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Sample records for dynamic neurotransmitter interactions

  1. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  2. Interaction of neurotransmitters with a phospholipid bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Werge, Mikkel; Elf-Lind, Maria Northved

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between the neurotransmitters (NTs) γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), glycine (GLY), acetylcholine (ACH) and glutamate (GLU) as well as the amidated/acetylated γ-aminobutyrate (GABAneu) and the osmolyte molecule glycerol...... umbrella sampling simulations, which were conducted for the four naturally occurring NTs. Free energy profiles for ACH and GLU show a minimum of ∼2–3 kJ/mol close to the bilayer interface, while for GABA and GLY, a minimum of respectively ∼2 kJ/mol and ∼5 kJ/mol is observed when these NTs are located...

  3. Interaction of anesthetics with neurotransmitter release machinery proteins.

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    Xie, Zheng; McMillan, Kyle; Pike, Carolyn M; Cahill, Anne L; Herring, Bruce E; Wang, Qiang; Fox, Aaron P

    2013-02-01

    General anesthetics produce anesthesia by depressing central nervous system activity. Activation of inhibitory GABA(A) receptors plays a central role in the action of many clinically relevant general anesthetics. Even so, there is growing evidence that anesthetics can act at a presynaptic locus to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our own data identified the neurotransmitter release machinery as a target for anesthetic action. In the present study, we sought to examine the site of anesthetic action more closely. Exocytosis was stimulated by directly elevating the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration at neurotransmitter release sites, thereby bypassing anesthetic effects on channels and receptors, allowing anesthetic effects on the neurotransmitter release machinery to be examined in isolation. Three different PC12 cell lines, which had the expression of different release machinery proteins stably suppressed by RNA interference, were used in these studies. Interestingly, there was still significant neurotransmitter release when these knockdown PC12 cells were stimulated. We have previously shown that etomidate, isoflurane, and propofol all inhibited the neurotransmitter release machinery in wild-type PC12 cells. In the present study, we show that knocking down synaptotagmin I completely prevented etomidate from inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Synaptotagmin I knockdown also diminished the inhibition produced by propofol and isoflurane, but the magnitude of the effect was not as large. Knockdown of SNAP-25 and SNAP-23 expression also changed the ability of these three anesthetics to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our results suggest that general anesthetics inhibit the neurotransmitter release machinery by interacting with multiple SNARE and SNARE-associated proteins.

  4. Mechanism of chloride interaction with neurotransmitter:sodium symporters.

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    Zomot, Elia; Bendahan, Annie; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Yongfang; Javitch, Jonathan A; Kanner, Baruch I

    2007-10-11

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) have a critical role in regulating neurotransmission and are targets for psychostimulants, anti-depressants and other drugs. Whereas the non-homologous glutamate transporters mediate chloride conductance, in the eukaryotic NSS chloride is transported together with the neurotransmitter. In contrast, transport by the bacterial NSS family members LeuT, Tyt1 and TnaT is chloride independent. The crystal structure of LeuT reveals an occluded binding pocket containing leucine and two sodium ions, and is highly relevant for the neurotransmitter transporters. However, the precise role of chloride in neurotransmitter transport and the location of its binding site remain elusive. Here we show that introduction of a negatively charged amino acid at or near one of the two putative sodium-binding sites of the GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transporter GAT-1 from rat brain (also called SLC6A1) renders both net flux and exchange of GABA largely chloride independent. In contrast to wild-type GAT-1, a marked stimulation of the rate of net flux, but not of exchange, was observed when the internal pH was lowered. Equivalent mutations introduced in the mouse GABA transporter GAT4 (SLC6A11) and the human dopamine transporter DAT (SLC6A3) also result in chloride-independent transport, whereas the reciprocal mutations in LeuT and Tyt1 render substrate binding and/or uptake by these bacterial NSS chloride dependent. Our data indicate that the negative charge, provided either by chloride or by the transporter itself, is required during binding and translocation of the neurotransmitter, probably to counterbalance the charge of the co-transported sodium ions.

