WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic probe selection

  1. Introducing Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: Probing the Substrate Selectivity of Acetylcholinesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelin, Marcus; Larsson, Rikard; Vongvilai, Pornrapee; Ramstrom, Olof

    2010-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, college students are introduced to dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) and apply it to determine the substrate selectivity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Initially, the students construct a chemical library of dynamically interchanging thioesters and thiols. Then, AChE is added and allowed to select and hydrolyze…

  2. Probing reaction dynamics with GDR decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beene, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The giant dipole resonance (GDR) has been a prolific source of information on the physics of the nucleus. Mostly it has taught us about nuclear structure, but recently experiments have utilized the GDR as a probe of nuclear reaction dynamics. In this report two examples of such investigations are discussed involving very different reactions and probing time scales that differ by a factor of ∼10 3

  3. Continuous waves probing in dynamic acoustoelastic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalerandi, M.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Ait Ouarabi, M.; Boubenider, F.

    2016-05-01

    Consolidated granular media display a peculiar nonlinear elastic behavior, which is normally analysed with dynamic ultrasonic testing exploiting the dependence on amplitude of different measurable quantities, such as the resonance frequency shift, the amount of harmonics generation, or the break of the superposition principle. However, dynamic testing allows measuring effects which are averaged over one (or more) cycles of the exciting perturbation. Dynamic acoustoelastic testing has been proposed to overcome this limitation and allow the determination of the real amplitude dependence of the modulus of the material. Here, we propose an implementation of the approach, in which the pulse probing waves are substituted by continuous waves. As a result, instead of measuring a time-of-flight as a function of the pump strain, we study the dependence of the resonance frequency on the strain amplitude, allowing to derive the same conclusions but with an easier to implement procedure.

  4. Probing Cellular Dynamics with Mesoscopic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular processes span a huge range of length and time scales from the molecular to the near-macroscopic. Understanding how effects on one scale influence, and are themselves influenced by, those on lower and higher scales is a critical issue for the construction of models in Systems Biology....... Advances in computing hardware and software now allow explicit simulation of some aspects of cellular dynamics close to the molecular scale. Vesicle fusion is one example of such a process. Experiments, however, typically probe cellular behavior from the molecular scale up to microns. Standard particle...... soon be coupled to Mass Action models allowing the parameters in such models to be continuously tuned according to the finer resolution simulation. This will help realize the goal of a computational cellular simulation that is able to capture the dynamics of membrane-associated processes...

  5. Probe Selection for DNA Microarrays using OligoWiz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Juncker, Agnieszka; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2007-01-01

    Nucleotide abundance measurements using DNA microarray technology are possible only if appropriate probes complementary to the target nucleotides can be identified. Here we present a protocol for selecting DNA probes for microarrays using the OligoWiz application. OligoWiz is a client-server appl......Nucleotide abundance measurements using DNA microarray technology are possible only if appropriate probes complementary to the target nucleotides can be identified. Here we present a protocol for selecting DNA probes for microarrays using the OligoWiz application. OligoWiz is a client......-server application that offers a detailed graphical interface and real-time user interaction on the client side, and massive computer power and a large collection of species databases (400, summer 2007) on the server side. Probes are selected according to five weighted scores: cross-hybridization, deltaT(m), folding...... computer skills and can be executed from any Internet-connected computer. The probe selection procedure for a standard microarray design targeting all yeast transcripts can be completed in 1 h....

  6. Efficient oligonucleotide probe selection for pan-genomic tiling arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array comparative genomic hybridization is a fast and cost-effective method for detecting, genotyping, and comparing the genomic sequence of unknown bacterial isolates. This method, as with all microarray applications, requires adequate coverage of probes targeting the regions of interest. An unbiased tiling of probes across the entire length of the genome is the most flexible design approach. However, such a whole-genome tiling requires that the genome sequence is known in advance. For the accurate analysis of uncharacterized bacteria, an array must query a fully representative set of sequences from the species' pan-genome. Prior microarrays have included only a single strain per array or the conserved sequences of gene families. These arrays omit potentially important genes and sequence variants from the pan-genome. Results This paper presents a new probe selection algorithm (PanArray that can tile multiple whole genomes using a minimal number of probes. Unlike arrays built on clustered gene families, PanArray uses an unbiased, probe-centric approach that does not rely on annotations, gene clustering, or multi-alignments. Instead, probes are evenly tiled across all sequences of the pan-genome at a consistent level of coverage. To minimize the required number of probes, probes conserved across multiple strains in the pan-genome are selected first, and additional probes are used only where necessary to span polymorphic regions of the genome. The viability of the algorithm is demonstrated by array designs for seven different bacterial pan-genomes and, in particular, the design of a 385,000 probe array that fully tiles the genomes of 20 different Listeria monocytogenes strains with overlapping probes at greater than twofold coverage. Conclusion PanArray is an oligonucleotide probe selection algorithm for tiling multiple genome sequences using a minimal number of probes. It is capable of fully tiling all genomes of a species on

  7. Hard photons a probe of the heavy ion collision dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Heavy-ion collisions have proven to be a unique tool to study the nucleus in extreme states, with values of energy, spin and isospin far away from those encountered in the nucleus in its ground state. Heavy-ion collisions provide also the only mean to form and study in the laboratory nuclear matter under conditions of density and temperature which could otherwise only be found in stellar objects like neutron stars and super-novae. the goal of such studies is to establish the equation of state of nuclear matter and the method consist in searching the collective behaviour in which heavy-ion collisions differ from a superposition of many nucleon-nucleon collisions. Among the various probes of collective effects, like flow, multifragmentation, or subthreshold particles, we have selected hard photons because they provide, together with dileptons, the only unperturbed probe of a phase of the collision well localized in space and time. The origin of hard photons, defined as the photons building up the spectrum beyond the energy of the giant dipole resonance (E γ > 30∼MeV), is attributed predominantly to the bremsstrahlung radiation emitted incoherently in individual neutron-proton collisions. Their energy reflects the combination of the beam momentum and the momenta induced by the Fermi motion of the nucleons within the collision zone. Therefore, at intermediate energies, hard photons probe the dynamical phase space distribution of participant nucleons and they convey information on the densities reached in heavy-ion collisions, the size and life time of the dense photon source and the compressibility of nuclear matter. The techniques we have developed include intensity interferometry and exclusive measurements scanning with high resolution the whole range of impact parameters. The interpretation of our data is guided by dynamical phase space calculations of the BUU type

  8. Dynamic pressure probe response tests for robust measurements in periodic flows close to probe resonating frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhun Şahin, Fatma; Schiffmann, Jürg

    2018-02-01

    A single-hole probe was designed to measure steady and periodic flows with high fluctuation amplitudes and with minimal flow intrusion. Because of its high aspect ratio, estimations showed that the probe resonates at a frequency two orders of magnitude lower than the fast response sensor cut-off frequencies. The high fluctuation amplitudes cause a non-linear behavior of the probe and available models are neither adequate for a quantitative estimation of the resonating frequencies nor for predicting the system damping. Instead, a non-linear data correction procedure based on individual transfer functions defined for each harmonic contribution is introduced for pneumatic probes that allows to extend their operating range beyond the resonating frequencies and linear dynamics. This data correction procedure was assessed on a miniature single-hole probe of 0.35 mm inner diameter which was designed to measure flow speed and direction. For the reliable use of such a probe in periodic flows, its frequency response was reproduced with a siren disk, which allows exciting the probe up to 10 kHz with peak-to-peak amplitudes ranging between 20%-170% of the absolute mean pressure. The effect of the probe interior design on the phase lag and amplitude distortion in periodic flow measurements was investigated on probes with similar inner diameters and different lengths or similar aspect ratios (L/D) and different total interior volumes. The results suggest that while the tube length consistently sets the resonance frequency, the internal total volume affects the non-linear dynamic response in terms of varying gain functions. A detailed analysis of the introduced calibration methodology shows that the goodness of the reconstructed data compared to the reference data is above 75% for fundamental frequencies up to twice the probe resonance frequency. The results clearly suggest that the introduced procedure is adequate to capture non-linear pneumatic probe dynamics and to

  9. Probing ultrafast carrier dynamics, nonlinear absorption

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We investigate the relaxation dynamics of photogenerated carriers in silicon nanowires consisting of a crystalline core and a surrounding amorphous shell, using femtosecond time resolved differential reflectivity and transmission spectroscopy at 3.15 eV and 1.57 eV photon energies. The complex behaviour of the ...

  10. Atomic probes of surface structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, E.J.; Jonsson, H.

    1992-01-01

    Progress for the period Sept. 15, 1992 to Sept. 14, 1993 is discussed. Semiclassical methods that will allow much faster and more accurate three-dimensional atom--surface scattering calculations, both elastic and inelastic, are being developed. The scattering of He atoms from buckyballs is being investigated as a test problem. Somewhat more detail is given on studies of He atom scattering from defective Pt surfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations of He + and Ar + ion sputtering of Pt surfaces are also being done. He atom scattering from Xe overlayers on metal surfaces and the thermalized dissociation of H 2 on Cu(110) are being studied. (R.W.R.) 64 refs

  11. A Local Probe for Universal Non-equilibrium Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    shown are polarizing beam splitters . About 700µW are superimposed with a reference laser on a glass plate and coupled into an optical fiber to detect...A Local Probe for Universal Non -equilibrium Dynamics We report on the results obtained across a nine-month ARO-sponsored project, whose purpose was...to implement a local probe for a gas of ultracold atoms. We used a phase plate with a spiral phase gradient to create a hollow-core laser beam . This

  12. Valley-selective optical Stark effect probed by Kerr rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMountain, Trevor; Bergeron, Hadallia; Balla, Itamar; Stanev, Teodor K.; Hersam, Mark C.; Stern, Nathaniel P.

    2018-01-01

    The ability to monitor and control distinct states is at the heart of emerging quantum technologies. The valley pseudospin in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) monolayers is a promising degree of freedom for such control, with the optical Stark effect allowing for valley-selective manipulation of energy levels in WS2 and WSe2 using ultrafast optical pulses. Despite these advances, understanding of valley-sensitive optical Stark shifts in TMDCs has been limited by reflectance-based detection methods where the signal is small and prone to background effects. More sensitive polarization-based spectroscopy is required to better probe ultrafast Stark shifts for all-optical manipulation of valley energy levels. Here, we show time-resolved Kerr rotation to be a more sensitive probe of the valley-selective optical Stark effect in monolayer TMDCs. Compared to the established time-resolved reflectance methods, Kerr rotation is less sensitive to background effects. Kerr rotation provides a fivefold improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the Stark effect optical signal and a more precise estimate of the energy shift. This increased sensitivity allows for observation of an optical Stark shift in monolayer MoS2 that exhibits both valley and energy selectivity, demonstrating the promise of this method for investigating this effect in other layered materials and heterostructures.

  13. Rotationally resolved flurorescence as a probe of molecular photoionization dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliakoff, E.D.; Kakar, S.; Choi, H.C.

    1993-01-01

    We present rotationally resolved data for N 2 (2σ u -1 ) photoionization in the excitation energy range 19 ≤ hν ≤ 35 eV. These are the first rotationally resolved measurements on the photoion over an extended spectral range above the ionization threshold. The requisite resolution is obtained by measuring rotationally resolved fluorescence from electronically excited photoions created by synchrotron radiation. This technique is useful for studying dynamical features embedded deep in the ionization continua and should supplement laser-based methods that are limited to probing near-threshold phenomena. The present study shows that the outgoing photoelectron can alter the rotational motion of the more massive photoion by exchanging angular momentum and this partitioning of angular momentum depends on the ionization dynamics. Thus, our data directly probe electron-molecule interactions and are sensitive probes of scattering dynamics. We are currently investigating dynamical features such as shape resonances and Cooper minima with rotational resolution for deciphering microscopic aspects of molecular scattering and these efforts will be discussed

  14. Probing electron correlation and nuclear dynamics in Momentum Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleuze, M S; Hajgato, B; Morini, F; Knippenberg, S

    2010-01-01

    Orbital imaging experiments employing Electron Momentum Spectroscopy are subject to many complications, such as distorted wave effects, conformational mobility in the electronic ground state, ultra-fast nuclear dynamics in the final state, or a dispersion of the ionization intensity over electronically excited (shake-up) configurations of the cation. The purpose of the present contribution is to illustrate how a proper treatment of these complications enables us to probe in momentum space the consequences of electron correlation and nuclear dynamics in neutral and cationic states.

  15. Adhesion Dynamics in Probing Micro- and Nanoscale Thin Solid Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling He

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on modeling the probe dynamics in scratching and indenting thin solid films at micro- and nanoscales. The model identifies bifurcation conditions that define the stick-slip oscillation patterns of the tip. It is found that the local energy fluctuations as a function of the inelastic deformation, defect formation, material properties, and contact parameters determine the oscillation behavior. The transient variation of the localized function makes the response nonlinear at the adhesion junction. By quantifying the relation between the bifurcation parameters and the oscillation behavior, this model gives a realistic representation of the complex adhesion dynamics. Specifically, the model establishes the link between the stick-slip behavior and the inelastic deformation and the local potentials. This model justifies the experimental observations and the molecular dynamics simulation of the adhesion and friction dynamics in both the micro- and nanoscale contact.

  16. Probing Dynamics in Colloidal Crystals with Pump-Probe Experiments at LCLS: Methodology and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastasia Mukharamova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We present results of the studies of dynamics in colloidal crystals performed by pump-probe experiments using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL. Colloidal crystals were pumped with an infrared laser at a wavelength of 800 nm with varying power and probed by XFEL pulses at an energy of 8 keV with a time delay up to 1000 ps. The positions of the Bragg peaks, and their radial and azimuthal widths were analyzed as a function of the time delay. The spectral analysis of the data did not reveal significant enhancement of frequencies expected in this experiment. This allowed us to conclude that the amplitude of vibrational modes excited in colloidal crystals was less than the systematic error caused by the noise level.

  17. Probing Ultrafast Electron Dynamics at Surfaces Using Soft X-Ray Transient Reflectivity Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L. Robert; Husek, Jakub; Biswas, Somnath; Cirri, Anthony

    The ability to probe electron dynamics with surface sensitivity on the ultrafast time scale is critical for understanding processes such as charge separation, injection, and surface trapping that mediate efficiency in catalytic and energy conversion materials. Toward this goal, we have developed a high harmonic generation (HHG) light source for femtosecond soft x-ray reflectivity. Using this light source we investigated the ultrafast carrier dynamics at the surface of single crystalline α-Fe2O3, polycrystalline α-Fe2O3, and the mixed metal oxide, CuFeO2. We have recently demonstrated that CuFeO2 in particular is a selective catalyst for photo-electrochemical CO2 reduction to acetate; however, the role of electronic structure and charge carrier dynamics in mediating catalytic selectivity has not been well understood. Soft x-ray reflectivity measurements probe the M2,3, edges of the 3d transition metals, which provide oxidation and spin state resolution with element specificity. In addition to chemical state specificity, these measurements are also surface sensitive, and by independently simulating the contributions of the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index, we can differentiate between surface and sub-surface contributions to the excited state spectrum. Accordingly, this work demonstrates the ability to probe ultrafast carrier dynamics in catalytic materials with element and chemical state specificity and with surface sensitivity.

  18. Imaging dynamic redox processes with genetically encoded probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeriņa, Daria; Morgan, Bruce; Dick, Tobias P

    2014-08-01

    Redox signalling plays an important role in many aspects of physiology, including that of the cardiovascular system. Perturbed redox regulation has been associated with numerous pathological conditions; nevertheless, the causal relationships between redox changes and pathology often remain unclear. Redox signalling involves the production of specific redox species at specific times in specific locations. However, until recently, the study of these processes has been impeded by a lack of appropriate tools and methodologies that afford the necessary redox species specificity and spatiotemporal resolution. Recently developed genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes now allow dynamic real-time measurements, of defined redox species, with subcellular compartment resolution, in intact living cells. Here we discuss the available genetically encoded redox probes in terms of their sensitivity and specificity and highlight where uncertainties or controversies currently exist. Furthermore, we outline major goals for future probe development and describe how progress in imaging methodologies will improve our ability to employ genetically encoded redox probes in a wide range of situations. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Redox Signalling in the Cardiovascular System." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Canopy Dynamics in Nanoscale Ionic Materials Probed by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirau, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are hybrids prepared from ionically functionalized nanoparticles (NP) neutralized by oligomeric polymer counter-ions. NIMs are designed to behave as liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and have no volatile organic content, making them useful for a number of applications. We have used NMR relaxation and pulse-field gradient NMR to probe local and collective canopy dynamics in NIMs based on silica nanoparticles (NP), fullerols and proteins in order to understand the relationship between the core and canopy structure and the bulk properties. The NMR studies show that the canopy dynamics depend on the degree of neutralization, the canopy radius of gyration and molecular crowding at the ionically modified NP surface. The viscosity in NIMs can be directly controlled with the addition of ions that enhance the exchange rate for polymers at the NP surface. These results show that NIMs for many applications can be prepared by controlling the dynamics of the NP interface.

  20. Retarded Local Dynamics of Single Fluorescent Probes in Polymeric Glass due to Interaction Strengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Yang, Jingfa; Zhao, Jiang

    The effect of strengthening of interaction between single fluorescent probes and polymer matrix to the probes dynamics is investigated using single molecule fluorescence defocus microscopy. By introducing multiple hydroxyl groups to the fluorescent probes, which builds up hydrogen bonds between the probe and polymer matrix, the dynamics is discovered to be retarded. This is evidenced by the lowering of the frequency of the vibrational modes in the power spectra of the rotation trajectories of individual fluorescent probes, and also by the lowering of population of rotating probes. The results show that by strengthening the probe-matrix interaction, the local dynamics detected by the probes is equivalent to that detected by a bigger probe, due to the enhanced friction between the probe and the polymer matrix. the National Basic Research Program of China (2012CB821500).

  1. Pump probe spectroscopy of quasiparticle dynamics in cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segre, Gino P.

    2001-01-01

    Pump probe spectroscopy is used to examine the picosecond response of a BSCCO thin film, and two YBCO crystals in the near infrared. The role of pump fluence and temperature have been closely examined in an effort to clarify the mechanism by which the quasiparticles rejoin the condensate. BSCCO results suggest that the recombination behavior is consistent with the d-wave density of states in that quasiparticles appear to relax to the nodes immediately before they rejoin the condensate. The first substantial investigation of polarized pump probe response in detwinned YBCO crystals is also reported. Dramatic doping dependent anisotropies along the a and b axes are observed in time and temperature resolved studies. Among many results, we highlight the discovery of an anomalous temperature and time dependence of a- axis response in optimally doped YBCO. We also report on the first observation of the photoinduced response in a magnetic field. We find the amplitude of the response, and in some cases, the dynamics considerably changed with the application of a 6T field. Finally, we speculate on two of the many theoretical directions stimulated by our results. We find that the two-fluid model suggests a mechanism to explain how changes at very low energies are visible to a high-energy probe. Also discussed are basic recombination processes which may play a role in the observed decay

  2. Ultrafast dissociation: An unexpected tool for probing molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Paul; Miron, Catalin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ultrafast dissociation has been investigated by means of XPS and mass spectrometry. ► The interplay between electron relaxation and molecular dynamics is evidenced. ► Extension toward polyatomics, clusters, adsorbed molecules is considered. ► Quantum effects (spectral hole, angular effects) evidence the molecular field anisotropy. -- Abstract: Ultrafast dissociation following core–shell excitation into an antibonding orbital led to the early observation in HBr of atomic Auger lines associated to the decay of dissociated excited atoms. The purpose of this article is to review the very large variety of systems where such a situation has been encountered, extending from simple diatomic molecules toward more complex systems like polyatomics, clusters, or adsorbed molecules. Interestingly, this phenomenon has revealed an extremely rich and powerful tool for probing nuclear dynamics and its subtle interplay with electron relaxation occurring on a comparable time scale. Consequently this review covers a surprisingly large period, starting in 1986 and still ongoing.

  3. A selectively rhodamine-based colorimetric probe for detecting copper(II) ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangang; Zhang, Li; Wei, Yanli; Chao, Jianbing; Shuang, Shaomin; Cai, Zongwei; Dong, Chuan

    2014-11-11

    A novel rhodamine derivative 3-bromo-5-methylsalicylaldehyde rhodamine B hydrazone (BMSRH) has been synthesized by reacting rhodamine B hydrazide with 3-bromo-5-methylsalicylaldehyde and developed as a new colorimetric probe for the selective and sensitive detection of Cu2+. Addition of Cu2+ to the solution of BMSRH results in a rapid color change from colorless to red together with an obvious new band appeared at 552 nm in the UV-vis absorption spectra. This change is attributed to the spirocycle form of BMSRH opened via coordination with Cu2+ in a 1:1 stoichiometry and their association constant is determined as 3.2×10(4) L mol(-1). Experimental results indicate that the BMSRH can provide a rapid, selective and sensitive response to Cu2+ with a linear dynamic range 0.667-240 μmol/L. Common interferent ions do not show any interference on the Cu2+ determination. It is anticipated that BMSRH can be a good candidate probe and has potential application for Cu2+ determination. The proposed probe exhibits the following advantages: a quick, simple and facile synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Topological mass of magnetic Skyrmions probed by ultrafast dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buettner, Felix

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the GHz dynamics of skyrmionic spin structures by means of pump-probe dynamic imaging to determine the equation of motion that governs the behavior of these technologically relevant spin structures. To achieve this goal, we first designed and optimized a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy CoB/Pt multilayer material for low magnetic pinning, as required for ultrafast pump-probe imaging experiments. Second, we developed an integrated sample design for X-ray holography capable of tracking relative magnetic positional changes down to 3 nm spatial resolution. These advances enabled us to image the trajectory of a single magnetic Skyrmion. We find that the motion is comprised of two gyrotropic modes, one clockwise and one counterclockwise. The existence of two modes shows that Skyrmions are massive quasiparticles. From their derived frequencies we find an inertial mass for the Skyrmion which is a factor of five larger than expected based on existing models for inertia in magnetism. Our results demonstrate that the mass of Skyrmions is based on a novel mechanism emerging from their confined nature, which is a direct consequence of their topology.

  5. Homology modeling, docking studies and molecular dynamic simulations using graphical processing unit architecture to probe the type-11 phosphodiesterase catalytic site: a computational approach for the rational design of selective inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichero, Elena; D'Ursi, Pasqualina; Moscatelli, Marco; Bruno, Olga; Orro, Alessandro; Rotolo, Chiara; Milanesi, Luciano; Fossa, Paola

    2013-12-01

    Phosphodiesterase 11 (PDE11) is the latest isoform of the PDEs family to be identified, acting on both cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The initial reports of PDE11 found evidence for PDE11 expression in skeletal muscle, prostate, testis, and salivary glands; however, the tissue distribution of PDE11 still remains a topic of active study and some controversy. Given the sequence similarity between PDE11 and PDE5, several PDE5 inhibitors have been shown to cross-react with PDE11. Accordingly, many non-selective inhibitors, such as IBMX, zaprinast, sildenafil, and dipyridamole, have been documented to inhibit PDE11. Only recently, a series of dihydrothieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-one derivatives proved to be selective toward the PDE11 isoform. In the absence of experimental data about PDE11 X-ray structures, we found interesting to gain a better understanding of the enzyme-inhibitor interactions using in silico simulations. In this work, we describe a computational approach based on homology modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulation to derive a predictive 3D model of PDE11. Using a Graphical Processing Unit architecture, it is possible to perform long simulations, find stable interactions involved in the complex, and finally to suggest guideline for the identification and synthesis of potent and selective inhibitors. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Proceedings of "Optical Probes of Dynamics in Complex Environments"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sension, R; Tokmakoff, A

    2008-04-01

    This document contains the proceedings from the symposium on Optical Probes of Dynamics in Complex Environments, which organized as part of the 235th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans, LA from April 6 to 10, 2008. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time ƒresolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time resolved spectroscopy is central to all of DOEs grand challenges for fundamental energy science. This symposium brought together leaders in the field of ultrafast spectroscopy, including experimentalists, theoretical chemists, and simulators, to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. DOE support for this conference was used to help young US and international scientists travel to the meeting. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, optical, and xray spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  7. In-vitro accuracy and reproducibility evaluation of probing depth measurements of selected periodontal probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.N. Al Shayeb

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Depth measurements with the Chapple UB-CF-15 probe were more accurate and reproducible compared to measurements with the Vivacare TPS and Williams 14 W probes. This in vitro model may be useful for intra-examiner calibration or clinician training prior to the clinical evaluation of patients or in longitudinal studies involving periodontal evaluation.

  8. Positron emission tomography probe to monitor selected sugar metabolism in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Owen; Clark, Peter M.; Castillo, Blanca Graciela Flores; Jung, Michael E.; Evdokimov, Nikolai M.

    2017-03-14

    The invention disclosed herein discloses selected ribose isomers that are useful as PET probes (e.g. [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-arabinose). These PET probes are useful, for example, in methods designed to monitor physiological processes including ribose metabolism and/or to selectively observe certain tissue/organs in vivo. The invention disclosed herein further provides methods for making and using such probes.

  9. Consistency of ΛCDM with geometric and dynamical probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perivolaropoulos, L

    2010-01-01

    The ΛCDM cosmological model assumes the existence of a small cosmological constant in order to explain the observed accelerating cosmic expansion. Despite the dramatic improvement of the quality of cosmological data during the last decade it remains the simplest model that fits remarkably well (almost) all cosmological observations. In this talk I review the increasingly successful fits provided by ΛCDM on recent geometric probe data of the cosmic expansion. I also briefly discuss some emerging shortcomings of the model in attempting to fit specific classes of data (eg cosmic velocity dipole flows and cluster halo profiles). Finally, I summarize recent results on the theoretically predicted matter overdensity (δ m =(δρ m )/ρ m ) evolution (a dynamical probe of the cosmic expansion), emphasizing its scale and gauge dependence on large cosmological scales in the context of general relativity. A new scale dependent parametrization which describes accurately the growth rate of perturbations even on scales larger than 100h -1 Mpc is shown to be a straightforward generalization of the well known scale independent parametrization f(a) = Ω m (a) γ valid on smaller cosmological scales.

  10. Solute-solvent interactions and dynamics probed by THz light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaab, Gerhard; Böhm, Fabian; Ma, Chun-Yu; Havenith, Martina

    The THz range (1-12 THz, 30-400 cm-1) is especially suited to probe changes in the solvent dynamics induced by solutes of different character (hydrophobic, hydrophilic, charged, neutral). In recent years we have investigated a large variety of such solutes and found characteristic spectral fingerprints for ions, but also for uncharged solutes, such as alcohols. We will present a status report on our current understanding of the observed spectral changes and how they relate to physico-chemical parameters like hydration shell size or the lifetime of an excited intermolecular oscillation. In addition, we will show, that in some cases the spectral changes are closely related to the partition function yielding access to a microscopic understanding of macroscopic thermodynamic functions. The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from the Cluster of Excellence RESOLV (Ruhr-Universität, EXC1069) funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  11. Sugar transport across lactose permease probed by steered molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Yin, Ying; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli lactose permease (LacY) transports sugar across the inner membrane of the bacterium using the proton motive force to accumulate sugar in the cytosol. We have probed lactose conduction across LacY using steered molecular dynamics, permitting us to follow molecular and energetic...... details of lactose interaction with the lumen of LacY during its permeation. Lactose induces a widening of the narrowest parts of the channel during permeation, the widening being largest within the periplasmic half-channel. During permeation, the water-filled lumen of LacY only partially hydrates lactose......, forcing it to interact with channel lining residues. Lactose forms a multitude of direct sugar-channel hydrogen bonds, predominantly with residues of the flexible N-domain, which is known to contribute a major part of LacY's affinity for lactose. In the periplasmic half-channel lactose predominantly...

  12. β-Isocyanoalanine as an IR probe: comparison of vibrational dynamics between isonitrile and nitrile-derivatized IR probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Michał; Ahn, Changwoo; Kossowska, Dorota; Park, Kwanghee; Kwak, Kyungwon; Han, Hogyu; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-07

    An infrared (IR) probe based on isonitrile (NC)-derivatized alanine 1 was synthesized and the vibrational properties of its NC stretching mode were investigated using FTIR and femtosecond IR pump-probe spectroscopy. It is found that the NC stretching mode is very sensitive to the hydrogen-bonding ability of solvent molecules. Moreover, its transition dipole strength is larger than that of nitrile (CN) in nitrile-derivatized IR probe 2. The vibrational lifetime of the NC stretching mode is found to be 5.5 ± 0.2 ps in both D2O and DMF solvents, which is several times longer than that of the azido (N3) stretching mode in azido-derivatized IR probe 3. Altogether these properties suggest that the NC group can be a very promising sensing moiety of IR probes for studying the solvation structure and dynamics of biomolecules.

  13. Highly selective and rapidly responsive fluorescent probe for hydrogen sulfide detection in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Jialin; Yang, Shaoxiang; Tian, Hongyu; Liu, Yongguo; Sun, Baoguo

    2018-08-15

    A new fluorescent probe 6-(2, 4-dinitrophenoxy)-2-naphthonitrile (probe 1) was designed and synthesized for the selective detection of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S). The addition of H 2 S to a solution of probe 1 resulted in a marked fluorescence turn-on alongside a visual color change from colorless to light yellow. Importantly, this distinct color response indicated that probe 1 could be used as a visual sensor for H 2 S. Moreover, probe 1 was successfully used as a signal tool to determine the H 2 S levels in beer and red wine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of ultrafast dispersed pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe spectroscopies to explore the light-induced dynamics of peridinin in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papagiannakis, E.; Vengris, M.; Larsen, D.S.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Hiller, R.G.; van Grondelle, R.

    2006-01-01

    Optical pump-induced dynamics of the highly asymmetric carotenoid peridinin in methanol was studied by dispersed pump-probe, pump-dump-probe, and pump-repump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy in the visible region. Dispersed pump-probe measurements show that the decay of the initially excited

  15. Probing ultrafast carrier tunneling dynamics in individual quantum dots and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Kai; Bechtold, Alexander; Kaldewey, Timo; Zecherle, Markus; Wildmann, Johannes S.; Bichler, Max; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J. [Walter Schottky Institut and Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748, Garching (Germany); Ruppert, Claudia; Betz, Markus [Experimentelle Physik 2, TU Dortmund, 44221, Dortmund (Germany); Krenner, Hubert J. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentalphysik 1 and Augsburg Centre for Innovative Technologies (ACIT), Universitaet Augsburg, Universitaetsstr 1, 86159, Augsburg (Germany); Villas-Boas, Jose M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2013-02-15

    Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy is employed to directly monitor the tunneling of charge carriers from single and vertically coupled quantum dots and probe intra-molecular dynamics. Immediately after resonant optical excitation, several peaks are observed in the pump-probe spectrum arising from Coulomb interactions between the photogenerated charge carriers. The influence of few-Fermion interactions in the photoexcited system and the temporal evolution of the optical response is directly probed in the time domain. In addition, the tunneling times for electrons and holes from the QD nanostructure are independently determined. In polarization resolved measurements, near perfect Pauli-spin blockade is observed in the spin-selective absorption spectrum as well as stimulated emission. While electron and hole tunneling from single quantum dots is shown to be well explained by the WKB formalism, for coupled quantum dots pronounced resonances in the electron tunneling rate are observed arising from elastic and inelastic electron tunneling between the different dots. (copyright 2012 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Probing the dynamics of dark energy with novel parametrizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jingzhe; Zhang Xin

    2011-01-01

    We point out that the CPL parametrization has a problem that the equation of state w(z) diverges in the far future, so that this model can only properly describe the past evolution but cannot depict the future evolution. To overcome such a difficulty, in this Letter we propose two novel parametrizations for dark energy, the logarithm form w(z)=w 0 +w 1 ((ln(2+z))/(1+z) -ln2) and the oscillating form w(z)=w 0 +w 1 ((sin(1+z))/(1+z) -sin(1)), successfully avoiding the future divergency problem in the CPL parametrization, and use them to probe the dynamics of dark energy in the whole evolutionary history. Our divergency-free parametrizations are proven to be very successful in exploring the dynamical evolution of dark energy and have powerful prediction capability for the ultimate fate of the universe. Constraining the CPL model and the new models with the current observational data, we show that the new models are more favored. The features and the predictions for the future evolution in the new models are discussed in detail.

  17. Reverse micelles as a tool for probing solvent modulation of protein dynamics: Reverse micelle encapsulated hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Camille J.; Dantsker, David; Heller, Elizabeth R.; Sabat, Joseph E.; Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-08-01

    Hydration waters impact protein dynamics. Dissecting the interplay between hydration waters and dynamics requires a protein that manifests a broad range of dynamics. Proteins in reverse micelles (RMs) have promise as tools to achieve this objective because the water content can be manipulated. Hemoglobin is an appropriate tool with which to probe hydration effects. We describe both a protocol for hemoglobin encapsulation in reverse micelles and a facile method using PEG and cosolvents to manipulate water content. Hydration properties are probed using the water-sensitive fluorescence from Hb bound pyranine and covalently attached Badan. Protein dynamics are probed through ligand recombination traces derived from photodissociated carbonmonoxy hemoglobin on a log scale that exposes the potential role of both α and β solvent fluctuations in modulating protein dynamics. The results open the possibility of probing hydration level phenomena in this system using a combination of NMR and optical probes.

  18. Improving probe set selection for microbial community analysis by leveraging taxonomic information of training sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Tao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population levels of microbial phylotypes can be examined using a hybridization-based method that utilizes a small set of computationally-designed DNA probes targeted to a gene common to all. Our previous algorithm attempts to select a set of probes such that each training sequence manifests a unique theoretical hybridization pattern (a binary fingerprint to a probe set. It does so without taking into account similarity between training gene sequences or their putative taxonomic classifications, however. We present an improved algorithm for probe set selection that utilizes the available taxonomic information of training gene sequences and attempts to choose probes such that the resultant binary fingerprints cluster into real taxonomic groups. Results Gene sequences manifesting identical fingerprints with probes chosen by the new algorithm are more likely to be from the same taxonomic group than probes chosen by the previous algorithm. In cases where they are from different taxonomic groups, underlying DNA sequences of identical fingerprints are more similar to each other in probe sets made with the new versus the previous algorithm. Complete removal of large taxonomic groups from training data does not greatly decrease the ability of probe sets to distinguish those groups. Conclusions Probe sets made from the new algorithm create fingerprints that more reliably cluster into biologically meaningful groups. The method can readily distinguish microbial phylotypes that were excluded from the training sequences, suggesting novel microbes can also be detected.

  19. Improving probe set selection for microbial community analysis by leveraging taxonomic information of training sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegger, Paul M; Della Vedova, Gianluca; Jiang, Tao; Borneman, James

    2011-10-10

    Population levels of microbial phylotypes can be examined using a hybridization-based method that utilizes a small set of computationally-designed DNA probes targeted to a gene common to all. Our previous algorithm attempts to select a set of probes such that each training sequence manifests a unique theoretical hybridization pattern (a binary fingerprint) to a probe set. It does so without taking into account similarity between training gene sequences or their putative taxonomic classifications, however. We present an improved algorithm for probe set selection that utilizes the available taxonomic information of training gene sequences and attempts to choose probes such that the resultant binary fingerprints cluster into real taxonomic groups. Gene sequences manifesting identical fingerprints with probes chosen by the new algorithm are more likely to be from the same taxonomic group than probes chosen by the previous algorithm. In cases where they are from different taxonomic groups, underlying DNA sequences of identical fingerprints are more similar to each other in probe sets made with the new versus the previous algorithm. Complete removal of large taxonomic groups from training data does not greatly decrease the ability of probe sets to distinguish those groups. Probe sets made from the new algorithm create fingerprints that more reliably cluster into biologically meaningful groups. The method can readily distinguish microbial phylotypes that were excluded from the training sequences, suggesting novel microbes can also be detected.

  20. Neutrons probing the structure and dynamics of liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq-Hugeux, F.; Coulet, M.V.; Gaspard, J.P.; Pouget, St.; Zanotti, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This article illustrates the benefits of neutron techniques to the understanding of the liquid state. As opposed to the nearly complete order of crystals or the nearly complete disorder of gas, the disorder of a liquid is partial and results from dynamical events acting on a broad range of space and time scales. Consequently, no single, simple parameter can encompass the concept of order or disorder in the liquid state. The wide variety of neutron techniques (diffraction, quasi-elastic and inelastic scattering) is a key asset to solve the issue. Selected studies ranging over typical interactions and conditions relevant to liquids (metallic, covalent, molecular, liquids near a phase transition and confined fluids) are presented. In each case, both structural and dynamical aspects, along with the connections to complementary techniques (computer simulation, X-ray absorption and/or scattering) are highlighted. (authors)

  1. A scanning fluid dynamic gauging technique for probing surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Patrick W; Chew, Y M John; Wilson, D Ian; Brooker, Anju D M; York, David W

    2010-01-01

    Fluid dynamic gauging (FDG) is a technique for measuring the thickness of soft solid deposit layers immersed in a liquid environment, in situ and in real time. This paper details the performance of a novel automated, scanning FDG probe (sFDG) which allows the thickness of a sample layer to be monitored at several points during an experiment, with a resolution of ±5 µm. Its application is demonstrated using layers of gelatine, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and baked tomato purée deposits. Swelling kinetics, as well as deformation behaviour—based on knowledge of the stresses imposed on the surface by the gauging flow—can be determined at several points, affording improved experimental data. The use of FDG as a surface scanning technique, operating as a fluid mechanical analogue of atomic force microscopy on a millimetre length scale, is also demonstrated. The measurement relies only on the flow behaviour, and is thus suitable for use in opaque fluids, does not contact the surface itself and does not rely on any specific physical properties of the surface, provided it is locally stiff

  2. Selection-Mutation Dynamics of Signaling Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Hofbauer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure of the rest points of signaling games and their dynamic behavior under selection-mutation dynamics by taking the case of three signals as our canonical example. Many rest points of the replicator dynamics of signaling games are not isolated and, therefore, not robust under perturbations. However, some of them attract open sets of initial conditions. We prove the existence of certain rest points of the selection-mutation dynamics close to Nash equilibria of the signaling game and show that all but the perturbed rest points close to strict Nash equilibria are dynamically unstable. This is an important result for the evolution of signaling behavior, since it shows that the second-order forces that are governed by mutation can increase the chances of successful signaling.

  3. Affinity-Selected Filamentous Bacteriophage as a Probe for Acoustic Wave Biodetectors of Salmonella typhimurium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olsen, Eric V; Sorokulova, Iryna B; Petrenko, Valery A; Chen, I-Hsuan; Barbaree, James M; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J

    2005-01-01

    Proof-in-concept biosensors were prepared for the rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium in solution, based on affinity-selected filamentous phage prepared as probes physically adsorbed to piezoelectric transducers...

  4. A sensitive fluorescent probe for the polar solvation dynamics at protein-surfactant interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priya; Choudhury, Susobhan; Singha, Subhankar; Jun, Yongwoong; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Jhimli; Das, Ranjan; Ahn, Kyo-Han; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2017-05-17

    Relaxation dynamics at the surface of biologically important macromolecules is important taking into account their functionality in molecular recognition. Over the years it has been shown that the solvation dynamics of a fluorescent probe at biomolecular surfaces and interfaces account for the relaxation dynamics of polar residues and associated water molecules. However, the sensitivity of the dynamics depends largely on the localization and exposure of the probe. For noncovalent fluorescent probes, localization at the region of interest in addition to surface exposure is an added challenge compared to the covalently attached probes at the biological interfaces. Here we have used a synthesized donor-acceptor type dipolar fluorophore, 6-acetyl-(2-((4-hydroxycyclohexyl)(methyl)amino)naphthalene) (ACYMAN), for the investigation of the solvation dynamics of a model protein-surfactant interface. A significant structural rearrangement of a model histone protein (H1) upon interaction with anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) as revealed from the circular dichroism (CD) studies is nicely corroborated in the solvation dynamics of the probe at the interface. The polarization gated fluorescence anisotropy of the probe compared to that at the SDS micellar surface clearly reveals the localization of the probe at the protein-surfactant interface. We have also compared the sensitivity of ACYMAN with other solvation probes including coumarin 500 (C500) and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylamino-styryl)-4H-pyran (DCM). In comparison to ACYMAN, both C500 and DCM fail to probe the interfacial solvation dynamics of a model protein-surfactant interface. While C500 is found to be delocalized from the protein-surfactant interface, DCM becomes destabilized upon the formation of the interface (protein-surfactant complex). The timescales obtained from this novel probe have also been compared with other femtosecond resolved studies and molecular dynamics simulations.

  5. Stability mechanisms of a thermophilic laccase probed by molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels J Christensen

    Full Text Available Laccases are highly stable, industrially important enzymes capable of oxidizing a large range of substrates. Causes for their stability are, as for other proteins, poorly understood. In this work, multiple-seed molecular dynamics (MD was applied to a Trametes versicolor laccase in response to variable ionic strengths, temperatures, and glycosylation status. Near-physiological conditions provided excellent agreement with the crystal structure (average RMSD ∼0.92 Å and residual agreement with experimental B-factors. The persistence of backbone hydrogen bonds was identified as a key descriptor of structural response to environment, whereas solvent-accessibility, radius of gyration, and fluctuations were only locally relevant. Backbone hydrogen bonds decreased systematically with temperature in all simulations (∼9 per 50 K, probing structural changes associated with enthalpy-entropy compensation. Approaching T opt (∼350 K from 300 K, this change correlated with a beginning "unzipping" of critical β-sheets. 0 M ionic strength triggered partial denucleation of the C-terminal (known experimentally to be sensitive at 400 K, suggesting a general salt stabilization effect. In contrast, F(- (but not Cl(- specifically impaired secondary structure by formation of strong hydrogen bonds with backbone NH, providing a mechanism for experimentally observed small anion destabilization, potentially remedied by site-directed mutagenesis at critical intrusion sites. N-glycosylation was found to support structural integrity by increasing persistent backbone hydrogen bonds by ∼4 across simulations, mainly via prevention of F(- intrusion. Hydrogen-bond loss in distinct loop regions and ends of critical β-sheets suggest potential strategies for laboratory optimization of these industrially important enzymes.

  6. Ad-hoc and context-dependent adjustments of selective attention in conflict control: an ERP study with visual probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigbur, R; Schneider, J; Sommer, W; Dimigen, O; Stürmer, B

    2015-02-15

    Cognitive conflict control in flanker tasks has often been described using the zoom-lens metaphor of selective attention. However, whether and how selective attention - in terms of suppression and enhancement - operates in this context has remained unclear. To examine the dynamic interplay of selective attention and cognitive control we used electrophysiological measures and presented task-irrelevant visual probe stimuli at foveal, parafoveal, and peripheral display positions. Target-flanker congruency varied either randomly from trial to trial (mixed-block) or block-wise (fixed-block) in order to induce reactive versus proactive control modes, respectively. Three EEG measures were used to capture ad-hoc adjustments within trials as well as effects of context-based predictions: the N1 component of the visual evoked potential (VEP) to probes, the VEP to targets, and the conflict-related midfrontal N2 component. Results from probe-VEPs indicate that enhanced processing of the foveal target rather than suppression of the peripheral flankers supports interference control. In incongruent mixed-block trials VEPs were larger to probes near the targets. In the fixed-blocks probe-VEPs were not modulated, but contrary to the mixed-block the preceding target-related VEP was affected by congruency. Results of the control-related N2 reveal largest amplitudes in the unpredictable context, which did not differentiate for stimulus and response incongruency. In contrast, in the predictable context, N2 amplitudes were reduced overall and differentiated between stimulus and response incongruency. Taken together these results imply that predictability alters interference control by a reconfiguration of stimulus processing. During unpredictable sequences participants adjust their attentional focus dynamically on a trial-by-trial basis as reflected in congruency-dependent probe-VEP-modulation. This reactive control mode also elicits larger N2 amplitudes. In contrast, when task demands

  7. Sequential electrochemical oxidation and site-selective growth of nanoparticles onto AFM probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Yong; Pan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Zhongdang

    2008-08-19

    In this work, we reported an approach for the site-selective growth of nanoparticle onto the tip apex of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe. The silicon AFM probe was first coated with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) through a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Subsequently, COOH groups were selectively generated at the tip apex of silicon AFM probes by applying an appropriate bias voltage between the tip and a flat gold electrode. The transformation of methyl to carboxylic groups at the tip apex of the AFM probe was investigated through measuring the capillary force before and after electrochemical oxidation. To prepare the nanoparticle terminated AFM probe, the oxidized AFM probe was then immersed in an aqueous solution containing positive metal ions, for example, Ag+, to bind positive metal ions to the oxidized area (COOH terminated area), followed by chemical reduction with aqueous NaBH 4 and further development (if desired) to give a metal nanoparticle-modified AFM probe. The formation of a metal nanoparticle at the tip apex of the AFM probe was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA).

  8. Dynamics of Exciton Relaxation in LH2 Antenna Probed by Multipulse Nonlinear Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novoderezhkin, V.I.; Cohen Stuart, T.A.; van Grondelle, R.

    2011-01-01

    We explain the relaxation dynamics in the LH2-B850 antenna as revealed by multipulse pump - dump - probe spectroscopy (Th. A. Cohen StuartM. VengrisV. I. NovoderezhkinR. J. CogdellC. N. HunterR. van Grondelle, submitted). The theory of pump - dump - probe response is evaluated using the doorway -

  9. Mapping Rotational Wavepacket Dynamics with Chirped Probe Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Dmitri; Odhner, Johanan; Levis, Robert

    2014-05-01

    We develop an analytical model description of the strong-field pump-probe polarization spectroscopy of rotational transients in molecular gases in a situation when the probe pulse is considerably chirped: the frequency modulation over the pulse duration is comparable with the carrier frequency. In this scenario, a femtosecond pump laser pulse prepares a rotational wavepacket in a gas-phase sample at room temperature. The rotational revivals of the wavepacket are then mapped onto a chirped broadband probe pulse derived from a laser filament. The slow-varying envelope approximation being inapplicable, an alternative approach is proposed which is capable of incorporating the substantial chirp and the related temporal dispersion of refractive indices. Analytical expressions are obtained for the probe signal modulation over the interaction region and for the resulting heterodyned transient birefringence spectra. Dependencies of the outputs on the probe pulse parameters reveal the trade-offs and the ways to optimize the temporal-spectral imaging. The results are in good agreement with the experiments on snapshot imaging of rotational revival patterns in nitrogen gas. We gratefully acknowledge financial support through AFOSR MURI Grant No. FA9550-10-1-0561.

  10. A novel dansyl-based fluorescent probe for highly selective detection of ferric ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Sun, Mingtai; Zhang, Zhongping; Wang, Suhua

    2013-02-15

    A novel dansyl-based fluorescent probe was synthesized and characterized. It exhibits high selectivity and sensitivity towards Fe(3+) ion. This fluorescent probe is photostable, water soluble and pH insensitive. The limit of detection is found to be 0.62 μM. These properties make it a good fluorescent probe for Fe(3+) ion detection in both chemical and biological systems. Spike recovery test confirms its practical application in tap water samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Selective turn-on fluorescent probes for imaging hydrogen sulfide in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Leticia A; Pluth, Michael D

    2012-05-16

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is an important biological messenger but few biologically-compatible methods are available for its detection. Here we report two bright fluorescent probes that are selective for H(2)S over cysteine, glutathione and other reactive sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen species. Both probes are demonstrated to detect H(2)S in live cells. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  12. Probing contextuality with pre- and post-selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollaksen, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    By analyzing the concept of contextuality (Bell-Kochen-Specker) in terms of pre-and-post-selection (PPS), it is possible to assign definite values to observables in a new way. Physical reasons are presented for restrictions on these assignments. When measurements are performed which do not disturb the pre- and post-selection (i.e. weak measurements), then novel experimental aspects of contextuality can be demonstrated including a proof that every PPS-paradox with definite predictions implies contextuality. Certain results of these measurements (eccentric weak values with e.g. negative values outside the spectrum), however, cannot be explained by a 'classical-like' hidden variable theory. Surprising theoretical implications are discussed

  13. Dynamic Selective Exposure during Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James G; Hoon, Teressa; Landon, Jason

    2016-01-01

    To understand dynamic changes in the likelihood that people would access and selectively expose themselves to information online, the present study examined the checking of account balances during simulated gambling. Sixteen participants played 120 hands of computer Blackjack for points, at higher or lower levels of risk (different point multipliers), and after each win or loss the computer recorded if participants checked their account balances. There were individual differences in checking rates. Participants who were more likely to check balances exhibited a selectivity of exposure to decision consonant information after a win at low risk. Although it was expected that people would seek to maintain positive mood, data were better explained in terms of Cognitive Dissonance. The effects of Cognitive Dissonance are liable to extend beyond single static decisions into dynamic online environments.

  14. Molecularly imprinted fluorescent probe based on FRET for selective and sensitive detection of doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhifeng, E-mail: 897061147@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Deng, Peihong; Li, Junhua [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Xu, Li [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Tang, Siping [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • FRET-based molecularly imprinted probe for detection of doxorubicin was prepared. • The detection limit of the probe was 13.8 nM for doxorubicin. • The FRET-based probe had a higher selectivity for the template than ordinary MIMs. - Abstract: In this work, a new type of fluorescent probe for detection of doxorubicin has been constructed by the combined use of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and molecular imprinting technique (MIT). Using doxorubicin as the template, the molecularly imprinted polymer thin layer was fabricated on the surfaces of carbon dot (CD) modified silica by sol-gel polymerization. The excitation energy of the fluorescent donor (CDs) could be transferred to the fluorescent acceptor (doxorubicin). The FRET based fluorescent probe demonstrated high sensitivity and selectivity for doxorubicin. The detection limit was 13.8 nM. The fluorescent probe was successfully applied for detecting doxorubicin in doxorubicin-spiked plasmas with a recovery of 96.8–103.8%, a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.3–2.8%. The strategy for construction of FRET-based molecularly imprinted materials developed in this work is very promising for analytical applications.

  15. X-ray Pump–Probe Investigation of Charge and Dissociation Dynamics in Methyl Iodine Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics is of fundamental interest in natural science research. The capability of investigating molecular dynamics is one of the various motivations for ultrafast optics. We present our investigation of photoionization and nuclear dynamics in methyl iodine (CH3I molecule with an X-ray pump X-ray probe scheme. The pump–probe experiment was realized with a two-mirror X-ray split and delay apparatus. Time-of-flight mass spectra at various pump–probe delay times were recorded to obtain the time profile for the creation of high charge states via sequential ionization and for molecular dissociation. We observed high charge states of atomic iodine up to 29+, and visualized the evolution of creating these high atomic ion charge states, including their population suppression and enhancement as the arrival time of the second X-ray pulse was varied. We also show the evolution of the kinetics of the high charge states upon the timing of their creation during the ionization-dissociation coupled dynamics. We demonstrate the implementation of X-ray pump–probe methodology for investigating X-ray induced molecular dynamics with femtosecond temporal resolution. The results indicate the footprints of ionization that lead to high charge states, probing the long-range potential curves of the high charge states.

  16. Fluorescent Reporters and Biosensors for Probing the Dynamic Behavior of Protein Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. González-Vera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Probing the dynamic activities of protein kinases in real-time in living cells constitutes a major challenge that requires specific and sensitive tools tailored to meet the particular demands associated with cellular imaging. The development of genetically-encoded and synthetic fluorescent biosensors has provided means of monitoring protein kinase activities in a non-invasive fashion in their native cellular environment with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we review existing technologies to probe different dynamic features of protein kinases and discuss limitations where new developments are required to implement more performant tools, in particular with respect to infrared and near-infrared fluorescent probes and strategies which enable improved signal-to-noise ratio and controlled activation of probes.

  17. Reverse micelles as a tool for probing solvent modulation of protein dynamics: Reverse micelle encapsulated hemoglobin☆

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Camille J.; Dantsker, David; Heller, Elizabeth R.; Sabat, Joseph E.; Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Hydration waters impact protein dynamics. Dissecting the interplay between hydration waters and dynamics requires a protein that manifests a broad range of dynamics. Proteins in reverse micelles (RMs) have promise as tools to achieve this objective because the water content can be manipulated. Hemoglobin is an appropriate tool with which to probe hydration effects. We describe both a protocol for hemoglobin encapsulation in reverse micelles and a facile method using PEG and cosolvents to mani...

  18. A new probe of dark sector dynamics at the LHC

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, ArpitDepartment of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21218, U.S.A.; Primulando, Reinard(Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21218, U.S.A.); Saraswat, Prashant(Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21218, U.S.A.)

    2015-01-01

    We propose a LHC search for dilepton resonances in association with large missing energy as a generic probe of TeV dark sector models. Such resonances can occur if the dark sector includes a U(1) gauge boson, or Z ′, which kinetically mixes with the Standard Model U(1). For small mixing, direct 2 → 1 production of the Z ′ is not visible in standard resonance searches due to the large Drell-Yan background. However, there may be significant production of the Z ′ boson in processes involving oth...

  19. Three-Dimensional Optical Trapping for Cell Isolation Using Tapered Fiber Probe by Dynamic Chemical Etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, K; Okada, J; Nomura, Y; Tamura, K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, chemically etched fiber probe was proposed for laser trapping and manipulation of cells. We fabricated tapered fiber probe by dynamic chemical etching technique. Three-Dimensional optical trap of a yeast cell dispersed in water solution could be formed by the fiber tip with 17deg tip. Optical forces were sufficient to move the yeast cell for trapping and manipulation. From these experimental results, it was found that our proposed tapered fiber tip was a promising tool for cell isolation.

  20. Hydrazine selective dual signaling chemodosimetric probe in physiological conditions and its application in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Sandip; Sahana, Animesh; Mandal, Sandip [Department of Chemistry, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan, 713104 West Bengal (India); Sengupta, Archya; Chatterjee, Ansuman [Department of Zoology, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, West Bengal (India); Safin, Damir A., E-mail: damir.a.safin@gmail.com [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Molecules, Solids and Reactivity (IMCN/MOST), Université catholique de Louvain, Place L. Pasteur 1, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Babashkina, Maria G.; Tumanov, Nikolay A.; Filinchuk, Yaroslav [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Molecules, Solids and Reactivity (IMCN/MOST), Université catholique de Louvain, Place L. Pasteur 1, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Das, Debasis, E-mail: ddas100in@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan, 713104 West Bengal (India)

    2015-09-17

    A rhodamine–cyanobenzene conjugate, (E)-4-((2-(3′,6′-bis(diethylamino)-3-oxospiro[isoindoline-1,9′-xanthene] -2-yl)ethylimino)methyl)benzonitrile (1), which structure has been elucidated by single crystal X-ray diffraction, was synthesized for selective fluorescent “turn-on” and colorimetric recognition of hydrazine at physiological pH 7.4. It was established that 1 detects hydrazine up to 58 nM. The probe is useful for the detection of intracellular hydrazine in the human breast cancer cells MCF-7 using a fluorescence microscope. Spirolactam ring opening of 1, followed by its hydrolysis, was established as a probable mechanism for the selective sensing of hydrazine. - Highlights: • A selective rhodamine–cyanobenzene conjugate is synthesized. • The conjugate is a selective dual signaling chemodosimetric probe towards hydrazine. • Spirolactam ring opening of the probe, followed by its hydrolysis, is the sensing mechanism. • The probe detects hydrazine in the human breast cancer cells MCF-7 imaging.

  1. Monitoring of Au(iii) species in plants using a selective fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Xu, Yuqing; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Hailiang; Qian, Yong

    2018-01-23

    A colorimetric and ratiometric probe with a push-pull chromophore dicyanoisophorone system, AuP, has been developed for the detection of Au(iii) species with highly sensitive and selective response to real-water samples and living tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  2. SHAPE selection (SHAPES) enrich for RNA structure signal in SHAPE sequencing-based probing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Line Dahl; Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan; Salama, Sofie R

    2015-01-01

    transcriptase. Here, we introduce a SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) reagent, N-propanone isatoic anhydride (NPIA), which retains the ability of SHAPE reagents to accurately probe RNA structure, but also allows covalent coupling between the SHAPES reagent and a biotin molecule. We demonstrate that SHAPES...

  3. Muon spin rotation and other microscopic probes of spin-glass dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLaughlin, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    A number of different microscopic probe techniques have been employed to investigate the onset of the spin-glass state in dilute magnetic alloys. Among these are Moessbauer-effect spectroscopy, neutron scattering, ESR of the impurity spins, host NMR and, most recently, muon spin rotation and depolarization. Spin probes yield information on the microscopic static and dynamic behavior of the impurity spins, and give insight into both the spin freezing process and the nature of low-lying excitations in the ordered state. Microscopic probe experiments in spin glasses are surveyed, and the unique advantages of muon studies are emphasized

  4. Fabrication and buckling dynamics of nanoneedle AFM probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beard, J D; Gordeev, S N, E-mail: jdb28@bath.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-29

    A new method for the fabrication of high-aspect-ratio probes by electron beam induced deposition is described. This technique allows the fabrication of cylindrical 'nanoneedle' structures on the atomic force microscope (AFM) probe tip which can be used for accurate imaging of surfaces with high steep features. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging showed that needles with diameters in the range of 18-100 nm could be obtained by this technique. The needles were shown to undergo buckling deformation under large tip-sample forces. The deformation was observed to recover elastically under vertical deformations of up to {approx} 60% of the needle length, preventing damage to the needle. A technique of stabilizing the needle against buckling by coating it with additional electron beam deposited carbon was also investigated; it was shown that coated needles of 75 nm or greater total diameter did not buckle even under tip-sample forces of {approx} 1.5 {mu}N.

  5. A 282 GHz Probe for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybalko, Oleksandr; Bowen, Sean; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    Introduction In DNP, microwave irradiation of a sample facilitates the transfer of spin polarization from electrons tonuclei. One of the way to improve the DNP enhancement is to transfer microwave power from the mm-wave source tothe sample more effectively. Several methods and techniques to effic......Introduction In DNP, microwave irradiation of a sample facilitates the transfer of spin polarization from electrons tonuclei. One of the way to improve the DNP enhancement is to transfer microwave power from the mm-wave source tothe sample more effectively. Several methods and techniques......: microwave can with RF coil; the rest of the probe consists of a waveguide, sample tube and coaxial transmission line. The probe is designed to study cylindrical samples with diameter - 9 mm, and height – 2-20 mm. An RF coil which is housed in cylindrical Macor coil form (dielectric with ε=5.64 and tangent δ...... is 0.0025) surrounds the sample. The RF coil has a saddle form and was madeout of two current loops run on opposite sides of a cylinder (in parallel). Material of the coil is copper wire with diameterequal to 0.7 mm. Coil dimensions are: diameter - 13 mm; height - 22.0 mm. The self resonant frequency...

  6. Dynamics of valence-shell electrons and nuclei probed by strong-field holography and rescattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt, Samuel G.; Bhargava Ram, Niraghatam; Atala, Marcos; Shvetsov-Shilovski, Nikolay I; von Conta, Aaron; Baykusheva, Denitsa; Lein, Manfred; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Strong-field photoelectron holography and laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) are two powerful emerging methods for probing the ultrafast dynamics of molecules. However, both of them have remained restricted to static systems and to nuclear dynamics induced by strong-field ionization. Here we extend these promising methods to image purely electronic valence-shell dynamics in molecules using photoelectron holography. In the same experiment, we use LIED and photoelectron holography simultaneously, to observe coupled electronic-rotational dynamics taking place on similar timescales. These results offer perspectives for imaging ultrafast dynamics of molecules on femtosecond to attosecond timescales. PMID:28643771

  7. The Cell Probe Complexity of Dynamic Range Counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green

    2012-01-01

    is the number of update operations, w the cell size, tq the query time and tu the update time. In the most natural setting of cell size w = (lg n), this gives a lower bound of tq = ((lg n/ lg lg n)2) for any polylogarithmic update time. This bound is almost a quadratic improvement over the highest previous...... is specified by a point q = (x, y), and the goal is to report the sum of the weights assigned to the points dominated by q, where a point (x0, y0) is dominated by q if x0 x and y0 y. In addition to being the highest cell probe lower bound to date, our lower bound is also tight for data struc- tures with update...

  8. Lambda attachment in fission: a probe of the necking dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.; Malek, F.

    1991-02-01

    A schematic scission model is applied to the lambda attachment function recently obtained by the LEAR PS177 collaboration, in their measurement of the prompt fission of hypernuclei. The relationship between the slope parameter and the fission dynamics was examined in a more quantitative way. It is shown that the attachment function is sensitive to the scission configuration, necking dynamics and nuclear temperature at scission. It provides a new and powerful way to study the nuclear scission process. (R.P.) 19 refs., 9 figs

  9. Probing the limits of metal plasticity with molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A.; Stukowski, Alexander; Oppelstrup, Tomas; Bulatov, Vasily V.

