algorithm (shape detection algorithm) and utilizes a neural block to provide the speed image for the level set methods. In this study, two different architectures of level set method have been implemented and their results are compared. The results show that the proposed Neuro-shape detection performs better in differentiating the tumor, edema, necrosis in reconstructed images of perfusion and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images. (author)

  13. Validation of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Derived Vascular Permeability Measurements Using Quantitative Autoradiography in the RG2 Rat Brain Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira C. Ferrier

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI is widely used to evaluate tumor permeability, yet measurements have not been directly validated in brain tumors. Our purpose was to compare estimates of forward leakage Ktrans derived from DCE-MRI to the estimates K obtained using [14C]aminoisobutyric acid quantitative autoradiography ([14C]AIB OAR, an established method of evaluating blood-tumor barrier permeability. Both DCE-MRI and [14C]AIB OAR were performed in five rats 9 to 11 days following tumor implantation. Ktrans in the tumor was estimated from DCE-MRI using the threeparameter general kinetic model and a measured vascular input function. Ki was estimated from OAR data using regions of interest (ROI closely corresponding to those used to estimate Ktrans. Ktrans and Ki correlated with each other for two independent sets of central tumor ROI (R = 0.905, P = .035; R = 0.933, P = .021. In an additional six rats, Ktrans was estimated on two occasions to show reproducibility (intraclass coefficient = 0.9993; coefficient of variance = 6.07%. In vivo blood-tumor permeability parameters derived from DCE-MRI are reproducible and correlate with the gold standard for quantifying blood tumor barrier permeability, [14C]AIB OAR.

  14. Variability of bed mobility in natural, gravel-bed channels and adjustments to sediment load at local and reach scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas E. Lisle; Jonathan M. Nelson; John Pitlick; Mary Ann Madej; Brent L. Barkett

    2000-01-01

    Abstract - Local variations in boundary shear stress acting on bed-surface particles control patterns of bed load transport and channel evolution during varying stream discharges. At the reach scale a channel adjusts to imposed water and sediment supply through mutual interactions among channel form, local grain size, and local flow dynamics that govern bed mobility...

  15. Pharmacokinetic Analysis of 64Cu-ATSM Dynamic PET in Human Xenograft Tumors in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Madsen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    with 64Cu-ATSM and CT scans with contrast. Irreversible and reversible two-tissue compartment models were fitted to time activity curves (TACs) obtained from whole tumor volumes and compared using the Akaike information criterion (AIC). Based on voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis, parametric maps...... of model rate constants k₁, k₃ and Ki were generated and compared to 64Cu-ATSM uptake.RESULTS: Based on the AIC, an irreversible two-tissue compartment model was selected for voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis. Of the extracted parameters, k₁ (~perfusion) showed a strong correlation with early tracer...... relevant parameters from voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis to be used for preclinical validation of 64Cu-ATSM as a hypoxia-specific PET tracer....

  16. Dependence of saltation characteristics on bed organisation in numerical simulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kharlamova, Irina; Vlasák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 1 (2015), s. 177-184 ISSN 1226-4806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/09/1718; GA ČR GAP105/10/1574 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : saltation parameters * bed roughness * bed structure * bed load transport * armoured bed Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.922, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs12303-014-0029-3.pdf

  17. Estimation of Pulmonary Motion in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Intrathoracic Tumors Using 3D-Dynamic MRI: Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plathow, Christian; Schoebinger, Max; Meinzer, Heinz Peter [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Herth, Felix; Tuengerthal, Siegfried [Clinic of Thoracic Disease, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans Ulrich [University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    To estimate a new technique for quantifying regional lung motion using 3D-MRI in healthy volunteers and to apply the technique in patients with intra- or extrapulmonary tumors. Intraparenchymal lung motion during a whole breathing cycle was quantified in 30 healthy volunteers using 3D-dynamic MRI (FLASH [fast low angle shot] 3D, TRICKS [time-resolved interpolated contrast kinetics]). Qualitative and quantitative vector color maps and cumulative histograms were performed using an introduced semiautomatic algorithm. An analysis of lung motion was performed and correlated with an established 2D-MRI technique for verification. As a proof of concept, the technique was applied in five patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 5 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). The correlation between intraparenchymal lung motion of the basal lung parts and the 2D-MRI technique was significant (r = 0.89, p < 0.05). Also, the vector color maps quantitatively illustrated regional lung motion in all healthy volunteers. No differences were observed between both hemithoraces, which was verified by cumulative histograms. The patients with NSCLC showed a local lack of lung motion in the area of the tumor. In the patients with MPM, there was global diminished motion of the tumor bearing hemithorax, which improved significantly after chemotherapy (CHT) (assessed by the 2D- and 3D-techniques) (p < 0.01). Using global spirometry, an improvement could also be shown (vital capacity 2.9 {+-} 0.5 versus 3.4 L {+-} 0.6, FEV1 0.9 {+-} 0.2 versus 1.4 {+-} 0.2 L) after CHT, but this improvement was not significant. A 3D-dynamic MRI is able to quantify intraparenchymal lung motion. Local and global parenchymal pathologies can be precisely located and might be a new tool used to quantify even slight changes in lung motion (e.g. in therapy monitoring, follow-up studies or even benign lung diseases)

  18. Tumor hypoxia imaging in orthotopic liver tumors and peritoneal metastasis: a comparative study featuring dynamic 18F-MISO and 124I-IAZG PET in the same study cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedl, Christopher C.; Brader, Peter; Hricak, Hedvig; Zanzonico, Pat; Humm, John L.; Reid, Vincent; Woo, Yanghee; Fong, Yuman; Wen, Bixiu; Ling, C.C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the uptake of two clinically promising positron emission tomography (PET) hypoxia targeting agents, 124 I-iodoazomycin galactopyranoside ( 124 I-IAZG) and 18 F-fluoromisonidazole ( 18 F-FMISO), by dynamic microPET imaging, in the same rats bearing liver tumors and peritoneal metastasis. Morris hepatoma (RH7777) fragments were surgically implanted into the livers of four nude rats. Tumors formed in the liver and disseminated into the peritoneal cavity. Each rat had a total of two to three liver tumors and peritoneal metastasis measuring 10-15 mm in size. Animals were injected with 18 F-FMISO, followed on the next day (upon complete 18 F decay) by 124 I-IAZG. The animals were imaged in list mode on the microPET system from the time of injection of each tracer for 3 h and then again at 6 h and 24 h for the long-lived 124 I-IAZG tracer (4.2-day half-life). Micro computed tomography (CT) scans of each rat were performed for co-registration with the microPET scans acquired with a liver contrast agent, allowing tumor identification. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn over the heart, liver, muscle, and the hottest areas of the tumors. Time-activity curves (TACs) were drawn for each tissue ROI. The 18 F-FMISO signal increased in tumors over the 3-h time course of observation. In contrast, after the initial injection, the 124 I-IAZG signal slowly and continuously declined in the tumors. Nevertheless, the tumor-to-normal-tissue ratios of 124 I-IAZG increased, but more slowly than those of 18 F-FMISO and as a result of the differentially faster clearance from the surrounding normal tissues. These pharmacokinetic patterns were seen in all 11 tumors of the four animals. 18 F-FMISO localizes in the same intra-tumor regions as 124 I-IAZG. The contrast ratios (tumor/background) reach similar values for the two hypoxia tracers, but at later times for 124 I-IAZG than for 18 F-FMISO and, therefore, with poorer count statistics. As a

  19. 2D numerical model of particle-bed collision in fluid-particle flows over bed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukerchenko, Nikolay; Chára, Zdeněk; Vlasák, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2006), s. 70-78 ISSN 0022-1686 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : saltation * particle-bed collision * collision angle * bed roughness Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.527, year: 2006

  20. Dynamics of Pb(II) adsorption on nanostructured γ-alumina: calculations of axial dispersion and overall mass transfer coefficients in the fixed-bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadi, Zahra; Saadi, Reyhaneh; Fazaeli, Reza

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the removal of metal ions Pb(II) using nanostructured γ-alumina was investigated by tests on batch operations and fixed-bed columns. Optimization was determined for factors effective on adsorption such as pH, contact time of metal solution with adsorbent and initial solution concentration. The optimum pH level was determined at 4.5 and the maximum adsorption percentage was achieved at 150 minutes. pHpzc was measured 8.3 for nanostructured γ-Al2O3. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms were used to analyze the experimental data. The Langmuir isotherm model showed the best agreement with the experimental data. The model showed evaluations for maximum adsorption capacity of adsorbent at 119.04 mg/g and adsorbent bed performance for different flow rates, bed heights and influent concentrations were also investigated. The lumped method was used to solve the bed equations, to predict the breakthrough curve and model overall mass transfer coefficient (Koverall) and axial dispersion coefficient (Dz) parameters to make comparisons with experimental results.

  1. Predicting bed shear stress and its role in sediment dynamics and restoration potential of the Everglades and other vegetated flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Laurel G.; Harvey, Judson; Crimaldi, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Entrainment of sediment by flowing water affects topography, habitat suitability, and nutrient cycling in vegetated floodplains and wetlands, impacting ecosystem evolution and the success of restoration projects. Nonetheless, restoration managers lack simple decision-support tools for predicting shear stresses and sediment redistribution potential in different vegetation communities. Using a field-validated numerical model, we developed state-space diagrams that provide these predictions over a range of water-surface slopes, depths, and associated velocities in Everglades ridge and slough vegetation communities. Diminished bed shear stresses and a consequent decrease in bed sediment redistribution are hypothesized causes of a recent reduction in the topographic and vegetation heterogeneity of this ecosystem. Results confirmed the inability of present-day flows to entrain bed sediment. Further, our diagrams showed bed shear stresses to be highly sensitive to emergent vegetation density and water-surface slope but less sensitive to water depth and periphyton or floating vegetation abundance. These findings suggested that instituting a pulsing flow regime could be the most effective means to restore sediment redistribution to the Everglades. However, pulsing flows will not be sufficient to erode sediment from sloughs with abundant spikerush, unless spikerush density first decreases by natural or managed processes. Our methods provide a novel tool for identifying restoration parameters and performance measures in many types of vegetated aquatic environments where sediment erosion and deposition are involved.

  2. Topography on a subcellular scale modulates cellular adhesions and actin stress fiber dynamics in tumor associated fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatov, Mikheil; Sun, Xiaoyu; Suberi, Alexandra; Fourkas, John T.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2017-12-01

    Cells can sense and adapt to mechanical properties of their environment. The local geometry of the extracellular matrix, such as its topography, has been shown to modulate cell morphology, migration, and proliferation. Here we investigate the effect of micro/nanotopography on the morphology and cytoskeletal dynamics of human pancreatic tumor-associated fibroblast cells (TAFs). We use arrays of parallel nanoridges with variable spacings on a subcellular scale to investigate the response of TAFs to the topography of their environment. We find that cell shape and stress fiber organization both align along the direction of the nanoridges. Our analysis reveals a strong bimodal relationship between the degree of alignment and the spacing of the nanoridges. Furthermore, focal adhesions align along ridges and form preferentially on top of the ridges. Tracking actin stress fiber movement reveals enhanced dynamics of stress fibers on topographically patterned surfaces. We find that components of the actin cytoskeleton move preferentially along the ridges with a significantly higher velocity along the ridges than on a flat surface. Our results suggest that a complex interplay between the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions coordinates the cellular response to micro/nanotopography.

  3. Delineation and segmentation of cerebral tumors by mapping blood-brain barrier disruption with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT and tracer kinetics modeling-a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisdas, S.; Vogl, T.J.; Yang, X.; Koh, T.S.; Lim, C.C.T.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging is a promising approach for in vivo assessment of tissue microcirculation. Twenty patients with clinical and routine computed tomography (CT) evidence of intracerebral neoplasm were examined with DCE-CT imaging. Using a distributed-parameter model for tracer kinetics modeling of DCE-CT data, voxel-level maps of cerebral blood flow (F), intravascular blood volume (v i ) and intravascular mean transit time (t 1 ) were generated. Permeability-surface area product (PS), extravascular extracellular blood volume (v e ) and extraction ratio (E) maps were also calculated to reveal pathologic locations of tracer extravasation, which are indicative of disruptions in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). All maps were visually assessed for quality of tumor delineation and measurement of tumor extent by two radiologists. Kappa (κ) coefficients and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to determine the interobserver agreement for each DCE-CT map. There was a substantial agreement for the tumor delineation quality in the F, v e and t 1 maps. The agreement for the quality of the tumor delineation was excellent for the v i , PS and E maps. Concerning the measurement of tumor extent, excellent and nearly excellent agreement was achieved only for E and PS maps, respectively. According to these results, we performed a segmentation of the cerebral tumors on the base of the E maps. The interobserver agreement for the tumor extent quantification based on manual segmentation of tumor in the E maps vs. the computer-assisted segmentation was excellent (κ = 0.96, CI: 0.93-0.99). The interobserver agreement for the tumor extent quantification based on computer segmentation in the mean images and the E maps was substantial (κ = 0.52, CI: 0.42-0.59). This study illustrates the diagnostic usefulness of parametric maps associated with BBB disruption on a physiology-based approach and highlights the feasibility for automatic segmentation of

  4. The Dynamical Behaviors for a Class of Immunogenic Tumor Model with Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Bi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at studying the model proposed by Kuznetsov and Taylor in 1994. Inspired by Mayer et al., time delay is introduced in the general model. The dynamic behaviors of this model are studied, which include the existence and stability of the equilibria and Hopf bifurcation of the model with discrete delays. The properties of the bifurcated periodic solutions are studied by using the normal form on the center manifold. Numerical examples and simulations are given to illustrate the bifurcation analysis and the obtained results.

  5. Tumor Delineation and Quantitative Assessment of Glucose Metabolic Rate within Histologic Subtypes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by Using Dynamic 18F Fluorodeoxyglucose PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, T.W.H.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Visser, E.P.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Looijen-Salamon, M.G.; Visvikis, D.; Verhagen, A.F.T.M.; Bussink, J.; Vriens, D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether dynamic fluorine 18 (18F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has added value over static 18F-FDG PET for tumor delineation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) radiation therapy planning by using pathology volumes as the reference standard and to

  6. Use of reduced dose rate when treating moving tumors using dynamic IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Laurence; Wagar, Matthew; Bogdanov, Madeleine; Ionascu, Dan; Schofield, Deborah; Allen, Aaron; Berbeco, Ross; Lingos, Tania

    2010-09-20

    The purpose was to evaluate the effect of dose rate on discrepancies between expected and delivered dose caused by the interplay effect. Fifteen separate dynamic IMRT plans and five hybrid IMRT plans were created for five patients (three IMRT plans and one hybrid IMRT plan per patient). The impact of motion on the delivered dose was evaluated experimentally for each treatment field for different dose rates (200 and 400 MU/min), and for a range of target amplitudes and periods. The maximum dose discrepancy for dynamic IMRT fields was 18.5% and 10.3% for dose rates of 400 and 200 MU/min, respectively. The maximum dose discrepancy was larger than this for hybrid plans, but the results were similar when weighted by the contribution of the IMRT fields. The percentage of fields for which 98% of the target never experienced a 5% or 10% dose discrepancy increased when the dose rate was reduced from 400 MU/min to 200 MU/min. For amplitudes up to 2 cm, reducing the dose rate to 200 MU/min is effective in keeping daily dose discrepancies for each field within 10%.

  7. Can visual assessment of blood flow patterns by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography distinguish between malignant and benign lung tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harders, Stefan Walbom; Madsen, Hans Henrik; Nellemann, Hanne Marie; Rasmussen, Torben Riis; Thygesen, Jesper; Hager, Henrik; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Rasmussen, Finn

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is a tool, which, in theory, can quantify the blood flow and blood volume of tissues. In structured qualitative analysis, parametric color maps yield a visual impression of the blood flow and blood volume within the tissue being studied, allowing for quick identification of the areas with the highest or lowest blood flow and blood volume. To examine whether DCE-CT could be used to distinguish between malignant and benign lung tumors in patients with suspected lung cancer. Fifty-nine patients with suspected lung cancer and a lung tumor on their chest radiograph were included for DCE-CT. The tumors were categorized using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns. Histopathology was used as reference standard. Using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns, it was possible to distinguish between malignant and benign lung tumors (Fisher-Freeman-Halton exact test, P  = 0.022). The inter-reader agreement of this method of analysis was slight to moderate (kappa = 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.13-0.46). DCE-CT in suspected lung cancer using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns is accurate as well as somewhat reproducible. However, there are significant limitations to DCE-CT.

  8. SU-G-BRA-15: Dosimetric Evaluation of Dynamic Tumor Tracking Radiation Therapy Using Digital Phantom: A Study On Margin and Desired Accuracy of Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, T; Osanai, M; Homma, N [Department of Radiological Imaging and Informatics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kadoya, N; Nakajima, Y; Jingu, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ichiji, K [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Takeda, K [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Takai, Y [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking radiation therapy can potentially reduce internal margin without prolongation of irradiation time. However, dynamic tumor tracking technique requires an extra margin (tracking margin, TM) for the uncertainty of tumor localization, prediction, and beam repositioning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a dosimetric impact caused by TM. Methods: We used 4D XCAT to create 9 digital phantom datasets of different tumor size and motion range: tumor diameter TD=(1, 3, 5) cm and motion range MR=(1, 2, 3) cm. For each dataset, respiratory gating (30%–70% phase) and tumor tracking treatment plans were created using 8-field 3D-CRT by 4D dose calculation implemented in RayStation. The dose constraint was based on RTOG0618. For the tracking plan, TMs of (0, 2.5, 5) mm were considered by surrounding a normal setup margin: SM=5 mm. We calculated V20 of normal lung to evaluate the dosimetric impact for each case, and estimated an equivalent TM that affects the same impact on V20 obtained by the gated plan. Results: The equivalent TMs for (TD=1 cm, MR=2 cm), (TD=1 cm, MR=3 cm), (TD=5 cm, MR=2 cm), and (TD=5 cm, MR=3 cm) were estimated as 1.47 mm, 3.95 mm, 1.04 mm, and 2.13 mm, respectively. The larger the tumor size, the equivalent TM became smaller. On the other hand, the larger the motion range, the equivalent TM was found to be increased. Conclusion: Our results showed the equivalent TM changes depending on tumor size and motion range. The tracking plan with TM less than the equivalent TM achieves a dosimetric impact better than the gated plan in less treatment time. This study was partially supported by JSPS Kakenhi and Varian Medical Systems.

  9. Simple quality assurance method of dynamic tumor tracking with the gimbaled linac system using a light field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideharu; Ozawa, Shuichi; Hayata, Masahiro; Tsuda, Shintaro; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2016-09-08

    We proposed a simple visual method for evaluating the dynamic tumor tracking (DTT) accuracy of a gimbal mechanism using a light field. A single photon beam was set with a field size of 30 × 30 mm2 at a gantry angle of 90°. The center of a cube phantom was set up at the isocenter of a motion table, and 4D modeling was performed based on the tumor and infrared (IR) marker motion. After 4D modeling, the cube phantom was replaced with a sheet of paper, which was placed perpen-dicularly, and a light field was projected on the sheet of paper. The light field was recorded using a web camera in a treatment room that was as dark as possible. Calculated images from each image obtained using the camera were summed to compose a total summation image. Sinusoidal motion sequences were produced by moving the phantom with a fixed amplitude of 20 mm and different breathing periods of 2, 4, 6, and 8 s. The light field was projected on the sheet of paper under three conditions: with the moving phantom and DTT based on the motion of the phantom, with the moving phantom and non-DTT, and with a stationary phantom for comparison. The values of tracking errors using the light field were 1.12 ± 0.72, 0.31 ± 0.19, 0.27 ± 0.12, and 0.15 ± 0.09 mm for breathing periods of 2, 4, 6, and 8s, respectively. The tracking accuracy showed dependence on the breath-ing period. We proposed a simple quality assurance (QA) process for the tracking accuracy of a gimbal mechanism system using a light field and web camera. Our method can assess the tracking accuracy using a light field without irradiation and clearly visualize distributions like film dosimetry. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. Whole genome sequencing of matched tumor, adjacent non-tumor tissues and corresponding normal blood samples of hepatocellular carcinoma patients revealed dynamic changes of the mutations profiles during hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ruifang; Liu, Jie; Liu, Guanfeng; Jin, Shanshan; Xue, Qingzhong; Ma, Liang; Fu, Yan; Zhao, Na; Xing, Jinliang; Li, Lanjuan; Qiu, Yunqing; Lin, Biaoyang

    2017-04-18

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has become the third most deadly disease worldwide and HBV is the major factor in Asia and Africa. We conducted 9 WGS (whole genome sequencing) analyses for matched samples of tumor, adjacent non-tumor tissues and normal blood samples of HCC patients from three HBV positive patients. We then validated the mutations identified in a larger cohort of 177 HCC patients. We found that the number of the unique somatic mutations (average of 59,136) in tumor samples is significantly less than that in adjacent non-tumor tissues (average 83, 633). We discovered that the TP53 R249S mutation occurred in 7.7% of the HCC patients, and it was significantly associated with poor diagnosis. In addition, we found that the L104P mutation in the VCX gene (Variable charge, X-linked) was absent in white blood cell samples, but present at 11.1% frequency in the adjacent tissues and increased to 14.6% in HCC tissues, suggesting that this mutation might be a tumor driver gene driving HCC carcinogenesis. Finally, we identified a TK1-RNU7 fusion, which would result in a deletion of 103 amino acids from its C-terminal. The frequencies of this fusion event decreased from the adjacent tissues (29.2%) to the tumors (16.7%), suggesting that a truncated thymidine Kinase1 (TK1) caused by the fusion event might be deleterious and be selected against during tumor progression. The three-way comparisons allow the identification of potential driver mutations of carcinogenesis. Furthermore, our dataset provides the research community a valuable dataset for identifying dynamic changes of mutation profiles and driver mutations for HCC.

  11. Long term dynamics of charophytes meadows and cut-sedge beds in the wetland of Las Tablas de Daimiel (Ciudad Real, Spain: relationship with environmental disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cirujano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses surface variations on charophyte meadows and cut-sedge beds in Las Tablas de Daimiel National Park (Ciudad Real, Spain from the 1950s to the present, and its relationship with the changes that have occurred in the wetland meanwhile (e.g. droughts, fires, pollution episodes. Therefore, the role of these two parameters as environmental indicators at this continental wetland has been assessed.

  12. The anatomy of effective discharge: the dynamics of coarse sediment transport revealed using continuous bedload monitoring in a gravel-bed river during a very wet year

    OpenAIRE

    Downs, Peter W.; Soar, Philip J.; Taylor, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Indirect, passive approaches for monitoring coarse bedload transport could allow cheaper, safer, higher-resolution, longer-term data that revolutionises bedload understanding and informs river management. Here, insights provided by seismic impact plates in a downstream reach of a flashy gravel-bed river (River Avon, Devon, UK) are explored in the context of plate performance. Monitoring of a centrally-situated plate (IP1) during an extremely wet 12-month period demonstrated that impacts were ...

  13. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiè, Mirco; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Calderan, Laura; Marzola, Pasquina; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia; Marchini, Cristina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 µm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes. PMID:15967105

  14. (18)F-alfatide II and (18)F-FDG dual-tracer dynamic PET for parametric, early prediction of tumor response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinxia; Guo, Ning; Lang, Lixin; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Xie, Qingguo; Li, Quanzheng; Eden, Henry S; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    A single dynamic PET acquisition using multiple tracers administered closely in time could provide valuable complementary information about a tumor's status under quasiconstant conditions. This study aimed to investigate the utility of dual-tracer dynamic PET imaging with (18)F-alfatide II ((18)F-AlF-NOTA-E[PEG4-c(RGDfk)]2) and (18)F-FDG for parametric monitoring of tumor responses to therapy. We administered doxorubicin to one group of athymic nude mice with U87MG tumors and paclitaxel protein-bound particles to another group of mice with MDA-MB-435 tumors. To monitor therapeutic responses, we performed dual-tracer dynamic imaging, in sessions that lasted 90 min, starting with injection via the tail vein catheters with (18)F-alfatide II, followed 40 min later by (18)F-FDG. To achieve signal separation of the 2 tracers, we fit a 3-compartment reversible model to the time-activity curve of (18)F-alfatide II for the 40 min before (18)F-FDG injection and then extrapolated to 90 min. The (18)F-FDG tumor time-activity curve was isolated from the 90-min dual-tracer tumor time-activity curve by subtracting the fitted (18)F-alfatide II tumor time-activity curve. With separated tumor time-activity curves, the (18)F-alfatide II binding potential (Bp = k3/k4) and volume of distribution (VD) and (18)F-FDG influx rate ((K1 × k3)/(k2 + k3)) based on the Patlak method were calculated to validate the signal recovery in a comparison with 60-min single-tracer imaging and to monitor therapeutic response. The transport and binding rate parameters K1-k3 of (18)F-alfatide II, calculated from the first 40 min of the dual-tracer dynamic scan, as well as Bp and VD correlated well with the parameters from the 60-min single-tracer scan (R(2) > 0.95). Compared with the results of single-tracer PET imaging, (18)F-FDG tumor uptake and influx were recovered well from dual-tracer imaging. On doxorubicin treatment, whereas no significant changes in static tracer uptake values of (18)F-alfatide II

  15. Recent advances in fluidized bed drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, N. S.; Zakaria, J. H.; Mohideen Batcha, M. F.

    2017-09-01

    Fluidized bed drying are very well known to yield high heat and mass transfer and hence adopted to many industrial drying processes particularly agricultural products. In this paper, recent advances in fluidized bed drying were reviewed and focus is given to the drying related to the usage of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). It can be seen that usage of modern computational tools such as CFD helps to optimize the fluidized bed dryer design and operation for lower energy consumption and thus better thermal efficiency. Among agricultural products that were reviewed in this paper were oil palm frond, wheat grains, olive pomace, coconut, pepper corn and millet.

  16. Correlation of Tumor Immunohistochemistry with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and DSC-MRI Parameters in Patients with Gliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.B.; Cron, G.O.; Bezzina, K.; Perdrizet, K.; Torres, C.H.; Chakraborty, S.; Woulfe, J.; Jansen, G.H.; Thornhill, R.E.; Zanette, B.; Cameron, I.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Tumor CBV is a prognostic and predictive marker for patients with gliomas. Tumor CBV can be measured noninvasively with different MR imaging techniques; however, it is not clear which of these techniques most closely reflects histologically-measured tumor CBV. Our aim was to

  17. Decline of Tumor Vascular Function as Assessed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Is Associated With Poor Responses to Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fang-Hsin; Wang, Chun-Chieh [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Radiation Biology Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University/Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Liu, Ho-Ling [Department of Imaging Physics, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fu, Sheng-Yung [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National TsingHua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Yu, Ching-Fang [Radiation Biology Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University/Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chen [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academic Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Chi-Shiun [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National TsingHua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ji-Hong, E-mail: jihong@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Radiation Biology Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University/Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether changes in the volume transfer coefficient (K{sup trans}) in a growing tumor could be used as a surrogate marker for predicting tumor responses to radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). Methods and Materials: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was consecutively performed on tumor-bearing mice, and temporal and spatial changes of K{sup trans} values were measured along with tumor growth. Tumor responses to RT and CT were studied before and after observed changes in K{sup trans} values with time. Results: Dynamic changes with an initial increase and subsequent decline in K{sup trans} values were found to be associated with tumor growth. When each tumor was divided into core and peripheral regions, the K{sup trans} decline was greater in core, although neither vascular structure or necrosis could be linked to this spatial difference. Tumor responses to RT were worse if applied after the decline of K{sup trans}, and there was less drug distribution and cell death in the tumor core after CT. Conclusion: The K{sup trans} value in growing tumors, reflecting the changes of tumor microenvironment and vascular function, is strongly associated with tumor responses to RT and CT and could be a potential surrogate marker for predicting the tumor response to these treatments.