  5. Sensing small neurotransmitter-enzyme interaction with nanoporous gated ion-sensitive field effect transistors.

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    Kisner, Alexandre; Stockmann, Regina; Jansen, Michael; Yegin, Ugur; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Mourzina, Yulia

    2012-01-15

    Ion-sensitive field effect transistors with gates having a high density of nanopores were fabricated and employed to sense the neurotransmitter dopamine with high selectivity and detectability at micromolar range. The nanoporous structure of the gates was produced by applying a relatively simple anodizing process, which yielded a porous alumina layer with pores exhibiting a mean diameter ranging from 20 to 35 nm. Gate-source voltages of the transistors demonstrated a pH-dependence that was linear over a wide range and could be understood as changes in surface charges during protonation and deprotonation. The large surface area provided by the pores allowed the physical immobilization of tyrosinase, which is an enzyme that oxidizes dopamine, on the gates of the transistors, and thus, changes the acid-base behavior on their surfaces. Concentration-dependent dopamine interacting with immobilized tyrosinase showed a linear dependence into a physiological range of interest for dopamine concentration in the changes of gate-source voltages. In comparison with previous approaches, a response time relatively fast for detecting dopamine was obtained. Additionally, selectivity assays for other neurotransmitters that are abundantly found in the brain were examined. These results demonstrate that the nanoporous structure of ion-sensitive field effect transistors can easily be used to immobilize specific enzyme that can readily and selectively detect small neurotransmitter molecule based on its acid-base interaction with the receptor. Therefore, it could serve as a technology platform for molecular studies of neurotransmitter-enzyme binding and drugs screening.

  6. [Detection of neurotransmitter interactions with PET and SPECT by pharmacological challenge paradigms].

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    Schlösser, R

    2000-01-01

    Functional brain imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) enables the in vivo study of specific neurochemical processes in the context of normal regulatory mechanisms and pathophysiological alterations of the brain. By combining these methods with pharmacological challenge-paradigms, the study of functional interactions of different neurotransmitter systems is possible. This review will present data from animal and healthy volunteer studies as well as first data from investigations in different patient populations with regard to this research direction. Especially, interactions of different neurotransmitter systems with the dopaminergic and the cholinergic system will be discussed. The database acquired so far confirms existing models of neuronal feedback-circuits, and the first clinical results are consistent with the hypothesis of an increased dopaminergic responsivity in schizophrenic patients. These results open up new perspectives for a further evaluation of treatment response predictors from drug-challenge studies and for the development of new drug treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders.

  7. Synapsin II desynchronizes neurotransmitter release at inhibitory synapses by interacting with presynaptic calcium channels.

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    Medrihan, Lucian; Cesca, Fabrizia; Raimondi, Andrea; Lignani, Gabriele; Baldelli, Pietro; Benfenati, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    In the central nervous system, most synapses show a fast mode of neurotransmitter release known as synchronous release followed by a phase of asynchronous release, which extends over tens of milliseconds to seconds. Synapsin II (SYN2) is a member of the multigene synapsin family (SYN1/2/3) of synaptic vesicle phosphoproteins that modulate synaptic transmission and plasticity, and are mutated in epileptic patients. Here we report that inhibitory synapses of the dentate gyrus of Syn II knockout mice display an upregulation of synchronous neurotransmitter release and a concomitant loss of delayed asynchronous release. Syn II promotes γ-aminobutyric acid asynchronous release in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner by a functional interaction with presynaptic Ca(2+) channels, revealing a new role in synaptic transmission for synapsins.

  8. Simultaneous analysis of multiple neurotransmitters by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

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    Tufi, Sara; Lamoree, Marja; de Boer, Jacob; Leonards, Pim

    2015-05-22

    Neurotransmitters are endogenous metabolites that allow the signal transmission across neuronal synapses. Their biological role is crucial for many physiological functions and their levels can be changed by several diseases. Because of their high polarity, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) is a promising tool for neurotransmitter analysis. Due to the large number of HILIC stationary phases available, an evaluation of the column performances and retention behaviors has been performed on five different commercial HILIC packing materials (silica, amino, amide and two zwitterionic stationary phases). Several parameters like the linear correlation between retention and the distribution coefficient (logD), the separation factor k and the column resolution Rs have been investigated and the column performances have been visualized with a heat map and hierarchical clustering analysis. An optimized and validated HILIC-MS/MS method based on the ZIC-cHILIC column is proposed for the simultaneous detection and quantification of twenty compounds consisting of neurotransmitters, precursors and metabolites: 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), 5-hydroxy-L-tripthophan, acetylcholine, choline, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), dopamine, epinephrine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, glutamine, histamine, histidine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, norepinephrine, normetanephrine, phenylalanine, serotonin and tyramine. The method was applied to neuronal metabolite profiling of the central nervous system of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. This method is suitable to explore neuronal metabolism and its alteration in different biological matrices.