    2017-10-01

    Ordinarily, the strength and plasticity properties of a metal are defined by dislocations--line defects in the crystal lattice whose motion results in material slippage along lattice planes. Dislocation dynamics models are usually used as mesoscale proxies for true atomistic dynamics, which are computationally expensive to perform routinely. However, atomistic simulations accurately capture every possible mechanism of material response, resolving every ``jiggle and wiggle'' of atomic motion, whereas dislocation dynamics models do not. Here we present fully dynamic atomistic simulations of bulk single-crystal plasticity in the body-centred-cubic metal tantalum. Our goal is to quantify the conditions under which the limits of dislocation-mediated plasticity are reached and to understand what happens to the metal beyond any such limit. In our simulations, the metal is compressed at ultrahigh strain rates along its [001] crystal axis under conditions of constant pressure, temperature and strain rate. To address the complexity of crystal plasticity processes on the length scales (85-340 nm) and timescales (1 ns-1μs) that we examine, we use recently developed methods of in situ computational microscopy to recast the enormous amount of transient trajectory data generated in our simulations into a form that can be analysed by a human. Our simulations predict that, on reaching certain limiting conditions of strain, dislocations alone can no longer relieve mechanical loads; instead, another mechanism, known as deformation twinning (the sudden re-orientation of the crystal lattice), takes over as the dominant mode of dynamic response. Below this limit, the metal assumes a strain-path-independent steady state of plastic flow in which the flow stress and the dislocation density remain constant as long as the conditions of straining thereafter remain unchanged. In this distinct state, tantalum flows like a viscous fluid while retaining its crystal lattice and remaining a strong

  10. Dynamic characterization of small fibers based on the flexural vibrations of a piezoelectric cantilever probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Ye, Xuan; Li, Xide

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a cantilever-probe system excited by a piezoelectric actuator, and use it to measure the dynamic mechanical properties of a micro- and nanoscale fiber. Coupling the fiber to the free end of the cantilever probe, we found the dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient of the fiber from the resonance frequency and the quality factor of the fiber-cantilever-probe system. The properties of Bacillus subtilis fibers measured using our proposed system agreed with tensile measurements, validating our method. Our measurements show that the piezoelectric actuator coupled to cantilever probe can be made equivalent to a clamped cantilever with an effective length, and calculated results show that the errors of measured natural frequency of the system can be ignored if the coupled fiber has an inclination angle of alignment of less than 10°. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the first or second resonant mode is the sensitive mode to test the sample’s dynamic stiffness, while the damping property has different sensitivities for the first four modes. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that the double-cantilever probe is also an effective sensitive structure that can be used to perform dynamic loading and characterize dynamic response. Our method has the advantage of using amplitude-frequency curves to obtain the dynamic mechanical properties without directly measuring displacements and forces as in tensile tests, and it also avoids the effects of the complex surface structure and deformation presenting in contact resonance method. Our method is effective for measuring the dynamic mechanical properties of fiber-like one-dimensional (1D) materials. (paper)

  11. Dynamic characterization of small fibers based on the flexural vibrations of a piezoelectric cantilever probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Ye, Xuan; Li, Xide

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a cantilever-probe system excited by a piezoelectric actuator, and use it to measure the dynamic mechanical properties of a micro- and nanoscale fiber. Coupling the fiber to the free end of the cantilever probe, we found the dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient of the fiber from the resonance frequency and the quality factor of the fiber-cantilever-probe system. The properties of Bacillus subtilis fibers measured using our proposed system agreed with tensile measurements, validating our method. Our measurements show that the piezoelectric actuator coupled to cantilever probe can be made equivalent to a clamped cantilever with an effective length, and calculated results show that the errors of measured natural frequency of the system can be ignored if the coupled fiber has an inclination angle of alignment of less than 10°. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the first or second resonant mode is the sensitive mode to test the sample’s dynamic stiffness, while the damping property has different sensitivities for the first four modes. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that the double-cantilever probe is also an effective sensitive structure that can be used to perform dynamic loading and characterize dynamic response. Our method has the advantage of using amplitude-frequency curves to obtain the dynamic mechanical properties without directly measuring displacements and forces as in tensile tests, and it also avoids the effects of the complex surface structure and deformation presenting in contact resonance method. Our method is effective for measuring the dynamic mechanical properties of fiber-like one-dimensional (1D) materials.

  12. Synthesis of a Cu2+-Selective Probe Derived from Rhodamine and Its Application in Cell Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunwei Yu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A new fluorescent probe P based on rhodamine for Cu2+ was synthesized and characterized. The new probe P showed high selectivity to Cu2+ over other tested metal ions. With optimal conditions, the proposed probe P worked in a wide linear range of 1.0 × 10−6–1.0 × 10−5 M with a detection limit of 3.3 × 10−7 M Cu2+ in ethanol-water solution (9:1, v:v, 20 mM HEPES, pH 7.0. Furthermore, it has been used for imaging of Cu2+ in living cells with satisfying results.

  13. Sensitive and Selective Ratiometric Fluorescence Probes for Detection of Intracellular Endogenous Monoamine Oxidase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofeng; Li, Lihong; Shi, Wen; Gong, Qiuyu; Li, Xiaohua; Ma, Huimin

    2016-01-19

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) is known to widely exist in most cell lines in the body, and its dysfunction (unusually high or low levels of MAO-A) is thought to be responsible for several psychiatric and neurological disorders. Thus, a sensitive and selective method for evaluating the relative MAO-A levels in different live cells is urgently needed to better understand the function of MAO-A, but to our knowledge such a method is still lacking. Herein, we rationally design two new ratiometric fluorescence probes (1 and 2) that can sensitively and selectively detect MAO-A. The probes are constructed by incorporating a recognition group of propylamine into the fluorescent skeleton of 1,8-naphthalimide, and the detection mechanism is based on amine oxidation and β-elimination to release the fluorophore (4-hydroxy-N-butyl-1,8-naphthalimide), which is verified by HPLC analysis. Reaction of the probes with MAO-A produces a remarkable fluorescence change from blue to green, and the ratio of fluorescence intensity at 550 and 454 nm is directly proportional to the concentration of MAO-A in the ranges of 0.5-1.5 and 0.5-2.5 μg/mL with detection limits of 1.1 and 10 ng/mL (k = 3) for probes 1 and 2, respectively. Surprisingly, these probes show strong fluorescence responses to MAO-A but almost none to MAO-B (one of two isoforms of MAO), indicating superior ability to distinguish MAO-A from MAO-B. The high specificity of the probes for MAO-A over MAO-B is further supported by different inhibitor experiments. Moreover, probe 1 displays higher sensitivity than probe 2 and is thus investigated to image the relative MAO-A levels in different live cells, such as HeLa and NIH-3T3 cells. It is found that the concentration of endogenous MAO-A in HeLa cells is approximately 1.8 times higher than that in NIH-3T3 cells, which is validated by the result from an ELISA kit. Additionally, the proposed probes may find more uses in the specific detection of MAO-A between the two isoforms of MAO

  14. Highly selective detection of glutathione using a NIP/Cu2+ complex fluorescent probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Wenrui; Zhao Zhi; Zhang Yang; Wang Qiusheng; Zhao Xin; Ouyang Jie

    2012-01-01

    A novel fluorescent compound, 4-(trimethyl ammonium chloride)acetamide-2-(1H-naphtho[2,3-d]imidazol-2-yl)phenol (TMACA-NIP), was synthesized and used as a fluorescent probe for detecting glutathione reduced (GSH). The new NIP-based probe exhibited high fluorescence in water, which was quenched during the presence of copper (II) due to the complexation between TMACA-NIP and Cu 2+ . But after adding GSH into the TMACA-NIP and Cu 2+ system, the fluorescence of TMACA-NIP was recovered because the binding force between GSH and Cu 2+ is stronger than that between TMACA-NIP and Cu 2+ , which destroys the equilibrium between NIP and copper (II) ions and releases the fluorescence probe of TMACA-NIP. This three-component competing system of NIP/Cu 2+ /GSH can be used to detect GSH simply and rapidly. - Highlights: ► A novel fluorescence probe was developed to detect GSH that operates in aqueous solution. ► TMACA-NIP was synthesized and employed as “read-out” units of NIP/Cu 2+ /GSH. ► NIP-based probe shows high selectivity over other sulfhydryl compounds.

  15. Probing into frictional contact dynamics by ultrasound and electrical simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changshan Jin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction arises in the interface of friction pair, and therefore, it is difficult to detect it. Ultrasonic means, as a NDT, is the correct alternative. This paper introduces a means of detecting dynamic contact and an interpretation of behaviors of dry friction. It has been determined that frictional surfaces have a specific property of dynamic response hardening (DRH. Dynamic response forces and oscillation arise during static–kinetic transition process. While the contact zone of sliding surfaces appears “hard” in motion, it appears “soft” at rest. Consequently, a separation of the surfaces occurs and the real area of contact is decreased as sliding velocity increases. This is the cause of F–v descent phenomenon. When the friction comes to a rest, the remaining process of DRH and micro-oscillation do not disappear instantaneously, instead they gradually return to their original static position. The contact area, therefore, is increased by rest period (F–T ascent characteristics. Based on analogies between a solid unit (η–m–k and an R-L-C circuit, the DRH is demonstrated by electrical simulations.

  16. Probing the Dynamic of Communal Conflict in Northern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs.

  17. Survey for service selection approaches in dynamic environments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Manqele, Lindelweyizizwe S

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The usage of the service selection approaches across different dynamic service provisioning environments has increased the challenges associated with an effective method that can be used to select a relevant service. The use of service selection...

  18. Selective and sensitive fluorescence-shift probes based on two dansyl groups for mercury(ii) ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Jun; Liu, Jialun; Deng, Lefang; Zhao, Meili; Deng, Zhifu; Li, Xutian; Tang, Jian; Yang, Liting

    2014-11-01

    Two probes ( and ) bearing two dansyl fluorophores were synthesized and applied to the detection of mercury(ii) ions in aqueous solution. These probes exhibited a selective response to Hg(2+) in a buffered solution, with high sensitivity and a unique fluorescence response signal which displayed a blue-shift effect in the fluorescence emission peak. The Hg(2+) recognition mechanisms of the probes were determined by NMR spectroscopy, ESI-MS and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that probe and mercury(ii) ions formed an unusual 2:2 stoichiometric ratio complex, while probe and Hg(2+) formed a multidentate complex with a stoichiometric ratio of 2:1.

  19. Stability mechanisms of a thermophilic laccase probed by molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Johan; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2013-01-01

    Laccases are highly stable, industrially important enzymes capable of oxidizing a large range of substrates. Causes for their stability are, as for other proteins, poorly understood. In this work, multiple-seed molecular dynamics (MD) was applied to a Trametes versicolor laccase in response...... integrity by increasing persistent backbone hydrogen bonds by ∼4 across simulations, mainly via prevention of F(-) intrusion. Hydrogen-bond loss in distinct loop regions and ends of critical β-sheets suggest potential strategies for laboratory optimization of these industrially important enzymes....

  20. Single Molecules as Optical Probes for Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrit, Michel

    Single molecules and single nanoparticles are convenient links between the nanoscale world and the laboratory. We discuss the limits for their optical detection by three different methods: fluorescence, direct absorption, and photothermal detection. We briefly review some recent illustrations of qualitatively new information gathered from single-molecule signals: intermittency of the fluorescence intensity, acoustic vibrations of nanoparticles (1-100 GHz) or of extended defects in molecular crystals (0.1-1 MHz), and dynamical heterogeneity in glass-forming molecular liquids. We conclude with an outlook of future uses of single-molecule methods in physical chemistry, soft matter, and material science.

  1. Real-Time Probing of Structural Dynamics by Interaction between Chromophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation of structural dynamics in excited-state cations probed in real-time by femtosecond timeresolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy. From photoelectron spectroscopy data on 1,3-dibromopropane we conclude that the pump pulse ionizes the molecule, populating an excited...

  2. Momentum distributions of selected rare-gas atoms probed by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    We provide a direct comparison between numerical and experimental (Rudenko et al 2004 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 L407) photoelectron momentum distributions in strong-field ionization of selected rare-gas atoms (He, Ne and Ar), probed by femtosecond linearly polarized laser pulses. The cal......We provide a direct comparison between numerical and experimental (Rudenko et al 2004 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 L407) photoelectron momentum distributions in strong-field ionization of selected rare-gas atoms (He, Ne and Ar), probed by femtosecond linearly polarized laser pulses....... The calculations are performed by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation within the single-active-electron approximation, and focal-volume effects are taken into account by appropriately averaging the results. The resulting momentum distributions are in quantitative agreement with the experimental...

  3. Bis-pyridinium quadrupolar derivatives. High Stokes shift selective probes for bio-imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salice, Patrizio; Versari, Silvia; Bradamante, Silvia; Meinardi, Francesco; Macchi, Giorgio; Pagani, Giorgio A.; Beverina, Luca

    2013-11-01

    We describe the design, synthesis and characterization of five high Stokes shift quadrupolar heteroaryl compounds suitable as fluorescent probes in bio-imaging. In particular, we characterize the photophysical properties and the intracellular localization in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (HMSCs) for each dye. We show that, amongst all of the investigated derivatives, the 2,5-bis[1-(4-N-methylpyridinium)ethen-2-yl)]- N-methylpyrrole salt is the best candidates as selective mitochondrial tracker. Finally, we recorded the full emission spectrum of the most performing - exclusively mitochondrial selective - fluorescent probe directly from HUVEC stained cells. The emission spectrum collected from the stained mitochondria shows a remarkably more pronounced vibronic structure with respect to the emission of the free fluorophore in solution.

  4. Heterodyne pump probe measurements of nonlinear dynamics in an indium phosphide photonic crystal cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuck, Mikkel; Combrié, S.; Lehoucq, G.

    2013-01-01

    Using a sensitive two-color heterodyne pump-probe technique, we investigate the carrier dynamics of an InP photonic crystal nanocavity. The heterodyne technique provides unambiguous results for all wavelength configurations, including the degenerate case, which cannot be investigated with the wid......Using a sensitive two-color heterodyne pump-probe technique, we investigate the carrier dynamics of an InP photonic crystal nanocavity. The heterodyne technique provides unambiguous results for all wavelength configurations, including the degenerate case, which cannot be investigated...... with the widely used homodyne technique. A model based on coupled mode theory including two carrier distributions is introduced to account for the relaxation dynamics, which is assumed to be governed by both diffusion and recombination....

  5. An Amidochlorin-Based Colorimetric Fluorescent Probe for Selective Cu2+ Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and synthesis of selective and sensitive chemosensors for the quantification of environmentally and biologically important ionic species has attracted widespread attention. Amidochlorin p6 (ACP; an effective colorimetric and fluorescent probe for copper ions (Cu2+ in aqueous solution derived from methyl pheophorbide-a (MPa was designed and synthesized. A remarkable color change from pale yellow to blue was easily observed by the naked eye upon addition of Cu2+; and a fluorescence quenching was also determined. The research of fluorescent quenching of ACP-Cu2+ complexation showed the detection limit was 7.5 × 10−8 mol/L; which suggested that ACP can act as a high sensitive probe for Cu2+ and can be used to quantitatively detect low levels of Cu2+ in aqueous solution. In aqueous solution the probe exhibits excellent selectivity and sensitivity toward Cu2+ ions over other metal ions (M = Zn2+; Ni2+; Ba2+; Ag+; Co2+; Na+; K+; Mg2+; Cd2+; Pb2+; Mn2+; Fe3+; and Ca2+. The obvious change from pale yellow to blue upon the addition of Cu2+ could make it a suitable “naked eye” indicator for Cu2+.

  6. A highly selective and sensitive Tb3+-acetylacetone photo probe for the assessment of acetazolamide in pharmaceutical and serum samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, A. O.

    2018-04-01

    A novel, simple, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric method was developed for the determination of Acetazolamide in pharmaceutical tablets and serum samples using photo probe Tb3+-ACAC. The Acetazolamide can remarkably quench the luminescence intensity of Tb3+-ACAC complex in DMSO at pH 6.8 and λex = 350 nm. The quenching of luminescence intensity of Tb3+-ACAC complex especially the electrical band at λem = 545 nm is used for the assessment of Acetazolamide in the pharmaceutical tablet and serum samples. The dynamic range found for the determination of Acetazolamide concentration is 4.49 × 10-9-1.28 × 10-7 mol L-1, and the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) are (4.0 × 10-9 and 1.21 × 10-8) mol L-1, respectively.

  7. A Locked Nucleic Acid Probe Based on Selective Salt-Induced Effect Detects Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of single based genetic mutation by using oligonucleotide probes is one of the common methods of detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms at known loci. In this paper, we demonstrated a hybridization system which included a buffer solution that produced selective salt-induced effect and a locked nucleic acid modified 12 nt oligonucleotide probe. The hybridization system is suitable for hybridization under room temperature. By using magnetic nanoparticles as carriers for PCR products, the SNPs (MDR1 C3435T/A from 45 volunteers were analyzed, and the results were consistent with the results from pyrophosphoric acid sequencing. The method presented in this paper differs from the traditional method of using molecular beacons to detect SNPs in that it is suitable for research institutions lacking real-time quantitative PCR detecting systems, to detect PCR products at room temperature.

  8. The importance of cantilever dynamics in the interpretation of Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satzinger, Kevin J; Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M

    2012-09-15

    A realistic interpretation of the measured contact potential difference (CPD) in Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is crucial in order to extract meaningful information about the sample. Central to this interpretation is a method to include contributions from the macroscopic cantilever arm, as well as the cone and sharp tip of a KPFM probe. Here, three models of the electrostatic interaction between a KPFM probe and a sample are tested through an electrostatic simulation and compared with experiment. In contrast with previous studies that treat the KPFM cantilever as a rigid object, we allow the cantilever to bend and rotate; accounting for cantilever bending provides the closest agreement between theory and experiment. We demonstrate that cantilever dynamics play a major role in CPD measurements and provide a simulation technique to explore this phenomenon.

  9. Protein rotational dynamics investigated with a dual EPR/optical molecular probe. Spin-labeled eosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, C E; Hustedt, E J; Beechem, J M; Beth, A H

    1993-01-01

    An acyl spin-label derivative of 5-aminoeosin (5-SLE) was chemically synthesized and employed in studies of rotational dynamics of the free probe and of the probe when bound noncovalently to bovine serum albumin using the spectroscopic techniques of fluorescence anisotropy decay and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and their long-lifetime counterparts phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR. Previous work (Beth, A. H., Cobb, C. E., and J. M. Beechem, 1992. Synthesis and characterization of a combined fluorescence, phosphorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance probe. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. Time-Resolved Laser Spectroscopy III. 504-512) has shown that the spin-label moiety only slightly altered the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes and quantum yields of 5-SLE when compared with 5-SLE whose nitroxide had been reduced with ascorbate and with the diamagnetic homolog 5-acetyleosin. In the present work, we have utilized time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and linear EPR spectroscopies to observe and quantitate the psec motions of 5-SLE in solution and the nsec motions of the 5-SLE-bovine serum albumin complex. Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy decay and saturation transfer EPR studies have been carried out to observe and quantitate the microseconds motions of the 5-SLE-albumin complex in glycerol/buffer solutions of varying viscosity. These latter studies have enabled a rigorous comparison of rotational correlation times obtained from these complementary techniques to be made with a single probe. The studies described demonstrate that it is possible to employ a single molecular probe to carry out the full range of fluorescence, phosphorescence, EPR, and saturation transfer EPR studies. It is anticipated that "dual" molecular probes of this general type will significantly enhance capabilities for extracting dynamics and structural information from macromolecules and their functional

  10. Colloidal probe dynamics in gelatin solution during the sol-gel transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Xu, Guozhi; Ou, Xiaogang; Sun, Weixiang; Wang, Tao; Tong, Zhen

    2018-05-16

    The dynamics of the colloidal probes in a gelatin solution during the time-dependent sol-gel transition was investigated by multi-particle tracking. The relationship between the relaxation of the medium at the critical gel point and the mean square displacement of the probes was elucidated. Based on this understanding, the critical gel point of gelatin and the corresponding critical exponent n were unambiguously determined by the loss angle criterion and the time-cure superposition. The shift factors of the latter are further used to estimate the time/length-scale evolution of the gelatin during the sol-gel transition. The growth of the medium length scale crossed with the two measuring length scales successively at the pre-gel regime. Coinciding with the length-scale crossovers, the probability density function (PDF) of the probe displacements displayed two transient peaks of non-Gaussianity. In the post-gel regime, the third peak of Gaussianity suggested inhomogeneity in the gel network. The non-Gaussianity results from the bifurcation of diffusivity. The present work showed that the non-Gaussian dynamics of the probes are not the direct equivalence of that of the medium, but an effect of length-scale coupling.

  11. Metal-organic framework based highly selective fluorescence turn-on probe for hydrogen sulphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, Sanjog S.; Saha, Tanmoy; Desai, Aamod V.; Talukdar, Pinaki; Ghosh, Sujit K.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is known to play a vital role in human physiology and pathology which stimulated interest in understanding complex behaviour of H2S. Discerning the pathways of H2S production and its mode of action is still a challenge owing to its volatile and reactive nature. Herein we report azide functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF) as a selective turn-on fluorescent probe for H2S detection. The MOF shows highly selective and fast response towards H2S even in presence of other relevant biomolecules. Low cytotoxicity and H2S detection in live cells, demonstrate the potential of MOF towards monitoring H2S chemistry in biological system. To the best of our knowledge this is the first example of MOF that exhibit fast and highly selective fluorescence turn-on response towards H2S under physiological conditions.

  12. Real-time ultrafast dynamics of dense, hot matter measured by pump-probe Doppler spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lad, Amit D; Mondal, S; Narayanan, V; Ahmed, Saima; Kumar, G Ravindra; Rajeev, P P; Robinson, A P L [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Pasley, J, E-mail: amitlad@tifr.res.i [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    A detailed understanding of the critical surface motion of high intensity laser produced plasma is very crucial for understanding the interaction. We employ the two colour pump-probe technique to report the first ever femtosecond scale ultrafast dynamics measurement of the critical surface of a solid plasma produced by a relativistically intense, femtosecond pump laser beam (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, 30 fs, 800 nm) on an aluminium target. We observe the Doppler shift of a time delayed probe laser beam (10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}, 80 fs, 400 nm) up to delays of 30 ps. Such unravelling of dynamics has not been possible in earlier measurements, which typically used the self reflection of a powerful pump pulse. We observe time dependent red and blue shifts and measure their magnitudes to infer plasma expansion velocity and acceleration and thereby the plasma profile. Our results are very well reproduced by 1D hydrodynamic simulation (HYADES code).

  13. A study of trapped ion dynamics by photon-correlation and pulse-probe techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rink, J.; Dholakia, K.; Zs, G.; Horvath, K.; Hernandez-Pozos, J. L.; Power, W.; Segal, D. M.; Thompson, R. C.; Walker, T.

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrate non-evasive methods for observing ion and ion cloud oscillation frequencies in a quadrupole ion trap. These trap resonances are measured for small clouds using a photon correlation technique. For large clouds the rotation frequency can be detected with the help of an additional pulsed probe laser. We show applications of the photon correlation method such as estimating the dynamic properties of a combined trap and detecting ion crystals

  14. Selective ultrafast probing of transient hot chemisorbed and precursor states of CO on Ru(0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beye, M.; Anniyev, T.; Coffee, R.

    2013-01-01

    to hot-electron-driven vibrational excitations. This process is faster than, but occurs in parallel with, the transition into the precursor state. With resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, we probe each of these states selectively and determine the respective transient populations depending on optical...... (2013)SCIEAS0036-8075] a phonon-mediated transition into a weakly adsorbed precursor state occurring on a time scale of >2 ps prior to desorption. Here we focus on processes within the first picosecond after laser excitation and show that the metal-adsorbate coordination is initially increased due...

  15. Synthesis and application of a highly selective copper ions fluorescent probe based on the coumarin group

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guangjie; Liu, Xiangli; Xu, Jinhe; Ji, Liguo; Yang, Linlin; Fan, Aiying; Wang, Songjun; Wang, Qingzhi

    2018-02-01

    A highly selective copper ions fluorescent probe based on the coumarin-type Schiff base derivative 1 (probe) was produced by condensation reaction between coumarin carbohydrazide and 1H-indazole-3-carbaldehyde. The UV-vis spectroscopy showed that the maximum absorption peak of compound 1 appeared at 439 nm. In the presence of Cu2 + ions, the maximum peak decreased remarkably compared with other physiological important metal ions and a new absorption peak at 500 nm appeared. The job's plot experiments showed that complexes of 1:2 binding mode were formed in CH3CN:HEPES (3:2, v/v) solution. Compound 1 exhibited a strong blue fluorescence. Upon addition of copper ions, the fluorescence gradually decreased and reached a plateau with the fluorescence quenching rate up to 98.73%. The detection limit for Cu2 + ions was estimated to 0.384 ppm. Fluorescent microscopy experiments demonstrated that probe 1 had potential to be used to investigate biological processes involving Cu2 + ions within living cells.

  16. Fluorescent probe encapsulated hydrogel microsphere for selective and reversible detection of Hg{sup 2+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Zhenhu; Wang, Fang; Qiang, Jian; Zhang, Zhijie; Chen, Yahui; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaoqiang

    2017-03-15

    We developed a simple and sensitive hydrogel sensor in the form of microspheres by using fluorescence probe encapsulated within a hydrogel matrix for the detection of Hg{sup 2+}. The traditional fluorescence probes suspended in solution are not transportable and recoverable. To overcome these disadvantages, we devised poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate-based hydrogel microspheres in which fluorescence probe (R19S) was embedded at high density. The functionalized hydrogel microspheres were prepared by combining a microfluidic device with UV light. The hydrogel microspheres-based sensor exhibited good selectivity to Hg{sup 2+} among various metal ions and high sensitivity with a detection limit of 90 nM. Furthermore, after binding with Hg{sup 2+}, the R19S encapsulated hydrogel microspheres can be separated from testing samples easily and treated with the solution containing KI to remove Hg{sup 2+} and realize reusable detection. The current work may offer a new method for Hg{sup 2+} recognition with a more efficient manner.

  17. Dynamic current susceptibility as a probe of Majorana bound states in nanowire-based Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trif, Mircea; Dmytruk, Olesia; Bouchiat, Hélène; Aguado, Ramón; Simon, Pascal

    2018-02-01

    We theoretically study a Josephson junction based on a semiconducting nanowire subject to a time-dependent flux bias. We establish a general density-matrix approach for the dynamical response of the Majorana junction and calculate the resulting flux-dependent susceptibility using both microscopic and effective low-energy descriptions for the nanowire. We find that the diagonal component of the susceptibility, associated with the dynamics of the Majorana state populations, dominates over the standard Kubo contribution for a wide range of experimentally relevant parameters. The diagonal term, explored, in this Rapid Communication, in the context of Majorana physics, allows probing accurately the presence of Majorana bound states in the junction.

  18. Static states and dynamic behaviour of charges: observation and control by scanning probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews charges that locally functionalize materials. Microscopic analyses and operation of charges using various scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques have revealed static, quasi-static/quasi-dynamic and dynamic charge behaviours. Charge-sensitive SPM has allowed for the visualization of the distribution of functionalized charges in electronic devices. When used as bit data in a memory system, the charges can be operated by SPM. The behaviour of quasi-static/quasi-dynamic charges is discussed here. In the data-writing process, spatially dispersive charges rather than a fast injection rate are introduced, but the technical problems can be solved by using nanostructures. Careful charge operations using SPM should realize a memory with a larger density than Tbit/inch 2 . Dynamic charges have been introduced in physical analyses and chemical processes. Although the observable timescale is limited by the SPM system response time of the order of several seconds, dynamics such as photon-induced charge redistributions and probe-assisted chemical reactions are observed. (topical review)

  19. Static states and dynamic behaviour of charges: observation and control by scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Masashi, E-mail: ISHII.Masashi@nims.go.j [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2010-05-05

    This paper reviews charges that locally functionalize materials. Microscopic analyses and operation of charges using various scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques have revealed static, quasi-static/quasi-dynamic and dynamic charge behaviours. Charge-sensitive SPM has allowed for the visualization of the distribution of functionalized charges in electronic devices. When used as bit data in a memory system, the charges can be operated by SPM. The behaviour of quasi-static/quasi-dynamic charges is discussed here. In the data-writing process, spatially dispersive charges rather than a fast injection rate are introduced, but the technical problems can be solved by using nanostructures. Careful charge operations using SPM should realize a memory with a larger density than Tbit/inch{sup 2}. Dynamic charges have been introduced in physical analyses and chemical processes. Although the observable timescale is limited by the SPM system response time of the order of several seconds, dynamics such as photon-induced charge redistributions and probe-assisted chemical reactions are observed. (topical review)

  20. Two sugar-rhodamine "turn-on" fluorescent probes for the selective detection of Fe3 +

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Fang, Zhijie

    2018-03-01

    Two new sugar-rhodamine fluorescent probes (RDG1 and RDG2) have been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and HRMS. Their UV-Vis, fluorescence spectra and fluorescence-response to Fe3 + are investigated and discussed. RDG1 had a very nice linear relationship between UV absorbance and Fe3 + concentration with the correlation coefficient as high as 0.997 and the detection limit is 3.46 × 10- 6 M. Upon the addition of Fe3 +, the spirolactam ring of RDG1 was opened and a 1:1 metal ligand complex was formed from Job's plot. The results showed that RDG1 can be used as an effective fluorescent probe for selective detection of Fe3 + in water. RDG2 was incorporated the well-known rhodamine group and a water-soluble D-glucose group within one molecule and can be used for detecting Fe3 + in natural water as a selective fluorescent sensor. The addition of Fe3 + into RDG2 resulted in a strongly enhanced fluorescence as well as color change of solution from colorless to pink. Job's plot of RDG2 indicated 1:1 stoichiometry of RDG2-Fe3 +. RDG2 can serve as a probe for Fe3 + between pH = 4.0 to 7.0 and it's detection limit is 2.09 × 10- 6 M. The OFF-ON fluorescent mechanisms of RDG1-Fe3 + and RDG2-Fe3 + are proposed.

  1. Planar dynamical systems selected classical problems

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yirong; Huang, Wentao

    2014-01-01

    This book presents in an elementary way the recent significant developments in the qualitative theory of planar dynamical systems. The subjects are covered as follows: the studies of center and isochronous center problems, multiple Hopf bifurcations and local and global bifurcations of the equivariant planar vector fields which concern with Hilbert's 16th problem. This book is intended for graduate students, post-doctors and researchers in the area of theories and applications of dynamical systems. For all engineers who are interested the theory of dynamical systems, it is also a reasona

  2. Dynamics of exciton relaxation in LH2 antenna probed by multipulse nonlinear spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Cohen Stuart, Thomas A; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2011-04-28

    We explain the relaxation dynamics in the LH2-B850 antenna as revealed by multipulse pump-dump-probe spectroscopy (Th. A. Cohen Stuart, M. Vengris, V. I. Novoderezhkin, R. J. Cogdell, C. N. Hunter, R. van Grondelle, submitted). The theory of pump-dump-probe response is evaluated using the doorway-window approach in combination with the modified Redfield theory. We demonstrate that a simultaneous fit of linear spectra, pump-probe, and pump-dump-probe kinetics can be obtained at a quantitative level using the disordered exciton model, which is essentially the same as used to model the spectral fluctuations in single LH2 complexes (Novoderezhkin, V.; Rutkauskas, D.; van Grondelle, R. Biophys. J. 2006, 90, 2890). The present studies suggest that the observed relaxation rates are strongly dependent on the realization of the disorder. A big spread of the rates (exceeding 3 orders of magnitude) is correlated with the disorder-induced changes in delocalization length and overlap of the exciton wave functions. We conclude that the bulk kinetics reflect a superposition of many pathways corresponding to different physical limits of energy transfer, varying from sub-20 fs relaxation between delocalized and highly spatially overlapping exciton states to >20 ps jumps between states localized at the opposite sides of the ring.

  3. Dynamic characterization of silicon nanowires using a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer-based pump-probe scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hua; Cleary, C. S.; Dailey, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic phase and amplitude all-optical responses of silicon nanowires are characterized using a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) based pump-probe scheme. Ultra-fast recovery is observed for moderate pump powers....

  4. Pump–probe microscopy: Visualization and spectroscopy of ultrafast dynamics at the nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumstrup, Erik M., E-mail: erik.grumstrup@montana.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59718 (United States); Gabriel, Michelle M.; Cating, Emma E.M.; Van Goethem, Erika M. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Papanikolas, John M., E-mail: john_papanikolas@unc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2015-09-08

    Highlights: • Diffraction limited pump–probe microscopy methods are described. • Spatial variation in dynamical phenomena across single structures. • Direct observation of carrier motion in individual nanostructures. - Abstract: Excited state dynamics at the nanoscale provide important insight into the influence of structural features such as interfaces, defects, and surfaces on material properties. Pump–probe microscopy combines the spatial resolution of far-field optical microscopy with the temporal resolution of ultrafast spectroscopy, and has emerged as a powerful technique for characterizing spatial variation in dynamical phenomena across nanometer length scales. It has helped correlate dynamical phenomena with specific structural features in a variety of materials, shedding light on how excited state behaviors can dramatically differ from one member of the ensemble to the next, and even at different points within a single structure. It has also enabled direct imaging of transport phenomena such as free carrier diffusion, exciton migration and plasmon propagation in nanostructures. This ability to observe individual objects provides unique insight into complex materials where heterogeneous behavior makes it difficult, if not impossible, to reach clear and quantitative conclusions.

  5. Vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions probed using broadband 2DIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Aritra; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    We employed ultrafast transient absorption and broadband 2DIR spectroscopy to study the vibrational dynamics of aqueous hydroxide solutions by exciting the O–H stretch vibrations of the strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxide solvation shell water and probing the continuum absorption of the solvated ion between 1500 and 3800 cm −1 . We observe rapid vibrational relaxation processes on 150–250 fs time scales across the entire probed spectral region as well as slower vibrational dynamics on 1–2 ps time scales. Furthermore, the O–H stretch excitation loses its frequency memory in 180 fs, and vibrational energy exchange between bulk-like water vibrations and hydroxide-associated water vibrations occurs in ∼200 fs. The fast dynamics in this system originate in strong nonlinear coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations and are explained in terms of non-adiabatic vibrational relaxation. These measurements indicate that the vibrational dynamics of the aqueous hydroxide complex are faster than the time scales reported for long-range transport of protons in aqueous hydroxide solutions

  6. A Dynamic Model for Limb Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, R.F.A; Smitsman, A.W.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments and a model on limb selection are reported. In Experiment 1 left-handed and right-handed participants (N = 36) repeatedly used one hand for grasping a small cube. After a clear switch in the cube’s location, perseverative limb selection was revealed in both handedness groups. In

  7. The ML1Nx2 Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-Bisphosphate Probe Shows Poor Selectivity in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Gerald R V; Takasuga, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Takehiko; Balla, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (3,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2) is a quantitatively minor phospholipid in eukaryotic cells that plays a fundamental role in regulating endocytic membrane traffic. Despite its clear importance for cellular function and organism physiology, mechanistic details of its biology have so far not been fully elucidated. In part, this is due to a lack of experimental tools that specifically probe for PtdIns(3,5)P2 in cells to unambiguously identify its dynamics and site(s) of action. In this study, we have evaluated a recently reported PtdIns(3,5)P2 biosensor, GFP-ML1Nx2, for its veracity as such a probe. We report that, in live cells, the localization of this biosensor to sub-cellular compartments is largely independent of PtdIns(3,5)P2, as assessed after pharmacological, chemical genetic or genomic interventions that block the lipid's synthesis. We therefore conclude that it is unwise to interpret the localization of ML1Nx2 as a true and unbiased biosensor for PtdIns(3,5)P2.

  8. A rhodamine chromene-based turn-on fluorescence probe for selectively imaging Cu2+ in living cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Yong; Li, Hai-Ying; Lv, Hong-Shui; Zhao, Bao-Xiang; Miao, Jun-Ying

    We describe the development of a rhodamine chromene-based turn-on fluorescence probe to monitor the intracellular Cu2+ level in living cells. The new fluorescent probe with a chlorine group in chromene moiety exhibits good membrane-permeable property than previous reported because the predicted lipophilicity of present probe 4 is stronger than that of methoxyl substituted probe in our previous work (CLogP of 4: 8.313, CLogP of methoxyl substituted probe: 7.706), and a fluorescence response toward Cu2+ under physiological conditions with high sensitivity and selectivity, and facilitates naked-eye detection of Cu2+. The fluorescence intensity was remarkably increased upon the addition of Cu2+ within 1 or 2 min, while the other sixteen metal ions caused no significant effect.

  9. Dynamic Channel Selection for Cognitive Femtocells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Costa, Gustavo Wagner Oliveira; Cattoni, Andrea Fabio; Mogensen, Preben

    2014-01-01

    on state-of-art techniques to manage the radio resources in order to cope with inter-cell interference in cognitive femtocells. Different techniques are presented as examples of gradually increasing sophistication of the cognitive femtocells, allowing for dynamic channel allocation, dynamic reuse......, but not least, the possibility of having closed-subscriber-groups aggravates the inter-cell interference problems. In order to tackle these issues we consider the implementation of some aspects of cognitive radio technology into femtocells, leading to the concept of cognitive femtocells. This chapter focuses...

  10. Blue emitting copper nanoclusters as colorimetric and fluorescent probe for the selective detection of bilirubin

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S., Aparna; J. S., Anjali Devi; John, Nebu; Abha, K.; S. S., Syamchand; George, Sony

    2018-06-01

    Hurdles to develop point of care diagnostic methods restrict the translation of progress in the health care sector from bench side to bedside. In this article a simple, cost effective fluorescent as well as colorimetric nanosensor was developed for the early and easy detection of hyperbilirubinemia. A stable, water soluble bovine serum albumin stabilised copper nanocluster (BSA CuNC) was used as the fluorescent probe which exhibited strong blue emission (404 nm) upon 330 nm excitation. The fluorescence of the BSA CuNC can be effectively quenched by the addition of bilirubin by the formation of copper-bilirubin complex. Meanwhile the copper-bilirubin complex resulted in an observable colour change from pale violet to green facilitating colorimetric detection. The prepared sensor displayed good selectivity and sensitivity over other co-existing molecules, and can be used for quantifying bilirubin with a detection limit down to 257 fM. Additionally, the as-prepared probe was coated on a paper strip to develop a portable paper strip sensor of bilirubin. Moreover, the method was successfully applied in real sample analysis and obtained promising result.

  11. Two rhodamine lactam modulated lysosome-targetable fluorescence probes for sensitively and selectively monitoring subcellular organelle pH change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongmei [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry, College of Chemistry & Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Wang, Cuiling [Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, College of Life Science, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); She, Mengyao; Zhu, Yuelu; Zhang, Jidong; Yang, Zheng [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry, College of Chemistry & Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Liu, Ping, E-mail: liuping@nwu.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry, College of Chemistry & Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Wang, Yaoyu [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry, College of Chemistry & Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Li, Jianli, E-mail: lijianli@nwu.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry, College of Chemistry & Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China)

    2015-11-05

    Be a powerful technique for convenient detection of pH change in living cells, especially at subcellular level, fluorescent probes has attracted more and more attention. In this work, we designed and synthesized three rhodamine lactam modulated fluorescent probes RS1, RS2 and RS3, which all respond sensitively toward weak acidity (pH range 4–6) via the photophysical property in buffer solution without interference from the other metal ions, and they also show ideal pKa values and excellent reversibility. Particularly, by changing the lone pair electrons distribution of lactam-N atom with different conjugations, RS2 and RS3 exhibit high quantum yield, negligible cytotoxicity and excellent permeability. They are suitable to stain selectively lysosomes of tumor cells and monitor its pH changes sensitively via optical molecular imaging. The above findings suggest that the probes we designed could act as ideal and easy method for investigating the pivotal role of H{sup +} in lysosomes and are potential pH detectors in disease diagnosis through direct intracellular imaging. - Highlights: • Two probes for sensitively and selectively monitoring weak acidic pH change. • The pKa of the probes was highly suitable for staining lysosomes in tumor cells. • The properties of those probes were changed by different conjugate system. • These probes have negligible cytotoxicity and good sensitivity in vivo.

  12. Two rhodamine lactam modulated lysosome-targetable fluorescence probes for sensitively and selectively monitoring subcellular organelle pH change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hongmei; Wang, Cuiling; She, Mengyao; Zhu, Yuelu; Zhang, Jidong; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yaoyu; Li, Jianli

    2015-01-01

    Be a powerful technique for convenient detection of pH change in living cells, especially at subcellular level, fluorescent probes has attracted more and more attention. In this work, we designed and synthesized three rhodamine lactam modulated fluorescent probes RS1, RS2 and RS3, which all respond sensitively toward weak acidity (pH range 4–6) via the photophysical property in buffer solution without interference from the other metal ions, and they also show ideal pKa values and excellent reversibility. Particularly, by changing the lone pair electrons distribution of lactam-N atom with different conjugations, RS2 and RS3 exhibit high quantum yield, negligible cytotoxicity and excellent permeability. They are suitable to stain selectively lysosomes of tumor cells and monitor its pH changes sensitively via optical molecular imaging. The above findings suggest that the probes we designed could act as ideal and easy method for investigating the pivotal role of H + in lysosomes and are potential pH detectors in disease diagnosis through direct intracellular imaging. - Highlights: • Two probes for sensitively and selectively monitoring weak acidic pH change. • The pKa of the probes was highly suitable for staining lysosomes in tumor cells. • The properties of those probes were changed by different conjugate system. • These probes have negligible cytotoxicity and good sensitivity in vivo.

  13. Functional Dynamics of Hexameric Helicase Probed by Hydrogen Exchange and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radou, Gaël; Dreyer, Frauke N.; Tuma, Roman; Paci, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    The biological function of large macromolecular assemblies depends on their structure and their dynamics over a broad range of timescales; for this reason, it is a significant challenge to investigate these assemblies using conventional experimental techniques. One of the most promising experimental techniques is hydrogen-deuterium exchange detected by mass spectrometry. Here, we describe to our knowledge a new computational method for quantitative interpretation of deuterium exchange kinetics and apply it to a hexameric viral helicase P4 that unwinds and translocates RNA into a virus capsid at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Room-temperature dynamics probed by a hundred nanoseconds of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is sufficient to predict the exchange kinetics of most sequence fragments and provide a residue-level interpretation of the low-resolution experimental results. The strategy presented here is also a valuable tool to validate experimental data, e.g., assignments, and to probe mechanisms that cannot be observed by x-ray crystallography, or that occur over timescales longer than those that can be realistically simulated, such as the opening of the hexameric ring. PMID:25140434

  14. Probing Properties of Glassy Water and Other Liquids with Site Selective Spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Nhan Chuong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The standard non-photochemical hole burning (NPHB) mechanism, which involves phonon-assisted tunneling in the electronically excited state, was originally proposed to explain the light-induced frequency change of chemically stable molecules in glassy solids at liquid helium temperatures by this research group more than two decades ago. The NPHB mechanism was then further elucidated and the concept of intrinsic to glass configurational relaxation processes as pre-mediating step to the hole burning process was introduced. The latter provided the theoretical basis for NPHB to evolve into a powerful tool probing the dynamics and nature of amorphous media, which aside from ''simple'' inorganic glasses may include also ''complex'' biological systems such as living cells and cancerous/normal tissues. Presented in this dissertation are the experimental and theoretical results of hole burning properties of aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulphonate (APT) in several different matrices: (1) hyperquenched glassy water (HGW); (2) cubic ice (Ic); and (3) water confined into poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (poly-HEMA). In addition, results of photochemical hole burning (PHB) studies obtained for phthalocyanine tetrasulphonate (PcT) in HGW and free base phthalocyanine (Pc) in ortho-dichlorobenzene (DCB) glass are reported. The goal of this dissertation was to provide further evidence supporting the NPHB mechanism and to provide more insight that leads to a better understanding of the kinetic events (dynamics) in glasses, and various dynamical processes of different fluorescent chromorphores in various amorphous solids and the liquid that exist above the glass transition temperature (Tg). The following issues are addressed in detail: (1) time evolution of hole being burned under different conditions and in different hole burning systems; (2) temperature dependent hole profile; and (3) the structure/dynamics

  15. Ionization and dissociation dynamics of vinyl bromide probed by femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Ming-Fu; Neumark, Daniel M.; Gessner, Oliver; Leone, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Strong-field induced ionization and dissociation dynamics of vinyl bromide, CH 2 =CHBr, are probed using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy. Strong-field ionization is initiated with an intense femtosecond, near infrared (NIR, 775 nm) laser field. Femtosecond XUV pulses covering the photon energy range of 50-72 eV probe the subsequent dynamics by measuring the time-dependent spectroscopic features associated with transitions of the Br (3d) inner-shell electrons to vacancies in molecular and atomic valence orbitals. Spectral signatures are observed for the depletion of neutral C 2 H 3 Br, the formation of C 2 H 3 Br + ions in their ground (X ~ ) and first excited (A ~ ) states, the production of C 2 H 3 Br ++ ions, and the appearance of neutral Br ( 2 P 3/2 ) atoms by dissociative ionization. The formation of free Br ( 2 P 3/2 ) atoms occurs on a timescale of 330 ± 150 fs. The ionic A ~ state exhibits a time-dependent XUV absorption energy shift of ∼0.4 eV within the time window of the atomic Br formation. The yield of Br atoms correlates with the yield of parent ions in the A ~ state as a function of NIR peak intensity. The observations suggest that a fraction of vibrationally excited C 2 H 3 Br + (A ~ ) ions undergoes intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution followed by the C–Br bond dissociation. The C 2 H 3 Br + (X ~ ) products and the majority of the C 2 H 3 Br ++ ions are relatively stable due to a deeper potential well and a high dissociation barrier, respectively. The results offer powerful new insights about orbital-specific electronic processes in high field ionization, coupled vibrational relaxation and dissociation dynamics, and the correlation of valence hole-state location and dissociation in polyatomic molecules, all probed simultaneously by ultrafast table-top XUV spectroscopy

  16. Selective probe of the morphology and local vibrations at carbon nanoasperities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, Toshihiko; Endo, Morinobu; Kaneko, Katsumi [Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons (JST), Shinshu University, 4-17-1, Wakasato, Nagano-city 380-8553 (Japan); Urita, Koki; Moriguchi, Isamu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Nagasaki University, 1-14 Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki-shi, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Tomanek, David [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Ohba, Tomonori [Department of Chemistry, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2012-02-14

    We introduce a way to selectively probe local vibration modes at nanostructured asperities such as tips of carbon nanohorns. Our observations benefit from signal amplification in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) at sites near a silver surface. We observe nanohorn tip vibration modes in the range 200-500 cm{sup -1}, which are obscured in regular Raman spectra. Ab initio density functional calculations assign modes in this frequency range to local vibrations at the nanohorn cap resembling the radial breathing mode of fullerenes. Careful interpretation of our SERS spectra indicates presence of caps with 5 or 6 pentagons, which are chemically the most active sites. Changes in the peak intensities and frequencies with time indicate that exposure to laser irradiation may cause structural rearrangements at the cap.

  17. Selected Problems in Nonlinear Dynamics and Sociophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westley, Alexandra Renee

    This Ph.D. dissertation focuses on a collection of problems on the dynamical behavior of nonlinear many-body systems, drawn from two substantially different areas. First, the dynamical behavior seen in strongly nonlinear lattices such as in the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-Tsingou (FPUT) system (part I) and second, time evolution behavior of interacting living objects which can be broadly considered as sociophysics systems (part II). The studies on FPUT-like systems will comprise of five chapters, dedicated to the properties of solitary and anti-solitary waves in the system, how localized nonlinear excitations decay and spread throughout these lattices, how two colliding solitary waves can precipitate highly localized and stable excitations, a possible alternative way to view these localized excitations through Duffing oscillators, and finally an exploration of parametric resonance in an FPUT-like lattice. Part II consists of two problems in the context of sociophysics. I use molecular dynamics inspired simulations to study the size and the stability of social groups of chimpanzees (such as those seen in central Africa) and compare the results with existing observations on the stability of chimpanzee societies. Secondly, I use an agent-based model to simulate land battles between an intelligent army and an insurgency when both have access to equally powerful weaponry. The study considers genetic algorithm based adaptive strategies to infer the strategies needed for the intelligent army to win the battles.

  18. Collective flow as a probe of heavy-ion reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awes, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    Collective flow of nuclear matter probes the dynamics of heavy-ion reactions and can provide information about the nuclear-matter equation of state. In particular, the incident energy dependences of collective flow may be a sensitive means to deduce the existence of a Quark Gluon Plasma phase in the equation of state. Collective flow measurements from 30 A MeV to 200 A GeV incident energies are briefly reviewed. Preliminary results on collective flow from the WA98 experiment at the CERN SPS are presented

  19. Probing of RNA structures in a positive sense RNA virus reveals selection pressures for structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Kyle E; Choudhary, Krishna; Aviran, Sharon; Perry, Keith L

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In single stranded (+)-sense RNA viruses, RNA structural elements (SEs) play essential roles in the infection process from replication to encapsidation. Using selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension sequencing (SHAPE-Seq) and covariation analysis, we explore the structural features of the third genome segment of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), RNA3 (2216 nt), both in vitro and in plant cell lysates. Comparing SHAPE-Seq and covariation analysis results revealed multiple SEs in the coat protein open reading frame and 3′ untranslated region. Four of these SEs were mutated and serially passaged in Nicotiana tabacum plants to identify biologically selected changes to the original mutated sequences. After passaging, loop mutants showed partial reversion to their wild-type sequence and SEs that were structurally disrupted by mutations were restored to wild-type-like structures via synonymous mutations in planta. These results support the existence and selection of virus open reading frame SEs in the host organism and provide a framework for further studies on the role of RNA structure in viral infection. Additionally, this work demonstrates the applicability of high-throughput chemical probing in plant cell lysates and presents a new method for calculating SHAPE reactivities from overlapping reverse transcriptase priming sites. PMID:29294088

  20. Sampling dynamics: an alternative to payoff-monotone selection dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berkemer, Rainer

    payoff-monotone nor payoff-positive which has interesting consequences. This can be demonstrated by application to the travelers dilemma, a deliberately constructed social dilemma. The game has just one symmetric Nash equilibrium which is Pareto inefficient. Especially when the travelers have many......'' of the standard game theory result. Both, analytical tools and agent based simulation are used to investigate the dynamic stability of sampling equilibria in a generalized travelers dilemma. Two parameters are of interest: the number of strategy options (m) available to each traveler and an experience parameter...... (k), which indicates the number of samples an agent would evaluate before fixing his decision. The special case (k=1) can be treated analytically. The stationary points of the dynamics must be sampling equilibria and one can calculate that for m>3 there will be an interior solution in addition...

  1. Temperature dependence of dynamical permeability characterization of magnetic thin films using shorted microstrip line probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiling; Li, Chengyi; Chai, Guozhi

    2017-01-01

    A temperature dependence microwave permeability characterization system of magnetic thin film up to 10 GHz is designed and fabricated. This system can be used at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 200 °C, and is based on a shorted microstrip probe, which is made by microwave printed circuit board. Without contacting the magnetic thin films to the probe, the microwave permeability of the film can be detected without any limitations of sample size and with almost the same accuracy, as shown by comparison with the results obtained from a shorted microstrip transmission-line fixture. The complex permeability can be deduced by an analytical approach from the measured reflection coefficient of a strip line ( S 11 ) with and without a ferromagnetic film material on it. The procedures are the same with the shorted microstrip transmission-line method. The microwave permeability of an oblique deposited CoZr thin film was investigated with this probe. The results show that the room temperature dynamic permeability of the CoZr film is in good agreement with the results obtained from the established short-circuited microstrip perturbation method. The temperature dependence permeability results fit well with the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. Development of the temperature-dependent measurement of the magnetic properties of magnetic thin film may be useful for the high-frequency application of magnetic devices at high temperatures. (paper)

  2. Dynamic Heterogeneous Multiscale Filtration Model: Probing Micro- and Macroscopic Filtration Characteristics of Gasoline Particulate Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Viswanathan, Sandeep; Rothamer, David A; Foster, David E; Rutland, Christopher J

    2017-10-03

    Motivated by high filtration efficiency (mass- and number-based) and low pressure drop requirements for gasoline particulate filters (GPFs), a previously developed heterogeneous multiscale filtration (HMF) model is extended to simulate dynamic filtration characteristics of GPFs. This dynamic HMF model is based on a probability density function (PDF) description of the pore size distribution and classical filtration theory. The microstructure of the porous substrate in a GPF is resolved and included in the model. Fundamental particulate filtration experiments were conducted using an exhaust filtration analysis (EFA) system for model validation. The particulate in the filtration experiments was sampled from a spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) gasoline engine. With the dynamic HMF model, evolution of the microscopic characteristics of the substrate (pore size distribution, porosity, permeability, and deposited particulate inside the porous substrate) during filtration can be probed. Also, predicted macroscopic filtration characteristics including particle number concentration and normalized pressure drop show good agreement with the experimental data. The resulting dynamic HMF model can be used to study the dynamic particulate filtration process in GPFs with distinct microstructures, serving as a powerful tool for GPF design and optimization.

  3. Investigations of ultrafast charge dynamics in laser-irradiated targets by a self probing technique employing laser driven protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, H. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Kar, S., E-mail: s.kar@qub.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Cantono, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Research Unit Adriano Gozzini, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Nersisyan, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Brauckmann, S. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany); Doria, D.; Gwynne, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Macchi, A. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Research Unit Adriano Gozzini, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Naughton, K. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Willi, O. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany); Lewis, C.L.S.; Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    The divergent and broadband proton beams produced by the target normal sheath acceleration mechanism provide the unique opportunity to probe, in a point-projection imaging scheme, the dynamics of the transient electric and magnetic fields produced during laser-plasma interactions. Commonly such experimental setup entails two intense laser beams, where the interaction produced by one beam is probed with the protons produced by the second. We present here experimental studies of the ultra-fast charge dynamics along a wire connected to laser irradiated target carried out by employing a ‘self’ proton probing arrangement – i.e. by connecting the wire to the target generating the probe protons. The experimental data shows that an electromagnetic pulse carrying a significant amount of charge is launched along the wire, which travels as a unified pulse of 10s of ps duration with a velocity close to speed of light. The experimental capabilities and the analysis procedure of this specific type of proton probing technique are discussed. - Highlights: • Prompt charging of laser irradiated target generates ultra-short EM pulses. • Its ultrafast propagation along a wire was studied by self-proton probing technique. • Self-proton probing technique is the proton probing with one laser pulse. • Pulse temporal profile and speed along the wire were measured with high resolution.

  4. Dynamic viscosity versus probe-reported microviscosity of aqueous mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanot, Chhavi; Trivedi, Shruti; Gupta, Arti; Pandey, Shubha; Pandey, Siddharth

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Aqueous polymer mixtures, non-toxic media of huge industrial importance, are investigated. ► Bulk viscosity of aqueous. PEG mixtures is shown to vary widely with composition and temperature. ► T-dependent viscosity follows Arrhenius behavior suggesting aqueous PEGs to be Newtonian fluids. ► Microviscosity sensed by a fluorescence ratiometric probe is estimated and correlated with viscosity. ► Microviscosity correlates well with bulk viscosity at higher PEG concentrations. - Abstract: Correlation between the dynamic viscosity (η) and the microviscosity of a hybrid green medium constituted of water and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) of average molar mass (200, 400, and 600) g · mol −1 , respectively, is explored over the temperatures range (10 to 90) °C across the complete composition regime. The microviscosity is obtained using a fluorescence probe 1,3-bis-(1-pyrenyl)propane (BPP), which is manifested through the ratio of the monomer-to-intramolecular excimer intensities (I M /I E ). Aqueous PEG mixtures are observed to behave similar to Newtonian fluids as the temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity follows Arrhenius-type behavior. Surprisingly, a simple and convenient linear dependence of ln η with wt% PEG of the mixture is established. The BPP I M /I E is observed, in general, to increase with the bulk dynamic viscosity of the mixture having >10 wt% PEG suggesting a good correlation between the bulk dynamic viscosity and BPP-reported microviscosity when the viscosity of the aqueous PEG mixture is relatively high.

  5. Exploiting Submodular Value Functions for Faster Dynamic Sensor Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satsangi, Y.; Whiteson, S.; Oliehoek, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge in the design of multi-sensor systems is the efficient allocation of scarce resources such as bandwidth, CPU cycles, and energy, leading to the dynamic sensor selection problem in which a subset of the available sensors must be selected at each timestep. While partially observable

  6. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Quantum Dots as Fluorescent Probes for Sensitive and Selective Detection of Nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibiao Feng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrites are the upstream precursors of the carcinogenic nitrosamines, which are widely found in the natural environment and many food products. It is important to develop a simple and sensitive sensor for detecting nitrites. In this work, a fluorescence probe based on nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CQDs was developed for the sensitive and selective determination of nitrites. At pH 2, the fluorescence of N-CQDs can be selectively quenched by nitrite due to the fact N-nitroso compounds can be formed in the reaction of amide groups with nitrous acid, which results in fluorescence static quenching. Under optimal conditions, fluorescence intensity quenching upon addition of nitrite gives a satisfactory linear relationship covering the linear range of 0.2–20 μM, and the limit of detection (LOD is 40 nM. Moreover, this method has been successfully applied to the determination of nitrites in tap water, which indicates its great potential for monitoring of nitrites in environmental samples.

  7. A flavone-based turn-on fluorescent probe for intracellular cysteine/homocysteine sensing with high selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Lv, Yanlin; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Hui; Liu, Rongji; Zhao, Yongsheng; Zhang, Guangjin; Tian, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    A new type of flavone-based fluorescent probe (DMAF) capable of cysteine (Cys)/homocysteine (Hcy) sensing with high selectivity over other amino acids was developed. Such type of probe undergoes Cys/Hcy-mediated cyclization reaction with the involvement of its aldehyde group, which suppresses of the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process of the probe molecule and consequently leads to the enhancement of fluorescence emission upon excitation using visible light. The formation of product of the Cys/Hcy-mediated cyclization reaction was confirmed and the preliminary fluorescence imaging experiments revealed the biocompatibility of the as-prepared probe and validated its practicability for intracellular Cys/Hcy sensing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Probing the Structure and Dynamics of Proteins by Combining Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Experimental NMR Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Jane R; Hertig, Samuel; Missimer, John H; Smith, Lorna J; Steinmetz, Michel O; Dolenc, Jožica

    2012-10-09

    NMR experiments provide detailed structural information about biological macromolecules in solution. However, the amount of information obtained is usually much less than the number of degrees of freedom of the macromolecule. Moreover, the relationships between experimental observables and structural information, such as interatomic distances or dihedral angle values, may be multiple-valued and may rely on empirical parameters and approximations. The extraction of structural information from experimental data is further complicated by the time- and ensemble-averaged nature of NMR observables. Combining NMR data with molecular dynamics simulations can elucidate and alleviate some of these problems, as well as allow inconsistencies in the NMR data to be identified. Here, we use a number of examples from our work to highlight the power of molecular dynamics simulations in providing a structural interpretation of solution NMR data.

  9. Structure from Dynamics: Vibrational Dynamics of Interfacial Water as a Probe of Aqueous Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The structural heterogeneity of water at various interfaces can be revealed by time-resolved sum-frequency generation spectroscopy. The vibrational dynamics of the O–H stretch vibration of interfacial water can reflect structural variations. Specifically, the vibrational lifetime is typically found to increase with increasing frequency of the O–H stretch vibration, which can report on the hydrogen-bonding heterogeneity of water. We compare and contrast vibrational dynamics of water in contact with various surfaces, including vapor, biomolecules, and solid interfaces. The results reveal that variations in the vibrational lifetime with vibrational frequency are very typical, and can frequently be accounted for by the bulk-like heterogeneous response of interfacial water. Specific interfaces exist, however, for which the behavior is less straightforward. These insights into the heterogeneity of interfacial water thus obtained contribute to a better understanding of complex phenomena taking place at aqueous interfaces, such as photocatalytic reactions and protein folding. PMID:29490138

  10. Pure zinc sulfide quantum dot as highly selective luminescent probe for determination of hazardous cyanide ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    A rapid and simple fluorescence method is presented for selective and sensitive determination of hazardous cyanide ion in aqueous solution based on functionalized zinc sulfide (ZnS) quantum dot (QD) as luminescent prob. The ultra-small ZnS QDs were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) as an efficient capping agent. The prepared pure ZnS QDs was applied as an optical sensor for determination of cyanide ions in aqueous solutions. ZnS nanoparticles have exhibited a strong fluorescent emission at about 424 nm. The fluorescence intensity of QDs is linearly proportional to the cyanide ion concentration in the range 2.44 × 10 −6 to 2.59 × 10 −5 M with a detection limit of 1.70 × 10 −7 M at pH 11. The designed fluorescent sensor possesses remarkable selectivity for cyanide ion over other anions such as Cl − , Br − , F − , I − , IO 3 − , ClO 4 − , BrO 3 − , CO 3 2− , NO 2 − , NO 3 − , SO 4 2− , S 2 O 4 2− , C 2 O 4 2− , SCN − , N 3 − , citrate and tartarate with negligible influences on the cyanide detection by fluorescence spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Preparation of functionalized ZnS quantum dots in aqueous media • Highly selective quantum dot based luminescent probe for determination of cyanide • Fast and sensitive determination of hazardous CN − by fluorescence quenching

  11. Pure zinc sulfide quantum dot as highly selective luminescent probe for determination of hazardous cyanide ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshamsipur@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rajabi, Hamid Reza, E-mail: h.rajabi@mail.yu.ac.ir [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75918-74831 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    A rapid and simple fluorescence method is presented for selective and sensitive determination of hazardous cyanide ion in aqueous solution based on functionalized zinc sulfide (ZnS) quantum dot (QD) as luminescent prob. The ultra-small ZnS QDs were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) as an efficient capping agent. The prepared pure ZnS QDs was applied as an optical sensor for determination of cyanide ions in aqueous solutions. ZnS nanoparticles have exhibited a strong fluorescent emission at about 424 nm. The fluorescence intensity of QDs is linearly proportional to the cyanide ion concentration in the range 2.44 × 10{sup −6} to 2.59 × 10{sup −5} M with a detection limit of 1.70 × 10{sup −7} M at pH 11. The designed fluorescent sensor possesses remarkable selectivity for cyanide ion over other anions such as Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, F{sup −}, I{sup −}, IO{sub 3}{sup −}, ClO{sub 4}{sup −}, BrO{sub 3}{sup −}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}, NO{sub 2}{sup −}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, S{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2−}, C{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2−}, SCN{sup −}, N{sub 3}{sup −}, citrate and tartarate with negligible influences on the cyanide detection by fluorescence spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Preparation of functionalized ZnS quantum dots in aqueous media • Highly selective quantum dot based luminescent probe for determination of cyanide • Fast and sensitive determination of hazardous CN{sup −} by fluorescence quenching.