  18. Assessment of arterial tumor vascularity in small hepatocellular carcinoma. Comparison between color Doppler ultrasonography and radiographic imagings with contrast medium: dynamic CT, angiography, and CT hepatic arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Junji; Maru, Yasushi; Yoshino, Masahiro; Mera, Kiyomi; Sumi, Hajime; Sekiguchi, Ryuzo; Satake, Mitsuo; Hasebe, Takahiro; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2000-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by tumor vascularization from the hepatic artery. The objective of our work was to compare color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU), including power Doppler ultrasonography (PDU) with radiographic imagings with contrast medium in regard to the detection of the arterial tumor vascularity of small hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). We examined 42 small HCC lesions 2 cm or less in diameter in 37 patients for arterial tumor vascularity by conventional CDU, PDU, dynamic computed tomography (dCT), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and CT hepatic arteriography (CTA). Color images were detected in 25 (59.5%) and 28 (66.7%) of the 42 lesions with conventional CDU and PDU, respectively, and tumor vascularity was detected in 26 (61.9%) by dCT, 23 (54.8%) by DSA, and 29 (69.0%) by CTA. Tumor vascularity could be detected in 51.9% by PDU and CTA, more than by conventional CDU, dCT, and DSA (44.4, 44.4, and 33.3%, respectively) in well-differentiated HCC, whereas the detection rates by these techniques were almost equal (86.7% by CDU, 93.3% by PDU, dCT, and DSA, 100% by CTA, respectively) in moderately and poorly differentiated HCC. PDU is superior to CDU, dCT and DSA and equal to CTA for the detection of tumor vascularity in small HCC, particularly in well-differentiated HCC

  19. Enhancement pattern analysis of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma on dynamic MR imaging with histopathological correlation: Validity of portal phase imaging for predicting tumor grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Daisuke; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Nishie, Akihiro; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Asayama, Yoshiki; Ishigami, Kousei; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Kakihara, Daisuke; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Nishihara, Yunosuke; Aishima, Shinichi; Taketomi, Akinobu; Kishimoto, Junji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To elucidate the correlation between hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) enhancement patterns on dynamic MR imaging and histological findings. Materials and methods: Surgically proven 46 hypervascular HCCs of forty-one patients were enrolled. For each HCC, the signal intensity in the portal phase (SIPP) was evaluated. In this study, high, iso-, or low intensity in the portal phase was hypothesized as late, moderate, or early washout pattern, respectively. The SIPP of each HCC was correlated to histological grade and architectural subtypes that represent degrees of trabecular structure. For the trabecular HCCs, the thickness of tumor plate was also correlated for indirect estimation of tumor sinusoid. Results: There was a significant correlation between the SIPP vs. histological grade and also vs. architectural subtypes, namely the degree of trabecular structure. Washout of hypervascular HCC occurred earlier as the histological grade advanced and the histological architecture got closer to pure trabecular HCC. For the trabecular HCCs, the thickness of tumor plate correlated significantly with SIPP or histological grade. Hypervascular HCCs with thicker tumor plates showed worse histological grade and earlier washout pattern. Conclusions: Histological grade of hypervascular HCC may be predicted using SIPP. The thickness of tumor plate, resultantly the size of sinusoid between tumor plates, can account for the relationship between washout pattern and histological grade in the trabecular HCCs.

  20. Fluidodinâmica de sementes de brócolos em leito fluizado e leito de jorro Fluid-dynamics of broccoli seeds in fluized and spouted beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina de Almeida

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Os processos em leito fluidizado e de jorro são comumente empregados para secagem, recobrimento e granulação de sistemas particulados nas indústrias química e farmacêutica, enquanto na área agronômica estão limitados a tratamento de algumas espécies de sementes. Este trabalho objetivou apresentar a análise fluidodinâmica dos leitos fluidizado e de jorro, quando são utilizadas sementes de brócolos (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica e verificar a influência na germinação das sementes, submetidas aos dois tipos de processo por 60 min à temperatura do ar de 25°C. A fluidodinâmica nos dois tipos de contato, leitos fluidizado e de jorro, foi estabelecida pelas medidas da queda de pressão no leito e vazões de ar crescentes e decrescentes, para diferentes cargas de sementes. As condições experimentais foram baseadas nas análises das propriedades físicas das sementes e limitadas às dimensões do equipamento de laboratório. O leito cone-cilíndrico foi projetado e construído em acrílico, para permitir a visualização do processo. Os valores de queda de pressão máxima, vazão de jorro mínimo, vazão de jorro estável e queda de pressão no mínimo jorro foram obtidos a partir dos gráficos de queda de pressão-vazão para o leito de jorro. Estes valores foram comparados aos correspondentes valores obtidos por equações empíricas citadas na literatura. O mesmo procedimento foi realizado para o leito fluidizado obtendo-se os valores para velocidade de mínima fluidização e queda de pressão na mínima fluidização. Não houve danos à germinação das sementes que participaram dos processos.The spouted and fluidized bed technologies are usually employed in operations of drying, coating and granulation of particles by the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The use of these techniques in agronomy is limited to the treatment of some species of seeds. In this work, the objective was to analyse the fluid-dynamics of

  1. 18F-Alfatide II and 18F-FDG Dual Tracer Dynamic PET for Parametric, Early Prediction of Tumor Response to Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinxia; Guo, Ning; Lang, Lixin; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Xie, Qingguo; Li, Quanzheng; Eden, Henry S.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    A single dynamic PET acquisition using multiple tracers administered closely in time could provide valuable complementary information about a tumor’s status under quasi-constant conditions. This study aims to investigate the utility of dual-tracer dynamic PET imaging with 18F-Alfatide II (18F-AlF-NOTA-E[PEG4-c(RGDfk)]2) and 18F-FDG for parametric monitoring of tumor responses to therapy. Methods We administered doxorubicin to one group of athymic nude mice with U87MG tumors and Abraxane to another group of mice with MDA-MB-435 tumors. To monitor therapeutic responses, we performed dual-tracer dynamic imaging, in sessions that lasted 90 min, starting by injecting the mice via tail vein catheters with 18F-Alfatide II, followed 40 minutes later by 18F-FDG. To achieve signal separation of the two tracers, we fit a three-compartment reversible model to the time activity curve (TAC) of 18F-Alfatide II for the 40 min prior to 18F-FDG injection, and then extrapolated to 90 min. The 18F-FDG tumor TAC was isolated from the 90 min dual tracer tumor TAC by subtracting the fitted 18F-Alfatide II tumor TAC. With separated tumor TACs, the 18F-Alfatide II binding potential (Bp=k3/k4) and volume of distribution (VD), and 18F-FDG influx rate ((K1×k3)/(k2 + k3)) based on the Patlak method were calculated to validate the signal recovery in a comparison with 60-min single tracer imaging and to monitor therapeutic response. Results The transport and binding rate parameters K1-k3 of 18F-Alfatide II, calculated from the first 40 min of dual tracer dynamic scan, as well as Bp and VD, correlated well with the parameters from the 60 min single tracer scan (R2 > 0.95). Compared with the results of single tracer PET imaging, FDG tumor uptake and influx were recovered well from dual tracer imaging. Upon doxorubicin treatment, while no significant changes in static tracer uptake values of 18F-Alfatide II or 18F-FDG were observed, both 18F-Alfatide II Bp and 18F-FDG influx from kinetic

  2. [Influence of Changing Respirator Pattern on Dynamic Tumor Tracking Accuracy with Gimbaled Linac System Using a Digital Camera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enosaki, Tsubasa; Miura, Hideharu; Tsuda, Shintarou; Kawakubo, Atsushi; Hayata, Masahiro; Ozawa, Shuichi; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2018-01-01

    It is important for high-precision radiation therapy that tracking accuracy in dynamic tumor tracking (DTT) using the gimbal X-ray head. We evaluated the tracking accuracy under various respiratory patterns differ from a correlation model [four-dimensional model (4D-model)] in real-time using a digital camera. A sheet of paper with luminous line was placed on the programmable respiratory motion table (CIRS Inc.) and operated with the laser projector. The luminous line was defined as a target and the laser was defined as a gimbal. Motion table was operated at a period of 4 s and amplitude of ±10 mm to create 4D-modeling. This movement was defined as the basic operation. To investigate the tracking accuracy, target and gimbal positions were recorded using a digital camera under amplitudes (±5-20 mm) and periods (2-8 s) and analyzed by ImageJ software (NIH). The maximum tracking errors under various period and amplitude were 1.7-0.9 mm and 0.4-1.9 mm, respectively. From the creation of 4D-modeling, it was confirmed that when the period has shortened and the amplitude has increased, tracking accuracy was reduced.

  3. The Dynamics of Glutathione Species and Ophthalmate Concentrations in Plasma from the VX2 Rabbit Model of Secondary Liver Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Available tumor markers have low sensitivity/specificity for the diagnosis of liver tumors. The present study was designed to evaluate the oxidoreductive status of the liver as surrogates of tumor subsistence and growth. Methods. Glutathione species (GSH:GSSG, ophthalmate (OA concentrations, and their turnover were measured in plasma of rabbits (n=6 in their healthy state and in the state of tumor growth after implantation of the VX2 carcinoma in their liver. Tumors were allowed to grow for a period of 14 days when rabbits were sacrificed. Livers were removed and cysteine concentration was measured in liver tissue. Results. Tumor growth was found in 100% of the rabbits. Concentration and labeling of GSH/GSSG were similar in experimental animals before and after tumor implantation and to sham animals. In contrast, OA concentration increased significantly in experimental animals after tumor implantation when compared to same animals prior to tumor implantation and to sham animals (P<.05. The concentration of cysteine, a precursor of GSH, was found to be significantly lower in the liver tissue adjacent to the tumor (P<.05. Conclusion. Disturbances in the oxidoreductive state of livers appear to be a surrogate of early tumor growth.

  4. Fluidized-bed reactors processes and operating conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, John G

    2016-01-01

    The fluidized-bed reactor is the centerpiece of industrial fluidization processes. This book focuses on the design and operation of fluidized beds in many different industrial processes, emphasizing the rationale for choosing fluidized beds for each particular process. The book starts with a brief history of fluidization from its inception in the 1940’s. The authors present both the fluid dynamics of gas-solid fluidized beds and the extensive experimental studies of operating systems and they set them in the context of operating processes that use fluid-bed reactors. Chemical engineering students and postdocs as well as practicing engineers will find great interest in this book.

  5. 3D discrete angiogenesis dynamic model and stochastic simulation for the assessment of blood perfusion coefficient and impact on heat transfer between nanoparticles and malignant tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yifat, Jonathan; Gannot, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of malignant tumors plays a crucial role in the survivability chances of the patient. Therefore, new and innovative tumor detection methods are constantly searched for. Tumor-specific magnetic-core nano-particles can be used with an alternating magnetic field to detect and treat tumors by hyperthermia. For the analysis of the method effectiveness, the bio-heat transfer between the nanoparticles and the tissue must be carefully studied. Heat diffusion in biological tissue is usually analyzed using the Pennes Bio-Heat Equation, where blood perfusion plays an important role. Malignant tumors are known to initiate an angiogenesis process, where endothelial cell migration from neighboring vasculature eventually leads to the formation of a thick blood capillary network around them. This process allows the tumor to receive its extensive nutrition demands and evolve into a more progressive and potentially fatal tumor. In order to assess the effect of angiogenesis on the bio-heat transfer problem, we have developed a discrete stochastic 3D model & simulation of tumor-induced angiogenesis. The model elaborates other angiogenesis models by providing high resolution 3D stochastic simulation, capturing of fine angiogenesis morphological features, effects of dynamic sprout thickness functions, and stochastic parent vessel generator. We show that the angiogenesis realizations produced are well suited for numerical bio-heat transfer analysis. Statistical study on the angiogenesis characteristics was derived using Monte Carlo simulations. According to the statistical analysis, we provide analytical expression for the blood perfusion coefficient in the Pennes equation, as a function of several parameters. This updated form of the Pennes equation could be used for numerical and analytical analyses of the proposed detection and treatment method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring Pc 4-mediated photodynamic therapy of U87 tumors with dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in the athymic nude rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghai, Davood; Covey, Kelly; Sharma, Rahul; Cross, Nathan; Feyes, Denise K.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Flask, Chris A.; Dean, David

    2008-02-01

    Post-operative verification of the specificity and sensitivity of photodynamic therapy (PDT) is most pressing for deeply placed lesions such as brain tumors. We wish to determine whether Dynamic Contrast Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) can provide a non-invasive and unambiguous quantitative measure of the specificity and sensitivity of brain tumor PDT. Methods: 2.5 x 10 5 U87 cells were injected into the brains of six athymic nude rats. After 5-6 days, the animals received 0.5 mg/kg b.w. of the phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4 via tail-vein injection. On day 7 peri-tumor DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 7T microMRI scanner before and after tail-vein administration of 100 μL gadolinium and 400 μL saline. After this scan the animals received a 30 J/cm2 dose of 672-nm light from a diode laser (i.e., PDT). The DCE-MRI scan protocol was repeated on day 13. Next, the animals were euthanized and their brains were explanted for Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) histology. Results: No tumor was found in one animal. The DCE-MRI images of the other five animals demonstrated significant tumor enhancement increase (p < 0.053 two-sided t-test and p < 0.026 one-sided t-test) following PDT. H&E histology presented moderate to severe tumor necrosis. Discussion: The change in signal detected by DCE-MRI appears to be due to PDT-induced tumor necrosis. This DCE-MRI signal appears to provide a quantitative, non-invasive measure of the outcome of PDT in this animal model and may be useful for determining the safety and effectiveness of PDT in deeply placed tumors (e.g., glioma).

  7. Which techniques for an additional irradiation of the tumour bed in a breast cancer?; Quelles techniques de complement d'irradiation du lit tumoral dans le cancer du sein?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenna, H.; Iraqi, M.; Ahmedou, M.M.; Berhil, H.; El Kacemi, H.; Hassouni, K.; Kebdani, T.; Benjaafar, N.; El Gueddari, B.K. [Service de radiotherapie, Institut national d' oncologie, Rabat (Morocco)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a comparison of different techniques for an additional irradiation of the tumour bed, in terms of local control and aesthetic result in the case of a breast cancer. This additional irradiation has been delivered by electron beam in five fractions, high dose rate curie-therapy in two fractions, photon beam in five or six fractions, and low dose rate curie-therapy. The dose increase in the tumour bed allows the local control rate to be increased without compromising aesthetic results. However, the comparison of the different boost techniques does not reveal significant differences. Short communication

  8. Dynamics of tumor oxygenation, CD31 staining and transforming growth factor-β levels after treatment with radiation or cyclophosphamide in the rat 13762 mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Ikebe, Masahiko; Teicher, Beverly A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Tumors are dynamic tissues that undergo marked molecular, biochemical, and physiologic changes in response to cytotoxic anticancer therapies. Understanding the changes in tumor oxygenation and transforming growth factor-β expression may allow improved treatment regimens to be developed. Methods and Materials: The effects of a single dose of radiation therapy (20 Gy) or a single dose of chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, 250 mg/kg) on several molecular and physiologic parameters of the rat 13762 mammary carcinoma growing subcutaneously in female Fischer 344 rats were explored. Results: Treatment of the tumor-bearing animals with 20 Gy of radiation killed about two logs (99%) of the 13762 tumor cells, and treatment with cyclophosphamide (250 mg/kg) killed about 1.5 logs (95%) of the 13762 tumor cells. Hypoxia, as determined by a pO 2 electrode, initially decreased in the tumors of treated animals until 6 h. posttreatment and then increased, so that 24 h. after administration of the radiation therapy or the chemotherapy the number of intratumoral vessels as determined by CD31 staining increased until about 24 h after cytotoxic therapy. Transforming growth factor-β1, measured by radioimmunoassay, peaked in the serum between 6 h and 18 h and again between 72 h and 96 h after radiation therapy and peaked in the tumor at 24 h and again at 72 h after radiation therapy. The first serum peak after cyclophosphamide was 3 h after drug injection, with second peaks at 36 h and 48 h after drug administration. In the tumor, transforming growth factor-β1 peaked between 6 h and 8 h after drug administration and again 36 h and 72 h after drug. Apoptosis was maximal 6 h after 20 Gy and 24 h after cyclophosphamide. Vascular endothelial growth factor was also increased in tumors after cytotoxic therapy. Conclusions: These changes in the tumor physiologic status are sufficient to protect the tumor from a second cytotoxic insult administered days afterwards and to result in a

  9. WE-AB-202-11: Radiobiological Modeling of Tumor Response During Radiotherapy Based On Pre-Treatment Dynamic PET Imaging Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crispin-Ortuzar, M; Grkovski, M; Beattie, B; Lee, N; Riaz, N; Humm, J; Jeong, J; Fontanella, A; Deasy, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of a multiscale radiobiological model of tumor response to predict mid-treatment hypoxia images, based on pretreatment imaging of perfusion and hypoxia with [18-F]FMISO dynamic PET and glucose metabolism with [18-F]FDG PET. Methods: A mechanistic tumor control probability (TCP) radiobiological model describing the interplay between tumor cell proliferation and hypoxia (Jeong et al., PMB 2013) was extended to account for intra-tumor nutrient heterogeneity, dynamic cell migration due to nutrient gradients, and stromal cells. This extended model was tested on 10 head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy, randomly drawn from a larger MSKCC protocol involving baseline and mid-therapy dynamic PET scans. For each voxel, initial fractions of proliferative and hypoxic tumor cells were obtained by finding an approximate solution to a system of linear equations relating cell fractions to voxel-level FDG uptake, perfusion (FMISO K 1 ) and hypoxia (FMISO k 3 ). The TCP model then predicted their evolution over time up until the mid treatment scan. Finally, the linear model was reapplied to predict each lesion’s median hypoxia level (k 3 [med,sim]) which in turn was compared to the FMISO k 3 [med] measured at mid-therapy. Results: The average k3[med] of the tumors in pre-treatment scans was 0.0035 min −1 , with an inter-tumor standard deviation of σ[pre]=0.0034 min −1 . The initial simulated k 3 [med,sim] of each tumor agreed with the corresponding measurements within 0.1σ[pre]. In 7 out of 10 lesions, the mid-treatment k 3 [med,sim] prediction agreed with the data within 0.3σ[pre]. The remaining cases corresponded to the most extreme relative changes in k 3 [med]. Conclusion: This work presents a method to personalize the prediction of a TCP model using pre-treatment kinetic imaging data, and validates the modeling of radiotherapy response by predicting changes in median hypoxia values during treatment. Variations

  10. WE-AB-202-11: Radiobiological Modeling of Tumor Response During Radiotherapy Based On Pre-Treatment Dynamic PET Imaging Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crispin-Ortuzar, M; Grkovski, M; Beattie, B; Lee, N; Riaz, N; Humm, J; Jeong, J; Fontanella, A; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of a multiscale radiobiological model of tumor response to predict mid-treatment hypoxia images, based on pretreatment imaging of perfusion and hypoxia with [18-F]FMISO dynamic PET and glucose metabolism with [18-F]FDG PET. Methods: A mechanistic tumor control probability (TCP) radiobiological model describing the interplay between tumor cell proliferation and hypoxia (Jeong et al., PMB 2013) was extended to account for intra-tumor nutrient heterogeneity, dynamic cell migration due to nutrient gradients, and stromal cells. This extended model was tested on 10 head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy, randomly drawn from a larger MSKCC protocol involving baseline and mid-therapy dynamic PET scans. For each voxel, initial fractions of proliferative and hypoxic tumor cells were obtained by finding an approximate solution to a system of linear equations relating cell fractions to voxel-level FDG uptake, perfusion (FMISO K{sub 1}) and hypoxia (FMISO k{sub 3}). The TCP model then predicted their evolution over time up until the mid treatment scan. Finally, the linear model was reapplied to predict each lesion’s median hypoxia level (k{sub 3}[med,sim]) which in turn was compared to the FMISO k{sub 3}[med] measured at mid-therapy. Results: The average k3[med] of the tumors in pre-treatment scans was 0.0035 min{sup −1}, with an inter-tumor standard deviation of σ[pre]=0.0034 min{sup −1}. The initial simulated k{sub 3}[med,sim] of each tumor agreed with the corresponding measurements within 0.1σ[pre]. In 7 out of 10 lesions, the mid-treatment k{sub 3}[med,sim] prediction agreed with the data within 0.3σ[pre]. The remaining cases corresponded to the most extreme relative changes in k{sub 3}[med]. Conclusion: This work presents a method to personalize the prediction of a TCP model using pre-treatment kinetic imaging data, and validates the modeling of radiotherapy response by predicting changes in median hypoxia

  11. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  12. Early quantification of the therapeutic efficacy of the vascular disrupting agent, CKD-516, using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in rabbit VX2 liver tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Ijin; Kim, Jung Hoon; Lee, Jeong Min; Choi, Jin Woo; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (DCE-US) in the early quantification of hemodynamic change following administration of the vascular disrupting agent (VDA) CKD-516 using a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. This study was approved by our institutional animal care and use committee. Eight VX2 liver-tumor-bearing rabbits were treated with intravenous CKD-516, and all underwent DCE-US using SonoVue before and again 2, 4, 6, and 24 hours following their treatment. The tumor perfusion parameters were obtained from the time-intensity curve of the DCE-US data. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to assess any significant change in tumor perfusion over time. Relative changes in the DCE-US parameters between the baseline and follow-up assessments were correlated with the relative changes in tumor size over the course of seven days using Pearson correlation. CKD-516 treatment resulted in significant changes in the DCE-US parameters, including the peak intensity, total area under the time-intensity curve (AUCtotal), and AUC during wash-out (AUCout) over time (P<0.05). Pairwise comparison tests revealed that the AUCtotal and AUC during wash-in (AUCin) seen on the two-hour follow-up were significantly lower than the baseline values (P<0.05). However, none of early changes in the DCE-US parameters until 24-hour follow-up showed a significant correlation with the relative changes in tumor size during seven days after CKD-516 treatment. Our results suggest that a novel VDA (CKD-516) can cause disruption of tumor perfusion as early as two hours after treatment and that the therapeutic effect of CKD-516 treatment can be effectively quantified using DCE-US.

  13. Impact of sampling interval in training data acquisition on intrafractional predictive accuracy of indirect dynamic tumor-tracking radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Akimoto, Mami; Miyabe, Yuki; Yokota, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-08-01

    To explore the effect of sampling interval of training data acquisition on the intrafractional prediction error of surrogate signal-based dynamic tumor-tracking using a gimbal-mounted linac. Twenty pairs of respiratory motions were acquired from 20 patients (ten lung, five liver, and five pancreatic cancer patients) who underwent dynamic tumor-tracking with the Vero4DRT. First, respiratory motions were acquired as training data for an initial construction of the prediction model before the irradiation. Next, additional respiratory motions were acquired for an update of the prediction model due to the change of the respiratory pattern during the irradiation. The time elapsed prior to the second acquisition of the respiratory motion was 12.6 ± 3.1 min. A four-axis moving phantom reproduced patients' three dimensional (3D) target motions and one dimensional surrogate motions. To predict the future internal target motion from the external surrogate motion, prediction models were constructed by minimizing residual prediction errors for training data acquired at 80 and 320 ms sampling intervals for 20 s, and at 500, 1,000, and 2,000 ms sampling intervals for 60 s using orthogonal kV x-ray imaging systems. The accuracies of prediction models trained with various sampling intervals were estimated based on training data with each sampling interval during the training process. The intrafractional prediction errors for various prediction models were then calculated on intrafractional monitoring images taken for 30 s at the constant sampling interval of a 500 ms fairly to evaluate the prediction accuracy for the same motion pattern. In addition, the first respiratory motion was used for the training and the second respiratory motion was used for the evaluation of the intrafractional prediction errors for the changed respiratory motion to evaluate the robustness of the prediction models. The training error of the prediction model was 1.7 ± 0.7 mm in 3D for all sampling

  14. Using Natural Boundary Conditions to Probe the Internal Dynamics of Pyroclastic Flows: Mass, Enthalpy and Momentum Transfer at the Flow-Bed Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufek, J.; Bergantz, G. W.; Manga, M.

    2006-12-01

    The interaction of pyroclastic density currents with their substrate plays a significant role in the transport and deposition of these flows. The basal particle concentration of these flows will ultimately determine the mechanism of mass, enthalpy and momentum transfer and the sensitivity of these flows to bed roughness, topography and even their ability to cross bodies of water. In order to probe the internal structure of these flows we used an Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian (EEL) computational approach coupled with an examination of ignimbrite deposits of the Kos Plateau Tuff (KPT) and the near-shore deposits of the 2003 Montserrat dome collapse (Allen and Cas, 2001; Edmonds and Herd, 2005). In particular, the KPT eruption provides a unique opportunity to compare flows that have traversed a body of water (and thereby filtering out their bed-load) versus flows that have traveled over-land. The examined Montserrat pyroclastic flows also encounter the ocean, and comparison with observations of the recently produced near-shore deposits allow us to access the near-surface energy transfer required to produce the observed steam explosions and the mass transfer necessary to produce tsunami. This coupled deposit-driven and numerical investigation reveals that energy-dissipation at the basal boundary is one of the primary factors determining the run-out distance of pyroclastic flows. A significant portion of the momentum of over-land flows is transported in a bed-load region dominated by numerous particle-particle and particle-boundary interactions. Mass and energy transfer in the near shore environment produce tsunami and steam explosions, which result in preferential fining in the proximal deposits and a source of water vapor to the propagating currents. However, the simulations indicate the internal structure and head of the pyroclastic density current are not significantly impacted by the steam explosions after they have traveled several kilometers away from the shore as

  15. Degradation of chlorinated benzenes in fluidized bed reactors in respect to the population dynamics. Abbau chlorierter Benzole in Wirbelbettreaktoren unter Beruecksichtigung der Populationszusammensetzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, J. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachgebiet Siedlungswasserwirtschaft); Schaefer, M. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachgebiet Siedlungswasserwirtschaft); Hegemann, W. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachgebiet Siedlungswasserwirtschaft); Dill, S. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachgebiet Siedlungswasserwirtschaft); Kirsch, N. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Lebensmittelchemie); Stan, H.J. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Lebensmittelchemie); Kaempfer, P. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachgebiet Hygiene); Dott, W. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Biologie); Sommer, C. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Biologie); Spiess, E. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Biologie); Goerisch, H. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Biologie)

    1993-06-01

    Chlorinated benzenes are wide spread in the environment and largely persistent against biological degradation. In this study a mixed bacterial population was enriched from a river polluted by industrial wastewater, that was able to degrade monochlorobenzene and the three isomers of dichlorobenzene. The mixed population was applied to a fluidized bed bioreactor containing an adsorptive carrier material (polyurethane foam with and without incorporated activated carbon). The total degradation of the chlorinated benzenes was determined quantitatively from the amount of chloride released. A maximum degradation rate of 150 mg/(l*d) was found. Both growth of the biomass on carriers and the composition of the population fluctuated. However, always species of Gram-negative genera Comamonas, Alcaligenes and Xanthobacter in addition to Gram-positive coryneform species of the Microbacterium/Cellulomonas group and Bacillus sp. were present. (orig.)