  9. Probing interactions of neurotransmitters with twin tailed anionic surfactant: A detailed physicochemical study.

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    Kaur, Rajwinder; Sanan, Reshu; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Keeping in view the role of neurotransmitters (NTs) in central nervous system diseases and in controlling various physiological processes, present study is aimed to study the binding of neurotransmitters (NTs) such as norepinephrine hydrochloride (NE) and serotonin hydrochloride (5-HT) with twin tailed surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT). Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements combined with microcalorimetric measurements were used to characterize the interactions between AOT and NTs. Meteoric modifications to emission profile and absorption spectra of NTs upon addition of AOT are indicative of the binding of NTs with AOT. Distinct interactional states such as formation of ion-pairs, induced and regular micelles with adsorbed NTs molecules have been observed in different concentration regimes of AOT. The formation of ion-pairs from oppositely charged NTs and AOT is confirmed by the reduced absorbance, quenched fluorescence intensity and decrease in peak current (ipa) as well as shifts in peak potential (Epa) values. The stoichiometry and formation of the NTs-AOT complexes has been judged and the extent of interactions is quantitatively discussed in terms of binding constant (K) and free energy of binding (ΔG°). The enthalpy (ΔH°mic) and free energy of micellization (ΔG°mic) for AOT in presence and absence of NTs are determined from the enthalpy curves.

  10. Binding of Neurotransmitters to Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Werge, Mikkel; Elf-Lind, Maria Northved

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a series of thermodynamic measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the interactions between the neurotransmitters (NTs) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), g-aminobutyrate (GABA), glycine (GLY), acetylcholine (ACH) and glutamate (GLU) as well as the amidated...... as the most important interaction by which the NTs are anchored to the membrane. These distinctive interactions could be related to nonspecific effects of these neurotransmitters and could point to a bilayer-mediated modulation of nerve transmission. However, due to the strong variability in affinity observed...... for the different NTs, this attraction is not an inherent property of all neurotransmitters....

  11. Effect of Dimerization on the Dynamics of Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters.

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    Gur, Mert; Cheng, Mary Hongying; Zomot, Elia; Bahar, Ivet

    2017-02-07

    Dimerization is a common feature among the members of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins. Yet, the effect of dimerization on the mechanism of action of NSS members is not fully understood. In this study, we examined the collective dynamics of two members of the family, leucine transporter (LeuT) and dopamine transporter (DAT), to assess the significance of dimerization in modulating the functional motions of the monomers. We used to this aim the anisotropic network model (ANM), an efficient and robust method for modeling the intrinsic motions of proteins and their complexes. Transporters belonging to the NSS family are known to alternate between outward-facing (OF) and inward-facing (IF) states, which enables the uptake and release of their substrate (neurotransmitter) respectively, as the substrate is transported from the exterior to the interior of the cell. In both LeuT and DAT, dimerization is found to alter the collective motions intrinsically accessible to the individual monomers in favor of the functional transitions (OF ↔ IF), suggesting that dimerization may play a role in facilitating transport.

  12. Conformational dynamics of a neurotransmitter:sodium symporter in a lipid bilayer.

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    Adhikary, Suraj; Deredge, Daniel J; Nagarajan, Anu; Forrest, Lucy R; Wintrode, Patrick L; Singh, Satinder K