  12. Probing Local Ionic Dynamics in Functional Oxides: From Nanometer to Atomic Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Vacancy-mediated electrochemical reactions in oxides underpin multiple applications ranging from electroresistive memories, to chemical sensors to energy conversion systems such as fuel cells. Understanding the functionality in these systems requires probing reversible (oxygen reduction/evolution reaction) and irreversible (cathode degradation and activation, formation of conductive filaments) electrochemical processes. In this talk, I summarize recent advances in probing and controlling these transformations locally on nanometer level using scanning probe microscopy. The localized tip concentrates the electric field in the nanometer scale volume of material, inducing local transition. Measured simultaneously electromechanical response (piezoresponse) or current (conductive AFM) provides the information on the bias-induced changes in material. Here, I illustrate how these methods can be extended to study local electrochemical transformations, including vacancy dynamics in oxides such as titanates, LaxSr1-xCoO3, BiFeO3, and YxZr1-xO2. The formation of electromechanical hysteresis loops and their bias-, temperature- and environment dependences provide insight into local electrochemical mechanisms. In materials such as lanthanum-strontium cobaltite, mapping both reversible vacancy motion and vacancy ordering and static deformation is possible, and can be corroborated by post mortem STEM/EELS studies. In ceria, a broad gamut of electrochemical behaviors is observed as a function of temperature and humidity. The possible strategies for elucidation ionic motion at the electroactive interfaces in oxides using high-resolution electron microscopy and combined ex-situ and in-situ STEM-SPM studies are discussed. In the second part of the talk, probing electrochemical phenomena on in-situ grown surfaces with atomic resolution is illustrated. I present an approach based on the multivariate statistical analysis of the coordination spheres of individual atoms to reveal

  13. Selection of Activities in Dynamic Business Process Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Rusinaitė

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining dynamicity of business processes is one of the core issues of today's business as it enables businesses to adapt to constantly changing environment. Upon changing the processes, it is vital to assess possible impact, which is achieved by using simulation of dynamic processes. In order to implement dynamicity in business processes, it is necessary to have an ability to change components of the process (a set of activities, a content of activity, a set of activity sequences, a set of rules, performers and resources or dynamically select them during execution. This problem attracted attention of researches over the past few years; however, there is no proposed solution, which ensures the business process (BP dynamicity. This paper proposes and specifies dynamic business process (DBP simulation model, which satisfies all of the formulated DBP requirements.

  14. Reaction-based small-molecule fluorescent probes for dynamic detection of ROS and transient redox changes in living cells and small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Rui

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic detection of transient redox changes in living cells and animals has broad implications for human health and disease diagnosis, because intracellular redox homeostasis regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays important role in cell functions, normal physiological functions and some serious human diseases (e.g., cancer, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, etc.) usually have close relationship with the intracellular redox status. Small-molecule ROS-responsive fluorescent probes can act as powerful tools for dynamic detection of ROS and redox changes in living cells and animals through fluorescence imaging techniques; and great advances have been achieved recently in the design and synthesis of small-molecule ROS-responsive fluorescent probes. This article highlights up-to-date achievements in designing and using the reaction-based small-molecule fluorescent probes (with high sensitivity and selectivity to ROS and redox cycles) in the dynamic detection of ROS and transient redox changes in living cells and animals through fluorescence imaging. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. A novel optical tool for controlling and probing ultrafast surface dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yudong

    2017-12-01

    Ultrashort pulse laser sources have been greatly developed over the past few decades. The available pulse duration has been reduced to the single-cycle pulse regime. The discovery of high harmonic generation has freed us from the limitation of the laser wavelength. Moreover, the demonstration of isolated attosecond pulse generation has indicated the advent of the attosecond science era. Attosecond pulses undoubtedly allow one to study ultrafast dynamics with unprecedented time resolution. However, physical systems with genuine attosecond time scale dynamics are rather challenging to find. Ultrafast surface charge transfer, which is an important process in photochemistry and electrochemistry, is a good candidate experimental system exhibiting attosecond electronic dynamics. Specifically, the ultrafast surface charge transfer on the c(4 x 2)S/Ru(0001) surface was previously studied and the charge transfer time inferred to be 320 as using core-hole clock spectroscopy at a synchrotron facility. In order to measure this benchmark attosecond electronic dynamics with real time-resolving methods, pump pulses centered at 160 eV and probe pulses centered at 40 eV are required. To this end, a dedicated attosecond experimental beamline including an ultrashort laser pulse source and an attosecond pulse generation and characterization setup has been designed and is being developed. The author of this thesis was responsible for the construction of the attosecond experimental beamline which will be used ultrafast surface charge transfer studies. In this thesis, a completely functional attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) beamline, which includes a few-cycle laser pulse source, an attosecond pulse generation and characterization setup, is described. A commercial Ti:sapphire-based chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser system is the overall source of the beamline. The laser system is actively carrier-envelope phase (CEP) stabilized and the output pulse duration is ∝35 fs. The

  16. A novel optical tool for controlling and probing ultrafast surface dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yudong

    2017-12-15

    Ultrashort pulse laser sources have been greatly developed over the past few decades. The available pulse duration has been reduced to the single-cycle pulse regime. The discovery of high harmonic generation has freed us from the limitation of the laser wavelength. Moreover, the demonstration of isolated attosecond pulse generation has indicated the advent of the attosecond science era. Attosecond pulses undoubtedly allow one to study ultrafast dynamics with unprecedented time resolution. However, physical systems with genuine attosecond time scale dynamics are rather challenging to find. Ultrafast surface charge transfer, which is an important process in photochemistry and electrochemistry, is a good candidate experimental system exhibiting attosecond electronic dynamics. Specifically, the ultrafast surface charge transfer on the c(4 x 2)S/Ru(0001) surface was previously studied and the charge transfer time inferred to be 320 as using core-hole clock spectroscopy at a synchrotron facility. In order to measure this benchmark attosecond electronic dynamics with real time-resolving methods, pump pulses centered at 160 eV and probe pulses centered at 40 eV are required. To this end, a dedicated attosecond experimental beamline including an ultrashort laser pulse source and an attosecond pulse generation and characterization setup has been designed and is being developed. The author of this thesis was responsible for the construction of the attosecond experimental beamline which will be used ultrafast surface charge transfer studies. In this thesis, a completely functional attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) beamline, which includes a few-cycle laser pulse source, an attosecond pulse generation and characterization setup, is described. A commercial Ti:sapphire-based chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser system is the overall source of the beamline. The laser system is actively carrier-envelope phase (CEP) stabilized and the output pulse duration is ∝35 fs. The

  17. Anxiety-related biases in visual orienting and spatial motor response selection independently assessed by a probe-classification task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrooten, M.G.S.; Smulders, F.T.Y.; Mogg, K.; Bradley, B.P.

    2012-01-01

    This dot-probe study assessed anxiety-related biases in visual attentional orienting and spatial motor response selection (motor attention) in high- and low-trait-anxious adults, and whether anxiety-related biases depend on response speed. Emotional-neutral word pairs appeared for 14 or 500 ms, with

  18. RECOGNITION DYNAMICS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI THIOREDOXIN PROBED USING MOLECULAR DYNAMICS AND BINDING FREE ENERGY CALCULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shahul Hameed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available E. coli thioredoxin has been regarded as a hub protein as it interacts with, and regulates, numerous target proteins involved in a wide variety of cellular processes. Thioredoxin can form complexes with a variety of target proteins with a wide range of affinity, using a consensus binding surface. In this study an attempt to deduce the molecular basis for the observed multispecificity of E. coli thioredoxin has been made. In this manuscript it has been shown that structural plasticity, adaptable and exposed hydrophobic binding surface, surface electrostatics, closely clustered multiple hot spot residues and conformational changes brought about by the redox status of the protein have been shown to account for the observed multispecificity and molecular recognition of thioredoxin. Dynamical differences between the two redox forms of the enzyme have also been studied to account for their differing interactions with some target proteins.

  19. Luminescent platinum(II) complexes with functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene or diphosphine selectively probe mismatched and abasic DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Che, CM; Chen, T; To, WP; Zou, T; FUNG, SK; Lok, CN; YANG, C; Cao, B

    2016-01-01

    The selective targeting of mismatched DNA overexpressed in cancer cells is an appealing strategy in designing cancer diagnosis and therapy protocols. Few luminescent probes that specifically detect intracellular mismatched DNA have been reported. Here we used Pt(II) complexes with luminescence sensitive to subtle changes in the local environment and report several Pt(II) complexes that selectively bind to and identify DNA mismatches. We evaluated the complexes' DNA-binding characteristics by ...

  20. Use of ultrafast dispersed pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe spectroscopies to explore the light-induced dynamics of peridinin in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannakis, Emmanouil; Vengris, Mikas; Larsen, Delmar S; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Hiller, Roger G; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2006-01-12

    Optical pump-induced dynamics of the highly asymmetric carotenoid peridinin in methanol was studied by dispersed pump-probe, pump-dump-probe, and pump-repump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy in the visible region. Dispersed pump-probe measurements show that the decay of the initially excited S2 state populates two excited states, the S1 and the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) state, at a ratio determined by the excitation wavelength. The ensuing spectral evolution occurs on the time scale of a few picoseconds and suggests the equilibration of these states. Dumping the stimulated emission of the ICT state with an additional 800-nm pulse after 400- and 530-nm excitation preferentially removes the ICT state contribution from the broad excited-state absorption, allowing for its spectral characterization. At the same time, an unrelaxed ground-state species, which has a subpicosecond lifetime, is populated. The application of the 800-nm pulse at early times, when the S2 state is still populated, led to direct generation of the peridinin cation, observed for the first time in a transient absorption experiment. The excited and ground electronic states manifold of peridinin has been reconstructed using target analysis; this approach combined with the measured multipulse spectroscopic data allows us to estimate the spectra and time scales of the corresponding transient states.

  1. Compensation of aberrations of deflected electron probe by means of dynamical focusing with stigmator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Norio; Ebe, Toyoe; Ikehata, Koichi; Ito, Yasuhiro; Terada, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Electron beam passing through a deflecting field is in general, subjected to aberrations such as distortion, astigmatism and coma in accordance with the deflecting angle. Accordingly the aberration defect of deflected beam is the most serious limiting factor in the performances of micromachining, microminiaturization and high resolution scanning electron microscopes. From many investigators' results, it is obvious that three important compensation methods to aberrations exist in principle, i.e., double deflection system, dynamical focusing, and the dynamical correction using a stigmator. In this paper, based on the aberration formula derived from the eikonal or the path method, the practical data of the aberration constants of deflected electron beam for the sequential deflection system with parallel plates are calculated, and using its result, the distorted spot patterns of an electron probe deflected in two-dimensional directions for various defocusings are graphically displayed by the aid of a computer. Further, by means of the dynamical focusing with a stigmator, the conditions to completely compensate the second order astigmatic aberration are derived, and spot patterns and the electron density distributions within the spots in the case when the compensating conditions are satisfied are also graphically displayed. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Dynamic Service Selection in Workflows Using Performance Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Walker

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to dynamic workflow management and optimisation using near-realtime performance data is presented. Strategies are discussed for choosing an optimal service (based on user-specified criteria from several semantically equivalent Web services. Such an approach may involve finding "similar" services, by first pruning the set of discovered services based on service metadata, and subsequently selecting an optimal service based on performance data. The current implementation of the prototype workflow framework is described, and demonstrated with a simple workflow. Performance results are presented that show the performance benefits of dynamic service selection. A statistical analysis based on the first order statistic is used to investigate the likely improvement in service response time arising from dynamic service selection.

  3. Probing ultrafast dynamics of solid-density plasma generated by high-contrast intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Kamalesh; Blackman, David R.; Shaikh, Moniruzzaman; Lad, Amit D.; Sarkar, Deep; Dey, Indranuj; Robinson, Alex P. L.; Pasley, John; Ravindra Kumar, G.

    2018-01-01

    We present ultrafast dynamics of solid-density plasma created by high-contrast (picosecond contrast ˜10-9), high-intensity (˜4 × 1018 W/cm2) laser pulses using time-resolved pump-probe Doppler spectrometry. Experiments show a rapid rise in blue-shift at early time delay (2-4.3 ps) followed by a rapid fall (4.3-8.3 ps) and then a slow rise in blue-shift at later time delays (>8.3 ps). Simulations show that the early-time observations, specifically the absence of any red-shifting of the reflected probe, can only be reproduced if the front surface is unperturbed by the laser pre-pulse at the moment that the high intensity pulse arrives. A flexible diagnostic which is capable of diagnosing the presence of low-levels of pre-plasma formation would be useful for potential applications in laser-produced proton and ion production, such as cancer therapy and security imaging.

  4. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in bilayer graphene studied by broadband infrared pump-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Thomas; da Como, Enrico; Niggebaum, Alexander; Feldmann, Jochen

    2010-03-01

    Recently, bilayer graphene gained a large interest because of its electrically tunable gap appearing in the middle infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. This feature is expected to open a number of applications of bilayer graphene in optoelectronics. In this communication we report on the first pump-probe experiment on a single bilayer flake with an unprecedented probe photon energy interval (0.25 -- 1.3 eV). Single flakes were prepared by mechanical exfoliation of graphite and transferred to calcium fluoride substrates. When illuminated with 800 nm (1.5 eV) pump pulses the induced change in transmission shows an ultrafast saturation of the interband transitions from 1.3 to 0.5 eV. In this energy range the saturation recovery occurs within 3 ps and is consistent with an ultrafast relaxation of hot carriers. Interestingly, we report on the observation of a resonance at 0.4 eV characterized by a longer dynamics. The results are discussed considering many-body interactions.

  5. Forecasting house prices in the 50 states using Dynamic Model Averaging and Dynamic Model Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Lasse; Møller, Stig Vinther

    2015-01-01

    We examine house price forecastability across the 50 states using Dynamic Model Averaging and Dynamic Model Selection, which allow for model change and parameter shifts. By allowing the entire forecasting model to change over time and across locations, the forecasting accuracy improves substantia......We examine house price forecastability across the 50 states using Dynamic Model Averaging and Dynamic Model Selection, which allow for model change and parameter shifts. By allowing the entire forecasting model to change over time and across locations, the forecasting accuracy improves...

  6. Nano-confined water in the interlayers of hydrocalumite: Reorientational dynamics probed by neutron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichev, A. G.; Faraone, A.; Udovic, T.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; de Souza, N. R.; Reinholdt, M. X.; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2008-12-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs, anionic clays) represent excellent model systems for detailed molecular- level studies of the structure, dynamics, and energetics of nano-confined water in mineral interlayers and nano-pores, because LDH interlayers can have a well-defined structures and contain H2O molecules and a wide variety of anions in structurally well-defined positions and coordinations. [Ca2Al(OH)6]Cl·2H2O, also known as hydrocalumite or Friedel's salt, has a well- ordered Ca,Al distribution in the hydroxide layer and a very high degree of H2O,Cl ordering in the interlayer. It is also one of the only LDH phase for which a single crystal structure refinement is available. Thus, it is currently the best model compound for understanding the structure and dynamical behavior of interlayer and surface species in other, less-ordered, LDHs. We investigated the structural and dynamic behavior of water in the interlayers of hydrocalumite using inelastic (INS) and quasielastic (QENS) neutron scattering and molecular dynamics computer simulations. The comperehensive neutron scattering studies were performed for one fully hydrated and one dehydrated sample of hydrocalumite using several complementary instruments (HFBS, DCS and FANS at NCNR; HRMECS and QENS at IPNS) at temperatures above and below the previously discovered order-disorder interlayer phase transition. Together the experimental and molecular modeling results capture the important details of the dynamics of nano-confined water and the effects of the orientational ordering of H2O molecules above and below the phase transition. They provide otherwise unobtainable experimental information about the transformation of H2O librational and diffusional modes across the order-disorder phase transition and significantly add to our current understanding of the structure and dynamics of water in LDH phases based on the earlier NMR, IR, X-ray, and calorimetric measurements. The approach can now be extended to probe the

  7. Molecular organization and dynamics of micellar phase of polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes: ESR spin probe study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, A. M.; Kasaikin, V. A.; Zakharova, Yu. A.; Aliev, I. I.; Baranovsky, V. Yu.; Doseva, V.; Yasina, L. L.

    2002-04-01

    Molecular dynamics and organization of the micellar phase of complexes of linear polyelectrolytes with ionogenic and non-ionogenic surfactants was studied by the ESR spin probe method. Complexes of polyacrylic acid (PAA) and sodium polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) with alkyltrimethylammonium bromides (ATAB), as well as complexes of poly- N, N'-dimethyldiallylammonium chloride (PDACL) with sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) were studied. The micellar phase of such complexes is highly organized molecular system, molecular ordering of which near the polymeric chain is much higher than in the 'center' of the micelle, it depends on the polymer-detergent interaction, flexibility of polymeric chain and length of carbonic part of the detergent molecule. Complexes of polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) with non-ionic detergent (dodecyl-substituted polyethyleneglycol), show that the local mobility of surfactant in such complexes is significantly lower than in 'free' micelles and depends on the number of micellar particles participating in formation of complexes.

  8. Selection and application of strand displacement probes for a fumonisin B1 aptamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a toxin produced by Fusarium moniliforme, mainly on contaminated maize and maize products. In this study a solid surface chain displacement strategy was used to isolate oligonucleotide displacement probes for a FB1 aptamer. The probes were used as the basis for the development ...

  9. Selectivity on-target of bromodomain chemical probes by structure-guided medicinal chemistry and chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdeano, Carles; Ciulli, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Targeting epigenetic proteins is a rapidly growing area for medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in developing small molecules binding to bromodomains, the readers of acetyl-lysine modifications. A plethora of co-crystal structures has motivated focused fragment-based design and optimization programs within both industry and academia. These efforts have yielded several compounds entering the clinic, and many more are increasingly being used as chemical probes to interrogate bromodomain biology. High selectivity of chemical probes is necessary to ensure biological activity is due to an on-target effect. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of bromodomain-targeting compounds, focusing on the structural basis for their on-target selectivity or lack thereof. We also highlight chemical biology approaches to enhance on-target selectivity.

  10. Molecularly barcoded Zika virus libraries to probe in vivo evolutionary dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T Aliota

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Defining the complex dynamics of Zika virus (ZIKV infection in pregnancy and during transmission between vertebrate hosts and mosquito vectors is critical for a thorough understanding of viral transmission, pathogenesis, immune evasion, and potential reservoir establishment. Within-host viral diversity in ZIKV infection is low, which makes it difficult to evaluate infection dynamics. To overcome this biological hurdle, we constructed a molecularly barcoded ZIKV. This virus stock consists of a "synthetic swarm" whose members are genetically identical except for a run of eight consecutive degenerate codons, which creates approximately 64,000 theoretical nucleotide combinations that all encode the same amino acids. Deep sequencing this region of the ZIKV genome enables counting of individual barcodes to quantify the number and relative proportions of viral lineages present within a host. Here we used these molecularly barcoded ZIKV variants to study the dynamics of ZIKV infection in pregnant and non-pregnant macaques as well as during mosquito infection/transmission. The barcoded virus had no discernible fitness defects in vivo, and the proportions of individual barcoded virus templates remained stable throughout the duration of acute plasma viremia. ZIKV RNA also was detected in maternal plasma from a pregnant animal infected with barcoded virus for 67 days. The complexity of the virus population declined precipitously 8 days following infection of the dam, consistent with the timing of typical resolution of ZIKV in non-pregnant macaques and remained low for the subsequent duration of viremia. Our approach showed that synthetic swarm viruses can be used to probe the composition of ZIKV populations over time in vivo to understand vertical transmission, persistent reservoirs, bottlenecks, and evolutionary dynamics.

  11. Functional network macroscopes for probing past and present Earth system dynamics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donges, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    probing past and present Earth system dynamics: Complex hierarchical interactions, tipping points, and beyond" by J.F. Donges, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany, 2012. URL: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:kobv:11-100207126.

  12. Self-probing spectroscopy of XUV photo-ionization dynamics in atoms subjected to a strong-field environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoury, Doron; Krüger, Michael; Orenstein, Gal; Larsson, Henrik R; Bauch, Sebastian; Bruner, Barry D; Dudovich, Nirit

    2017-11-13

    Single-photon ionization is one of the most fundamental light matter interactions in nature, serving as a universal probe of the quantum state of matter. By probing the emitted electron, one can decode the full dynamics of the interaction. When photo-ionization is evolving in the presence of a strong laser field, the fundamental properties of the mechanism can be signicantly altered. Here we demonstrate how the liberated electron can perform a self-probing measurement of such interaction with attosecond precision. Extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulses initiate an electron wavepacket by photo-ionization, a strong infrared field controls its motion, and finally electron-ion collision maps it into re-emission of attosecond radiation bursts. Our measurements resolve the internal clock provided by the self-probing mechanism, obtaining a direct insight into the build-up of photo-ionization in the presence of the strong laser field.

  13. A new simple phthalimide-based fluorescent probe for highly selective cysteine and bioimaging for living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Youming; Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Youyu; Zhang, Chunxiang; Jin, Junling; Li, Haitao

    2017-10-01

    A new turn-on phthalimide fluorescent probe has designed and synthesized for sensing cysteine (Cys) based on excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) process. It is consisted of a 3-hydroxyphthalimide derivative moiety as the fluorophore and an acrylic ester group as a recognition receptor. The acrylic ester acts as an ESIPT blocking agent. Upon addition of cystein, intermolecular nucleophilic attack of cysteine on acrylic ester releases the fluorescent 3-hydroxyphthalimide derivative, thereby enabling the ESIPT process and leading to enhancement of fluorescence. The probe displays high sensitivity, excellent selectivity and with large Stokes shift toward cysteine. The linear interval range of the fluorescence titration ranged from 0 to 1.0 × 10- 5 M and detection limit is low (6 × 10- 8 M). In addition, the probe could be used for bio-imaging in living cells.

  14. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the probe fluorescence in the study of human blood protein dynamic structure on SR beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobretsov, G.E.; Kurek, N.K.; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Yakimenko, M.N.; Clarke, D.T.; Jones, G.R.; Munro, I.H.

    2000-01-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy on the SRS of the Daresbury Laboratory was used for the study of the human serum lipoproteins and human blood albumins with fluorescent probes K-37 and K-35, developed in Russia. The probe K-37 was found sensitive to the difference in dynamic properties of the lipid objects. Two sets of the parameters were used for the description of lipid dynamic structure: (1) time-resolved fluorescence spectra and (2) time-resolved fluorescence depolarization as a function of rotational mobility of lipid molecules. Each measured dynamic parameter reflected the monotonous changes of dynamic properties in the range: lipid spheres-very low density lipoproteins-low density lipoproteins-high density lipoproteins-phospholipid liposomes. The range is characterized by the increase of the ratio polar/ nonpolar lipids. Thus, time-resolved fluorescence could be used to detect some structural modifications in lipoproteins related to atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular diseases development

  15. Popularity and Adolescent Friendship Networks : Selection and Influence Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Borch, Casey

    This study examined the dynamics of popularity in adolescent friendship networks across 3 years in middle school. Longitudinal social network modeling was used to identify selection and influence in the similarity of popularity among friends. It was argued that lower status adolescents strive to

  16. Popularity and Adolescent Friendship Networks: Selection and Influence Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J.K.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Borch, C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the dynamics of popularity in adolescent friendship networks across 3 years in middle school. Longitudinal social network modeling was used to identify selection and influence in the similarity of popularity among friends. It was argued that lower status adolescents strive to

  17. Popularity and Adolescent Friendship Networks: Selection and Influence Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Borch, Casey

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the dynamics of popularity in adolescent friendship networks across 3 years in middle school. Longitudinal social network modeling was used to identify selection and influence in the similarity of popularity among friends. It was argued that lower status adolescents strive to enhance their status through befriending higher…

  18. based 2D dynamic metal-organic framework showing selective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    materials have been extensively studied for storage, separation, magnetism, sensing, biomedical and very recently for ion conduction applications.14–21 Hydrogen ... thesis of dynamic MOF with high affinity for water becomes handy in separation applications. Also, for a material to be smart sorbent, in addition to selective ...

  19. Prediction of Liquefaction Potential of Dredge Fill Sand by DCP and Dynamic Probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Md. Jahangir; Azad, Abul Kalam; Rahman, Ziaur

    2008-01-01

    From many research it is proved that liquefaction potential of sand is function of mainly relative density and confining pressure. During routine site investigations, high-quality sampling and laboratory testing of sands are not feasible because of inevitable sample disturbance effects and budgetary constraints. On the other hand quality control of sand fill can be done by determining in situ density of sand in layer by layer which is expensive and time consuming. In this paper TRL DCP (Transportation Research Laboratory Dynamic Cone Penetration) and DPL (Dynamic Probing Light) are calibrated to predict the relative density of sand deposit. For this purpose sand of known relative density is prepared in a calibration chamber which is a mild steel cylinder with diameter 0.5 m and height 1.0 m. Relative density of sand is varied by controlling height of fall and diameter of hole of sand discharge bowl. After filling, every time DPL and DCP tests are performed and for every blow the penetration of cone is recorded. N10 is then calculated from penetration records. Thus a database is compiled where N10 and relative densities are known. A correlation is made between N 10 and relative density for two types of sand. A good correlation of N 10 and relative density is found

  20. Probing the Chaotic Dynamics of Fluids using Insights from Coupled Map Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbish, Johnathon; Xu, Mu; Paul, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Many difficult fluid challenges exhibit high-dimensional spatiotemporal chaos. Natural examples include the dynamics of the atmosphere and oceans. New insights have been gained by studying canonical fluid problems such as Rayleigh-Bénard convection where significant progress has been made using large-scale computations of the partial differential equations that describe the fluid flow. However, these computations remain very expensive which makes it difficult, if not currently impossible, to explore new ideas that require large sample sets, vast sweeps of parameter space, and long-time statistics. We study these questions using coupled map lattices (CML) in one and two dimensions. We compute the covariant Lyapunov vectors to probe fundamental features of the CML's including the Lyapunov spectrum, fractal dimension, and the principal angle between the stable and unstable manifolds. We are particularly interested in the role of a conservation law on the chaotic dynamics, the use of ideas from equilibrium thermodynamics to yield a coarse-grained representation, and in the development of reduced order models. This work is supported by NSF DMS-1622299.

  1. Carrier dynamics in silicon nanowires studied using optical-pump terahertz-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Alexandre; Salem, Bassem; Baron, Thierry; Gentile, Pascal; Morris, Denis

    2014-03-01

    The advance of non-contact measurements involving pulsed terahertz radiation presents great interests for characterizing electrical properties of a large ensemble of nanowires. In this work, N-doped and undoped silicon nanowires (SiNWs) grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on quartz substrate were characterized using optical-pump terahertz probe (OPTP) transmission experiments. Our results show that defects and ionized impurities introduced by N-doping the CVD-grown SiNWs tend to reduce the photoexcited carrier lifetime and degrade their conductivity properties. Capture mechanisms by the surface trap states play a key role on the photocarrier dynamics in theses small diameters' (~100 nm) SiNWs and the doping level is found to alter this dynamics. We propose convincing capture and recombination scenarios that explain our OPTP measurements. Fits of our photoconductivity data curves, from 0.5 to 2 THz, using a Drude-plasmon conductivity model allow determining photocarrier mobility values of 190 and 70 cm2/V .s, for the undoped and N-doped NWs samples, respectively.

  2. Initial dynamics of the Norrish Type I reaction in acetone: probing wave packet motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y; Sølling, Theis I; Møller, Klaus B

    2011-02-10

    The Norrish Type I reaction in the S(1) (nπ*) state of acetone is a prototype case of ketone photochemistry. On the basis of results from time-resolved mass spectrometry (TRMS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) experiments, it was recently suggested that after excitation the wave packet travels toward the S(1) minimum in less than 30 fs and stays there for more than 100 picoseconds [Chem. Phys. Lett.2008, 461, 193]. In this work we present simulated TRMS and TRPES signals based on ab initio multiple spawning simulations of the dynamics during the first 200 fs after excitation, getting quite good agreement with the experimental signals. We can explain the ultrafast decay of the experimental signals in the following manner: the wave packet simply travels, mainly along the deplanarization coordinate, out of the detection window of the ionizing probe. This window is so narrow that subsequent revival of the signal due to the coherent deplanarization vibration is not observed, meaning that from the point of view of the experiment the wave packets travels directly to the S(1) minimum. This result stresses the importance of pursuing a closer link to the experimental signal when using molecular dynamics simulations in interpreting experimental results.

  3. Selective and Sensitive Detection of Cyanide Based on the Displacement Strategy Using a Water-Soluble Fluorescent Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Ming; Hao, Yuanqiang; Wang, Zhaoyang; Han, Guo-Cheng; Qu, Lingbo

    2016-01-01

    A water-soluble fluorescent probe (C-GGH) was used for the highly sensitive and selective detection of cyanide (CN−) in aqueous media based on the displacement strategy. Due to the presence of the recognition unit GGH (Gly-Gly-His), the probe C-GGH can coordinate with Cu2+ and consequently display ON-OFF type fluorescence response. Furthermore, the in situ formed nonfluorescent C-GGH-Cu2+ complex can act as an effective OFF-ON type fluorescent probe for sensing CN− anion. Due to the strong binding affinity of CN− to Cu2+, CN− can extract Cu2+ from C-GGH-Cu2+ complex, leading to the release of C-GGH and the recovery of fluorescent emission of the system. The probe C-GGH-Cu2+ allowed detection of CN− in aqueous solution with a LOD (limit of detection) of 0.017 μmol/L which is much lower than the maximum contaminant level (1.9 μmol/L) for CN− in drinking water set by the WHO (World Health Organization). The probe also displayed excellent specificity for CN− towards other anions, including F−, Cl−, Br−, I−, SCN−, PO4 3−, N3 −, NO3 −, AcO−, SO4 2−, and CO3 2−. PMID:26881185

  4. Selective and Sensitive Detection of Cyanide Based on the Displacement Strategy Using a Water-Soluble Fluorescent Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming La

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A water-soluble fluorescent probe (C-GGH was used for the highly sensitive and selective detection of cyanide (CN− in aqueous media based on the displacement strategy. Due to the presence of the recognition unit GGH (Gly-Gly-His, the probe C-GGH can coordinate with Cu2+ and consequently display ON-OFF type fluorescence response. Furthermore, the in situ formed nonfluorescent C-GGH-Cu2+ complex can act as an effective OFF-ON type fluorescent probe for sensing CN− anion. Due to the strong binding affinity of CN− to Cu2+, CN− can extract Cu2+ from C-GGH-Cu2+ complex, leading to the release of C-GGH and the recovery of fluorescent emission of the system. The probe C-GGH-Cu2+ allowed detection of CN− in aqueous solution with a LOD (limit of detection of 0.017 μmol/L which is much lower than the maximum contaminant level (1.9 μmol/L for CN− in drinking water set by the WHO (World Health Organization. The probe also displayed excellent specificity for CN− towards other anions, including F−, Cl−, Br−, I−, SCN−, PO43-, N3-, NO3-, AcO−, SO42-, and CO32-.

  5. Incremental Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion and Multihole Pressure Probes for Disturbance Rejection Control of Fixed-wing Micro Air Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeur, E.J.J.; Remes, B.D.W.; de Wagter, C.; Chu, Q.; J.-M. Moschetta G. Hattenberger, H. de Plinval

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining stable flight during high turbulence intensities is challenging for fixed-wing micro air vehicles (MAV). Two methods are proposed
    to improve the disturbance rejection performance of the MAV: incremental nonlinear dynamic inversion (INDI) control and phaseadvanced pitch probes. INDI

  6. Modular Rake of Pitot Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Timothy A.; Henry, Michael W.; Homyk, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    The figure presents selected views of a modular rake of 17 pitot probes for measuring both transient and steady-state pressures in a supersonic wind tunnel. In addition to pitot tubes visible in the figure, the probe modules contain (1) high-frequency dynamic-pressure transducers connected through wires to remote monitoring circuitry and (2) flow passages that lead to tubes that, in turn, lead to remote steady-state pressure transducers. Prior pitot-probe rakes were fabricated as unitary structures, into which the individual pitot probes were brazed. Repair or replacement of individual probes was difficult, costly, and time-consuming because (1) it was necessary to remove entire rakes in order to unbraze individual malfunctioning probes and (2) the heat of unbrazing a failed probe and of brazing a new probe in place could damage adjacent probes. In contrast, the modules in the present probe are designed to be relatively quickly and easily replaceable with no heating and, in many cases, without need for removal of the entire rake from the wind tunnel. To remove a malfunctioning probe, one first removes a screw-mounted V-cross-section cover that holds the probe and adjacent probes in place. Then one removes a screw-mounted cover plate to gain access to the steady-state pressure tubes and dynamicpressure wires. Next, one disconnects the tube and wires of the affected probe. Finally, one installs a new probe in the reverse of the aforementioned sequence. The wire connections can be made by soldering, but to facilitate removal and installation, they can be made via miniature plugs and sockets. The connections between the probe flow passages and the tubes leading to the remote pressure sensors can be made by use of any of a variety of readily available flexible tubes that can be easily pulled off and slid back on for removal and installation, respectively.

  7. Dynamic variable selection in SNP genotype autocalling from APEX microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamar Ruben H

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are DNA sequence variations, occurring when a single nucleotide – adenine (A, thymine (T, cytosine (C or guanine (G – is altered. Arguably, SNPs account for more than 90% of human genetic variation. Our laboratory has developed a highly redundant SNP genotyping assay consisting of multiple probes with signals from multiple channels for a single SNP, based on arrayed primer extension (APEX. This mini-sequencing method is a powerful combination of a highly parallel microarray with distinctive Sanger-based dideoxy terminator sequencing chemistry. Using this microarray platform, our current genotype calling system (known as SNP Chart is capable of calling single SNP genotypes by manual inspection of the APEX data, which is time-consuming and exposed to user subjectivity bias. Results Using a set of 32 Coriell DNA samples plus three negative PCR controls as a training data set, we have developed a fully-automated genotyping algorithm based on simple linear discriminant analysis (LDA using dynamic variable selection. The algorithm combines separate analyses based on the multiple probe sets to give a final posterior probability for each candidate genotype. We have tested our algorithm on a completely independent data set of 270 DNA samples, with validated genotypes, from patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU of St. Paul's Hospital (plus one negative PCR control sample. Our method achieves a concordance rate of 98.9% with a 99.6% call rate for a set of 96 SNPs. By adjusting the threshold value for the final posterior probability of the called genotype, the call rate reduces to 94.9% with a higher concordance rate of 99.6%. We also reversed the two independent data sets in their training and testing roles, achieving a concordance rate up to 99.8%. Conclusion The strength of this APEX chemistry-based platform is its unique redundancy having multiple probes for a single SNP. Our

  8. Plasma turbulence. Structure formation, selection rule, dynamic response and dynamics transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Sanae I.

    2010-01-01

    The five-year project of Grant-in-Aid for Specially Promoted Research entitled general research on the structure formation and selection rule in plasma turbulence had brought many outcomes. Based on these outcomes, the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) program entitled general research on dynamic response and dynamic transport in plasma turbulence has started. In the present paper, the state-of-the-art of the research activities on the structure formation, selection rule and dynamics in plasma turbulence are reviewed with reference to outcomes of these projects. (author)

  9. Ultrafast relaxation dynamics of a biologically relevant probe dansyl at the micellar surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Rupa; Ghosh, Manoranjan; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2005-02-01

    We report picosecond-resolved measurement of the fluorescence of a well-known biologically relevant probe, dansyl chromophore at the surface of a cationic micelle (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB). The dansyl chromophore has environmentally sensitive fluorescence quantum yields and emission maxima, along with large Stokes shift. In order to study the solvation dynamics of the micellar environment, we measured the fluorescence of dansyl chromophore attached to the micellar surface. The fluorescence transients were observed to decay (with time constant approximately 350 ps) in the blue end and rise with similar timescale in the red end, indicative of solvation dynamics of the environment. The solvation correlation function is measured to decay with time constant 338 ps, which is much slower than that of ordinary bulk water. Time-resolved anisotropy of the dansyl chromophore shows a bi-exponential decay with time constants 413 ps (23%) and 1.3 ns (77%), which is considerably slower than that in free solvents revealing the rigidity of the dansyl-micelle complex. Time-resolved area-normalized emission spectroscopic (TRANES) analysis of the time dependent emission spectra of the dansyl chromophore in the micellar environment shows an isoemissive point at 21066 cm-1. This indicates the fluorescence of the chromophore contains emission from two kinds of excited states namely locally excited state (prior to charge transfer) and charge transfer state. The nature of the solvation dynamics in the micellar environments is therefore explored from the time-resolved anisotropy measurement coupled with the TRANES analysis of the fluorescence transients. The time scale of the solvation is important for the mechanism of molecular recognition.

  10. Probing cellular mechanoadaptation using cell-substrate de-adhesion dynamics: experiments and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S S, Soumya; Sthanam, Lakshmi Kavitha; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Inamdar, Mandar M; Sen, Shamik

    2014-01-01

    Physical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are known to regulate cellular processes ranging from spreading to differentiation, with alterations in cell phenotype closely associated with changes in physical properties of cells themselves. When plated on substrates of varying stiffness, fibroblasts have been shown to exhibit stiffness matching property, wherein cell cortical stiffness increases in proportion to substrate stiffness up to 5 kPa, and subsequently saturates. Similar mechanoadaptation responses have also been observed in other cell types. Trypsin de-adhesion represents a simple experimental framework for probing the contractile mechanics of adherent cells, with de-adhesion timescales shown to scale inversely with cortical stiffness values. In this study, we combine experiments and computation in deciphering the influence of substrate properties in regulating de-adhesion dynamics of adherent cells. We first show that NIH 3T3 fibroblasts cultured on collagen-coated polyacrylamide hydrogels de-adhere faster on stiffer substrates. Using a simple computational model, we qualitatively show how substrate stiffness and cell-substrate bond breakage rate collectively influence de-adhesion timescales, and also obtain analytical expressions of de-adhesion timescales in certain regimes of the parameter space. Finally, by comparing stiffness-dependent experimental and computational de-adhesion responses, we show that faster de-adhesion on stiffer substrates arises due to force-dependent breakage of cell-matrix adhesions. In addition to illustrating the utility of employing trypsin de-adhesion as a biophysical tool for probing mechanoadaptation, our computational results highlight the collective interplay of substrate properties and bond breakage rate in setting de-adhesion timescales.

  11. Multiphoton ionization as a probe of molecular photofragmentation: statistical and dynamical energy partitioning in the multiphoton dissociation of nitromethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockney, B.H.

    1982-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) appears in its first use as a probe of laser-induced photofragmentation. Specifically, MPI here reveals the internal and translational energy content of the nascent fragments from the infrared multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of nitromethane (CH 3 NO 2 ). The apparatus for this work consists of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam crossed by two pulsed and focused lasers - a CO 2 laser to induce collision-free unimolecular dissociation of CH 3 NO 2 , and a tunable dye laser following immediately to ionize selectively one of the pair of dissociation fragments for detection by a mass spectrometer and particle multiplier. A computer simulation of each fragment's MPI spectrum, a series of four photon resonances to members of the npsigma/sub u/ Rydberg state of NO 2 and three photon resonances to two vibrational members of the #betta# 1 Rydberg state of CH 3 , aids in determining the fragment's internal energy content. The dye laser is delayed and its focus is traced through a small quarter circle centered at the focus of the CO 2 laser. The flight times of the fragments from the point of dissociation and their laboratory scattering angular distributions at fixed ionizing laser wavelength provide their center of mass recoil velocity distributions. The energy deposited in the fragments evidences a striking mixture of statistical and dynamical energy partitioning. The statistical RRKM theory of unimolecular decomposition accurately predicts the amount of internal energy found in the fragments

  12. Dynamic angle selection in X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabravolski, Andrei, E-mail: andrei.dabravolski@uantwerpen.be [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Batenburg, Kees Joost, E-mail: joost.batenburg@uantwerpen.be [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica (CWI), Science Park 123, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sijbers, Jan, E-mail: jan.sijbers@uantwerpen.be [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • We propose the dynamic angle selection algorithm for CT scanning. • The approach is based on the concept of information gain over a set of solutions. • Projection angles are selected based on the already available projection data. • The approach can lead to more accurate results from fewer projections. - Abstract: In X-ray tomography, a number of radiographs (projections) are recorded from which a tomogram is then reconstructed. Conventionally, these projections are acquired equiangularly, resulting in an unbiased sampling of the Radon space. However, especially in case when only a limited number of projections can be acquired, the selection of the angles has a large impact on the quality of the reconstructed image. In this paper, a dynamic algorithm is proposed, in which new projection angles are selected by maximizing the information gain about the object, given the set of possible new angles. Experiments show that this approach can select projection angles for which the accuracy of the reconstructed image is significantly higher compared to the standard angle selections schemes.

  13. Dynamic angle selection in X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabravolski, Andrei; Batenburg, Kees Joost; Sijbers, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose the dynamic angle selection algorithm for CT scanning. • The approach is based on the concept of information gain over a set of solutions. • Projection angles are selected based on the already available projection data. • The approach can lead to more accurate results from fewer projections. - Abstract: In X-ray tomography, a number of radiographs (projections) are recorded from which a tomogram is then reconstructed. Conventionally, these projections are acquired equiangularly, resulting in an unbiased sampling of the Radon space. However, especially in case when only a limited number of projections can be acquired, the selection of the angles has a large impact on the quality of the reconstructed image. In this paper, a dynamic algorithm is proposed, in which new projection angles are selected by maximizing the information gain about the object, given the set of possible new angles. Experiments show that this approach can select projection angles for which the accuracy of the reconstructed image is significantly higher compared to the standard angle selections schemes

  14. PLASTICITY OF SELECTED METALLIC MATERIALS IN DYNAMIC DEFORMATION CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek PAWLICKI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of a modernized flywheel machine has been presented in the paper. The laboratory stand enables to perform dynamic tensile tests and impact bending with a linear velocity of the enforcing element in the range of 5÷40 m/s. A new data acquisition system, based on the tensometric sensors, allows for significant qualitative improvement of registered signals. Some preliminary dynamic forming tests were performed for the selected group of metallic materials. Subsequent microstructural examinations and identification of the fracture type enabled to describe a correlation between strain rate, strain and microstructure.

  15. Weather conditions drive dynamic habitat selection in a generalist predator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunde, Peter; Thorup, Kasper; Jacobsen, Lars B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dynamic nature of habitat selection, temporal variation as arising from factors such as weather are rarely quantified in species-habitat relationships. We analysed habitat use and selection (use/availability) of foraging, radio-tagged little owls (Athene noctua), a nocturnal, year...... and quadratic effects of temperature. Even when controlling for the temporal context, both land cover types were used more evenly than predicted from variation in availability (functional response in habitat selection). Use of two other land cover categories (pastures and moist areas) increased linearly...... with temperature and was proportional to their availability. The study shows that habitat selection by generalist foragers may be highly dependent on temporal variables such as weather, probably because such foragers switch between weather dependent feeding opportunities offered by different land cover types...

  16. The sequence relay selection strategy based on stochastic dynamic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rui; Chen, Xihao; Huang, Yangchao

    2017-07-01

    Relay-assisted (RA) network with relay node selection is a kind of effective method to improve the channel capacity and convergence performance. However, most of the existing researches about the relay selection did not consider the statically channel state information and the selection cost. This shortage limited the performance and application of RA network in practical scenarios. In order to overcome this drawback, a sequence relay selection strategy (SRSS) was proposed. And the performance upper bound of SRSS was also analyzed in this paper. Furthermore, in order to make SRSS more practical, a novel threshold determination algorithm based on the stochastic dynamic program (SDP) was given to work with SRSS. Numerical results are also presented to exhibit the performance of SRSS with SDP.

  17. Wavelength-Dependent Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy: Selectively Imaging Nanoparticle Probes in Live Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning; and Yeung, Edward S.

    2009-11-15

    Gold and silver nanoparticles display extraordinarily large apparent refractive indices near their plasmon resonance (PR) wavelengths. These nanoparticles show good contrast in a narrow spectral band but are poorly resolved at other wavelengths in differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The wavelength dependence of DIC contrast of gold/silver nanoparticles is interpreted in terms of Mie's theory and DIC working principles. We further exploit this wavelength dependence by modifying a DIC microscope to enable simultaneous imaging at two wavelengths. We demonstrate that gold/silver nanoparticles immobilized on the same glass slides through hybridization can be differentiated and imaged separately. High-contrast, video-rate images of living cells can be recorded both with and without illuminating the gold nanoparticle probes, providing definitive probe identification. Dual-wavelength DIC microscopy thus presents a new approach to the simultaneous detection of multiple probes of interest for high-speed live-cell imaging.

  18. Proton probing of ultra-thin foil dynamics in high intensity regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Aktan, Esin; Aurand, Bastian; Cerchez, Mirela; Willi, Oswald

    2017-10-01

    The field of laser driven ion acceleration has been enriched significantly over the past decade, thanks to the advanced laser technologies. Already, from 100s TW class systems, laser driven sources of particles and radiations are being considered in number of potential applications in science and medicine due to their unique properties. New physical effects unearthed at these systems may help understand and conduct successful experiments at several PW class multi-beam facilities with high rep rate systems, e.g. ELI. Here we present the first experimental results on ultra-thin foil dynamics irradiated by an ultra-high intensity (1020 W/cm2) , ultra-high contrast (10-12) laser pulse at ARCTURUS laser facility at HHU Duesseldorf. By employing the elegant proton probing technique it is observed that for the circular polarization of laser light, a 100nm thin target is pushed forward as a compressed layer due to the radiation pressure of light. Whereas, the linear polarization seems to decompress the target drastically. 2D particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the experimental findings. Our results confirm the previous simulation studies investigating the fundamental role played by light polarization, finite focus spot size effect and eventually electron heating including the oblique incidence at the target edges.

  19. Using computer simulations to probe the structure and dynamics of biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.M.; Hirata, F.; Kim, K.; Zhang, P.

    1987-01-01

    The use of computer simulations to study internal motions and thermodynamic properties is receiving increased attention. One important use of the method is to provide a more fundamental understanding of the molecular information contained in various kinds of experiments on these complex systems. In the first part of this paper the authors review recent work in their laboratory concerned with the use of computer simulations for the interpretation of experimental probes of molecular structure and dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids. The interplay between computer simulations and three experimental techniques is emphasized: (1) nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation spectroscopy, (2) refinement of macro-molecular x-ray structures, and (3) vibrational spectroscopy. The treatment of solvent effects in biopolymer simulations is a difficult problem. It is not possible to study systematically the effect of solvent conditions, e.g. added salt concentration, on biopolymer properties by means of simulations alone. In the last part of the paper the authors review a more analytical approach they developed to study polyelectrolyte properties of solvated biopolymers. The results are compared with computer simulations

  20. Low temperature excitonic spectroscopy and dynamics as a probe of quality in hybrid perovskite thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarang, Som; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Chen, Yen-Chang; Lin, Oliver; Gopinathan, Ajay; Tung, Vincent C; Ghosh, Sayantani

    2016-10-19

    We have developed a framework for using temperature dependent static and dynamic photoluminescence (PL) of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (PVSKs) to characterize lattice defects in thin films, based on the presence of nanodomains at low temperature. Our high-stability PVSK films are fabricated using a novel continuous liquid interface propagation technique, and in the tetragonal phase (T > 120 K), they exhibit bi-exponential recombination from free charge carriers with an average PL lifetime of ∼200 ns. Below 120 K, the emergence of the orthorhombic phase is accompanied by a reduction in lifetimes by an order of magnitude, which we establish to be the result of a crossover from free carrier to exciton-dominated radiative recombination. Analysis of the PL as a function of excitation power at different temperatures provides direct evidence that the exciton binding energy is different in the two phases, and using these results, we present a theoretical approach to estimate this variable binding energy. Our findings explain this anomalous low temperature behavior for the first time, attributing it to an inherent fundamental property of the hybrid PVSKs that can be used as an effective probe of thin film quality.

  1. Exciton versus Free Carrier Photogeneration in Organometal Trihalide Perovskites Probed by Broadband Ultrafast Polarization Memory Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, ChuanXiang; Zhang, Chuang; Zhai, Yaxin; Mielczarek, Kamil; Wang, Weiwei; Ma, Wanli; Zakhidov, Anvar; Vardeny, Z. Valy

    2015-03-01

    We studied the ultrafast transient response of photoexcitations in two hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite films used for high efficiency photovoltaic cells, namely, CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbI1.1Br1.9 using polarized broadband pump-probe spectroscopy in the spectral range of 0.3-2.7 eV with 300 fs time resolution. For CH3NH3PbI3 with above-gap excitation we found both photogenerated carriers and excitons, but only carriers are photogenerated with below-gap excitation. In contrast, mainly excitons are photogenerated in CH3NH3PbI1.1Br1.9 . Surprisingly, we also discovered in CH3NH3PbI3 , but not in CH3NH3PbI1.1Br1.9 , transient photoinduced polarization memory for both excitons and photocarriers, which is also reflected in the steady state photoluminescence. From the polarization memory dynamics we obtained the excitons diffusion constant in CH3NH3PbI3 , D ≈0.01 cm2 s-1 .

  2. 6,7-dimethoxy-coumarin as a probe of hydration dynamics in biologically relevant systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Avisek; Amaro, Mariana; Kovaricek, Petr; Hof, Martin; Sykora, Jan

    2018-04-01

    Coumarin derivatives are well known fluorescence reporters for investigating biological systems due to their strong micro-environment sensitivity. Despite having wide range of environment sensitive fluorescence probes, the potential of 6,7-dimethoxy-coumarin has not been studied extensively so far. With a perspective of its use in protein studies, namely using the unnatural amino acid technology or as a substrate for hydrolase enzymes, we study acetyloxymethyl-6,7-dimethoxycoumarin (Ac-DMC). We investigate the photophysics and hydration dynamics of this dye in aerosol-OT (AOT) reverse micelles at various water contents using the time dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) method. The TDFS response in AOT reverse micelles from water/surfactant ratio of 0 to 20 confirms its sensitivity towards the hydration and mobility of its microenvironment. Moreover, we show that the fluorophore can be efficiently quenched by halide ions. Hence, we conclude that the 6,7-dimethoxy-methylcoumarin fluorophore is useful for studying hydration parameters in biologically relevant systems.

  3. Optical techniques for probing the excited state dynamics of quantum dot solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroz, P.; Kholmicheva, N.; Razgoniaeva, N. [Center for Photochemical Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43402 (United States); Department of Physics, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43402 (United States); Burchfield, D. [Department of Chemistry, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43402 (United States); Sharma, N.; Acharya, A. [Department of Physics, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43402 (United States); Zamkov, M., E-mail: zamkovm@bgsu.edu [Center for Photochemical Sciences, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43402 (United States); Department of Physics, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43402 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Highlights: • Optical techniques represent a powerful tool for probing exciton diffusion in QD solids. • Exciton dissociation in QD solids is caused by charge tunneling to traps and other dots. • Exciton and free-carrier lifetimes are given by fast and slow components of PL decay. • Surface PL offers valuable information on the type and density of traps in QD solids. - Abstract: Quantum dot (QD) solids represent an important class of functional materials that holds strong promise for future applications in technology. Their optoelectronic properties are determined by energy diffusion processes, which character can often be inferred from the temporal and spectral analysis of the film’s photoluminescence (PL). Here, optical techniques based on PL lifetime, bulk quenching, and temperature-dependent PL will be discussed. These techniques complement the electrical conductivity measurements by mapping the flow of optically induced excitons through undepleted, contact-free films with an unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution. By correlating the QD solid morphology with the ensuing photoluminescence (PL) dynamics, these methods allow estimating important transport characteristics, including exciton and charge carrier diffusion lengths, the rate of interparticle energy transfer, carrier mobility, and the exciton diffusivity. The review will cover most popular PL-based strategies and summarize the key experimental findings resulting from these works.

  4. Measurement of dynamic viscoelasticity of confined lubricant by using oscillating optical fiber probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, S; Fukuzawa, K; Hamamoto, Y; Zhang, H

    2007-01-01

    When a liquid is confined in molecularly narrow gaps, it shows characteristic viscoelasticity such as enhanced viscosity or prolonged relaxation time. In order to investigate the dynamic viscoelasticity of the confined liquid, we developed a new shear force measuring method that uses a ball-ended optical fiber as a shearing probe. Our method can measure the shear force of 0.1 nN order with the oscillation frequency of up to 10 kHz. In addition, the gap that confines the liquid can be set at any constant value ranging from 10 μm to 0.1 nm. In this study, we measured the gap dependence of viscoelasticity of confined liquid lubricants. The gap ranged from 200 nm to a few nm. The tested lubricant was Fomblin Z03 and Zdo14000. A magnetic disk was used as the solid substrate. Oscillation frequency was set at 800 Hz. The experiment showed the viscosity of both Z03 and Zdo14000 gradually increased as the confining gap decreased. The gap width where the viscosity increase started was wider than 100 nm, which is dozens of times larger than the gyration diameter of lubricant molecules. Although Z03 and Zdo14000 have negligibly small elasticity in a bulk state, elasticity suddenly appeared at gaps less than about 8 nm with Zdo14000, and at gaps less than about 4 nm with Z03. Stronger affinity of Zdo14000 molecules to the solid substrate could cause the wider gap width of elasticity appearance

  5. The glass transition in nanoscaled confinement probed by dynamic mechanical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppensteiner, J.

    2009-01-01

    , able to join the row of successfully used experimental methods as NMR, light scattering, dielectric and calorimetric spectroscopy. A main point of investigation was inhomogeneous relaxation within a nm-sized pore geometry. An increase of τ when approaching the rough (untreated) pore surface as recently proposed by computer simulations nicely reproduces the data at hand, yielding a downshift of ΔT g ∝ 1/d in perfect agreement with literature data. Interaction with the pore walls to a large extend was removed by silanation. Homogeneous relaxation is found within silanated pores following a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation. This lubrication effect leads to a stronger downshift of T g with decreasing pore size. Further, high resolution thermal expansion measurements of silanated and untreated porous silica samples, both unfilled and filled, revealed the intensely discussed contribution of negative pressure. These findings allow to separate competing side effects from the pure confinement induced acceleration of molecular dynamics. Thereon, the dynamic elastic susceptibility data for the rst time were analyzed in terms of a recently proposed procedure [C. Dalle-Ferrier et al., Phys. Rev. E 76, 041510 (2007)], relating the number N corr,T of molecules, whose dynamics is correlated to a local enthalpy fluctuation, to the three-point dynamic susceptibility χ T . The observed increase of N corr,T with decreasing temperature strongly indicates that the size ξ of dynamic heterogeneities increases when approaching T g to ξ∼3 nm. The calculation of N corr,T and estimation of ξ(T g ), both of nanoscopic nature, from a macroscopic probe experiment are major results of this thesis. (author) [de

  6. Dual Mechanism of an Intramolecular Charge Transfer (ICT)-FRET-Based Fluorescent Probe for the Selective Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Xu, Xiaoyi; Qiao, Dan; Yin, Zheng; Shang, Luqing

    2017-12-14

    A dual-mechanism intramolecular charge transfer (ICT)-FRET fluorescent probe for the selective detection of H 2 O 2 in living cells has been designed and synthesized. This probe used a coumarin-naphthalimide hybrid as the FRET platform and a boronate moiety as the recognition group. Upon the addition of H 2 O 2 , the probe exhibited a redshifted (73 nm) fluorescence emission, and the ratio of fluorescence intensities at λ=558 and 485 nm (F 558 /F 485 ) shifted notably (up to 100-fold). Moreover, there was a good linearity (R 2 =0.9911) between the ratio and concentration of H 2 O 2 in the range of 0 to 60 μm, with a limit of detection of 0.28 μm (signal to noise ratio (S/N)=3). This probe could also detect enzymatically generated H 2 O 2 . Importantly, it could be used to visualize endogenous H 2 O 2 produced by stimulation from epidermal growth factor. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Design of Selective Substrates and Activity-Based Probes for Hydrolase Important for Pathogenesis 1 (HIP1) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Christian S; Ordonez, Alvaro A; Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; La Greca, Florencia; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Schulze, Christopher J; Powers, James C; Craik, Charles S; Drag, Marcin; Jain, Sanjay K; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-11-11

    Although serine proteases are important mediators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) virulence, there are currently no tools to selectively block or visualize members of this family of enzymes. Selective reporter substrates or activity-based probes (ABPs) could provide a means to monitor infection and response to therapy using imaging methods. Here, we use a combination of substrate selectivity profiling and focused screening to identify optimized reporter substrates and ABPs for the Mtb "Hydrolase important for pathogenesis 1" (Hip1) serine protease. Hip1 is a cell-envelope-associated enzyme with minimal homology to host proteases, making it an ideal target for probe development. We identified substituted 7-amino-4-chloro-3-(2-bromoethoxy)isocoumarins as irreversible inhibitor scaffolds. Furthermore, we used specificity data to generate selective reporter substrates and to further optimize a selective chloroisocoumarin inhibitor. These new reagents are potentially useful in delineating the roles of Hip1 during pathogenesis or as diagnostic imaging tools for specifically monitoring Mtb infections.

  8. Chaotic Dynamical State Variables Selection Procedure Based Image Encryption Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Bashir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, in the modern digital era, the use of computer technologies such as smartphones, tablets and the Internet, as well as the enormous quantity of confidential information being converted into digital form have resulted in raised security issues. This, in turn, has led to rapid developments in cryptography, due to the imminent need for system security. Low-dimensional chaotic systems have low complexity and key space, yet they achieve high encryption speed. An image encryption scheme is proposed that, without compromising the security, uses reasonable resources. We introduced a chaotic dynamic state variables selection procedure (CDSVSP to use all state variables of a hyper-chaotic four-dimensional dynamical system. As a result, less iterations of the dynamical system are required, and resources are saved, thus making the algorithm fast and suitable for practical use. The simulation results of security and other miscellaneous tests demonstrate that the suggested algorithm excels at robustness, security and high speed encryption.

  9. Evolutionary dynamics on graphs: Efficient method for weak selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Feng; Wang, Long; Nowak, Martin A.; Hauert, Christoph

    2009-04-01

    Investigating the evolutionary dynamics of game theoretical interactions in populations where individuals are arranged on a graph can be challenging in terms of computation time. Here, we propose an efficient method to study any type of game on arbitrary graph structures for weak selection. In this limit, evolutionary game dynamics represents a first-order correction to neutral evolution. Spatial correlations can be empirically determined under neutral evolution and provide the basis for formulating the game dynamics as a discrete Markov process by incorporating a detailed description of the microscopic dynamics based on the neutral correlations. This framework is then applied to one of the most intriguing questions in evolutionary biology: the evolution of cooperation. We demonstrate that the degree heterogeneity of a graph impedes cooperation and that the success of tit for tat depends not only on the number of rounds but also on the degree of the graph. Moreover, considering the mutation-selection equilibrium shows that the symmetry of the stationary distribution of states under weak selection is skewed in favor of defectors for larger selection strengths. In particular, degree heterogeneity—a prominent feature of scale-free networks—generally results in a more pronounced increase in the critical benefit-to-cost ratio required for evolution to favor cooperation as compared to regular graphs. This conclusion is corroborated by an analysis of the effects of population structures on the fixation probabilities of strategies in general 2×2 games for different types of graphs. Computer simulations confirm the predictive power of our method and illustrate the improved accuracy as compared to previous studies.

  10. A dynamic data source selection system for smartwatch platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Ebrahim; Sideris, Konstantinos; Kalantarian, Haik; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2016-08-01

    A novel data source selection algorithm is proposed for ambulatory activity tracking of elderly people. The algorithm introduces the concept of dynamic switching between the data collection modules (a smartwatch and a smartphone) to improve accuracy and battery life using contextual information. We show that by making offloading decisions as a function of activity, the proposed algorithm improves power consumption and accuracy of the previous work by 7 hours and 5% respectively compared to the baseline.

  11. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  12. Probing the dynamics of identified neurons with a data-driven modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Nowotny

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In controlling animal behavior the nervous system has to perform within the operational limits set by the requirements of each specific behavior. The implications for the corresponding range of suitable network, single neuron, and ion channel properties have remained elusive. In this article we approach the question of how well-constrained properties of neuronal systems may be on the neuronal level. We used large data sets of the activity of isolated invertebrate identified cells and built an accurate conductance-based model for this cell type using customized automated parameter estimation techniques. By direct inspection of the data we found that the variability of the neurons is larger when they are isolated from the circuit than when in the intact system. Furthermore, the responses of the neurons to perturbations appear to be more consistent than their autonomous behavior under stationary conditions. In the developed model, the constraints on different parameters that enforce appropriate model dynamics vary widely from some very tightly controlled parameters to others that are almost arbitrary. The model also allows predictions for the effect of blocking selected ionic currents and to prove that the origin of irregular dynamics in the neuron model is proper chaoticity and that this chaoticity is typical in an appropriate sense. Our results indicate that data driven models are useful tools for the in-depth analysis of neuronal dynamics. The better consistency of responses to perturbations, in the real neurons as well as in the model, suggests a paradigm shift away from measuring autonomous dynamics alone towards protocols of controlled perturbations. Our predictions for the impact of channel blockers on the neuronal dynamics and the proof of chaoticity underscore the wide scope of our approach.

  13. Selective imaging of cancer cells with a pH-activatable lysosome-targeting fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rongguang; Huang, Lu; Duan, Xiaoxue; Sun, Guohao; Yin, Gui; Wang, Ruiyong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2017-10-02

    Fluorescence imaging with tumor-specific fluorescent probe has emerged as a tool to aid surgeons in the identification and removal of tumor tissue. We report here a new lysosome-targeting fluorescent probe (NBOH) with BODIPY fluorephore to distinguish tumor tissue out of normal tissue based on different pH environment. The probe exhibited remarkable pH-dependent fluorescence behavior in a wide pH range from 3.0 to 11.0, especially a sensitive pH-dependent fluorescence change at pH range between 3.5 and 5.5, corresponding well to the acidic microenvironment of tumor cells, in aqueous solution. The response time of NBOH was extremely short and the photostability was proved to be good. Toxicity test and fluorescence cell imaging together with a sub-cellular localization study were carried out revealing its low biotoxicity and good cell membrane permeability. And NBOH was successfully applied to the imaging of tumor tissue in tumor-bearing mice suggesting potential application to surgery as a tumor-specific probe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Selective Incorporation of Nitrile-Based Infrared Probes into Proteins via Cysteine Alkylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hyunil; Culik, Robert M.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; DeGrado, William F.; Gai, Feng

    2010-01-01

    The nitrile stretching vibration is increasingly used as a sensitive infrared probe of local protein environments. However, site-specific incorporation of a nitrile moiety into proteins is difficult. Here we show that various aromatic nitriles can be easily incorporated into peptides and proteins via either thiol alkylation or arylation reaction. PMID:21077670

  15. Selective Incorporation of Nitrile-Based Infrared Probes into Proteins via Cysteine Alkylation

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, Hyunil; Culik, Robert M.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; DeGrado, William F.; Gai, Feng

    2010-01-01

    The nitrile stretching vibration is increasingly used as a sensitive infrared probe of local protein environments. However, site-specific incorporation of a nitrile moiety into proteins is difficult. Here we show that various aromatic nitriles can be easily incorporated into peptides and proteins via either thiol alkylation or arylation reaction.