  16. An Evolutionary Explanation for the Perturbation of the Dynamics of Metastatic Tumors Induced by Surgery and Acute Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Carmona Bayonas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgery has contributed to unveil a tumor behavior that is difficult to reconcile with the models of tumorigenesis based on gradualism. The postsurgical patterns of progression include unexpected features such as distant interactions and variable rhythms. The underlying evidence can be summarized as follows: (1 the resection of the primary tumor is able to accelerate the evolution of micrometastasis in early stages, and (2 the outcome is transiently opposed in advanced tumors. The objective of this paper is to give some insight into tumorigenesis and surgery-related effects, by applying the concepts of the evolutionary theory in those tumor behaviors that gompertzian and tissular-centered models are unable to explain. According to this view, tumors are the consequence of natural selection operating at the somatic level, which is the basic mechanism of tumorigenesis, notwithstanding the complementary role of the intrinsic constrictions of complex networks. A tumor is a complicated phenomenon that entails growth, evolution and development simultaneously. So, an evo-devo perspective can explain how and why tumor subclones are able to translate competition from a metabolic level into neoangiogenesis and the immune response. The paper proposes that distant interactions are an extension of the ecological events at the local level. This notion explains the evolutionary basis for tumor dormancy, and warns against the teleological view of tumorigenesis as a process directed towards the maximization of a concrete trait such as aggressiveness.

  17. Fluidized bed incinerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.; Johnson, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A fluidized bed incinerator is being developed for burning rad contaminated solid and liquid waste materials. In situ neutralization of acid gases by the bed material, catalytic afterburning, and gas filtration are used to produce a clean flue gas without the use of aqueous scrubbing

  18. Gas Distribution in Shallow Packed Beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Ian Miles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Packed beds have many industrial applications and are increasingly used in the process industries due to their low pressure drop. Obtaining uniform gas distribution in such beds is of crucial importance in minimising operating costs and optimising plant performance. Since to some extent a packed bed acts as its own distributor the importance of obtaining uniform gas distribution has increased as aspect ratios (bed height to diameter) decrease. There is no rigorous design method for distributors due to a limited understanding of the fluid flow phenomena and in particular of the effect of the bed base/free fluid interface. This study is based on a combined theoretical and modelling approach. The Ergun Equation is used to determine the pressure drop over a bed where the flow is uni-directional. This equation has been used in a vectorial form so that it can be applied to maldistributed and multi -directional flows and has been realised in the Computational Fluid Dynamics code PHOENICS. The use of this equation and its application has been verified by modelling experimental measurements of maldistributed gas flows, where there is no free fluid/bed base interface. A novel, two-dimensional experiment has been designed to investigate the fluid mechanics of maldistributed gas flows in shallow packed beds. The results from this apparatus provide useful insights into the fluid mechanics of flow in and around a shallow packed bed and show the critical effect of the bed base. The PHOENICS/vectorial Ergun Equation model has been adapted to model this situation. The model has been improved by the inclusion of spatial voidage variations in the bed and the prescription of a novel bed base boundary condition. The flow in a curved bed section, which is three -dimensional in nature, is examined experimentally. The effect of the walls and the changes in gas direction on the gas flow are shown to be particularly significant

  19. Model investigations 3D of gas-powder two phase flow in descending packed bed in metallurgical shaft furnaces

    OpenAIRE

    B. Panic; K. Janiszewski

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the second phase of model investigations of static pressure radial distribution conducted on 4 levels of bed height. During the phase the diameter of glass bed particles was increased, blast-furnace pellets were introduced as bed and iron powder was used as powder. Experiments were carried out with regard to gas velocity, bed and powder type and size of bed particles. The radial distribution of 3 fractions of powder accumulated in the bed – static powder, dynamic powder an...

  20. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  1. Reduction of Dimensionality of a Dynamical Model of Aggressive Tumor Treated by Chemotherapy, Immunotherapy and siRNA Infusion. Part І. Establishment of Time Hierarchy in the Model Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolova E.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Tichonov's theorem for quasi-stationary approximation is considered as a basic approach for reduction of dynamical systems with time hierarchy. On the basis of previously determined parameters, seven ordinary differential equations of the dynamical model of tumor treated by chemotherapy, immunotherapy and siRNA infusion are written in a form appropriate to evaluate their terms for model reduction. In accordance with the terminology of the Tichonov's theorem, it is established that three of the system components are fast varying such that the corresponding kinetic equations form an attached system. The other four variables are slow varying and their kinetic equations form a degenerate system

  2. Real-time dynamic optical imaging of ACC-M tumor cells killed by HSV-tk/ACV system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tao; Li, Yongjin; Li, Zhiyang; Xie, Xiangmo; Lu, Lisha

    2013-01-01

    HSV-tk/ACV induced and killed human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell (ACC-M) in vivo and in vitro, which were observed through optical imaging and green fluorescence protein (GFP) tagging technique. ACC-M was transfected with TK-GFP, and the single clone cell ACC-M-TK-GFP was selected by G418. With fluorescent stereomicroscope, whole-body fluorescent imaging system and fluorescent microscope, we could observe ACV treated ACC-M-TK-GFP cells in cell level and nude mice. The therapies of tumor were visualized clearly with optical imaging. This study proves that optical imaging is a very good approach for studying the effect of HSV-tk/ACV on the ACC-M tumor cells and decreasing the amount of vessel about tumors cell. Optical imaging will become a visual groundwork for monitoring tumor growth and evaluating in vivo curative effect of antitumor drugs.

  3. Error analysis of tumor blood flow measurement using dynamic contrast-enhanced data and model-independent deconvolution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Kenya; Miyazaki, Shohei

    2007-01-01

    We performed error analysis of tumor blood flow (TBF) measurement using dynamic contrast-enhanced data and model-independent deconvolution analysis, based on computer simulations. For analysis, we generated a time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent in the volume of interest (VOI) from the arterial input function (AIF) consisting of gamma-variate functions using an adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model under various plasma flow (F p ), mean capillary transit time (T c ), permeability-surface area product (PS) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values. Deconvolution analyses based on truncated singular value decomposition with a fixed threshold value (TSVD-F), with an adaptive threshold value (TSVD-A) and with the threshold value determined by generalized cross validation (TSVD-G) were used to estimate F p values from the simulated concentration-time curves in the VOI and AIF. First, we investigated the relationship between the optimal threshold value and SNR in TSVD-F, and then derived the equation describing the relationship between the threshold value and SNR for TSVD-A. Second, we investigated the dependences of the estimated F p values on T c , PS, the total duration for data acquisition and the shape of AIF. Although TSVD-F with a threshold value of 0.025, TSVD-A with the threshold value determined by the equation derived in this study and TSVD-G could estimate the F p values in a similar manner, the standard deviation of the estimates was the smallest and largest for TSVD-A and TSVD-G, respectively. PS did not largely affect the estimates, while T c did in all methods. Increasing the total duration significantly improved the variations in the estimates in all methods. TSVD-G was most sensitive to the shape of AIF, especially when the total duration was short. In conclusion, this study will be useful for understanding the reliability and limitation of model-independent deconvolution analysis when applied to TBF measurement using an

  4. Experimental validation of packed bed chemical-looping combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, S.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical-looping combustion has emerged as a promising alternative technology, intrinsically integrating CO2 capture in power production. A novel reactor concept based on dynamically operated packed beds has been proposed [Noorman, S., van Sint Annaland, M., Kuipers, J.A.M., 2007. Packed bed reactor

  5. Modelling of Devolatilization in Fluidized Bed Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenseng, Mette; Lin, Weigang; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the devolatilization process in a circulating fluidized bed combustor. The model is a combination of two submodels: single particle devolatilization and fluid dynamics. The single particle model includes the influence of both chemical kinetics and hea...

  6. Dynamic simulation of a circulating fluidized bed boiler system part II: Simulation of a boiler system operating in a power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Il; Choi, Sang Min; Yang, Jong In

    2016-01-01

    A case of dynamic performance simulation model of a CFB boiler is presented in this study. The dynamic system of a CFB boiler in an operating power plant and the transient behavior of sub-models is described in the accompanying paper, Part I. The current paper, Part II, describes the model extension for the CFB boiler system in a power plant. The open loop model in Paper I was expanded by applying a set of PID (Proportional-integral-differential) control loops. In the control loop, pressure, temperature, mass flow rate of the main steam, the drum water level and the oxygen level at the stack were controlled. Dynamic performance was simulated to check the response of the closed control loop. Finally, performance of the total boiler system for a range of operation load of the power plant was simulated, where the parameters were calculated and control variables were maintained at the set values by PID control. Dynamic performance of a boiler at a selected load variation case was simulated and compared with actual measurements and their transient response characteristics were discussed. The simulation can also directly produce useful operation parameters, which are not measurable, but could be used for engineering evaluation

  7. Dynamic contrast-enhanced case-control analysis in 3T MRI of prostate cancer can help to characterize tumor aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz-Requena, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.sanz@quironsalud.es [Biomedical Engineering, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); GIBI230, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Martí-Bonmatí, Luis [Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); GIBI230, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Pérez-Martínez, Rosario [Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); García-Martí, Gracián [Biomedical Engineering, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); GIBI230, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); CIBER-SAM, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Curve types showed no statistical association with healthy/tumor peripheral areas. • K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, upslope and AUC showed significant differences in controls vs. tumors. • The global diagnostic performance of standard MRI perfusion parameters is poor. • Normalized K{sup trans}, upslope and AUC had good diagnostic accuracy for tumor grading. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this work is to establish normality and tumor tissue ranges for perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR of the peripheral prostate at 3T and to compare the diagnostic performance of quantitative and semi-quantitative parameters. Materials and methods: Thirty-six patients with prostate carcinomas (18 Gleason-6, 15 Gleason-7, and 3 Gleason-8) and 33 healthy subjects were included. Image analysis workflow comprised four steps: manual segmentation of whole prostate and lesions, series registration, voxelwise T1 mapping and calculation of pharmacokinetic and semi-quantitative parameters. Results: K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, upslope and AUC60 showed statistically significant differences between healthy peripheral areas and tumors. Curve type showed no association with healthy/tumor peripheral areas (chi-square = 0.702). Areas under the ROC curves were 0.64 (95% CI: 0.54–0.75), 0.70 (0.60–0.80), 0.62 (0.51–0.72) and 0.63 (0.52–0.74) for K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, upslope and AUC60, respectively. The optimal cutoff values were: K{sup trans} = 0.21 min{sup −1} (sensitivity = 0.61, specificity = 0.64), v{sub e} = 0.36 (0.63, 0.71), upslope = 0.59 (0.59, 0.59) and AUC60 = 2.4 (0.63, 0.64). Significant differences were found between Gleason scores 6 and 7 for normalized K{sup trans}, upslope and AUC60, with good diagnostic accuracy (area under ROC curve 0.80, 95% CI: 0.60–1.00). Conclusion: Quantitative (K{sup trans} and v{sub e}) and semi-quantitative (upslope and AUC60) perfusion parameters showed significant differences between tumors and control

  8. Bed rest during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Belizán JM, Bergel E. Bed rest in singleton pregnancies for preventing preterm birth. Cochrane Database ... and Gynecology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda Center for Fertility, ...

  9. Enuresis (Bed-Wetting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptoms of enuresis Enuresis is when an older child (age 7 or older) wets the bed at night ... feel guilt and embarrassment. It’s true that your child should take responsibility for bedwetting. He or she could do this ...

  10. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Savino, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H 2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  11. Highly dynamic biological seabed alterations revealed by side scan sonar tracking of Lanice conchilega beds offshore the island of Sylt (German Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, C.; Feldens, P.; Schwarzer, K.

    2017-06-01

    Hydroacoustic surveys are common tools for habitat investigation and monitoring that aid in the realisation of the aims of the EU Marine Directives. However, the creation of habitat maps is difficult, especially when benthic organisms densely populate the seafloor. This study assesses the sensitivity of entropy and homogeneity image texture parameters derived from backscatter strength data to benthic habitats dominated by the tubeworm Lanice conchilega. Side scan sonar backscatter surveys were carried out in 2010 and 2011 in the German Bight (southern North Sea) at two sites approx. 20 km offshore of the island of Sylt. Abiotic and biotic seabed facies, such as sorted bedforms, areas of fine to medium sand and L. conchilega beds with different tube densities, were identified and characterised based on manual expert analysis and image texture analysis. Ground truthing was performed by grab sampling and underwater video observations. Compared to the manual expert analysis, the k- means classification of image textures proves to be a semi-automated method to investigate small-scale differences in a biologically altered seabed from backscatter data. The texture parameters entropy and homogeneity appear linearly interrelated with tube density, the former positively and the latter negatively. Reinvestigation of one site after 1 year showed an extensive change in the distribution of the L. conchilega-altered seabed. Such marked annual fluctuations in L. conchilega tube cover demonstrate the need for dense time series and high spatial coverage to meaningfully monitor ecological patterns on the seafloor with acoustic backscatter methods in the study region and similar settings worldwide, particularly because the sand mason plays a pivotal role in promoting biodiversity. In this context, image texture analysis provides a cost-effective and reproducible method to track biologically altered seabeds from side scan sonar backscatter signatures.

  12. Innovative rock bed construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.

    1983-06-01

    A general discussion of the use of rock beds for heating and cooling thermal storage is particularized for design and construction in Phoenix, Arizona. The rock bed parameters for three two-story condominium apartments constructed in 1982 are discussed, including sizing criteria and original construction details. A revised construction method using gabions that are self-supporting chain link cylinders provided a much more economical construction method as well as other advantages of speed and structural flexibility.

  13. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using a macromolecular MR contrast agent (P792): Evaluation of antivascular drug effect in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Sun [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Jeong Min; Woo, Sung Min; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Il [Dept. of Radiology, Sheikh Khalifa Specialty Hospital, Ras Al Khaimah (United Arab Emirates); Choi, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using macromolecular contrast agent (P792) for assessment of vascular disrupting drug effect in rabbit VX2 liver tumor models. This study was approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. DCE-MRI was performed with 3-T scanner in 13 VX2 liver tumor-bearing rabbits, before, 4 hours after, and 24 hours after administration of vascular disrupting agent (VDA), using gadomelitol (P792, n = 7) or low molecular weight contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine [Gd-DOTA], n = 6). P792 was injected at a of dose 0.05 mmol/kg, while that of Gd-DOTA was 0.2 mmol/kg. DCE-MRI parameters including volume transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve until 60 seconds (iAUC) of tumors were compared between the 2 groups at each time point. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with tumor histopathology. Reproducibility in measurement of DCE-MRI parameters and image quality of source MR were compared between groups. P792 group showed a more prominent decrease in Ktrans and iAUC at 4 hours and 24 hours, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Changes in DCE-MRI parameters showed a weak correlation with histologic parameters (necrotic fraction and microvessel density) in both groups. Reproducibility of DCE-MRI parameters and overall image quality was not significantly better in the P792 group, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a macromolecular contrast agent shows changes of hepatic perfusion more clearly after administration of the VDA. Gadolinium was required at smaller doses than a low molecular contrast agent.

  14. Utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for differentiating glioblastoma, primary central nervous system lymphoma and brain metastatic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shanshan, E-mail: lushan1118@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Gao, Qianqian, E-mail: gaoqian123011@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Yu, Jing, E-mail: yujing0303@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Yang, E-mail: yuhao040511@163.com [Department of Pathology,The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Cao, Peng, E-mail: peng.cao@ge.com [GE healthcare, Shanghai (China); Shi, Haibin, E-mail: hbshi346@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Hong, Xunning, E-mail: hongxunning@sina.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: The study aimed to investigate the use of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived permeability parameters for the differentiation of glioblastoma multiformes (GBMs), primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs), and brain metastatic tumors (MTs). Materials and methods: Seventy-five patients with histopathologically confirmed GBMs (n = 38), PCNSLs (n = 16) and MTs (n = 21) underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRIs before surgery. The volume transfer constant K{sup trans}, the flux rate constant between extravascular extracellular space and plasma K{sub ep}, the extravascular extracellular volume V{sub e} and the fractional plasma volume V{sub p} were measured within the entire contrast-enhancing tumor by extended Tofts model. A one-way analysis of variance was used to compare all of the parameters among these three tumors, followed by the post-hoc test. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the permeability parameters. Results: Mean K{sup trans} value and V{sub e} value were significantly higher in PCNSLs than in GBMs (P < 0.001 and P = 0.011) and MTs (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in all of the permeability parameters between GBMs and MTs. According to the receiver operating characteristic analyses, both K{sup trans} and V{sub e} had good diagnostic performance for discriminating between PCNSLs and GBMs (the area under the curve: 0.847 and 0.785, respectively), as well as between PCNSLs and MTs (the area under the curve: 0.851 and 0.884, respectively). Conclusions: The K{sup trans} and V{sub e} derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI facilitate the differentiation of PCNSLs from GBMs and MTs.

  15. Mediastinal tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thymoma - mediastinal; Lymphoma - mediastinal ... mediastinal tumors in adults occur in the anterior mediastinum. They are usually cancerous (malignant) lymphomas, germ cell tumors, or thymomas. These tumors are ...

  16. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hak, Sjoerd; Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only...... kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging...

  17. Comparative multifractal analysis of dynamic infrared thermograms and X-ray mammograms enlightens changes in the environment of malignant tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya Gerasimova-Chechkina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that the microenvironment surrounding a tumor plays a special role in cancer development and cancer therapeutic resistance. Tumors arise from the dysregulation and alteration of both the malignant cells and their environment. By providing tumor-repressing signals, the microenvironment can impose and sustain normal tissue architecture. Once tissue homeostasis is lost, the altered microenvironment can itself become a promoter of the tumorigenic transformation process. A major challenge in early breast cancer diagnosis is thus to show that these physiological and architectural alterations can be detected with currently used screening techniques. In a recent study, we used a 1D wavelet-based multi-scale method to analyze the temporal fluctuations of breast skin temperature collected with an IR thermography camera in patients with breast cancer. This study reveals that the multifractal complexity of temperature fluctuations about the cardiogenic and vasomotor perfusion oscillations observed in healthy breasts is lost in malignant tumor foci in cancerous breasts. Here we use a 2D wavelet-based multifractal method to analyze the spatial fluctuations of breast density in the X-ray mammograms of the same panel of patients. As compared to the long-range correlations and anti-correlations in roughness fluctuations, respectively observed in dense and fatty breast areas, some significant change in the nature of breast density fluctuations with some clear loss of correlations is detected in the neighborhood of malignant tumors. This attests to some architectural disorganization that may deeply affect heat transfer and related thermomechanics in breast tissues, corroborating the change to homogeneous monofractal temperature fluctuations recorded in cancerous breasts with the IR camera. These results open new perspectives in computer-aided methods to assist in early breast cancer diagnosis.

  18. Dynamic tumor modeling of the dose–response relationship for everolimus in metastatic renal cell carcinoma using data from the phase 3 RECORD-1 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, Andrew; Wang, Wenping; Carter, Alison A; Chiparus, Ovidiu; Hollaender, Norbert; Kim, Hyewon; Motzer, Robert J; Sarr, Celine

    2012-01-01

    The phase 3 RECORD-1 trial (NCT00410124) established the efficacy and safety of everolimus in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) who progress on sunitinib or sorafenib. In RECORD-1, patients received 10 mg everolimus daily, with dose reduction to 5 mg daily allowed for toxicity. We have developed a model of tumor growth dynamics utilizing serial measurements of the sum of the longest tumor diameters (SLD) from individual RECORD-1 patients to define the dose–response relationship of everolimus. The model predicts that after 1 year of continuous dosing, the change in SLD of target lesions will be +142.1% ± 98.3%, +22.4% ± 17.2%, and –15.7% ± 11.5% in the average patient treated with placebo, 5 mg everolimus, and 10 mg everolimus, respectively. This nonlinear, mixed-effects modeling approach can be used to describe the dynamics of each individual patient, as well as the overall population. This allows evaluation of how an actual dosing history and individual covariates impact on the observed drug effect, and offers the possibility of predicting clinical observations as a function of time. In this pharmacodynamic model of tumor response, everolimus more effectively shrinks target lesions in mRCC when dosed 10 mg daily versus 5 mg daily, although a 5-mg dose still shows an antitumor effect. These data support earlier studies that established 10 mg daily as the preferred clinical dose of everolimus, and improve our understanding of the everolimus dose–response relationship

  19. Bed bug deterrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes Kenneth F

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent study in BMC Biology has determined that the immature stage of the bed bug (the nymph signals its reproductive status to adult males using pheromones and thus avoids the trauma associated with copulation in this species. The success of this nymphal strategy of deterrence is instructive. Against the background of increasing problems with bed bugs, this research raises the question whether pheromones might be used to control them. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/121

  20. The Safety of Hospital Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Pierre; Pooler, Charlotte; Merryweather, Andrew; Doig, Alexa K.; Bloswick, Donald

    2015-01-01

    To explore the safety of the standard and the low hospital bed, we report on a microanalysis of 15 patients’ ability to ingress, move about the bed, and egress. The 15 participants were purposefully selected with various disabilities. Bed conditions were randomized with side rails up or down and one low bed with side rails down. We explored the patients’ use of the side rails, bed height, ability to lift their legs onto the mattress, and ability to turn, egress, and walk back to the chair. The standard bed was too high for some participants, both for ingress and egress. Side rails were used by most participants when entering, turning in bed, and exiting. We recommend that side rails be reconsidered as a means to facilitate in-bed movement, ingress, and egress. Furthermore, single deck height settings for all patients are not optimal. Low beds as a safety measure must be re-evaluated. PMID:28462302

  1. Influence of the convergence angle on the morphodynamics of discordant bed confluences

    OpenAIRE

    Guillén Ludeña, Sebastián; Franca, Rodrigues Pereira Da; Jorge, Mario; Schleiss, Anton; Cardoso, Antonio H.

    2013-01-01

    Within the fluvial network, confluences are particular areas characterized by great ecological value where flow dynamics and bed morphology are much influenced by local patterns. The aim of this article is to describe the influence of the convergence angle on the morphology and hydrodynamics at river channel confluences, where the tributary bed level is higher than the main channel bed (discordant bed). For that purpose, experiments were carried out in a laboratory flume running three dischar...

  2. Bed Prism Spectacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2018-01-01

    We only became aware of the existence of bed prism spectacles when a student brought them to the classroom and asked us about how they work. The device proved to be a fertile source of curiosity among the students, and, to be properly understood, it required us to develop a comparison between reflection in a typical mirror and total internal…

  3. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the mattress end Subscribe: FDA Consumer Health Information "Hospital beds are found in nearly all patient care settings or environments," says Joan Ferlo Todd, RN, a senior nurse-consultant at the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH). " ...

  4. Deleterious Thermal Effects Due To Randomized Flow Paths in Pebble Bed, and Particle Bed Style Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    A review of literature associated with Pebble Bed and Particle Bed reactor core research has revealed a systemic problem inherent to reactor core concepts which utilize randomized rather than structured coolant channel flow paths. For both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor designs; case studies reveal that for indeterminate reasons, regions within the core would suffer from excessive heating leading to thermal runaway and localized fuel melting. A thermal Computational Fluid Dynamics model was utilized to verify that In both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor concepts randomized coolant channel pathways combined with localized high temperature regions would work together to resist the flow of coolant diverting it away from where it is needed the most to cooler less resistive pathways where it is needed the least. In other words given the choice via randomized coolant pathways the reactor coolant will take the path of least resistance, and hot zones offer the highest resistance. Having identified the relationship between randomized coolant channel pathways and localized fuel melting it is now safe to assume that other reactor concepts that utilize randomized coolant pathways such as the foam core reactor are also susceptible to this phenomenon.

  5. Erucin, the major isothiocyanate in arugula (Eruca sativa, inhibits proliferation of MCF7 tumor cells by suppressing microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Azarenko

    Full Text Available Consumption of cruciferous vegetables is associated with reduced risk of various types of cancer. Isothiocyanates including sulforaphane and erucin are believed to be responsible for this activity. Erucin [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylthiobutane], which is metabolically and structurally related to sulforaphane, is present in large quantities in arugula (Eruca sativa, Mill., kohlrabi and Chinese cabbage. However, its cancer preventive mechanisms remain poorly understood. We found that erucin inhibits proliferation of MCF7 breast cancer cells (IC50 = 28 µM in parallel with cell cycle arrest at mitosis (IC50 = 13 µM and apoptosis, by a mechanism consistent with impairment of microtubule dynamics. Concentrations of 5-15 µM erucin suppressed the dynamic instability of microtubules during interphase in the cells. Most dynamic instability parameters were inhibited, including the rates and extents of growing and shortening, the switching frequencies between growing and shortening, and the overall dynamicity. Much higher erucin concentrations were required to reduce the microtubule polymer mass. In addition, erucin suppressed dynamic instability of microtubules reassembled from purified tubulin in similar fashion. The effects of erucin on microtubule dynamics, like those of sulforaphane, are similar qualitatively to those of much more powerful clinically-used microtubule-targeting anticancer drugs, including taxanes and the vinca alkaloids. The results suggest that suppression of microtubule dynamics by erucin and the resulting impairment of critically important microtubule-dependent cell functions such as mitosis, cell migration and microtubule-based transport may be important in its cancer preventive activities.

  6. Discriminating between benign and malignant breast tumors using 3D convolutional neural network in dynamic contrast enhanced-MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Li, Lihua

    2017-03-01

    Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are the state-of-the-art deep learning network architectures that can be used in a range of applications, including computer vision and medical image analysis. It exhibits a powerful representation learning mechanism with an automated design to learn features directly from the data. However, the common 2D CNNs only use the two dimension spatial information without evaluating the correlation between the adjoin slices. In this study, we established a method of 3D CNNs to discriminate between malignant and benign breast tumors. To this end, 143 patients were enrolled which include 66 benign and 77 malignant instances. The MRI images were pre-processed for noise reduction and breast tumor region segmentation. Data augmentation by spatial translating, rotating and vertical and horizontal flipping is applied to the cases to reduce possible over-fitting. A region-of-interest (ROI) and a volume-of-interest (VOI) were segmented in 2D and 3D DCE-MRI, respectively. The enhancement ratio for each MR series was calculated for the 2D and 3D images. The results for the enhancement ratio images in the two series are integrated for classification. The results of the area under the ROC curve(AUC) values are 0.739 and 0.801 for 2D and 3D methods, respectively. The results for 3D CNN which combined 5 slices for each enhancement ratio images achieved a high accuracy(Acc), sensitivity(Sens) and specificity(Spec) of 0.781, 0.744 and 0.823, respectively. This study indicates that 3D CNN deep learning methods can be a promising technology for breast tumor classification without manual feature extraction.

  7. Three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound score and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging score in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis: Correlation with biological factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Wan-Ru, E-mail: jiawanru@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chai, Wei-Min, E-mail: chai_weimin@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Tang, Lei, E-mail: jessietang1003@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Yi, E-mail: xiatian.0602@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Fei, Xiao-Chun, E-mail: xcf0222@163.com [Department of Pathology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Han, Bao-San, E-mail: hanbaosan@126.com [Department of Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Man, E-mail: lucyjia1370@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound (3D-CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) score systems in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis by comparing their diagnostic efficacy and correlation with biological factors. Methods: 3D-CEUS was performed in 183 patients with breast tumors by Esaote Mylab90 with SonoVue (Bracco, Italy), DCE-MRI was performed on a dedicated breast magnetic resonance imaging (DBMRI) system (Aurora Dedicated Breast MRI Systems, USA) with a dedicated breast coil. 3D-CEUS and DCE-MRI score systems were created based on tumor perfusion and vascular characteristics. Microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) expression were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pathological results showed 35 benign and 148 malignant breast tumors. MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.76), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.55), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.39) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.41) expression were all significantly different between benignity and malignancy. Regarding 3D-CEUS 4 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 85.1%, 94.3% and 86.9%, respectively, and correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.50) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.66). Taking DCE-MRI 5 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.5%, 94.3% and 88.0%, respectively and also correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.52), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.44), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.42) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.35). Conclusions: 3D-CEUS score system displays inspiring diagnostic performance and good agreement with DCE-MRI scoring. Moreover, both score systems correlate well with MVD, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and thus have great potentials in tumor angiogenesis evaluation.

  8. VA National Bed Control System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA National Bed Control System records the levels of operating, unavailable and authorized beds at each VAMC, and it tracks requests for changes in these levels....