    2017-03-07

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) are integral membrane proteins responsible for the sodium-dependent reuptake of small-molecule neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft. The symporters for the biogenic amines serotonin (SERT), dopamine (DAT), and norepinephrine (NET) are targets of multiple psychoactive agents, and their dysfunction has been implicated in numerous neuropsychiatric ailments. LeuT, a thermostable eubacterial NSS homolog, has been exploited as a model protein for NSS members to canvass the conformational mechanism of transport with a combination of X-ray crystallography, cysteine accessibility, and solution spectroscopy. Despite yielding remarkable insights, these studies have primarily been conducted with protein in the detergent-solubilized state rather than embedded in a membrane mimic. In addition, solution spectroscopy has required site-specific labeling of nonnative cysteines, a labor-intensive process occasionally resulting in diminished transport and/or binding activity. Here, we overcome these limitations by reconstituting unlabeled LeuT in phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs, subjecting them to hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS), and facilitating interpretation of the data with molecular dynamics simulations. The data point to changes of accessibility and dynamics of structural elements previously implicated in the transport mechanism, in particular transmembrane helices (TMs) 1a and 7 as well as extracellular loops (ELs) 2 and 4. The results therefore illuminate the value of this strategy for interrogating the conformational mechanism of the more clinically significant mammalian membrane proteins including SERT and DAT, neither of which tolerates complete removal of endogenous cysteines, and whose activity is heavily influenced by neighboring lipids.

  13. Evidence for dynamic network regulation of Drosophila photoreceptor function from mutants lacking the neurotransmitter histamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An eDau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic feedback from interneurons to photoreceptors can help to optimize visual information flow by balancing its allocation on retinal pathways under changing light conditions. But little is known about how this critical network operation is regulated dynamically. Here, we investigate this question by comparing signaling properties and performance of wild-type Drosophila R1-R6 photoreceptors to those of the hdcJK910 mutant, which lacks the neurotransmitter histamine and therefore cannot transmit information to interneurons. Recordings show that hdcJK910 photoreceptors sample similar amounts of information from naturalistic stimulation to wild-type photoreceptors, but this information is packaged in smaller responses, especially under bright illumination. Analyses reveal how these altered dynamics primarily resulted from network overload that affected hdcJK910 photoreceptors in two ways. First, the missing inhibitory histamine input to interneurons almost certainly depolarized them irrevocably, which in turn increased their excitatory feedback to hdcJK910 R1-R6s. This tonic excitation depolarized the photoreceptors to artificially high potentials, reducing their operational range. Second, rescuing histamine input to interneurons in hdcJK910 mutant also restored their normal phasic feedback modulation to R1-R6s, causing photoreceptor output to accentuate dynamic intensity differences at bright illumination, similar to the wild-type. These results provide mechanistic explanations of how synaptic feedback connections optimize information packaging in photoreceptor output and novel insight into the operation and design of dynamic network regulation of sensory neurons.

  14. Evidence for Dynamic Network Regulation of Drosophila Photoreceptor Function from Mutants Lacking the Neurotransmitter Histamine.

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    Dau, An; Friederich, Uwe; Dongre, Sidhartha; Li, Xiaofeng; Bollepalli, Murali K; Hardie, Roger C; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic feedback from interneurons to photoreceptors can help to optimize visual information flow by balancing its allocation on retinal pathways under changing light conditions. But little is known about how this critical network operation is regulated dynamically. Here, we investigate this question by comparing signaling properties and performance of wild-type Drosophila R1-R6 photoreceptors to those of the hdc (JK910) mutant, which lacks the neurotransmitter histamine and therefore cannot transmit information to interneurons. Recordings show that hdc (JK910) photoreceptors sample similar amounts of information from naturalistic stimulation to wild-type photoreceptors, but this information is packaged in smaller responses, especially under bright illumination. Analyses reveal how these altered dynamics primarily resulted from network overload that affected hdc (JK910) photoreceptors in two ways. First, the missing inhibitory histamine input to interneurons almost certainly depolarized them irrevocably, which in turn increased their excitatory feedback to hdc (JK910) R1-R6s. This tonic excitation depolarized the photoreceptors to artificially high potentials, reducing their operational range. Second, rescuing histamine input to interneurons in hdc (JK910) mutant also restored their normal phasic feedback modulation to R1-R6s, causing photoreceptor output to accentuate dynamic intensity differences at bright illumination, similar to the wild-type. These results provide mechanistic explanations of how synaptic feedback connections optimize information packaging in photoreceptor output and novel insight into the operation and design of dynamic network regulation of sensory neurons.

  15. Design and Synthesis of High-Affinity Dimeric Inhibitors Targeting the Interactions between Gephyrin and Inhibitory Neurotransmitter Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Hans-Michael; Kasaragod, Vikram Babu; Kedström, Linda Maria Haugaard

    2015-01-01

    Gephyrin is the central scaffolding protein for inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. Here we describe the development of dimeric peptides that inhibit the interaction between gephyrin and these receptors, a process which is fundamental to numerous synaptic functions and diseases...