  16. Selective interaction between Xanthophylls and Chlorophylls in LHCII probed by femtosecond transient absoprtion spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradinaru, C.C.; Grondelle, van R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed femtosecond transient absorption measurements on trimeric light-harvesting complex II from spinach. Either chlorophyll (Chl) a (675 nm) or Chl b (650 nm) was excited, and the spectral response was probed for wavelengths longer than 470 nm. Excitation of Chl b led to instantaneous

  17. Vibrational dynamics of adsorbed molecules under conditions of photodesorption: Pump-probe SFG spectra of CO/Pt(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Frédéric; Zheng, Wanquan; Carrez, Serge; Dubost, Henri; Bourguignon, Bernard

    2004-09-01

    Interaction of CO adsorbed on Pt(111) with electrons and phonons is studied experimentally by means of a pump-probe experiment where CO is probed by IR+visible sum frequency generation under a pump laser intensity that allows photodesorption. Vibrational spectra of CO internal stretch are obtained as a function of pump-probe delay. A two-temperature and anharmonic coupling model is used to extract from the spectra the real time variations of CO peak frequency and dephasing time. The main conclusions are the following: (i) The CO stretch is perturbed by two low-frequency modes, assigned to frustrated rotation and frustrated translation. (ii) The frustrated rotation is directly coupled to electrons photoexcited in Pt(111) by the pump laser. (iii) There is no evidence of Pt-CO stretch excitation in the spectra. The implications for the photodesorption dynamics are discussed.

  18. Plasma membrane organization and dynamics is probe and cell line dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuangru; Lim, Shi Ying; Gupta, Anjali; Bag, Nirmalya; Wohland, Thorsten

    2017-09-01

    The action and interaction of membrane receptor proteins take place within the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane, however, is not a passive matrix. It rather takes an active role and regulates receptor distribution and function by its composition and the interaction of its lipid components with embedded and surrounding proteins. Furthermore, it is not a homogenous fluid but contains lipid and protein domains of various sizes and characteristic lifetimes which are important in regulating receptor function and signaling. The precise lateral organization of the plasma membrane, the differences between the inner and outer leaflet, and the influence of the cytoskeleton are still debated. Furthermore, there is a lack of comparisons of the organization and dynamics of the plasma membrane of different cell types. Therefore, we used four different specific membrane markers to test the lateral organization, the differences between the inner and outer membrane leaflet, and the influence of the cytoskeleton of up to five different cell lines, including Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1), Human cervical carcinoma (HeLa), neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y), fibroblast (WI-38) and rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells by Imaging Total Internal Reflection (ITIR)-Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). We measure diffusion in the temperature range of 298-310K to measure the Arrhenius activation energy (E Arr ) of diffusion and apply the FCS diffusion law to obtain information on the spatial organization of the probe molecules on the various cell membranes. Our results show clear differences of the FCS diffusion law and E Arr for the different probes in dependence of their localization. These differences are similar in the outer and inner leaflet of the membrane. However, these values can differ significantly between different cell lines raising the question how molecular plasma membrane events measured in different cell lines can be compared. This article is part of a Special Issue

  19. Highly selective and sensitive detection of Cu2+ with lysine enhancing bovine serum albumin modified-carbon dots fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Lin, Li-ping; Wang, Xin-Xing; Lin, Shao-Qin; Cai, Wen-Lian; Zhang, Li-Hong; Zheng, Zhi-Yong

    2012-06-07

    Based on the ability of lysine (Lys) to enhance the fluorescence intensity of bovine serum albumin modified-carbon dots (CDs-BSA) to decrease surface defects and quench fluorescence of the CDs-BSA-Lys system in the presence of Cu(2+) under conditions of phosphate buffer (PBS, pH = 5.0) at 45 °C for 10 min, a sensitive Lys enhancing CDs-BSA fluorescent probe was designed. The environment-friendly, simple, rapid, selective and sensitive fluorescent probe has been utilized to detect Cu(2+) in hair and tap water samples and it achieved consistent results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The mechanism of the proposed assay for the detection of Cu(2+) is discussed.

  20. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Guo, Ning; Li, Quanzheng; Ma, Ying; Jacboson, Orit; Lee, Seulki; Choi, Hak Soo; Mansfield, James R; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/(64)Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide. The integrin α(v)β(3) binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA)-ZW-1 was characterized by cell staining and receptor binding assay. Sixty-min dynamic PET and optical imaging were acquired on a MDA-MB-435 tumor model. Singular value decomposition (SVD) method was applied to compute the dynamic optical signal from the two-dimensional optical projection images. Compartment models were used to quantitatively analyze and compare the dynamic optical and PET data. The dual-labeled probe (64)Cu-RGD-C(DOTA)-ZW-1 showed integrin specific binding in vitro and in vivo. The binding potential (Bp) derived from dynamic optical imaging (1.762 ± 0.020) is comparable to that from dynamic PET (1.752 ± 0.026). The signal un-mixing process using SVD improved the accuracy of kinetic modeling of 2D dynamic optical data. Our results demonstrate that 2D dynamic optical imaging with SVD analysis could achieve comparable quantitative results as dynamic PET imaging in preclinical xenograft models.

  1. Calcium dynamics in root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana visualized with selective plane illumination microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Costa

    Full Text Available Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM is an imaging technique particularly suited for long term in-vivo analysis of transparent specimens, able to visualize small organs or entire organisms, at cellular and eventually even subcellular resolution. Here we report the application of SPIM in Calcium imaging based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the genetically encoded-FRET-based Ca(2+ probe Cameleon, in the cytosol or nucleus, were used to demonstrate that SPIM enables ratiometric fluorescence imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, both at tissue and single cell level. The SPIM-FRET technique enabled us to follow nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis root tip cells, deep inside the organ, in response to different stimuli. A relevant physiological phenomenon, namely Ca(2+ signal percolation, predicted in previous studies, has been directly visualized.

  2. Probing spin-vibronic dynamics using femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penfold, T. J.; Pápai, Mátyás Imre; Rozgonyi, T.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy within the X-ray regime is now possible owing to the development of X-ray Free Electrons Lasers (X-FELs) and is opening new opportunities for the direct probing of femtosecond evolution of the nuclei, the electronic and spin degrees of freedom. In this contributi...

  3. Long Range Polymer Chain Dynamics of Highly Flexible Polysiloxane in Solution Probed by Pyrene Excimer Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine L. Thoma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A poly(dimethylsiloxane-co-(3-aminopropylmethylsiloxane polymer (PDMS with 20.3 mol % of (3-aminopropylmethyl siloxane monomer has been labeled randomly with 1-pyreneacetyl groups to generate a series of polysiloxanes (Py-PDMS with pyrenyl contents ranging from 0.7 mol % to 5.2 mol % of the total number of structural units. The remainder of the amino groups were acetylated to avoid intra-chain quenching of the excited singlet states of pyrene via exciplex formation with free amino groups while allowing the formation of excimers to proceed. The fluorescence spectra and temporal decays of the Py-PDMS samples were acquired in tetrahydrofuran (THF, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF, and dioxane. blob, the average rate constant for intra-chain pyrene excimer formation, was determined from the analysis of the fluorescence decays. blob was found to equal 1.16 (±0.13 × 109, 1.14 (±0.12 × 109, and 0.99 (±0.10 × 109 s−1 in THF, DMF, and dioxane, respectively, at room temperature. They are the largest values found to date for any polymeric backbone in these solvents. The qualitative relationship found here between blob and the chemical structures of the polymers indicates that the luminescence characteristics of randomly labeled polymers is a very useful method to probe the long range dynamics of chains of almost any polymer that is amenable to substitution by a lumophore.

  4. Radiator selection for Space Station Solar Dynamic Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Mike; Hoehn, Frank

    A study was conducted to define the best radiator for heat rejection of the Space Station Solar Dynamic Power System. Included in the study were radiators for both the Organic Rankine Cycle and Closed Brayton Cycle heat engines. A number of potential approaches were considered for the Organic Rankine Cycle and a constructable radiator was chosen. Detailed optimizations of this concept were conducted resulting in a baseline for inclusion into the ORC Preliminary Design. A number of approaches were also considered for the CBC radiator. For this application a deployed pumped liquid radiator was selected which was also refined resulting in a baseline for the CBC preliminary design. This paper reports the results and methodology of these studies and describes the preliminary designs of the Space Station Solar Dynamic Power System radiators for both of the candidate heat engine cycles.

  5. A quinoline-based Cu2 + ion complex fluorescence probe for selective detection of inorganic phosphate anion in aqueous solution and its application to living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yanpeng; Wang, Peng; Fu, Jiaxin; Yao, Kun; Xu, Kuoxi; Pang, Xiaobin

    2017-08-01

    A quinaldine functionalized probe QP has been designed and synthesized. It exhibited selective turn-off fluorescence response toward Cu2 + ion over most of the biologically important ions at physiological pH. The binding ratio of the probe QP and Cu2 + ion was determined to be 1:1 through fluorescence titration, Job's plot and ESI-MS. The binding constant (K) of Cu2 + to probe QP was found to be 2.12 × 104 M- 1. Further, the Cu2 + ensemble of probe QP was found to respond H2PO4- and HPO42 - among other important biological anions via fluorescence turn-on response at physiological pH. Fluorescence microscopy imaging using living Hela cells showed that probe QP could be used as an effective fluorescent probe for detecting Cu2 + cation and H2PO4- and HPO42 - anions in living cells.

  6. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K; Orozco, Luis A; Rolston, S L

    2017-06-15

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  7. Coupling an electrospray source and a solids probe/chemical ionization source to a selected ion flow tube apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melko, Joshua J.; Ard, Shaun G.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Pedder, Randall E.; Taormina, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    A new ion source region has been constructed and attached to a variable temperature selected ion flow tube. The source features the capabilities of electron impact, chemical ionization, a solids probe, and electrospray ionization. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated through a series of reactions from ions created in each of the new source regions. The chemical ionization source is able to create H 3 O + , but not as efficiently as similar sources with larger apertures. The ability of this source to support a solids probe, however, greatly expands our capabilities. A variety of rhenium cations and dications are created from the solids probe in sufficient abundance to study in the flow tube. The reaction of Re + with O 2 proceeds with a rate constant that agrees with the literature measurements, while the reaction of Re 2 2+ is found to charge transfer with O 2 at about 60% of the collision rate; we have also performed calculations that support the charge transfer pathway. The electrospray source is used to create Ba + , which is reacted with N 2 O to create BaO + , and we find a rate constant that agrees with the literature

  8. Probe Sensor Using Nanostructured Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Yarn for Selective and Sensitive Detection of Dopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wed Al-Graiti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The demands for electrochemical sensor materials with high strength and durability in physiological conditions continue to grow and novel approaches are being enabled by the advent of new electromaterials and novel fabrication technologies. Herein, we demonstrate a probe-style electrochemical sensor using highly flexible and conductive multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT yarns. The MWNT yarn-based sensors can be fabricated onto micro Pt-wire with a controlled diameter varying from 100 to 300 µm, and then further modified with Nafion via a dip-coating approach. The fabricated micro-sized sensors were characterized by electron microscopy, Raman, FTIR, electrical, and electrochemical measurements. For the first time, the MWNT/Nafion yarn-based probe sensors have been assembled and assessed for high-performance dopamine sensing, showing a significant improvement in both sensitivity and selectivity in dopamine detection in presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid. It offers the potential to be further developed as implantable probe sensors.

  9. An objective method for High Dynamic Range source content selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narwaria, Manish; Mantel, Claire; Da Silva, Matthieu Perreira

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of improving the immersive experience of the end user, High Dynamic Range (HDR) imaging has been gaining popularity. Therefore, proper validation and performance benchmarking of HDR processing algorithms is a key step towards standardization and commercial deployment. A crucial...... component of such validation studies is the selection of a challenging and balanced set of source (reference) HDR content. In order to facilitate this, we present an objective method based on the premise that a more challenging HDR scene encapsulates higher contrast, and as a result will show up more...

  10. Comparing Internet Probing Methodologies Through an Analysis of Large Dynamic Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    System Number CAIDA Cooperative Association of Internet Data Analysis GB gigabyte IETF IPv4 IP IPv6 ISP NPS NTC RFC RTT TTL ICMP NPS ESD VSD TCP UDP DoS...including, DIMES, IPlane, Ark IPv4 All Prefix /24 and recently NPS probing methodol- ogy. NPS probing methodology is different from the others because it...trace, a history of the forward interface-level path and time to send and acknowledge are available to analyze. However, traceroute may not return

  11. Probing the equilibrium dynamics of colloidal hard spheres above the mode-coupling glass transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brambilla, G.; al Masri, J.H.M.; Pierno, M.; Berthier, L.; Cipelletti, L.

    2010-01-01

    We use dynamic light scattering and computer simulations to study equilibrium dynamics and dynamic heterogeneity in concentrated suspensions of colloidal hard spheres. Our study covers an unprecedented density range and spans seven decades in structural relaxation time, , including equilibrium

  12. Scanning probe microscopy studies on the adsorption of selected molecular dyes on titania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub S. Prauzner-Bechcicki

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide, or titania, sensitized with organic dyes is a very attractive platform for photovoltaic applications. In this context, the knowledge of properties of the titania–sensitizer junction is essential for designing efficient devices. Consequently, studies on the adsorption of organic dyes on titania surfaces and on the influence of the adsorption geometry on the energy level alignment between the substrate and an organic adsorbate are necessary. The method of choice for investigating the local environment of a single dye molecule is high-resolution scanning probe microscopy. Microscopic results combined with the outcome of common spectroscopic methods provide a better understanding of the mechanism taking place at the titania–sensitizer interface. In the following paper, we review the recent scanning probe microscopic research of a certain group of molecular assemblies on rutile titania surfaces as it pertains to dye-sensitized solar cell applications. We focus on experiments on adsorption of three types of prototypical dye molecules, i.e., perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA, phtalocyanines and porphyrins. Two interesting heteromolecular systems comprising molecules that are aligned with the given review are discussed as well.

  13. Automated region selection for analysis of dynamic cardiac SPECT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, E. V. R.; Gullberg, G. T.; Barclay, A. B.; Eisner, R. L.

    1997-06-01

    Dynamic cardiac SPECT using Tc-99m labeled teboroxime can provide kinetic parameters (washin, washout) indicative of myocardial blood flow. A time-consuming and subjective step of the data analysis is drawing regions of interest to delineate blood pool and myocardial tissue regions. The time-activity curves of the regions are then used to estimate local kinetic parameters. In this work, the appropriate regions are found automatically, in a manner similar to that used for calculating maximum count circumferential profiles in conventional static cardiac studies. The drawbacks to applying standard static circumferential profile methods are the high noise level and high liver uptake common in dynamic teboroxime studies. Searching along each ray for maxima to locate the myocardium does not typically provide useful information. Here we propose an iterative scheme in which constraints are imposed on the radii searched along each ray. The constraints are based on the shape of the time-activity curves of the circumferential profile members and on an assumption that the short axis slices are approximately circular. The constraints eliminate outliers and help to reduce the effects of noise and liver activity. Kinetic parameter estimates from the automatically generated regions were comparable to estimates from manually selected regions in dynamic canine teboroxime studies.

  14. Rational design of reversible fluorescent probes for live-cell imaging and quantification of fast glutathione dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Keitaro; Yoshida, Masafumi; Kamiya, Mako; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Urano, Yasuteru

    2017-03-01

    Alterations in glutathione (GSH) homeostasis are associated with a variety of diseases and cellular functions, and therefore, real-time live-cell imaging and quantification of GSH dynamics are important for understanding pathophysiological processes. However, existing fluorescent probes are unsuitable for these purposes due to their irreversible fluorogenic mechanisms or slow reaction rates. In this work, we have successfully overcome these problems by establishing a design strategy inspired by Mayr's work on nucleophilic reaction kinetics. The synthesized probes exhibit concentration-dependent, reversible and rapid absorption/fluorescence changes (t1/2 = 620 ms at [GSH] = 1 mM), as well as appropriate Kd values (1-10 mM: within the range of intracellular GSH concentrations). We also developed FRET-based ratiometric probes, and demonstrated that they are useful for quantifying GSH concentration in various cell types and also for real-time live-cell imaging of GSH dynamics with temporal resolution of seconds.

  15. Selective attention towards painful faces among chronic pain patients: evidence from a modified version of the dot-probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi, Ali; Dehghani, Mohsen; Sharpe, Louise; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Pouretemad, Hamidreza

    2009-03-01

    Evidence that patients with chronic pain selectively attend to pain-related stimuli presented in modified Stroop and dot-probe paradigms is mixed. The pain-related stimuli used in these studies have been primarily verbal in nature (i.e., words depicting themes of pain). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether patients with chronic pain, relative to healthy controls, show selective attention for pictures depicting painful faces. To do so, 170 patients with chronic pain and 40 age- and education-matched healthy control participants were tested using a dot-probe task in which painful, happy, and neutral facial expressions were presented. Selective attention was denoted using the mean reaction time and the bias index. Results indicated that, while both groups shifted attention away from happy faces (and towards neutral faces), only the control group shifted attention away from painful faces. Additional analyses were conducted on chronic pain participants after dividing them into groups on the basis of fear of pain/(re)injury. The results of these analyses revealed that while chronic pain patients with high and low levels of fear both shifted attention away from happy faces, those with low fear shifted attention away from painful faces, whereas those with high fear shifted attention towards painful faces. These results suggest that patients with chronic pain selectively attend to facial expressions of pain and, importantly, that the tendency to shift attention towards such stimuli is positively influenced by high fear of pain/(re)injury. Implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed.

  16. Dynamics of tropomyosin in muscle fibers as monitored by saturation transfer EPR of bi-functional probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni F Rayes

    Full Text Available The dynamics of four regions of tropomyosin was assessed using saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance in the muscle fiber. In order to fully immobilize the spin probe on the surface of tropomyosin, a bi-functional spin label was attached to i,i+4 positions via cysteine mutagenesis. The dynamics of bi-functionally labeled tropomyosin mutants decreased by three orders of magnitude when reconstituted into "ghost muscle fibers". The rates of motion varied along the length of tropomyosin with the C-terminus position 268/272 being one order of magnitude slower then N-terminal domain or the center of the molecule. Introduction of troponin decreases the dynamics of all four sites in the muscle fiber, but there was no significant effect upon addition of calcium or myosin subfragment-1.

  17. Theoretical Investigation of Dynamic Properties of Magnetic Molecule Systems as Probed by NMR and Pulsed Fields Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-12-17

    The field of molecular magnetism[l-6] has become a subject of intense theoretical and experimental interest and has rapidly evolved during the last years. This inter-disciplinary field concerns magnetic systems at the molecular or "nanoscopic" level, whose realization has become feasible due to recent advances in the field of chemical synthesis. The present theoretical work provides a first step towards exploiting the possibilities that are offered by probing magnetic molecules using external magnetic fields with high sweep rates. These probes, apart for providing information specific to magnetic molecules, offer the possibility of conducting a detailed study of the relaxational behavior of interacting spin systems as a result of their coupling with a "heat bath" and in particular the excitations of the host lattice. Development of a broad theoretical framework for dealing with relaxational phenomena induced by dynamical magnetic fields is indeed a worthy goal.

  18. Probing ultrafast dynamics in electronic structure of epitaxial Gd(0 0 0 1) on W(1 1 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaulieu, Nathan [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Malinowski, Gregory [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Bendounan, Azzedine; Silly, Mathieu G.; Chauvet, Christian [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Krizmancic, Damjan [Instituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM)-CNR Laboratorio TASC, in Area Science Park S.S.14, Km 163.5, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Sirotti, Fausto [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: •Study of the magnetism of epitaxial Gd(0 0 0 1)/W(1 1 0). •Study of Gd(0 0 0 1) band structure as a function of the temperature. •Study of the Gd magnetism dynamics probing the M5 edge. -- Abstract: The electronic and magnetic properties of Gd have been studied using time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy employing laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe pulses. The static temperature evolution of the valence band and more precisely, the 5d6s exchange splitting is reported. Ultrafast demagnetization is measured using dichroic resonant Auger spectroscopy. Remarkably, a complete demagnetization is observed followed up by a non-monotonic recovery that could be associated to magnetization oscillations.

  19. Influence of Divalent Counterions on the Dynamics in DNA as Probed by Using a Minor-Groove Binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sneha; Ahmed, Tasnim; Samanta, Anunay

    2017-08-05

    DNA dynamics, to which water, counterions, and DNA motions contribute, is a topic of considerable interest because it is closely related to the efficiency of biological functions performed by it. Simulation studies and experiments suggest that the counterion dynamics in DNA probed by a minor-groove binder are similar for various monovalent counterions. To date, the influence on DNA dynamics of higher-valence counterions, which are also present around DNA and are known to bind more strongly to it than monovalent ions, has not been studied. Herein we investigated DNA dynamics in the presence of Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ , chosen for their relative abundance in cells, by using minor-groove binder 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) as a fluorescence probe. The dynamics, as measured from the time-resolved fluorescence Stokes shifts of DAPI bound to calf thymus DNA on a subpicosecond-to-nanosecond timescale, were found to be very similar in the presence of both the divalent ions and Na + ions. The observation is explained by considering the screening of the electric field of the divalent ion by its hydration shell, preferential binding of the ions to the phosphate groups, and displacement of ions from the minor groove by DAPI due to the stronger binding interaction of the latter. Furthermore, the similarity of our results in the presence of Na + to those reported for smaller oligonucleotides suggests that the chain length of DNA does not influence the DNA dynamics. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu, Ning Guo, Quanzheng Li, Ying Ma, Orit Jacboson, Seulki Lee, Hak Soo Choi, James R. Mansfield, Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/64Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide.Methods: The integrin αvβ3 binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA-ZW-1 was characterized by cell staining and receptor binding assay. Sixty-min dynamic PET and optical imaging were acquired on a MDA-MB-435 tumor model. Singular value decomposition (SVD method was applied to compute the dynamic optical signal from the two-dimensional optical projection images. Compartment models were used to quantitatively analyze and compare the dynamic optical and PET data.Results: The dual-labeled probe 64Cu-RGD-C(DOTA-ZW-1 showed integrin specific binding in vitro and in vivo. The binding potential (Bp derived from dynamic optical imaging (1.762 ± 0.020 is comparable to that from dynamic PET (1.752 ± 0.026.Conclusion: The signal un-mixing process using SVD improved the accuracy of kinetic modeling of 2D dynamic optical data. Our results demonstrate that 2D dynamic optical imaging with SVD analysis could achieve comparable quantitative results as dynamic PET imaging in preclinical xenograft models.

  1. Spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics of visual selective attention during a flanker task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Timothy J; Wiesman, Alex I; Proskovec, Amy L; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Wilson, Tony W

    2017-08-01

    The flanker task is a test of visual selective attention that has been widely used to probe error monitoring, response conflict, and related constructs. However, to date, few studies have focused on the selective attention component of this task and imaged the underlying oscillatory dynamics serving task performance. In this study, 21 healthy adults successfully completed an arrow-based version of the Eriksen flanker task during magnetoencephalography (MEG). All MEG data were pre-processed and transformed into the time-frequency domain. Significant oscillatory brain responses were imaged using a beamforming approach, and voxel time series were extracted from the peak responses to identify the temporal dynamics. Across both congruent and incongruent flanker conditions, our results indicated robust decreases in alpha (9-12Hz) activity in medial and lateral occipital regions, bilateral parietal cortices, and cerebellar areas during task performance. In parallel, increases in theta (3-7Hz) oscillatory activity were detected in dorsal and ventral frontal regions, and the anterior cingulate. As per conditional effects, stronger alpha responses (i.e., greater desynchronization) were observed in parietal, occipital, and cerebellar cortices during incongruent relative to congruent trials, whereas the opposite pattern emerged for theta responses (i.e., synchronization) in the anterior cingulate, left dorsolateral prefrontal, and ventral prefrontal cortices. Interestingly, the peak latency of theta responses in these latter brain regions was significantly correlated with reaction time, and may partially explain the amplitude difference observed between congruent and incongruent trials. Lastly, whole-brain exploratory analyses implicated the frontal eye fields, right temporoparietal junction, and premotor cortices. These findings suggest that regions of both the dorsal and ventral attention networks contribute to visual selective attention processes during incongruent trials

  2. The selective dynamical downscaling method for extreme-wind atlases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Badger, Jake; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    2012-01-01

    A selective dynamical downscaling method is developed to obtain extreme-wind atlases for large areas. The method is general, efficient and flexible. The method consists of three steps: (i) identifying storm episodes for a particular area, (ii) downscaling of the storms using mesoscale modelling...... and (iii) post-processing. The post-processing generalizes the winds from the mesoscale modelling to standard conditions, i.e. 10-m height over a homogeneous surface with roughness length of 5 cm. The generalized winds are then used to calculate the 50-year wind using the annual maximum method for each...... mesoscale grid point. The generalization of the mesoscale winds through the post-processing provides a framework for data validation and for applying further the mesoscale extreme winds at specific places using microscale modelling. The results are compared with measurements from two areas with different...

  3. Development of selective colorimetric probes for hydrogen sulfide based on nucleophilic aromatic substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Leticia A; Pearce, Taylor F; Hansen, Ryan J; Zakharov, Lev N; Pluth, Michael D

    2013-07-05

    Hydrogen sulfide is an important biological signaling molecule and an important environmental target for detection. A major challenge in developing H2S detection methods is separating the often similar reactivity of thiols and other nucleophiles from H2S. To address this need, the nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) reaction of H2S with electron-poor aromatic electrophiles was developed as a strategy to separate H2S and thiol reactivity. Treatment of aqueous solutions of nitrobenzofurazan (7-nitro-1,2,3-benzoxadiazole, NBD) thioethers with H2S resulted in thiol extrusion and formation of nitrobenzofurazan thiol (λmax = 534 nm). This reactivity allows for unwanted thioether products to be converted to the desired nitrobenzofurazan thiol upon reaction with H2S. The scope of the reaction was investigated using a Hammett linear free energy relationship study, and the determined ρ = +0.34 is consistent with the proposed SN2Ar reaction mechanism. The efficacy of the developed probes was demonstrated in buffer and in serum with associated submicromolar detection limits as low as 190 nM (buffer) and 380 nM (serum). Furthermore, the sigmoidal response of nitrobenzofurazan electrophiles with H2S can be fit to accurately quantify H2S. The developed detection strategy offers a manifold for H2S detection that we foresee being applied in various future applications.

  4. Highly selective and sensitive fluorogenic ferric probes based on aggregation-enhanced emission with - SiMe3 substituted polybenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Hua; Jiang, Qin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Feng, Shengyu; Liu, Hong-Guo

    2018-01-01

    In this study, thiophene was linked to polybenzene to generate novel fluorescent probes, namely 3,4-diphenyl-2,5-di(2-thienyl)phenyl-trimethylsilane (DPTB-TMS) with a - SiMe3 substituent and 3,4-diphenyl-2,5-di(2-thienyl)phenyl (DPTB) without the - SiMe3 substituent, respectively. Both of the two compounds exhibit aggregation-enhanced emission (AEE) properties in tetrahydrofuran/water mixtures due to restricted intramolecular rotation of the peripheral groups, which make the two compounds good candidates for the detection of Fe3 + ions in aqueous-based solutions. The fluorescence intensity of the two compounds decreases immediately and obviously upon addition of a trace amount of Fe3 +, and decreases continuously as the amount of Fe3 + increases. The fluorescence was quenched to 92% of its initial intensity when the amount of Fe3 + ions reached 6 μmol for DPTB-TMS and to 80% for DPTB in the systems, indicating that the compound with the - SiMe3 group is a more effective probe. The detection limit was found to be 1.17 μM (65 ppb). The detection mechanism is proposed to be static quenching. DPTB-TMS is highly efficient for the detection of ferric ions even in the presence of other metal ions. In addition, the method is also successfully applied to the detection of ferric ions in water, blood serum, or solid films. This indicates that these polybenzene compounds can be applied as low-cost, high selectivity, and high efficiency Fe3 + probes in water or in clinical applications.

  5. Dynamics of the evolution of learning algorithms by selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo; Caticha, Nestor

    2003-01-01

    We study the evolution of artificial learning systems by means of selection. Genetic programming is used to generate populations of programs that implement algorithms used by neural network classifiers to learn a rule in a supervised learning scenario. In contrast to concentrating on final results, which would be the natural aim while designing good learning algorithms, we study the evolution process. Phenotypic and genotypic entropies, which describe the distribution of fitness and of symbols, respectively, are used to monitor the dynamics. We identify significant functional structures responsible for the improvements in the learning process. In particular, some combinations of variables and operators are useful in assessing performance in rule extraction and can thus implement annealing of the learning schedule. We also find combinations that can signal surprise, measured on a single example, by the difference between predicted and correct classification. When such favorable structures appear, they are disseminated on very short time scales throughout the population. Due to such abruptness they can be thought of as dynamical transitions. But foremost, we find a strict temporal order of such discoveries. Structures that measure performance are never useful before those for measuring surprise. Invasions of the population by such structures in the reverse order were never observed. Asymptotically, the generalization ability approaches Bayesian results

  6. Dynamic Disturbance Processes Create Dynamic Lek Site Selection in a Prairie Grouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torre J Hovick

    Full Text Available It is well understood that landscape processes can affect habitat selection patterns, movements, and species persistence. These selection patterns may be altered or even eliminated as a result of changes in disturbance regimes and a concomitant management focus on uniform, moderate disturbance across landscapes. To assess how restored landscape heterogeneity influences habitat selection patterns, we examined 21 years (1991, 1993-2012 of Greater Prairie-Chicken (Tympanuchus cupido lek location data in tallgrass prairie with restored fire and grazing processes. Our study took place at The Nature Conservancy's Tallgrass Prairie Preserve located at the southern extent of Flint Hills in northeastern Oklahoma. We specifically addressed stability of lek locations in the context of the fire-grazing interaction, and the environmental factors influencing lek locations. We found that lek locations were dynamic in a landscape with interacting fire and grazing. While previous conservation efforts have treated leks as stable with high site fidelity in static landscapes, a majority of lek locations in our study (i.e., 65% moved by nearly one kilometer on an annual basis in this dynamic setting. Lek sites were in elevated areas with low tree cover and low road density. Additionally, lek site selection was influenced by an interaction of fire and patch edge, indicating that in recently burned patches, leks were located near patch edges. These results suggest that dynamic and interactive processes such as fire and grazing that restore heterogeneity to grasslands do influence habitat selection patterns in prairie grouse, a phenomenon that is likely to apply throughout the Greater Prairie-Chicken's distribution when dynamic processes are restored. As conservation moves toward restoring dynamic historic disturbance patterns, it will be important that siting and planning of anthropogenic structures (e.g., wind energy, oil and gas and management plans not view lek

  7. Ultrafast far-infrared dynamics probed by terahertz pulses: A frequency-domain approach. II. Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Hynek; Kadlec, Filip; Kadlec, Christelle; Kužel, Petr; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 10 (2005), 104504/1-104504/8 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB100100512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : optical pump * terahertz probe Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.138, year: 2005

  8. Investigation of the dynamics of a nonlinear optical response in glassy chalcogenide semiconductors by the pump–probe method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, E. A.; Kuzyutkina, Yu S.; Shiryaev, V. S.; Guizard, S.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of the results of measurements by using the pump–probe method with a femtosecond resolution in time and computer simulation of the charge carrier kinetics have revealed two types of a nonlinear optical response in samples of chalcogenide glasses belonging to the As – S – Se system, irradiated by 50-fs laser pulses with a wavelength of 0.79 μm. The difference in the nonlinear dynamics is due to the difference in the photoexcitation character, because laser radiation can be absorbed either through bound states in the band gap or without their participation, depending on the ratio of the pump photon energy to the bandgap energy.

  9. Probing the roles of SUMOylation in cancer cell biology by using a selective SAE inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xingyue; Riceberg, Jessica; Soucy, Teresa; Koenig, Erik; Minissale, James; Gallery, Melissa; Bernard, Hugues; Yang, Xiaofeng; Liao, Hua; Rabino, Claudia; Shah, Pooja; Xega, Kristina; Yan, Zhong-Hua; Sintchak, Mike; Bradley, John; Xu, He; Duffey, Matt; England, Dylan; Mizutani, Hirotake; Hu, Zhigen; Guo, Jianping; Chau, Ryan; Dick, Lawrence R; Brownell, James E; Newcomb, John; Langston, Steve; Lightcap, Eric S; Bence, Neil; Pulukuri, Sai M

    2017-11-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) family proteins regulate target-protein functions by post-translational modification. However, a potent and selective inhibitor targeting the SUMO pathway has been lacking. Here we describe ML-792, a mechanism-based SUMO-activating enzyme (SAE) inhibitor with nanomolar potency in cellular assays. ML-792 selectively blocks SAE enzyme activity and total SUMOylation, thus decreasing cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, we found that induction of the MYC oncogene increased the ML-792-mediated viability effect in cancer cells, thus indicating a potential application of SAE inhibitors in treating MYC-amplified tumors. Using ML-792, we further explored the critical roles of SUMOylation in mitotic progression and chromosome segregation. Furthermore, expression of an SAE catalytic-subunit (UBA2) S95N M97T mutant rescued SUMOylation loss and the mitotic defect induced by ML-792, thus confirming the selectivity of ML-792. As a potent and selective SAE inhibitor, ML-792 provides rapid loss of endogenously SUMOylated proteins, thereby facilitating novel insights into SUMO biology.

  10. Identification of Early Intermediates of Caspase Activation Using Selective Inhibitors and Activity-Based Probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Alicia B.; Witte, Martin D.; Denault, Jean-Bernard; Sadaghiani, Amir Masoud; Sexton, Kelly M.B.; Salvesen, Guy S.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Caspases are cysteine proteases that are key effectors in apoptotic cell death. Currently, there is a lack of tools that can be used to monitor the regulation of specific caspases in the context of distinct apoptotic programs. We describe the development of highly selective inhibitors and active

  11. Selective activation of SHP2 activity by cisplatin revealed by a novel chemical probe-based assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Chun-Chen; Chu, Chi-Yuan; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lo, Lee-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Src homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2) is known to participate in several different signaling pathways to mediate cell growth, survival, migration, and differentiation. However, due to the lack of proper analytical tools, it is unclear whether the phosphatase activity of SHP2 is activated in most studies. We have previously developed an activity-based probe LCL2 that formed covalent linkage with catalytically active protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Here, by combining LCL2 with a SHP2 specific antibody, we established an assay system that enables the direct monitoring of SHP2 activity upon cisplatin treatment of cancer cells. The protocol is advantageous over conventional colorimetric or in-gel PTP assays as it is specific and does not require the use of radioisotope reagents. Using this assay, we found SHP2 activity was selectively activated by cisplatin. Moreover, the activation of SHP2 appeared to be specific for cisplatin as other DNA damage agents failed to activate the activity. Although the role of SHP2 activation by cisplatin treatments is still unclear to us, our results provide the first direct evidence for the activation of SHP2 during cisplatin treatments. More importantly, the concept of using activity-based probe in conjunction with target-specific antibodies could be extended to other enzyme classes.

  12. A Low-Power High-Dynamic-Range Receiver System for In-Probe 3-D Ultrasonic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarzadeh, Hourieh; Xu, Ye; Ytterdal, Trond

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a dual-mode low-power, high dynamic-range receiver circuit is designed for the interface with a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer. The proposed ultrasound receiver chip enables the development of an in-probe digital beamforming imaging system. The flexibility of having two operation modes offers a high dynamic range with minimum power sacrifice. A prototype of the chip containing one receive channel, with one variable transimpedance amplifier (TIA) and one analog to digital converter (ADC) circuit is implemented. Combining variable gain TIA functionality with ADC gain settings achieves an enhanced overall high dynamic range, while low power dissipation is maintained. The chip is designed and fabricated in a 65 nm standard CMOS process technology. The test chip occupies an area of 76[Formula: see text] 170 [Formula: see text]. A total average power range of 60-240 [Formula: see text] for a sampling frequency of 30 MHz, and a center frequency of 5 MHz is measured. An instantaneous dynamic range of 50.5 dB with an overall dynamic range of 72 dB is obtained from the receiver circuit.

  13. Highly Sensitive Fluorescence Probe Based on Functional SBA-15 for Selective Detection of Hg2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaoyu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An inorganic–organic hybrid fluorescence chemosensor (DA/SBA-15 was prepared by covalent immobilization of a dansylamide derivative into the channels of mesoporous silica material SBA-15 via (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES groups. The primary hexagonally ordered mesoporous structure of SBA-15 was preserved after the grafting procedure. Fluorescence characterization shows that the obtained inorganic–organic hybrid composite is highly selective and sensitive to Hg2+ detection, suggesting the possibility for real-time qualitative or quantitative detection of Hg2+ and the convenience for potential application in toxicology and environmental science.

  14. Sensitive and selective tumor imaging with novel and highly activatable fluorescence probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urano, Yasuteru

    2008-01-01

    Selective and sensitive tumor imaging in vivo is one of the most requested methodologies in medical sciences. Although several imaging modalities have been developed including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the detection of tumors, none of these modalities can activate the signals upon being accumulated or uptaken to tumor sites. Among these modalities, only optical fluorescence imaging has a marked advantage, that is, their signals can be dramatically increased upon detecting some biological features. In this short review, I will introduce some recent strategies for activatable optical fluorescence imaging of tumors, and discuss their advantages over other modalities. (author)

  15. Hyperspectral Probing of Exciton dynamics and Multiplication in PbSe Nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Bawendi M.G.; Strasfeld D.; Roitblat A.; Sachs H.; Gdor I.; Ruhman S.

    2013-01-01

    Height time hyperspectral near IR probing providing broad-band coverage is employed on PbSe nanocrystals, uncovering spectral evolution following high energy photo-excitation due to hot exciton relaxation and recombination. Separation of single, double and triple exciton state contributions to these spectra is demonstrated, and the mechanisms underlying the course of spectral evolution are investigated. In addition no sign of MEG was detected in this sample up to a photon energy 3.7 times tha...

  16. Dynamical instability of a spin spiral in an interacting Fermi gas as a probe of the Stoner transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conduit, G. J.; Altman, E.

    2010-10-01

    We propose an experiment to probe ferromagnetic phenomena in an ultracold Fermi gas, while alleviating the sensitivity to three-body loss and competing many-body instabilities. The system is initialized in a small pitch spin spiral, which becomes unstable in the presence of repulsive interactions. To linear order the exponentially growing collective modes exhibit critical slowing down close to the Stoner transition point. Also, to this order, the dynamics are identical on the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic sides of the transition. However, we show that scattering off the exponentially growing modes qualitatively alters the collective mode structure. The critical slowing down is eliminated and in its place a new unstable branch develops at large wave vectors. Furthermore, long-wavelength instabilities are quenched on the paramagnetic side of the transition. We study the experimental observation of the instabilities, specifically addressing the trapping geometry and how phase-contrast imaging will reveal the emerging domain structure. These probes of the dynamical phenomena could allow experiments to detect the transition point and distinguish between the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic regimes.

  17. Dynamical instability of a spin spiral in an interacting Fermi gas as a probe of the Stoner transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conduit, G. J.; Altman, E.

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experiment to probe ferromagnetic phenomena in an ultracold Fermi gas, while alleviating the sensitivity to three-body loss and competing many-body instabilities. The system is initialized in a small pitch spin spiral, which becomes unstable in the presence of repulsive interactions. To linear order the exponentially growing collective modes exhibit critical slowing down close to the Stoner transition point. Also, to this order, the dynamics are identical on the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic sides of the transition. However, we show that scattering off the exponentially growing modes qualitatively alters the collective mode structure. The critical slowing down is eliminated and in its place a new unstable branch develops at large wave vectors. Furthermore, long-wavelength instabilities are quenched on the paramagnetic side of the transition. We study the experimental observation of the instabilities, specifically addressing the trapping geometry and how phase-contrast imaging will reveal the emerging domain structure. These probes of the dynamical phenomena could allow experiments to detect the transition point and distinguish between the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic regimes.

  18. Defect-selective dry etching for quick and easy probing of hexagonal boron nitride domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinke; Lee, Joohyun; Park, Sangwoo; Woo, Hwi Je; Lee, Sungjoo; Song, Young Jae

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a new method to selectively etch the point defects or the boundaries of as-grown hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) films and flakes in situ on copper substrates using hydrogen and argon gases. The initial quality of the chemical vapor deposition-grown hBN films and flakes was confirmed by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Different gas flow ratios of Ar/H2 were then employed to etch the same quality of samples and it was found that etching with hydrogen starts from the point defects and grows epitaxially, which helps in confirming crystalline orientations. However, etching with argon is sensitive to line defects (boundaries) and helps in visualizing the domain size. Finally, based on this defect-selective dry etching technique, it could be visualized that the domains of a polycrystalline hBN monolayer merged together with many parts, even with those that grew from a single nucleation seed.

  19. Dynamic interactions between visual working memory and saccade target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneegans, Sebastian; Spencer, John P.; Schöner, Gregor; Hwang, Seongmin; Hollingworth, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recent psychophysical experiments have shown that working memory for visual surface features interacts with saccadic motor planning, even in tasks where the saccade target is unambiguously specified by spatial cues. Specifically, a match between a memorized color and the color of either the designated target or a distractor stimulus influences saccade target selection, saccade amplitudes, and latencies in a systematic fashion. To elucidate these effects, we present a dynamic neural field model in combination with new experimental data. The model captures the neural processes underlying visual perception, working memory, and saccade planning relevant to the psychophysical experiment. It consists of a low-level visual sensory representation that interacts with two separate pathways: a spatial pathway implementing spatial attention and saccade generation, and a surface feature pathway implementing color working memory and feature attention. Due to bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and feature attention in the model, the working memory content can indirectly exert an effect on perceptual processing in the low-level sensory representation. This in turn biases saccadic movement planning in the spatial pathway, allowing the model to quantitatively reproduce the observed interaction effects. The continuous coupling between representations in the model also implies that modulation should be bidirectional, and model simulations provide specific predictions for complementary effects of saccade target selection on visual working memory. These predictions were empirically confirmed in a new experiment: Memory for a sample color was biased toward the color of a task-irrelevant saccade target object, demonstrating the bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and perceptual processing. PMID:25228628

  20. Dynamic interactions between visual working memory and saccade target selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneegans, Sebastian; Spencer, John P; Schöner, Gregor; Hwang, Seongmin; Hollingworth, Andrew

    2014-09-16

    Recent psychophysical experiments have shown that working memory for visual surface features interacts with saccadic motor planning, even in tasks where the saccade target is unambiguously specified by spatial cues. Specifically, a match between a memorized color and the color of either the designated target or a distractor stimulus influences saccade target selection, saccade amplitudes, and latencies in a systematic fashion. To elucidate these effects, we present a dynamic neural field model in combination with new experimental data. The model captures the neural processes underlying visual perception, working memory, and saccade planning relevant to the psychophysical experiment. It consists of a low-level visual sensory representation that interacts with two separate pathways: a spatial pathway implementing spatial attention and saccade generation, and a surface feature pathway implementing color working memory and feature attention. Due to bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and feature attention in the model, the working memory content can indirectly exert an effect on perceptual processing in the low-level sensory representation. This in turn biases saccadic movement planning in the spatial pathway, allowing the model to quantitatively reproduce the observed interaction effects. The continuous coupling between representations in the model also implies that modulation should be bidirectional, and model simulations provide specific predictions for complementary effects of saccade target selection on visual working memory. These predictions were empirically confirmed in a new experiment: Memory for a sample color was biased toward the color of a task-irrelevant saccade target object, demonstrating the bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and perceptual processing. © 2014 ARVO.

  1. Selective Labeling of Proteins on Living Cell Membranes Using Fluorescent Nanodiamond Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Sotoma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The impeccable photostability of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs is an ideal property for use in fluorescence imaging of proteins in living cells. However, such an application requires highly specific labeling of the target proteins with FNDs. Furthermore, the surface of unmodified FNDs tends to adsorb biomolecules nonspecifically, which hinders the reliable targeting of proteins with FNDs. Here, we combined hyperbranched polyglycerol modification of FNDs with the β-lactamase-tag system to develop a strategy for selective imaging of the protein of interest in cells. The combination of these techniques enabled site-specific labeling of Interleukin-18 receptor alpha chain, a membrane receptor, with FNDs, which eventually enabled tracking of the diffusion trajectory of FND-labeled proteins on the membrane surface.

  2. Electron transfer driven decomposition of adenine and selected analogs as probed by experimental and theoretical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, T.; Mendes, M.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Eden, S.; García, G.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.; Limão-Vieira, P.

    2018-04-01

    We report on a combined experimental and theoretical study of electron-transfer-induced decomposition of adenine (Ad) and a selection of analog molecules in collisions with potassium (K) atoms. Time-of-flight negative ion mass spectra have been obtained in a wide collision energy range (6-68 eV in the centre-of-mass frame), providing a comprehensive investigation of the fragmentation patterns of purine (Pu), adenine (Ad), 9-methyl adenine (9-mAd), 6-dimethyl adenine (6-dimAd), and 2-D adenine (2-DAd). Following our recent communication about selective hydrogen loss from the transient negative ions (TNIs) produced in these collisions [T. Cunha et al., J. Chem. Phys. 148, 021101 (2018)], this work focuses on the production of smaller fragment anions. In the low-energy part of the present range, several dissociation channels that are accessible in free electron attachment experiments are absent from the present mass spectra, notably NH2 loss from adenine and 9-methyl adenine. This can be understood in terms of a relatively long transit time of the K+ cation in the vicinity of the TNI tending to enhance the likelihood of intramolecular electron transfer. In this case, the excess energy can be redistributed through the available degrees of freedom inhibiting fragmentation pathways. Ab initio theoretical calculations were performed for 9-methyl adenine (9-mAd) and adenine (Ad) in the presence of a potassium atom and provided a strong basis for the assignment of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals accessed in the collision process.

  3. A dihydrazone based fluorescent probe for selective determination of Al{sup 3+} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratap Singh, Divya; Singh, Vinod P., E-mail: singvp@yahoo.co.in

    2014-11-15

    A highly selective fluorescent sensor N,N′-bis((2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yl)methylene) oxalohydrazide (H{sub 2}ohn) for the determination of Al{sup 3+} ions was synthesized and characterized by different physico-chemical and spectroscopic techniques. The single crystal structure of H{sub 2}ohn receptor has also been reported. The H{sub 2}ohn shows an enhanced fluorescence in the presence of Al{sup 3+} ions in ethanol–water (2:3 v/v) solution. Other cations viz. Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+} show no appreciable change in fluorescence intensity. The binding mode of H{sub 2}ohn receptor with Al{sup 3+} was studied by UV–visible, fluorescence and {sup 1}H NMR titrations. The receptor acts as a dibasic hexadentate ligand and interacts with two Al{sup 3+} ions with a high binding constant K{sub B}=2.62×10{sup 11} M{sup −2}. The lowest detection limit for Al{sup 3+} complex of H{sub 2}ohn was determined to be 8.56×10{sup −10} M. The structures of H{sub 2}ohn and its Al(III) complex were also optimized by DFT calculations. - Highlights: • A dihydrazone based fluorescent sensor is synthesized. • Characterized by IR, NMR, UV−visible and mass spectral analysis. • The receptor serves as a selective fluorescent sensor for Al{sup 3+} over other cations. • The sensing property is monitored by UV−visible, fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. • A high binding constant of the receptor with Al{sup 3+} is reported here.

  4. Probing the dynamics of complexed local anesthetics via neutron scattering spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longo Martins, Murillo; Eckert, Juergen; Jacobsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Since potential changes in the dynamics and mobility of drugs upon complexation for delivery may affect their ultimate efficacy, we have investigated the dynamics of two local anesthetic molecules, bupivacaine (BVC, C18H28N2O) and ropivacaine (RVC, C17H26N2O), in both their crystalline forms...

  5. Degeneracy-driven self-structuring dynamics in selective repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamas, Sergei P; Bell, Jonathan

    2009-08-01

    Numerous biological interactions, such as interactions between T cell receptors or antibodies with antigens, interactions between enzymes and substrates, or interactions between predators and prey are often not strictly specific. In such less specific, or "sloppy," systems, referred to here as degenerate systems, a given unit of a diverse resource (antigens, enzymatic substrates, prey) is at risk of being recognized and consumed by multiple consumers (lymphocytes, enzymes, predators). In this study, we model generalized degenerate consumer-resource systems of Lotka-Volterra and Verhulst types. In the degenerate systems of Lotka-Volterra, there is a continuum of types of consumer and resource based on variation of a single trait (characteristic, or preference). The consumers experience competition for a continuum of resource types. This non-local interaction system is modeled with partial differential-integral equations and shows spontaneous self-structuring of the consumer population that depends on the degree of interaction degeneracy between resource and consumer, but does not mirror the distribution of resource. We also show that the classical Verhulst (i.e. logistic) single population model can be generalized to a degenerate model, which shows qualitative behavior similar to that in the degenerate Lotka-Volterra model. These results provide better insight into the dynamics of selective systems in biology, suggesting that adaptation of degenerate repertoires is not a simple "mirroring" of the environment by the "fittest" elements of population.

  6. High-throughput platform assay technology for the discovery of pre-microrna-selective small molecule probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Daniel A; Song, James M; Garner, Amanda L

    2015-01-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) play critical roles in human development and disease. As such, the targeting of miRNAs is considered attractive as a novel therapeutic strategy. A major bottleneck toward this goal, however, has been the identification of small molecule probes that are specific for select RNAs and methods that will facilitate such discovery efforts. Using pre-microRNAs as proof-of-concept, herein we report a conceptually new and innovative approach for assaying RNA-small molecule interactions. Through this platform assay technology, which we term catalytic enzyme-linked click chemistry assay or cat-ELCCA, we have designed a method that can be implemented in high throughput, is virtually free of false readouts, and is general for all nucleic acids. Through cat-ELCCA, we envision the discovery of selective small molecule ligands for disease-relevant miRNAs to promote the field of RNA-targeted drug discovery and further our understanding of the role of miRNAs in cellular biology.

  7. Surface-modified CdS nanoparticles as a fluorescent probe for the selective detection of cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negi, Devendra P S; Chanu, T Inakhunbi

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel method for the selective detection of cysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, which plays a crucial role in many important biological functions such as protein folding. Surface-modified colloidal CdS nanoparticles have been used as a fluorescent probe to selectively detect cysteine in the presence of other amino acids in the micromolar concentration range. Cysteine quenches the emission of CdS in the 0.5-10 μM concentration range, whereas the other amino acids do not affect its emission. Among the other amino acids, histidine is most efficient in quenching the emission of the CdS nanoparticles. The sulfur atom of cysteine plays a crucial role in the quenching process in the 0.5-10 μM concentration range. Cysteine is believed to quench the emission of the CdS nanoparticles by binding to their surface via its negatively charged sulfur atom. This method can potentially be applied for its detection in biological samples.

  8. Dynamic stereoscopic selective visual attention (dssva): integrating motion and shape with depth in video segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    López Bonal, María Teresa; Fernández Caballero, Antonio; Saiz Valverde, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Depth inclusion as an important parameter for dynamic selective visual attention is presented in this article. The model introduced in this paper is based on two previously developed models, dynamic selective visual attention and visual stereoscopy, giving rise to the so-called dynamic stereoscopic selective visual attention method. The three models are based on the accumulative computation problem-solving method. This paper shows how software reusability enables enhancing results in vision r...

  9. Inversion of membrane surface charge by trivalent cations probed with a cation-selective channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnev, Philip A; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2012-11-13

    We demonstrate that the cation-selective channel formed by gramicidin A can be used as a reliable sensor for studying the multivalent ion accumulation at the surfaces of charged lipid membranes and the "charge inversion" phenomenon. In asymmetrically charged membranes with the individual leaflets formed from pure negative and positive lipids bathed by 0.1 M CsCl solutions the channel exhibits current rectification, which is comparable to that of a typical n/p semiconductor diode. We show that even at these highly asymmetrical conditions the channel conductance can be satisfactorily described by the electrodiffusion equation in the constant field approximation but, due to predictable limitations, only when the applied voltages do not exceed 50 mV. Analysis of the changes in the voltage-dependent channel conductance upon addition of trivalent cations allows us to gauge their interactions with the membrane surface. The inversion of the sign of the effective surface charge takes place at the concentrations, which correlate with the cation size. Specifically, these concentrations are close to 0.05 mM for lanthanum, 0.25 mM for hexaamminecobalt, and 4 mM for spermidine.

  10. Development of an iron-selective antioxidant probe with protective effects on neuronal function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpo García-Beltrán

    Full Text Available Iron accumulation, oxidative stress and calcium signaling dysregulation are common pathognomonic signs of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson´s and Alzheimer's diseases, Friedreich ataxia and Huntington's disease. Given their therapeutic potential, the identification of multifunctional compounds that suppress these damaging features is highly desirable. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of N-(1,3-dihydroxy-2-(hydroxymethylpropan-2-yl-2-(7-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromen-4-ylacetamide, named CT51, which exhibited potent free radical neutralizing activity both in vitro and in cells. CT51 bound Fe2+ with high selectivity and Fe3+ with somewhat lower affinity. Cyclic voltammetric analysis revealed irreversible binding of Fe3+ to CT51, an important finding since stopping Fe2+/Fe3+ cycling in cells should prevent hydroxyl radical production resulting from the Fenton-Haber-Weiss cycle. When added to human neuroblastoma cells, CT51 freely permeated the cell membrane and distributed to both mitochondria and cytoplasm. Intracellularly, CT51 bound iron reversibly and protected against lipid peroxidation. Treatment of primary hippocampal neurons with CT51 reduced the sustained calcium release induced by an agonist of ryanodine receptor-calcium channels. These protective properties of CT51 on cellular function highlight its possible therapeutic use in diseases with significant oxidative, iron and calcium dysregulation.

  11. E917 experiment: Probing the dynamics of HI collisions + searching for the QGP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogilvie, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Experiment E917 has two main goals: to understand and probe the detailed mechanism of hadronic rescattering in HI collisions and to systematically search for a small volume of QGP. Correlated, discrete changes in sensitive QGP signatures as a function of both centrality and beam energy could indicate the presence of new physics. A precursor to the QGP is the possible change of hadronic properties in a dense medium. We will measure the φ and K * effective mass as a function of centrality to search for any change in the width or mass of these particles

  12. Hyperspectral Probing of Exciton dynamics and Multiplication in PbSe Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdor, I.; Sachs, H.; Roitblat, A.; Strasfeld, D.; Bawendi, M. G.; Ruhman, S.

    2013-03-01

    Height time hyperspectral near IR probing providing broad-band coverage is employed on PbSe nanocrystals, uncovering spectral evolution following high energy photo-excitation due to hot exciton relaxation and recombination. Separation of single, double and triple exciton state contributions to these spectra is demonstrated, and the mechanisms underlying the course of spectral evolution are investigated. In addition no sign of MEG was detected in this sample up to a photon energy 3.7 times that of the band gap.

  13. Hyperspectral Probing of Exciton dynamics and Multiplication in PbSe Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bawendi M.G.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Height time hyperspectral near IR probing providing broad-band coverage is employed on PbSe nanocrystals, uncovering spectral evolution following high energy photo-excitation due to hot exciton relaxation and recombination. Separation of single, double and triple exciton state contributions to these spectra is demonstrated, and the mechanisms underlying the course of spectral evolution are investigated. In addition no sign of MEG was detected in this sample up to a photon energy 3.7 times that of the band gap.

  14. Selection of the landing site in Isidis Planitia of Mars probe Beagle 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, J. C.; Seabrook, A. M.; Rothery, D. A.; Kim, J. R.; Pillinger, C. T.; Sims, M. R.; Golombek, M. P.; Duxbury, T.; Head, J. W.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Mitchell, K. L.; Muller, J.-P.; Lewis, S. R.; Moncrieff, C.; Wright, I. P.; Grady, M. M.; Morley, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes selection and characterization of the landing site for the Mars 2004 Beagle 2 mission. The site is within Isidis Planitia between 10°-12°N, 266°-274°W, centered at 11.6°N, 269.5°W. This is at low elevation (-3600 to -3900 m MOLA), is flat (MOLA RMS slope = 0.57°), radar data suggest a smoother surface at decimeter to meter scales than the Pathfinder site and it has a moderate rock abundance (2-17%, mean 11%). In addition to this, Isidis shows evidence for concentration and remobilization of volatiles. In particular, the basin contains conical landforms. We favor models involving the formation of tuff cones during magma-ice interaction. Structures identified as dykes in MOC images may be remnants of magma conduits. The pattern of bulk thermal inertia in Isidis (higher values of 500 Jm-2s-0.5K-1 around the SW-S-E margin decreasing toward the center and north) suggests that an influx of sediment spread from the Noachian areas around the southern half of the basin over the basin floor. The coarse, higher thermal inertia material was deposited closest to the sediment source. The variable state of erosion of the tuff cones suggests that they formed intermittently over a long period of time during Amazonian and possibly Hesperian epochs. Geologically recent resurfacing of Isidis has also occurred by aeolian processes, and this is shown by a deficit in impact craters duricrust.

  15. Insights into structural and dynamical features of water at halloysite interfaces probed by DFT and classical molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, Davide; Pedone, Alfonso; Mancini, Giordano; Duce, Celia; Tiné, Maria Rosaria; Barone, Vincenzo

    2016-01-21

    Density functional theory calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the structure and dynamics of water molecules on kaolinite surfaces and confined in the interlayer of a halloysite model of nanometric dimension. The first technique allowed us to accurately describe the structure of the tetrahedral-octahedral slab of kaolinite in vacuum and in interaction with water molecules and to assess the performance of two widely employed empirical force fields to model water/clay interfaces. Classical molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the hydrogen bond network structure and dynamics of water adsorbed on kaolinite surfaces and confined in the halloysite interlayer. The results are in nice agreement with the few experimental data available in the literature, showing a pronounced ordering and reduced mobility of water molecules at the hydrophilic octahedral surfaces of kaolinite and confined in the halloysite interlayer, with respect to water interacting with the hydrophobic tetrahedral surfaces and in the bulk. Finally, this investigation provides new atomistic insights into the structural and dynamical properties of water-clay interfaces, which are of fundamental importance for both natural processes and industrial applications.

  16. Probing heterogeneous dynamics from spatial density correlation in glass-forming liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Wei; Zhu, You-Liang; Sun, Zhao-Yan

    2016-12-01

    We numerically investigate the connection between spatial density correlation and dynamical heterogeneity in glass-forming liquids. We demonstrate that the cluster size defined by the spatial aggregation of densely packed particles (DPPs) can better capture the difference between the dynamics of the Lennard-Jones glass model and the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen truncation model than the commonly used pair correlation functions. More interestingly, we compare the mobility of DPPs and loosely packed particles, and we find that high local density correlates well with slow dynamics in systems with relatively hard repulsive interactions but links to mobile ones in the system with soft repulsive interactions at one relaxation time scale. Our results show clear evidence that the above model dependence behavior stems from the hopping motion of DPPs at the end of the caging stage due to the compressive nature of soft repulsive spheres, which activates the dynamics of DPPs in the α relaxation stage.

  17. Action Potential Dynamics in Fine Axons Probed with an Axonally Targeted Optical Voltage Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yihe; Bayguinov, Peter O; Jackson, Meyer B

    2017-01-01

    The complex and malleable conduction properties of axons determine how action potentials propagate through extensive axonal arbors to reach synaptic terminals. The excitability of axonal membranes plays a major role in neural circuit function, but because most axons are too thin for conventional electrical recording, their properties remain largely unexplored. To overcome this obstacle, we used a genetically encoded hybrid voltage sensor (hVOS) harboring an axonal targeting motif. Expressing this probe in transgenic mice enabled us to monitor voltage changes optically in two populations of axons in hippocampal slices, the large axons of dentate granule cells (mossy fibers) in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region and the much finer axons of hilar mossy cells in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Action potentials propagated with distinct velocities in each type of axon. Repetitive firing broadened action potentials in both populations, but at an intermediate frequency the degree of broadening differed. Repetitive firing also attenuated action potential amplitudes in both mossy cell and granule cell axons. These results indicate that the features of use-dependent action potential broadening, and possible failure, observed previously in large nerve terminals also appear in much finer unmyelinated axons. Subtle differences in the frequency dependences could influence the propagation of activity through different pathways to excite different populations of neurons. The axonally targeted hVOS probe used here opens up the diverse repertoire of neuronal processes to detailed biophysical study.

  18. First selection, then influence : Developmental differences in friendship dynamics regarding academic achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gremmen, Mariola Claudia; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Steglich, Christian; Veenstra, René

    This study concerns peer selection and influence dynamics in early adolescents' friendships regarding academic achievement. Using longitudinal social network analysis (RSiena), both selection and influence processes were investigated for students' average grades and their cluster-specific grades

  19. An NBD derivative of the selective rat toxicant norbormide as a new probe for living cell imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio D'amore

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Norbormide (NRB is a unique compound that acts directly on rat vascular myocytes to trigger a contractile process, through an as yet unknown mechanism, which results in the selective contraction of rat peripheral arteries. To gain insight into the mechanisms involved in NRB rat-selective activity, we investigated the subcellular distribution of NRB-AF12, a nitrobenzodiazole (NBD-derivative of NRB, in living NRB-sensitive and NRB-insensitive cells. In both cell types, NRB-AF12 localised to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, Golgi apparatus, mitochondria, lysosomes and endosomes; however, in NRB-sensitive cells, the fluorescence also extended to the plasma membrane. NRB-AF12 was rapidly internalised into the cells, could easily be washed out and then reloaded back into the same cells, all with a high degree of reproducibility. Cells exposed for 24 h to NRB-AF12 did not show apparent signs of toxicity, even at concentrations of the dye (10 µM much higher than those required for fluorescence labelling (500 ηM. The distribution pattern of NRB-AF12 fluorescence was near identical to that of ER-Tracker® (Er-Tr, a fluorescent derivative of glibenclamide, a known KATP channel blocker. Displacement tests did not demonstrate, but at the same time did not rule out the possibility of a common target for ER-Tr, NRB-AF12, NRB and glibenclamide. On the basis of these results we hypothesize a common target site for NRB-AF12 and ER-Tr, and a similar target profile for norbormide and glibenclamide, and propose NRB-AF12 as an alternative fluorescence probe to ER-Tracker. Furthermore, NRB-based fluorescence derivatives could be designed to selectively label single cellular structures.