  9. Preoperative diagnosis of tumors of the head and neck with CT and MIR-imaging. A comparison of techniques with special reference to a dynamic FLASH-2D-sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeurer, J.; Vogl, T.J.; Steinkamp, H.J.; Tykocinski, M.; Helwig, A.

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with clinically confirmed head and neck tumors were examined by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The results of CT, dynamic FLASH-2D-sequence and a Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted sequence were analysed and compared with surgical and pathological findings. The extent of tumors was clearly defined by the dynamic technique in 21 cases. Furthermore it was superior for the purposes of demonstrating contrast behavior and concerning T-classification. Diagnostic findings of CT correlated in 79% with N-classification, while MRI provides exact information in 72%. (orig.) [de

  10. Geomechanics of bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serata, S.; Milnor, S.W.

    1979-01-01

    Creep data from the literature search is reinterpreted by SGI, resulting in a better understanding of the temperature and stress state dependence of the octahedral creep rate and the octahedral shear strength. The concept of a transition strength between the elastic and the plastic states is in agreement with the data. The elastic and rheological properties of salt are described, and a set of constitutive equations is presented. The dependence of material properties on parameters such as temperature is considered. Findings on the permeability of salt are summarized, and the in-situ behavior of openings in bedded salt is described based on extensive engineering experience. A stress measuring system utilizing a finite element computer code is discussed. Geological factors affecting the stability of salt openings are considered, and the Stress Control Technique for designing stable openings in bedded salt formations is explained

  11. Technical innovation in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal tumors: an MR angiographic sequence using a sparse k-space sampling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, Laura M; Mugera, Charles; Soldatos, Theodoros; Flammang, Aaron; del Grande, Filippo

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the clinical use of an MR angiography sequence performed with sparse k-space sampling (MRA), as a method for dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, and apply it to the assessment of sarcomas for treatment response. Three subjects with sarcomas (2 with osteosarcoma, 1 with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas) underwent MRI after neoadjuvant therapy/prior to surgery, with conventional MRI (T1-weighted, fluid-sensitive, static post-contrast T1-weighted sequences) and DCE-MRI (MRA, time resolution = 7-10 s, TR/TE 2.4/0.9 ms, FOV 40 cm(2)). Images were reviewed by two observers in consensus who recorded image quality (1 = diagnostic, no significant artifacts, 2 = diagnostic, 75 % with good response, >75 % with poor response). DCE-MRI findings were concordant with histological response (arterial enhancement with poor response, no arterial enhancement with good response). Unlike conventional DCE-MRI sequences, an MRA sequence with sparse k-space sampling is easily integrated into a routine musculoskeletal tumor MRI protocol, with high diagnostic quality. In this preliminary work, tumor enhancement characteristics by DCE-MRI were used to assess treatment response.

  12. Technical innovation in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal tumors: an MR angiographic sequence using a sparse k-space sampling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Laura M.; Mugera, Charles; Grande, Filippo del; Soldatos, Theodoros; Flammang, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the clinical use of an MR angiography sequence performed with sparse k-space sampling (MRA), as a method for dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, and apply it to the assessment of sarcomas for treatment response. Three subjects with sarcomas (2 with osteosarcoma, 1 with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas) underwent MRI after neoadjuvant therapy/prior to surgery, with conventional MRI (T1-weighted, fluid-sensitive, static post-contrast T1-weighted sequences) and DCE-MRI (MRA, time resolution = 7-10 s, TR/TE 2.4/0.9 ms, FOV 40 cm 2 ). Images were reviewed by two observers in consensus who recorded image quality (1 = diagnostic, no significant artifacts, 2 = diagnostic, 75 % with good response, >75 % with poor response). DCE-MRI findings were concordant with histological response (arterial enhancement with poor response, no arterial enhancement with good response). Unlike conventional DCE-MRI sequences, an MRA sequence with sparse k-space sampling is easily integrated into a routine musculoskeletal tumor MRI protocol, with high diagnostic quality. In this preliminary work, tumor enhancement characteristics by DCE-MRI were used to assess treatment response. (orig.)

  13. Tumor Delineation and Quantitative Assessment of Glucose Metabolic Rate within Histologic Subtypes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by Using Dynamic18F Fluorodeoxyglucose PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Tineke W H; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Visser, Eric P; Oyen, Wim J G; Looijen-Salamon, Monika G; Visvikis, Dimitris; Verhagen, Ad F T M; Bussink, Johan; Vriens, Dennis

    2017-05-01

    Purpose To assess whether dynamic fluorine 18 ( 18 F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has added value over static 18 F-FDG PET for tumor delineation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) radiation therapy planning by using pathology volumes as the reference standard and to compare pharmacokinetic rate constants of 18 F-FDG metabolism, including regional variation, between NSCLC histologic subtypes. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the institutional review board. Patients gave written informed consent. In this prospective observational study, 1-hour dynamic 18 F-FDG PET/computed tomographic examinations were performed in 35 patients (36 resectable NSCLCs) between 2009 and 2014. Static and parametric images of glucose metabolic rate were obtained to determine lesion volumes by using three delineation strategies. Pathology volume was calculated from three orthogonal dimensions (n = 32). Whole tumor and regional rate constants and blood volume fraction (V B ) were computed by using compartment modeling. Results Pathology volumes were larger than PET volumes (median difference, 8.7-25.2 cm 3 ; Wilcoxon signed rank test, P metabolic rate and 18 F-FDG phosphorylation rate were higher in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) than in adenocarcinoma (AC), whereas V B was lower (Mann-Whitney U test or t test, P = .003, P = .036, and P = .019, respectively). Glucose metabolic rate, 18 F-FDG phosphorylation rate, and V B were less heterogeneous in AC than in SCC (Friedman analysis of variance). Conclusion Parametric images are not superior to static images for NSCLC delineation. FLAB-based segmentation on static 18 F-FDG PET images is in best agreement with pathology volume and could be useful for NSCLC autocontouring. Differences in glycolytic rate and V B between SCC and AC are relevant for research in targeting agents and radiation therapy dose escalation. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  14. Dynamics of fever and serum levels of tumor necrosis factor are closely associated during clinical paroxysms in Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaweera, N D; Grau, G E; Gamage, P; Carter, R; Mendis, K N

    1992-01-01

    Paroxysms are sharp episodes of high fever accompanied by chills and rigors that occur periodically, once in every 48 hr in Plasmodium vivax infections. We have measured the changing levels of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF) during paroxysms in non-immune patients infected with P. vivax malaria. The changes in TNF levels closely paralleled the rise and fall in temperature during the paroxysms but tended to precede them by 30-60 min. These observations suggest that the rise and fall in temperature during P. vivax paroxysm may be directly related to the periodic changes in TNF levels induced during these infections. The peak TNF levels reached during P. vivax infections were much higher than even those which have been recorded during severe and fatal P. falciparum infections in which TNF has been postulated to contribute to the severe manifestations of this disease. Images PMID:1565611

  15. Results of surgical treatment of glomus tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubilay Ersin Turkmen

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Glomus tumors are often diagnosed by their characteristic clinical symptoms; pain, tenderness and cold intolerance. Given the considerably delayed time to diagnosis, glomus tumors should be taken into consideration in the presence of severe finger tip pain of unknown origin. These patients are usually operated for other reasons because of difficulties in diagnosis. After the exploration of the tumors on nail bed, was repaired properly observed. [Hand Microsurg 2014; 3(3.000: 66-69

  16. Understanding and predicting bed humidity in fluidized bed granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinhui; Cunningham, John; Winstead, Denita

    2008-04-01

    Bed humidity is a critical parameter that needs to be controlled in a fluidized bed granulation to ensure reliability. To predict and control the bed humidity during the fluidized bed granulation process, a simple model based on the mass conservation of moisture was developed. The moisture mass balance model quantitatively simulates the effects of spray rate, binder solution concentration, airflow rate, inlet air temperature, and dew point on the bed humidity. The model was validated by a series of granulations performed in different scale granulators including Glatt GPCG-1, GPCG-15, and GPCG-60. Good agreement was observed between the theoretical prediction and the measured loss on drying (LOD). The model developed in the current work enables us to choose the appropriate parameters for the fluidized bed granulation and can be used as a valuable tool in process scaling-up. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  17. Intraluminal filling defects of the bile ducts: differentiation of stones from tumors-the value of magnetic resonance cholangiography in conjunction with a 3D spoiled gradient echo gadolinium enhanced dynamic sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Suk; Kim, Chang Won [Busan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-05-15

    We wanted to determinate the value of a dynamic volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) as a supplement to MR cholangiography for differentiating biliary stones from tumors when patient are suspected of having intraluminal filling defects on direct cholangiography. A retrospective analysis was performed for 49 patients who underwent MRI among all the patients who showed intraluminal filling defects on direct cholangiography for evaluating the cause of their jaundice from June 2002 to June 2003. After dividing these patients into two groups; i.e., the group with stones and the group wth tumors, we analyzed and compared each MR patterns of 1) signal intensity, 2) shape, and 3) enhancement. High signal intensity on T1-weighted images ({rho} < 0.001, X{sup 2} test), dark signal intensity on T2-weighted images ({rho} < 0.01, Fisher' s exact test) or smooth contour of intraluminal filling defects ({rho} < 0.001, X{sup 2} test) could be significantly suggestive findings of stone rather than a tumor mass. Dynamic VIBE is the most specific sequence for differentiating non-enhancing stone from an enhancing mass ({rho} < 0.001, Fisher' s exact test). We showed that MR cholangiography, when added to the dynamic VIBE sequences, could be an important imaging technique for patients who are suspected of having intraluminal filling defects on direct cholangiography to differentiate stones from tumors. Especially, the addition of dynamic VIBE images can provide the increased level of confidence in the diagnosis.

  18. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  19. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  20. Particle bed reactor modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  1. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Microenvironment Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and 18F-Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in Neck Nodal Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Jacobus; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Wang Ya

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess noninvasively the tumor microenvironment of neck nodal metastases in patients with head-and-neck cancer by investigating the relationship between tumor perfusion measured using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and hypoxia measured by 18 F-fluoromisonidazole ( 18 F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: Thirteen newly diagnosed head-and-neck cancer patients with metastatic neck nodes underwent DCE-MRI and 18 F-FMISO PET imaging before chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The matched regions of interests from both modalities were analyzed. To examine the correlations between DCE-MRI parameters and standard uptake value (SUV) measurements from 18 F-FMISO PET, the nonparametric Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated. Furthermore, DCE-MRI parameters were compared between nodes with 18 F-FMISO uptake and nodes with no 18 F-FMISO uptake using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: For the 13 patients, a total of 18 nodes were analyzed. The nodal size strongly correlated with the 18 F-FMISO SUV (ρ = 0.74, p ep (redistribution rate constant) value (ρ = -0.58, p = 0.042) and the 18 F-FMISO SUV. Hypoxic nodes (moderate to severe 18 F-FMISO uptake) had significantly lower median K trans (volume transfer constant) (p = 0.049) and median k ep (p = 0.027) values than did nonhypoxic nodes (no 18 F-FMISO uptake). Conclusion: This initial evaluation of the preliminary results support the hypothesis that in metastatic neck lymph nodes, hypoxic nodes are poorly perfused (i.e., have significantly lower K trans and k ep values) compared with nonhypoxic nodes.

  2. Tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.; Ihan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regiments. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tumor vaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which immune tolerance exists. That is why the population of tumor-specific lymphocytes is represented by a small number of low-affinity T-lymphocytes that induce weak antitumor immune response. Simultaneously, tumors evolve many mechanisms to actively evade immune system, what makes them poorly immunogenic or even tolerogenic. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies are directed toward breaking immune tolerance to tumor antigens, enhancing immunogenicity of tumor vaccines and overcoming mechanisms of tumor escape. There are several approaches, unfortunately, all of them still far away from an ideal tumor vaccine that would reject a tumor. Difficulties in the activation of antitumor immune response by tumor vaccines have led to the development of alternative immunotherapeutic strategies that directly focus on effector mechanisms of immune system (adoptive tumor- specific T-lymphocyte transfer and tumor specific monoclonal antibodies). (author)

  3. Real-time dynamic MR image reconstruction using compressed sensing and principal component analysis (CS-PCA): Demonstration in lung tumor tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Bryson; Yip, Eugene; Yun, Jihyun; Fallone, B Gino; Wachowicz, Keith

    2017-08-01

    This work presents a real-time dynamic image reconstruction technique, which combines compressed sensing and principal component analysis (CS-PCA), to achieve real-time adaptive radiotherapy with the use of a linac-magnetic resonance imaging system. Six retrospective fully sampled dynamic data sets of patients diagnosed with non-small-cell lung cancer were used to investigate the CS-PCA algorithm. Using a database of fully sampled k-space, principal components (PC's) were calculated to aid in the reconstruction of undersampled images. Missing k-space data were calculated by projecting the current undersampled k-space data onto the PC's to generate the corresponding PC weights. The weighted PC's were summed together, and the missing k-space was iteratively updated. To gain insight into how the reconstruction might proceed at lower fields, 6× noise was added to the 3T data to investigate how the algorithm handles noisy data. Acceleration factors ranging from 2 to 10× were investigated using CS-PCA and Split Bregman CS for comparison. Metrics to determine the reconstruction quality included the normalized mean square error (NMSE), as well as the dice coefficients (DC) and centroid displacement of the tumor segmentations. Our results demonstrate that CS-PCA performed superior than CS alone. The CS-PCA patient averaged DC for 3T and 6× noise added data remained above 0.9 for acceleration factors up to 10×. The patient averaged NMSE gradually increased with increasing acceleration; however, it remained below 0.06 up to an acceleration factor of 10× for both 3T and 6× noise added data. The CS-PCA reconstruction speed ranged from 5 to 20 ms (Intel i7-4710HQ CPU @ 2.5 GHz), depending on the chosen parameters. A real-time reconstruction technique was developed for adaptive radiotherapy using a Linac-MRI system. Our CS-PCA algorithm can achieve tumor contours with DC greater than 0.9 and NMSE less than 0.06 at acceleration factors of up to, and including, 10×. The

  4. Variability of Bed Drag on Cohesive Beds under Wave Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilgar Safak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law, a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10 - 4 m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  5. Prediction of bed level variations in nonuniform sediment bed channel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B R Andharia

    2018-04-12

    Apr 12, 2018 ... have been undertaken for measurements of bed and water levels in an aggrading channel due to overloading of nonuniform sediments ..... 2.4 Thickness of active bed layer. The mixing zone of sediment remaining in contact with the flow is referred as active layer (ABL). The thickness and particle size ...

  6. Variability of bed drag on cohesive beds under wave action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Ilgar

    2016-01-01

    Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law), a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10 -4">−4 m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold) with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  7. Dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging: II. Task-oriented statistical estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    In the context of oncology, dynamic PET imaging coupled with standard graphical linear analysis has been previously employed to enable quantitative estimation of tracer kinetic parameters of physiological interest at the voxel level, thus, enabling quantitative PET parametric imaging. However, dynamic PET acquisition protocols have been confined to the limited axial field-of-view (~15–20cm) of a single bed position and have not been translated to the whole-body clinical imaging domain. On the contrary, standardized uptake value (SUV) PET imaging, considered as the routine approach in clinical oncology, commonly involves multi-bed acquisitions, but is performed statically, thus not allowing for dynamic tracking of the tracer distribution. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. In a companion study, we presented a novel clinically feasible dynamic (4D) multi-bed PET acquisition protocol as well as the concept of whole body PET parametric imaging employing Patlak ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to estimate the quantitative parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V. In the present study, we propose an advanced hybrid linear regression framework, driven by Patlak kinetic voxel correlations, to achieve superior trade-off between contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean squared error (MSE) than provided by OLS for the final Ki parametric images, enabling task-based performance optimization. Overall, whether the observer's task is to detect a tumor or quantitatively assess treatment response, the proposed statistical estimation framework can be adapted to satisfy the specific task performance criteria, by adjusting the Patlak correlation-coefficient (WR) reference value. The multi-bed dynamic acquisition protocol, as optimized in the preceding companion study

  8. DNA-induced inter-particle cross-linking during expanded bed adsorption chromatography - Impact on future support design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theodossiou, Irini; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of adsorbent size, ionic capacity and surface immobilised polymers on dynamic capacity and changes occurring to beds of anion-exchangers during the binding of DNA. During application of low concentrations of "3-20 kilobase" calf thymus DNA feeds to expanded beds...... of anion-exchangers, the bed heights dropped progressively as DNA molecules physically cross-linked neighbouring adsorbent particles together, to form severely aggregated fluidised beds. In plots of dynamic binding capacities and absolute changes in bed porosity at maximum contraction, against the inverse...

  9. Dual turn-on fluorescence signal-based controlled release system for real-time monitoring of drug release dynamics in living cells and tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiuqi; Dong, Baoli; Song, Xuezhen; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Nan; Lin, Weiying

    2018-01-01

    Controlled release systems with capabilities for direct and real-time monitoring of the release and dynamics of drugs in living systems are of great value for cancer chemotherapy. Herein, we describe a novel dual turn-on fluorescence signal-based controlled release system ( CDox ), in which the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin ( Dox ) and the fluorescent dye ( CH ) are conjugated by a hydrazone moiety, a pH-responsive cleavable linker. CDox itself shows nearly no fluorescence as the fluorescence of CH and Dox is essentially quenched by the C=N isomerization and N-N free rotation. However, when activated under acidic conditions, CDox could be hydrolyzed to afford Dox and CH , resulting in dual turn-on signals with emission peaks at 595 nm and 488 nm, respectively. Notably, CDox exhibits a desirable controlled release feature as the hydrolysis rate is limited by the steric hindrance effect from both the Dox and CH moieties. Cytotoxicity assays indicate that CDox shows much lower cytotoxicity relative to Dox , and displays higher cell inhibition rate to cancer than normal cells. With the aid of the dual turn-on fluorescence at different wavelengths, the drug release dynamics of CDox in living HepG2 and 4T-1 cells was monitored in double channels in a real-time fashion. Importantly, two-photon fluorescence imaging of CDox in living tumor tissues was also successfully performed by high-definition 3D imaging. We expect that the unique controlled release system illustrated herein could provide a powerful means to investigate modes of action of drugs, which is critical for development of much more robust and effective chemotherapy drugs.

  10. Probabilistic estimation of entrainment rate in coarse sediment beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottacin-Busolin, Andrea; Tregnaghi, Matteo; Cecchetto, Martina; Marion, Andrea; Tait, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Many problems in river and coastal engineering depend on sediment transport dynamics induced by turbulent flows over sediment beds. Given the chaotic nature of turbulence and the complex mechanics of granular beds, grain-scale interactions between fluid and sediment are better described using stochastic approaches. A probabilistic model is presented linking entrainment rate to the stochastic properties of the near-bed fluid velocity and the probability distribution of particle elevation. By using a simplified description of the mechanics of grain dislodgement, the distribution of particle waiting time is derived, which is linked to the entrainment rate. The predictive capability of the model and the associated uncertainty are analysed using near-bed flow field and grain motion data obtained from flume experiments at low transport stages. The model predictions are found to be in good agreement with the data. Experimental evidence of distinct entrainment mechanisms is discussed, and flow patterns are identified that cause significant fluctuations in the entrainment rate.

  11. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  12. Mammary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Mammary neoplasia is one of the more common malignancies affecting domestic species. Despite their importance, they are often over- diagnosed, undertreated and subject to several misconceptions propagated by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Mammary neoplasia is the most frequent tumor type encountered in the female accounting for almost half of all malignancies reported. The canine has the highest incidence of mammary tumors of all domestic species. In the dog, about 65 percent of mammary tumors are benign mixed tumors, and 25 percent are carcinomas. The rest are adenomas, myoepitheliomas, and malignant mixed tumors. The age distribution of mammary tumors closely follows the age distribution of most tumors in the dog. Mammary tumors are rare in dogs 2 years old, but incidence begins to increase sharply at approximately 6 years of age. Median age at diagnosis is about 10 years. No breed predilection has been consistently reported

  13. Effectiveness of Bed Bug Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before EPA allows a bed bug claim on a label, the product must be supported by data showing it will kill bed bugs when applied according to the label. Also consider factors such as extent of infestation, site preparation, and insect life stages.

  14. Turning patients over in bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000426.htm Turning patients over in bed To use the sharing features on this page, ... Patient The following steps should be followed when turning a patient: If you can, raise the bed to a level that reduces back strain for ...

  15. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  16. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  18. Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-31

    During the fourth quarter of 1990, steady-state performance testing at the Nucla Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) resumed under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. Co-sponsorship of the Demonstration Test Program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was completed on June 15, 1990. From October through December, 1990, Colorado-Ute Electric Association (CUEA) completed a total of 23 steady-state performance tests, 4 dynamic tests, and set operating records during November and December as the result of improved unit operating reliability. Highlight events and achievements during this period of operation are presented.

  19. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  20. Orbital lymphoid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroko; Ueno, Hisayuki

    1994-01-01

    We examined 13 cases of orbital lymphoid tumors (OLT) and 1 of orbital hemangioma (OH), using dynamic MRI, to determine the biological behavior of the tumors before surgery. We measured time-dependent changes in the contrast enhancement of tumors and described time intensity curves (TIC), dividing the cases into 3 architectural types: completes septum (CS), incomplete septum (IS), and diffuse types. The TICs of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH, 2 cases) of CS type and idiopathic orbital inflamation (1), RLH (5) of IS type, atypical lymphoid hyperplasia (4), and malignant lymphoma (1) and OH (1) showed rapid increase with low peak and gradual decrease, rapid increase with high peak and gradual decrease, rapid increase and plateau, and gradual increase type, respectively. In order words, OLT showed various TIC, roughly correlating with pathological findings. These results indicate that dynamic MRI may be useful in the preoperative clinical diagnosis of OLT. (author)

  1. Torsion testing of bed joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klavs Feilberg; Pedersen, Carsten Mørk

    2008-01-01

    be carried out directly in a normal testing machine. The torsion strength is believed to be the most important parameter in out-of-plane resistance of masonry walls subjected to bending about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints. The paper also contains a few test results from bending of small walls about...... an axis perpendicular to the bed joints, which indicate the close connection between these results and results from torsion tests. These characteristics make the torsion strength well suited to act as substitute parameter for the bending strength of masonry about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints....

  2. An examination of flame shape related to convection heat transfer in deep-fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara M. Yedinak; Jack D. Cohen; Jason M. Forthofer; Mark A. Finney

    2010-01-01

    Fire spread through a fuel bed produces an observable curved combustion interface. This shape has been schematically represented largely without consideration for fire spread processes. The shape and dynamics of the flame profile within the fuel bed likely reflect the mechanisms of heat transfer necessary for the pre-heating and ignition of the fuel during fire spread....

  3. Gas-particle interactions in dense gas-fluidised beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of heterogeneous flow structures in gas-particle flows seriously affects gas¿solid contacting and transport processes in dense gas-fluidized beds. A computational study, using a discrete particle method based on Molecular Dynamics techniques, has been carried out to explore the

  4. Packed Bed Reactor Technology for Chemical-Looping Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, S.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has emerged as an alternative for conventional power production processes to intrinsically integrate power production and CO2 capture. In this work a new reactor concept for CLC is proposed, based on dynamically operated packed bed reactors. With analytical

  5. Interaction of slurry pipe flow with a stationary bed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Václav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 6 (2007), s. 365-372 ISSN 0038-223X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/06/0428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : sheet flow * particle dispersion * suspension * concentration profile * bed shear stress Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.108, year: 2007

  6. On equivalent roughness of mobile bed at high shear stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Václav; Krupička, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2009), s. 191-199 ISSN 0042-790X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/06/0428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : bed shear * experiment * hydraulic transport * sediment transport Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2009

  7. Theoretical Benefits of Dynamic Collimation in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy for Brain Tumors: Dosimetric and Radiobiological Metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moignier, Alexandra; Gelover, Edgar; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake; Flynn, Ryan; Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Solberg, Timothy; Lin, Alexander; Hyer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric benefit of using a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for penumbra reduction during the treatment of brain tumors by pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBS PT). Methods and Materials: Collimated and uncollimated brain treatment plans were created for 5 patients previously treated with PBS PT and retrospectively enrolled in an institutional review board–approved study. The in-house treatment planning system, RDX, was used to generate the plans because it is capable of modeling both collimated and uncollimated beamlets. The clinically delivered plans were reproduced with uncollimated plans in terms of target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing to ensure a clinically relevant starting point, and collimated plans were generated to improve the OAR sparing while maintaining target coverage. Physical and biological comparison metrics, such as dose distribution conformity, mean and maximum doses, normal tissue complication probability, and risk of secondary brain cancer, were used to evaluate the plans. Results: The DCS systematically improved the dose distribution conformity while preserving the target coverage. The average reduction of the mean dose to the 10-mm ring surrounding the target and the healthy brain were 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.6%-15.7%; P<.0001) and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001), respectively. This yielded an average reduction of 24.8% (95% CI 0.8%-48.8%; P<.05) for the brain necrosis normal tissue complication probability using the Flickinger model, and 25.1% (95% CI 16.8%-33.4%; P<.001) for the risk of secondary brain cancer. A general improvement of the OAR sparing was also observed. Conclusion: The lateral penumbra reduction afforded by the DCS increases the normal tissue sparing capabilities of PBS PT for brain cancer treatment while preserving target coverage.

  8. Eddy dynamics in the Southern Ocean: How does the interaction of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current with sea-bed topography influence the surface mixed layer and hence the carbon-climate feedback processes?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kobo, N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocean: How does the interaction of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current with sea-bed topography infl uence the surface mixed layer and hence the carbon-climate feedback processes N KOBO, S HERBETTE, PMS MONTEIRO AND C REASON CSIR Natural Resources... encounters topography the generation of mesoscale features (such as eddies) can result. These mesoscale features influence water mass formation, meridional heat transport and carbon dioxide uptake[2]. This project investigates the how. METHODS...

  9. Bed Bugs: The Australian Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Russell

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Australia has experienced a sudden and unexpected resurgence in bed bug infestations from both Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus F. A survey in 2006 revealed that infestations had increased across the nation by an average of 4,500% since the start of the decade. In response, a multi-disciplinary approach to combat the rise of this public health pest was implemented and involved the coordinated efforts of several organizations. The key components of the strategy included the introduction of a pest management standard ‘A Code of Practice for the Control of Bed Bug Infestations in Australia’ that defines and promotes ‘best practice’ in bed bug eradication, the development of a policy and procedural guide for accommodation providers, education of stakeholders in best management practices, and research. These strategies continue to evolve with developments that lead to improvements in ‘best practice’ while bed bugs remain problematic in Australia.

  10. Getting Rid of Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control is very important whether you are considering hiring a professional or planning to do it yourself. Controlling bed ... control methods, as others may cause serious harm. Hiring a pest management professional is a good option in many cases, but ...

  11. Sea bed mapping and inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The conference has 24 presentations on the topics: Sea bed mapping, inspection, positioning, hydrography, marine archaeology, remote operation vehicles and computerized simulation technologies, oil field activities and plans, technological experiences and problems. (tk)

  12. Tumor vaccines:

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Mojca; Ihan, Alojz

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regirrcents. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tccmor aaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which imrrtune tol...

  13. Operating characteristics of rotating beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyvani, M.; Gardner, N.C.

    1988-01-01

    Vapor-liquid contacting in high gravitational fields offers prospects for significant reductions in the physical size, capital, and operating costs of packed towers. Pressure drops, power requirements, mass transfer coefficients and liquid residence time distributions are reported for a rotating bed separator. The beds studied were rigid, foamed aluminum, with specific surface areas ranging from 650 to 3000 m{sup 2}/m{sup 2}. Gravitational fields were varied from 50 to 300g.

  14. The usefulness of dynamic O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine PET in the clinical evaluation of brain tumors in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunkl, Veronika; Cleff, Corvin; Stoffels, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Experience regarding O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET in children and adolescents with brain tumors is limited. METHODS: Sixty-nine (18)F-FET PET scans of 48 children and adolescents (median age, 13 y; range, 1-18 y) were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-six scans...... to assess newly diagnosed cerebral lesions, 24 scans for diagnosing tumor progression or recurrence, 8 scans for monitoring of chemotherapy effects, and 11 scans for the detection of residual tumor after resection were obtained. Maximum and mean tumor-to-brain ratios (TBRs) were determined at 20-40 min...... decision making in pediatric brain tumor patients....

  15. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  16. Tumoral tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    Direct tumor tracers are subdivided in the following categories:metabolite tracers, antitumoral tracers, radioactive proteins and cations. Use of 67 Ga-citrate as a clinically important tumoral tracer is emphasized and gallium-67 whole-body scintigraphy is discussed in detail. (M.A.) [pt

  17. Carcinoid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spread to other parts of the body. Doctors don't know what causes the mutations that can lead to carcinoid tumors. But they know that carcinoid tumors develop in neuroendocrine cells. Neuroendocrine cells are found in various organs throughout the body. They perform some nerve cell ...

  18. CFD Flow and Heat Transfer Simulation for Empty and Packed Fixed Bed Reactor in Catalytic Cracking of Naphtha

    OpenAIRE

    D. Salari; A. Niaei; P. Chitsaz Yazdi; M. Derakhshani; S. R. Nabavi

    2007-01-01

    This work aims to test the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to fixed bed catalytic cracking reactors. Studies of CFD with a fixed bed design commonly use a regular packing with N=2 to define bed geometry. CFD allows us to obtain a more accurate view of the fluid flow and heat transfer mechanisms present in fixed bed equipment. Naphtha was used as feedstock and the reactor length was 80cm. It is divided in three sections that catalyst bed packed in the middle section ...

  19. Animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    There are few trained veterinary radiation oncologists and the expense of facilities has limited the extent to which this modality is used. In recent years, a few cobalt teletherapy units and megavoltage x-ray units have been employed in larger veterinary institutions. In addition, some radiation oncologists of human medical institutions are interested and willing to cooperate with veterinarians in the treatment of animal tumors. Carefully designed studies of the response of animal tumors to new modalities serve two valuable purposes. First, these studies may lead to improved tumor control in companion animals. Second, these studies may have important implications to the improvement of therapy of human tumors. Much remains to be learned of animal tumor biology so that appropriate model systems can be described for such studies. Many of the latter studies can be sponsored by agencies interested in the improvement of cancer management

  20. Particle motion in fluidised beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, M.G.

    1999-07-01

    Gas fluidised beds are important components in many process industries, e.g. coal combustors and granulators, but not much is known about the movement of the solids. Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) enables the movement of a single, radioactive tracer particle to be followed rapidly and faithfully. Experiments were carried out in columns sized between 70 and 240mm. diameter, operating in the bubbling regime at ambient process conditions using particles of group B and D (Geldart Classification). Particle motion was tracked and the data applied to models for particle movement at the gas distributor as well as close to other surfaces and to models for particle circulation in beds of cohesive particles. In the light of these data, models for particle and bubble interaction, particle circulation, segregation, attrition, erosion, heat transfer and fluidised bed scale-up rules were reassessed. Particle motion is directly caused by bubble motion, and their velocities were found to be equal for particles travelling in a bubble. PEPT enables particle circulation to be measured, giving a more accurate correlation for future predictions. Particle motion follows the scale-up rules based on similarities of the bubble motion in the bed. A new group of parameters was identified controlling the amount of attrition in fluidised beds and a new model to predict attrition is proposed. (author)

  1. Clinical physiology of bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Maintenance of optimal health in humans requires the proper balance between exercise, rest, and sleep as well as time in the upright position. About one-third of a lifetime is spent sleeping; and it is no coincidence that sleeping is performed in the horizontal position, the position in which gravitational influence on the body is minimal. Although enforced bed rest is necessary for the treatment of some ailments, in some cases it has probably been used unwisely. In addition to the lower hydrostatic pressure with the normally dependent regions of the cardiovascular system, body fuid compartments during bed rest in the horizontal body position, and virtual elimination of compression on the long bones of the skeletal system during bed rest (hypogravia), there is often reduction in energy metabolism due to the relative confinement (hypodynamia) and alteration of ambulatory circadian variations in metabolism, body temperature, and many hormonal systems. If patients are also moved to unfamiliar surroundings, they probably experience some feelings of anxiety and some sociopsychological problems. Adaptive physiological responses during bed rest are normal for that environment. They are attempts by the body to reduce unnecessary energy expenditure, to optimize its function, and to enhance its survival potential. Many of the deconditioning responses begin within the first day or two of bed rest; these early responses have prompted physicians to insist upon early resumption of the upright posture and ambulation of bedridden patients.

  2. Pathologic Validation of a Model Based on Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Tumor Delineation in the Prostate Peripheral Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenendaal, Greetje, E-mail: G.Groenendaal-2@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Borren, Alie; Moman, Maaike R. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Monninkhof, Evelyn [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Diest, Paul J. van [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Vulpen, Marco van; Heide, Uulke A. van der [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: For focal boost strategies in the prostate, the robustness of magnetic resonance imaging-based tumor delineations needs to be improved. To this end we developed a statistical model that predicts tumor presence on a voxel level (2.5 Multiplication-Sign 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 2.5 mm3) inside the peripheral zone. Furthermore, we show how this model can be used to derive a valuable input for radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The model was created on 87 radiotherapy patients. For the validation of the voxelwise performance of the model, an independent group of 12 prostatectomy patients was used. After model validation, the model was stratified to create three different risk levels for tumor presence: gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (CTV), and low-risk CTV. Results: The model gave an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.70 for the prediction of tumor presence in the prostatectomy group. When the registration error between magnetic resonance images and pathologic delineation was taken into account, the area under the curve further improved to 0.89. We propose that model outcome values with a high positive predictive value can be used to define the GTV. Model outcome values with a high negative predictive value can be used to define low-risk CTV regions. The intermediate outcome values can be used to define a high-risk CTV. Conclusions: We developed a logistic regression with a high diagnostic performance for voxelwise prediction of tumor presence. The model output can be used to define different risk levels for tumor presence, which in turn could serve as an input for dose planning. In this way the robustness of tumor delineations for focal boost therapy can be greatly improved.

  3. Pathologic validation of a model based on diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for tumor delineation in the prostate peripheral zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendaal, Greetje; Borren, Alie; Moman, Maaike R; Monninkhof, Evelyn; van Diest, Paul J; Philippens, Marielle E P; van Vulpen, Marco; van der Heide, Uulke A

    2012-03-01

    For focal boost strategies in the prostate, the robustness of magnetic resonance imaging-based tumor delineations needs to be improved. To this end we developed a statistical model that predicts tumor presence on a voxel level (2.5×2.5×2.5 mm3) inside the peripheral zone. Furthermore, we show how this model can be used to derive a valuable input for radiotherapy treatment planning. The model was created on 87 radiotherapy patients. For the validation of the voxelwise performance of the model, an independent group of 12 prostatectomy patients was used. After model validation, the model was stratified to create three different risk levels for tumor presence: gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (CTV), and low-risk CTV. The model gave an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.70 for the prediction of tumor presence in the prostatectomy group. When the registration error between magnetic resonance images and pathologic delineation was taken into account, the area under the curve further improved to 0.89. We propose that model outcome values with a high positive predictive value can be used to define the GTV. Model outcome values with a high negative predictive value can be used to define low-risk CTV regions. The intermediate outcome values can be used to define a high-risk CTV. We developed a logistic regression with a high diagnostic performance for voxelwise prediction of tumor presence. The model output can be used to define different risk levels for tumor presence, which in turn could serve as an input for dose planning. In this way the robustness of tumor delineations for focal boost therapy can be greatly improved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A new bed elevation dataset for Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Bamber

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new bed elevation dataset for Greenland derived from a combination of multiple airborne ice thickness surveys undertaken between the 1970s and 2012. Around 420 000 line kilometres of airborne data were used, with roughly 70% of this having been collected since the year 2000, when the last comprehensive compilation was undertaken. The airborne data were combined with satellite-derived elevations for non-glaciated terrain to produce a consistent bed digital elevation model (DEM over the entire island including across the glaciated–ice free boundary. The DEM was extended to the continental margin with the aid of bathymetric data, primarily from a compilation for the Arctic. Ice thickness was determined where an ice shelf exists from a combination of surface elevation and radar soundings. The across-track spacing between flight lines warranted interpolation at 1 km postings for significant sectors of the ice sheet. Grids of ice surface elevation, error estimates for the DEM, ice thickness and data sampling density were also produced alongside a mask of land/ocean/grounded ice/floating ice. Errors in bed elevation range from a minimum of ±10 m to about ±300 m, as a function of distance from an observation and local topographic variability. A comparison with the compilation published in 2001 highlights the improvement in resolution afforded by the new datasets, particularly along the ice sheet margin, where ice velocity is highest and changes in ice dynamics most marked. We estimate that the volume of ice included in our land-ice mask would raise mean sea level by 7.36 m, excluding any solid earth effects that would take place during ice sheet decay.

  5. Intruder Motion in Two-Dimensional Shaken Granular Beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Huan-Ping; Lv Yong-Jun; Zheng Ning; Shi Qing-Fan; Li Liang-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of an intruder immersed in a two-dimensional shaken granular bed is experimentally investigated. With two types of background particles, f−Γ phase diagrams depicting the intruder's motion are measured and compared. It is found that even with the same size and density ratio of the intruder to the background particles, the intruder exhibits a distinct behavior at given vibrational conditions: rising behavior in one granular bed; sinking behavior in another granular bed. We slightly tune the size and density ratio to confirm the reliability of the experimental results. In addition, we examine the influences of interstitial air, convection and the initial position on the intruder's motion, speculating that the opposite motion could be traced to the material properties of the background particles

  6. Particle Bed Reactor scaling relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovik, G.; Araj, K.; Horn, F.L.; Ludewig, H.; Benenati, R.

    1987-01-01

    Scaling relationships for Particle Bed Reactors (PBRs) are discussed. The particular applications are short duration systems, i.e., for propulsion or burst power. Particle Bed Reactors can use a wide selection of different moderators and reflectors and be designed for such a wide range of power and bed power densities. Additional design considerations include the effect of varying the number of fuel elements, outlet Mach number in hot gas channel, etc. All of these variables and options result in a wide range of reactor weights and performance. Extremely light weight reactors (approximately 1 kg/MW) are possible with the appropriate choice of moderator/reflector and power density. Such systems are very attractive for propulsion systems where parasitic weight has to be minimized

  7. Fluidized-bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimmett, E.S.; Kunze, J.F.

    1975-01-01

    A reactor vessel containing a fluidized-bed region of particulate material including both a neutron-moderating and a fertile substance is described. A gas flow including fissile material passes through the vessel at a sufficient rate to fluidize the particulate material and at a sufficient density to support a thermal fission reaction within the fluidized-bed region. The high-temperature portion of a heat transfer system is located within the fluidized-bed region of the reactor vessel in direct contact with the fluidized particles. Heat released by fission is thereby transferred at an enhanced rate to a coolant circulating within the heat transfer system. Fission products are continuously removed from the gas flow and supplemental fissile material added during the reactor operation. (U.S.)

  8. Physiological and Functional Alterations after Spaceflight and Bed Rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Peters, Brian T; Miller, Chris A; Kofman, Igor S; Reschke, Millard F; Taylor, Laura C; Lawrence, Emily L; Wood, Scott J; Laurie, Steven S; Lee, Stuart M C; Buxton, Roxanne E; May-Phillips, Tiffany R; Stenger, Michael B; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L; Ryder, Jeffrey W; Feiveson, Alan H; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2018-04-03

    Exposure to microgravity causes alterations in multiple physiological systems, potentially impacting the ability of astronauts to perform critical mission tasks. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of spaceflight on functional task performance and to identify the key physiological factors contributing to their deficits. A test battery comprised of 7 functional tests and 15 physiological measures was used to investigate the sensorimotor, cardiovascular and neuromuscular adaptations to spaceflight. Astronauts were tested before and after 6-month spaceflights. Subjects were also tested before and after 70 days of 6° head-down bed rest, a spaceflight analog, to examine the role of axial body unloading on the spaceflight results. These subjects included Control and Exercise groups to examine the effects of exercise during bed rest. Spaceflight subjects showed the greatest decrement in performance during functional tasks that required the greatest demand for dynamic control of postural equilibrium which was paralleled by similar decrements in sensorimotor tests that assessed postural and dynamic gait control. Other changes included reduced lower limb muscle performance and increased heart rate to maintain blood pressure. Exercise performed during bed rest prevented detrimental change in neuromuscular and cardiovascular function, however, both bed rest groups experienced functional and balance deficits similar to spaceflight subjects. Bed rest data indicates that body support unloading experienced during spaceflight contributes to postflight postural control dysfunction. Further, the bed rest results in the Exercise group of subjects confirm that resistance and aerobic exercises performed during spaceflight can play an integral role in maintaining neuromuscular and cardiovascular function, which can help in reducing decrements in functional performance. These results indicate that a countermeasure to mitigate postflight postural control dysfunction is

  9. Better backs by better beds?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, Kim; Fabricius, Rasmus N; Bendix, Tom

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A "randomized"/stratified, single-blinded, parallel-group study. OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate 3 structurally different mattresses relative influence on patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In several advertisements, it is proclaimed that certain...... using the probably most relevant "worst case" data. There were no relevant difference between the effects of the water bed and the foam bed. CONCLUSION: The Waterbed and foam mattress' did influence back symptoms, function and sleep more positively as apposed to the hard mattress, but the differences...

  10. MARKETING STRATEGY TO INCREASE BED OCCUPANCY RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwaningsih Purwaningsih

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A hospital is an institution for health care providing treatment by specialized staff and equipment, more often but not always providing for longer-term patient stays. Today, hospitals are very complex institution, not only survive in dynamic environment but also make a profit based on their services. The aimed of this research was to know marketing mix concept (product, price, place, promotion, people, process and provision of customer service in formulating marketing strategy to increased Bed Occupancy Rate of Obstetric Gynecology Ward 2. Method: The population are health care personnel including midwife, midwife associate, administrator and also client or consumer. The variable were product, price, place, promotion, people, process and provision of customer service. Data were collected by using structured questionnaire. Result: The result showed that product (type of services, infrastructure and facility, relative price, comfortable and safe place, targeted promotion, trained human resources, standard process and provision of customer service are an important aspect to implement strategy marketing to increase Bed Occupancy Rate. Analysis: The result of this study has enlightened the importance of strategy marketing in health care services based on seven principle of marketing mix. Discussion: Implementation of marketing mix in obstetric gynecology ward 2 need to be considered.

  11. Tumor Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... only a small number of people will test positive for the disease who do not have it—in other words, it will result in very few false-positive results. Although tumor markers are extremely useful in ...

  12. Tumor Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Review and Funding Outcomes Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring ... may require immediate or more aggressive treatment. The importance of tumor grade in planning treatment and determining ...

  13. Air Distributor Designs for Fluidized Bed Combustors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shukrie

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed combustion (FBC has been recognized as one of the suitable technologies for converting a wide variety of biomass fuels into energy. One of the key factors affecting the successful operation of fluidized bed combustion is its distributor plate design. Therefore, the main purpose of this article is to provide a critical overview of the published studies that are relevant to the characteristics of different fluidized bed air distributor designs. The review of available works display that the type of distributor design significantly affects the operation of the fluidized bed i.e., performance characteristics, fluidization quality, air flow dynamics, solid pattern and mixing caused by the direction of air flow through the distributors. Overall it is observed that high pressure drop across the distributor is one of the major draw backs of the current distributor designs. However, fluidization was stable in a fluidized bed operated at a low perforation ratio distributor due to the pressure drop across the distributor, adequate to provide uniform gas distribution. The swirling motion produced by the inclined injection of gas promotes lateral dispersion and significantly improves fluidization quality. Lastly, the research gaps are highlighted for future improvement consideration on the development of efficient distributor designs.

  14. File list: ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_tumor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_tumor mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary tumor SRX700365,SRX7...00366 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_tumor.bed ...

  15. STUCTURE OF PULSED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Bokun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of pulsed layer is proposed which can be suggested as a state of particulates that is blown by intermittent gas flow with speed which has the force to start material moving. Layer during one cycle is in a suspension, falling down and immobile state resulting in changes of particles arrangement as well as ways of gas flowing through layer. Moreover, it allows carrying out effective interphase heat exchange even adamant real granulation.The process of formation of impact flows is considered aw well as their influence on formation of air bubbles in pulsed layer. At startup of air blast the balance between the force of hydro-dynamic resistance is broken, on one side, and forces of gravity, particles inertia and their links with walls on the other side. The layer is transferred in the state of pulsed pseudo-fluidization, and presents gas-disperse mixture, inside of which impulse of pressure increasing is spreading to all sides as pressure waves (compression. These waves are the sources of impact flows’ formation, the force of which is two times more than during the stationary flow.The waves of pressure are divided into weak and strong ones depending on movement velocity within gas-disperse system. Weak waves are moving with a sound speed and strong ones in active phase of pulsed layer are moving over the speed of sound limit within gas-disperse system. The peculiarity of strong wave is that parameters of system (pressure, density and others are changing in discrete steps.The article describes the regime of layer’s falling down in the passive stage of cycle, which begins after finishing of gas impulse action. And suspension layer of moving up granular material is transferred in the state of falling resulting in change of the layer structure.

  16. Dynamic interaction of /sup 111/indium-labeled monoclonal antibodies with surface antigens of solid tumors visualized in vivo by external scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, K.M.; Keenan, A.M.; Frincke, J.; David, G.; Pearson, J.; Oldham, R.K.; Morgan, A.C. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Two /sup 111/indium-labeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), D3 and 9.2.27, directed to tumor antigens of L-10 hepatocarcinoma and human melanoma, respectively, selectively localized antigen-positive target cells in guinea pigs and nude mice. The fate of MoAb differed in the two antigen-antibody systems after reacting with their corresponding tumor antigens in vivo as reflected by patterns of distribution and turnover in vivo. The 9.2.27 localized in melanoma xenograft in nude mice after intravenous administration with slow loss from tumor but more rapid loss from normal tissues and thus demonstrated optimal imaging of small tumors (approximately equal to 5 mm) between 3 and 6 days after injection of the radiolabeled antibody. In contrast, D3 demonstrated a biphasic localization in guinea pig L-10 hepatocarcinoma with a maximal activity on the 2d day after administration and showed rapid loss from both tumor and normal tissues. Nonspecific localization of antibodies in liver and in kidney was found both in syngeneic (nude mice) and xenogeneic (guinea pig) hosts but was more pronounced in the xenogeneic species. These results indicate that the nature of the antigen-antibody interaction may be of importance in selecting MoAb for both diagnosis and therapy of malignant diseases.

  17. Apparatus and process for controlling fluidized beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmat, Amirali G.; Patel, Jitendra G.

    1985-10-01

    An apparatus and process for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance.

  18. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  19. Coupling Solute and Fine Particle Transport with Sand Bed Morphodynamics within a Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. B.; Ortiz, C. P.; Schumer, R.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Packman, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    Fine suspended particles are typically considered to pass through streams and rivers as wash load without interacting with the bed, however experiments have demonstrated that hyporheic flow causes advective exchange of fine particles with the stream bed, yielding accumulation of fine particle deposits within the bed. Ultimately, understanding river morphodynamics and ecosystem dynamics requires coupling both fine particle and solute transport with bed morphodynamics. To better understand the coupling between these processes we analyze a novel dataset from a controlled field experiment conducted on Clear Run, a 2nd order sand bed stream located within the North Carolina coastal plain. Data include concentrations of continuously injected conservative solutes and fine particulate tracers measured at various depths within the stream bed, overhead time lapse images of bed forms, stream discharge, and geomorphological surveys of the stream. We use image analysis of bed morphodynamics to assess exchange, retention, and remobilization of solutes and fine particles during constant discharge and a short duration experimental flood. From the images, we extract a time series of bedform elevations and scour depths for the duration of the experiment. The high-resolution timeseries of bed elevation enables us to assess coupling of bed morphodynamics with both the solute and fine particle flux during steady state mobile bedforms prior to the flood and to changing bedforms during the flood. These data allow the application of a stochastic modeling framework relating bed elevation fluctuations to fine particle residence times. This combined experimental and modeling approach ultimately informs our ability to predict not only the fate of fine particulate matter but also associated nutrient and carbon dynamics within streams and rivers.

  20. Propagation of a Strong Shock Over a Random Bed of Spherical Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Y. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Neal, C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Salari, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jackson, T. L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Balachandar, S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Thakur, S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-04-11

    Propagation of a strong shock through a bed of particles results in complex wave dynamics such as a reflected shock, a transmitted shock, and highly unsteady flow inside the particle bed. In this paper we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of shock propagation in air over a random bed of particles. We assume the flow is inviscid and governed by the Euler equations of gas dynamics. Simulations are carried out by varying the volume fraction of the particle bed at a fixed shock Mach number. We compute the unsteady inviscid streamwise and transverse drag coefficients as a function of time for each particle in the random bed as a function of volume fraction. We show that (i) there are significant variations in the peak drag for the particles in the bed, (ii) the mean peak drag as a function of streamwise distance through the bed decreases with a slope that increases as the volume fraction increases, and (iii) the deviation from the mean peak drag does not correlate with local volume fraction. We also present the local Mach number and pressure contours for the different volume fractions to explain the various observed complex physical mechanisms occurring during the shock-particle interactions. Since the shock interaction with the random bed of particles leads to transmitted and reflected waves, we compute the average flow properties to characterize the strength of the transmitted and reflected shock waves and quantify the energy dissipation inside the particle bed. Finally, to better understand the complex wave dynamics in a random bed, we consider a simpler approximation of a planar shock propagating in a duct with a sudden area change. We obtain Riemann solutions to this problem, which are used to compare with fully resolved numerical simulations.

  1. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search Menu Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Instagram LinkedIn Brain Tumor Information | News & Blog Our Mission Our History Mission Leadership & Staff Financials Careers News & Blog Contact Us Donate Now Our Impact Our Impact Recent News News & ...

  2. A Comparison of Tandem Walk Performance Between Bed Rest Subjects and Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian; Kofman, Igor; Philips, Tiffany; Batson, Crystal; Cerisano, Jody; Fisher, Elizabeth; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Feiveson, Alan; Reschke, Millard; hide

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts experience a microgravity environment during spaceflight, which results in a central reinterpretation of both vestibular and body axial-loading information by the sensorimotor system. Subjects in bed rest studies lie at 6deg head-down in strict bed rest to simulate the fluid shift and gravity-unloading of the microgravity environment. However, bed rest subjects still sense gravity in the vestibular organs. Therefore, bed rest isolates the axial-unloading component, thus allowing for the direct study of its effects. The Tandem Walk is a standard sensorimotor test of dynamic postural stability. In a previous abstract, we compared performance on a Tandem Walk test between bed rest control subjects, and short- and long-duration astronauts both before and after flight/bed rest using a composite index of performance, called the Tandem Walk Parameter (TWP), that takes into account speed, accuracy, and balance control. This new study extends the previous data set to include bed rest subjects who performed exercise countermeasures. The purpose of this study was to compare performance during the Tandem Walk test between bed rest subjects (with and without exercise), short-duration (Space Shuttle) crewmembers, and long-duration International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers at various time points during their recovery from bed rest or spaceflight.

  3. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  4. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18–25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume ≥12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED ≥100 Gy (total dose, 50–60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  5. Mediastinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canizares, Claudio; Araujo, Ivan; Rodriguez, Amparo; Robles, Wilson; Simba, Catalina

    2005-01-01

    In our practice the mediastinal tumors are infrequent. The mediastinum is the portion of the thoracic cavity that contains numerous organs and structures which makes a crossroad for the diagnostic process. Within which congenital cysts, inflammatory and benign tumors, malignant neoplasms may develop. In the superior compartment are found: thymoma and thymic cysts, germ cell tumors, thyroid lesions, parathyroid adenomas, malignant lymphomas, paragangliomas, hemangiomas, lipomas, and inflammatory lesions such as fibrosing mediastinitis. In the middle portion: pericardial cysts, bronchial cysts, malignant lymphomas. In the posterior region: neurogenic tumors such as Shawnomas, neurofibromas, ganglioneuroblastomas, neuroblastomas, paragangliomas, and gastro enteric cysts. We describe two cases. One of a female patient with a prominent tumor in the anterior compartment of the mediastinum, detected by the x-ray films. Initially a cardiac lesion was excluded by echographic, angiographic studies. The biopsy exhibited a prominent fibrosis that suggested fibrosing mediastinitis (sclerosing). Whoever the immunohistochemical phenotype was positive for lambda chains, determining the diagnosis of lymphoma. The other case is of a young male with a thymoma associated to a pure red cell aplasia, which was the initial clinical symptom. Computerized tomography and thyroid scintigraphy was used. (The author)

  6. [Bed baths--an initiation ritual for the nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, M do C; de Figueirêdo, N M; Kestenberg, C C; Martins, E R

    1998-01-01

    It's a experience, at the Fundamental Nursing Laboratory, for the "Bath in the Bed" practice with 22 graduating from the UERJ nursing course, the object was to record the teaching strategy procedure, identify the students representations and feelings with her own bath and characterize, after the sensibility dynamic developed in "LIVING EXPERIENCES", her feelings. The explorer-qualitative research was implemented in 1997. Among the results there are the proper categories of the knowledge construction on the "Bath in the Bed": Incentive for body dirt cleaner; Incentive to pleasure--the relax body; Incentive to comfort--free body and Incentive to sensations--dynamic body. Conclusion, the students carry from their reality common sense knowledge for "dirt" and "clean" when representing their own body. When experiment to "touch" humors and perceives the client bad odors, even of symbolic way, their reactions are different and re-extend a cultural and scientific knowledge.

  7. Protecting Your Home from Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your home: Inspect the luggage rack in your hotel room for bed bugs. Check secondhand furniture, beds, ... Grants January 19, 2017 Web Snapshot No FEAR Act Data Privacy Privacy and Security Notice Connect. Data. ...

  8. Videos, Webinars, Blogs Related to Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    These tools provide practical insight on issues such as integrated pest management (IPM) for schools, bed bug bites, how carpet beetles can help, bed bugs as hitchhikers, and preventing and controlling infestations.

  9. EPA-Registered Bed Bug Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treat your bed bug infestation. Foggers and bug bombs should not be used as the only method ... effective but take some time to kill the population); or Bed bugs’ becoming resistant to a specific ...

  10. Immune Priming of the Tumor Microenvironment by Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Chan, Charles K; Weissman, Irving L; Kim, Betty Y S; Hahn, Stephen M

    2016-11-01

    Ionizing irradiation can induce a multitude of alterations within the tumor microenvironment. Unlike targeted therapies, radiation delivered to the tumor bed can prompt phenotypic changes in both normal stromal and cancer cells, leading to molecular and physiological alterations within the tumor microenvironment. These environmental modulations directly influence the degree of immunogenicity of the tumor microenvironment and may ultimately affect tumor responsiveness to cancer immunotherapies. Here we review the preclinical evidence for tumor microenvironment-mediated immune suppression and how radiation can modulate immune properties within a tumor. We then discuss the therapeutic opportunities for combining radiation with molecular agents to enhance tumor immunogenicity and how this represents a potential exciting strategy to complement immunotherapies including immune checkpoint blockers in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Imaging of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaensler, E.H.L.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.)