  20. Dynamics of Phenanthrenequinone on Carbon Nano-Onion Surfaces Probed by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Gilbert M.; Overbury, Steven H.; Mavila Chathoth, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    We used quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) to study the dynamics of phenanthrenequinone (PQ) on the surface of onion-like carbon (OLC), or so called carbon onions, as a function of surface coverage and temperature. For both the high- and low-coverage samples, we observed two diffusion processes; a faster process and nearly an order of magnitude slower process. On the high-coverage surface, the slow diffusion process is of long-range translational character, whereas the fast diffusion process is spatially localized on the length scale of ∼ 4.7. On the low-coverage surface, both diffusion processes are spatially localized; on the same length scale of ∼ 4.7 for the fast diffusion and a somewhat larger length scale for the slow diffusion. Arrhenius temperature dependence is observed except for the long-range diffusion on the high-coverage surface. We attribute the fast diffusion process to the generic localized in-cage dynamics of PQ molecules, and the slow diffusion process to the long-range translational dynamics of PQ molecules, which, depending on the coverage, may be either spatially restricted, or long-range. On the low-coverage surface, uniform surface coverage is not attained, and the PQ molecules experience the effect of spatial constraints on their long-range translational dynamics. Unexpectedly, the dynamics of PQ molecules on OLC as a function of temperature and surface coverage bears qualitative resemblance to the dynamics of water molecules on oxide surfaces, including practically temperature-independent residence times for the low-coverage surface. The dynamics features that we observed may be universal across different classes of surface adsorbates.

  1. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia probed by both calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Clément; Fresnais, Jérôme; Peyre, Véronique; Dupuis, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.dupuis@upmc.fr

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using combined calorimetric and newly implemented dynamic hysteresis measurements for two sets of well characterized size-sorted maghemite nanoparticles (with diameters of about 10 nm and 20 nm) dispersed in water and in glycerol. Our primary goal was to assess the influence of viscosity on the heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles described in terms of specific loss power (SLP or specific absorption rate, SAR) and dynamic hysteresis. In particular, we aimed to investigate how this SLP depends on the transition from Néelian to Brownian behavior of nanoparticles expected to occur between 10 nm and 20 nm (for maghemite) and dependent on the viscosity. While we observed a good agreement between calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements, we found that the SLP measured for the different systems do not depend noticeably on the viscosity of solvent. Calculations performed according to Rosensweig's linear model [1] allow us to quantitatively reproduce our results at low field intensities, provided we use a value for the magnetic anisotropy constant much smaller than the one commonly used in the literature. This raises the question of the temperature dependance of the magnetic anisotropy constant and its relevance for a quantitative description of MFH. - Highlights: • Dynamic hysteresis measurements are a promising tool to study magnetic hyperthermia. • Dynamic hysteresis cycles can be reproduced using a simple model. • The effect of viscosity on hyperthermia of maghemite is weaker than expected.

  2. Hydrogen dynamics in the low temperature phase of LiBH{sub 4} probed by quasielastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remhof, Arndt, E-mail: arndt.remhof@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Institute for Materials Science and Technology, Hydrogen and Energy, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Züttel, Andreas [Empa, Swiss Federal Institute for Materials Science and Technology, Hydrogen and Energy, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Ramirez-Cuesta, Timmy; García-Sakai, Victoria [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Frick, Bernhard [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38002 Grenoble (France)

    2013-12-12

    Highlights: • Inelastic fixed window sans offer new possibilities in neutron backscattering spectrometers. • Two different kind of reorientational motion were identified in the low temperature phase of LiBH{sub 4}. • Thermally activated jump rotation. - Abstract: LiBH{sub 4} contains 18.5 wt% hydrogen and undergoes a structural phase transition (orthorhombic → hexagonal) at 381 K which is associated with a large increase in hydrogen and lithium solid-state mobility. We investigated the hydrogen dynamics in the low temperature phase of LiBH{sub 4} by quasielastic neutron scattering, including a new kind of inelastic fixed window scan (IFWS). In the temperature range from 175 to 380 K the H-dynamics is dominated by thermally activated rotational jumps of the [BH{sub 4}]{sup −} anion around the c3 axis with an activation energy of about 162 meV. In agreement with earlier NMR data, a second type of thermally activated motion with an activation energy of about 232 meV could be identified using the IFWS. The present study of hydrogen dynamics in LiBH{sub 4} illustrates the feasibility of using IFWS on neutron backscattering spectrometers as a probe of localised motion.

  3. Hidden Markov Model of atomic quantum jump dynamics in an optically probed cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, S.; Molmer, K.; Alt, W.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the quantum jumps of an atom interacting with a cavity field. The strong atom- field interaction makes the cavity transmission depend on the time dependent atomic state, and we present a Hidden Markov Model description of the atomic state dynamics which is conditioned in a Bayesian...... manner on the detected signal. We suggest that small variations in the observed signal may be due to spatial motion of the atom within the cavity, and we represent the atomic system by a number of hidden states to account for both the small variations and the internal state jump dynamics. In our theory...

  4. Pump-probe spectroscopy of spin-injection dynamics in double quantum wells of diluted magnetic semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishibayashi, K.; Aoshima, I.; Souma, I.; Murayama, A.; Oka, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Dynamics of spin injection has been investigated in a double quantum well (DQW) composed of a diluted magnetic semiconductor by the pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy in magnetic field. The DQW consists of a non-magnetic well (NMW) of CdTe and a magnetic well (MW) of Cd 0.92 Mn 0.08 Te. The MW shows a transient absorption saturation in the exciton band for more than 200 ps after the optical pumping, while the exciton photoluminescence does not arise from the MW. In the NMW, the circular polarization degree of the transient absorption saturation shows an increase with increasing time. The results are interpreted by the individual tunneling of spin-polarized electrons and holes from the MW to the NMW with different tunneling times. Depolarization processes of the carrier spins in the MW and the NMW are also discussed

  5. Electron charge and spin delocalization revealed in the optically probed longitudinal and transverse spin dynamics in n -GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belykh, V. V.; Kavokin, K. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Bayer, M.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of the electron spin dynamics as consequence of carrier delocalization in n -type GaAs is investigated by the recently developed extended pump-probe Kerr/Faraday rotation spectroscopy. We find that isolated electrons localized on donors demonstrate a prominent difference between the longitudinal and transverse spin relaxation rates in a magnetic field, which is almost absent in the metallic phase. The inhomogeneous transverse dephasing time T2* of the spin ensemble strongly increases upon electron delocalization as a result of motional narrowing that can be induced by increasing either the donor concentration or the temperature. An unexpected relation between T2* and the longitudinal spin relaxation time T1 is found, namely, that their product is about constant, as explained by the magnetic field effect on the spin diffusion. We observe a two-stage longitudinal spin relaxation, which suggests the establishment of spin temperature in the system of exchange-coupled donor-bound electrons.

  6. Ultrafast photoinduced carrier dynamics in GaNAs probed using femtosecond time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Yasuhiko; Aoyama, Masahiro; Kondo, Hiroyuki; Taninaka, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2007-01-01

    The combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) with optical excitation using ultrashort laser pulses enables us, in principle, to simultaneously obtain ultimate spatial and temporal resolutions. We have developed the shaken-pulse-pair-excited STM (SPPX-STM) and succeeded in detecting a weak time-resolved tunnelling current signal from a low-temperature-grown GaNAs sample. To clarify the underlying physics in SPPX-STM measurements, we performed optical pump-probe reflectivity measurements with a wavelength-changeable ultrashort-pulse laser. By comparing the results obtained from the two methods with an analysis based on the nonlinear relationship between the photocarrier density and tunnelling current, we obtained a comprehensive explanation that the photocarrier dynamics is reflected in the SPPX-STM signal through the surface photovoltage effect

  7. Diffusion-assisted selective dynamical recoupling: A new approach to measure background gradients in magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Shemesh, Noam; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-02-01

    Dynamical decoupling, a generalization of the original NMR spin-echo sequence, is becoming increasingly relevant as a tool for reducing decoherence in quantum systems. Such sequences apply non-equidistant refocusing pulses for optimizing the coupling between systems, and environmental fluctuations characterized by a given noise spectrum. One such sequence, dubbed Selective Dynamical Recoupling (SDR) [P. E. S. Smith, G. Bensky, G. A. Álvarez, G. Kurizki, and L. Frydman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 109, 5958 (2012)], allows one to coherently reintroduce diffusion decoherence effects driven by fluctuations arising from restricted molecular diffusion [G. A. Álvarez, N. Shemesh, and L. Frydman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 080404 (2013)]. The fully-refocused, constant-time, and constant-number-of-pulses nature of SDR also allows one to filter out "intrinsic" T1 and T2 weightings, as well as pulse errors acting as additional sources of decoherence. This article explores such features when the fluctuations are now driven by unrestricted molecular diffusion. In particular, we show that diffusion-driven SDR can be exploited to investigate the decoherence arising from the frequency fluctuations imposed by internal gradients. As a result, SDR presents a unique way of probing and characterizing these internal magnetic fields, given an a priori known free diffusion coefficient. This has important implications in studies of structured systems, including porous media and live tissues, where the internal gradients may serve as fingerprints for the system's composition or structure. The principles of this method, along with full analytical solutions for the unrestricted diffusion-driven modulation of the SDR signal, are presented. The potential of this approach is demonstrated with the generation of a novel source of MRI contrast, based on the background gradients active in an ex vivo mouse brain. Additional features and limitations of this new method are discussed.

  8. Diffusion-assisted selective dynamical recoupling: A new approach to measure background gradients in magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Shemesh, Noam; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Dynamical decoupling, a generalization of the original NMR spin-echo sequence, is becoming increasingly relevant as a tool for reducing decoherence in quantum systems. Such sequences apply non-equidistant refocusing pulses for optimizing the coupling between systems, and environmental fluctuations characterized by a given noise spectrum. One such sequence, dubbed Selective Dynamical Recoupling (SDR) [P. E. S. Smith, G. Bensky, G. A. Álvarez, G. Kurizki, and L. Frydman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 109, 5958 (2012)], allows one to coherently reintroduce diffusion decoherence effects driven by fluctuations arising from restricted molecular diffusion [G. A. Álvarez, N. Shemesh, and L. Frydman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 080404 (2013)]. The fully-refocused, constant-time, and constant-number-of-pulses nature of SDR also allows one to filter out “intrinsic” T 1 and T 2 weightings, as well as pulse errors acting as additional sources of decoherence. This article explores such features when the fluctuations are now driven by unrestricted molecular diffusion. In particular, we show that diffusion-driven SDR can be exploited to investigate the decoherence arising from the frequency fluctuations imposed by internal gradients. As a result, SDR presents a unique way of probing and characterizing these internal magnetic fields, given an a priori known free diffusion coefficient. This has important implications in studies of structured systems, including porous media and live tissues, where the internal gradients may serve as fingerprints for the system's composition or structure. The principles of this method, along with full analytical solutions for the unrestricted diffusion-driven modulation of the SDR signal, are presented. The potential of this approach is demonstrated with the generation of a novel source of MRI contrast, based on the background gradients active in an ex vivo mouse brain. Additional features and limitations of this new method are discussed

  9. Probing Lipid Coating Dynamics of Quantum Dot Core Micelles via Forster Resonance Energy Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiming; Schapotschnikow, Philipp; Skajaa, Torjus; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Meijerink, Andries

    2014-01-01

    Lipid coated nanocrystal assemblies are among the most extensively investigated nanoparticle platforms for biomedical imaging and therapeutic purposes. However, very few efforts have been addressed to the lipid coating exchange dynamics in such systems, which is key to our understanding of the

  10. Ultrafast Dynamics in Light-Driven Molecular Rotary Motors Probed by Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, Christopher R.; Conyard, Jamie; Heisler, Ismael A.; Jones, Garth; Frost, James; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Meech, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    Photochemical isomerization in sterically crowded chiral alkenes is the driving force for molecular rotary motors in nanoscale machines. Here the excited-state dynamics and structural evolution of the prototypical light-driven rotary motor are followed on the ultrafast time scale by femtosecond

  11. Potent and selective chemical probe of hypoxic signalling downstream of HIF-α hydroxylation via VHL inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Julianty; Galdeano, Carles; Soares, Pedro; Gadd, Morgan S.; Grzes, Katarzyna M.; Ellis, Lucy; Epemolu, Ola; Shimamura, Satoko; Bantscheff, Marcus; Grandi, Paola; Read, Kevin D.; Cantrell, Doreen A.; Rocha, Sonia; Ciulli, Alessio

    2016-11-01

    Chemical strategies to using small molecules to stimulate hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) activity and trigger a hypoxic response under normoxic conditions, such as iron chelators and inhibitors of prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) enzymes, have broad-spectrum activities and off-target effects. Here we disclose VH298, a potent VHL inhibitor that stabilizes HIF-α and elicits a hypoxic response via a different mechanism, that is the blockade of the VHL:HIF-α protein-protein interaction downstream of HIF-α hydroxylation by PHD enzymes. We show that VH298 engages with high affinity and specificity with VHL as its only major cellular target, leading to selective on-target accumulation of hydroxylated HIF-α in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion in different cell lines, with subsequent upregulation of HIF-target genes at both mRNA and protein levels. VH298 represents a high-quality chemical probe of the HIF signalling cascade and an attractive starting point to the development of potential new therapeutics targeting hypoxia signalling.

  12. Luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, highly sensitive and selective detection of minocycline

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; Peng, Rufang

    2014-11-01

    In this work, luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles (LuAuNPs) were used as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, sensitive and selective detection of minocycline (MC). The LuAuNPs were prepared by simple one-pot reduction of HAuCl4 with luminol, which exhibited a good chemiluminescence (CL) activity owing to the presence of luminol molecules on their surface and surface plasmon resonance absorption. In the absence of MC, the color of LuAuNPs was wine red and their size was relatively small (˜25 nm), which could react with silver nitrate, producing a strong CL emission. Upon the addition of MC at acidic buffer solutions, the electrostatic interaction between positively charged MC and negatively charged LuAuNPs caused the aggregation of LuAuNPs, generating a purple or blue color. Simultaneously, the aggregated LuAuNPs did not effectively react with silver nitrate, producing a weak CL emission. The signal change was linearly dependent on the logarithm of MC concentration in the range from 30 ng to 1.0 μg for colorimetric detection and from 10 ng to 1.0 μg for CL detection. With colorimetry, a detection limit of 22 ng was achieved, while the detection limit for CL detection modality was 9.7 ng.

  13. Luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, highly sensitive and selective detection of minocycline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yi; Peng, Rufang

    2014-01-01

    In this work, luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles (LuAuNPs) were used as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, sensitive and selective detection of minocycline (MC). The LuAuNPs were prepared by simple one-pot reduction of HAuCl 4 with luminol, which exhibited a good chemiluminescence (CL) activity owing to the presence of luminol molecules on their surface and surface plasmon resonance absorption. In the absence of MC, the color of LuAuNPs was wine red and their size was relatively small (∼25 nm), which could react with silver nitrate, producing a strong CL emission. Upon the addition of MC at acidic buffer solutions, the electrostatic interaction between positively charged MC and negatively charged LuAuNPs caused the aggregation of LuAuNPs, generating a purple or blue color. Simultaneously, the aggregated LuAuNPs did not effectively react with silver nitrate, producing a weak CL emission. The signal change was linearly dependent on the logarithm of MC concentration in the range from 30 ng to 1.0 μg for colorimetric detection and from 10 ng to 1.0 μg for CL detection. With colorimetry, a detection limit of 22 ng was achieved, while the detection limit for CL detection modality was 9.7 ng. (paper)

  14. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  15. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, T; Kiessling, T; Ossau, W; Molenkamp, L W; Biermann, K; Santos, P V

    2013-12-01

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast "white light" supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  16. Probing the hydrogen equilibrium and kinetics in zeolite imidazolate frameworks via molecular dynamics and quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantatosaki, Evangelia; Jobic, Hervé; Kolokolov, Daniil I; Karmakar, Shilpi; Biniwale, Rajesh; Papadopoulos, George K

    2013-01-21

    The problem of simulating processes involving equilibria and dynamics of guest sorbates within zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIF) by means of molecular dynamics (MD) computer experiments is of growing importance because of the promising role of ZIFs as molecular "traps" for clean energy applications. A key issue for validating such an atomistic modeling attempt is the possibility of comparing the MD results, with real experiments being able to capture analogous space and time scales to the ones pertained to the computer experiments. In the present study, this prerequisite is fulfilled through the quasi-elastic neutron scattering technique (QENS) for measuring self-diffusivity, by elaborating the incoherent scattering signal of hydrogen nuclei. QENS and MD experiments were performed in parallel to probe the hydrogen motion, for the first time in ZIF members. The predicted and measured dynamics behaviors show considerable concentration variation of the hydrogen self-diffusion coefficient in the two topologically different ZIF pore networks of this study, the ZIF-3 and ZIF-8. Modeling options such as the flexibility of the entire matrix versus a rigid framework version, the mobility of the imidazolate ligand, and the inclusion of quantum mechanical effects in the potential functions were examined in detail for the sorption thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen and also of deuterium, by employing MD combined with Widom averaging towards studying phase equilibria. The latter methodology ensures a rigorous and efficient way for post-processing the dynamics trajectory, thereby avoiding stochastic moves via Monte Carlo simulation, over the large number of configurational degrees of freedom a nonrigid framework encompasses.

  17. Dynamic regimes in YBCO in applied magnetic field probed by swept frequency microwave measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarti, S; Silva, E; Giura, M; Fastampa, R; Boffa, M; Cucolo, A M

    2004-01-01

    We report measurements of the microwave resistivity in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO), in the presence of an applied magnetic field. Measurements are performed as a function of frequency, over a continuum spectrum between 6 and 20 GHz, by means of a Corbino disc geometry. These data allow for a direct identification of different dynamical regimes in the dissipation of YBCO in the presence of an applied magnetic field. While at high temperatures a frequency independent resistivity is observed, at lower temperatures we find a marked frequency dependence. The line in the (H,T) plane at which this change in the dynamical regime is observed is clearly identified and discussed in terms of vortex motion and fluctuational resistivity

  18. Spin dynamics at level crossing in molecular AF rings probed by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, A. E-mail: lascialfari@fisicavolta.unipv.it; Borsa, F.; Julien, M.-H.; Micotti, E.; Furukawa, Y.; Jang, Z.H.; Cornia, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Horvatic, M.; Van Slageren, J

    2004-05-01

    The low-temperature spin dynamics in molecular rings with a finite number (N{<=}10) of magnetic ions was studied by means of {sup 1}H NMR. When an external magnetic field (B) induces a crossing between energy levels, peaks are observed in the spin-lattice relaxation rate of protons, 1/T{sub 1}(B), at constant temperature. We discuss similarities and differences in the data from three different rings: Fe10, Fe6:Li and Cr8.

  19. Spin dynamics at level crossing in molecular AF rings probed by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.; Julien, M.-H.; Micotti, E.; Furukawa, Y.; Jang, Z.H.; Cornia, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Horvatic, M.; Van Slageren, J.

    2004-01-01

    The low-temperature spin dynamics in molecular rings with a finite number (N≤10) of magnetic ions was studied by means of 1 H NMR. When an external magnetic field (B) induces a crossing between energy levels, peaks are observed in the spin-lattice relaxation rate of protons, 1/T 1 (B), at constant temperature. We discuss similarities and differences in the data from three different rings: Fe10, Fe6:Li and Cr8

  20. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics in InSb Probed by Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, A.H.; Shank, C.V.; Chin, A.H.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Shank, C.V.; Glover, T.E.; Leemans, W.P.; Balling, P.

    1999-01-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in laser-perturbed InSb are studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction with a novel femtosecond x-ray source. We report the first observation of a delay in the onset of lattice expansion, which we attribute to energy relaxation processes and lattice strain propagation. In addition, we observe direct indications of ultrafast disordering on a subpicosecond time scale. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  1. The dynamics of the Local Group as a probe of dark energy and modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Mota, David F.; Winther, Hans A.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we study the dynamics of the Local Group (LG) within the context of cosmological models beyond General Relativity (GR). Using observable kinematic quantities to identify candidate pairs, we build up samples of simulated LG-like objects drawing from f(R), symmetron, Dvali, Gabadadze & Porrati and quintessence N-body simulations together with their Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) counterparts featuring the same initial random phase realizations. The variables and intervals used to define LG-like objects are referred to as LG model; different models are used throughout this work and adapted to study their dynamical and kinematic properties. The aim is to determine how well the observed LG dynamics can be reproduced within cosmological theories beyond GR, We compute kinematic properties of samples drawn from alternative theories and ΛCDM and compare them to actual observations of the LG mass, velocity and position. As a consequence of the additional pull, pairwise tangential and radial velocities are enhanced in modified gravity and coupled dark energy with respect to ΛCDM inducing significant changes to the total angular momentum and energy of the LG. For example, in models such as f(R) and the symmetron this increase can be as large as 60 per cent, peaking well outside of the 95 per cent confidence region allowed by the data. This shows how simple considerations about the LG dynamics can lead to clear small-scale observational signatures for alternative scenarios, without the need of expensive high-resolution simulations.

  2. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia probed by both calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibert, Clément; Fresnais, Jérôme; Peyre, Véronique; Dupuis, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using combined calorimetric and newly implemented dynamic hysteresis measurements for two sets of well characterized size-sorted maghemite nanoparticles (with diameters of about 10 nm and 20 nm) dispersed in water and in glycerol. Our primary goal was to assess the influence of viscosity on the heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles described in terms of specific loss power (SLP or specific absorption rate, SAR) and dynamic hysteresis. In particular, we aimed to investigate how this SLP depends on the transition from Néelian to Brownian behavior of nanoparticles expected to occur between 10 nm and 20 nm (for maghemite) and dependent on the viscosity. While we observed a good agreement between calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements, we found that the SLP measured for the different systems do not depend noticeably on the viscosity of solvent. Calculations performed according to Rosensweig's linear model [1] allow us to quantitatively reproduce our results at low field intensities, provided we use a value for the magnetic anisotropy constant much smaller than the one commonly used in the literature. This raises the question of the temperature dependance of the magnetic anisotropy constant and its relevance for a quantitative description of MFH.

  3. A ratiometric rhodamine–naphthalimide pH selective probe built on the basis of a PAMAM light-harvesting architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamry, Khalid A.; Georgiev, Nikolai I.; El-Daly, Samy Abdullah; Taib, Layla A.; Bojinov, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    PAMAM light harvesting antenna of second generation was synthesized and investigated. Novel compound was configured as a wavelength-shifting bichromophoric molecule where the system surface is labeled with yellow-green emitting 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethylamino-1,8-naphthalimide “donor” units capable of absorbing light and efficiently transferring the energy to a focal Rhodamine 6G “acceptor”. Furthermore, the 1,8-naphthalimide periphery of the system was designed on the “fluorophore-spacer-receptor” format, capable of acting as a molecular fluorescence photoinduced electron transfer based probe. Due to the both effects, photoinduced electron transfer in the periphery of the system and pH dependent rhodamine core absorption, novel antenna is able to act as a selective ratiometric pH fluorescence probe in aqueous medium. Thus, the distinguishing features of light-harvesting systems (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) were successfully combined with the properties of classical ring-opening sensor systems, which may be beneficial for monitoring pH variations in complex samples. - Highlights: • PAMAM antenna decorated with Rhodamine 6G and 1,8-naphthalimides is synthesized. • Periphery of the antenna is designed as a PET based fluorescence probe. • System manifests excellent selective response to protons in aqueous medium. • Core emission of the systems is enhanced more than 10 times as a function of pH. • Bichromophoric system acts as a selective ratiometric probe in complex samples

  4. Temporal dynamics and neural architecture of action selection

    OpenAIRE

    Buc Calderon, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we pitted two views of action selection. On the one hand, a traditional view suggesting that action selection emerges from a sequential process whereby perception, cognition and action proceed serially and are subtended by distinct brain areas. On the other hand, an ecological view (formalized in the affordance competition hypothesis) advocating that action selection stems from the parallel implementation of potential action plans. In parallel, the competition between these act...

  5. Facial expression movement enhances the measurement of temporal dynamics of attentional bias in the dot-probe task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudek, Corrado; Ceccarini, Francesco; Sica, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    The facial dot-probe task is one of the most common experimental paradigms used to assess attentional bias toward emotional information. In recent years, however, the psychometric properties of this paradigm have been questioned. In the present study, attentional bias to emotional face stimuli was measured with dynamic and static images of realistic human faces in 97 college students (63 women) who underwent either a positive or a negative mood-induction prior to the experiment. We controlled the bottom-up salience of the stimuli in order to dissociate the top-down orienting of attention from the effects of the bottom-up physical properties of the stimuli. A Bayesian analysis of our results indicates that 1) the traditional global attentional bias index shows a low reliability, 2) reliability increases dramatically when biased attention is analyzed by extracting a series of bias estimations from trial-to-trial (Zvielli, Bernstein, & Koster, 2015), 3) dynamic expression of emotions strengthens biased attention to emotional information, and 4) mood-congruency facilitates the measurement of biased attention to emotional stimuli. These results highlight the importance of using ecologically valid stimuli in attentional bias research, together with the importance of estimating biased attention at the trial level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrafast Photodissociation Dynamics of the F State of Sulfur Dioxide by Femtosecond Time-Resolved Pump-Probe Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dong-Dong; Ni Qiang; Luo Si-Zuo; Zhang Jing; Liu Hang; Xu Hai-Feng; Jin Ming-Xing; Ding Da-Jun

    2011-01-01

    A femtosecond pump-probe method is employed to study the dissociation dynamics of sulfur dioxide. SO 2 molecules are excited to the F state by absorbing two photons of 267 nm femtosecond laser pulses, and ionized by 400 nm laser pulses at different delay times between the two lasers. Transients of both parent ions (SO + 2 ) and the fragment ions (SO + , S + and O + ) are observed. The SO + 2 transient can be well fitted to a biexponential decay comprising a fast and a slow component of 280 fs and 2.97 ps lifetimes, respectively. The SO + transient consists of two growth components of 270 fs and 2.50 ps. The results clearly show that the F state of SO 2 dissociates along an S-O bond. The transients of S + and O + , however, have different behavior, which consist of a fast growth and a long decay component. A possible mechanism of the fragment formation is discussed to understand the dissociation dynamics of the F state of SO 2 . (atomic and molecular physics)

  7. Single Molecular Level Probing of Structure and Dynamics of Papain Under Denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bhaswati; Chaudhury, Apala; Das, Nilimesh; Sen, Pratik

    2017-01-01

    Papain is a cysteine protease enzyme present in papaya and known to help in digesting peptide. Thus the structure and function of the active site of papain is of interest. The objective of present study is to unveil the overall structural transformation and the local structural change around the active site of papain as a function of chemical denaturant. Papain has been tagged at Cys-25 with a thiol specific fluorescence probe N-(7- dimethylamino-4-methylcoumarin-3-yl) iodoacetamide (DACIA). Guanidine hydrochloride (GnHCl) has been used as the chemical denaturant. Steady state, time-resolved, and single molecular level fluorescence techniques was applied to map the change in the local environment. It is found that papain undergoes a two-step denaturation in the presence of GnHCl. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopic (FCS) data indicate that the size (hydrodynamic diameter) of native papain is ~36.8 Å, which steadily increases to ~53 Å in the presence of 6M GnHCl. FCS study also reveals that the conformational fluctuation time of papain is 6.3 µs in its native state, which decreased to 2.7 µs in the presence of 0.75 M GnHCl. Upon further increase in GnHCl concentration the conformational fluctuation time increase monotonically till 6 M GnHCl, where the time constant is measured as 14 µs. On the other hand, the measurement of ellipticity, hence the helical structure, by circular dichroism spectroscopy is found to be incapable to capture such structural transformation. It is concluded that in the presence of small amount of GnHCl the active site of papain takes up a more compact structure (although the overall size increases) than in the native state, which has been designated as the intermediate state. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Dynamical scaling and critical scattering in pure and disordered ferromagnets probed by NSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alba, M. [LLB, CEA-CNRS UMR12, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France)]. E-mail: michel.alba@cea.fr; Pouget, S. [DRFMC/SPSMS, CEN-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Fouquet, P. [ILL, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Farago, B. [ILL, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Pappas, C. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Glienickerstr. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    We have studied the 3D Heisenberg ferromagnetic model system CdCr{sub 2} {sub x} In{sub 2-2} {sub x} S{sub 4} in the ferromagnetic and reentrant phases as a function of temperature and momentum transfer using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy. The results from the pure sample CdCr{sub 2}S{sub 4} are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the renormalization group theory. In the presence of disorder, we see the evolution from a simple critical ferromagnetic scattering with single fast relaxation times to a more complex slow dynamics characteristic of spin glasses.

  9. Probing the dynamics of 3He atoms adsorbed on MCM-41 with pulsed NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, C.; Masuhara, N.; Adams, J.; Lewkowitz, M.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2018-03-01

    We report measurements of the nuclear spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times for 3He adsorbed on MCM-41 for temperatures 0.08 < T < 1.2 K. Deviations from Curie behavior are observed at low temperatures. The relaxation times exhibit a two-component behavior representing the differing dynamics of the mobile quasi-free molecules in the center of the tubes compared to the adsorbed layer on the walls. The amplitudes of the two components provide an accurate measure of the number of fluid-like molecules traveling in the center of the nanotubes.

  10. Imaging the reactions of molecular dications: a new probe of dicationic reaction dynamics and energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan-Ping Hu, S.; Harper, S.M.; Price, S.D.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments which generated angularly resolved data to prove the dynamics of dication chemical reactions were performed using a position sensitive coincidence (PSCO) apparatus, to detect in coincidence both of the charged products from such reaction. It consists of a ion source, a hemispherical energy analyser, and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Initial experiments to test the apparatus performance were runned on the atomic electron transfer reaction: Ne 2+ + Ar → Ne + + Ar + . Angular distributions, translational and internal energies of the product ions were extracted, as well as the scattering diagram among other data. (nevyjel)

  11. Probing carrier dynamics of individual layers in a heterostructure using transient reflectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Salahuddin; Jayabalan, J., E-mail: jjaya@rrcat.gov.in; Singh, Asha; Yogi, Rachana; Chari, Rama [Laser Physics Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2015-09-21

    We report the wavelength dependent transient reflectivity measurements in AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructures having two-dimensional electron (or hole) gas near the interface. Using a multilayer model for transient reflectivity, we show that the magnitude and sign of contributions from the carriers in two-dimensional electron (or hole) gas and GaAs to the total signal depends on the wavelength. Further, it has been shown that it is possible to study the carrier dynamics in a given layer of a heterostructure by performing transient reflectivity at specific wavelengths.

  12. Probing carrier dynamics of individual layers in a heterostructure using transient reflectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Salahuddin; Jayabalan, J.; Singh, Asha; Yogi, Rachana; Chari, Rama

    2015-01-01

    We report the wavelength dependent transient reflectivity measurements in AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructures having two-dimensional electron (or hole) gas near the interface. Using a multilayer model for transient reflectivity, we show that the magnitude and sign of contributions from the carriers in two-dimensional electron (or hole) gas and GaAs to the total signal depends on the wavelength. Further, it has been shown that it is possible to study the carrier dynamics in a given layer of a heterostructure by performing transient reflectivity at specific wavelengths

  13. Scaling of F-actin network rheology to probe single filament elasticity and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardel, M L; Shin, J H; MacKintosh, F C; Mahadevan, L; Matsudaira, P A; Weitz, D A

    2004-10-29

    The linear and nonlinear viscoelastic response of networks of cross-linked and bundled cytoskeletal filaments demonstrates remarkable scaling with both frequency and applied prestress, which helps elucidate the origins of the viscoelasticity. The frequency dependence of the shear modulus reflects the underlying single-filament relaxation dynamics for 0.1-10 rad/sec. Moreover, the nonlinear strain stiffening of such networks exhibits a universal form as a function of prestress; this is quantitatively explained by the full force-extension relation of single semiflexible filaments.

  14. Using genomic DNA-based probe-selection to improve the sensitivity of high-density oligonucleotide arrays when applied to heterologous species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Townsend Henrik J

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High-density oligonucleotide (oligo arrays are a powerful tool for transcript profiling. Arrays based on GeneChip® technology are amongst the most widely used, although GeneChip® arrays are currently available for only a small number of plant and animal species. Thus, we have developed a method to improve the sensitivity of high-density oligonucleotide arrays when applied to heterologous species and tested the method by analysing the transcriptome of Brassica oleracea L., a species for which no GeneChip® array is available, using a GeneChip® array designed for Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. Genomic DNA from B. oleracea was labelled and hybridised to the ATH1-121501 GeneChip® array. Arabidopsis thaliana probe-pairs that hybridised to the B. oleracea genomic DNA on the basis of the perfect-match (PM probe signal were then selected for subsequent B. oleracea transcriptome analysis using a .cel file parser script to generate probe mask files. The transcriptional response of B. oleracea to a mineral nutrient (phosphorus; P stress was quantified using probe mask files generated for a wide range of gDNA hybridisation intensity thresholds. An example probe mask file generated with a gDNA hybridisation intensity threshold of 400 removed > 68 % of the available PM probes from the analysis but retained >96 % of available A. thaliana probe-sets. Ninety-nine of these genes were then identified as significantly regulated under P stress in B. oleracea, including the homologues of P stress responsive genes in A. thaliana. Increasing the gDNA hybridisation intensity thresholds up to 500 for probe-selection increased the sensitivity of the GeneChip® array to detect regulation of gene expression in B. oleracea under P stress by up to 13-fold. Our open-source software to create probe mask files is freely available http://affymetrix.arabidopsis.info/xspecies/ and may be used to facilitate transcriptomic analyses of a wide range of plant and animal

  15. Probing the Evaporation Dynamics of Ethanol/Gasoline Biofuel Blends Using Single Droplet Manipulation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, Stella; Miles, Rachael E H; McDonald, Craig; Belotti, Yuri; Reid, Jonathan P; Kiefer, Johannes; McGloin, David

    2015-12-24

    Using blends of bioethanol and gasoline as automotive fuel leads to a net decrease in the production of harmful emission compared to the use of pure fossil fuel. However, fuel droplet evaporation dynamics change depending on the mixing ratio. Here we use single particle manipulation techniques to study the evaporation dynamics of ethanol/gasoline blend microdroplets. The use of an electrodynamic balance enables measurements of the evaporation of individual droplets in a controlled environment, while optical tweezers facilitate studies of the behavior of droplets inside a spray. Hence, the combination of both methods is perfectly suited to obtain a complete picture of the evaporation process. The influence of adding varied amounts of ethanol to gasoline is investigated, and we observe that droplets with a greater fraction of ethanol take longer to evaporate. Furthermore, we find that our methods are sensitive enough to observe the presence of trace amounts of water in the droplets. A theoretical model, predicting the evaporation of ethanol and gasoline droplets in dry nitrogen gas, is used to explain the experimental results. Also a theoretical estimation of the saturation of the environment, with other aerosols, in the tweezers is carried out.

  16. Reduction Dynamics of Doped Ceria, Nickel Oxide, and Cermet Composites Probed Using In Situ Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Robert C; Shearing, Paul R; Brightman, Edward; Brett, Dan J L; Brandon, Nigel P; Cohen, Lesley F

    2016-01-01

    The redox properties of gadolinium doped ceria (CGO) and nickel oxide (NiO) composite cermets underpin the operation of solid oxide electrochemical cells. Although these systems have been widely studied, a full comprehension of the reaction dynamics at the interface of these materials is lacking. Here, in situ Raman spectroscopic monitoring of the redox cycle is used to investigate the interplay between the dynamic and competing processes of hydrogen spillover and water dissociation on the doped ceria surface. In order to elucidate these mechanisms, the redox process in pure CGO and NiO is studied when exposed to wet and dry hydrogen and is compared to the cermet behavior. In dry hydrogen, CGO reduces relatively rapidly via a series of intermediate phases, while NiO reduces via a single-step process. In wet reducing atmospheres, however, the oxidation state of pure CGO is initially stabilized due to the dissociation of water by reduced Ce(III) and subsequent incorporation of oxygen into the structure. In the reduction process involving the composite cermet, the close proximity of the NiO improves the efficiency and speed of the composite reduction process. Although NiO is already incorporated into working cells, these observations suggest direct routes to further improve cell performance.

  17. Probing dynamics and pinning of single vortices in superconductors at nanometer scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embon, L.; Anahory, Y.; Suhov, A.; Halbertal, D.; Cuppens, J.; Yakovenko, A.; Uri, A.; Myasoedov, Y.; Rappaport, M. L.; Huber, M. E.; Gurevich, A.; Zeldov, E.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of quantized magnetic vortices and their pinning by materials defects determine electromagnetic properties of superconductors, particularly their ability to carry non-dissipative currents. Despite recent advances in the understanding of the complex physics of vortex matter, the behavior of vortices driven by current through a multi-scale potential of the actual materials defects is still not well understood, mostly due to the scarcity of appropriate experimental tools capable of tracing vortex trajectories on nanometer scales. Using a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference microscope we report here an investigation of controlled dynamics of vortices in lead films with sub-Angstrom spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity. We measured, for the first time, the fundamental dependence of the elementary pinning force of multiple defects on the vortex displacement, revealing a far more complex behavior than has previously been recognized, including striking spring softening and broken-spring depinning, as well as spontaneous hysteretic switching between cellular vortex trajectories. Our results indicate the importance of thermal fluctuations even at 4.2 K and of the vital role of ripples in the pinning potential, giving new insights into the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation and electromagnetic response of superconductors.

  18. Dynamics of a nanoscale Josephson junction probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ast, Christian R.; Jaeck, Berthold; Eltschka, Matthias; Etzkorn, Markus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Kern, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Institut de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    The Josephson effect is an intriguing phenomenon as it presents an interplay of different energy scales, such as the Josephson energy ε{sub J} (critical current), charging energy ε{sub C}, and temperature T. Using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating at a base temperature of 15 mK, we create a nanoscale superconductor-vacuum-superconductor tunnel junction in an extremely underdamped regime (Q>>10). We observe extremely small retrapping currents also owing to strongly reduced ohmic losses in the well-developed superconducting gaps. While formally operating in the zero temperature limit, i.e. the temperature T is smaller than the Josephson plasma frequency ω{sub J} (k{sub B}T<<ℎω{sub J}=√(8ε{sub J}ε{sub C})), experimentally other phenomena, such as stray photons, may perturb the Josephson junction, leading to an effectively higher temperature. The dynamics of the Josephson junction can be addressed experimentally by looking at characteristic parameters, such as the switching current and the retrapping current. We discuss the dynamics of the Josephson junction in the context of reaching the zero temperature limit.

  19. Probing molecular interactions in bone biomaterials: Through molecular dynamics and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowmik, Rahul; Katti, Kalpana S.; Verma, Devendra; Katti, Dinesh R.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer-hydroxyapatite (HAP) composites are widely investigated for their potential use as bone replacement materials. The molecular interactions at mineral polymer interface are known to have significant role of mechanical response of the composite system. Modeling interactions between such dissimilar molecules using molecular dynamics (MD) is an area of current interest. Molecular dynamics studies require potential function or force field parameters. Some force fields are described in literature that represents the structure of hydroxyapatite reasonably well. Yet, the applicability of these force fields for studying the interaction between dissimilar materials (such as mineral and polymer) is limited, as there is no accurate representation of polymer in these force fields. We have obtained the parameters of consistent valence force field (CVFF) for monoclinic hydroxyapatite. Validation of parameters was done by comparing the computationally obtained unit cell parameters, vibrational spectra and atomic distances with XRD and FTIR experiments. Using the obtained parameters of HAP, and available parameters of polymer (polyacrylic acid), interaction study was performed with MD simulations. The MD simulations showed that several hydrogen bonds may form between HAP and polyacrylic acid depending upon the exposed surface of HAP. Also there are some favourable planes of HAP where polyacrylic acid is most likely to attach. We have also simulated the mineralization of HAP using a 'synthetic biomineralization'. These modeling studies are supported by photoacoustic spectroscopy experiments on both porous and non porous composite samples for potential joint replacement and bone tissue engineering applications

  20. Probing charge transfer dynamics in self-assembled monolayers by core hole clock approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharnikov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent progress in the application of core hole clock approach in the framework of resonant Auger electron spectroscopy to the monomolecular assembles of alkyl, oligophenyl, and oligo(phenylene–ethynylene) based molecules on Au(1 1 1) substrates, referring mostly to the work by the author et al. The major goal was to study electron transfer (ET) dynamics in these systems serving as prototypes of molecular electronics (ME) devices. The ET pathway to the conductive substrate was unambiguously defined by resonant excitation of the nitrile tailgroup attached to the molecular backbone. Characteristic ET times within the femtosecond domain were determined, along with the attenuation factors for the ET dynamics, analogous to the case of the static transport. The above parameters were found to exhibit strong dependence on the character of the molecular orbital which mediates the ET process. In addition, certain spectral features, which can be associated with an inverse ET from the molecular backbone to the excitation site, were observed upon exchange of the nitrile group by strongly electronegative nitro moiety. The reported results represent a valuable input for theory and a certain potential for applications such as ME devices where optimization of ET can have significant technological impact.

  1. Probing the dynamic response of antivortex, interstitial and trapped vortex lattices on magnetic periodic pinning potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, A; Gonzalez, E M; Vicent, J L; Gilbert, D A; Liu Kai; Milošević, M V

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of the pinned vortex, antivortex and interstitial vortex have been studied in superconducting/magnetic hybrids consisting of arrays of Co/Pd multilayer nanodots embedded in Nb films. The magnetic nanodots show out-of-plane magnetization at the remanent state. This magnetic state allows for superconducting vortex lattices of different types in an applied homogeneous magnetic field. We experimentally and theoretically show three such lattices: (i) a lattice containing only antivortices; (ii) a vortex lattice entirely pinned on the dots; and (iii) a vortex lattice with pinned and interstitial vortices. Between the flux creep (low vortex velocity) and the free flux flow (high vortex velocity) regimes the interaction between the magnetic array and the vortex lattice governs the vortex dynamics, which in turn enables distinguishing experimentally the type of vortex lattice which governs the dissipation. We show that the vortex lattice with interstitial vortices has the highest onset velocity where the lattice becomes ordered, whereas the pinned vortex lattice has the smallest onset velocity. Further, for this system, we directly estimate that the external force needed to depin vortices is 60% larger than the one needed to depin antivortices; therefore we are able to decouple the antivortex–vortex motion. (paper)

  2. Probing the effect of neutron excess on the dynamics of Hf compound system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ishita; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2018-05-01

    The reaction dynamics of 170Hf* and 174Hf* compound systems formed in 46,50Ti +124Sn reactions have been analyzed within the framework of Dynamical Cluster-decay Model (DCM) over an energy range of Ec.m.=115-156 MeV. The experimental data of fusion evaporation cross sections for 170,174Hf* systems is successfully addressed by optimizing the value of neck length ΔR. It is to be noted that calculations are performed by taking quadrupole deformations β2 with the optimum orientation of decaying fragments. Here, the effect of neutron excess has been examined on the structural properties of decaying fragments via fragmentation potential and preformation probability. The observation depicts that the isotopic effect prevails at fission region and as we move from lighter nucleus i.e. 170Hf* to heavier nucleus i.e. 174Hf*, the heavy mass fragments (HMF) start contributing along with fission fragments which are equally evident for 170Hf* as well. The ΔR values so obtained are compared at center of mass-energies which consequently provides information regarding the relative time scale of decaying fragments.

  3. Probing BL Lac and Cluster Evolution via a Wide-angle, Deep X-ray Selected Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, E.; Jones, L.; White, N.; Angelini, L.; Giommi, P.; McHardy, I.; Wegner, G.

    1994-12-01

    The WARPS survey (Wide-Angle ROSAT Pointed Survey) has been constructed from the archive of all public ROSAT PSPC observations, and is a subset of the WGACAT catalog. WARPS will include a complete sample of >= 100 BL Lacs at F_x >= 10(-13) erg s(-1) cm(-2) . A second selection technique will identify ~ 100 clusters at 0.15 = 0.304 +/- 0.062 for XBLs but = 0.60 +/- 0.05 for RBLs. Models of the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) are also poorly constrained. WARPS will allow us to compute an accurate XLF, decreasing the error bars above by over a factor of two. We will also test for low-luminosity BL Lacs, whose non-thermal nuclear sources are dim compared to the host galaxy. Browne and Marcha (1993) claim the EMSS missed most of these objects and is incomplete. If their predictions are correct, 20-40% of the BL Lacs we find will fall in this category, enabling us to probe the evolution and internal workings of BL Lacs at lower luminosities than ever before. By removing likely QSOs before optical spectroscopy, WARPS requires only modest amounts of telescope time. It will extend measurement of the cluster XLF both to higher redshifts (z>0.5) and lower luminosities (LX<1x10(44) erg s(-1) ) than previous measurements, confirming or rejecting the 3sigma detection of negative evolution found in the EMSS, and constraining Cold Dark Matter cosmologies. Faint NELGs are a recently discovered major contributor to the X-ray background. They are a mixture of Sy2s, starbursts and galaxies of unknown type. Detailed classification and evolution of their XLF will be determined for the first time.

  4. Selective fluorescence response and magnetic separation probe for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene based on iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Ya-Qin; Wang, Feng; Shao, Qun; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jin

    2013-05-01

    Despite the rapid development of nanomaterials and nanotechnology, it is still desirable to develop novel nanoparticle-based techniques which are cost-effective, timesaving, and environment-friendly, and with ease of operation and procedural simplicity, for assay of target analytes. In the work discussed in this paper, the dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was conjugated to 1,6-hexanediamine (HDA)-capped iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (FITC-HDA Fe3O4 MNPs), and the product was characterized. HDA ligands on the surface of Fe3O4 MNPs can bind 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to form TNT anions by acid-base pairing interaction. Formation of TNT anions, and captured TNT substantially affect the emission of FITC on the surface of the Fe3O4 MNPs, resulting in quenching of the fluorescence at 519 nm. A novel FITC-HDA Fe3O4 MNPs-based probe featuring chemosensing and magnetic separation has therefore been constructed. i.e. FITC-HDA Fe3O4 MNPs had a highly selective fluorescence response and enabled magnetic separation of TNT from other nitroaromatic compounds by quenching of the emission of FITC and capture of TNT in aqueous solution. Very good linearity was observed for TNT concentrations in the range 0.05-1.5 μmol L(-1), with a detection limit of 37.2 nmol L(-1) and RSD of 4.7 % (n = 7). Approximately 12 % of the total amount of TNT was captured. The proposed methods are well-suited to trace detection and capture of TNT in aqueous solution.

  5. Charge dynamics of 57Fe probe atoms in La2Li0.5Cu0.5O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presniakov, I. A.; Sobolev, A. V.; Rusakov, V. S.; Moskvin, A. S.; Baranov, A. V.

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize the electronic state and local surrounding of 57Fe Mössbauer probe atoms within iron-doped layered perovskite La2Li0.5Cu0.5O4 containing transition metal in unusual formal oxidation states "+3". An approach based on the qualitative energy diagrams analysis and the calculations within the cluster configuration interaction method have been developed. It was shown that a large amount of charge is transferred via Cu-O bonds from the O: 2p bands to the Cu: 3d orbitals and the ground state is dominated by the d9L configuration ("Cu2+-O-" state). The dominant d9L ground state for the (CuO6) sublattice induces in the environment of the 57Fe probe cations a charge transfer Fe3+ + O-(L) → Fe4+ + O2-, which transforms "Fe3+" into "Fe4+" state. The experimental spectra in the entire temperature range 77-300 K were described with the use of the stochastic two-level model based on the assumption of dynamic equilibrium between two Fe3+↔Fe4+ valence states related to the iron atom in the [Fe(1)O4]4- center. The relaxation frequencies and activation energies of the corresponding charge fluctuations were estimated based on Mössbauer data. The results are discussed assuming a temperature-induced change in the electronic state of the [CuO4]5- clusters in the layered perovskite.

  6. A novel mitochondria-targeted two-photon fluorescent probe for dynamic and reversible detection of the redox cycles between peroxynitrite and glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunlong; Du, Wen; Wang, Peng; Wu, Yang; Wang, Baoqin; Wang, Jun; Xie, Wenjun

    2017-12-16

    Redox homeostasis is important for maintenance of normal physiological functions within cells. Redox state of cells is primarily a consequence of precise balance between levels of reducing equivalents and reactive oxygen species. Redox homeostasis between peroxynitrite (ONOO - ) and glutathione (GSH) is closely associated with physiological and pathological processes, such as prolonged relaxation in vascular tissues and smooth muscle preparations, attenuation of hepatic necrosis, and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2. We report a two-photon fluorescent probe (TP-Se) based on water-soluble carbazole-based compound, which integrates with organic selenium, to monitor changes in ONOO - /GSH levels in cells. This probe can reversibly respond to ONOO - and GSH and exhibits high selectivity, sensitivity, and mitochondrial targeting. The probe was successfully applied to visualize changes in redox cycles during ONOO - outbreak and antioxidant GSH repair in cells. The probe will lead to significant development on redox events involved in cellular redox regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Ecological Dynamics of Natural Selection: Traits and the Coevolution of Community Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeek, Mark A

    2017-05-01

    Natural selection has both genetic and ecological dynamics. The fitnesses of individuals change with their ecological context, and so the form and strength of selective agents change with abiotic factors and the phenotypes and abundances of interacting species. I use standard models of consumer-resource interactions to explore the ecological dynamics of natural selection and how various trait types influence these dynamics and the resulting structure of a community of coevolving species. Evolutionary optima favored by natural selection depend critically on the abundances of interacting species, and the traits of species can undergo dynamic cycling in limited areas of parameter space. The ecological dynamics of natural selection can also drive shifts from one adaptive peak to another, and these ecologically driven adaptive peak shifts are fundamental to the dynamics of niche differentiation. Moreover, this ecological differentiation is fostered in more productive and more benign environments where species interactions are stronger and where the selection gradients generated by species interactions are stronger. Finally, community structure resulting from coevolution depends fundamentally on the types of traits that underlie species interactions. The ecological dynamics of the process cannot be simplified, neglected, or ignored if we are to build a predictive theory of natural selection.

  8. Magnetic ground state of low-doped manganites probed by spin dynamics under magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kober, P.; Hennion, M.; Moussa, F.; Ivanov, A.; Regnault, L.-P.; Pinsard, L.; Revcolevschi, A.

    2004-01-01

    We present a neutron scattering study of spin dynamics under magnetic field in La 0.9 Ca 0.1 MnO 3 . In zero field, the spin wave spectrum consists of two branches, a high and a low-energy one. In applied field, the high-energy branch splits into two branches due to twinned domains. The gap of the new intermediate-energy branch strongly decreases above a spin-flop transition that occurs for H//b and H>2 T. Furthermore, this branch, that we could attribute to the twinned domain H//b, shows a q-discontinuity under field. The low-energy branch, measurable only around ferromagnetic zone centers at H=0, appears at all q-values under field

  9. Heavy atoms as molecular probes in studying the solvent dependence of the dynamics of triplet exciplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, U.; Winter, G.

    1981-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions between thiopyronine triplet (acceptor 3 A + ) and the electron donors (D), aniline, p-Br-aniline and p-I-aniline, are investigated by flash spectroscopy in solvents of different viscosity and polarity. Due to the heavy-atom effect the radical yield becomes very sensitive to the solvent influence, which can be explained by the dynamic properties of a triplet exciplex ( 3 (AD + )) formed as a primary product in the reaction between acceptor triplet and donor. Whereas on variation of solvent viscosity the solvent cage effect on the dissociation of 3 (AD + ) is observed, a change in solvent polarity is suggested to affect the radiationless deactivation of 3 (AD + ) to the ground state of the components. (author)

  10. Neutron emission as a probe of fusion-fission and quasi-fission dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Pre- and post scission neutron yeilds have been measured as a function of projectile mass, compound nucleus fissility, and fission mass-split and total kinetic energy (TKE) for 27 fusion-fission and quasi-fission reactions induced by beams of 16,18 O, 40 Ar and 64 Ni. A new method of interpretation of experimental pre-scission neutron multiplicities ν-pre and mean kinetic energies ε ν allows the extraction of fission time scales with much less uncertainty than previously, all fusion-fission results being consistent with a dynamical time scale of (35±15) x 10 -21 s for symmetric fission. All reactions show that ν-pre falls quite rapidly with increasing mass-asymmetry; evidence is presented that for fusion-fission reactions this is partly due to a reduction of the dynamical fission time scale with mass-asymmetry. For quasi-fission, the data indicate that the pre-scission multiplicity and mean neutron kinetic energy are very sensitive to the final mass-asymmetry, but that the time scale is virtually independent of mass-asymmetry. It is concluded that for fusion-fission there is no dependence of ν-pre on TKE, whilst for 64 Ni-induced quasi-fission reactions, a strong increase of ν-pre with decreasing TKE is observed, probably largely caused by neutron emission during the acceleration time of the fission fragments in these fast reactions. Interpretation of post-scission multiplicities in terms of fragment excitation energies leads to deduced time scales consistent with those determined from the pre-scission data. 54 refs., 17 tabs., 25 figs

  11. Assessing the Utility of Temporally Dynamic Terrain Indices in Alaskan Moose Resource Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennewein, J. S.; Hebblewhite, M.; Meddens, A. J.; Gilbert, S.; Vierling, L. A.; Boelman, N.; Eitel, J.

    2017-12-01

    The accelerated warming in arctic and boreal regions impacts ecosystem structure and plant species distribution, which have secondary effects on wildlife. In summer months, moose (Alces alces) are especially vulnerable to changes in the availability and quality of forage and foliage cover due to their thermoregulatory needs and high energetic demands post calving. Resource selection functions (RSFs) have been used with great success to model such tradeoffs in habitat selection. Recently, RSFs have expanded to include more dynamic representations of habitat selection through the use of time-varying covariates such as dynamic habitat indices. However, to date few studies have investigated dynamic terrain indices, which incorporate long-term, highly-dynamic meteorological data (e.g., albedo, air temperature) and their utility in modeling habitat selection. The purpose of this study is to compare two dynamic terrain indices (i.e., solar insolation and topographic wetness) to their static counterparts in Alaskan moose resource selection over a ten-year period (2008-2017). Additionally, the utility of a dynamic wind-shelter index is assessed. Three moose datasets (n=130 total), spanning a north-to-south gradient in Alaska, are analyzed independently to assess location-specific resource selection. The newly-released, high-resolution Arctic Digital Elevation Model (5m2) is used as the terrain input into both dynamic and static indices. Dynamic indices are programmed with meteorological data from the North American Regional Analysis (NARR) and NASA's Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES-DISC) databases. Static wetness and solar insolation indices are estimated using only topographic parameters (e.g., slope, aspect). Preliminary results from pilot analyses suggest that dynamic terrain indices may provide novel insights into resource selection of moose that could not be gained when using static counterparts. Future applications of such dynamic

  12. Probing Conformational Stability and Dynamics of Erythroid and Nonerythroid Spectrin: Effects of Urea and Guanidine Hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Malay; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the conformational stability of the two homologous membrane skeletal proteins, the erythroid and non-erythroid spectrins, in their dimeric and tetrameric forms respectively during unfolding in the presence of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl). Fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy have been used to study the changes of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, anisotropy, far UV-CD and extrinsic fluorescence of bound 1-anilinonapthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS). Chemical unfolding of both proteins were reversible and could be described as a two state transition. The folded erythroid spectrin and non-erythroid spectrin were directly converted to unfolded monomer without formation of any intermediate. Fluorescence quenching, anisotropy, ANS binding and dynamic light scattering data suggest that in presence of low concentrations of the denaturants (up-to 1M) hydrogen bonding network and van der Waals interaction play a role inducing changes in quaternary as well as tertiary structures without complete dissociation of the subunits. This is the first report of two large worm like, multi-domain proteins obeying twofold rule which is commonly found in small globular proteins. The free energy of stabilization (ΔGu H 2 0) for the dimeric spectrin has been 20 kcal/mol lesser than the tetrameric from. PMID:25617632

  13. Probing spatial locality in ionic liquids with the grand canonical adaptive resolution molecular dynamics technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrack Jabes, B.; Krekeler, C.; Klein, R.; Delle Site, L.

    2018-05-01

    We employ the Grand Canonical Adaptive Resolution Simulation (GC-AdResS) molecular dynamics technique to test the spatial locality of the 1-ethyl 3-methyl imidazolium chloride liquid. In GC-AdResS, atomistic details are kept only in an open sub-region of the system while the environment is treated at coarse-grained level; thus, if spatial quantities calculated in such a sub-region agree with the equivalent quantities calculated in a full atomistic simulation, then the atomistic degrees of freedom outside the sub-region play a negligible role. The size of the sub-region fixes the degree of spatial locality of a certain quantity. We show that even for sub-regions whose radius corresponds to the size of a few molecules, spatial properties are reasonably reproduced thus suggesting a higher degree of spatial locality, a hypothesis put forward also by other researchers and that seems to play an important role for the characterization of fundamental properties of a large class of ionic liquids.

  14. Stability and morphology of Ag nanoplatelets probed by depolarized dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbone, M.; Contino, A.; Maccarrone, G.; Musumeci, P.; Lo Faro, M. J.; Calcagno, L.

    2018-06-01

    The stability of silver nanoplatelet (NP) suspensions prepared with different concentrations of trisodium citrate (TSC) was studied by depolarized dynamic light scattering (DDLS) and UV–vis spectrometry. The morphology of the nanoparticles, as well as the color and stability of the sols, are tuned by the concentration of the capping agent. The nanoparticles prepared with high TSC concentration (>10‑4 M) are blue triangular NPs showing a slight truncation of the tips with aging. When low TSC concentrations are used, the color of the sols changes from blue to yellow with aging time and a strong modification of the morphology occurs: the nanoparticle shape changes from triangular to spherical. Remarkably, they show a high degree of anisotropy. The aging process was followed by the UV–vis spectra and by measuring the rotational diffusion coefficient by DDLS, providing information on the nanoparticle size and shape evolution. The high intensity of depolarized signal and the high value of rotational diffusion coefficient suggest that the aging process increases the thickness and the roughness of the nanoparticles

  15. Momentum mapping spectrometer for probing the fragmentation dynamics of molecules induced by keV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Raj; Bhatt, Pragya; Yadav, Namita; Shanker, R

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new experimental setup for studying the fragmentation dynamics of molecules induced by the impact of keV electrons using the well-known technique of recoil ion momentum spectroscopy. The apparatus consists of mainly a time- and position-sensitive multi-hit particle detector for ion analysis and a channel electron multiplier detector for detecting the ejected electrons. Different components of the setup and the relevant electronics for data acquisition are described in detail with their working principles. In order to verify the reliable performance of the setup, we have recorded the collision-induced ionic spectra of the CO 2 molecule by the impact of keV electrons. Information about the ion pairs of CO + :O + , C + :O + and O + :O + resulting from dissociative ionizing collisions of 20 and 26 keV electrons with a dilute gaseous target of CO 2 molecules has been obtained. Under conditions of the present experiment, the momentum resolutions of the spectrometer for the combined momenta of CO + and O + ions in the direction of the time-of-flight axis and perpendicular to the direction of an electron beam are found to be 10.0 ± 0.2 and 15.0 ± 0.3 au, respectively

  16. Quantum state-resolved gas/surface reaction dynamics probed by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Li [Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, Goettingen (Germany); Ueta, Hirokazu; Beck, Rainer D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moleculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Bisson, Regis [Aix-Marseille Universite, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France)

    2013-05-15

    We report the design and characterization of a new molecular-beam/surface-science apparatus for quantum state-resolved studies of gas/surface reaction dynamics combining optical state-specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage with detection of surface-bound reaction products by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). RAIRS is a non-invasive infrared spectroscopic detection technique that enables online monitoring of the buildup of reaction products on the target surface during reactant deposition by a molecular beam. The product uptake rate obtained by calibrated RAIRS detection yields the coverage dependent state-resolved reaction probability S({theta}). Furthermore, the infrared absorption spectra of the adsorbed products obtained by the RAIRS technique provide structural information, which help to identify nascent reaction products, investigate reaction pathways, and determine branching ratios for different pathways of a chemisorption reaction. Measurements of the dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111) with this new apparatus are presented to illustrate the utility of RAIRS detection for highly detailed studies of chemical reactions at the gas/surface interface.

  17. The dynamics of giant unilamellar vesicle oxidation probed by morphological transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankhagowit, Shalene; Wu, Shao-Hua; Biswas, Roshni; Riche, Carson T; Povinelli, Michelle L; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-10-01

    We have studied the dynamics of Lissamine Rhodamine B dye sensitization-induced oxidation of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), where the progression of the underlying chemical processes was followed via vesicle membrane area changes. The surface-area-to-volume ratio of our spherical GUVs increased after as little as ten seconds of irradiation. The membrane area expansion was coupled with high amplitude fluctuations not typical of GUVs in isoosmotic conditions. To accurately measure the area of deformed and fluctuating membranes, we utilized a dual-beam optical trap (DBOT) to stretch GUV membranes into a geometrically regular shape. Further oxidation led to vesicle contraction, and the GUVs became tense, with micron-scale pores forming in the bilayer. We analyzed the GUV morphological behaviors as two consecutive rate-limiting steps. We also considered the effects of altering DOPC and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl) (RhDPPE) concentrations. The resulting kinetic model allows us to measure how lipid molecular area changes during oxidation, as well as to determine the rate constants controlling how quickly oxidation products are formed. Controlled membrane oxidation leading to permeabilization is also a potential tool for drug delivery based on engineered photosensitizer-containing lipid vesicles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Probing the conformational dynamics of photosystem I in unconfined and confined spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gaurav; Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Nandi, Somen; Mondal, Prasenjit; Saha, Abhijit; Bhattacharyya, Kankan; Ghosh, Surajit

    2017-12-20

    The fluorescence dynamics of Photosystem I (PSI) in bulk water and inside a confined environment like a liposome have been investigated using time resolved confocal microscopy. In bulk water, PSI exhibits a major emission peak at ∼680 nm, while in the liposome it exhibits a markedly blue shifted emission maximum at ∼485 nm. This is indicative of conformational changes due to entrapment and emergence of a stressed conformation of PSI inside the liposome. The observed time constants for the fluorescence lifetime of PSI inside the liposome are significantly high as opposed to PSI in bulk water. More interestingly, the fluorescence intensity of PSI in bulk water exhibits strong fluctuations with many high intensity jumps and these are anti-correlated with the fluorescence lifetime of PSI. In contrast, inside the liposome, no such anti-correlated behaviour is observed. We further demonstrated that PSI exhibits at least two conformational states in bulk water, whereas a single conformation is observed inside the liposome, indicating the conformational rigidity and locking of the PSI complex inside a liposome.