  12. PET-based analysis of tumor glucose metabolism and tumor hypoxia before and during anti-neoplastic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollineni, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is an important contributor to chemo-radiotherapy resistance. This has been demonstrated in several tumor types including non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Tumor hypoxia is a dynamic process, some parts of the tumor exhibit higher levels of hypoxia

  13. Influência da imobilização de biomassa e do tamanho da partícula na fluidodinâmica de um reator anaeróbio de leito fluidizado = The influence of immobilized biomass and particle size on the fluid dynamics of an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Bentes Freire

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O estudo da fluidodinâmica é muito comum em diversas áreas relacionadas com a engenharia química, tais como nos processos de secagem e nos reatores químicos. Entretanto, em reatores biológicos empregados no tratamento de águas residuárias, esses aspectos ainda necessitam de investigações mais aprofundadas. Deste modo, é fundamental avaliar a influência da presença do biofilme no comportamento fluidodinâmico do reator, por meio de importantes parâmetros como, por exemplo, a velocidade de mínima fluidização, a expansão, a porosidade do leito e a velocidade terminal da partícula. O objetivo deste trabalho foi realizar uma investigação da fluidodinâmica de um reator anaeróbio de leito fluidizado, tratando uma água residuária sintética preparada a partir da solução utilizada para determinação de DBO, tendo o carvão ativado como meio suportepara a imobilização de biomassa. Especificamente, no trabalho, verificou-se que a biomassa imobilizada aumentou a densidade das partículas e alterou os principais parâmetros fluidodinâmicos avaliados.Fluid dynamic analysis is an important branch of several chemical engineering related areas, such as drying processes and chemical reactors. However, aspects concerning fluid dynamics in wastewater treatment bioreactors still require further investigation, as they highly influence process efficiency. Therefore, it is essential to evaluate the influence of biofilm on the reactor fluid dynamicbehavior, through the analysis of a few important parameters, such as minimum fluidization velocity, bed expansion and porosity, and particle terminal velocity. The main objective of the present work was to investigate the fluid dynamics of an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor, having activated carbon particles as support media for biomass immobilization. Reactor performance was tested using synthetic residual water, which was prepared using the solution employed in BOD determination. The results

  14. Parallel-Processing Test Bed For Simulation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blech, Richard; Cole, Gary; Townsend, Scott

    1996-01-01

    Second-generation Hypercluster computing system is multiprocessor test bed for research on parallel algorithms for simulation in fluid dynamics, electromagnetics, chemistry, and other fields with large computational requirements but relatively low input/output requirements. Built from standard, off-shelf hardware readily upgraded as improved technology becomes available. System used for experiments with such parallel-processing concepts as message-passing algorithms, debugging software tools, and computational steering. First-generation Hypercluster system described in "Hypercluster Parallel Processor" (LEW-15283).

  15. Fluidization quality analyzer for fluidized beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daw, C.S.; Hawk, J.A.

    1995-07-25

    A control loop and fluidization quality analyzer for a fluidized bed utilizes time varying pressure drop measurements. A fast-response pressure transducer measures the overall bed pressure drop, or over some segment of the bed, and the pressure drop signal is processed to produce an output voltage which changes with the degree of fluidization turbulence. 9 figs.

  16. Dissolved oxygen control in a coupled fluidized bed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.M.; Melcer, H.

    1988-01-01

    The biological fluidized bed process is a modification of more conventional fixed film processes, such as the trickling filter, in which wastewater is passed upward through a bed of granular support medium, typically sand, at a sufficient velocity to expand or fluidize the medium. The granular medium provides a large surface area for the establishment of a biological film. The fluidized bed process was selected to investigate the treatment of coking plant wastewaters in view of the significant advantages offered in terms of reduced reactor volumes that result from the high biomass concentration maintained on the support medium. The technical feasibility of treating coal distillation condensates was evaluated during a 3-year study at Environment Canada's Wastewater Technology Centre (WTC). The feed to the pilot scale test system consisted of effluent from fixed and free leg ammonia stills at the by-product coke plant of Dofasco Inc. in Hamilton, Ontario. The pilot plant consisted of two fluidized bed reactors in series, coupled to provide carbon oxidation, nitrification and denitrification in the predenitrification operating mode. The anoxic denitrification reactor was 115 mm in diameter and the oxygenic nitrification reactor, 290 mm in diameter. The bed heights and reactor volumes were adjustable by relocation of the position of the sand/biomass wasting valve. The experimental objective of this research was to determine those operating conditions required to maintain stable nitrification and complete denitrification under both steady state and dynamic operating conditions. Details regarding operating, sampling and analytic procedures have been presented elsewhere. A specific operating problem existed relating to the control of the dissolved oxygen concentration in the oxygenic fluidized bed reactor, the solution of which forms the basis of the paper

  17. PENGARUH MASSA JENIS PARTIKEL DAN KETINGGIAN PARTIKEL TERHADAP FENOMENA FLUIDISASI DALAM FLUIDIZED BED DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosyida Permatasari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fenomena fluidisasi pada fluidized bed yaitu kecepatan minimum dan tekanan statis partikel merupakan hal fenomena yang penting dalam desain fluidized bed. Fenomena-fenomena tersebut dipengaruhi oleh banyak faktor dalam fluidized bed diantaranya massa jenis dan tinggi partikel di dalam fluidized bed. Penelitian ini menggunakan jenis partikel yang berbeda-beda dan rasio ketinggian partikel terhadap diameter fluidized bed (H/D dengan menggunakan Computational Fluid Dynamics. Partikel yang digunakan adalah partikel dengan jenis Geldart B yaitu glass beads (ρ=2600 kg/m3, ground walnut shell (ρ=1200 kg/m3 dan ground corncob (ρ=800 kg/m3, sedangkan rasio ketinggian partikel yang digunakan yaitu 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, dan 2.5. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa massa jenis partikel berbanding lurus dengan kecepatan minimum fluidisasi dan ketinggian partikel tidak mempengaruhi kecepatan minimum fluidisasi.

  18. Modelling and dynamic simulation of a pilot-scale moving bed bioreactor for the treatment of municipal wastewater: model concepts and the use of respirometry for the estimation of kinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattes, M; Fiorelli, D; Gillé, S; Girard, C; Henry, E; Minette, F; O'Nagy, O; Schosseler, P M

    2007-01-01

    A model for the simulation of a moving bed bioreactor (MBBR) used for the treatment of municipal wastewater is proposed. The model includes attachment of particulates to the biofilm and detachment of biofilm into the bulk liquid. The growth kinetics are modelled with the activated sludge model no. 1 (ASM1). Respirometry was used for the estimation of kinetic parameters. The resulting respirograms featured the typical endogenous and exogenous respiration phases and the respirogram shapes were as expected from analogous respirometry with activated sludge. The estimated parameter set was used for modelling and simulation of the pilot-scale MBBR. The main proportion of biomass in the MBBR was found to be attached as biofilm on the carrier elements (4.1 -4.6 g dm-3) and only a small amount was suspended in the bulk liquid (0.15gdm(-3)). Attachment and detachment rates were estimated to be 4.8-7.5g m(-2) d(-1) 1for attachment and 6.5-7.5g m(-2) d(-1) for detachment. The biofilm age was estimated to be 1.8-2.7d. The model was used to predict effluent quality parameters and a good fit of the simulated data to the measured data originating from a four-days-long measurement campaign was obtained.

  19. Designing a CR Test bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cattoni, Andrea Fabio; Buthler, Jakob Lindbjerg; Tonelli, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    with their own set up, since the potential costs and efforts could not pay back in term of expected research results. Software Defined Radio solutions offer an easy way to communication researchers for the development of customized research test beds. While several hardware products are commercially available......Research on intelligent and reconfigurable wireless systems is in continuous evolution. Nevertheless, in order to fix some keystones, more and more researchers are entering the idea of research-oriented test beds. Unfortunately, it is very difficult for a wide number of research groups to start......, the software is most of the times open source and ready to use for third party users. Even though the software solution developers claim complete easiness in the development of custom applications, in reality there are a number of practical hardware and software issues that research groups need to face, before...

  20. Review of acute cancer beds.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Evans, D S

    2012-01-01

    A review of admissions to cancer services at University Hospital Galway (UHG) was undertaken to assess the appropriateness of hospital usage. All cancer specialty patients admitted from 26-28 May 2009 were reviewed (n = 82). Chi square tests, Exact tests, and One-way ANOVA were utilised to analyse key issues emerging from the data. Fifty (61%) were classified as emergencies. Twenty three (67%) occupied a designated cancer bed with 24 (30%) in outlying non-oncology wards. The mean length of stay was 29.3 days. Possible alternatives to admission were identified for 15 (19%) patients. There was no evidence of discharge planning for 50 (60%) admissions. There is considerable potential to make more appropriate utilisation of UHG for cancer patients, particularly in terms of reducing bed days and length of stay and the proportion of emergency cancer admissions, and further developing integrated systems of discharge planning.

  1. Device for measuring bed pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulin, B.M.; Chubar, V.G.

    1979-03-05

    The invention refers to studies in wells and is designed for piezomeasurements for the processes of undergrond leaching out associated with the movement of fluids of variable density to the productive beds. The purpose of he invention is to increase the accuracy of measurements of bed pressure by reducing the influence of changes of fluid density in the well. The goal is achieved because the device is equipped with a piezometric pipe arranged in the well and filled with liquid whose density is less than the density of the solution, and the transformer of the level is installed in the pipe. The pipe can have a throttle. A drawing and description of the proposed device are presented.

  2. THE BAUXITES AND JELAR - BEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krešimir Sakač

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Minor bauxite deposits and occurrences were formed in technically disturbed environments in the middle part of the Adriatic geotectonic unit in Dinarides, contemporary with the clastic Jelar-beds in the Late Lutetian time. Uneven chemical composition of these Eocene bauxites, their sporadic occurrences in developed paleorelief as well as characteristic petrographic composition of the immediate overlying rocks point out at different genetical conditions (the paper is published in Croatian.

  3. Dynometer test bed (fact sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Dell, K.

    2000-04-24

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Dynamometer Test Bed is one of a kind. It offers wind industry engineers a unique opportunity to conduct lifetime endurance tests on a wide range of wind turbine drivetrains and gearboxes at various speeds, using low or high torque. By testing full-scale wind turbines, engineers from NREL and industry hope to understand the impact of various wind conditions with the goal of improving hardware design.

  4. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nursing, or cause a man to lose his sex drive or lower his sperm count. Pituitary tumors often go undiagnosed because their symptoms resemble those of so many other more common diseases. × Definition The pituitary is a small, bean-sized gland ...

  5. Nephrogenic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesbauer, P.

    2008-01-01

    Nephroblastomas are the most common malignant renal tumors in childhood. According to the guidelines of the SIOP (Societe Internationale d'Oncologie Pediatrique) and GPOH (Gesellschaft fuer Paediatrische Onkologie und Haematologie) pre-operative chemotherapy can be started without histological confirmation and thus initial imaging studies, in particular ultrasound, play an outstanding role for diagnostic purposes

  6. Advances in fluidized bed technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutanen, K.

    1992-01-01

    Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) has advanced into industrial cogeneration and utility-scale electric generation. During the 1980's AFBC became the dominant technology in the United States for power generation systems fired with solid fuels. Development of pressurized fluidized bed combustion/gasification (PFB/G) has grown rapidly from small bench-scale rigs to large pilot and demonstration plants. AFBC as large as 160 MWe in capacity are now in operation, while pressurized combustion systems generating 80 MWe have started up two years ago. The major driving forces behind development of fluidized bed technologies are all the time strictening emission control regulations, need for fuel flexibility, repowering of older power plants and need for higher efficiency in electricity generation. Independent power producers (IPP) and cogenerators were the first ones in the United States who accepted AFBC for wide commercial use. Their role will be dominant in the markets of the 1990's also. Developers of AFBC systems are working on designs that reduce investment costs, decrease emissions and offer even higher reliability and availability in utility-scale applications while developers of PFBC/G work on designs that increase plant efficiencies, allow modular construction, decrease emissions further and reduce the cost of generating power. This paper presents technological background, commercial status, boiler performance, emissions and future developments for both AFBC and PFBC/G systems

  7. Natural gas in coal beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsov, A.I.; Voytov, G.I.

    1983-01-01

    The special importance is noted of the problem of computing and careful use of the energy raw material, coal, oil and natural gases. An examination is made of the mechanism for the formation of carboniferous gases in the beds with the use of the model of coal macromolecule. A schematic section is presented for the coal field and plan for vertical gas zonality. The change in chemical composition of the natural gases with depth is governed by the countermovement of the natural gases: from top to bottom the gases of the earth's atmosphere move, mainly oxygenand nitrogen, from bottom to top, the gases of metamorphic and deep origin. Constant isotope composition of the carbon in the fossil coals is noted. The distribution of the quanitity deltaC/sup 13/ of carbon in the fossil coals of the Donets basin is illustrated. The gas content of the coal beds and gas reserves are discussed. The flowsheet is shown for the unit for degasification of the coal bed before the cleaning face.

  8. Pituitary gland tumors; Hypophysentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesser, J.; Schlamp, K.; Bendszus, M. [Radiologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    This article gives an overview of the most common tumors of the pituitary gland and the differential diagnostics with special emphasis on radiological diagnostic criteria. A selective search of the literature in PubMed was carried out. Pituitary adenomas constitute 10-15 % of all intracranial tumors and are the most common tumors of the sellar region. Tumors smaller than 1 cm in diameter are called microadenomas while those larger than 1 cm in diameter are called macroadenomas. Approximately 65 % of pituitary gland adenomas secrete hormones whereby approximately 50 % secrete prolactin, 10 % secrete growth hormone (somatotropin) and 6 % secrete corticotropin. Other tumors located in the sella turcica can also cause endocrinological symptoms, such as an oversecretion of pituitary hormone or pituitary insufficiency by impinging on the pituitary gland or its stalk. When tumors spread into the space cranial to the sella turcica, they can impinge on the optic chiasm and cause visual disorders. A common differential diagnosis of a sellar tumor is a craniopharyngeoma. In children up to 10 % of all intracranial tumors are craniopharyngeomas. Other differential diagnoses for sellar tumors are metastases, meningiomas, epidermoids and in rare cases astrocytomas, germinomas or Rathke cleft cysts As these tumors are located in an anatomically complex region of the skull base and are often very small, a highly focused imaging protocol is required. The currently favored modality is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the administration of a contrast agent. The sellar region should be mapped in thin slices. In cases of suspected microadenoma the imaging protocol should also contain a sequence with dynamic contrast administration in order to assess the specific enhancement characteristics of the tumor and the pituitary gland. (orig.) [German] Diese Arbeit ist eine Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten Hypophysentumoren und deren Differenzialdiagnosen mit Augenmerk auf die

  9. Accelerating Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Lung Tumor Tracking Based on Low-Rank Decomposition in the Spatial–Temporal Domain: A Feasibility Study Based on Simulation and Preliminary Prospective Undersampled MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, Manoj; Hu, Peng; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Ennis, Daniel; Thomas, Albert; Lee, Percy; Kupelian, Patrick; Sheng, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a low-rank decomposition method to reconstruct down-sampled k-space data for the purpose of tumor tracking. Methods and Materials: Seven retrospective lung cancer patients were included in the simulation study. The fully-sampled k-space data were first generated from existing 2-dimensional dynamic MR images and then down-sampled by 5 × -20 × before reconstruction using a Cartesian undersampling mask. Two methods, a low-rank decomposition method using combined dynamic MR images (k-t SLR based on sparsity and low-rank penalties) and a total variation (TV) method using individual dynamic MR frames, were used to reconstruct images. The tumor trajectories were derived on the basis of autosegmentation of the resultant images. To further test its feasibility, k-t SLR was used to reconstruct prospective data of a healthy subject. An undersampled balanced steady-state free precession sequence with the same undersampling mask was used to acquire the imaging data. Results: In the simulation study, higher imaging fidelity and low noise levels were achieved with the k-t SLR compared with TV. At 10 × undersampling, the k-t SLR method resulted in an average normalized mean square error <0.05, as opposed to 0.23 by using the TV reconstruction on individual frames. Less than 6% showed tracking errors >1 mm with 10 × down-sampling using k-t SLR, as opposed to 17% using TV. In the prospective study, k-t SLR substantially reduced reconstruction artifacts and retained anatomic details. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance reconstruction using k-t SLR on highly undersampled dynamic MR imaging data results in high image quality useful for tumor tracking. The k-t SLR was superior to TV by better exploiting the intrinsic anatomic coherence of the same patient. The feasibility of k-t SLR was demonstrated by prospective imaging acquisition and reconstruction

  10. Multiple breath-hold CBCT for online image guided radiotherapy of lung tumors: Simulation with a dynamic phantom and first patient data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Fleckenstein, Jens; Lohr, Frank; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Nachit, Mohammed; Blessing, Manuel; Stsepankou, Dzimitry; Loeb, Iris; Kuepper, Beate; Kavanagh, Anthony; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Brada, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; McNair, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Computer controlled breath-hold effectively reduces organ motion for image-guided precision radiotherapy of lung tumors. However, the acquisition time of 3D cone-beam-CT (CBCT) exceeds maximum breath-hold times. We have developed an approach enabling online verification using CBCT image acquisition with ABC (registered) -based breath-hold. Methods: Patient CBCT images were acquired with ABC (registered) -based repeat breath-hold. The clinical situation was also simulated with a Motion Phantom. Reconstruction of patient and phantom images with selection of free-breathing and breath-hold projections only was performed. Results: CBCT-imaging in repeat breath-hold resulted in a precisely spherical appearance of a tumor-mimicking structure in the phantom. A faint 'ghost' structure (free-breathing phases) can be clearly discriminated. Mean percentage of patient breath-hold time was 66%. Reconstruction based on free-breathing-only shows blurring of both tumor and diaphragm, reconstruction based on breath-hold projections only resulted in sharp contours of the same structures. From the phantom experiments, a maximal repositioning error of 1 mm in each direction can be estimated. Discussion and Conclusion: CBCT during repetitive breath hold provides reliable soft-tissue-based positioning. Fast 3D-imaging during one breath-hold is currently under development and has the potential to accelerate clinical linac-based volume imaging.

  11. The characteristics of bed agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaivatamaset, Pawin; Tia, Suvit

    2015-01-01

    The bed agglomeration behaviors were investigated experimentally when eucalyptus bark was burning tested in a laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor. The focuses of this work were the influences of operating conditions and bed materials on the bed agglomeration tendency and the elucidation in the behaviors of fuel inorganic elements and the governing mode of the agglomeration. It was found that the defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was clearly detectable from the decrease in measured bed pressure. The growth of bed particle and accumulation of agglomerates during combustion provided the partial to complete defluidization. The defluidization was promoted by the increase of bed temperature and bed particle size, and the decrease of fluidizing air velocity. The SEM-EDS analyses revealed that the bed agglomeration was mainly attributed to the formation of potassium silicate compounds as liquid phase during the combustion. This was initiated by the chemical reaction between the bed particle and the released ash constituents. In this study, the inorganic migration from fuel particle to bed particle was likely dominated by the condensation/reaction. The thermodynamic examination by ternary phase diagram analysis corroborated that the liquid phase formation of the ash derived materials controlled the agglomeration. The alumina sand prevented the bed agglomeration since it was inactive in the formation of viscous molten substances during combustion at the observed temperatures. - Highlights: • The behaviors of bed agglomeration were studied during the fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark. • The increase in bed temperature and sand size, and the decrease of air velocity promoted bed defluidization. • The formation of molten potassium silicate compounds conduced to the bed agglomeration. • Condensation/reaction was the dominant inorganic migration mechanism from fuel particle to bed particle. • The alumina sand prevented effectively the bed

  12. Bed agglomeration characteristics of palm shell and corncob combustion in fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaivatamaset, Pawin; Sricharoon, Panchan; Tia, Suvit

    2011-01-01

    Bed particle agglomeration was studied experimentally in an atmospheric laboratory scale fluidized bed combustor using quartz sand as bed material. Palm shell and corncob were tested. The objectives of the study were (i) to describe the contributions of the biomass ash properties and the operating conditions on the bed agglomeration tendency in term of the bed defluidization time (t def ) and the extent of potassium accumulation in the bed (K/Bed) and (ii) to further elucidate the ash inorganic behaviors and the governing bed agglomeration mechanisms. Defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was experienced in all experiments during combustion of these biomasses, as a consequence of the presence of potassium in biomass. The experimental results indicated that biomass ash characteristics were the significant influence on the bed agglomeration. The increasing bed temperature, bed particle size and static bed height and the decreasing fluidizing air velocity enhanced the bed agglomeration tendency. The SEM/EDS analyses on the agglomerates confirmed that the agglomeration was attributed to the formation of potassium silicate liquid enriched on the surface of quartz sand particles in conjunction with the high surface temperature of the burning biomass char particles. Thermodynamic examination based on the phase diagram analysis confirmed that the molten phase formation was responsible for the agglomeration. In this study, the high molten ash fraction resulting from the high potassium content in biomass promoted the agglomeration and thus defluidization. - Highlights: → Palm shell and corncob of Thailand are tested their bed agglomeration behaviors during fluidized bed combustion. → The increase of bed temperature, bed particle size and static bed height and the decrease of air velocity enhance bed agglomeration. → The formation of ash derived potassium silicate melts enriched on sand surface is the key process. → The collision between char and sand

  13. Tumor regrowth and development of keratinocytic neoplasms in patients under smoothened inhibition: in vivo assessment with reflectance confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, I; Pasquali, P; Malvehy, J; Puig, S

    2017-08-01

    The regrowth of a tumor after complete clinical response and the development of keratinocytic neoplasms while patients are still undergoing continuous vismodegib have stressed the importance of the accurate monitoring to detect recurrences earlier and ensure the best possible outcome. The objective of this study was to determine the role of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) in monitoring the response of locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (laBCC) to vismodegib and to discard secondary resistance. Seven patients presenting with nine laBCC, were prospectively included and their response to this drug was assessed by means of clinical examination, dermoscopy, and RCM. The study was conducted at the Melanoma Unit in Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, between June 2012 and March 2013. Histologically confirmed lesion 10 mm or larger in diameter for which surgery was contraindicated and radiation therapy was inappropriate. The median patient age was 73 years and the most common histological type was infiltrating BCC. RCM allowed the identification of residual tumor in two lesions and to confirm complete response in the other four cases. Two patients developed new lesions within the tumor bed, they were assessed by RCM showing features of actinic keratosis which were confirmed by histopathology. The use of in vivo RCM allowed the characterization of the dynamic morphologic changes in tumor response helping to better define partial response and to differentiate it from secondary resistance. Another interesting observation was the recognition of a phenomenon characterized by the development of keratinocytic neoplasms within the tumor bed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Essam A

    2013-01-09

    Details of numerical simulations of two-phase gas-solid turbulent flow in the riser section of Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor (CFBR) using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique are reported. Two CFBR riser configurations are considered and modeled. Each of these two riser models consist of inlet, exit, connecting elbows and a main pipe. Both riser configurations are cylindrical and have the same diameter but differ in their inlet lengths and main pipe height to enable investigation of riser geometrical scaling effects. In addition, two types of solid particles are exploited in the solid phase of the two-phase gas-solid riser flow simulations to study the influence of solid loading ratio on flow patterns. The gaseous phase in the two-phase flow is represented by standard atmospheric air. The CFD-based FLUENT software is employed to obtain steady state and transient solutions for flow modulations in the riser. The physical dimensions, types and numbers of computation meshes, and solution methodology utilized in the present work are stated. Flow parameters, such as static and dynamic pressure, species velocity, and volume fractions are monitored and analyzed. The differences in the computational results between the two models, under steady and transient conditions, are compared, contrasted, and discussed.

  15. Clinical evaluation of an automated turning bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland, H I; Langemo, D; Hanson, D; Olson, B; Hunter, S

    1999-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess client comfort and sleep quality, client physiologic response (skin and respiratory status), the effect on the need for caregiver assistance, and cost when using an automated turning bed. Nonexperimental, evaluative study. Twenty-four adult home or long-term care resident subjects who had a degenerative disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, cerebral palsy, or back surgery. Each subject agreed to use the automated turning bed for four weeks. Researchers completed a demographic survey and skin assessment, and assessed each subject for pressure ulcer risk and for the need of assistance of a care giver for turning before and after the four weeks of using the turning bed. Subjects rated the turning bed in terms of comfort and sleep quality. Subjects rated the turning bed as more comfortable than their own bed and expressed satisfaction at the pain relief attained when on the turning bed. While using the turning bed, there was a significant improvement in sleep quality. No skin breakdown or deterioration in respiratory status occurred. Fewer subjects required the assistance of a caregiver for turning when on the turning bed. This automated turning bed shows great promise in meeting a need for patients with limited mobility whether they are homebound or in a residential community. Future studies that further investigate use of the turning bed for postoperative back patients while still in the acute care setting are indicated. Replicative studies with a larger sample size are also indicated.

  16. Choice of treatment and diagnostic tactics at nonpalpable breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. P. Kulikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of inspection, treatment and dynamic supervision of 166 patients with nonpalpable breast tumors are presented. Distribution of tumors on BI-RADS system is given. Possibilities of a mammography and ultrasonography in diagnostics of a preclinical breast cancer are shown. Practical recommendations about a choice of an optimum way of presurgical verification of nonpalpable tumors are offered. Indications for surgical treat- ment and dynamic supervision are specified at nonpalpable breast tumors.

  17. Design of expanded bed supports for the recovery of plasmid DNA by anion exchange adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theodossiou, Irini; Søndergaard, M.; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2001-01-01

    and blueprints for improved expanded bed adsorbents have been put forward. The characterisation and testing of small (20-40 mum) high density (>3.7 g cm(-3)) pellicular expanded bed materials functionalised with various anion exchange structures is presented. In studies with calf thymus DNA, dynamic binding......In this study we detail the rational design of new chromatographic adsorbents tailored for the capture of plasmid DNA. Features present on current chromatographic supports that can significantly enhance plasmid binding capacity have been identified in packed bed chromatography experiments...... sensitivity to inter-particle bridging by nucleic acid polymers, gave low DNA recoveries (0.8 mg ml(-1)) capture of plasmid...

  18. Design of expanded bed supports for the recovery of plasmid DNA by anion exchange adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theodossiou, Irini; Søndergaard, M.; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2001-01-01

    and blueprints for improved expanded bed adsorbents have been put forward. The characterisation and testing of small (20-40 mum) high density (>3.7 g cm(-3)) pellicular expanded bed materials functionalised with various anion exchange structures is presented. In studies with calf thymus DNA, dynamic binding...... capacities of 1.2 and 3.4 mg ml(-1) were recorded for prototype diethylaminoethyl-and polyethylene imine-linked adsorbents which were respectively 25 and 70 fold higher than those of equivalently derivatised commercial expanded bed materials. The prototype polyethylene imine-coupled material exhibited severe...

  19. Experimental study on evolution of bed structures of natural mountain rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-xiang Liu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bed structures in many mountain rivers provide additional resistance to the flow. A field experiment was conducted on debris flow deposits in the valley of the Jiangjiagou Ravine, a tributary of the Yangtze River in southwestern China, to study the evolution and distribution of bed structures and their relationship with environmental conditions. Water and sediment from the Jiangjiagou main stream were diverted into the experimental channel. Several hydrological schemes were adopted to scour the channel until equilibrium was reached. During this process the evolutions of bed structures and channel configuration were investigated. The results indicate that stronger bed structures mean greater stream power consumption, greater resistance, and greater slope in a certain section when rivers are in dynamic equilibrium. Thus, to some extent the longitudinal profiles of channels can be determined by the distribution of bed structures. In natural cases, the strength and evolution of bed structures are under the influence of environmental conditions such as discharge and bed-load transportation rate. That is, given the same conditions, the same bed structure distribution and longitudinal profile can be predicted.