  19. Probing Conformational Dynamics of Tau Protein by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Iacob, Roxana E.; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Yang, Ling; Ahlijanian, Michael; Tao, Li; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Chen, Guodong

    2018-01-01

    Fibrillization of the microtubule-associated protein tau has been recognized as one of the signature pathologies of the nervous system in Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and other tauopathies. The conformational transition of tau in the fibrillization process, tau monomer to soluble aggregates to fibrils in particular, remains unclear. Here we report on the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) in combination with other biochemical approaches, including Thioflavin S fluorescence measurements, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and Western blotting to understand the heparin-induced tau's fibrillization. HDX-MS studies including anti-tau antibody epitope mapping experiments provided molecular level details of the full-length tau's conformational dynamics and its regional solvent accessibility upon soluble aggregates formation. The results demonstrate that R3 region in the full-length tau's microtubule binding repeat region (MTBR) is stabilized in the aggregation process, leaving both N and C terminal regions to be solvent exposed in the soluble aggregates and fibrils. The findings also illustrate the practical utility of orthogonal analytical methodologies for the characterization of protein higher order structure. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Nonadiabatic Dynamics May Be Probed through Electronic Coherence in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kochise; Kowalewski, Markus; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-02-09

    We present a hierarchy of Fermi golden rules (FGRs) that incorporate strongly coupled electronic/nuclear dynamics in time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) signals at different levels of theory. Expansion in the joint electronic and nuclear eigenbasis yields the numerically most challenging exact FGR (eFGR). The quasistatic Fermi Golden Rule (qsFGR) neglects nuclear motion during the photoionization process but takes into account electronic coherences as well as populations initially present in the pumped matter as well as those generated internally by coupling between electronic surfaces. The standard semiclassical Fermi Golden Rule (scFGR) neglects the electronic coherences and the nuclear kinetic energy during the ionizing pulse altogether, yielding the classical Condon approximation. The coherence contributions depend on the phase-profile of the ionizing field, allowing coherent control of TRPES signals. The photoelectron spectrum from model systems is simulated using these three levels of theory. The eFGR and the qsFGR show temporal oscillations originating from the electronic or vibrational coherences generated as the nuclear wave packet traverses a conical intersection. These oscillations, which are missed by the scFGR, directly reveal the time-evolving splitting between electronic states of the neutral molecule in the curve-crossing regime.

  1. Dynamic selection mechanism for quality of service aware web services

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, Demian Antony; Ananthanarayana, V. S.

    2010-02-01

    A web service is an interface of the software component that can be accessed by standard Internet protocols. The web service technology enables an application to application communication and interoperability. The increasing number of web service providers throughout the globe have produced numerous web services providing the same or similar functionality. This necessitates the use of tools and techniques to search the suitable services available over the Web. UDDI (universal description, discovery and integration) is the first initiative to find the suitable web services based on the requester's functional demands. However, the requester's requirements may also include non-functional aspects like quality of service (QoS). In this paper, the authors define a QoS model for QoS aware and business driven web service publishing and selection. The authors propose a QoS requirement format for the requesters, to specify their complex demands on QoS for the web service selection. The authors define a tree structure called quality constraint tree (QCT) to represent the requester's variety of requirements on QoS properties having varied preferences. The paper proposes a QoS broker based architecture for web service selection, which facilitates the requesters to specify their QoS requirements to select qualitatively optimal web service. A web service selection algorithm is presented, which ranks the functionally similar web services based on the degree of satisfaction of the requester's QoS requirements and preferences. The paper defines web service provider qualities to distinguish qualitatively competitive web services. The paper also presents the modelling and selection mechanism for the requester's alternative constraints defined on the QoS. The authors implement the QoS broker based system to prove the correctness of the proposed web service selection mechanism.

  2. An oligogalacturonide-derived molecular probe demonstrates the dynamics of calcium-mediated pectin complexation in cell walls of tip-growing structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Rydahl, Maja Gro

    2017-01-01

    walls and in mediating cell-to-cell adhesion. Current immunological methods enable only steady-state detection of egg box formation in situ. Here we present a tool for efficient real-time visualisation of available sites for HG crosslinking within cell wall microdomains. Our approach is based on calcium-mediated...... thermodynamic model. Using defined carbohydrate microarrays, we show that the long OG probe binds exclusively to HG that has a very low degree of esterification and in the presence of divalent ions. We used this probe to study real-time dynamics of HG during elongation of Arabidopsis pollen tubes and root hairs...

  3. NMR relaxometric probing of ionic liquid dynamics and diffusion under mesoscopic confinement within bacterial cellulose ionogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chip J.; Gehrke, Sascha; Hollóczki, Oldamur; Wagle, Durgesh V.; Heitz, Mark P.; Baker, Gary A.

    2018-05-01

    Bacterial cellulose ionogels (BCIGs) represent a new class of material comprising a significant content of entrapped ionic liquid (IL) within a porous network formed from crystalline cellulose microfibrils. BCIGs suggest unique opportunities in separations, optically active materials, solid electrolytes, and drug delivery due to the fact that they can contain as much as 99% of an IL phase by weight, coupled with an inherent flexibility, high optical transparency, and the ability to control ionogel cross-sectional shape and size. To allow for the tailoring of BCIGs for a multitude of applications, it is necessary to better understand the underlying principles of the mesoscopic confinement within these ionogels. Toward this, we present a study of the structural, relaxation, and diffusional properties of the ILs, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([emim][Tf2N]) and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([bmpy][Tf2N]), using 1H and 19F NMR T1 relaxation times, rotational correlation times, and diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) diffusion coefficients, accompanied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We observed that the cation methyl groups in both ILs were primary points of interaction with the cellulose chains and, while the pore size in cellulose is rather large, [emim]+ diffusion was slowed by ˜2-fold, whereas [Tf2N]- diffusion was unencumbered by incorporation in the ionogel. While MD simulations of [bmpy][Tf2N] confinement at the interface showed a diffusion coefficient decrease roughly 3-fold compared to the bulk liquid, DOSY measurements did not reveal any significant changes in diffusion. This suggests that the [bmpy][Tf2N] alkyl chains dominate diffusion through formation of apolar domains. This is in contrast to [emim][Tf2N] where delocalized charge appears to preclude apolar domain formation, allowing interfacial effects to be manifested at a longer range in [emim][Tf2N].

  4. Probing parton dynamics of QCD matter with Ω and ϕ production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We present measurements of Ω and ϕ production at midrapidity from Au+Au collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies √{sN N}=7.7 , 11.5 , 19.6 , 27, and 39 GeV by the STAR experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Motivated by the coalescence formation mechanism for these strange hadrons, we study the ratios of N (Ω-+Ω¯+) /[2 N (ϕ ) ] . These ratios as a function of transverse momentum pT fall on a consistent trend at high collision energies, but start to show deviations in peripheral collisions at √{sN N}=19.6 , 27, and 39 GeV, and in central collisions at 11.5 GeV in the intermediate pT region of 2.4 -3.6 GeV/c . We further evaluate empirically the strange quark pT distributions at hadronization by studying the Ω /ϕ ratios scaled by the number of constituent quarks (NCQ). The NCQ-scaled Ω /ϕ ratios show a suppression of strange quark production in central collisions at 11.5 GeV compared to √{sN N}≥19.6 GeV. The shapes of the presumably thermal strange quark distributions in 0-60% most central collisions at 7.7 GeV show significant deviations from those in 0-10% most central collisions at higher energies. These features suggest that there is likely a change of the underlying strange quark dynamics in the transition from quark matter to hadronic matter at collision energies below 19.6 GeV.

  5. Mixing of alcohol and water molecules studied by neutron probe. Structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Koji

    2001-01-01

    Structure of water/alcohol mixing solution was studied by three methods such as an isotope-exchanged neutron scattering method, RISM (Reference Interaction Site Model) integral equation and a neutron spin echo method. The principle of methods, experiments and results were reported. The results of experiments of water/tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) solution by the isotope-exchange neutron scattering method showed TBA molecule associated with each other through end methyl group. Especially this effect was the largest at x TBA = 0.06 and decreased with increasing the concentration of TBA. However, hydrogen bonding of TBA was very rare at x TBA = 0.06. By the partial radial distribution function obtained from RISM integral equation, it indicated that the structure of pure TBA became chain structure by hydrogen bond but changed to the structure contacted directly each hydrophobic group with increasing the concentration of water. Water/2-butoxyethanol (BE) mixing solution was measured by a neutron spin echo method. The activation energy of the diffusion coefficients obtained agreed to the energy of hydrogen bonding. The temperature response of diffusion coefficients showed the inverse of the experimental results obtained by the dynamic light scattering method. The difference between two measurement methods was different time scale and space scale. Namely, the object of the neutron scattering method is nano meter and nano second, but one of light scattering method many times over. It was proved from the above results that there was the cluster consisted of the same kind of molecule in the homogeneous two components solution, but the cluster was not stable and constantly exchanged with molecule, where the production and decay of the cluster is repeated at about nano sec. (S.Y.)

  6. Selective host molecules obtained by dynamic adaptive chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matache, Mihaela; Bogdan, Elena; Hădade, Niculina D

    2014-02-17

    Up till 20 years ago, in order to endow molecules with function there were two mainstream lines of thought. One was to rationally design the positioning of chemical functionalities within candidate molecules, followed by an iterative synthesis-optimization process. The second was the use of a "brutal force" approach of combinatorial chemistry coupled with advanced screening for function. Although both methods provided important results, "rational design" often resulted in time-consuming efforts of modeling and synthesis only to find that the candidate molecule was not performing the designed job. "Combinatorial chemistry" suffered from a fundamental limitation related to the focusing of the libraries employed, often using lead compounds that limit its scope. Dynamic constitutional chemistry has developed as a combination of the two approaches above. Through the rational use of reversible chemical bonds together with a large plethora of precursor libraries, one is now able to build functional structures, ranging from quite simple molecules up to large polymeric structures. Thus, by introduction of the dynamic component within the molecular recognition processes, a new perspective of deciphering the world of the molecular events has aroused together with a new field of chemistry. Since its birth dynamic constitutional chemistry has continuously gained attention, in particular due to its ability to easily create from scratch outstanding molecular structures as well as the addition of adaptive features. The fundamental concepts defining the dynamic constitutional chemistry have been continuously extended to currently place it at the intersection between the supramolecular chemistry and newly defined adaptive chemistry, a pivotal feature towards evolutive chemistry. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Dynamic Portfolio Selection on Croatian Financial Markets: MGARCH Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Škrinjarić, Tihana; Šego, Boško

    2016-01-01

    Background: Investors on financial markets are interested in finding trading strategies which could enable them to beat the market. They always look for best possibilities to achieve above-average returns and manage risks successfully. MGARCH methodology (Multivariate Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity) makes it possible to model changing risks and return dynamics on financial markets on a daily basis. The results could be used in order to enhance portfolio formation an...

  8. Dynamic Portfolio Selection on Croatian Financial Markets: MGARCH Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škrinjarić Tihana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Investors on financial markets are interested in finding trading strategies which could enable them to beat the market. They always look for best possibilities to achieve above-average returns and manage risks successfully. MGARCH methodology (Multivariate Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity makes it possible to model changing risks and return dynamics on financial markets on a daily basis. The results could be used in order to enhance portfolio formation and restructuring over time.

  9. 2D fringe probing of liquid film dynamics of a plug bubble in a micropipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, H F; Qiu, H H

    2009-01-01

    An extended film thickness measurement method that can obtain the liquid film thickness profile of the whole plug bubble in a capillary tube simultaneously is presented. The approach is based on a 2D spatial fringe scattering technique, where the spatial frequency of scattered fringes is a function of liquid film thickness along the micropipe. Laser sheets are used instead of the laser beams, and the width of the laser sheets can be selected to cover the whole measurement field. Capillary tubes, with inner diameters of 1.0 mm and 0.3 mm, and lengths of 125 mm and 65 mm, are used. A gas plug bubble, 2.5–20 mm long, is introduced and moves through the testing part of the tube, which is filled with water as the working fluid. The interference fringes produced by two incident laser sheets are scattered from the interface between gas and water, and captured by a high-speed camera at a speed of up to 2000 frames s −1 . The experimental results show that the improved method can obtain the liquid film thickness profile at the different times and can be used to analyze the status of the plug bubble movement in a micropipe

  10. Review of selected dynamic material control functions for international safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, L.L.

    1980-09-01

    With the development of Dynamic Special Nuclear Material Accounting and Control systems used in nuclear manufacturing and reprocessing plants, there arises the question as to how these systems affect the IAEA inspection capabilities. The systems in being and under development provide information and control for a variety of purposes important to the plant operator, the safeguards purpose being one of them. This report attempts to judge the usefulness of these dynamic systems to the IAEA and have defined 12 functions that provide essential information to it. If the information acquired by these dynamic systems is to be useful to the IAEA, the inspectors must be able to independently verify it. Some suggestions are made as to how this might be done. But, even if it should not be possible to verify all the data, the availability to the IAEA of detailed, simultaneous, and plant-wide information would tend to inhibit a plant operator from attempting to generate a floating or fictitious inventory. Suggestions are made that might be helpful in the design of future software systems, an area which has proved to be fatally deficient in some systems and difficult in all

  11. Simulating molecular mechanisms of the MDM2-mediated regulatory interactions: a conformational selection model of the MDM2 lid dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady M Verkhivker

    Full Text Available Diversity and complexity of MDM2 mechanisms govern its principal function as the cellular antagonist of the p53 tumor suppressor. Structural and biophysical studies have demonstrated that MDM2 binding could be regulated by the dynamics of a pseudo-substrate lid motif. However, these experiments and subsequent computational studies have produced conflicting mechanistic models of MDM2 function and dynamics. We propose a unifying conformational selection model that can reconcile experimental findings and reveal a fundamental role of the lid as a dynamic regulator of MDM2-mediated binding. In this work, structure, dynamics and energetics of apo-MDM2 are studied as a function of posttranslational modifications and length of the lid. We found that the dynamic equilibrium between "closed" and "semi-closed" lid forms may be a fundamental characteristic of MDM2 regulatory interactions, which can be modulated by phosphorylation, phosphomimetic mutation as well as by the lid size. Our results revealed that these factors may regulate p53-MDM2 binding by fine-tuning the thermodynamic equilibrium between preexisting conformational states of apo-MDM2. In agreement with NMR studies, the effect of phosphorylation on MDM2 interactions was more pronounced with the truncated lid variant that favored the thermodynamically dominant closed form. The phosphomimetic mutation S17D may alter the lid dynamics by shifting the thermodynamic equilibrium towards the ensemble of "semi-closed" conformations. The dominant "semi-closed" lid form and weakened dependence on the phosphorylation seen in simulations with the complete lid can provide a rationale for binding of small p53-based mimetics and inhibitors without a direct competition with the lid dynamics. The results suggested that a conformational selection model of preexisting MDM2 states may provide a robust theoretical framework for understanding MDM2 dynamics. Probing biological functions and mechanisms of MDM2

  12. The storm time ring current dynamics and response to CMEs and CIRs using Van Allen Probes observations and CIMI simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouikis, Christopher; Bingham, Samuel; Kistler, Lynn; Spence, Harlan; Gkioulidou, Matina

    2017-04-01

    The ring current responds differently to the different solar and interplanetary storm drivers such as coronal mass injections, (CME's), and co-rotating interaction regions (CIR's). Using Van Allen Probes observations, we develop an empirical ring current model of the ring current pressure, the pressure anisotropy and the current density development during the storm phases for both types of storm drivers and for all MLTs inside L 6. Delineating the differences in the ring current development between these two drivers will aid our understanding of the ring current dynamics. We find that during the storm main phase most of the ring current pressure in the pre-midnight inner magnetosphere is contributed by particles on open drift paths that cause the development of a strong partial ring current that causes most of the main phase Dst drop. These particles can reach as deep as L 2 and their pressure compares to the local magnetic field pressure as deep as L 3. During the recovery phase, if these particles are not lost at the magnetopause, will become trapped and will contribute to the symmetric ring current. However, the largest difference between the CME and CIR ring current responses during the storm main and early recovery phases is caused by how the 15 - 60 keV O+ responds to these drivers. This empirical model is compared to the results of CIMI simulations of a CMEs and a CIRs where the model input is comprised of the superposed epoch solar wind conditions of the storms that comprise the empirical model. Different inner magnetosphere boundary conditions are tested in order to match the empirical model results. Comparing the model and simulation results improves our understanding of the ring current dynamics as part of the highly coupled inner magnetosphere system. In addition, within the framework of this empirical model, the prediction of the EMIC wave generation linear theory is tested using the observed plasma parameters and comparing with the observations of

  13. Probing strongly interacting electroweak dynamics through W+W-/ZZ ratios at future e+e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barger, V.; Cheung, K.; Han, T.; Phillips, R.J.N.

    1995-01-01

    We point out that the ratio of W + W - →W + W - and W + W - →ZZ cross sections is a sensitive probe of the dynamics of electroweak symmetry breaking, in the c.m. energy region √s WW approx-gt 1 TeV where vector boson scattering may well become strong. We suggest ways in which this ratio can be extracted at a 1.5 TeV e + e - linear collider, using W ± ,Z→jj hadronic decays and relying on dijet mass resolution to provid statistical discrimination between W ± and Z. WW fusion processes studied here are unique for exploring scalar resonances of mass of about 1 TeV and are complementary to studies via the direct channel e + e - →W + W - for the vector and nonresonant cases. With an integrated luminosity of 200 fb -1 , the signals obtained are statistically significant. A comparision with a study of the e - e - →ννW - W - process is made. Enhancements of the signal rate from using a polarized electron beam, or at a 2 TeV e + e - linear colider and possible higher energy μ + μ - colliders, are also presented

  14. Real time observation of the excimer formation dynamics of a gas phase benzene dimer by picosecond pump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki

    2015-10-21

    We observed the real-time excimer (EXC) formation dynamics of a gas phase benzene dimer (Bz2) cluster after photo-excitation to the S1 state by applying an ionization detected picosecond transient absorption method for probing the visible EXC absorption for the first time. The time evolution of the EXC absorption from the S1 0(0) level shows a rise that is well fitted by a single exponential function with a time constant of 18 ± 2 ps. The structure of the Bz dimer has a T-shaped structure in the ground electronic state, and that in the EXC state is a parallel sandwich (SW) structure. Thus, the observed rise time corresponds to the structural change from the T to the SW structures, which directly shows the EXC formation. On the other hand, the EXC formation after excitation of the S1 6(1) vibrational level of the stem site showed a faster rise of the time constant of 10 ± 2 ps. Supposing equilibrium between the EXC and the local excited states, it followed that the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution rate of the 6(1) level is largely enhanced and becomes faster than the EXC formation reaction.

  15. Probing strongly-interacting electroweak dynamics through W+W-/ZZ ratios at future e+e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barger, V.

    1995-01-01

    The authors point out that the ratio of W + W - → W + W - and W + W - → ZZ cross sections is a sensitive probe of the dynamics of electroweak symmetry breaking, in the CM energy region √s ww approx-gt 1 TeV where vector boson scattering may well become strong. They suggest ways in which this ratio can be extracted at a 1.5 TeV e + e - linear collider, using W ± , Z → jj hadronic decays and relying on dijet mass resolution to provide statistical discrimination between W ± and Z. WW fusion processes studied here are unique for exploring scalar resonances of mass about 1 TeV and are complementary to studies via the direct channel e + e - → W + W - for the vector and non-resonant cases. With an integrated luminosity of 200 fb -1 , the signals obtained are statistically significant. Comparison with a study of e - e - → ννW - W - process is made. Enhancements of the signal rate from using a polarized electron beam, or at a 2 TeV e + e - linear collider and possible higher energy μ + μ - colliders, are also presented

  16. Self-sorting of dynamic metallosupramolecular libraries (DMLs) via metal-driven selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Istvan; Dumitrescu, Dan; Legrand, Yves-Marie; van der Lee, Arie; Grosu, Ion; Barboiu, Mihail

    2014-03-11

    "Metal-driven" selection between finite mononuclear and polymeric metallosupramolecular species can be quantitatively achieved in solution and in a crystalline state via coupled coordination/stacking interactional algorithms within dynamic metallosupramolecular libraries - DMLs.

  17. The market dynamics of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The market dynamics of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors: a private sector study in South Africa. Frasia Oosthuizen, Pariksha Jolene Kondiah, Hawa Bibi Moosa, Siddiqa Naroth, Nabeel Ismail Patel, Divashnee Reddy, Amanda Soobramoney ...

  18. Probing deformation substructure by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and dislocation dynamics modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hofmann, Felix; Song, Xu; Eve, Sophie; Collins, Steve P

    2010-09-01

    Materials characterization at the nano-scale is motivated by the desire to resolve the structural aspects and deformation behavior at length scales relevant to those mechanisms that define the novel and unusual properties of nano-structured materials. A range of novel techniques has recently become accessible with the help of synchrotron X-ray beams that can be focused down to spot sizes of less than a few microns on the sample. The unique combination of tunability (energy selection), parallelism and brightness of synchrotron X-ray beams allows their use for high resolution diffraction (determination of crystal structure and transformations, analysis of dislocation sub-structures, orientation and texture analysis, strain mapping); small angle X-ray scattering (analysis of nano-scale voids and defects; orientation analysis) and imaging (radiography and tomography). After a brief review of the state-of-the-art capabilities for monochromatic and white beam synchrotron diffraction, we consider the usefulness of these techniques for the task of bridging the gap between experiment and modeling. Namely, we discuss how the experiments can be configured to provide information relevant to the validation and improvement of modeling approaches, and also how the results of various simulations can be post-processed to improve the possibility of (more or less) direct comparison with experiments. Using the example of some recent experiments carried out on beamline 116 at Diamond Light Source near Oxford, we discuss how such experimental results can be interpreted in view and in conjunction with numerical deformation models, particularly those incorporating dislocation effects, e.g., finite-element based pseudo-continuum strain gradient formulations, and discrete dislocation simulations. Post-processing of FE and discrete dislocation simulations is described, illustrating the kind of information that can be extracted from comparisons between modeling and experimental data.

  19. A Dynamic Supramolecular System Exhibiting Substrate Selectivity in the Catalytic Epoxidation of Olefins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Stefan; Odille, Fabrice G. J.; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic supramolecular system involving hydrogen bonding between a Mn(III) salen catalyst and a Zn(II) porphyrin receptor exhibits selectivity for pyridine appended cis-beta-substituted styrene derivatives over phenyl appended derivatives in a catalytic epoxidation reaction.......A dynamic supramolecular system involving hydrogen bonding between a Mn(III) salen catalyst and a Zn(II) porphyrin receptor exhibits selectivity for pyridine appended cis-beta-substituted styrene derivatives over phenyl appended derivatives in a catalytic epoxidation reaction....

  20. Ultrafast S1 and ICT state dynamics of a marine carotenoid probed by femtosecond one- and two-photon pump-probe spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Kusumoto, Toshiyuki; Fujii, Ritsuko; Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Iinuma, Yoshiro; Oka, Naohiro; Takaesu, Yuki; Taira, Tomonori; Iha, Masahiko; Frank, Harry A.; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Ultrafast relaxation kinetics of fucoxanthin in polar and non-polar solvents have been studied by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Transient absorption associated with S 1 or intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) excited state has been observed following either one-photon excitation to the optically allowed S 2 state or two-photon excitation to the symmetry-forbidden S 1 state. The results suggest that the ICT state formed after excitation of fucoxanthin in a polar solvent is a distinct excited state from S 1 .

  1. Ultrafast S{sub 1} and ICT state dynamics of a marine carotenoid probed by femtosecond one- and two-photon pump-probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosumi, Daisuke, E-mail: kosumi@sci.osaka-cu.ac.j [CREST/JST and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Kusumoto, Toshiyuki [CREST/JST and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Fujii, Ritsuko; Sugisaki, Mitsuru [CREST/JST and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Osaka City University Advanced Research Institute for Natural Science and Technology (OCARINA), Osaka (Japan); Iinuma, Yoshiro; Oka, Naohiro; Takaesu, Yuki; Taira, Tomonori; Iha, Masahiko [South Product Co. Ltd., 12-75 Suzaki, Uruma-shi, Okinawa 904-2234 (Japan); Frank, Harry A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3060 (United States); Hashimoto, Hideki, E-mail: hassy@sci.osaka-cu.ac.j [CREST/JST and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Osaka City University Advanced Research Institute for Natural Science and Technology (OCARINA), Osaka (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Ultrafast relaxation kinetics of fucoxanthin in polar and non-polar solvents have been studied by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Transient absorption associated with S{sub 1} or intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) excited state has been observed following either one-photon excitation to the optically allowed S{sub 2} state or two-photon excitation to the symmetry-forbidden S{sub 1} state. The results suggest that the ICT state formed after excitation of fucoxanthin in a polar solvent is a distinct excited state from S{sub 1}.

  2. Dynamic supplier selection problem considering full truck load in probabilistic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno, Wicaksono, Purnawan Adi

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a mathematical model in a probabilistic dynamic optimization to solve a dynamic supplier selection problem considering full truck load in probabilistic environment where some parameters are uncertain. We determine the optimal strategy for this problem by using stochastic dynamic programming. We give some numerical experiments to evaluate and analyze the model. From the results, the optimal supplier and the optimal product volume from the optimal supplier were determined for each time period.

  3. Sexual selection and physical attractiveness : Implications for mating dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangestad, S W

    1993-09-01

    Sexual selection processes have received much attention in recent years, attention reflected in interest in human mate preferences. Among these mate preferences are preferences for physical attractiveness. Preferences in and of themselves, however, do not fully explain the nature of the relationships that individuals attain. A tacit negotiation process underlies relationship formation and maintenance. The notion that preferences for physical attractiveness evolved under parasite-driven "good genes" sexual selection leads to predictions about the nature of trade-offs that individuals make between mates' physical attractiveness and investment potential. These predictions and relevant data are explored, with a primary emphasis on women's preferences for men's qualities. In addition, further implications of trade-offs are examined, most notably (a) the impact of environmental variations on the nature of mating and (b) some effects of trade-offs on infidelity and male attempts to control women.

  4. Experimental Observations on Dynamic Response of Selected Transparent Armor Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Monolithic single crystal sapphire plates (100×100× 10 mm), from GT Crystal Systems, Inc., Salem , MA, in crystallographically controlled directions...Future Army Applications (2011) The National Academies Press , Washington, D.C. 5. Graff KF (1991) Wave motion in elastic solids, Dover Publications 6...2004) Visualization of impact damage in ceramics using the edge-on impact technique. Int J Appl Ceram Technol 1 (3):235–242 Fig. 38 Selection of a

  5. Selective chromo-fluorogenic detection of DFP (a Sarin and Soman mimic) and DCNP (a Tabun mimic) with a unique probe based on a boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba-Bon, Andrea; Costero, Ana M; Gil, Salvador; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Sancenón, Félix

    2014-11-21

    A novel colorimetric probe (P4) for the selective differential detection of DFP (a Sarin and Soman mimic) and DCNP (a Tabun mimic) was prepared. Probe P4 contains three reactive sites; i.e. (i) a nucleophilic phenol group able to undergo phosphorylation with nerve gases, (ii) a carbonyl group as a reactive site for cyanide; and (iii) a triisopropylsilyl (TIPS) protecting group that is known to react with fluoride. The reaction of P4 with DCNP in acetonitrile resulted in both the phosphorylation of the phenoxy group and the release of cyanide, which was able to react with the carbonyl group of P4 to produce a colour modulation from pink to orange. In contrast, phosphorylation of P4 with DFP in acetonitrile released fluoride that hydrolysed the TIPS group in P4 to yield a colour change from pink to blue. Probe P4 was able to discriminate between DFP and DCNP with remarkable sensitivity; limits of detection of 0.36 and 0.40 ppm for DCNP and DFP, respectively, were calculated. Besides, no interference from other organophosphorous derivatives or with presence of acid was observed. The sensing behaviour of P4 was also retained when incorporated into silica gel plates or onto polyethylene oxide membranes, which allowed the development of simple test strips for the colorimetric detection of DCNP and DFP in the vapour phase. P4 is the first probe capable of colorimetrically differentiating between a Tabun mimic (DCNP) and a Sarin and Soman mimic (DFP).

  6. Molecular frame photoemission: a probe of electronic/nuclear photo-dynamics and polarization state of the ionizing light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veyrinas, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This is thesis is dedicated to the study and the use of the remarkable properties of the molecular frame photoelectron angular distribution (MFPAD). This observable is a very sensitive probe of both the photoionization (PI) processes in small molecules, through the determination of the magnitudes and relative phases of the dipole matrix elements, and the polarization state of the ionizing light, which is entirely encoded in the MFPAD in terms of the Stokes parameters (s1, s2, s3). MFPAD measurements take advantage of dissociative photoionization (DPI) processes by combining an electron-ion 3D momentum spectroscopy technique with the use of different radiation facilities: SOLEIL synchrotron (DESIRS and PLEIADES beamlines) and the XUV PLFA beamline (SLIC, LIDyL Attophysics group, CEA Saclay) based on the interaction of a strong laser field with a gaseous target called high harmonic generation (HHG). The first part of the thesis is devoted to the complete characterization of the polarization state of an incoming radiation. In this context, an original 'molecular polarimetry' method is introduced and demonstrated by comparison with a VUV optical polarimeter available on the DESIRS beamline. Using this method to determine the full polarization ellipse of HHG radiation generated in different conditions on the XUV PLFA facility leads to original results that include the challenging disentanglement of the circular and unpolarized components of the studied radiation. The second part deals with the study of DPI of the H 2 , D 2 and HD molecules induced by circularly polarized light at resonance with the doubly excited states Q1 and Q2. In this energy region (30-35 eV) where direct ionization, autoionization and dissociation compete on a femtosecond timescale, the photonic excitation gives rise to complex ultrafast electronic and nuclear coupled dynamics. The remarkable asymmetries observed in the circular dichroism in the molecular frame, compared to quantum

  7. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  8. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  9. Electrons as probes of dynamics in molecules and clusters: A contribution from Time Dependent Density Functional Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wopperer, P.; Dinh, P.M.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Suraud, E.

    2015-01-01

    total ionization signals to the more elaborate PES and PAD, possibly combining them and/or resolving them in time. This experimental discussion will be complemented in a third part by a presentation of available theoretical tools focusing on TDDFT and detailing the methods used to address ionization observables. We shall also discuss the shortcomings of standard versions of TDDFT, especially what concerns the SIC problem, and show how to improve formally and practically the theory on that aspect. A long fourth part will be devoted to representative results. We shall illustrate the use of total ionization in pump and probe scenarios with fs lasers for tracking ionic dynamics in clusters. More challenging from the experimental point of view is pump and probe setups using attosecond pulses. The effort there is more on the capability to define proper signals to be measured/computed at such a short time scale. TDDFT analysis provides here a valuable tool in the search for the most efficient observables. PES and PAD will allow one to address more directly electronic dynamics itself by means of fs or ns laser pulses. We shall in particular discuss the impact of the dynamical regime in PES and PAD. We shall end this fourth part by addressing the role of temperature in PES and PAD. When possible, the results will be directly compared to experiments. The fifth part of the paper will be devoted to future directions of investigations. From the rich choice of developments, we shall in particular address two aspects. We shall start to discuss the information content of energy/angular spectra of emitted electrons in case of excitation by swift and highly charged ions rather than lasers. The second issue concerns the account of dissipative effects in TDDFT to be able to consider longer laser pulses where the competition between direct electron emission and thermalization is known to play a role as, e.g., in experiments with C 60 . Although such questions have been superficially

  10. Organic liquids-responsive β-cyclodextrin-functionalized graphene-based fluorescence probe: label-free selective detection of tetrahydrofuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huawen; Xin, John H; Hu, Hong; Wang, Xiaowen; Lu, Xinkun

    2014-06-06

    In this study, a label-free graphene-based fluorescence probe used for detection of volatile organic liquids was fabricated by a simple, efficient and low-cost method. To fabricate the probe, a bio-based β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was firstly grafted on reduced graphene surfaces effectively and uniformly, as evidenced by various characterization techniques such as Ultraviolet/Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The subsequent inclusion of Rhodamine B (RhB) into the inner cavities of the β-CD grafted on the graphene surfaces was achieved easily by a solution mixing method, which yielded the graphene-based fluorescent switch-on probe. In addition, the gradual and controllable quenching of RhB by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer from RhB to graphene during the process of stepwise accommodation of the RhB molecules into the β-CD-functionalized graphene was investigated in depth. A wide range of organic solvents was examined using the as-fabricated fluorescence probe, which revealed the highest sensitivity to tetrahydrofuran with the detection limit of about 1.7 μg/mL. Some insight into the mechanism of the different responsive behaviors of the fluorescence sensor to the examined targets was also described.

  11. Effect of secondary structure on single nucleotide polymorphism detection with a porous microarray matrix; implications for probe selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anthony, R. M.; Schuitema, A. R. J.; Chan, A. B.; Boender, P. J.; Klatser, P. R.; Oskam, L.

    2003-01-01

    Oligonucleotide arrays capable of detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from amplified nucleic acid have many applications. The expected SNP is usually placed approximately in the center of the probe to ensure the maximum shift in Tm between complementary and SNP sequences. Unfortunately,

  12. Organic Liquids-Responsive β-Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Graphene-Based Fluorescence Probe: Label-Free Selective Detection of Tetrahydrofuran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawen Hu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a label-free graphene-based fluorescence probe used for detection of volatile organic liquids was fabricated by a simple, efficient and low-cost method. To fabricate the probe, a bio-based β-cyclodextrin (β-CD was firstly grafted on reduced graphene surfaces effectively and uniformly, as evidenced by various characterization techniques such as Ultraviolet/Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The subsequent inclusion of Rhodamine B (RhB into the inner cavities of the β-CD grafted on the graphene surfaces was achieved easily by a solution mixing method, which yielded the graphene-based fluorescent switch-on probe. In addition, the gradual and controllable quenching of RhB by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer from RhB to graphene during the process of stepwise accommodation of the RhB molecules into the β-CD-functionalized graphene was investigated in depth. A wide range of organic solvents was examined using the as-fabricated fluorescence probe, which revealed the highest sensitivity to tetrahydrofuran with the detection limit of about 1.7 μg/mL. Some insight into the mechanism of the different responsive behaviors of the fluorescence sensor to the examined targets was also described.

  13. Dynamics and Control of Chemical Reactors-Selectively Surveyed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, S. B.; Jensen, N.

    1989-01-01

    The chemical reactor or bioreactor is physically at a central position in a process, and often with a decisive role on the overall technical and economical performance. Even though application of feedback control on reactors is gaining momentum and on-line optimization has been implemented....... For bioreactors the theory and practice of reactor design, dynamics and control have to be adapted to the peculiarities of the biological catalysts. Enzymes, the protein catalysts, are the simplest ones, which have many common features with chemical catalysts. The living cells are much more complex, these growing...... in industry, many reactor control problems are still left unsolved or only partly solved using open loop strategies where disturbance rejection and model inaccuracies have to be handled through manual reactor control and feedback control of raw material preprocessing and product purification operations...

  14. SELECT NUMERICAL METHODS FOR MODELING THE DYNAMICS SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana D. Panchenko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the creation of methodical support for mathematical modeling of dynamic processes in elements of the systems and complexes. As mathematical models ordinary differential equations have been used. The coefficients of the equations of the models can be nonlinear functions of the process. The projection-grid method is used as the main tool. It has been described iterative method algorithms taking into account the approximate solution prior to the first iteration and proposed adaptive control computing process. The original method of estimation error in the calculation solutions as well as for a given level of error of the technique solutions purpose adaptive method for solving configuration parameters is offered. A method for setting an adaptive method for solving the settings for a given level of error is given. The proposed method can be used for distributed computing.

  15. Non-affine deformation in microstructure selection in solids: I. Molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Jayee; Paul, Arya; Sengupta, Surajit [S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Calcutta 700 098 (India); Rao, Madan [Raman Research Institute, C V Raman Avenue, Bangalore 560 080 (India)

    2008-09-10

    We study the nucleation dynamics and microstructure selection in a model two-dimensional solid undergoing a square to rhombic transformation, using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find a range of microstructures depending on the depth of quench. The transformations are accompanied by the creation of transient and localized non-affine zones (NAZ), which evolve with the rapidly moving parent-product interface. These plastic regions are created beyond a threshold stress, at a rate proportional to the local stress. We show that the dynamics of NAZs determines the selection of microstructure, including the ferrite and martensite.

  16. Sex ratio selection and multi-factorial sex determination in the housefly : A dynamic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozielska, M.A.; Pen, I.R.; Beukeboom, L.W.; Weissing, F.J.

    Sex determining (SD) mechanisms are highly variable between different taxonomic groups and appear to change relatively quickly during evolution. Sex ratio selection could be a dominant force causing such changes. We investigate theoretically the effect of sex ratio selection on the dynamics of a

  17. A molecular dual fluorescence-ON probe for Mg2+ and Zn2+: Higher selectivity towards Mg2+ over Zn2+ in a mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maity, Shubhra Bikash; Bharadwaj, Parimal K.

    2014-01-01

    A Schiff base incorporating a coumarin fluorophore has been synthesized from easily available materials and is characterized by X-ray crystallography and other techniques. The probe serves as a dual analyte sensor and quantifies Mg 2+ and Zn 2+ ions by emission enhancement at different wavelengths without interference from a host of biologically relevant alkali/alkaline earth and transition metal ions. In presence of Mg 2+ the light yellow color of the probe in methanol changes to yellow–orange while in presence of Zn 2+ ion it changes to orange and hence can be detected through naked eye. The probe selectively gives emission of Mg 2+ when Zn 2+ ion is also present. - Highlights: • A Schiff base incorporating a coumarin fluorophore has been synthesized. • It acts as a dual analyte sensor and quantifies Mg 2+ and Zn 2+ ions by emission enhancement at different wavelengths. • It shows excellent selectivity for Mg 2+ ion in presence of alkali, alkaline earth metals as well as first row transition metals

  18. Dual Selectivity Expressed in [2+2+1] Dynamic Clipping of Unsymmetrical [2]Catenanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yi

    2010-06-11

    A {pi}-templated dynamic [2+2+1] clipping protocol is established for the synthesis of [2]catenanes from two parts dialdehyde, two parts diamine and one part tetracationic cyclophane. It is further diversified for the selective formation of an unsymmetrical [2]catenane showing great translational selectivity by employing two different dialdehydes in a one-pot reaction. The dual selectivity and the dynamic nature are verified by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, X-ray single crystal structural studies and exchange experiments.

  19. The role of fear of movement and injury in selective attentional processing in patients with chronic low back pain: a dot-probe evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Jeffrey; Peters, Madelon L; Fassaert, Thijs; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2005-05-01

    The present study sought to investigate to what extent patients with chronic low back pain and pain-free control subjects selectively attend to pain-related stimuli as measured with 2 dot-probe tasks with word stimuli and pictorial stimuli. Selective attentional processing was measured by means of 3 indices: the bias index, a congruency effect, and an incongruency effect. Pain-related fear as a trait measure (Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia [TSK]) was expected to be positively associated with all indices of selective attentional processing of pain stimuli. Results were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance. An incongruency effect was found for patients and to a significantly less degree for pain-free control subjects on the dot-probe task with pictorial stimuli, indicating that pain patients have difficulty disengaging from threat pictures. Pain-related fear as a trait measure (TSK) was not associated with selective attentional processing of word and pictorial stimuli in either pain patients or control subjects. Results from the present study are discussed, and directions for future research are provided. Demonstrating difficulty to disengage from threat might be clinically relevant because patients might pay less attention to fear-disconfirming information and remain engaged in avoidance, which might eventually lead to prolonged anxiety states.

  20. State selective dynamics of molecules, clusters, and nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John W. Keto

    2005-01-01

    Early objectives of this grant were: (1) Measure two-photon excitation of even parity excitons in liquid an solid xenon, (2) Study state-to-state energy transfer between two-photon laser excited states or rare-gas atoms to other rare has atoms, (3) study reactive half-collisions between xenon and chlorine leading to the XeCl* B state, (4) measure the spectra of ro-vibrational states of cluster ions and radicals formed in high-pressure discharges and to study their dynamics, (5) measure the surface and bulk electronic states of nanoparticles produced by a unique method of synthesis--laser ablation of microspheres (LAM). Using near-field and microluminescence techniques, we obtained spectra of single nanocrystals to compare with spectra obtained in a supersonic jet apparatus using resonance excitation followed by photoionization (REMPI) with time-of-flight mass analysis. These materials combine the functional advantages obtained from the size-tunable properties of nanocomposite materials with the fabrication and direct-write advantages of NPs manufactured by LAM. We demonstrated that CdSe nanoparticles produced by LAM were efficient fluorescers, even when deposited dry on sapphire substrates. Si nanoparticles were fluorescent when captured in ethylene glycol. We also obtained efficient fluorescence from Er doped phosphate glass nanoparticles which have application to gain waveguides in integrated optics or to nanoslush lasers. We used a femptosecond laser to study the nonlinear spectra of NC composites. We are currently measuring fluorescence and second and third-order susceptibilities of composites of Ag, Si, and GaN nanoparticles encapsulated within thin films of sapphire or SiO2

  1. State selective dynamics of molecules, clusters, and nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keto, John W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Early objectives of this grant were: (1) Measure two-photon excitation of even parity excitons in liquid an solid xenon, (2) Study state-to-state energy transver between two-photon laser excited states or rare-gas atoms to other rare has atoms, (3) study reactive half-collisions between xenon and chlorine leading to the XeCl* B state, (4) measure the spectra of ro-vibrational states of cluster ions and radicals formed in high-pressure discharges and to study their dynamics, (5) measure the surface and bulk electronic states of nanoparticles produced by a unique method of synthesis--laser ablation of microspheres (LAM). Using near-field and microluminescence techniques, we obtained spectra of single nanocrystals to compare with spectra obtained in a supersonic jet apparatus using resonance excitation followed by photoionization (REMPI) with time-of-flight mass analysis. These materials combine the functional advantages obtained from the size-tunable properties of nanocomposite materials with the fabrication and direct-write advantages of NPs manufactured by LAM. We demostrated that CdSe nanoparticles produced by LAM were efficiient fluorescers, even when deposited dry on sapphire substrates. Si nanoparticles were fluorescent when captured in ethylene glycol. We also obtiained efficient fluorescence from Er doped phosphate glass nanopartiicles which have application to gain wafeguides in integrated optics or to nanoslush lasers. We used a femptosecond laser to study the nonlinear spectra of NC composites. We are currently measuring fluorescence and second and third-order susceptibilities of composites of Ag, Si, and GaN nanoparticles encapsulated within thin films of sapphire or SiO 2.

  2. Traversing probe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashburn, D.N.; Stevens, R.H.; Woodall, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride. 10 claims, 6 figures

  3. Traversing probe system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  4. Lipophilic phosphorescent gold(I) clusters as selective probes for visualization of lipid droplets by two-photon microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koshel, E. I.; Cheluskin, P. S.; Melnikov, A. S.; Serdobintsev, P. Y.; Stolbovaia, A. Y.; Saifitdinova, A. F.; Scheslavskiy, V. I.; Chernyavskiy, Oleksandr; Gaginskaya, E. R.; Koshevoy, I. O.; Tunik, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 332, Jan 1 (2017), s. 122-130 ISSN 1010-6030 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : polynuclear gold-alkynyl cluster * lipophilic probe * phosphorescence * adipocyte * two-photon microscopy * PLIM Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Medical laboratory technology (including laboratory samples analysis Impact factor: 2.625, year: 2016

  5. A highly selective turn-on fluorescent probe for Al3+ in aqueous solution based on quinoline Schiff-base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng-Cheng; Fang, Hao; Xiong, Jing-Jing; Wu, Fang-Ying

    2017-06-01

    A new Al3+-specific fluorescent probe NQ was designed and synthesized from 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and 2-aminoquinoline. Upon the addition of Al3+, the fluorescent intensity of NQ was significantly enhanced compared with other examined metal ions in aqueous solution. The result of a Job’s plot indicated the formation of a 1:1 complex between the probe and Al3+, and the possible binding mode of the system between NQ and Al3+ was clarified by IR analysis and 1H NMR titration. Moreover, other metal ions examined had little effect on the detection of Al3+. The detection limit of NQ for Al3+ detection was 1.98 μM, which is lower than the level (7.4 μM) in drinking water defined by the World Health Organization. In addition, the fluorescent probe NQ could be recyclable simply through treatment with a proper reagent such as F-, and could also be used for the detection of Al3+ in real samples.

  6. Designing topological defects in 2D materials using scanning probe microscopy and a self-healing mechanism: a density functional-based molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Igor; Đurišić, Ivana; Belić, Milivoj R.

    2017-12-01

    Engineering of materials at the atomic level is one of the most important aims of nanotechnology. The unprecedented ability of scanning probe microscopy to address individual atoms opened up the possibilities for nanomanipulation and nanolitography of surfaces and later on of two-dimensional materials. While the state-of-the-art scanning probe lithographic methods include, primarily, adsorption, desorption and repositioning of adatoms and molecules on substrates or tailoring nanoribbons by etching of trenches, the precise modification of the intrinsic atomic structure of materials is yet to be advanced. Here we introduce a new concept, scanning probe microscopy with a rotating tip, for engineering of the atomic structure of membranes based on two-dimensional materials. In order to indicate the viability of the concept, we present our theoretical research, which includes atomistic modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, Fourier analysis and electronic transport calculations. While stretching can be employed for fabrication of atomic chains only, our comprehensive molecular dynamics simulations indicate that nanomanipulation by scanning probe microscopy with a rotating tip is capable of assembling a wide range of topological defects in two-dimensional materials in a rather controllable and reproducible manner. We analyze two possibilities. In the first case the probe tip is retracted from the membrane while in the second case the tip is released beneath the membrane allowing graphene to freely relax and self-heal the pore made by the tip. The former approach with the tip rotation can be achieved experimentally by rotation of the sample, which is equivalent to rotation of the tip, whereas irradiation of the membrane by nanoclusters can be utilized for the latter approach. The latter one has the potential to yield a yet richer diversity of topological defects on account of a lesser determinacy. If successfully realized experimentally the concept proposed here could

  7. Probing the role of Skyrme interactions on the fission dynamics of the {sup 6}Li + {sup 238}U reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ishita; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Manoj K. [Thapar University, School of Physics and Materials Science, Patiala (India)

    2017-06-15

    The performance of selected five Skyrme forces (out of a set of 240), tested by Dutra et al., is analyzed in view of fusion-fission dynamics. These forces are assumed to perform better for neutron-rich systems, so the choice of the reaction is accordingly made by opting for a neutron-rich target in {sup 6}Li + {sup 238}U reaction. This reaction is diagnosed further in reference to fusion hindrance within the dynamical approach of the cluster-decay model (DCM). In order to reduce the computational time, three Skyrme forces are figured out with the criteria that these forces cover the barrier characteristics of the remaining two forces as well. The fission cross-sections are successfully addressed at low energies for the {sup 6}Li + {sup 238}U reaction. However, at relatively higher energies, the excitation functions show theoretical suppression with respect to experimental data, which may be associated with the possible existence of incomplete fusion (ICF). For ICF, we have considered that the {sup 6}Li broke into {sup 4}He + {sup 2}H, as mentioned in the experimental work. The calculations of ICF are carried out for the {sup 4}He + {sup 238}U reaction with the selected Skyrme forces at E{sub c.m.} = 26.20 and 27.51 MeV. These forces address the data nicely for the compound nucleus (CN) as well as ICF processes. Here, the NRAPR force seems to require lesser barrier modification as compared to the other forces, therefore it can be used as an alternate choice for calculating the interaction potential. Additionally, the prediction of cross-sections at lower energies has been done with DCM using the NRAPR force. The l-dependent % barrier modification of the Skyrme forces undertaken is also worked out in reference to fusion hindrance at below barrier energies. (orig.)

  8. Electrical resistivity probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  9. Design of a highly selective quenched activity-based probe and its application in dual color imaging studies of cathepsin S activity localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oresic Bender, Kristina; Ofori, Leslie; van der Linden, Wouter A; Mock, Elliot D; Datta, Gopal K; Chowdhury, Somenath; Li, Hao; Segal, Ehud; Sanchez Lopez, Mateo; Ellman, Jonathan A; Figdor, Carl G; Bogyo, Matthew; Verdoes, Martijn

    2015-04-15

    The cysteine cathepsins are a group of 11 proteases whose function was originally believed to be the degradation of endocytosed material with a high degree of redundancy. However, it has become clear that these enzymes are also important regulators of both health and disease. Thus, selective tools that can discriminate between members of this highly related class of enzymes will be critical to further delineate the unique biological functions of individual cathepsins. Here we present the design and synthesis of a near-infrared quenched activity-based probe (qABP) that selectively targets cathepsin S which is highly expressed in immune cells. Importantly, this high degree of selectivity is retained both in vitro and in vivo. In combination with a new green-fluorescent pan-reactive cysteine cathepsin qABP we performed dual color labeling studies in bone marrow-derived immune cells and identified vesicles containing exclusively cathepsin S activity. This observation demonstrates the value of our complementary cathepsin probes and provides evidence for the existence of specific localization of cathepsin S activity in dendritic cells.

  10. Preconditioned dynamic mode decomposition and mode selection algorithms for large datasets using incremental proper orthogonal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmichi, Yuya

    2017-07-01

    In this letter, we propose a simple and efficient framework of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and mode selection for large datasets. The proposed framework explicitly introduces a preconditioning step using an incremental proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to DMD and mode selection algorithms. By performing the preconditioning step, the DMD and mode selection can be performed with low memory consumption and therefore can be applied to large datasets. Additionally, we propose a simple mode selection algorithm based on a greedy method. The proposed framework is applied to the analysis of three-dimensional flow around a circular cylinder.

  11. Design of a synthetic luminescent probe from a biomolecule binding domain: selective detection of AU-rich mRNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raibaut, Laurent; Vasseur, William; Shimberg, Geoffrey D; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Michel, Sarah L J; Sénèque, Olivier

    2017-02-01

    We report the design of a luminescent sensor based upon the zinc finger (ZF) protein TIS11d, that allows for the selective time-resolved detection of the UUAUUUAUU sequence of the 3'-untranslated region of messenger RNA. This sensor is composed of the tandem ZF RNA binding domain of TIS11d functionalized with a luminescent Tb 3+ complex on one of the ZFs and a sensitizing antenna on the other. This work provides the proof of principle that an RNA binding protein can be re-engineered as an RNA sensor and, more generally, that tunable synthetic luminescent probes for biomolecules can be obtained by modifying biomolecule-binding domains.

  12. Probing ligand binding modes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MurC ligase by molecular modeling, dynamics simulation and docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, C M; Mulakayala, Chaitanya; Babajan, Banaganapalli; Naveen, M; Rajasekhar, Chikati; Kumar, Chitta Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Multi drug resistance capacity for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-Mtb) demands the profound need for developing new anti-tuberculosis drugs. The present work is on Mtb-MurC ligase, which is an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, a component of Mtb cell wall. In this paper the 3-D structure of Mtb-MurC has been constructed using the templates 1GQQ and 1P31. Structural refinement and energy minimization of the predicted Mtb-MurC ligase model has been carried out by molecular dynamics. The streochemical check failures in the energy minimized model have been evaluated through Procheck, Whatif ProSA, and Verify 3D. Further torsion angles for the side chains of amino acid residues of the developed model were determined using Predictor. Docking analysis of Mtb-MurC model with ligands and natural substrates enabled us to identify specific residues viz. Gly125, Lys126, Arg331, and Arg332, within the Mtb-MurC binding pocket to play an important role in ligand and substrate binding affinity and selectivity. The availability of Mtb-MurC ligase built model, together with insights gained from docking analysis will promote the rational design of potent and selective Mtb-MurC ligase inhibitors as antituberculosis therapeutics.

  13. A highly selective and sensitive photoswitchable fluorescent probe for Hg2+ based on bisthienylethene-rhodamine 6G dyad and for live cells imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Wang, Sheng; Lv, Yingnian; Son, Young-A; Cao, Derong

    2014-07-15

    A new photochromic diarylethene derivative bearing rhodamine 6G dimmer as a fluorescent molecular probe is designed and synthesized successfully. All the compounds are characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. The bisthienylethene-rhodamine 6G dyad exhibit excellent phtochromism with reversibly color and fluorescence changes alternating irradiation with ultraviolet and visible light. Upon addition of Hg(2+), its color changes from colorless to red and its fluorescence is remarkably enhanced. Whereas other ions including K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Pb(2+), Ni(2+), Fe(3+), Al(3+), Cr(3+) and so on induce basically no spectral changes, which constitute a highly selective and sensitive photoswitchable fluorescent probe toward Hg(2+). Furthermore, by means of laser confocal scanning microscopy experiments, it is demonstrated that this probe can be applied for live cell imaging and monitoring Hg(2+) in living lung cancer cells with satisfying results, which shows its value of potential application in environmental and biological systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cassini revisited by the Cassini-Huygens probe: dynamical and photometric study of the rings with the ISS images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deau, Estelle

    2007-12-01

    In the Solar system, the planetary rings represent a fantastic opportunity of studying a majority of phenomena taking place in the thin discs. One can find discs at all redshifts and on all scales of the Universe. Planetary discs are very different: among the Jovian rings, one finds a halo of fine and diffuse dust; the rings of Uranus are very compact, like radially confined strings and the system of rings of Neptune consists of azimuthally stable arcs. However our interest goes on Saturn which has the most complex and widest system of rings known to date: 484 000 km and a vertical extension which increases with the distance to Saturn (typically less than 1 km to 10 000 km). The interest of such a matter organization around Saturn plus its many moons (more than one forty including 8 of a size of several hundreds kilometers) gave birth to the exploration mission CASSINI, supposed to allow the development and the refinement of models set up at the flybies of the two interplanetary probes VOYAGER. The CASSINI Mission began its nominal tour on January, 15 2005 after the orbital insertion the 1 July 2004 and the dropping of HUYGENS probe on january, 14 2005 on Titan's surface. The purpose of this thesis consists to revisit two subjects unsolved of long date in the photometric and dynamic behaviours of the Saturn's rings. In a first part, we try to solve the problem of accretion of matter within the Roche limit by studying the F ring. This ring, since its discovery in 1979 by Pioneer 11, is involved in a most various dynamic theories to explain its complex multi-radial structure and its variable azimuthal structure. We showed that the multi-radial structure of this ring can be understood by the existence of a spiral which is rolled up around a central area, bright, eccentric and inclined: the core. The lifespan of this spiral is not the same one as the core, suggesting that the processes which create the spiral are periodic. Moreover, we showed that the structure of the

  15. A Dynamic and Adaptive Selection Radar Tracking Method Based on Information Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Jianjun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the battlefield environment has become much more complex and variable. This paper presents a quantitative method and lower bound for the amount of target information acquired from multiple radar observations to adaptively and dynamically organize the detection of battlefield resources based on the principle of information entropy. Furthermore, for minimizing the given information entropy’s lower bound for target measurement at every moment, a method to dynamically and adaptively select radars with a high amount of information for target tracking is proposed. The simulation results indicate that the proposed method has higher tracking accuracy than that of tracking without adaptive radar selection based on entropy.

  16. A sensitive two-photon probe to selectively detect monoamine oxidase B activity in Parkinson’s disease models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Chen, Grace Y. J.; Zhu, Biwei; Chai, Chou; Xu, Qing-Hua; Tan, Eng-King; Zhu, Qing; Lim, Kah-Leong; Yao, Shao Q.

    2014-02-01

    The unusually high MAO-B activity consistently observed in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients has been proposed as a biomarker; however, this has not been realized due to the lack of probes suitable for MAO-B-specific detection in live cells/tissues. Here we report the first two-photon, small molecule fluorogenic probe (U1) that enables highly sensitive/specific and real-time imaging of endogenous MAO-B activities across biological samples. We also used U1 to confirm the reported inverse relationship between parkin and MAO-B in PD models. With no apparent toxicity, U1 may be used to monitor MAO-B activities in small animals during disease development. In clinical samples, we find elevated MAO-B activities only in B lymphocytes (not in fibroblasts), hinting that MAO-B activity in peripheral blood cells might be an accessible biomarker for rapid detection of PD. Our results provide important starting points for using small molecule imaging techniques to explore MAO-B at the organism level.

  17. Unraveling the sub-processes of selective attention: insights from dynamic modeling and continuous behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Simon; Dshemuchadse, Maja; Görner, Max; Goschke, Thomas; Scherbaum, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Selective attention biases information processing toward stimuli that are relevant for achieving our goals. However, the nature of this bias is under debate: Does it solely rely on the amplification of goal-relevant information or is there a need for additional inhibitory processes that selectively suppress currently distracting information? Here, we explored the processes underlying selective attention with a dynamic, modeling-based approach that focuses on the continuous evolution of behavior over time. We present two dynamic neural field models incorporating the diverging theoretical assumptions. Simulations with both models showed that they make similar predictions with regard to response times but differ markedly with regard to their continuous behavior. Human data observed via mouse tracking as a continuous measure of performance revealed evidence for the model solely based on amplification but no indication of persisting selective distracter inhibition.

  18. Spatio-temporal dynamics of word selection in speech production: Insights from electrocorticography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie K Ries

    2015-04-01

    Our results suggest that the posterior inferior LTC is involved in word selection as semantic concepts become available. Posterior medial and left PFC regions may be involved in trial-by-trial top-down control over LTC to help overcome interference caused by semantically-related alternatives in word selection. The single-case result supports this hypothesis and suggests that the posterior medial PFC plays a causal role in resolving this interference in word selection. Lastly, the sensitivity to semantic interference of the post-vocal onset posterior LTC activity suggests the semantic interference effect does not only reflect word selection difficulty but is also present at post-selection stages such as verbal response monitoring. In sum, this study reveals a dynamic network of interacting brain regions that support word selection in language production.

  19. Dynamical study of the radial structure of the fluctuations measured by a reciprocating Langmuir probe in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devynck, P.; Antar, G.; Wang, G.; Garbet, X.; Gunn, J.; Pascal, J.Y.

    1999-01-01

    The fluctuations in the Scrape Off Layer (S.O.L.) of Tore Supra are studied with a movable Langmuir probe biased to ion saturation current. The probe system consists of three probes separated poloidally (0.68 cm between two nearby probes). The probe has no magnetic connection to the mid plane limiter on which the plasma is leaning, but the radial profile of the ion saturation current fluctuations displays a dip at the limiter position. At the same location the ion saturation current displays a dip at the limiter position. At the same location the ion saturation current displays an inflexion point. A correlation analysis technique is developed to study the radial behaviour of the fluctuations. It reveals that this dip is associated with a reduction of the poloidal velocity of the fluctuations with no sign reversal. In the dip the mean poloidal correlation length of the fluctuations is also reduced. These observations are consistent with a reduction of the fluctuations by a shear of the radial electric field created at the limiter surface. The autocorrelation time is also calculated. It increases slightly in the dip and is found to be sensitive to both the convection time and lifetime of the turbulent structures, because these quantities are of the same order. (authors)

  20. Eu(III)-functionalized MIL-124 as fluorescent probe for highly selectively sensing ions and organic small molecules especially for Fe(III) and Fe(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Yu; Yan, Bing

    2015-01-14

    A layerlike MOF (MIL-124, orGa2(OH)4(C9O6H4)) has been prepared and chosen as a parent compound to encapsulate Eu(3+) cations by one uncoordinated carbonyl group in its pores. The Eu(3+)-incorporated sample (Eu(3+)@MIL-124) is fully characterized, which shows excellent luminescence and good fluorescence stability in water or other organic solvents. Subsequently, we choose Eu(3+)@MIL-124 as sensitive probe for sensing metal ions, anions, and organic small molecules because of its robust framework. Studying of the luminescence properties reveals that the complex Eu(3+)@MIL-124 was developed as a highly selective and sensitive probe for detection of Fe(3+) (detection limit, 0.28 μM) and Fe(2+) ions through fluorescence quenching of Eu(3+) and MOF over other metal ions. In connection to this, a probable sensing mechanism was also discussed in this paper. In addition, when Eu(3+)@MIL-124 was immersed in the different anions solutions and organic solvents, it also shows highly selective for Cr2O7(2-)(detection limit, 0.15 μM)and acetone. Remarkably, it is the first Eu-doped MOF to exhibit an excellent ability for the detection of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) in an aqueous environment without any structural disintegration of the framework.

  1. Quality control of the soil moisture probe response patterns from a green infrastructure site using Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) and association rule learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Bedig, A.; Quigley, M.; Montalto, F. A.

    2017-12-01

    In-situ field monitoring can help to improve the design and management of decentralized Green Infrastructure (GI) systems in urban areas. Because of the vast quantity of continuous data generated from multi-site sensor systems, cost-effective post-construction opportunities for real-time control are limited; and the physical processes that influence the observed phenomena (e.g. soil moisture) are hard to track and control. To derive knowledge efficiently from real-time monitoring data, there is currently a need to develop more efficient approaches to data quality control. In this paper, we employ dynamic time warping method to compare the similarity of two soil moisture patterns without ignoring the inherent autocorrelation. We also use a rule-based machine learning method to investigate the feasibility of detecting anomalous responses from soil moisture probes. The data was generated from both individual and clusters of probes, deployed in a GI site in Milwaukee, WI. In contrast to traditional QAQC methods, which seek to detect outliers at individual time steps, the new method presented here converts the continuous time series into event-based symbolic sequences from which unusual response patterns can be detected. Different Matching rules are developed on different physical characteristics for different seasons. The results suggest that this method could be used alternatively to detect sensor failure, to identify extreme events, and to call out abnormal change patterns, compared to intra-probe and inter-probe historical observations. Though this algorithm was developed for soil moisture probes, the same approach could easily be extended to advance QAQC efficiency for any continuous environmental datasets.

  2. Investigation of static and dynamic behavior of functionally graded piezoelectric actuated Poly-Si micro cantilever probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Vibhuti Bhushan; Parashar, Sandeep Kumar, E-mail: skparashar@rtu.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajasthan Technical University, Kota (India)

    2016-04-13

    In the present paper a novel functionally graded piezoelectric (FGP) actuated Poly-Si micro cantilever probe is proposed for atomic force microscope. The shear piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 15} has much higher value than coupling coefficients d{sub 31} and d{sub 33}, hence in the present work the micro cantilever beam actuated by d{sub 15} effect is utilized. The material properties are graded in the thickness direction of actuator by a simple power law. A three dimensional finite element analysis has been performed using COMSOL Multiphysics® (version 4.2) software. Tip deflection and free vibration analysis for the micro cantilever probe has been done. The results presented in the paper shall be useful in the design of micro cantilever probe and their subsequent utilization in atomic force microscopes.

  3. Assessment of photon migration for subsurface probing in selected types of bone using spatially offset Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Churchwell, John H.; Buckley, Kevin; Kerns, Jemma G.; Goodship, Allen E.; Parker, Anthony W.; Matousek, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Bone diseases and disorders are a growing challenge in aging populations; so effective diagnostic and therapeutic solutions are now essential to manage the demands of healthcare sectors effectively. Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) allows for chemically specific sub-surface probing and has a great potential to become an in vivo tool for early non-invasive detection of bone conditions. Bone is a complex hierarchical material and the volume probed by SORS is dependent on its optical properties. Understanding and taking into account the variations in diffuse scattering properties of light in various bone types is essential for the effective development and optimization of SORS as a diagnostic in vivo tool for characterizing bone disease. This study presents SORS investigations at 830 nm excitation on two specific types of bone with differing mineralization levels. Thin slices of bone from horse metacarpal cortex (0.6 mm thick) and whale bulla (1.0 mm thick) were cut and stacked on top of each other (4-7 layers with a total thickness of 4.1 mm). To investigate the depth origin of the detected Raman signal inside the bone a 0.38 mm thin Teflon slice was used as test sample and inserted in between the layers of stacked bone slices. For both types of bone it could be demonstrated that chemically specific Raman signatures different from those of normal bone can be retrieved through 3.8-4.0 mm of overlying bone material with a spatial offset of 7-8 mm. The determined penetration depths can be correlated with the mechanical and optical properties of the specimens. The findings of this study increase our understanding of SORS analysis of bone and thus have impact for medical diagnostic applications e.g. enabling the non-invasive detection of spectral changes caused by degeneration, infection or cancer deep inside the bone matrix.

  4. Selective attention to phonology dynamically modulates initial encoding of auditory words within the left hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoncheva, Yuliya; Maurer, Urs; Zevin, Jason D; McCandliss, Bruce D

    2014-08-15

    Selective attention to phonology, i.e., the ability to attend to sub-syllabic units within spoken words, is a critical precursor to literacy acquisition. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence has demonstrated that a left-lateralized network of frontal, temporal, and posterior language regions, including the visual word form area, supports this skill. The current event-related potential (ERP) study investigated the temporal dynamics of selective attention to phonology during spoken word perception. We tested the hypothesis that selective attention to phonology dynamically modulates stimulus encoding by recruiting left-lateralized processes specifically while the information critical for performance is unfolding. Selective attention to phonology was captured by manipulating listening goals: skilled adult readers attended to either rhyme or melody within auditory stimulus pairs. Each pair superimposed rhyming and melodic information ensuring identical sensory stimulation. Selective attention to phonology produced distinct early and late topographic ERP effects during stimulus encoding. Data-driven source localization analyses revealed that selective attention to phonology led to significantly greater recruitment of left-lateralized posterior and extensive temporal regions, which was notably concurrent with the rhyme-relevant information within the word. Furthermore, selective attention effects were specific to auditory stimulus encoding and not observed in response to cues, arguing against the notion that they reflect sustained task setting. Collectively, these results demonstrate that selective attention to phonology dynamically engages a left-lateralized network during the critical time-period of perception for achieving phonological analysis goals. These findings suggest a key role for selective attention in on-line phonological computations. Furthermore, these findings motivate future research on the role that neural mechanisms of attention may

  5. Selective attention to phonology dynamically modulates initial encoding of auditory words within the left hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoncheva; Maurer, Urs; Zevin, Jason; McCandliss, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Selective attention to phonology, i.e., the ability to attend to sub-syllabic units within spoken words, is a critical precursor to literacy acquisition. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence has demonstrated that a left-lateralized network of frontal, temporal, and posterior language regions, including the visual word form area, supports this skill. The current event-related potential (ERP) study investigated the temporal dynamics of selective attention to phonology during spoken word perception. We tested the hypothesis that selective atten tion to phonology dynamically modulates stimulus encoding by recruiting left-lateralized processes specifically while the information critical for performance is unfolding. Selective attention to phonology was captured by ma nipulating listening goals: skilled adult readers attended to either rhyme or melody within auditory stimulus pairs. Each pair superimposed rhyming and melodic information ensuring identical sensory stimulation. Selective attention to phonology produced distinct early and late topographic ERP effects during stimulus encoding. Data- driven source localization analyses revealed that selective attention to phonology led to significantly greater re cruitment of left-lateralized posterior and extensive temporal regions, which was notably concurrent with the rhyme-relevant information within the word. Furthermore, selective attention effects were specific to auditory stimulus encoding and not observed in response to cues, arguing against the notion that they reflect sustained task setting. Collectively, these results demonstrate that selective attention to phonology dynamically engages a left-lateralized network during the critical time-period of perception for achieving phonological analysis goals. These findings support the key role of selective attention to phonology in the development of literacy and motivate future research on the neural bases of the interaction between phonological

  6. Dynamic nuclear polarization and optimal control spatial-selective 13C MRI and MRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Mads Sloth; Laustsen, Christoffer; Maximov, Ivan I.

    2013-01-01

    . This is achieved through the development of spatial-selective single-shot spiral-readout MRI and MRS experiments combined with dynamic nuclear polarization hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate on a 4.7T pre-clinical MR scanner. The method stands out from related techniques by facilitating anatomic shaped region...

  7. On dynamic selection of households for direct marketing based on Markov chain models with memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, Pieter W.

    A simple, dynamic selection procedure is proposed, based on conditional, expected profits using Markov chain models with memory. The method is easy to apply, only frequencies and mean values have to be calculated or estimated. The method is empirically illustrated using a data set from a charitable

  8. Tropical forest harvesting and taxation: a dynamic model of harvesting behavior under selective extraction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert F. Conrad; Malcolm Gillis; D. Evan Mercer

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic model of selective harvesting in multi-species,multi-age tropical forests is developed. Forests are predicted to exhibit different optimal harvesting profiles depending on the nature of their joint cost functions and own or cross-species stock effects. The model is applied to the controversy about incentives produced by various taxes. The impacts of specific...

  9. Action-Selection Perseveration in Young Children : Advances of a Dynamic Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, R.F.A

    2008-01-01

    This study presents an empirical test and dynamic model of perseverative limb selection in children of 14-, 24-, and 36-months old (N = 66 in total). In the experiment children repeatedly grasped a spoon with a single hand. In 2 separate conditions, the spoon was presented either 4 times on their

  10. Is There Really a Global Business Cycle? : A Dynamic Factor Model with Stochastic Factor Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Berger (Tino); L.C.G. Pozzi (Lorenzo)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe investigate the presence of international business cycles in macroeconomic aggregates (output, consumption, investment) using a panel of 60 countries over the period 1961-2014. The paper presents a Bayesian stochastic factor selection approach for dynamic factor models with

  11. Dynamic frame selection for in vivo ultrasound temperature estimation during radiofrequency ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, Matthew J; Varghese, Tomy

    2010-01-01

    Minimally invasive therapies such as radiofrequency ablation have been developed to treat cancers of the liver, prostate and kidney without invasive surgery. Prior work has demonstrated that ultrasound echo shifts due to temperature changes can be utilized to track the temperature distribution in real time. In this paper, a motion compensation algorithm is evaluated to reduce the impact of cardiac and respiratory motion on ultrasound-based temperature tracking methods. The algorithm dynamically selects the next suitable frame given a start frame (selected during the exhale or expiration phase where extraneous motion is reduced), enabling optimization of the computational time in addition to reducing displacement noise artifacts incurred with the estimation of smaller frame-to-frame displacements at the full frame rate. A region of interest that does not undergo ablation is selected in the first frame and the algorithm searches through subsequent frames to find a similarly located region of interest in subsequent frames, with a high value of the mean normalized cross-correlation coefficient value. In conjunction with dynamic frame selection, two different two-dimensional displacement estimation algorithms namely a block matching and multilevel cross-correlation are compared. The multi-level cross-correlation method incorporates tracking of the lateral tissue expansion in addition to the axial deformation to improve the estimation performance. Our results demonstrate the ability of the proposed motion compensation using dynamic frame selection in conjunction with the two-dimensional multilevel cross-correlation to track the temperature distribution.

  12. Impact of dynamic specimen shape evolution on the atom probe tomography results of doped epitaxial oxide multilayers: Comparison of experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madaan, Nitesh; Nandasiri, Manjula; Devaraj, Arun, E-mail: arun.devaraj@pnnl.gov [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3335 Innovation Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Bao, Jie [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Xu, Zhijie [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3335 Innovation Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, PO Box 5825, Doha (Qatar)

    2015-08-31

    The experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results from two different specimen orientations (top-down and sideways) of a high oxygen ion conducting Samaria-doped-ceria/Scandia-stabilized-zirconia multilayer thin film solid oxide fuel cell electrolyte was compared with level-set method based field evaporation simulations for the same specimen orientations. This experiment-simulation comparison explains the dynamic specimen shape evolution and ion trajectory aberrations that can induce density artifacts in final reconstruction, leading to inaccurate estimation of interfacial intermixing. This study highlights the importance of comparing experimental results with field evaporation simulations when using APT to study oxide heterostructure interfaces.

  13. Growth and decay dynamics of a stable microbubble produced at the end of a near-field scanning optical microscopy fiber probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.S.; Hnatovsky, C.

    2004-01-01

    Low power cw laser radiation coupled into a near-field scanning optical microscopy fiber probe has been used to generate a stable microbubble in water. A probe tip which was selectively chemically etched and metallized served as a microheater for the generation of the stable bubble. Bubble diameters in the range of 40-400 μm and lifetimes of over an hour have been obtained. The microbubble exhibited a linear growth phase over a period of a few seconds before reaching a maximum diameter which depended on the laser power. When the laser beam was blocked the microbubble decayed with a rate which was inversely proportional to the bubble diameter. The bubble lifetime depended on the square of the initial bubble diameter. Instabilities which transform a large stable bubble into a microjet stream of micron sized bubbles as the laser power was increased is also described

  14. The cultural implications of growth: Modeling nonlinear interaction of trait selection and population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoci, Angelo; Galeotti, Marcello; Russu, Paolo; Luigi Sacco, Pier

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we study a nonlinear model of the interaction between trait selection and population dynamics, building on previous work of Ghirlanda et al. [Theor. Popul. Biol. 77, 181-188 (2010)] and Antoci et al. [Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simul. 58, 92-106 (2018)]. We establish some basic properties of the model dynamics and present some simulations of the fine-grained structure of alternative dynamic regimes for chosen combinations of parameters. The role of the parameters that govern the reinforcement/corruption of maladaptive vs. adaptive traits is of special importance in determining the model's dynamic evolution. The main implication of this result is the need to pay special attention to the structural forces that may favor the emergence and consolidation of maladaptive traits in contemporary socio-economies, as it is the case, for example, for the stimulation of dysfunctional consumption habits and lifestyles in the pursuit of short-term profits.

  15. The cultural implications of growth: Modeling nonlinear interaction of trait selection and population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoci, Angelo; Galeotti, Marcello; Russu, Paolo; Luigi Sacco, Pier

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we study a nonlinear model of the interaction between trait selection and population dynamics, building on previous work of Ghirlanda et al. [Theor. Popul. Biol. 77, 181-188 (2010)] and Antoci et al. [Commun. Nonlinear Sci. Numer. Simul. 58, 92-106 (2018)]. We establish some basic properties of the model dynamics and present some simulations of the fine-grained structure of alternative dynamic regimes for chosen combinations of parameters. The role of the parameters that govern the reinforcement/corruption of maladaptive vs. adaptive traits is of special importance in determining the model's dynamic evolution. The main implication of this result is the need to pay special attention to the structural forces that may favor the emergence and consolidation of maladaptive traits in contemporary socio-economies, as it is the case, for example, for the stimulation of dysfunctional consumption habits and lifestyles in the pursuit of short-term profits.

  16. Anti-HER2 immunoliposomes for selective delivery of electron paramagnetic resonance imaging probes to HER2-overexpressing breast tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Scott R.; Macedo, Luciana F.; Barth, Eugene D.; Tkaczuk, Katherine H.; Martin, Stuart S.; Rosen, Gerald M.; Halpern, Howard J.; Brodie, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging is an emerging modality that can detect and localize paramagnetic molecular probes (so-called spin probes) in vivo. We previously demonstrated that nitroxide spin probes can be encapsulated in liposomes at concentrations exceeding 100 mM, at which nitroxides exhibit a concentration-dependent quenching of their EPR signal that is analogous to the self-quenching of fluorescent molecules. Therefore, intact liposomes encapsulating high concentrations of nitroxides exhibit greatly attenuated EPR spectral signals, and endocytosis of such liposomes represents a cell-activated contrast-generating mechanism. After endocytosis, the encapsulated nitroxide is liberated and becomes greatly diluted in the intracellular milieu. This dequenches the nitroxides to generate a robust intracellular EPR signal. It is therefore possible to deliver a high concentration of nitroxides to cells while minimizing background signal from unendocytosed liposomes. We report here that intracellular EPR signal can be selectively generated in a specific cell type by exploiting its expression of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2). When targeted by anti-HER2 immunoliposomes encapsulating quenched nitroxides, Hc7 cells, which are novel HER2-overexpressing cells derived from the MCF7 breast tumor cell line, endocytose the liposomes copiously, in contrast to the parent MCF7 cells or control CV1 cells, which do not express HER2. HER2-dependent liposomal delivery enables Hc7 cells to accumulate 750 μM nitroxide intracellularly. Through the use of phantom models, we verify that this concentration of nitroxides is more than sufficient for EPR imaging, thus laying the foundation for using EPR imaging to visualize HER2-overexpressing Hc7 tumors in animals. PMID:20066490

  17. Optimal Strategy for Integrated Dynamic Inventory Control and Supplier Selection in Unknown Environment via Stochastic Dynamic Programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutrisno; Widowati; Solikhin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a mathematical model in stochastic dynamic optimization form to determine the optimal strategy for an integrated single product inventory control problem and supplier selection problem where the demand and purchasing cost parameters are random. For each time period, by using the proposed model, we decide the optimal supplier and calculate the optimal product volume purchased from the optimal supplier so that the inventory level will be located at some point as close as possible to the reference point with minimal cost. We use stochastic dynamic programming to solve this problem and give several numerical experiments to evaluate the model. From the results, for each time period, the proposed model was generated the optimal supplier and the inventory level was tracked the reference point well. (paper)

  18. STED Imaging of Golgi Dynamics with Cer-SiR: A Two-Component, Photostable, High-Density Lipid Probe for Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Roman S; Toomre, Derek; Schepartz, Alanna

    2017-01-01

    Long time-lapse super-resolution imaging in live cells requires a labeling strategy that combines a bright, photostable fluorophore with a high-density localization probe. Lipids are ideal high-density localization probes, as they are >100 times more abundant than most membrane-bound proteins and simultaneously demark the boundaries of cellular organelles. Here, we describe Cer-SiR, a two-component, high-density lipid probe that is exceptionally photostable. Cer-SiR is generated in cells via a bioorthogonal reaction of two components: a ceramide lipid tagged with trans-cyclooctene (Cer-TCO) and a reactive, photostable Si-rhodamine dye (SiR-Tz). These components assemble within the Golgi apparatus of live cells to form Cer-SiR. Cer-SiR is benign to cellular function, localizes within the Golgi at a high density, and is sufficiently photostable to enable visualization of Golgi structure and dynamics by 3D confocal or long time-lapse STED microscopy.

  19. 1-(2-Methyl-5H-chromeno[2,3-b]pyridin-5-ylidene) hydrazone as fluorescent probes for selective zinc sensing in DMSO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouri, Hela [URCA—Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims, CNRS UMR 7312, Groupe Chimie de Coordination, UFR Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); LACReSNE—Université de Carthage, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna Bizerte (Tunisia); Cadiou, Cyril, E-mail: cyril.cadiou@univ-reims.fr [URCA—Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims, CNRS UMR 7312, Groupe Chimie de Coordination, UFR Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Henry, Axelle; Déchamps-Olivier, Isabelle [URCA—Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims, CNRS UMR 7312, Groupe Chimie de Coordination, UFR Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Ternane, Riadh; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika [LACReSNE—Université de Carthage, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna Bizerte (Tunisia); Lemercier, Gilles; Chuburu, Françoise [URCA—Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims, CNRS UMR 7312, Groupe Chimie de Coordination, UFR Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)

    2014-04-15

    Two methyl-chromeno-pyridinylidene hydrazone derivatives L1, a cyclen derivative, and L2 were studied as potential fluorescent OFF–ON sensors towards Zn{sup 2+} in DMSO. Upon addition of one equivalent of Zn{sup 2+}, L1 fluorescence was quenched, but addition of a second equivalent of Zn{sup 2+} restored partially the signal. Therefore ZnL1 behaved as a OFF–ON sensor for zinc. By comparison, L2 behaved as a very sensitive probe for zinc. ZnL1 and L2 sensor efficiencies were correlated to Zn{sup 2+} coordination via the hydrazone moiety of the fluorophore, which prevented a photoinduced electron transfer (PET), and allowed an efficient CHelation-Enhanced Fluorescence (CHEF) effect. -- Highlights: • According to Zn{sup 2+} concentration, L1 behaves as an on-off-on sensor. • Given that L1 concentration is known, its fluorescence response could give an immediate suggestion about the range of Zn{sup 2+} concentration. • L2 exhibited a strong fluorescence enhancement upon Zn{sup 2+} addition. • It was demonstrated that L2 was highly specific to Zn{sup 2+}, which rendered this very straightforward ligand as an efficient and selective probe for this ion.

  20. Evolutionary Dynamics of Collective Behavior Selection and Drift: Flocking, Collapse, and Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shaolin; Wang, Yaonan; Chen, Yao; Wang, Zhen

    2016-06-14

    Behavioral choice is ubiquitous across a wide range of interactive decision-making processes and a myriad of scientific disciplines. With regard to this issue, one entitative problem is actually to understand how collective social behaviors form and evolve among populations when they face a variety of conflict alternatives. In this paper, a selection-drift dynamic model is formulated to characterize the behavior imitation and exploration processes in social populations. Based on the proposed framework, several typical behavior evolution patterns, including behavioral flocking, collapse, and oscillation, are reproduced with different kinds of behavior networks. Interestingly, for the selection-drift dynamics on homogeneous symmetric behavior networks, we unveil the phase transition from behavioral flocking to collapse and derive the bifurcation diagram of the evolutionary stable behaviors in social behavior evolution. While via analyzing the survival conditions of the best behavior on heterogeneous symmetric behavior networks, we propose a selection-drift mechanism to guarantee consensus at the optimal behavior. Moreover, when the selection-drift dynamics on asymmetric behavior networks is simulated, it is shown that breaking the symmetry in behavior networks can induce various behavioral oscillations. These obtained results may shed new insights into understanding, detecting, and further controlling how social norm and cultural trends evolve.

  1. 11C-MCG: Synthesis, Uptake Selectivity, and Primate PET of a Probe for Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II (NAALADase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G. Pomper

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II, also known as N-acetylated α-linked l-amino dipeptidase (NAALADase, may enable study of glutamatergic transmission, prostate cancer, and tumor neovasculature in vivo. Our goal was to develop a probe for GCP II for use with positron emission tomography (PET. Radiosynthesis of 11C–MeCys–C(O–Glu or 11C-(S-2-[3-((R-1-carboxy-2-methylsulfanyl-ethyl-ureido]-pentanedioic acid (11C-MCG, an asymmetric urea and potent (Ki = 1.9 nM inhibitor of GCP II, was performed by C-11 methylation of the free thiol. Biodistribution of 11C-MCG was assayed in mice, and quantitative PET was performed in a baboon. 11C-MCG was obtained in 16% radiochemical yield at the end of synthesis with specific radioactivities over 167 GBq/mmol (4000 Ci/mmol within 30 min after the end of bombardment. At 30 min postinjection, 11C-MCG showed 33.0 ± 5.1%, 0.4 ± 0.1%, and 1.1 ± 0.2% ID/g in mouse kidney (target tissue, muscle, and blood, respectively. Little radioactivity gained access to the brain. Blockade with unlabeled MCG or 2-(phosphonomethylpentanedioic acid (PMPA, another potent inhibitor of GCP II, provided sevenfold and threefold reductions, respectively, in binding to target tissue. For PET, distribution volumes (DVs were 1.38 then 0.87 pre- and postblocker (PMPA. Little metabolism of 11C-MCG occurred in the mouse or baboon. These results suggest that 11C-MCG may be useful for imaging GCP II in the periphery.

  2. Interplay of stereoelectronic and enviromental effects in tuning the structural and magnetic properties of a prototypical spin probe: further insights from a first principle dynamical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Michele; Cimino, Paola; De Angelis, Filippo; Barone, Vincenzo

    2006-04-05

    The nitrogen isotropic hyperfine coupling constant (hcc) and the g tensor of a prototypical spin probe (di-tert-butyl nitroxide, DTBN) in aqueous solution have been investigated by means of an integrated computational approach including Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and quantum mechanical calculations involving a discrete-continuum embedding. The quantitative agreement between computed and experimental parameters fully validates our integrated approach. Decoupling of the structural, dynamical, and environmental contributions acting onto the spectral observables allows an unbiased judgment of the role played by different effects in determining the overall experimental observables and highlights the importance of finite-temperature vibrational averaging. Together with their intrinsic interest, our results pave the route toward more reliable interpretations of EPR parameters of complex systems of biological and technological relevance.

  3. Lineage dynamics and mutation-selection balance in non-adapting asexual populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pénisson, Sophie; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Colato, Alexandre; Gerrish, Philip J.

    2013-02-01

    In classical population genetics, mutation-selection balance refers to the equilibrium frequency of a deleterious allele established and maintained under two opposing forces: recurrent mutation, which tends to increase the frequency of the allele; and selection, which tends to decrease its frequency. In a haploid population, if μ denotes the per capita rate of production of the deleterious allele by mutation and s denotes the selective disadvantage of carrying the allele, then the classical mutation-selection balance frequency of the allele is approximated by μ/s. This calculation assumes that lineages carrying the mutant allele in question—the ‘focal allele’—do not accumulate deleterious mutations linked to the focal allele. In principle, indirect selection against the focal allele caused by such additional mutations can decrease the frequency of the focal allele below the classical mutation-selection balance. This effect of indirect selection will be strongest in an asexual population, in which the entire genome is in linkage. Here, we use an approach based on a multitype branching process to investigate this effect, analyzing lineage dynamics under mutation, direct selection, and indirect selection in a non-adapting asexual population. We find that the equilibrium balance between recurrent mutation to the focal allele and the forces of direct and indirect selection against the focal allele is closely approximated by γμ/(s + U) (s = 0 if the focal allele is neutral), where γ ≈ eθθ-(ω+θ)(ω + θ)(Γ(ω + θ) - Γ(ω + θ,θ)), \\theta =U/\\tilde {s}, and \\omega =s/\\tilde {s}; U denotes the genomic deleterious mutation rate and \\tilde {s} denotes the geometric mean selective disadvantage of deleterious mutations elsewhere on the genome. This mutation-selection balance for asexual populations can remain surprisingly invariant over wide ranges of the mutation rate.

  4. On the role of thermal fluid dynamics into the evolution of porosity during selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panwisawas, C.; Qiu, C.L.; Sovani, Y.; Brooks, J.W.; Attallah, M.M.; Basoalto, H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal fluid dynamics and experiments have been used to study the evolution of pores during selective laser melting of Ti-6Al-4V. Scanning electron micrographs show that the morphology of pores changed from near-spherical to elongated shape as the laser scan speed increased. Computational fluid dynamics suggests that this is caused by the change of flow pattern in the melt pool which is dictated by forces such as vapour pressure, gravitational force, capillary and thermal capillary forces exerted on the metallic/gaseous interface

  5. Ultrafast Dynamics of the VO2 Insulator-to-Metal Transition Observed by Nondegenerate Pump-Probe Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haglund R. F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-degenerate pump (1.5 eV-probe (0.4 eV transmission spectroscopy on vanadium dioxide films grown on glass and three different sapphire substrates shows systematic variations with substrate that correlate with VO2 grain size and laser fluence. Temperature dependent measurements showed changes in the electronic response that is proportional to the metallic fraction.

  6. Using the seismology of non-magnetic chemically peculiar stars as a probe of dynamical processes in stellar interiors

    OpenAIRE

    Turcotte, S.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical composition is a good tracer of hydrodynamical processes that occur in stars as they often lead to mixing and particle transport. By comparing abundances predicted by models and those observed in stars we can infer some constraints on those mixing processes. As pulsations in stars are often very sensitive to chemical composition, we can use asteroseismology to probe the internal chemical composition of stars where no direct observations are possible. In this paper I focus on main seq...

  7. A simple and selective resonance Rayleigh scattering-energy transfer spectral method for determination of trace neomycin sulfate using Cu2O particle as probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Huixiang; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2018-02-01

    The stable Cu2O nanocubic (Cu2ONC) sol was prepared, based on graphene oxide (GO) catalysis of glucose-Fehling's reagent reaction, and its absorption and resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were examined. Using the as-prepared Cu2ONC as RRS probe, and coupling with the neomycin sulfate (NEO) complex reaction, a new, simple, sensitive and selective RRS-energy transfer (RRS-ET) method was established for detection of neomycin sulfate, with a linear range of 1.4-112 μM and a detection limit of 0.4 μM. The method has been applied to the detection of neomycin sulfate in samples with satisfactory results.

  8. Probing the Selectivity and Protein•Protein Interactions of a Non-Reducing Fungal Polyketide Synthase Using Mechanism-Based Crosslinkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruegger, Joel; Haushalter, Bob; Vagstad, Anna; Shakya, Gaurav; Mih, Nathan; Townsend, Craig A.; Burkart, Michael D.; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein•protein interactions, which often involve interactions between an acyl carrier protein (ACP) and its partner enzymes, are important for coordinating polyketide biosynthesis. However, the nature of such interactions is not well understood, especially in the fungal non-reducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs) that biosynthesize toxic and pharmaceutically important polyketides. Here, we employ a mechanism-based crosslinker to successfully probe ACP and ketosynthase (KS) domain interactions in NR-PKSs. We found that crosslinking efficiency is closely correlated with the strength of ACP•KS interactions, and that KS demonstrates strong starter unit selectivity. We further identified positively charged surface residues by KS mutagenesis, which mediate key interactions with the negatively-charged ACP surface. Such complementary/matching contact pairs can serve as “adapter surfaces” for future efforts to generate new polyketides using NR-PKSs. PMID:23993461

  9. Cell-type Dependent Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes: Probing the Biology of Selective Neuronal Vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina R. Muratore

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Alzheimer's disease (AD induces memory and cognitive impairment in the absence of motor and sensory deficits during its early and middle course. A major unresolved question is the basis for this selective neuronal vulnerability. Aβ, which plays a central role in AD pathogenesis, is generated throughout the brain, yet some regions outside of the limbic and cerebral cortices are relatively spared from Aβ plaque deposition and synapse loss. Here, we examine neurons derived from iPSCs of patients harboring an amyloid precursor protein mutation to quantify AD-relevant phenotypes following directed differentiation to rostral fates of the brain (vulnerable and caudal fates (relatively spared in AD. We find that both the generation of Aβ and the responsiveness of TAU to Aβ are affected by neuronal cell type, with rostral neurons being more sensitive than caudal neurons. Thus, cell-autonomous factors may in part dictate the pattern of selective regional vulnerability in human neurons in AD. : In this article, Muratore et al. examine differential vulnerability of neuronal subtypes in AD by directing iPSC lines from control and familial AD subjects to different regional neuronal fates. APP processing and TAU proteostasis are differentially affected between regional fates, such that neuronal cell type dictates generation of and responsiveness to Aβ. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, disease modeling, iPSCs, neural stem cells, Abeta, Tau, selective vulnerability, amyloid, familial AD, differential susceptibility

  10. Selective detection of Co2+ by fluorescent nano probe: Diagnostic approach for analysis of environmental samples and biological activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Prasad G.; Dige, Nilam C.; Desai, Netaji K.; Patil, Shivajirao R.; Kondalkar, Vijay V.; Hong, Seong-Karp; Lee, Ki Hwan

    2018-06-01

    Nowadays scientist over the world are engaging to put forth improved methods to detect metal ion in an aqueous medium based on fluorescence studies. A simple, selective and sensitive method was proposed for detection of Co2+ ion using fluorescent organic nanoparticles. We synthesized a fluorescent small molecule viz. 4,4‧-{benzene-1,4-diylbis-[(Z)methylylidenenitrilo]}dibenzoic acid (BMBA) to explore its suitability as sensor for Co2+ ion and biocompatibility in form of nanoparticles. Fluorescence nanoparticles (BMBANPs) prepared by simple reprecipitation method. Aggregation induced enhanced emission of BMBANPs exhibits the narrower particle size of 68 nm and sphere shape morphology. The selective fluorescence quenching was observed by addition of Co2+ and does not affected by presence of other coexisting ion solutions. The photo-physical properties, viz. UV-absorption, fluorescence emission, and lifetime measurements are in support of ligand-metal interaction followed by static fluorescence quenching phenomenon in emission of BMBANPs. Finally, we develop a simple analytical method for selective and sensitive determination of Co2+ ion in environmental samples. The cell culture E. coli, Bacillus sps., and M. tuberculosis H37RV strain in the vicinity of BMBANPs indicates virtuous anti-bacterial and anti-tuberculosis activity which is of additional novel application shown by prepared nanoparticles.

  11. Laser-produced Sm{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}NiO{sub 3} plasma dynamic through Langmuir probe and ICCD imaging combined analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngom, B.D. [Universite Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar (UCAD), Laboratoire de Photonique et Nano-Fabrication, Groupe de Physique du Solide et Sciences des Materiaux (GPSSM), Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Dakar-Fann Dakar (Senegal); University of South Africa, UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, Pretoria (South Africa); National Research Foundation, Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Lafane, S.; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Kerdja, T. [Centre de Developpement des Technologies Avancees, Division des Milieux Ionises et Laser, Baba Hassen (Algeria); Maaza, M. [University of South Africa, UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, Pretoria (South Africa); National Research Foundation, Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2016-01-15

    The dynamics of laser-produced plasma of Sm{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}NiO{sub 3} is studied over oxygen pressure ranging from vacuum up to 2 mbar via Langmuir probe, and intensified charge-coupled device-imaging techniques. The analysis of the oxygen pressure dependence of the ion yield points out to four different regimes. More accurately, the specific ionic current shows a first drop at about 2 x 10{sup -2} mbar corresponding to the appearance of two peaks in the profile of the ionic signal. Likewise, this pressure marks the early stage of the plume splitting into two prominent components as observed by the ICCD imaging. Below 2 x 10{sup -2} mbar, the dynamic of the plume is directive (1D), while a quasi-stable behavior on the ionic current signal is observed. In the 0.2- to 0.5-mbar region, a quasi-stationary regime is obtained. More accurately, both the ionic yield and the plume stopping distance vary very slowly in such pressures range. Above 0.5 mbar, the ionic yield is altered again corresponding to the appearance of the diffusion regime. At a pressure of 1.5 mbar we observe a second appearance of an ionic signal peak. A correlation between the results obtained by Langmuir probe and ICCD imaging is made, presented, and discussed within this contribution. (orig.)

  12. Highly selective probe based on imine linkage for Zn{sup 2+} and HSO{sub 3}{sup −} in mixed aqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Kamaljot; Chaudhary, Savita; Singh, Sukhjinder; Mehta, S.K., E-mail: skmehta@pu.ac.in

    2015-04-15

    A simple salicylaldehyde derived Schiff base N, N′- bis (p-chloro salicylidene)-1, 2- ethylenediamine (L) was synthesized and characterized. The receptor demonstrates simultaneous dual channel chromogenic and fluorogenic signaling towards HSO{sub 3}{sup −} and Zn{sup 2+} in mixed aqueous media. Solvatochromism was employed systematically for modulating its optoelectronic properties. The probe was successfully assessed to monitor HSO{sub 3}{sup −} detection via UV–vis spectroscopy. DFT calculations and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy further support the results based on shifting of equilibrium. Moreover, the sensor showed large fluorescence enhancement with blue-shift of 48 nm after addition of Zn{sup 2+}. The probe exhibits high selectivity over other competitive ions with high detection limit of 6.54×10{sup −5} M and 3.21×10{sup −6} M for HSO{sub 3}{sup −} and Zn{sup 2+}, respectively. Importantly, this is one of the rare reports in which Schiff base was utilized for the fabrication of chromogenic or fluorogenic sensor using solvent effect for multianalyte detection. - Highlights: • Easy synthesis of highly selective and sensitive Salicylideneaniline moiety. • Solvatochromism induced tautomerism between the enol-imine and keto-amine forms. • Computational studies revealing the effect of solvent on stability of NH form. • Discriminative detection of HSO{sub 3}{sup −} and Zn{sup 2+} by different spectroscopic techniques. • Optical feedbacks as absorption transitions with HSO{sub 3}{sup −} on bisulphite adduct formation. • Fluorescence enhancement for Zn{sup 2+} based on imine binding mechanism.

  13. Probing topology and dynamics of the second transmembrane domain (M2δ) of the acetyl choline receptor using magnetically aligned lipid bilayers (bicelles) and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Indra D; Mayo, Daniel J; Subbaraman, Nidhi; Inbaraj, Johnson J; McCarrick, Robert M; Lorigan, Gary A

    2017-08-01

    Characterizing membrane protein structure and dynamics in the lipid bilayer membrane is very important but experimentally challenging. EPR spectroscopy offers a unique set of techniques to investigate a membrane protein structure, dynamics, topology, and distance constraints in lipid bilayers. Previously our lab demonstrated the use of magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) for probing topology and dynamics of the membrane peptide M2δ of the acetyl choline receptor (AchR) as a proof of concept. In this study, magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers and rigid spin labels were further utilized to provide improved dynamic information and topology of M2δ peptide. Seven TOAC-labeled AchR M2δ peptides were synthesized to demonstrate the utility of a multi-labeling amino acid substitution alignment strategy. Our data revealed the helical tilts to be 11°, 17°, 9°, 17°, 16°, 11°, 9°±4° for residues I7TOAC, Q13TOAC, A14TOAC, V15TOAC, C16TOAC, L17TOAC, and L18TOAC, respectively. The average helical tilt of the M2δ peptide was determined to be ∼13°. This study also revealed that the TOAC labels were attached to the M2δ peptide with different dynamics suggesting that the sites towards the C-terminal end are more rigid when compared to the sites towards the N-terminus. The dynamics of the TOAC labeled sites were more resolved in the aligned samples when compared to the randomly disordered samples. This study highlights the use of magnetically aligned lipid bilayer EPR technique to determine a more accurate helical tilt and more resolved local dynamics of AchR M2δ peptide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The dynamics of diverse segmental amplifications in populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adapting to strong selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payen, Celia; Di Rienzi, Sara C; Ong, Giang T; Pogachar, Jamie L; Sanchez, Joseph C; Sunshine, Anna B; Raghuraman, M K; Brewer, Bonita J; Dunham, Maitreya J

    2014-03-20

    Population adaptation to strong selection can occur through the sequential or parallel accumulation of competing beneficial mutations. The dynamics, diversity, and rate of fixation of beneficial mutations within and between populations are still poorly understood. To study how the mutational landscape varies across populations during adaptation, we performed experimental evolution on seven parallel populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae continuously cultured in limiting sulfate medium. By combining quantitative polymerase chain reaction, array comparative genomic hybridization, restriction digestion and contour-clamped homogeneous electric field gel electrophoresis, and whole-genome sequencing, we followed the trajectory of evolution to determine the identity and fate of beneficial mutations. During a period of 200 generations, the yeast populations displayed parallel evolutionary dynamics that were driven by the coexistence of independent beneficial mutations. Selective amplifications rapidly evolved under this selection pressure, in particular common inverted amplifications containing the sulfate transporter gene SUL1. Compared with single clones, detailed analysis of the populations uncovers a greater complexity whereby multiple subpopulations arise and compete despite a strong selection. The most common evolutionary adaptation to strong selection in these populations grown in sulfate limitation is determined by clonal interference, with adaptive variants both persisting and replacing one another.

  15. Dynamic behaviors of a broad-area diode laser with lateral-mode-selected external feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a BAL with lateral-mode selected external feedback experimentally by measuring the far-field profile, intensity noise spectrum and time series of the output beam. The mode-selection is achieved by adjusting a stripe mirror at the pseudo far-field plan...... with a frequency of the single roundtrip external-cavity loop modulated by periodic low-frequency fluctuation. This is the first observation of pulse-package oscillation in a diode laser with long-cavity feedback, to our knowledge....

  16. Selecting core-hole localization or delocalization in CS2 by photofragmentation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemin, R; Decleva, P; Stener, M; Bomme, C; Marin, T; Journel, L; Marchenko, T; Kushawaha, R K; Jänkälä, K; Trcera, N; Bowen, K P; Lindle, D W; Piancastelli, M N; Simon, M

    2015-01-21

    Electronic core levels in molecules are highly localized around one atomic site. However, in single-photon ionization of symmetric molecules, the question of core-hole localization versus delocalization over two equivalent atoms has long been debated as the answer lies at the heart of quantum mechanics. Here, using a joint experimental and theoretical study of core-ionized carbon disulfide (CS2), we demonstrate that it is possible to experimentally select distinct molecular-fragmentation pathways in which the core hole can be considered as either localized on one sulfur atom or delocalized between two indistinguishable sulfur atoms. This feat is accomplished by measuring photoelectron angular distributions within the frame of the molecule, directly probing entanglement or disentanglement of quantum pathways as a function of how the molecule dissociates.

  17. Inhibition in the Dynamics of Selective Attention: An Integrative Model for Negative Priming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hecke eSchrobsdorff

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a computational model of the negative priming (NP effect that includes perception, memory, attention, decision making, and action. The model is designed to provide a coherent picture across competing theories of NP and to relate psychological experiments to physiological measurements. The model is formulated in terms of an abstract dynamics of activations of features, their binding into object entities or their semantic categorization as well as related memories and implied reactions. The dynamical variables interact in a connectionist network which is shown to be adaptable to a variety of experimental paradigms. We find that selective attention can be modeled by means of inhibitory processes and by a threshold dynamics. Considering the implementation it becomes obvious that the specificity of the experimental paradigm must be taken into account when predicting the nature of the NP effect.

  18. Procedure for Selection of Suitable Resources in Interactions in Complex Dynamic Systems Using Artificial Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naors Y. anadalsaleem

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic optimization procedure for -dimensional vector function of a system, the state of which is interpreted as adaptable immune cell, is considered Using the results of the theory of artificial immune systems. The procedures for estimate of monitoring results are discussed. The procedure for assessing the entropy is recommended as a general recursive estimation algorithm. The results are focused on solving the optimization problems of cognitive selection of suitable physical resources, what expands the scope of Electromagnetic compatibility.

  19. Optical Probes for Neurobiological Sensing and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric H; Chin, Gregory; Rong, Guoxin; Poskanzer, Kira E; Clark, Heather A

    2018-04-13

    probing entire neurobiological units with high spatiotemporal resolution. Thus, we introduce selected applications for ion and neurotransmitter detection to investigate both neurons and non-neuronal brain cells. We focus on families of optical probes because of their ability to sense a wide array of molecules and convey spatial information with minimal damage to tissue. We start with a discussion of currently available molecular probes, highlight recent advances in genetically modified fluorescent probes for ions and small molecules, and end with the latest research in nanosensors for biological imaging. Customizable, nanoscale optical sensors that accurately and dynamically monitor the local environment with high spatiotemporal resolution could lead to not only new insights into the function of all cell types but also a broader understanding of how diverse neural signaling systems act in conjunction with neighboring cells in a spatially relevant manner.

  20. Strong influence of coadsorbate interaction on CO desorption dynamics on Ru(0001) probed by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and ab initio simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); LaRue, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Oberg, H. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Beye, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Dell' Angela, M. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Turner, J. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gladh, J. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Ng, M. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sellberg, J. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Kaya, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mercurio, G. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Hieke, F. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Nordlund, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Schlotter, W. F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Dakovski, G. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Minitti, M. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fohlisch, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Univ. Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Wolf, M. [Fritz-Haber Institute of the Max-Planck-Society, Berlin (Germany); Wurth, W. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY Photon Science, Hamburg (Germany); Ogasawara, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Norskov, J. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Ostrom, H. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Pettersson, L. G. M. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Ablid-Pedersen, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-04-16

    We show that coadsorbed oxygen atoms have a dramatic influence on the CO desorption dynamics from Ru(0001). In contrast to the precursor-mediated desorption mechanism on Ru(0001), the presence of surface oxygen modifies the electronic structure of Ru atoms such that CO desorption occurs predominantly via the direct pathway. This phenomenon is directly observed in an ultrafast pump-probe experiment using a soft x-ray free-electron laser to monitor the dynamic evolution of the valence electronic structure of the surface species. This is supported with the potential of mean force along the CO desorption path obtained from density-functional theory calculations. Charge density distribution and frozen-orbital analysis suggest that the oxygen-induced reduction of the Pauli repulsion, and consequent increase of the dative interaction between the CO 5σ and the charged Ru atom, is the electronic origin of the distinct desorption dynamics. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of CO desorption from Ru(0001) and oxygen-coadsorbed Ru(0001) provide further insights into the surface bond-breaking process.

  1. Impacts of land cover data selection and trait parameterisation on dynamic modelling of species' range expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risto K Heikkinen

    Full Text Available Dynamic models for range expansion provide a promising tool for assessing species' capacity to respond to climate change by shifting their ranges to new areas. However, these models include a number of uncertainties which may affect how successfully they can be applied to climate change oriented conservation planning. We used RangeShifter, a novel dynamic and individual-based modelling platform, to study two potential sources of such uncertainties: the selection of land cover data and the parameterization of key life-history traits. As an example, we modelled the range expansion dynamics of two butterfly species, one habitat specialist (Maniola jurtina and one generalist (Issoria lathonia. Our results show that projections of total population size, number of occupied grid cells and the mean maximal latitudinal range shift were all clearly dependent on the choice made between using CORINE land cover data vs. using more detailed grassland data from three alternative national databases. Range expansion was also sensitive to the parameterization of the four considered life-history traits (magnitude and probability of long-distance dispersal events, population growth rate and carrying capacity, with carrying capacity and magnitude of long-distance dispersal showing the strongest effect. Our results highlight the sensitivity of dynamic species population models to the selection of existing land cover data and to uncertainty in the model parameters and indicate that these need to be carefully evaluated before the models are applied to conservation planning.

  2. Abstract and Effector-Selective Decision Signals Exhibit Qualitatively Distinct Dynamics before Delayed Perceptual Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Deirdre M; Kelly, Simon P; O'Connell, Redmond G

    2016-07-13

    Electrophysiological research has isolated neural signatures of decision formation in a variety of brain regions. Studies in rodents and monkeys have focused primarily on effector-selective signals that translate the emerging decision into a specific motor plan, but, more recently, research on the human brain has identified an abstract signature of evidence accumulation that does not appear to play any direct role in action preparation. The functional dissociations between these distinct signal types have only begun to be characterized, and their dynamics during decisions with deferred actions with or without foreknowledge of stimulus-effector mapping, a commonly studied task scenario in single-unit and functional imaging investigations, have not been established. Here we traced the dynamics of distinct abstract and effector-selective decision signals in the form of the broad-band centro-parietal positivity (CPP) and limb-selective β-band (8-16 and 18-30 Hz) EEG activity, respectively, during delayed-reported motion direction decisions with and without foreknowledge of direction-response mapping. With foreknowledge, the CPP and β-band signals exhibited a similar gradual build-up following evidence onset, but whereas choice-predictive β-band activity persisted up until the delayed response, the CPP dropped toward baseline after peaking. Without foreknowledge, the CPP exhibited identical dynamics, whereas choice-selective β-band activity was eliminated. These findings highlight qualitative functional distinctions between effector-selective and abstract decision signals and are of relevance to the assumptions founding functional neuroimaging investigations of decision-making. Neural signatures of evidence accumulation have been isolated in numerous brain regions. Although animal neurophysiology has largely concentrated on effector-selective decision signals that translate the emerging decision into a specific motor plan, recent research on the human brain has

  3. Probing the effect of human normal sperm morphology rate on cycle outcomes and assisted reproductive methods selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    Full Text Available Sperm morphology is the best predictor of fertilization potential, and the critical predictive information for supporting assisted reproductive methods selection. Given its important predictive value and the declining reality of semen quality in recent years, the threshold of normal sperm morphology rate (NSMR is being constantly corrected and controversial, from the 4th edition (14% to the 5th version (4%. We retrospectively analyzed 4756 cases of infertility patients treated with conventional-IVF(c-IVF or ICSI, which were divided into three groups according to NSMR: ≥14%, 4%-14% and <4%. Here, we demonstrate that, with decrease in NSMR(≥14%, 4%-14%, <4%, in the c-IVF group, the rate of fertilization, normal fertilization, high-quality embryo, multi-pregnancy and birth weight of twins gradually decreased significantly (P<0.05, while the miscarriage rate was significantly increased (p<0.01 and implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate, ectopic pregnancy rate, preterm birth rate, live birth rate, sex ratio, and birth weight(Singleton showed no significant change. In the ICSI group, with decrease in NSMR (≥14%, 4%-14%, <4%, high-quality embryo rate, multi-pregnancy rate and birth weight of twins were gradually decreased significantly (p<0.05, while other parameters had no significant difference. Considering the clinical assisted methods selection, in the NFMR ≥14% group, normal fertilization rate of c-IVF was significantly higher than the ICSI group (P<0.05, in the 4%-14% group, birth weight (twins of c-IVF were significantly higher than the ICSI group, in the <4% group, miscarriage of IVF was significantly higher than the ICSI group. Therefore, we conclude that NSMR is positively related to embryo reproductive potential, and when NSMR<4% (5th edition, ICSI should be considered first, while the NSMR≥4%, c-IVF assisted reproduction might be preferred.

  4. Lanthanide paramagnetic probes for NMR spectroscopic studies of fast molecular conformational dynamics and temperature control. Effective six-site proton exchange in 18-crown-6 by exchange spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babailov, Sergey P

    2012-02-06

    (1)H and (13)C NMR measurements are reported for the CDCl(3) and CD(2)Cl(2) solutions of [La(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (I), [Pr(18-crown-6) (NO(3))(3)] (II), [Ce(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (III), and [Nd(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (IV) complexes. Temperature dependencies of the (1)H NMR spectra of paramagnetic II-IV have been analyzed using the dynamic NMR (DNMR) methods for six-site exchange. Two types of conformational dynamic processes were identified (the first one is conditioned by interconversion of complex enantiomeric forms and pseudorotation of a macrocycle molecule upon the C(2) symmetry axis; the second one is conditioned by macrocycle molecule inversion). Application of exchange spectroscopy (2D-EXSY) of DNMR for investigation of this dynamic system (II-IV) simplifies the assignment of the NMR signals and represents the first experimental study of multisite exchange. In the present work, the methodology of paramagnetic 4f (Ce, Pr, and Nd) probe applications for the study of free-energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes in chemical exchange processes, as well as the advantages of this method in a comparison with DNMR studies of diamagnetic substances, is discussed. In particular, as a result of paramagnetic chemical shifts in 4f complexes, the range of measurable rate constants expands considerably compared to the analogous range in diamagnetic compounds. Coordination compounds investigated in the paper represent new types of thermometric NMR sensors and lanthanide paramagnetic probes for in situ temperature control in solution.

  5. An Adaptive Learning Based Network Selection Approach for 5G Dynamic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Networks will continue to become increasingly heterogeneous as we move toward 5G. Meanwhile, the intelligent programming of the core network makes the available radio resource be more changeable rather than static. In such a dynamic and heterogeneous network environment, how to help terminal users select optimal networks to access is challenging. Prior implementations of network selection are usually applicable for the environment with static radio resources, while they cannot handle the unpredictable dynamics in 5G network environments. To this end, this paper considers both the fluctuation of radio resources and the variation of user demand. We model the access network selection scenario as a multiagent coordination problem, in which a bunch of rationally terminal users compete to maximize their benefits with incomplete information about the environment (no prior knowledge of network resource and other users’ choices. Then, an adaptive learning based strategy is proposed, which enables users to adaptively adjust their selections in response to the gradually or abruptly changing environment. The system is experimentally shown to converge to Nash equilibrium, which also turns out to be both Pareto optimal and socially optimal. Extensive simulation results show that our approach achieves significantly better performance compared with two learning and non-learning based approaches in terms of load balancing, user payoff and the overall bandwidth utilization efficiency. In addition, the system has a good robustness performance under the condition with non-compliant terminal users.

  6. Alleles versus genotypes: Genetic interactions and the dynamics of selection in sexual populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Physical interactions between amino-acids are essential for protein structure and activity, while protein-protein interactions and regulatory interactions are central to cellular function. As a consequence of these interactions, the combined effect of two mutations can differ from the sum of the individual effects of the mutations. This phenomenon of genetic interaction is known as epistasis. However, the importance of epistasis and its effects on evolutionary dynamics are poorly understood, especially in sexual populations where recombination breaks up existing combinations of alleles to produce new ones. Here, we present a computational model of selection dynamics involving many epistatic loci in a recombining population. We demonstrate that a large number of polymorphic interacting loci can, despite frequent recombination, exhibit cooperative behavior that locks alleles into favorable genotypes leading to a population consisting of a set of competing clones. As the recombination rate exceeds a certain critical value this ``genotype selection'' phase disappears in an abrupt transition giving way to ``allele selection'' - the phase where different loci are only weakly correlated as expected in sexually reproducing populations. Clustering of interacting sets of genes on a chromosome leads to the emergence of an intermediate regime, where localized blocks of cooperating alleles lock into genetic modules. Large populations attain highest fitness at a recombination rate just below critical, suggesting that natural selection might tune recombination rates to balance the beneficial aspect of exploration of genotype space with the breaking up of synergistic allele combinations.

  7. Probing molecular dynamics of metal borohydrides on the surface of mesoporous scaffolds by multinuclear high resolution solid state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Son-Jong, E-mail: Sonjong@cheme.caltech.edu [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Eng., California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lee, Hyun-Sook [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); To, Magnus [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Eng., California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lee, Young-Su; Cho, Young Whan [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyungkeun; Kim, Chul [Department of Chemistry, Hannam University, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-05

    Graphical abstract: In situ variable temperature multinuclear solid state NMR allows to probe surface wetting, diffusivity, and confinement of metal borohydrides into nanopores. - Abstract: Understanding of surface interactions between borohydride molecules and the surfaces of porous supports have gained growing attention for successful development of nano-confinement engineering. By use of in situ variable temperature (VT) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR, molecular mobility changes of LiBH{sub 4} crystalline solid has been investigated in the presence of silica based and carbonaceous surfaces. Spin–spin J-coupling of {sup 1}H–{sup 11}B in LiBH{sub 4} was monitored in series of VT NMR spectra to probe translational mobility of LiBH{sub 4} that appeared to be greatly enhanced upon surface contact. Such enhanced diffusivity was found to be effective in the formation of solid solution and co-confinement with other metal borohydrides. Co-confinement of LiBH{sub 4}–Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} mixture was demonstrated at temperature as low as 100 °C, much lower than the reported bulk eutectic melting temperature. The discovery adds a novel property of LiBH{sub 4} that has been proven to be highly versatile in many energy related applications.

  8. Indigo Carmine-Cu complex probe exhibiting dual colorimetric/fluorimetric sensing for selective determination of mono hydrogen phosphate ion and its logic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Moaddeli, Ali; Asghari, Khadijeh

    2017-08-01

    A new selective probe based on copper complex of Indigo Carmine (IC-Cu2) for colorimetric, naked-eye, and fluorimetric recognition of mono hydrogen phosphate (MHP) ion in H2O/DMSO (4:1 v/v, 1.0 mmol L- 1 HEPES buffer solution pH 7.5) was developed. Detection limit of HPO42 - determination, achieved by fluorimetric and 3lorimetric method, are 0.071 and 1.46 μmol L- 1, respectively. Potential, therefore is clearly available in IC-Cu2 complex to detect HPO42 - in micromolar range via dual visible color change and fluorescence response. Present method shows high selectivity toward HPO42 - over other phosphate species and other anions and was successfully utilized for analysis of P2O5 content of a fertilizer sample. The results obtained by proposed chemosensor presented good agreement with those obtained the colorimetric reference method. INHIBIT and IMPLICATION logic gates operating at molecular level have been achieved using Cu2 + and HPO42 - as chemical inputs and UV-Vis absorbance signal as output.

  9. Indigo Carmine-Cu complex probe exhibiting dual colorimetric/fluorimetric sensing for selective determination of mono hydrogen phosphate ion and its logic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Moaddeli, Ali; Asghari, Khadijeh

    2017-08-05

    A new selective probe based on copper complex of Indigo Carmine (IC-Cu 2 ) for colorimetric, naked-eye, and fluorimetric recognition of mono hydrogen phosphate (MHP) ion in H 2 O/DMSO (4:1v/v, 1.0mmolL -1 HEPES buffer solution pH7.5) was developed. Detection limit of HPO 4 2- determination, achieved by fluorimetric and 3 lorimetric method, are 0.071 and 1.46μmolL -1 , respectively. Potential, therefore is clearly available in IC-Cu 2 complex to detect HPO 4 2- in micromolar range via dual visible color change and fluorescence response. Present method shows high selectivity toward HPO 4 2- over other phosphate species and other anions and was successfully utilized for analysis of P 2 O 5 content of a fertilizer sample. The results obtained by proposed chemosensor presented good agreement with those obtained the colorimetric reference method. INHIBIT and IMPLICATION logic gates operating at molecular level have been achieved using Cu 2+ and HPO 4 2- as chemical inputs and UV-Vis absorbance signal as output. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Simple, Fast and Selective Detection of Adenosine Triphosphate at Physiological pH Using Unmodified Gold Nanoparticles as Colorimetric Probes and Metal Ions as Cross-Linkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Pang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a simple, fast and selective colorimetric assay of adenosine triphosphate (ATP using unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs as probes and metal ions as cross-linkers. ATP can be assembled onto the surface of AuNPs through interaction between the electron-rich nitrogen atoms and the electron-deficient surface of AuNPs. Accordingly, Cu2+ ions induce a change in the color and UV/Vis absorbance of AuNPs by coordinating to the triphosphate groups and a ring nitrogen of ATP. A detection limit of 50 nM was achieved, which is comparable to or lower than that achievable by the currently used electrochemical, spectroscopic or chromatographic methods. The theoretical simplicity and high selectivity reported herein demonstrated that AuNPs-based colorimetric assay could be applied in a wide variety of fields by rationally designing the surface chemistry of AuNPs. In addition, our results indicate that ATP-modified AuNPs are less stable in Cu2+, Cd2+ or Zn2+-containing solutions due to the formation of the corresponding dimeric metal-ATP complexes.

  11. Magnetic properties of some selected, soil-related iron oxides and oxyhydroxides as probed by 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrave, E.; Vandenberghe, R.E.; Bowen, L.H.

    1990-01-01

    In the last decade, Mossbauer spectroscopy has become an increasingly important and applied analytical tool for the characterization of environmental Fe-containing material. One of the most fastly growing application area of this technique is undoubtedly that of soils and sediments. Since such systems are commonly complex mixtures of various and mostly poorly crystalline compounds, much emphasis has been displayed towards the Mossbauer spectra of the pure constituents which, in the case of oxides and oxyhydroxides, usually concern well characterized synthetic samples. Many excellent and fairly complete review papers in that respect have been published in the recent literature and it is not the aim of the present authors to come up with still another one covering the same period. Only those results reported since 1985 and which have provided basically new insight concerning structural and/or magnetic properties have been selected. In addition, it has been attempted to collect some of the less-frequently dealt-with magnetic characteristics which more often have a fundamental importance rather than an analytical one, and which are therefore at the moment less-directly related and restricted to soil studies. A particular aspect that has received considerable attention in this paper is the effect on the Mossbauer spectra of the application of strong magnetic fields

  12. Using CO as a Physical Probe of the SF Activity in the Planck-Herschel Selected Hyper Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Multi-J CO line studies are essential for quantifying the physical properties of the star-forming ISM, yet it is observationally expensive to detect those faint CO emission lines at high redshift. Our eight Planck-Herschel selected galaxies, with apparent LIR > 1013‑14 L⊙, serve as the best laboratories to conduct such a CO spectral line energy distribution analysis at high-z. Using our GBT and LMT (Jup = 1-3) measurements, we trace the bulk molecular gas mass, finding relatively large star formation efficiencies (as traced by the LIR-to-L’CO(1‑0) ratio) consistent with a starburst mode of activity. With our mid-J (Jup = 4-8) CO line measurements, obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope, we find gas excitation conditions ranging from sub-thermal SMGs to highly excited local starbursts out to Jup = 5-8. The consistently high velocity-integrated line intensities at Jup = 5-8 indicates the presence a warm/dense component responsible for exciting the higher-J CO lines, therefore we use coupled non-LTE large velocity gradient and dust radiative transfer models to begin characterising the two-component molecular ISM in these strongly lensed systems.

  13. A coumarin based Schiff base probe for selective fluorescence detection of Al3 + and its application in live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Bhaskar; Sheet, Sanjoy Kumar; Thounaojam, Romita; Jamatia, Ramen; Pal, Amarta Kumar; Aguan, Kripamoy; Khatua, Snehadrinarayan

    2017-02-01

    A new coumarin based Schiff base compound, CSB-1 has been synthesized to detect metal ion based on the chelation enhanced fluorescence (CHEF). The cation binding properties of CSB-1 was thoroughly examined in UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. In fluorescence spectroscopy the compound showed high selectivity toward Al3 + ion and the Al3 + can be quantified in mixed aqueous buffer solution (MeOH: 0.01 M HEPES Buffer; 9:1; v/v) at pH 7.4 as well as in BSA media. The fluorescence intensity of CSB-1 was enhanced by 24 fold after addition of only five equivalents of Al3 +. The fluorescence titration of CSB-1 with Al3 + in mixed aqueous buffer afforded a binding constant, Ka = (1.06 ± 0.2) × 104 M- 1. The colour change from light yellow to colourless and the appearance of blue fluorescence, which can be observed by the naked eye, provides a real-time method for Al3 + sensing. Further the live cell imaging study indicated that the detection of intracellular Al3 + ions are also readily possible in living cell.

  14. Ultrasonic selectivity on depressing photosynthesis of cyanobacteria and green algae probed by chlorophyll-a fluorescence transient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhipeng; Tan, Xiao; Li, Niegui

    2017-10-01

    Ultrasound can inhibit cyanobacterial growth through rupturing cells, but this pathway frequently has the risk to release intercellular toxin (e.g., microcystin). Depressing photosynthesis without cell disruption may provide a new strategy to control cyanobacterial blooms using ultrasound, especially Microcystis blooms. In this work, Microcystis aeruginosa (toxic cyanobacteria) and Chlorella pyrenoidosa (typical green algae) were chosen as model microalgae to verify this hypothesis. Results showed that ultrasound has the ability to inhibit cyanobacterial photosynthesis significantly and selectively. Specifically, sonication damaged Q A , a tightly bound one-electron acceptor, and blocked electron flow at Q B , a two-electron acceptor, in the photosystem II (PSII) of M. aeruginosa when it was exposed for 60 s (35 kHz, 0.043 W/cm 3 ). Moreover, 44.8% of the reaction centers (RCs) in the PSII of M. aeruginosa were transferred into inactive ones (RC si s), and the cell concentration decreased by 32.5% after sonication for 300 s. By contrast, only 7.9% of RC si occurred in C. pyrenoidosa, and cell concentration and chlorophyll-a content reduced by 18.7% and 9.3%, respectively. Differences in both species (i.e., cell structures) might be responsible for the varying levels to sonication. This research suggests that cyanobacteria, especially Microcystis, could be controlled by ultrasound via damaging their PSIIs.