  20. Analysis of the pressure fluctuations in binary solids circulating fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yongguo [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China)]. E-mail: yongguo_chen@hotmail.com; Tian Ziping [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Miao Zhengqing [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2006-03-15

    Pressure fluctuations are often selected to analyze the dynamic changes in the fluidized bed. Many researchers in the field of fluidization have adopted many methods to analyze the pressure signals in fluidized beds, such as statistical analysis (in time domain), frequency analysis (in frequency domain) and non-linear analysis (such as chaotic method). There are many literatures concentrated on statistical analysis in the fluidization field since this method can display the distribution density of the pressure fluctuations. In this study, the pressure fluctuations on the bed wall at different bed heights in the cold two dimensional (2-D) circulating fluidized bed (200 x 30 x 1200 mm{sup 3}) were sampled. The colophony, millet and 20% millet plus 80% colophony were selected as bed materials. The pressure signals were analyzed by means of statistical methods. The correlation equations between the pressure signals and fluidization parameters were obtained under different operational conditions. Finally, comparisons between the single solid and binary solids 2-D circulating fluidized beds were investigated deeply. Two parameters, K {sub 1} (=0.54(u - u {sub mf}){sup 0.4} h {sup 0.8}/g {sup 0.2}) and K {sub 2} (={sigma} {sub b}/({rho} {sub s} g(1 - {epsilon} {sub mf}))), were selected to characterize the fluidization mechanism. It was found that the relationships between K {sub 2} and K {sub 1} among the single solid and binary solids circulating fluidized beds vary a great deal.

  1. Complex nonlinear behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1999-01-01

    The fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle investigated in this paper can exhibit periodic solutions. These solutions bifurcate from the steady state in a Hopf bifurcation. The Hopf bifurcation encountered at the lowest value of the inlet concentration turns the steady state unstable and marks......,that the dynamic behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle is much more complex than previously reported....

  2. Development of Bed Ridges in Open Channels and their Effects on Secondary Currents and Wall Shear

    OpenAIRE

    Kamran Ansari; Ashfaque Ahmed Memon; Naeem Aziz Memon

    2012-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the ridges on the bed of wide, open channels and their effects on the distribution of secondary currents and wall shear is undertaken using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). The presence of the lines of boil, consisting of low speed streaks, periodically in the transverse direction, is reported in the literature due to the presence of the ridges. In the present work, simulations are run on channel sections with varying the number of ridges on the bed and ...

  3. [Brain tumor immunotherapy: Illusion or hope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Denis; Dutoit, Valérie; Walker, Paul R; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves

    2017-05-01

    Immunotherapy has proven efficient for many tumors and is now part of standard of care in many indications. What is the picture for brain tumors? The recent development of anti-CTLA-4 and PD1 immune checkpoint inhibitors, which have the ability to restore T lymphocytes activity, has gathered enthusiasm and is now paving the way towards more complex models of immune system manipulation. These models include, among others, vaccination and adoptive T cell transfer technologies. Complementary to those strategies, molecules capable of reshaping the immune tumor microenvironment are currently being investigated in early phase trials. Indeed, the tumor bed is hostile to anti-tumor immune responses due to many escape mechanisms, and this is particularly true in the context of brain tumors, a master in eliciting immunosuppressive cells and molecules. The goal of this review is to describe the hopes and challenges of brain tumors immunotherapy and to propose an inventory of the current clinical research with specific focus on the therapies targeting the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Gupta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic studies of trickle bed reactors (TBRs are essential for the design and prediction of their performance. The hydrodynamic characteristics involving pressure drop and dynamic liquid saturation are greatly affected by the physical properties of the liquids. In the present study experiments have been carried out in a concurrent downflow air - liquid trickle bed reactor to investigate the dynamic liquid saturation and pressure drop for the water (non-foaming and 3% polyethylene glycol and 4% polyethylene glycol foaming liquids in the gas continuous regime (GCF and foaming pulsing regime (FP. In the GCF regime the dynamic liquid saturation was found to increase with increase in liquid flow rate for non-foaming and foaming liquids. While for 3% and 4% polyethylene glycol solutions the severe foaming was observed in the high interaction regime and the regime is referred to as foaming pulsing (FP regime. The decrease in dynamic liquid saturation followed by a sharp rise in the pressure drop was observed during transition from gas GCF to FP regime. However in the FP regime, a dip in the dynamic liquid saturation was observed. The pressure drop for foaming liquids is observed to be manifolds higher compared to non-foaming liquid in the GCF regime. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 16th January 2010, Revised: 10th February 2010, Accepted: 21st Feberuary 2010[How to Cite: R. Gupta, A. Bansal. (2010. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 5 (1: 31-37. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.1.7127.31-37][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.1.7127.31-37 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7127][Cited by: Scopus 1 | ] 

  5. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Bansal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic studies of trickle bed reactors (TBRs are essential for the design and prediction of their performance. The hydrodynamic characteristics involving pressure drop and dynamic liquid saturation are greatly affected by the physical properties of the liquids. In the present study experiments have been carried out in a concurrent downflow air - liquid trickle bed reactor to investigate the dynamic liquid saturation and pressure drop for the water (non-foaming and 3% polyethylene glycol and 4% polyethylene glycol foaming liquids in the gas continuous regime (GCF and foaming pulsing regime (FP. In the GCF regime the dynamic liquid saturation was found to increase with increase in liquid flow rate for non-foaming and foaming liquids. While for 3% and 4% polyethylene glycol solutions the severe foaming was observed in the high interaction regime and the regime is referred to as foaming pulsing (FP regime. The decrease in dynamic liquid saturation followed by a sharp rise in the pressure drop was observed during transition from gas GCF to FP regime. However in the FP regime, a dip in the dynamic liquid saturation was observed. The pressure drop for foaming liquids is observed to be manifolds higher compared to non-foaming liquid in the GCF regime. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 16th January 2010, Revised: 10th February 2010, Accepted: 21st Feberuary 2010[How to Cite: R. Gupta, A. Bansal. (2010. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 5 (1: 31-37. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.1.775.31-37][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.1.775.31-37 ][Cited by: Scopus 1 |

  6. Design and implementation of a MRI compatible and dynamic phantom simulating the motion of a tumor in the liver under the breathing cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelhand de Merxem, Arnould; Lechien, Vianney; Thibault, Tanguy; Dasnoy, Damien; Macq, Benoît

    2017-11-01

    In the context of cancer treatment by proton therapy, research is carried out on the use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to perform real-time tracking of tumors during irradiation. The purpose of this combination is to reduce the irradiation of healthy tissues surrounding the tumor, while using a non-ionizing imaging method. Therefore, it is necessary to validate the tracking algorithms on real-time MRI sequences by using physical simulators, i.e. a phantom. Our phantom is a device representing a liver with hepatocellular carcinoma, a stomach and a pancreas close to the anatomy and the magnetic properties of the human body, animated by a motion similar to the one induced by the respiration. Many anatomical or mobile phantoms already exist, but the purpose here is to combine a reliable representation of the abdominal organs with the creation and the evaluation of a programmable movement in the same device, which makes it unique. The phantom is composed of surrogate organs made of CAGN gels. These organs are placed in a transparent box filled with water and attached to an elastic membrane. A programmable electro-pneumatic system creates a movement, similarly to a human diaphragm, by inflating and deflating the membrane. The average relaxation times of the synthetic organs belongs to a range corresponding to the human organs values (T1 = [458.7-1660] ms, T2 = [39.3-89.1] ms). The displacement of the tumor is tracked in real time by a camera inside the MRI. The amplitude of the movement varies from 12.8 to 20.1 mm for a periodic and repeatable movement. Irregular breath patterns can be created with a maximum amplitude of 40 mm.

  7. Glomus Tumor of the Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Lee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundGlomus tumors were first described by Wood in 1812 as painful subcutaneous tubercles. It is an uncommon benign neoplasm involving the glomus body, an apparatus that involves in thermoregulation of cutaneous microvasculature. Glomus tumor constitutes 1%-5% of all hand tumors. It usually occurs at the subungual region and more commonly in aged women. Its classical clinical triad consists of pain, tenderness and temperature intolerance, especially cold sensitivity. This study reviews 15 cases of glomus tumor which were analyzed according to its anatomic location, surgical approach and histologic findings.MethodsFifteen patients with subungual glomus tumors of the hand operated on between January 2006 and March 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were evaluated preoperatively with standard physical examination including ice cube test and Love's test. Diagnostic imaging consisted of ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. All procedures were performed with tourniquet control under local anesthesia. Eleven patients underwent excision using the transungual approach, 3 patients using the volar approach and 1 patient using the lateral subperiosteal approach.ResultsTotal of 15 cases were reviewed. 11 tumors were located in the nail bed, 3 in the volar pulp and 1 in the radial aspect of the finger tip. After complete excision, patients remained asymptomatic in the immediate postoperative period. In the long term follow up, patients exhibited excellent cosmetic results with no recurrence.ConclusionsAccurate diagnosis should be made by physical, radiologic and pathologic examinations. Preoperative localization and complete extirpation is essential in preventing recurrence and subsequent nail deformity.

  8. The Safety of Hospital Beds: Ingress, Egress, and In-Bed Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Janice M; Gervais, Pierre; Pooler, Charlotte; Merryweather, Andrew; Doig, Alexa K; Bloswick, Donald

    2015-01-01

    To explore the safety of the standard and the low hospital bed, we report on a microanalysis of 15 patients' ability to ingress, move about the bed, and egress. The 15 participants were purposefully selected with various disabilities. Bed conditions were randomized with side rails up or down and one low bed with side rails down. We explored the patients' use of the side rails, bed height, ability to lift their legs onto the mattress, and ability to turn, egress, and walk back to the chair. The standard bed was too high for some participants, both for ingress and egress. Side rails were used by most participants when entering, turning in bed, and exiting. We recommend that side rails be reconsidered as a means to facilitate in-bed movement, ingress, and egress. Furthermore, single deck height settings for all patients are not optimal. Low beds as a safety measure must be re-evaluated.

  9. Particle bed reactor scaling relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovik, G.; Araj, K.; Horn, F. L.; Ludewig, H.; Benenati, R.

    The Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) concept can be used in several applications both as part of a power generating system or as a direct propulsion unit. In order to carry out optimization studies of systems involving a PBR, it is necessary to know the variation of the critical mass with pertinent system parameters such as weight, size, power level and thrust level. A parametric study is presented for all the practical combinations of fuel and moderating material. The PBR is described, the practical combinations of materials and dimensions are discussed, and an example is presented.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Tumor Metabolic Markers for Cancer Diagnosis, Metabolic Phenotyping, and Characterization of Tumor Microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    He, Qiuhong; Xu, Ray Z.; Shkarin, Pavel; Pizzorno, Giuseppe; Lee-French, Carol H.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2004-01-01

    Cancer cells display heterogeneous genetic characteristics, depending on the tumor dynamic microenvironment. Abnormal tumor vasculature and poor tissue oxygenation generate a fraction of hypoxic tumor cells that have selective advantages in metastasis and invasion and often resist chemo- and radiation therapies. The genetic alterations acquired by tumors modify their biochemical pathways, which results in abnormal tumor metabolism. An elevation in glycolysis known as the “Warburg effect” and ...

  11. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  12. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Headaches Seizures Memory Depression Mood Swings & Cognitive Changes Fatigue Other Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us ...

  13. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  14. NMR of 19F emulsions: methodological developments and application to evaluation of oxi-metry and dynamic biodistribution in the liver and spleen and to detection of tumor angiogenesis in the rodent brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraudeau, C.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at developing a method for detection of brain tumors at 7 tesla thanks to 19 F MRI contrast agents. We particularly assessed the potential of this method to highlight tumor angiogenesis with RGD-functionalized contrast agents targeting αvβ3integrin, a bio-marker over-expressed at the surface of new capillary blood vessels. Owing to low local concentrations in contrast agent, the first step consisted in optimizing a multi spin echo sequence dedicated to a well-known biocompatible per-fluorocarbon, perfluoro-octylbromide (PFOB). We show that careful adjustment of sequence parameters allows cancellation of J-modulation and T2 enhancement, and yields an excellent sensitivity in vitro. Our sequence was then tested for oxygenation measurements in the mouse liver and spleen after injection of a PFOB emulsion. The results demonstrate very good accuracy of the measurements after one single infusion of emulsion. We also perform a dynamic biodistribution study in order to monitor emulsion nano-particle uptake in the liver and spleen. Moreover, we show that stealth of emulsions grafted with different quantities of polyethylene glycol (PEG) can be assessed by fitting experimental data with a pharmacokinetic empirical model. Our sequence was finally used to visualize αvβ3-targeted nano-particles in a U87 glioblastoma mouse model. Concentrations found in tumors after injection of an RGD-functionalized emulsion and a control emulsion are compared. Concentrations are found to be significantly higher with the RGD emulsion than with the control emulsion, suggesting specific binding of functionalized nano-particles with αvβ3 integrin. The last part is dedicated to a new diffusion-weighted 19 F NMR spectroscopy sequence. This method aims at suppressing vascular signal coming from circulating PFOB nano-particles in order to evaluate signal coming from bound nano-particles only. (author) [fr

  15. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, José, E-mail: jose.soria@probien.gob.ar [Institute for Research and Development in Process Engineering, Biotechnology and Alternative Energies (PROBIEN, CONICET – UNCo), 1400 Buenos Aires St., 8300 Neuquén (Argentina); Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles [Processes, Materials and Solar Energy Laboratory (PROMES-CNRS, UPR 8521), 7 Four Solaire Street, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Rodriguez, Rosa [Chemical Engineering Institute, National University of San Juan, 1109 Libertador (O) Avenue, 5400 San Juan (Argentina); Mazza, Germán [Institute for Research and Development in Process Engineering, Biotechnology and Alternative Energies (PROBIEN, CONICET – UNCo), 1400 Buenos Aires St., 8300 Neuquén (Argentina)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A CFD two-scale model is formulated to simulate heavy metal vaporization from waste incineration in fluidized beds. • MSW particle is modelled with the macroscopic particle model. • Influence of bed dynamics on HM vaporization is included. • CFD predicted results agree well with experimental data reported in literature. • This approach may be helpful for fluidized bed reactor modelling purposes. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073 K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator.

  16. Label-free profiling of cell dynamics: A sequence of impedance-based assays to estimate tumor cell invasiveness in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Láng, Orsolya; Kőhidai, László; Wegener, Joachim

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic properties of cancer cells, most notably their ability to migrate, have been correlated successfully with their invasive nature in vivo. To establish a stronger experimental basis for such a correlation we subjected five different cancer cell lines of well-defined metastatic potential to a sequence of three independent assays reporting on three different aspects of cell dynamics, namely (1) the kinetics of cell spreading, (2) cell shape fluctuations, and (3) cell migration. The sequentially applied assays correspond to different measuring modes of the well-established ECIS technique that is based on non-invasive and label-free impedance readings of planar gold-film electrodes that serve as the growth substrate for the cells under study. Every individual assay returned a characteristic parameter describing the behavior of the cell lines in that particular assay quantitatively. The parameters of all three assays were ranked to establish individual profiles of cell dynamics for every cell line that correlate favorably with the cells' invasive properties. The sequence of impedance-based assays described here requires only small cell populations (< 10.000 cells), it is highly automated and easily adapted to 96-well formats. It provides an in-depth dynamic profile of adherent cells that might be useful in other areas besides cancer research as well. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. On partial fluidization in rotating fluidized beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, J.; Pfeffer, R.; Tardos, G.I.

    1987-01-01

    In a rotating fluidized bed, unlike in a conventional fluidized bed, the granules are fluidized layer by layer from the (inner) free surface outward at increasing radius as the gas velocity is increased. This is a very significant and interesting phenomenon and is extremely important in the design of these fluidized beds. The phenomenon was first suggested in a theoretical analysis and recently verified experimentally in the authors' laboratory. However, in the first paper, the equations presented are too cumbersome and the influence of bed thickness is not clearly stated. In this note the authors present simplified equations, based on that paper, for the pressure drop and the minimum fluidizing velocities in a rotating fluidized bed. Experimental data are also shown and compared with the theoretical model, and the effect of bed thickness is shown. Furthermore, an explanation for the observation of a maximum in the pressure drop vs. velocity curve instead of the plateau derived by Chen is proposed

  18. Gruppebaseret behandling af BED - et faseopdelt behandlingstilbud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laust, Jakob; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Waaddegaard, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Titel: Afrapportering vedr. SATS-puljemidler til behandling og erfaringsopsamling vedr. BED for perioden 1. marts 2013 – 1. maj 2015. Baggrund: Binge Eating Disorder (BED), på dansk tvangsoverspisning, er en udbredt, men overset spiseforstyrrelse med alvorlige psykiske, fysiske og sociale...... konsekvenser. BED blev i 2013 optaget i DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) som en selvstændig diagnose og BED forventes medtaget i den forestående revision af det internationale diagnose system, ICD-11. Sundhedsstyrelsen gav på denne baggrund satspuljemidler til erfaringsopsamling...... vedr. BED. I den forbindelse ansøgte Ambulatorium for Spiseforstyrrelser på Psykoterapeutisk Center Stolpegård ovenstående midler til at udvikle en ambulant, primært psykoterapeutisk gruppebehandling til patienter med moderat til svær BED med fokus på såvel spiseforstyrrelse såvel som overvægt. Metode...

  19. Using a modified Lane’s relation in local bed scouring studies in aluvial bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kiraga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous approaches to the local scour studies have been developed. The research aim was to verify modified Lane’s relation in scope of local scouring phenomenon basing on laboratory studies results. Original Lane’s relation [1955] is applicable in dynamic balance conditions in alluvial rivers context. Original form is not an equation, but a qualitative expression which cannot be directly used to estimate the influence of a change in one parameter on the magnitude of others. Modified version allows transforming it into equation for dynamic equilibrium conditions in steady flow assumption and gives a new opportunity to this principle application. Two physical models of laboratory channel with rectangular cross-sections and glass panels have been constructed, with totally or partially sandy bottom. Model I assumed non-continual sediment transport, because of model construction, i.e. the solid bottom transforms into sandy bottom in the intake part. Model II assumed water structure (the weir with four slots introducing into laboratory channel with solid bottom in its region, whereas the rest of channel was filled with sand above and below structure, i.e. continuity of sediment transport was assured. Results of research confirmed modified Lane’s relation usability in scope of local scouring phenomenon description in dynamic equilibrium conditions of alluvial sandy bed.

  20. CLDN5 affects lncRNAs acting as ceRNA dynamics contributing to regulating blood‑brain barrier permeability in tumor brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shun-Chang; Li, Qi; Peng, Jia-Yi; Zhouwen, Jian-Long; Zhang, Dai-Nan; Zhang, Chuan-Bao; Jiang, Wen-Guo; Jia, Wang

    2018-03-01

    The blood‑brain barrier (BBB) constitutes an efficient organization of tight junctions that limits the delivery of tumor to the brain. The principal tight junction protein in BBB is claudin‑5 (CLDN5), but its mechanism of action remains largely unknown. Long non‑coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are aberrantly expressed in many cancers, some lncRNAs play key roles in regulating BBB permeability and are involved in tumor brain metastasis. In particular, lncRNAs can function as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs). Herein, we investigated whether ceRNA dysregulation is associated with alterations of the level of CLDN5 in human brain vascular endothelial hCMEC/D3 cells. The Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 and Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA 4.0 Array were used to detect the expression levels of 2,578 miRNAs, 22,829 lncRNAs, and 44,699 mRNAs in pLL3.7‑CLDN5‑transfected and pLL3.7 control hCMEC/D3 cells. The distinctly expressed miRNAs, lncRNAs, and mRNAs were subjected to construction of miRNA‑lncRNA‑mRNA interaction network. A total of 41 miRNAs, 954 lncRNAs, and 222 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between the CLDN5‑overexpressing and control group. 148 lncRNA acting as ceRNAs were identified based on the miRNA‑lncRNA‑mRNA interaction network. The function of differential mRNA in the network was determined by GO and pathway analysis. The potential roles of the 27 ceRNAs were revealed, the possible biology functions of these regulatory ceRNAs mainly included tight junction, focal adhesion, cell‑cell adhesion, cell growth and apoptosis. The identified sets of miRNAs, lncRNAs and mRNAs specific to CLDN5‑overexpressing hCMEC/D3 cells were verified by quantitative real‑time RT‑PCR experiment. Our study predicts the biological functions of a multitude of ceRNAs associated with the alteration of CLDN5 in brain vascular endothelial cells. Our data suggest that these dysregulated ceRNAs, in conjunction with the high CLDN5 levels, could serve

  1. Gas distributor for fluidized bed coal gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Arthur C.; Zboray, James A.

    1980-01-01

    A gas distributor for distributing high temperature reaction gases to a fluidized bed of coal particles in a coal gasification process. The distributor includes a pipe with a refractory reinforced lining and a plurality of openings in the lining through which gas is fed into the bed. These feed openings have an expanding tapered shape in the downstream or exhaust direction which aids in reducing the velocity of the gas jets as they enter the bed.

  2. Gas filtration in binary fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rincon, J. (Univ. de Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain)); Guardiola, J.; Romero, A. (Univ. de Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain))

    1992-12-01

    A systematic experimental study of aerosol filtration in a binary fluidized bed of dielectric material is carried out. Measurements of the collection efficiency when such parameters as gas velocity, bed height, collecting mixture, and column diameter are varied over a wide range have been made. Experimental evidence is given to show that charges generated naturally by triboelectrification of the bed dielectric particles can considerably increase the efficiency of such beds. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a proper choice of the fluidized mixture can significantly improve the performance of such filters.

  3. Exploring Parental Bonding in BED and Non-BED Obesity Compared with Healthy Controls: Clinical, Personality and Psychopathology Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amianto, Federico; Ercole, Roberta; Abbate Daga, Giovanni; Fassino, Secondo

    2016-05-01

    Early inadequate attachment experiences are relevant co-factors in the development of obesity and Binge Eating Disorder (BED), which often concurs with obesity. The relationship of parental bonding with personality and psychopathology may influence treatment strategies for obese subjects, either affected or not with BED. In this study, 443 obese women (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), including 243 with and 200 without BED, and 158 female controls were assessed with regards to attachment, personality and eating psychopathology measures. Clusters obtained using the scores of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) were compared with each other and with a control subjects' group. Lower scores of parental bonding distinguished obese subjects with respect to healthy controls. The cluster analysis revealed two clusters of parenting among obese subjects. The larger one displayed intermediate care and overprotection between controls and the smaller cluster, with the exception of paternal overprotection which is similar to controls. This larger cluster was characterized by low persistence and levels of psychopathology which are intermediate between healthy controls and the smaller cluster. The smaller cluster displayed lower care and higher overcontrol from both parents. It also displays more extreme personality traits (high novelty seeking and harm avoidance, and lower self-directedness and cooperativeness) and more severe eating and general psychopathology. Different parenting dynamics relate to different personality patterns and eating psychopathology of obese subjects, but not to binge eating conducts. Personality differences between parenting clusters are more extensive than those between BED and non-BED subgroups. The two different typologies of obese subjects based on parenting may be relevant for treatment personalization. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  4. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest on Functional Mobility and Balance: Relationship to Resting State Motor Cortex Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdeniz, B.; Koppelmans, V.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Kofman, I. S.; DeDios, Y. E.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    NASA offers researchers from a variety of backgrounds the opportunity to study bed rest as an experimental analog for space flight. Extended exposure to a head-down tilt position during long duration bed rest can resemble many of the effects of a low-gravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The aim of our study is to a) identify changes in brain function that occur with prolonged bed rest and characterize their recovery time course; b) assess whether and how these changes impact behavioral and neurocognitive performance. Thus far, we completed data collection from six participants that include task based and resting state fMRI. The data have been acquired through the bed rest facility located at the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston, TX). Subjects remained in bed with their heads tilted down 6 degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. Behavioral measures and neuroimaging assessments were obtained at seven time points: a) 7 and 12 days before bed rest; b) 7, 30, and 65 days during bed rest; and c) 7 and 12 days after bed rest. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (FcMRI) analysis was performed to assess the connectivity of motor cortex in and out of bed rest. We found a decrease in motor cortex connectivity with vestibular cortex and the cerebellum from pre bed rest to in bed rest. We also used a battery of behavioral measures including the functional mobility test and computerized dynamic posturography collected before and after bed rest. We will report the preliminary results of analyses relating brain and behavior changes. Furthermore, we will also report the preliminary results of a spatial working memory task and vestibular stimulation during in and out of bed rest.

  5. Transport and storage of bed material in a gravel-bed channel during episodes of aggradation and degradation: a field and flume study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnie Smith Pryor; Thomas Lisle; Diane Sutherland Montoya; Sue Hilton

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of sediment transport capacity in gravel-bed rivers is critical to understanding the formation and preservation of fluvial landforms and formulating sediment-routing models in drainage systems. We examine transport-storage relations during cycles of aggradation and degradation by augmenting observations of three events of channel aggradation and...

  6. The influence of bed roughness on partial alluviation in an experimental bedrock channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. R.; Sklar, L. S.; Demeter, G. I.; Johnson, J. P.; Whipple, K. X.

    2005-12-01

    The extent of alluvial cover on a bedrock channel bed strongly influences the efficiency of river incision, and can affect the quality of habitat for aquatic ecosystems. The extent of partial cover is commonly modeled as a simple function of sediment supply relative to the transport capacity of the stream, although other factors are likely to be important, particularly the roughness of the underlying bedrock surface. Here we report results of a set of laboratory experiments investigating the influence of bedrock channel bed topography on the dynamics of partial bed alluviation. The experiments were conducted in a tilting flume 8 m long and 0.3 m wide with an erodible bedrock bed made of a sand-cement mixture. The flume has a calibrated sediment feed and a double-basket sediment trap that provides a continuous record of sediment flux out of the downstream end. We used a uniform grain size of 5 mm, and varied the sediment supply rate from zero to that sufficient to create a fully alluviated bed. We created a variety of bedrock roughness conditions, from smooth, nearly planar surfaces to an egg-carton texture made with a plaster-coated foam mold. Intermediate roughness was achieved by chiseling into smooth beds and by allowing the bed topography to evolve by sustained bedload abrasion. We used a laser microtopography scanning device to make topographic maps of the bed surface, with a vertical resolution of 0.2 mm and a horizontal spacing of 5 mm. From these data we quantify bedrock bed roughness as the standard deviation of the distribution of bed elevations relative to a plane inclined at the mean bed slope. To guide our selection of bed roughness values we made topographic surveys of a number of bedrock channel beds, including partially alluviated channels where we dug trenches through alluvial deposits to expose the underlying bedrock surface. For each bed roughness condition we systematically varied the sediment supply rate and repeatedly mapped the extent of

  7. A new comprehensive model and simulation package for fluidized bed spray granulation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihlow, M.; Drechsler, J.; Peglow, M.; Henneberg, M. [AVA GbRmbH, Steinfeldstrasse 5, D-39179 Barleben-Magdeburg (Germany); Moerl, L. [Universitaet Magdeburg, Institut fuer Apparate- und Umwelttechnik, Postfach 4120, D-39016 Magdeburg (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    The model introduced in this paper makes it possible to calculate the expected product and bed material particle size distribution, as well as the dynamic behavior of process state variables. It was integrated in the developed software package FBSim and it could be shown that even a complex process like the fluidized bed spray granulation can be simulated in its dynamic behavior, if existing models are extended and coupled. The implemented model achieves a coupled solution of the population balance and heat and mass transfer equations. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Exchange between the stagnant and flowing zone in gas-flowing solids-fixed bed contactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSANDAR P. DUDUKOVIC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In countercurrent gas – flowing solids – fixed bed contactors, a fraction of the flowing solids is in motion (dynamic holdup, while the other fraction is resting on the fixed bed elements. In this study it was experimentally proved that the stagnant zone should not be considered as a dead part of the column, but that there is a dynamic exchange between these two portions of flowing solids particles. Combining a mathematical model with tracer experiments, the rate of exchange was determined and it was shown that only a small part (ca. 20 % of the stagnant region should be considered as a dead one.