  15. A disposable evanescent wave fiber optic sensor coated with a molecularly imprinted polymer as a selective fluorescence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Xuan-Anh; Acha, Victor; Bonomi, Paolo; Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette; Haupt, Karsten

    2015-02-15

    We have developed a disposable evanescent wave fiber optic sensor by coating a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) containing a fluorescent signaling group on a 4-cm long polystyrene optical waveguide. The MIP is composed of a naphthalimide-based fluorescent monomer, which shows fluorescence enhancement upon binding with carboxyl-containing molecules. The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and the mycotoxin citrinin were used as model analytes. The coating of the MIP was either performed ex-situ, by dip-coating the fiber with MIP particles synthesized beforehand, or in-situ by evanescent-wave photopolymerization on the fiber. The sensing element was interrogated with a fiber-coupled spectrofluorimeter. The fiber optic sensor detects targets in the low nM range and exhibits specific and selective recognition over structural analogs and non-related carboxyl-containing molecules. This technology can be extended to other carboxyl-containing analytes, and to a broader spectrum of targets using different fluorescent monomers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The development of 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran as a highly selective probe for the detection and quantitative determination of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żamojć, Krzysztof; Zdrowowicz, Magdalena; Rudnicki-Velasquez, Paweł Błażej; Krzymiński, Karol; Zaborowski, Bartłomiej; Niedziałkowski, Paweł; Jacewicz, Dagmara; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2017-01-01

    1,3-Diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF) has been developed as a selective probe for the detection and quantitative determination of hydrogen peroxide in samples containing different reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS). DPBF is a fluorescent probe which, for almost 20 years, was believed to react in a highly specific manner toward some reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as singlet oxygen and hydroxy, alkyloxy or alkylperoxy radicals. Under the action of these individuals DPBF has been rapidly transformed to 1,2-dibenzoylbenzene (DBB). In order to check if DPBF can act as a unique indicator of the total amount of different RNOS, as well as oxidative stress caused by an overproduction of these individuals, a series of experiments was carried out, in which DPBF reacted with peroxynitrite anion, superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorite anion, and anions commonly present under biological conditions, namely nitrite and nitrate. In all cases, except for hydrogen peroxide, the product of the reaction is DBB. Only under the action of H 2 O 2 9-hydroxyanthracen-10(9H)-one (oxanthrone) is formed. This product has been identified with the use of fluorescence spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and cyclic voltammetry (CV). A linear relationship was found between a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of DPBF and the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the range of concentrations of 0.196-3.941 mM. DPBF responds to hydrogen peroxide in a very specific way with the limits of detection and quantitation of 88 and 122.8 μM, respectively. The kinetics of the reaction between DBBF and H 2 O 2 was also studied.

  17. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  18. Photodissociation of aligned CH3I and C6H3F2I molecules probed with time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging by site-selective extreme ultraviolet ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Kasra; Savelyev, Evgeny; Brauße, Felix; Berrah, Nora; Bomme, Cédric; Brouard, Mark; Burt, Michael; Christensen, Lauge; Düsterer, Stefan; Erk, Benjamin; Höppner, Hauke; Kierspel, Thomas; Krecinic, Faruk; Lauer, Alexandra; Lee, Jason W L; Müller, Maria; Müller, Erland; Mullins, Terence; Redlin, Harald; Schirmel, Nora; Thøgersen, Jan; Techert, Simone; Toleikis, Sven; Treusch, Rolf; Trippel, Sebastian; Ulmer, Anatoli; Vallance, Claire; Wiese, Joss; Johnsson, Per; Küpper, Jochen; Rudenko, Artem; Rouzée, Arnaud; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Boll, Rebecca

    2018-01-01

    We explore time-resolved Coulomb explosion induced by intense, extreme ultraviolet (XUV) femtosecond pulses from a free-electron laser as a method to image photo-induced molecular dynamics in two molecules, iodomethane and 2,6-difluoroiodobenzene. At an excitation wavelength of 267 nm, the dominant reaction pathway in both molecules is neutral dissociation via cleavage of the carbon-iodine bond. This allows investigating the influence of the molecular environment on the absorption of an intense, femtosecond XUV pulse and the subsequent Coulomb explosion process. We find that the XUV probe pulse induces local inner-shell ionization of atomic iodine in dissociating iodomethane, in contrast to non-selective ionization of all photofragments in difluoroiodobenzene. The results reveal evidence of electron transfer from methyl and phenyl moieties to a multiply charged iodine ion. In addition, indications for ultrafast charge rearrangement on the phenyl radical are found, suggesting that time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging is sensitive to the localization of charge in extended molecules.

  19. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  20. Influence of static and dynamic dipolar fields in bulk YIG/thin film NiFe systems probed via spin rectification effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soh, Wee Tee, E-mail: a0046479@u.nus.edu [Center for Superconducting and Magnetic Materials, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117551 (Singapore); Tay, Z.J. [Center for Superconducting and Magnetic Materials, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117551 (Singapore); Yakovlev, N.L. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Peng, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Ong, C.K. [Center for Superconducting and Magnetic Materials, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117551 (Singapore); Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, 5A Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117411 (Singapore)

    2017-03-15

    The characteristics of the static and dynamic components of the dipolar fields originating from a bulk polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet (YIG) substrate are probed by depositing a NiFe (Permalloy) layer on it, which acts as a detector. By measuring dc voltages generated via spin rectification effect (SRE) within the NiFe layer under microwave excitation, we characterize the influence of dipolar fields from bulk YIG on the NiFe layer. It is found that the dynamic YIG dipolar fields modify the self-SRE of NiFe, driving its own rectification voltages within the NiFe layer, an effect we term as non-local SRE. This non-local SRE only occurs near the simultaneous resonance of both YIG and NiFe. On the other hand, the static dipolar field from YIG manifests itself as a negative anisotropy in the NiFe layer which shifts the latter’s ferromagnetic resonance frequency. - Highlights: • We demonstrate the quantification of both the static and dynamic components of the dipolar fields due to a YIG slab. • The detection and characterisation of such dipolar fields are important in many magnetic applications such as magnonics. • The dipolar fields can pose potential pitfalls if not properly considered in certain spin-electronics systems.

  1. PROBING THE ROLE OF DYNAMICAL FRICTION IN SHAPING THE BSS RADIAL DISTRIBUTION. I. SEMI-ANALYTICAL MODELS AND PRELIMINARY N-BODY SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miocchi, P.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Alessandrini, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Pasquato, M.; Lee, Y.-W. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Galaxy Evolution Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Vesperini, E. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    We present semi-analytical models and simplified N-body simulations with 10{sup 4} particles aimed at probing the role of dynamical friction (DF) in determining the radial distribution of blue straggler stars (BSSs) in globular clusters. The semi-analytical models show that DF (which is the only evolutionary mechanism at work) is responsible for the formation of a bimodal distribution with a dip progressively moving toward the external regions of the cluster. However, these models fail to reproduce the formation of the long-lived central peak observed in all dynamically evolved clusters. The results of N-body simulations confirm the formation of a sharp central peak, which remains as a stable feature over time regardless of the initial concentration of the system. In spite of noisy behavior, a bimodal distribution forms in many cases, with the size of the dip increasing as a function of time. In the most advanced stages, the distribution becomes monotonic. These results are in agreement with the observations. Also, the shape of the peak and the location of the minimum (which, in most of cases, is within 10 core radii) turn out to be consistent with observational results. For a more detailed and close comparison with observations, including a proper calibration of the timescales of the dynamical processes driving the evolution of the BSS spatial distribution, more realistic simulations will be necessary.

  2. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lei; Guo, Ning; Li, Quanzheng; Ma, Ying; Jacboson, Orit; Lee, Seulki; Choi, Hak Soo; Mansfield, James R.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/64Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide. Methods: The integrin αvβ3 binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA)...

  3. Site-selective probing of cTAR destabilization highlights the necessary plasticity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein to chaperone the first strand transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, Julien; Kenfack, Cyril; Przybilla, Frédéric; Richert, Ludovic; Duportail, Guy; Mély, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) is a nucleic acid chaperone required during reverse transcription. During the first strand transfer, NCp7 is thought to destabilize cTAR, the (−)DNA copy of the TAR RNA hairpin, and subsequently direct the TAR/cTAR annealing through the zipping of their destabilized stem ends. To further characterize the destabilizing activity of NCp7, we locally probe the structure and dynamics of cTAR by steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. NC(11–55), a truncated NCp7 version corresponding to its zinc-finger domain, was found to bind all over the sequence and to preferentially destabilize the penultimate double-stranded segment in the lower part of the cTAR stem. This destabilization is achieved through zinc-finger–dependent binding of NC to the G10 and G50 residues. Sequence comparison further revealed that C•A mismatches close to the two G residues were critical for fine tuning the stability of the lower part of the cTAR stem and conferring to G10 and G50 the appropriate mobility and accessibility for specific recognition by NC. Our data also highlight the necessary plasticity of NCp7 to adapt to the sequence and structure variability of cTAR to chaperone its annealing with TAR through a specific pathway. PMID:23511968

  4. Double level selection in a constitutional dynamic library of coordination driven supramolecular polygons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancan, Marzio; Tessarolo, Jacopo; Casarin, Maurizio; Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Quici, Silvio; Armelao, Lidia

    2014-07-21

    A constitutional dynamic library (CDL) of Cu(II) metallo-supramolecular polygons has been studied as a bench test to examine an interesting selection case based on molecular recognition. Sorting of the CDL polygons is achieved through a proper guest that is hosted into the triangular metallo-macrocycle constituent. Two selection mechanisms are observed, a guest induced path and a guest templated self-assembly (virtual library approach). Remarkably, the triangular host can accommodate several guests with a degree of selectivity ranging from ∼1 to ∼10(4) for all possible guest pairs. A double level selection operates: guests drive the CDL toward the triangular polygon, and, at the same time, this is able to pick a specific guest from a set of competitive molecules, according to a selectivity-affinity correlation. Association constants of the host-guest systems have been determined. Guest competition and exchange studies have been analyzed through variable temperature UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Molecular structures and electronic properties of the triangular polygon and of the host-guest systems also have been studied by means of all electrons density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations including dispersive contributions. DFT outcomes ultimately indicate the dispersive nature of the host-guest interactions, while TDDFT results allow a thorough assignment of the host and host-guests spectral features.

  5. Neutrons as a probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizumi, Masashi

    1993-01-01

    As an introduction to the symposium a brief overview will be given about the features of neutrons as a probe. First it will be pointed out that the utilization of neutrons as a probe for investigating the structural and dynamical properties of condensed matters is a benign gift eventuated from the release of atomic energy initiated by Enrico Fermi exactly half century ago. Features of neutrons as a probe are discussed in accordance with the four basic physical properties of neutrons as an elementary particle; (1) no electric charge (the interaction with matter is nuclear), (2) the mass of neutron is 1 amu, (3) spin is 1/2 and (4) neutrons have magnetic dipole moment. Overview will be given on the uniqueness of neutrons as a probe and on the variety in the way they are used in the wide research area from the pure science to the industrial applications. (author)

  6. Selection-driven extinction dynamics for group II introns in Enterobacteriales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Leclercq

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs are one of the major driving forces of genome evolution, raising the question of the long-term dynamics underlying their evolutionary success. Some TEs were proposed to evolve under a pattern of periodic extinctions-recolonizations, in which elements recurrently invade and quickly proliferate within their host genomes, then start to disappear until total extinction. Depending on the model, TE extinction is assumed to be driven by purifying selection against colonized host genomes (Sel-DE model or by saturation of host genomes (Sat-DE model. Bacterial group II introns are suspected to follow an extinction-recolonization model of evolution, but whether they follow Sel-DE or Sat-DE dynamics is not known. Our analysis of almost 200 group II intron copies from 90 sequenced Enterobacteriales genomes confirms their extinction-recolonization dynamics: patchy element distributions among genera and even among strains within genera, acquisition of new group II introns through plasmids or other mobile genetic elements, and evidence for recent proliferations in some genomes. Distributions of recent and past proliferations and of their respective homing sites further provide strong support for the Sel-DE model, suggesting that group II introns are deleterious to their hosts. Overall, our observations emphasize the critical impact of host properties on TE dynamics.

  7. Surface mobility and structural transitions of poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) probed by dynamic contact angle measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, H.S.; Hogt, A.H.; Feijen, Jan

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic contact angles and contact-angle hysteresis of a series of poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) (PAMA) were investigated using the Wilhelmy plate technique. The mobility of polymer surface chains, segments, and side groups affected the measured contact angles and their hysteresis. A model is

  8. Probing lipid coating dynamics of quantum dot core micelles via förster resonance energy transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiming; Schapotschnikow, Philipp; Skajaa, Torjus; Vlugt, Thijs J H; Mulder, Willem J M; De Mello Donegá, Celso; Meijerink, A

    2014-01-01

    Lipid coated nanocrystal assemblies are among the most extensively investigated nanoparticle platforms for biomedical imaging and therapeutic purposes. However, very few efforts have been addressed to the lipid coating exchange dynamics in such systems, which is key to our understanding of the

  9. Red fluorescent probes for real-time imaging of the cell cycle by dynamic monitoring of the nucleolus and chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang-Nan; Chao, Xi-Juan; Liu, Bing; Zhou, Dan-Jie; He, Liang; Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Cao, Qian; Tan, Cai-Ping; Zhang, Chen; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2018-03-08

    Two cationic molecular rotors, 1 and 2, capable of real-time cell-cycle imaging by specifically dynamic monitoring of nucleolus and chromosome changes were developed. A further study shows that fluorescence enhancements in the nucleolus and chromosome are attributed to a combination effect of interaction with nucleic acid and high condensation of the nucleolus and chromosome.

  10. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance

  11. Utilizing the dynamic stark shift as a probe for dielectric relaxation in photosynthetic reaction centers during charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi; Lin, Su; Woodbury, Neal W

    2013-09-26

    In photosynthetic reaction centers, the electric field generated by light-induced charge separation produces electrochromic shifts in the transitions of reaction center pigments. The extent of this Stark shift indirectly reflects the effective field strength at a particular cofactor in the complex. The dynamics of the effective field strength near the two monomeric bacteriochlorophylls (BA and BB) in purple photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers has been explored near physiological temperature by monitoring the time-dependent Stark shift during charge separation (dynamic Stark shift). This dynamic Stark shift was determined through analysis of femtosecond time-resolved absorbance change spectra recorded in wild type reaction centers and in four mutants at position M210. In both wild type and the mutants, the kinetics of the dynamic Stark shift differ from those of electron transfer, though not in the same way. In wild type, the initial electron transfer and the increase in the effective field strength near the active-side monomer bacteriochlorophyll (BA) occur in synchrony, but the two signals diverge on the time scale of electron transfer to the quinone. In contrast, when tyrosine is replaced by aspartic acid at M210, the kinetics of the BA Stark shift and the initial electron transfer differ, but transfer to the quinone coincides with the decay of the Stark shift. This is interpreted in terms of differences in the dynamics of the local dielectric environment between the mutants and the wild type. In wild type, comparison of the Stark shifts associated with BA and BB on the two quasi-symmetric halves of the reaction center structure confirm that the effective dielectric constants near these cofactors are quite different when the reaction center is in the state P(+)QA(-), as previously determined by Steffen et al. at 1.5 K (Steffen, M. A.; et al. Science 1994, 264, 810-816). However, it is not possible to determine from static, low-temperature measurments if the

  12. Dynamic selective switching in antiferromagnetically-coupled bilayers close to the spin reorientation transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Pacheco, A.; Mansell, R.; Petit, D.; Lee, J. H.; Cowburn, R. P.; Ummelen, F. C.; Swagten, H. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed a bilayer synthetic antiferromagnet where the order of layer reversal can be selected by varying the sweep rate of the applied magnetic field. The system is formed by two ultra-thin ferromagnetic layers with different proximities to the spin reorientation transition, coupled antiferromagnetically using Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions. The different dynamic magnetic reversal behavior of both layers produces a crossover in their switching fields for field rates in the kOe/s range. This effect is due to the different effective anisotropy of both layers, added to an appropriate asymmetric antiferromagnetic coupling between them. Field-rate controlled selective switching of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy layers as shown here can be exploited in sensing and memory applications.

  13. Mixed integer linear programming model for dynamic supplier selection problem considering discounts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Wicaksono Purnawan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Supplier selection is one of the most important elements in supply chain management. This function involves evaluation of many factors such as, material costs, transportation costs, quality, delays, supplier capacity, storage capacity and others. Each of these factors varies with time, therefore, supplier identified for one period is not necessarily be same for the next period to supply the same product. So, mixed integer linear programming (MILP was developed to overcome the dynamic supplier selection problem (DSSP. In this paper, a mixed integer linear programming model is built to solve the lot-sizing problem with multiple suppliers, multiple periods, multiple products and quantity discounts. The buyer has to make a decision for some products which will be supplied by some suppliers for some periods cosidering by discount. To validate the MILP model with randomly generated data. The model is solved by Lingo 16.

  14. Complex Dynamics of Droplet Traffic in a Bifurcating Microfluidic Channel: Periodicity, Multistability, and Selection Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessoms, D. A.; Amon, A.; Courbin, L.; Panizza, P.

    2010-10-01

    The binary path selection of droplets reaching a T junction is regulated by time-delayed feedback and nonlinear couplings. Such mechanisms result in complex dynamics of droplet partitioning: numerous discrete bifurcations between periodic regimes are observed. We introduce a model based on an approximation that makes this problem tractable. This allows us to derive analytical formulae that predict the occurrence of the bifurcations between consecutive regimes, establish selection rules for the period of a regime, and describe the evolutions of the period and complexity of droplet pattern in a cycle with the key parameters of the system. We discuss the validity and limitations of our model which describes semiquantitatively both numerical simulations and microfluidic experiments.

  15. Sequence selection by dynamical symmetry breaking in an autocatalytic binary polymer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold; Tanaka, Shinpei; Rasmussen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    Template-directed replication of nucleic acids is at the essence of all living beings and a major milestone for any origin of life scenario. We present an idealized model of prebiotic sequence replication, where binary polymers act as templates for their autocatalytic replication, thereby serving...... as each others reactants and products in an intertwined molecular ecology. Our model demonstrates how autocatalysis alters the qualitative and quantitative system dynamics in counterintuitive ways. Most notably, numerical simulations reveal a very strong intrinsic selection mechanism that favors...... the appearance of a few population structures with highly ordered and repetitive sequence patterns when starting from a pool of monomers. We demonstrate both analytically and through simulation how this "selection of the dullest" is caused by continued symmetry breaking through random fluctuations...

  16. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johannes Bernardus Charles; Khatib, M.G.; Koelmans, W.W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data

  17. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  18. Probing the energy landscape of alanine dipeptide and decalanine using temperature as a tunable parameter in molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, A; Bhattacharya, S

    2016-01-01

    We perform several molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of solvated alanine dipeptide and decalanine in vacuum with temperature as a tunable parameter and in the process, generate Markov state models (MSMs) at each temperature. An interesting observation that the kinetic rates appear to obey the Arrhenius rate law allows us to predict the dynamics of alanine dipeptide at 300 K at the microsecond timescales using the nanoseconds long high temperature calculations without actually performing MD simulations at 300 K. We conclude that the energy landscape of alanine dipeptide contains superbasins deeper than k B T and determine the energy barriers associated with the moves from the Arrhenius rate expression. Similar insights regarding the energy landscape associated with folding/unfolding pathways of a deca-alanine molecule are obtained using kinetic rates calculated at different temperatures. (paper)

  19. Ultrafast Dynamics of Sb-Corroles: A Combined Vis-Pump Supercontinuum Probe and Broadband Fluorescence Up-Conversion Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Zahn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Corroles are a developing class of tetrapyrrole-based molecules with significant chemical potential and relatively unexplored photophysical properties. We combined femtosecond broadband fluorescence up-conversion and fs broadband Vis-pump Vis-probe spectroscopy to comprehensively characterize the photoreaction of 5,10,15-tris-pentafluorophenyl-corrolato-antimony(V-trans-difluoride (Sb-tpfc-F2. Upon fs Soret band excitation at ~400 nm, the energy relaxed almost completely to Q band electronic excited states with a time constant of 500 ± 100 fs; this is evident from the decay of Soret band fluorescence at around 430 nm and the rise time of Q band fluorescence, as well as from Q band stimulated emission signals at 600 and 650 nm with the same time constant. Relaxation processes on a time scale of 10 and 20 ps were observed in the fluorescence and absorption signals. Triplet formation showed a time constant of 400 ps, with an intersystem crossing yield from the Q band to the triplet manifold of between 95% and 99%. This efficient triplet formation is due to the spin-orbit coupling of the antimony ion.

  20. An Adaptable Neuromorphic Model of Orientation Selectivity Based On Floating Gate Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti eGupta

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The biggest challenge that the neuromorphic community faces today is to build systems that can be considered truly cognitive. Adaptation and self-organization are the two basic principles that underlie any cognitive function that the brain performs. If we can replicate this behavior in hardware, we move a step closer to our goal of having cognitive neuromorphic systems. Adaptive feature selectivity is a mechanism by which nature optimizes resources so as to have greater acuity for more abundant features. Developing neuromorphic feature maps can help design generic machines that can emulate this adaptive behavior. Most neuromorphic models that have attempted to build self-organizing systems, follow the approach of modeling abstract theoretical frameworks in hardware. While this is good from a modeling and analysis perspective, it may not lead to the most efficient hardware. On the other hand, exploiting hardware dynamics to build adaptive systems rather than forcing the hardware to behave like mathematical equations, seems to be a more robust methodology when it comes to developing actual hardware for real world applications. In this paper we use a novel time-staggered Winner Take All circuit, that exploits the adaptation dynamics of floating gate transistors, to model an adaptive cortical cell that demonstrates Orientation Selectivity, a well-known biological phenomenon observed in the visual cortex. The cell performs competitive learning, refining its weights in response to input patterns resembling different oriented bars, becoming selective to a particular oriented pattern. Different analysis performed on the cell such as orientation tuning, application of abnormal inputs, response to spatial frequency and periodic patterns reveal close similarity between our cell and its biological counterpart. Embedded in a RC grid, these cells interact diffusively exhibiting cluster formation, making way for adaptively building orientation selective maps

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Analysis of Interfacial Water at Selected Sulfide Mineral Surfaces under Anaerobic Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we report on a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) study of the behavior of interfacial water at selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions. The study revealed the interfacial water structure and wetting characteristics of the pyrite (100) surface, galena (100) surface, chalcopyrite (012) surface, sphalerite (110) surface, and molybdenite surfaces (i.e., the face, armchair-edge, and zigzag-edge surfaces), including simulated contact angles, relative number density profiles, water dipole orientations, hydrogen-bonding, and residence times. For force fields of the metal and sulfur atoms in selected sulfide minerals used in the MDS, we used the universal force field (UFF) and another set of force fields optimized by quantum chemical calculations for interactions with interfacial water molecules at selected sulfide mineral surfaces. Simulation results for the structural and dynamic properties of interfacial water molecules indicate the natural hydrophobic character for the selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions as well as the relatively weak hydrophobicity for the sphalerite (110) surface and two molybdenite edge surfaces. Part of the financial support for this study was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Basic Science Grant No. DE-FG-03-93ER14315. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE, funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES. The authors are grateful to Professor Tsun-Mei Chang for valuable discussions.

  2. On the selection of ordinary differential equation models with application to predator-prey dynamical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Cao, Jiguo; Carroll, Raymond J

    2015-03-01

    We consider model selection and estimation in a context where there are competing ordinary differential equation (ODE) models, and all the models are special cases of a "full" model. We propose a computationally inexpensive approach that employs statistical estimation of the full model, followed by a combination of a least squares approximation (LSA) and the adaptive Lasso. We show the resulting method, here called the LSA method, to be an (asymptotically) oracle model selection method. The finite sample performance of the proposed LSA method is investigated with Monte Carlo simulations, in which we examine the percentage of selecting true ODE models, the efficiency of the parameter estimation compared to simply using the full and true models, and coverage probabilities of the estimated confidence intervals for ODE parameters, all of which have satisfactory performances. Our method is also demonstrated by selecting the best predator-prey ODE to model a lynx and hare population dynamical system among some well-known and biologically interpretable ODE models. © 2014, The International Biometric Society.

  3. Positive Selection or Free to Vary? Assessing the Functional Significance of Sequence Change Using Molecular Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane R Allison

    Full Text Available Evolutionary arms races between pathogens and their hosts may be manifested as selection for rapid evolutionary change of key genes, and are sometimes detectable through sequence-level analyses. In the case of protein-coding genes, such analyses frequently predict that specific codons are under positive selection. However, detecting positive selection can be non-trivial, and false positive predictions are a common concern in such analyses. It is therefore helpful to place such predictions within a structural and functional context. Here, we focus on the p19 protein from tombusviruses. P19 is a homodimer that sequesters siRNAs, thereby preventing the host RNAi machinery from shutting down viral infection. Sequence analysis of the p19 gene is complicated by the fact that it is constrained at the sequence level by overprinting of a viral movement protein gene. Using homology modeling, in silico mutation and molecular dynamics simulations, we assess how non-synonymous changes to two residues involved in forming the dimer interface-one invariant, and one predicted to be under positive selection-impact molecular function. Interestingly, we find that both observed variation and potential variation (where a non-synonymous change to p19 would be synonymous for the overprinted movement protein does not significantly impact protein structure or RNA binding. Consequently, while several methods identify residues at the dimer interface as being under positive selection, MD results suggest they are functionally indistinguishable from a site that is free to vary. Our analyses serve as a caveat to using sequence-level analyses in isolation to detect and assess positive selection, and emphasize the importance of also accounting for how non-synonymous changes impact structure and function.

  4. Nanosecond dynamics of influenza A/M2TM and an amantadine resistant mutant probed by time-dependent red shifts of a native tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Vikas [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School – UMDNJ, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School – UMDNJ, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Cristian, Lidia [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6059 (United States); Toptygin, Dmitri; Brand, Ludwig [Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); DeGrado, William F., E-mail: William.Degrado@ucsf.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: ► Examined nanosecond dynamics of essential tryptophan residue of M2 proton channel. ► Channel blocking drugs restrict the ability of M2 to stabilize charge. ► Dielectric relaxation of M2 consistent with molecular dynamics simulation studies. - Abstract: Proteins involved in functions such as electron transfer or ion transport must be capable of stabilizing transient charged species on time scales ranging from picoseconds to microseconds. We study the influenza A M2 proton channel, containing a tryptophan residue that serves as an essential part of the proton conduction pathway. We induce a transition dipole in tryptophan by photoexcitation, and then probe the dielectric stabilization of its excited state. The magnitude of the stabilization over this time regime was larger than that generally found for tryptophan in membrane or protein environments. M2 achieves a water-like stabilization over a 25 ns time scale, slower than that of bulk water, but sufficiently rapid to contribute to stabilization of charge as protons diffuse through the channel. These measurements should stimulate future MD studies to clarify the role of sidechain versus non-bulk water in defining the process of relaxation.

  5. Monte Carlo wave-packet approach to trace nuclear dynamics in molecular excited states by XUV-pump-IR-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Qingli; Bello, Roger Y.; Martín, Fernando; Palacios, Alicia; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2018-04-01

    Recent research interests have been raised in uncovering and controlling ultrafast dynamics in excited neutral molecules. In this work we generalize the Monte Carlo wave packet (MCWP) approach to XUV-pump-IR-probe schemes to simulate the process of dissociative double ionization of H2 where singly excited states in H2 are involved. The XUV pulse is chosen to resonantly excite the initial ground state of H2 to the lowest excited electronic state of 1Σu + symmetry in H2 within the Franck-Condon region. The delayed intense IR pulse couples the excited states of 1Σu + symmetry with the nearby excited states of 1Σg + symmetry. It also induces the first ionization from H2 to H2 + and the second ionization from H2 + to H++H+. To reduce the computational costs in the MCWP approach, a sampling method is proposed to determine in time the dominant ionization events from H2 to H2+. By conducting a trajectory analysis, which is a unique possibility within the MCWP approach, the origins of the characteristic features in the nuclear kinetic energy release spectra are identified for delays ranging from 0 to 140 fs and the nuclear dynamics in the singly excited states in H2 is mapped out.

  6. Information-theoretic model selection for optimal prediction of stochastic dynamical systems from data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmon, David

    2018-03-01

    In the absence of mechanistic or phenomenological models of real-world systems, data-driven models become necessary. The discovery of various embedding theorems in the 1980s and 1990s motivated a powerful set of tools for analyzing deterministic dynamical systems via delay-coordinate embeddings of observations of their component states. However, in many branches of science, the condition of operational determinism is not satisfied, and stochastic models must be brought to bear. For such stochastic models, the tool set developed for delay-coordinate embedding is no longer appropriate, and a new toolkit must be developed. We present an information-theoretic criterion, the negative log-predictive likelihood, for selecting the embedding dimension for a predictively optimal data-driven model of a stochastic dynamical system. We develop a nonparametric estimator for the negative log-predictive likelihood and compare its performance to a recently proposed criterion based on active information storage. Finally, we show how the output of the model selection procedure can be used to compare candidate predictors for a stochastic system to an information-theoretic lower bound.

  7. Life at extreme conditions: neutron scattering studies of biological molecules suggest that evolution selected dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaccai, Joseph Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    The short review concentrates on recent work performed at the neutrons in biology laboratories of the Institut Laue Langevin and Institut de Biologie Structurale in Grenoble. Extremophile organisms have been discovered that require extreme conditions of temperature, pressure or solvent environment for survival. The existence of such organisms poses a significant challenge in understanding the physical chemistry of their proteins, in view of the great sensitivity of protein structure and stability to the aqueous environment and to external conditions in general. Results of neutron scattering measurements on the dynamics of proteins from extremophile organisms, in vitro as well as in vivo, indicated remarkably how adaptation to extreme conditions involves forces and fluctuation amplitudes that have been selected specifically, suggesting that evolutionary macromolecular selection proceeded via dynamics. The experiments were performed on a halophilic protein, and membrane adapted to high salt, a thermophilic enzyme adapted to high temperature and its mesophilic (adapted to 37 degC) homologue; and in vivo for psychrophilic, mesophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic bacteria, adapted respectively to temperatures of 4 degC, 37 degC, 75 degC and 85 degC. Further work demonstrated the existence of a water component of exceptionally low mobility in an extreme halophile from the Dead Sea, which is not present in mesophile bacterial cells. (author)

  8. Early circulating tumor DNA dynamics and clonal selection with palbociclib and fulvestrant for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Ben; Hrebien, Sarah; Morden, James P; Beaney, Matthew; Fribbens, Charlotte; Huang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Bartlett, Cynthia Huang; Koehler, Maria; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Bliss, Judith M; Turner, Nicholas C

    2018-03-01

    CDK4/6 inhibition substantially improves progression-free survival (PFS) for women with advanced estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, although there are no predictive biomarkers. Early changes in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) level may provide early response prediction, but the impact of tumor heterogeneity is unknown. Here we use plasma samples from patients in the randomized phase III PALOMA-3 study of CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib and fulvestrant for women with advanced breast cancer and show that relative change in PIK3CA ctDNA level after 15 days treatment strongly predicts PFS on palbociclib and fulvestrant (hazard ratio 3.94, log-rank p = 0.0013). ESR1 mutations selected by prior hormone therapy are shown to be frequently sub clonal, with ESR1 ctDNA dynamics offering limited prediction of clinical outcome. These results suggest that early ctDNA dynamics may provide a robust biomarker for CDK4/6 inhibitors, with early ctDNA dynamics demonstrating divergent response of tumor sub clones to treatment.

  9. Dynamics in the quantum/classical limit based on selective use of the quantum potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garashchuk, Sophya; Dell’Angelo, David; Rassolov, Vitaly A.

    2014-01-01

    A classical limit of quantum dynamics can be defined by compensation of the quantum potential in the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The quantum potential is a non-local quantity, defined in the trajectory-based form of the Schrödinger equation, due to Madelung, de Broglie, and Bohm, which formally generates the quantum-mechanical features in dynamics. Selective inclusion of the quantum potential for the degrees of freedom deemed “quantum,” defines a hybrid quantum/classical dynamics, appropriate for molecular systems comprised of light and heavy nuclei. The wavefunction is associated with all of the nuclei, and the Ehrenfest, or mean-field, averaging of the force acting on the classical degrees of freedom, typical of the mixed quantum/classical methods, is avoided. The hybrid approach is used to examine evolution of light/heavy systems in the harmonic and double-well potentials, using conventional grid-based and approximate quantum-trajectory time propagation. The approximate quantum force is defined on spatial domains, which removes unphysical coupling of the wavefunction fragments corresponding to distinct classical channels or configurations. The quantum potential, associated with the quantum particle, generates forces acting on both quantum and classical particles to describe the backreaction

  10. Dynamics in the quantum/classical limit based on selective use of the quantum potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garashchuk, Sophya, E-mail: garashchuk@sc.edu; Dell’Angelo, David; Rassolov, Vitaly A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)

    2014-12-21

    A classical limit of quantum dynamics can be defined by compensation of the quantum potential in the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The quantum potential is a non-local quantity, defined in the trajectory-based form of the Schrödinger equation, due to Madelung, de Broglie, and Bohm, which formally generates the quantum-mechanical features in dynamics. Selective inclusion of the quantum potential for the degrees of freedom deemed “quantum,” defines a hybrid quantum/classical dynamics, appropriate for molecular systems comprised of light and heavy nuclei. The wavefunction is associated with all of the nuclei, and the Ehrenfest, or mean-field, averaging of the force acting on the classical degrees of freedom, typical of the mixed quantum/classical methods, is avoided. The hybrid approach is used to examine evolution of light/heavy systems in the harmonic and double-well potentials, using conventional grid-based and approximate quantum-trajectory time propagation. The approximate quantum force is defined on spatial domains, which removes unphysical coupling of the wavefunction fragments corresponding to distinct classical channels or configurations. The quantum potential, associated with the quantum particle, generates forces acting on both quantum and classical particles to describe the backreaction.

  11. Probing the role of long-range interactions in the dynamics of a long-range Kitaev chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Dutta, Amit

    2017-09-01

    We study the role of long-range interactions (more precisely, the long-range superconducting gap term) on the nonequilibrium dynamics considering a long-range p -wave superconducting chain in which the superconducting term decays with distance between two sites in a power-law fashion characterized by an exponent α . We show that the Kibble-Zurek scaling exponent, dictating the power-law decay of the defect density in the final state reached following a slow (in comparison to the time scale associated with the minimum gap in the spectrum of the Hamiltonian) quenching of the chemical potential μ across a quantum critical point, depends nontrivially on the exponent α as long as α 2 , we find that the exponent saturates to the corresponding well-known value of 1 /2 expected for the short-range model. Furthermore, studying the dynamical quantum phase transitions manifested in the nonanalyticities in the rate function of the return possibility I (t ) in subsequent temporal evolution following a sudden change in μ , we show the existence of a new region; in this region, we find three instants of cusp singularities in I (t ) associated with a single sector of Fisher zeros. Notably, the width of this region shrinks as α increases and vanishes in the limit α →2 , indicating that this special region is an artifact of the long-range nature of the Hamiltonian.

  12. Probing the 3-D Structure, Dynamics, and Stability of Bacterial Collagenase Collagen Binding Domain (apo- versus holo-) by Limited Proteolysis MALDI-TOF MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sides, Cynthia R.; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O.; Philominathan, Sagaya Theresa Leena; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Pairing limited proteolysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to probe clostridial collagenase collagen binding domain (CBD) reveals the solution dynamics and stability of the protein, as these factors are crucial to CBD effectiveness as a drug-delivery vehicle. MS analysis of proteolytic digests indicates initial cleavage sites, thereby specifying the less stable and highly accessible regions of CBD. Modulation of protein structure and stability upon metal binding is shown through MS analysis of calcium-bound and cobalt-bound CBD proteolytic digests. Previously determined X-ray crystal structures illustrate that calcium binding induces secondary structure transformation in the highly mobile N-terminal arm and increases protein stability. MS-based detection of exposed residues confirms protein flexibility, accentuates N-terminal dynamics, and demonstrates increased global protein stability exported by calcium binding. Additionally, apo- and calcium-bound CBD proteolysis sites correlate well with crystallographic B-factors, accessibility, and enzyme specificity. MS-observed cleavage sites with no clear correlations are explained either by crystal contacts of the X-ray crystal structures or by observed differences between Molecules A and B in the X-ray crystal structures. The study newly reveals the absence of the βA strand and thus the very dynamic N-terminal linker, as corroborated by the solution X-ray scattering results. Cobalt binding has a regional effect on the solution phase stability of CBD, as limited proteolysis data implies the capture of an intermediate-CBD solution structure when cobalt is bound.

  13. Primitive chain network simulations of probe rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masubuchi, Yuichi; Amamoto, Yoshifumi; Pandey, Ankita; Liu, Cheng-Yang

    2017-09-27

    Probe rheology experiments, in which the dynamics of a small amount of probe chains dissolved in immobile matrix chains is discussed, have been performed for the development of molecular theories for entangled polymer dynamics. Although probe chain dynamics in probe rheology is considered hypothetically as single chain dynamics in fixed tube-shaped confinement, it has not been fully elucidated. For instance, the end-to-end relaxation of probe chains is slower than that for monodisperse melts, unlike the conventional molecular theories. In this study, the viscoelastic and dielectric relaxations of probe chains were calculated by primitive chain network simulations. The simulations semi-quantitatively reproduced the dielectric relaxation, which reflects the effect of constraint release on the end-to-end relaxation. Fair agreement was also obtained for the viscoelastic relaxation time. However, the viscoelastic relaxation intensity was underestimated, possibly due to some flaws in the model for the inter-chain cross-correlations between probe and matrix chains.

  14. Probing and exploiting the chaotic dynamics of a hydrodynamic photochemical oscillator to implement all the basic binary logic functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Kenta [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu-shi, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Biology, and Biotechnology, University of Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Gotoda, Hiroshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, 6-3-1 Niijuku, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Gentili, Pier Luigi, E-mail: pierluigi.gentili@unipg.it [Department of Chemistry, Biology, and Biotechnology, University of Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    The convective motions within a solution of a photochromic spiro-oxazine being irradiated by UV only on the bottom part of its volume, give rise to aperiodic spectrophotometric dynamics. In this paper, we study three nonlinear properties of the aperiodic time series: permutation entropy, short-term predictability and long-term unpredictability, and degree distribution of the visibility graph networks. After ascertaining the extracted chaotic features, we show how the aperiodic time series can be exploited to implement all the fundamental two-inputs binary logic functions (AND, OR, NAND, NOR, XOR, and XNOR) and some basic arithmetic operations (half-adder, full-adder, half-subtractor). This is possible due to the wide range of states a nonlinear system accesses in the course of its evolution. Therefore, the solution of the convective photochemical oscillator results in hardware for chaos-computing alternative to conventional complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-based integrated circuits.

  15. Probing Dirac fermion dynamics in topological insulator Bi2Se3 films with a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Can-Li; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2015-05-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy have been used to investigate the femtosecond dynamics of Dirac fermions in the topological insulator Bi2Se3 ultrathin films. At the two-dimensional limit, bulk electrons become quantized and the quantization can be controlled by the film thickness at a single quintuple layer level. By studying the spatial decay of standing waves (quasiparticle interference patterns) off steps, we measure directly the energy and film thickness dependence of the phase relaxation length lϕ and inelastic scattering lifetime τ of topological surface-state electrons. We find that τ exhibits a remarkable (E - EF)(-2) energy dependence and increases with film thickness. We show that the features revealed are typical for electron-electron scattering between surface and bulk states.

  16. Glitches as probes of neutron star internal structure and dynamics: Effects of the superfluid-superconducting core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gügercinoğlu, Erbil

    2017-12-01

    Glitches, sudden spin-up of pulsars with subsequent recovery, provide us with a unique opportunity to investigate various physical processes, including the crust-core coupling, distribution of reservoir angular momentum within different internal layers, spin-up in neutral and charged superfluids and constraining the equation of state of the neutron star (NS) matter. In this work, depending on the dynamic interaction between the vortex lines and the nuclei in the inner crust, and between the vortex lines and the magnetic flux tubes in the outer core, various types of relaxation behavior are obtained and confronted with the observations. It is shown that the glitches have strong potential to deduce information about the cooling behavior and interior magnetic field configuration of NSs. Some implications of the relative importance of the external spin-down torques and the superfluid internal torques for recently observed unusual glitches are also discussed.

  17. Magneto-structural coupling and harmonic lattice dynamics in CaFe2As2 probed by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhiwei; Ma Xiaoming; Pang Hua; Li Fashen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed Moessbauer spectroscopy study of the structural and magnetic properties of the undoped parent compound CaFe 2 As 2 single crystal. By fitting the temperature dependence of the hyperfine magnetic field we show that the magneto-structural phase transition is clearly first order in nature and we also deduce the compressibility of our sample to be 1.67 x 10 -2 GPa -1 . Within Landau's theory of phase transition, we further argue that the observed phase transition may stem from the strong magneto-structural coupling effect. The temperature dependence of the Lamb-Moessbauer factor shows that the paramagnetic phase and the antiferromagnetic phase exhibit similar lattice dynamics in high-frequency modes with very close Debye temperatures, Θ D ∼ 270 K.

  18. A dynamical model of hierarchical selection and coordination in speech planning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Tilsen

    Full Text Available studies of the control of complex sequential movements have dissociated two aspects of movement planning: control over the sequential selection of movement plans, and control over the precise timing of movement execution. This distinction is particularly relevant in the production of speech: utterances contain sequentially ordered words and syllables, but articulatory movements are often executed in a non-sequential, overlapping manner with precisely coordinated relative timing. This study presents a hybrid dynamical model in which competitive activation controls selection of movement plans and coupled oscillatory systems govern coordination. The model departs from previous approaches by ascribing an important role to competitive selection of articulatory plans within a syllable. Numerical simulations show that the model reproduces a variety of speech production phenomena, such as effects of preparation and utterance composition on reaction time, and asymmetries in patterns of articulatory timing associated with onsets and codas. The model furthermore provides a unified understanding of a diverse group of phonetic and phonological phenomena which have not previously been related.

  19. DYNAMIC FEATURE SELECTION FOR WEB USER IDENTIFICATION ON LINGUISTIC AND STYLISTIC FEATURES OF ONLINE TEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Vorobeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with identification and authentication of web users participating in the Internet information processes (based on features of online texts.In digital forensics web user identification based on various linguistic features can be used to discover identity of individuals, criminals or terrorists using the Internet to commit cybercrimes. Internet could be used as a tool in different types of cybercrimes (fraud and identity theft, harassment and anonymous threats, terrorist or extremist statements, distribution of illegal content and information warfare. Linguistic identification of web users is a kind of biometric identification, it can be used to narrow down the suspects, identify a criminal and prosecute him. Feature set includes various linguistic and stylistic features extracted from online texts. We propose dynamic feature selection for each web user identification task. Selection is based on calculating Manhattan distance to k-nearest neighbors (Relief-f algorithm. This approach improves the identification accuracy and minimizes the number of features. Experiments were carried out on several datasets with different level of class imbalance. Experiment results showed that features relevance varies in different set of web users (probable authors of some text; features selection for each set of web users improves identification accuracy by 4% at the average that is approximately 1% higher than with the use of static set of features. The proposed approach is most effective for a small number of training samples (messages per user.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of the Selectivity of a Silica Polymer for Ibuprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Concu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, the sol-gel polycondensation technique has been increasingly employed with great success as an alternative approach to the preparation of molecularly imprinted materials (MIMs. The main aim of this study was to study, through a series of molecular dynamics (MD simulations, the selectivity of an imprinted silica xerogel towards a new template—the (±-2-(P-Isobutylphenyl propionic acid (Ibuprofen, IBU. We have previously demonstrated the affinity of this silica xerogel toward a similar molecule. In the present study, we simulated the imprinting process occurring in a sol-gel mixture using the Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations-All Atom (OPLS-AA force field, in order to evaluate the selectivity of this xerogel for a template molecule. In addition, for the first time, we have developed and verified a new parameterisation for the Ibuprofen® based on the OPLS-AA framework. To evaluate the selectivity of the polymer, we have employed both the radial distribution functions, interaction energies and cluster analyses.

  1. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  2. Optical probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, J.; Decaudin, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The probe includes optical means of refractive index n, refracting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n1>n and reflecting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n2 [fr

  3. Non-affine deformation in microstructure selection in solids II: Elastoplastic theory for the dynamics of solid state transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Arya; Bhattacharya, Jayee; Sengupta, Surajit [S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Calcutta 700 098 (India); Rao, Madan [Raman Research Institute, C V Raman Avenue, Bangalore 560 080 (India)

    2008-09-10

    We study the nucleation dynamics of a model solid state transformation and the criterion for microstructure selection. Using a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we had shown that the dynamics of the solid is accompanied by the creation of transient non-affine zones (NAZ), which evolve with the rapidly moving transformation front. Guided by our MD results, we formulate a dynamical continuum theory of solid state transformation, which couples the elastic strain to the non-affine deformation. We demonstrate that our elastoplastic description recovers all qualitative features of the MD simulation. We construct a dynamical phase diagram for microstructure selection, including regimes where martensite or ferrite obtains, in addition to making several testable predictions.

  4. Dynamics of ions in the selectivity filter of the KcsA channel: Towards a coupled Brownian particle description

    OpenAIRE

    Cosseddu, Salvatore M.; Khovanov, Igor A.; Allen, Michael P.; Rodger, P. M.; Luchinsky, Dmitry G.; McClintock, Peter V. E.

    2013-01-01

    The statistical and dynamical properties of ions in the selectivity filter of the KcsA ion channel are considered on the basis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the KcsA protein embedded in a lipid membrane surrounded by an ionic solution. A new approach to the derivation of a Brownian dynamics (BD) model of ion permeation through the filter is discussed, based on unbiased MD simulations. It is shown that depending on additional assumptions, ion’s dynamics can be described either by u...

  5. Counting probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Unveiling NIR Aza-Boron-Dipyrromethene (BODIPY) Dyes as Raman Probes: Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)-Guided Selective Detection and Imaging of Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adarsh, Nagappanpillai; Ramya, Adukkadan N; Maiti, Kaustabh Kumar; Ramaiah, Danaboyina

    2017-10-12

    The development of new Raman reporters has attracted immense attention in diagnostic research based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) techniques, which is a well established method for ultrasensitive detection through molecular fingerprinting and imaging. Herein, for the first time, we report the unique and efficient Raman active features of the selected aza-BODIPY dyes 1-6. These distinctive attributes could be extended at the molecular level to allow detection through SERS upon adsorption onto nano-roughened gold surface. Among the newly revealed Raman reporters, the amino substituted derivative 4 showed high signal intensity at very low concentrations (ca. 0.4 μm for 4-Au). Interestingly, an efficient nanoprobe has been constructed by using gold nanoparticles as SERS substrate, and 4 as the Raman reporter (4-Au@PEG), which unexpectedly showed efficient recognition of three human cancer cells (lung: A549, cervical: HeLa, Fibrosarcoma: HT-1080) without any specific surface marker. We observed well reflected and resolved Raman mapping and characteristic signature peaks whereas, such recognition was not observed in normal fibroblast (3T3L1) cells. To confirm these findings, a SERS nanoprobe was conjugated with a specific tumour targeting marker, EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor), a well known targeted agent for Human Fibrosarcoma (HT1080). This nanoprobe efficiently targeted the surface marker of HT1080 cells, threreby demonstrating its use as an ultrasensitive Raman probe for detection and targeted imaging, leaving normal cells unaffected. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A new cationic porphyrin derivative (TMPipEOPP with large side arm substituents: a highly selective G-quadruplex optical probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Na Zhu

    Full Text Available The discovery of uncommon DNA structures and speculation about their potential functions in genes has brought attention to specific DNA structure recognition. G-quadruplexes are four-stranded nucleic acid structures formed by G-rich DNA (or RNA sequences. G-rich sequences with a high potential to form G-quadruplexes have been found in many important genomic regions. Porphyrin derivatives with cationic side arm substituents are important G-quadruplex-binding ligands. For example, 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium-4-yl-21H,23H-porphyrin (TMPyP4, interacts strongly with G-quadruplexes, but has poor selectivity for G-quadruplex versus duplex DNA. To increase the G-quadruplex recognition specificity, a new cationic porphyrin derivative, 5,10,15,20-tetra-{4-[2-(1-methyl-1-piperidinylethoxy]phenyl} porphyrin (TMPipEOPP, with large side arm substituents was synthesized, and the interactions between TMPipEOPP and different DNA structures were compared. The results show that G-quadruplexes cause large changes in the UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectra of TMPipEOPP, but duplex and single-stranded DNAs do not, indicating that TMPipEOPP can be developed as a highly specific optical probe for discriminating G-quadruplex from duplex and single-stranded DNA. Visual discrimination is also possible. Job plot and Scatchard analysis suggest that a complicated binding interaction occurs between TMPipEOPP and G-quadruplexes. At a low [G-quadruplex]/[TMPipEOPP] ratio, one G-quadruplex binds two TMPipEOPP molecules by end-stacking and outside binding modes. At a high [G-quadruplex]/[TMPipEOPP] ratio, two G-quadruplexes bind to one TMPipEOPP molecule in a sandwich-like end-stacking mode.

  8. A new cationic porphyrin derivative (TMPipEOPP) with large side arm substituents: a highly selective G-quadruplex optical probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Na; Zhao, Shu-Juan; Wu, Bin; Li, Xiao-Zeng; Kong, De-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of uncommon DNA structures and speculation about their potential functions in genes has brought attention to specific DNA structure recognition. G-quadruplexes are four-stranded nucleic acid structures formed by G-rich DNA (or RNA) sequences. G-rich sequences with a high potential to form G-quadruplexes have been found in many important genomic regions. Porphyrin derivatives with cationic side arm substituents are important G-quadruplex-binding ligands. For example, 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-21H,23H-porphyrin (TMPyP4), interacts strongly with G-quadruplexes, but has poor selectivity for G-quadruplex versus duplex DNA. To increase the G-quadruplex recognition specificity, a new cationic porphyrin derivative, 5,10,15,20-tetra-{4-[2-(1-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethoxy]phenyl} porphyrin (TMPipEOPP), with large side arm substituents was synthesized, and the interactions between TMPipEOPP and different DNA structures were compared. The results show that G-quadruplexes cause large changes in the UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectra of TMPipEOPP, but duplex and single-stranded DNAs do not, indicating that TMPipEOPP can be developed as a highly specific optical probe for discriminating G-quadruplex from duplex and single-stranded DNA. Visual discrimination is also possible. Job plot and Scatchard analysis suggest that a complicated binding interaction occurs between TMPipEOPP and G-quadruplexes. At a low [G-quadruplex]/[TMPipEOPP] ratio, one G-quadruplex binds two TMPipEOPP molecules by end-stacking and outside binding modes. At a high [G-quadruplex]/[TMPipEOPP] ratio, two G-quadruplexes bind to one TMPipEOPP molecule in a sandwich-like end-stacking mode.

  9. Dynamics of a broad-area diode laser with lateral-mode-selected long-cavity feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of a broad-area diode laser with lateral-mode-selected long-cavity feedback is studied experimentally. Different dynamics are observed when different lateral modes are selected. When the feedback mirror is aligned perfectly and high-order modes are selected, in most....... When the feedback mirror is aligned non-perfectly, pulse-package oscillation is observed, for the first time to our knowledge, in a diode laser with long-cavity feedback....... of the cases, the output of the laser shows a periodic oscillation corresponding to a single roundtrip external-cavity loop, but the dynamic behavior disappears in some case; when the zero-order lateral-mode is selected, periodic oscillation corresponding to a double roundtrip external-cavity loop is observed...

  10. Temporal dynamics of selective attention and conflict resolution during cross-dimensional go-nogo decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moschner Carsten

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision-making is a fundamental capacity which is crucial to many higher-order psychological functions. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs during a visual target-identification task that required go-nogo choices. Targets were identified on the basis of cross-dimensional conjunctions of particular colors and forms. Color discriminability was manipulated in three conditions to determine the effects of color distinctiveness on component processes of decision-making. Results Target identification was accompanied by the emergence of prefrontal P2a and P3b. Selection negativity (SN revealed that target-compatible features captured attention more than target-incompatible features, suggesting that intra-dimensional attentional capture was goal-contingent. No changes of cross-dimensional selection priorities were measurable when color discriminability was altered. Peak latencies of the color-related SN provided a chronometric measure of the duration of attention-related neural processing. ERPs recorded over the frontocentral scalp (N2c, P3a revealed that color-overlap distractors, more than form-overlap distractors, required additional late selection. The need for additional response selection induced by color-overlap distractors was severely reduced when color discriminability decreased. Conclusion We propose a simple model of cross-dimensional perceptual decision-making. The temporal synchrony of separate color-related and form-related choices determines whether or not distractor processing includes post-perceptual stages. ERP measures contribute to a comprehensive explanation of the temporal dynamics of component processes of perceptual decision-making.

  11. Interaction and dynamics of ambient water adlayers on graphite probed using AFM voltage nanolithography and electrostatic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowthami, T; Raina, Gargi; Kurra, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the impact of the interaction and dynamics of increasing ambient water adlayers on etch patterns on a hydrophobic highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM) voltage nanolithography in contact mode by applying a positive bias to the sample. The changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns were investigated as a function of the increasing number of water adlayers present on the HOPG, which is varied by changing the time interval since HOPG cleavage. Changes in the width of the etch patterns and the surrounding water droplets were monitored with time, using intermittent-contact-mode AFM. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) has been employed to study the charged nature of the etch patterns and the neighboring water film with time. The width of the etch patterns made on freshly cleaved HOPG shows an increase of ∼33% over 48 h, whereas nine-day-old cleaved HOPG shows a 79% increase over the same period. No changes in the dimensions are observed while imaging in a nitrogen atmosphere soon after lithography. In ambient conditions, the EFM phase shift of the patterns shows a large change of ∼84–88% over 30 h. This study demonstrates the effect of the stored electrostatic energy of a polarized ice-like water adlayer, resulting in changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns long after lithography, whereas liquid-like water droplets do not affect the etch patterns. (paper)

  12. Composition-dependent trap distributions in CdSe and InP quantum dots probed using photoluminescence blinking dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heejae; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Koh, Weon-Kyu; Kim, Dongho; Kim, Jiwon

    2016-07-21

    Although Group II-VI quantum dots (QDs) have attracted much attention due to their wide range of applications in QD-based devices, the presence of toxic ions in II-VI QDs raises environmental concerns. To fulfill the demands of nontoxic QDs, synthetic routes for III-V QDs have been developed. However, only a few comparative analyses on optical properties of III-V QDs have been performed. In this study, the composition-related energetic trap distributions have been explored by using three different types of core/multishell QDs: CdSe-CdS (CdSe/CdS/ZnS), InP-ZnSe (InP/ZnSe/ZnS), and InP-GaP (InP/GaP/ZnS). It was shown that CdSe-CdS QDs have much larger trap densities than InP-shell QDs at higher energy states (at least 1Eg (band gap energy) above the lowest conduction band edge) based on probability density plots and Auger ionization efficiencies which are determined by analyses of photoluminescence blinking dynamics. This result suggests that the composition of encapsulated QDs is closely associated with the charge trapping processes, and also provides an insight into the development of more environmentally friendly QD-based devices.

  13. Probing the ionization wave packet and recollision dynamics with an elliptically polarized strong laser field in the nondipole regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, J.; Willenberg, B.; Daněk, J.; Mayer, B. W.; Phillips, C. R.; Gallmann, L.; Klaiber, M.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.; Keller, U.

    2018-01-01

    We explore ionization and rescattering in strong mid-infrared laser fields in the nondipole regime over the full range of polarization ellipticity. In three-dimensional photoelectron momentum distributions (3D PMDs) measured with velocity map imaging spectroscopy, we observe the appearance of a sharp ridge structure along the major polarization axis. Within a certain range of ellipticity, the electrons in this ridge are clearly separated from the two lobes that commonly appear in the PMD with elliptically polarized laser fields. In contrast to the well-known lobes of direct electrons, the sharp ridge is created by Coulomb focusing of the softly recolliding electrons. These ridge electrons are directly related to a counterintuitive shift of the PMD peak opposite to the laser beam propagation direction when the dipole approximation breaks down. The ellipticity-dependent 3D PMDs give access to different ionization and recollision dynamics with appropriate filters in the momentum space. For example, we can extract information about the spread of the initial wave packet and the Coulomb momentum transfer of the rescattering electrons.

  14. Automated selection of areas of interest in dynamic studies and camera-cinematograpy of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitter, F.; Adam, W.E.; Kampmann, H.; Meyer, G.; Weller, R.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported in heart investigations using the first transit principle and the steady-state procedure for radionuclide scanning. Progress in the first transit principle relies on automated selection of areas of interest. A procedure has been developed which automatically performs the evaluation of the areas corresponding to the right heart, the lungs, and the left heart. A different procedure has been built up for dynamic lung studies with Xe-133 (Radiospirometry), which principally can be applied to any other organ investigation. R-wave time averaged procedures of the heart in steady state can be performed in direct or indirect manner. A direct procedure is described that leads eventually to a cinematographic presentation of the heart kinetics on the computer display. The analysis yields an exact outline of heart ventricles and auricles as prerequisite for determination of ejection fractions and clinically relevant data of the heart function

  15. A dynamic voltage restorer (DVR) with selective harmonic compensation at medium voltage level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, M.J.; Holmes, D.G.; Nielsen, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic voltage restorers (DVRs) are now becoming more established in industry to reduce the impact of voltage sags to sensitive loads. However, DVRs spend most of their time in standby mode, since voltage sags occur very infrequently, and hence their utilization is low. In principle, it would...... be advantageous if the series-connected inverter of a DVR could also be used to compensate for any steady-state load voltage harmonics, since this would increase the power quality "value-added" benefits to the grid system. However, before this can be done, consideration must be given to the control of steady......-state power through the DVR, the increased losses, and the low modulation depths at which the scheme must operate to achieve acceptable harmonic compensation performance. This paper presents a selective harmonic feedback control strategy that can be easily added to medium-voltage DVR systems to provide...

  16. Global dynamics of selective attention and its lapses in primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter; Barczak, Annamaria; Neymotin, Samuel A; McGinnis, Tammy; Ross, Deborah; Javitt, Daniel C; O'Connell, Monica Noelle

    2016-12-01

    Previous research demonstrated that while selectively attending to relevant aspects of the external world, the brain extracts pertinent information by aligning its neuronal oscillations to key time points of stimuli or their sampling by sensory organs. This alignment mechanism is termed oscillatory entrainment. We investigated the global, long-timescale dynamics of this mechanism in the primary auditory cortex of nonhuman primates, and hypothesized that lapses of entrainment would correspond to lapses of attention. By examining electrophysiological and behavioral measures, we observed that besides the lack of entrainment by external stimuli, attentional lapses were also characterized by high-amplitude alpha oscillations, with alpha frequency structuring of neuronal ensemble and single-unit operations. Entrainment and alpha-oscillation-dominated periods were strongly anticorrelated and fluctuated rhythmically at an ultra-slow rate. Our results indicate that these two distinct brain states represent externally versus internally oriented computational resources engaged by large-scale task-positive and task-negative functional networks.

  17. Tracer kinetic model selection for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallehauge, Jesper Folsted; Tanderup, Kari; Duan, Chong

    2014-01-01

    , the TM was optimal in 17.0%, the ETM was optimal in 2.2%, the C-TU in 23.4% and the 2CXM was optimal in 57.3%. Throughout the tumour, a high correlation was found between Ktrans(TM) and Fp(2CXM), ρ = 0.91. Conclusion. The 2CXM was most often optimal in describing the contrast agent enhancement of pre......Background. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) offers a unique capability to probe tumour microvasculature. Different analysis of the acquired data will possibly lead to different conclusions. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate under which...

  18. A dynamic view of molecular switch behavior at serotonin receptors: implications for functional selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Martí-Solano

    Full Text Available Functional selectivity is a property of G protein-coupled receptors that allows them to preferentially couple to particular signaling partners upon binding of biased agonists. Publication of the X-ray crystal structure of serotonergic 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors in complex with ergotamine, a drug capable of activating G protein coupling and β-arrestin signaling at the 5-HT1B receptor but clearly favoring β-arrestin over G protein coupling at the 5-HT2B subtype, has recently provided structural insight into this phenomenon. In particular, these structures highlight the importance of specific residues, also called micro-switches, for differential receptor activation. In our work, we apply classical molecular dynamics simulations and enhanced sampling approaches to analyze the behavior of these micro-switches and their impact on the stabilization of particular receptor conformational states. Our analysis shows that differences in the conformational freedom of helix 6 between both receptors could explain their different G protein-coupling capacity. In particular, as compared to the 5-HT1B receptor, helix 6 movement in the 5-HT2B receptor can be constrained by two different mechanisms. On the one hand, an anchoring effect of ergotamine, which shows an increased capacity to interact with the extracellular part of helices 5 and 6 and stabilize them, hinders activation of a hydrophobic connector region at the center of the receptor. On the other hand, this connector region in an inactive conformation is further stabilized by unconserved contacts extending to the intracellular part of the 5-HT2B receptor, which hamper opening of the G protein binding site. This work highlights the importance of considering receptor capacity to adopt different conformational states from a dynamic perspective in order to underpin the structural basis of functional selectivity.

  19. A highly selective turn-on fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid based on hypochlorous acid-induced oxidative intramolecular cyclization of boron dipyrromethene-hydrazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei-Chieh; Venkatesan, Parthiban; Wu, Shu-Pao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A BODIPY-based fluorescent probe for sensing HOCl was developed. • The probe utilizes the HOCl-promoted cyclization in response to the amount of HOCl. • The probe might have application in the investigation of HOCl in biological systems. - Abstract: A BODIPY-based fluorescent probe, HBP, was developed for the detection of hypochlorous acid based on the specific hypochlorous acid-promoted oxidative intramolecular cyclization of heterocyclic hydrazone in response to the amount of HOCl. The reaction is accompanied by a 41-fold increase in the fluorescent quantum yield (from 0.004 to 0.164). The fluorescence intensity of the reaction between HOCl and HBP is linear in the HOCl concentration range of 1–8 μM with a detection limit of 2.4 nM (S/N = 3). Confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging using RAW264.7 cells showed that the new probe HBP could be used as an effective fluorescent probe for detecting HOCl in living cells

  20. A highly selective turn-on fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid based on hypochlorous acid-induced oxidative intramolecular cyclization of boron dipyrromethene-hydrazone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei-Chieh; Venkatesan, Parthiban; Wu, Shu-Pao, E-mail: spwu@mail.nctu.edu.tw

    2015-07-02

    Highlights: • A BODIPY-based fluorescent probe for sensing HOCl was developed. • The probe utilizes the HOCl-promoted cyclization in response to the amount of HOCl. • The probe might have application in the investigation of HOCl in biological systems. - Abstract: A BODIPY-based fluorescent probe, HBP, was developed for the detection of hypochlorous acid based on the specific hypochlorous acid-promoted oxidative intramolecular cyclization of heterocyclic hydrazone in response to the amount of HOCl. The reaction is accompanied by a 41-fold increase in the fluorescent quantum yield (from 0.004 to 0.164). The fluorescence intensity of the reaction between HOCl and HBP is linear in the HOCl concentration range of 1–8 μM with a detection limit of 2.4 nM (S/N = 3). Confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging using RAW264.7 cells showed that the new probe HBP could be used as an effective fluorescent probe for detecting HOCl in living cells.