  9. Metabolic Resistance in Bed Bugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omprakash Mittapalli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood-feeding insects have evolved resistance to various insecticides (organochlorines, pyrethroids, carbamates, etc. through gene mutations and increased metabolism. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius are hematophagous ectoparasites that are poised to become one of the major pests in households throughout the United States. Currently, C. lectularius has attained a high global impact status due to its sudden and rampant resurgence. Resistance to pesticides is one factor implicated in this phenomenon. Although much emphasis has been placed on target sensitivity, little to no knowledge is available on the role of key metabolic players (e.g., cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases towards pesticide resistance in C. lectularius. In this review, we discuss different modes of resistance (target sensitivity, penetration resistance, behavioral resistance, and metabolic resistance with more emphasis on metabolic resistance.

  10. Particle Bed Reactor engine technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, S.; Feddersen, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) based propulsion system being developed under the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. A PBR engine is a light weight, compact propulsion system which offers significant improvement over current technology systems. Current performance goals are a system thrust of 75,000 pounds at an Isp of 1000 sec. A target thrust to weight ratio (T/W) of 30 has been established for an unshielded engine. The functionality of the PBR, its pertinent technology issues and the systems required to make up a propulsion system are described herein. Accomplishments to date which include hardware development and tests for the PBR engine are also discussed. This paper is intended to provide information on and describe the current state-of-the-art of PBR technology. 4 refs

  11. Particle Bed Reactor engine technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, S.; Feddersen, R.

    1992-03-01

    This paper discusses the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) based propulsion system being developed under the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. A PBR engine is a light weight, compact propulsion system which offers significant improvement over current technology systems. Current performance goals are a system thrust of 75,000 pounds at an Isp of 1000 sec. A target thrust to weight ratio (T/W) of 30 has been established for an unshielded engine. The functionality of the PBR, its pertinent technology issues and the systems required to make up a propulsion system are described herein. Accomplishments to date which include hardware development and tests for the PBR engine are also discussed. This paper is intended to provide information on and describe the current state-of-the-art of PBR technology.

  12. Building Controls Virtual Test Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-04-01

    The Building Controls Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB) is a modular software environment that is based on the Ptolemy II software environment. The BCVTB can be used for design and analysis of heterogenous systems, such as building energy and controls systems. Our additions to Ptolemy II allow users to Couple to Ptolemy II simulation software such as EnergyPlus, MATLAB/Simulink or Dymola for data exchange during run-time. Future versions of the BCVTS will also contain an interface to BACnet which is a communication protocol for building Control systems, and interfaces to digital/analog converters that allow communication with controls hardware. Through Ptolemy II, the BCVTB provides a graphical model building environment, synchronizes the exchanged data and visualizes the system evolution during run- time.

  13. Flue gas desulfurization by rotating beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, N.; Keyvani, M.; Coskundeniz, A.

    1992-01-01

    The operating and mass transfer characteristics of rotating foam metal beds were studied to determine the potential for flue gas desulfurization. This is a final technical report on the work supported by DOE [number sign]FG22-87-PC79924. The report is divided into two sections, Part 1 deals primarily with the operating characteristics of rotating beds, and Part 2 covers the mass transfer characteristics of S0[sub 2] absorption in water-lime slurries. Rotating foam metal beds are in essence packed towers operated in high gravitational fields. The foam metal bed is in the form of a cylindrical donut, or torus, and is rotated to produced the high centrifugal forces. The liquid phase enters the bed at the inner surface of the torus and is pulled by the field through the bed. Gas flows countercurrent to the liquid. The bed packing can have a very large specific surface areas and not flood. Possible benefits include much smaller height of a transfer unit resulting in smaller equipment and supporting structures, reduced solvent inventory, faster response with improved process control, reduced pressure drop, and shorter startup and shut-down times. This work is concerned broadly with the operating characteristics of rotating beds, the objectives being to (1) determine the pressure drop through the rotating bed; (2) determine the power required to operate the beds, (3) investigate the residence time distribution of the liquid phase in the beds; and (4) determine the mass transfer coefficients of S0[sub 2] absorption. Three packings of differing specific surface areas were studied, with areas ranging from 656 to 2952 m[sub 2]/m[sub 3]. Liquid flow rates to 36 kg/s*m[sub 2], gas flow rate to 2.2 kg/s*m[sub 2], and gravitational fields to 300 g were covered in this study.

  14. Manual for computing bed load transport using BAGS (Bedload Assessment for Gravel-bed Streams) Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Pitlick; Yantao Cui; Peter Wilcock

    2009-01-01

    This manual provides background information and instructions on the use of a spreadsheet-based program for Bedload Assessment in Gravel-bed Streams (BAGS). The program implements six bed load transport equations developed specifically for gravel-bed rivers. Transport capacities are calculated on the basis of field measurements of channel geometry, reach-average slope,...

  15. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  16. Measurements, patterns, and controls of nitrogen flux in a cranberry bed during the harvest flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential nutrient for cranberry production but also a source of freshwater eutrophication in southeastern Massachusetts. Surface application of N fertilizer is pervasive throughout the cranberry industry, accounting for 93% of total annual N export from farms. The agricultural practice of "wet harvesting", involving the flooding of farms with ~1 ft of water, may promote the vertical transport and transformation of nitrogen in cranberry beds. A cranberry bed at the University of Massachusetts Cranberry Station (East Wareham, MA) has been instrumented with a network of hydrological monitoring equipment for quantifying patterns and controls of nitrogen dynamics during the harvest flood. Here, data of (1) hydraulic head gradient between floodwater and groundwater (J), (2) hydraulic conductivity (K), and (3) N concentration in groundwater (C) collected from multiple points on the cranberry bed will be presented, and used to evaluate the patterns and controls N fluxes (f = JKC) in the cranberry bed.

  17. Breakthrough of toluene vapours in granular activated carbon filled packed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, N.; Kannan, G.K.; Upendra, S.; Subha, R.; Kumar, N.S.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the toluene removal efficiency and breakthrough time using commercially available coconut shell-based granular activated carbon in packed bed reactor. To study the effect of toluene removal and break point time of the granular activated carbon (GAC), the parameters studied were bed lengths (2, 3, and 4 cm), concentrations (5, 10, and 15 mg l -1 ) and flow rates (20, 40, and 60 ml/min). The maximum percentage removal of 90% was achieved and the maximum carbon capacity for 5 mg l -1 of toluene, 60 ml/min flow rate and 3 cm bed length shows 607.14 mg/g. The results of dynamic adsorption in a packed bed were consistent with those of equilibrium adsorption by gravimetric method. The breakthrough time and quantity shows that GAC with appropriate surface area can be utilized for air cleaning filters. The result shows that the physisorption plays main role in toluene removal.

  18. DNA binding during expanded bed adsorption and factors affecting adsorbent aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Mathiasen, N.; Hobley, Timothy John

    2008-01-01

    DNA-induced aggregation and contraction of expanded bed adsorption chromatography beds have been examined using strong anion exchanger Q HyperZ and calf thymus DNA in buffers containing added NaCl. Two batches of adsorbent with different ionic capacities were used allowing the effects of different...... tolerance of anion exchangers when binding DNA. However, more importantly. with the adsorbents examined here. attempts to reduce bed aggregation by feedstock conditioning with added salt may increase DNA binding leading to a reduction in expanded bed adsorption performance compromising protein capture...... ligand densities to be examined. Very high dynamic binding capacities at 10% breakthrough were found in the absence of added salt. However, the highest binding capacities (similar to 10 and similar to 19mg DNA ml(-1) gel) were found in buffers containing added salt at concentrations of either 0.25 or 0...

  19. Numerical simulation of a full-loop circulating fluidized bed under different operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yupeng [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Musser, Jordan M. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Li, Tingwen [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); AECOM, Morgantown, WV (United States); Rogers, William A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-10-17

    Both experimental and computational studies of the fluidization of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) particles in a small-scale full-loop circulating fluidized bed are conducted. Experimental measurements of pressure drop are taken at different locations along the bed. The solids circulation rate is measured with an advanced Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique. The bed height of the quasi-static region in the standpipe is also measured. Comparative numerical simulations are performed with a Computational Fluid Dynamics solver utilizing a Discrete Element Method (CFD-DEM). This paper reports a detailed and direct comparison between CFD-DEM results and experimental data for realistic gas-solid fluidization in a full-loop circulating fluidized bed system. The comparison reveals good agreement with respect to system component pressure drop and inventory height in the standpipe. In addition, the effect of different drag laws applied within the CFD simulation is examined and compared with experimental results.

  20. Glomus tumor of the thigh: confluent with the periosteum of the femur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, George; Klein, Michael J.; Springfield, Dempsey; Abdelwahab, Ibrahim F.; Hoch, Benjamin L.

    2005-01-01

    True glomus tumor is rare. In the majority of cases it involves the hand, preferring the fingertips or nail beds. We report a patient with glomus tumor of the mid-thigh who presented with severe localized pain and limp. The imaging features are discussed and the English literature reviewed. (orig.)

  1. Flue Gas Emissions from Fluidized Bed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramer, E.A.; Valk, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the past decades fluidized bed coal combustion was developed as a technology for burning coal in an effective way meeting the standards for pollution control. During the earlier years of research on fluidized bed combustion, the potential for limiting the S02 emission by adding limestone to

  2. Print a Bed Bug Card - (Single Cards)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two sets of business-card-sized lists of tips for recognizing bed bugs and the signs of an infestation, including a photo of bed bugs to assist identification. One card is for general use around home or office, the other for travelers.

  3. Determination of true bed thickness using folded bed model and borehole data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S.S.; Velasquillo-Martinez, L.G.; Grajales-Nishimura, J.M.; Murillo-Muneton, G. [Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico); Garcia-Hernandez, J. [Petroleos Mexicanos Exploracion y Produccion, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Nieto-Samaniego, A.F. [Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Univ., Veracruz (Mexico). Centro de Geociencias

    2007-11-15

    The actual thickness of a given formation perpendicular to the bedding plane is known as the true bed thickness. Petroleum engineers rely on information regarding true bed thickness, particularly in dipping beds and in deviated holes because reservoir volume and isochore maps depend on these properties and not on the measured thickness. True bed thickness can be estimated from information gathered from well logs such as the dipmeter and borehole images. However, when deviations and dips exceed 10 degrees, corrections are needed. In this paper, a folded bed model was proposed to calculate the true bed thickness in the subsurface utilizing well log data. The value of true bed thickness (t) was shown to depend on the angle and the direction of the dip of the measured formation, as well as the drift angle and azimuth of the borehole. A case study from the Cantarell oil field in the southern Gulf of Mexico, offshore Campeche, was used to test the folded bed method. The model was shown to yield more uniform spatial change of the values of t, compared to the monoclinal bed model that often overestimates the average value of t. The maximum relative deviation of t from the monoclinal bed model reached 22.3 per cent and the maximum absolute deviation of t reached 34.5 m. The key factors that influence the values of t were found to be the bed dip, the dip difference between the top and base of the bed and the deviated angle of the well. The folded bed model yielded fewer changed values of the true bed thickness. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  4. Hybrid modelling of bed-discordant river confluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franca, M. J.; Guillén-Ludeña, S.; Cheng, Z.; Cardoso, A. H.; Constantinescu, G.

    2016-12-01

    In fluvial networks, tributaries are the main providers of sediment and water to the main rivers. Furthermore, confluences are environmental hotspots since they provide ecological connectivity and flow and morphology diversity. Mountain confluences, in particular, are characterized by narrow and steep tributaries that provide important sediment load to the confluence, whereas the main channel supplies the dominant flow discharge. This results in a marked bed discordance between the tributary and main channel. This discordance has been observed to be a key feature that alters the dynamics of the confluence, when compared to concordant confluences. The processes of initiation and maintenance of the morphology of confluences is still unknown, and research linking morphodynamics and hydrodynamics of river confluences is required to understand this. Here, a hybrid approach combining laboratory experiments made in a live-bed model of a river confluence, with 3D numerical simulations using advanced turbulence models is presented. We use the laboratory experiments performed by Guillén-Ludeña et al. (2016) for a 70o channel confluence, which focused on sediment transport and morphology changes rather than on the structure of the flow. Highly eddy resolving simulations were performed for two extreme bathymetric conditions, at the start of the experiment and at equilibrium scour conditions. The first allows to understand the initiation mechanisms which will condition later the equilibrium morphology. The second allows to understand the hydrodynamics actions which keep the equilibrium morphology. The patterns of the mean flow, turbulence and dynamics of the large-scale coherent structures, show how the main sediment-entrainment mechanisms evolve during the scour process. The present results contribute to a better understanding of the interaction between bed morphology and flow dynamics at discordant mountain river confluences.

  5. Does Bedding Affect the Airway and Allergy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RW Siebers

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Various cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested that synthetic bedding is associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema while feather bedding seems to be protective. Synthetic bedding items have higher house dust mite allergen levels than feather bedding items. This is possibly the mechanism involved although fungal and bacterial proinflammatory compounds and volatile organic compounds may play a role. In this review we present and discuss the epidemiological evidence and suggest possible mechanisms. Primary intervention studies are required to show whether feather bedding is protective for the development of childhood asthma and allergic diseases while secondary intervention studies are required to potentially reduce symptoms and medication use in subjects with established disease.

  6. Continuous austempering fluidized bed furnace. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, M.N. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-09-23

    The intended objective of this project was to show the benefits of using a fluidized bed furnace for austenitizing and austempering of steel castings in a continuous manner. The division of responsibilities was as follows: (1) design of the fluidized bed furnace--Kemp Development Corporation; (2) fabrication of the fluidized bed furnace--Quality Electric Steel, Inc.; (3) procedure for austempering of steel castings, analysis of the results after austempering--Texas A and M University (Texas Engineering Experiment Station). The Department of Energy provided funding to Texas A and M University and Kemp Development Corporation. The responsibility of Quality Electric Steel was to fabricate the fluidized bed, make test castings and perform austempering of the steel castings in the fluidized bed, at their own expense. The project goals had to be reviewed several times due to financial constraints and technical difficulties encountered during the course of the project. The modifications made and the associated events are listed in chronological order.

  7. Single particle behaviour in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus

    1994-01-01

    of fuel particles in a boiler. A cold pilot scale model of a circulating fluidized bed combustor was used. Here sand was recirculated by means of air. Pressure measurements along the riser determined suspension density. A radioactive tracking facility to determined the dynamic picture of the particle...... trajectories in the simulated boiler. In the splash zone, closest to the secondary air inlet an exponential decay in the solids suspension density with the riser height was observed. A transport zone was characterized by an exponential decay in the solids suspension but with a smaller decay constant...

  8. Energy Saving by Novel Bed-Integrated Local Exhaust Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bivolarova, Mariya Petrova; Kehayova, Nushka; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2016-01-01

    was used alone at 4, 6 and 12 ACH. The air exhausted through the mattress was 1.5 L/s. The occupants were present 24 hours every day including weekends. Compared to the CAV ventilation used alone at 4, 6 and 12 ACH the use of the VM in the single-bed room decreased the annual energy consumption......-bed hospital patient room (1.3 air changes per hour (ACH)) and double-bed patient room (1.6 ACH) was assessed by means of dynamic computer simulations. The estimated annual energy consumption for the rooms using the VM combined with CAV was compared to the annual energy consumption when the CAV ventilation...... the mattress to the exhaust of the room background ventilation system. Comprehensive research reveals that the method is highly efficient for removal of bio-effluents. The energy saving potential of the VM combined with constant air volume (CAV) ventilation operating at reduced ventilation rate in a single...

  9. Laboratory study of gravel-bed cluster formation and disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heays, K. G.; Friedrich, H.; Melville, B. W.

    2014-03-01

    Increased knowledge of clusters is essential for the understanding of sediment transport behavior and the monitoring and protection of aquatic life. A physical study using graded river gravels is conducted in a laboratory environment. Using photogrammetry and painted gravels, a cluster identification tool (CIT) is developed based on image subtraction between subsequent frames, allowing identification of any stable areas and groups of particles on the bed. This is combined with digital particle tracking (DPT) to present a novel approach for monitoring the formation and disintegration of clusters. Clusters from graded gravels are formed successfully during the experimental stage, allowing investigation into the complex dynamic behavior of cluster formation and disintegration in a simulated natural environment. Various anchor stone arrangements are used in the experiments. However, only about one fifth of the potential anchor stones on the bed surface enable cluster formation. In general, clusters classified as "typical" and "heap" are most common. Inspection of temporal cluster coverage of the test-bed surface shows that the proportion of clusters present on the surface tends to grow with time. Maximum cluster surface coverage of between 5% and 34% is observed. In addition, particles entering and departing from clusters are monitored. Most commonly, particles enter from directly upstream of the cluster, however >20% of particles approach from a direction >20 deg from the streamwise direction. Approximately 35% of all particles directly upstream of a cluster bypass the cluster.

  10. Bed care for patients in palliative settings: considering risks to caregivers and bed surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragala, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Ensuring patients are comfortable in bed is key to effective palliative care, but when moving and positioning patients in bed, health professionals face an occupational risk of injury. The turning and positioning (TAP) system is a new method of moving patients in bed, that evidence has shown to reduce the risk of injury to caregivers. Providing the correct bed surface is another aspect of bed care essential to the comfort of the palliative patient, and to aid wound prevention and treatment. It is important to take a patient-centred approach when considering the most appropriate bed surface patients. This article provides an overview and discussion of these two aspects of bed care for palliative patients.

  11. Characterization of biofilm in 200W fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Michelle H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saurey, Sabrina D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Parker, Kent E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eisenhauer, Emalee E. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cordova, Elsa A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Golovich, Elizabeth C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-29

    Contaminated groundwater beneath the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington is currently being treated using a pump and treat system to remove organics, inorganics, radionuclides, and metals. A granular activated carbon-based fluidized bed reactor (FBR) has been added to remove nitrate, hexavalent chromium and carbon tetrachloride. Initial analytical results indicated the microorganisms effectively reduced many of the contaminants to less than cleanup levels. However shortly thereafter operational upsets of the FBR include carbon carry over, over production of microbial extracellular polymeric substance (biofilm) materials, and over production of hydrogen sulfide. As a result detailed investigations were undertaken to understand the functional diversity and activity of the microbial community present in the FBR over time. Molecular analyses including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the microbial community extracted from the biofilm within the bed and from the inoculum, to determine functional dynamics of the FBR bed over time and following operational changes. Findings from these analyses indicated: 1) the microbial community within the bed was completely different than community used for inoculation, and was likely from the groundwater; 2) analyses early in the testing showed an FBR community dominated by a few Curvibacter and Flavobacterium species; 3) the final sample taken indicated that the microbial community in the FBR bed had become more diverse; and 4) qPCR analyses indicated that bacteria involved in nitrogen cycling, including denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria, were dominant in the bed. These results indicate that molecular tools can be powerful for determining functional diversity within FBR type reactors. Coupled with micronutrient, influent and effluent chemistry

  12. Sand Bed Morphodynamics under Standing Waves and Vegetated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, B. J.; Garcia, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    Littoral processes such as sediment transport, wave attenuation, and boundary layer development are governed by the presence of bathymetric features, which include large-scale sand bars upon which smaller-scale sand ripples are superimposed, as well as the presence of submarine vegetation. Numerous studies on sand ripples and bars have aided to elucidate the dynamics in oscillatory flows; however, the effect of vegetation on the system is less understood. Recent laboratory studies have focused on quantifying wave attenuation by emergent vegetation as a natural method to mitigate storm surges. The emergent vegetation, while promising for coastal protection, alters sediment transport rates directly by the physical presence of the plants near the bed and indirectly from reduction in near-bed shear stresses due to attenuated wave energy. The experimental work herein focuses on the area near the deeply submerged vegetated canopy limit (current work has a ratio of mean still water depth to plant height, H/h, = 7.9) to minimize the effect on the surface waves and discern the direct impact vegetation has on sand bed morphodynamics. Experiments were conducted in the large wave tank (49-m long by 1.83-m wide by 1.22-m deep) in the Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory at the University of Illinois in which a high reflection wave forcing was used over a uniform sand bed with a 0.25-mm median sediment diameter in which staggered and uniform arrangements of idealized vegetation (i.e., 6.35-mm diameter rigid wooden cylinders) were positioned along the bed (e.g., at predetermined sand bar troughs and over an entire sand bar). The resulting bathymetric evolution from the vegetated case experiments were compared to the base case of no vegetation using two optical methods: a high-resolution laser displacement sensor for three-dimensional surveys and digitized profiles via high-definition panoramic images of the entire test section. The experimental findings illustrate the profound

  13. Intraoperative photodynamic therapy for nonorgan retroperitoneal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. А. Vashakmadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of treatment in 17 patients with morphologically confirmed resectable primary or recurrent retroperitoneal tumor using intraoperative photodynamic therapy with photogem (5 patients, radaсhlorin (7 patients and photodithazine (5 patients. The drugs were administered intravenously in following regimen: photogem 48 h before surgery in dose 2.5–3.0 mg/kg, radaсhlorin and photodithazine – 0.7 and 0.7–1.0 mg/kg, respectively, 2–3 h before resection. Irradiation was performed to tumor bed after complete radical removal from one or several positions depending on tumor localization. The light dose accounted for 30 J/cm2, duration of treatment session depended on area of irradiation. Two patients with recurrent tumor had two reoperations with session of photodynamic therapy. One patient had repeated recurrence requiring third surgery with photodynamic therapy. Thus, 17 patients underwent 25 sessions of intraoperative photodynamic therapy. There were no intraoperative complications. One patient had an early post-operative complication in the form of pancreonecrosis which could be associated with extended resection. The recurrence rate was 17.6%. The results showed safety of the method and affinity of utilized photosensitizers to retroperitoneal tumors of different histological types (sarcoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor and others. 

  14. Development of Bed Ridges in Open Channels and their Effects on Secondary Currents and Wall Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Ansari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A numerical analysis of the ridges on the bed of wide, open channels and their effects on the distribution of secondary currents and wall shear is undertaken using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics. The presence of the lines of boil, consisting of low speed streaks, periodically in the transverse direction, is reported in the literature due to the presence of the ridges. In the present work, simulations are run on channel sections with varying the number of ridges on the bed and the size of these ridges. The effect of these variations on the flow structures and shear stress distribution in wide open channels is reported. The results offer an interesting insight into the 3D (Three-Dimensional flow structures involved and the link between flow structures and bed morpho-dynamics in prismatic channels.

  15. Measurement and modelling of bed shear induced by solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.

    horizontal continental shelf. Measurements of bed shear stress, surface elevation and flow velocities were carried out. Periodic waves were also generated and the bed shear stresses measured over a horizontal bed were found to be comparable with the earlier...

  16. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on the survival rates for people with a ...

  17. Tumors and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  18. DCB - Tumor Metastasis Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor metastasis research examines the mechanisms that allow cancer cells to leave the primary tumor and spread to another part of the body. Learn about recent tumor metastasis research studies supported by the Division of Cancer Biology.

  19. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  20. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  1. Long-term and high resolution measurements of bed level changes in a temperate, microtidal coastal lagoon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thorbjørn J.; Pejrup, Morten; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2006-01-01

    This study presents the results of a long-term monitoring program of bed level changes measured during 8 yr at an intertidal mudflat in a microtidal, temperate coastal lagoon. Additionally, bed level measurements obtained at a 10-min temporal resolution at the same tidal flat and at the bed...... of a nearby tidal channel are presented. Short-term changes in bed level are one or two orders of magnitude larger than the annual net-deposition rate, which shows that the environment is highly dynamic with respect to erosion, transport and deposition of fine-grained sediment. Some seasonality in the bed...... level changes was observed and there is a tendency for mudflat deposition in spring, summer and early autumn and erosion during the rest of the year, but interannual variations are large and different parts of the mudflat show different seasonal signals. A close coupling between sub- and intertidal...

  2. Fluidized bed adsorption of cephalosporin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicketier, M; Buchholz, K

    2002-02-28

    Fluidized bed adsorption can substantially simplify the recovery of products from fermentation. There are, however, several critical parameters, which have a significant influence on the performance of such systems. This paper presents experimental results on the adsorption of an antibiotic, Cephalosporin C, on macroporous adsorbents of the polystyrene type and on an ion exchanger. Internals (static mixers) were used to control bed expansion and mixing, the range of flow rates could thus be extended significantly. An integrated mathematical model was developed comprising bed expansion, residence time distribution and mixing, adsorption kinetics and equilibria.

  3. Fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, T.; Kudjoi, A.; Hippinen, I.; Heinolainen, A.; Suominen, M.; Lu Yong [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab of Energy Economics and Power Plant Engineering

    1996-12-01

    Partial gasification processes have been presented as possibilities for future power production. In the processes, the solid materials removed from a gasifier (i.e. fly ash and bed material) contain unburnt fuel and the fuel conversion is increased by burning this gasification residue either in an atmospheric or a pressurised fluidised-bed. In this project, which is a part of European JOULE 2 EXTENSION research programme, the main research objectives are the behaviour of calcium and sulphur compounds in solids and the emissions of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O) in pressurised fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residues. (author)

  4. Electrostatic collection efficiency in binary fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, A.; Guardiola, J.; Rincon, J. (Univ. of Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain))

    1992-01-01

    Fluidized beds of binary mixtures have been used to clean air streams containing dust particles in the size range 4.4 to 14 {mu}m. All beds were composed of glass beads and plastic granules mixed at different proportions. The effect on the electrostatic collection efficiency of a number of variables, including type of collecting mixture, bed height, and gas velocity, was examined. To calculate the single collection efficiency from experimental results, an early model proposed by Clift et al. was used. The electrostatic collection efficiency was determined by subtracting the other individual mechanism efficiencies from the single particle collection efficiency.

  5. A PROTOTYPE FOUR INCH SHORT HYDRIDE (FISH) BED AS A REPLACEMENT TRITIUM STORAGE BED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.; Estochen, E.; Shanahan, K.; Heung, L.

    2011-02-23

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities have used 1st generation (Gen1) metal hydride storage bed assemblies with process vessels (PVs) fabricated from 3 inch nominal pipe size (NPS) pipe to hold up to 12.6 kg of LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} metal hydride for tritium gas absorption, storage, and desorption for over 15 years. The 2nd generation (Gen2) of the bed design used the same NPS for the PV, but the added internal components produced a bed nominally 1.2 m long, and presented a significant challenge for heater cartridge replacement in a footprint limited glove-box. A prototype 3rd generation (Gen3) metal hydride storage bed has been designed and fabricated as a replacement candidate for the Gen2 storage bed. The prototype Gen3 bed uses a PV pipe diameter of 4 inch NPS so the bed length can be reduced below 0.7 m to facilitate heater cartridge replacement. For the Gen3 prototype bed, modeling results show increased absorption rates when using hydrides with lower absorption pressures. To improve absorption performance compared to the Gen2 beds, a LaNi{sub 4.15}Al{sub 0.85} material was procured and processed to obtain the desired pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) properties. Other bed design improvements are also presented.

  6. In-Bed Accountability Development for a Passively Cooled, Electrically Heated Hydride (PACE) Bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    A nominal 1500 STP-L PAssively Cooled, Electrically heated hydride (PACE) Bed has been developed for implementation into a new Savannah River Site tritium project. The 1.2 meter (four-foot) long process vessel contains on internal 'U-tube' for tritium In-Bed Accountability (IBA) measurements. IBA will be performed on six, 12.6 kg production metal hydride storage beds.IBA tests were done on a prototype bed using electric heaters to simulate the radiol