  16. Stochastic Properties of Neurotransmitter Release Expand the Dynamic Range of Synapses

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    Yang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Release of neurotransmitter is an inherently random process, which could degrade the reliability of postsynaptic spiking, even at relatively large synapses. This is particularly important at auditory synapses, where the rate and precise timing of spikes carry information about sounds. However, the functional consequences of the stochastic properties of release are unknown. We addressed this issue at the mouse endbulb of Held synapse, which is formed by auditory nerve fibers onto bushy cells (BCs) in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus. We used voltage clamp to characterize synaptic variability. Dynamic clamp was used to compare BC spiking with stochastic or deterministic synaptic input. The stochastic component increased the responsiveness of the BC to conductances that were on average subthreshold, thereby increasing the dynamic range of the synapse. This had the benefit that BCs relayed auditory nerve activity even when synapses showed significant depression during rapid activity. However, the precision of spike timing decreased with stochastic conductances, suggesting a trade-off between encoding information in spike timing versus probability. These effects were confirmed in fiber stimulation experiments, indicating that they are physiologically relevant, and that synaptic randomness, dynamic range, and jitter are causally related. PMID:24005293

  17. Substrate-modulated gating dynamics in a Na+-coupled neurotransmitter transporter homologue.

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    Zhao, Yongfang; Terry, Daniel S; Shi, Lei; Quick, Matthias; Weinstein, Harel; Blanchard, Scott C; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2011-06-02

    Neurotransmitter/Na(+) symporters (NSSs) terminate neuronal signalling by recapturing neurotransmitter released into the synapse in a co-transport (symport) mechanism driven by the Na(+) electrochemical gradient. NSSs for dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin are targeted by the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamine, as well as by antidepressants. The crystal structure of LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS homologue, revealed an occluded conformation in which a leucine (Leu) and two Na(+) are bound deep within the protein. This structure has been the basis for extensive structural and computational exploration of the functional mechanisms of proteins with a LeuT-like fold. Subsequently, an 'outward-open' conformation was determined in the presence of the inhibitor tryptophan, and the Na(+)-dependent formation of a dynamic outward-facing intermediate was identified using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging has been used to reveal reversible transitions to an inward-open LeuT conformation, which involve the movement of transmembrane helix TM1a away from the transmembrane helical bundle. We investigated how substrate binding is coupled to structural transitions in LeuT during Na(+)-coupled transport. Here we report a process whereby substrate binding from the extracellular side of LeuT facilitates intracellular gate opening and substrate release at the intracellular face of the protein. In the presence of alanine, a substrate that is transported ∼10-fold faster than leucine, we observed alanine-induced dynamics in the intracellular gate region of LeuT that directly correlate with transport efficiency. Collectively, our data reveal functionally relevant and previously hidden aspects of the NSS transport mechanism that emphasize the functional importance of a second substrate (S2) binding site within the extracellular vestibule. Substrate binding in this S2 site appears to act cooperatively

  18. Dynamic Interactive Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, Khaled; Barker, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses the notions of interactivity and dynamicity of learning systems in relation to information technologies and design principles that can contribute to interactive and dynamic learning. It explores the concept of dynamic interactive learning systems based on the emerging generation of information as part of a…

  19. Fluorine Substitution in Neurotransmitters: Microwave Spectroscopy and Modelling of the Conformational Space and Non Bonding Interactions

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    Melandri, S.; Maris, A.; Merloni, A.

    2011-06-01

    Fluorine substitution in molecules is a common practice in bio-organic chemistry in order to modulate physicochemical properties and biological activity of molecules and an increasing number of drugs on the market contain fluorine, the presence of which is often of major importance to modify pharmacokinetics properties and molecular activity. The rationale for such a strategy is that fluorine is generally a stronger electron acceptor than the other halogen atoms and its size is intermediate between that of hydrogen and oxygen. We have studied two fluorinated analogs of 2-phenylethylamine (PEA), the prototype molecule for adrenergic neurotransmitters, namely: 4-Fluoro (4FPEA) and 2-Fluoro-2-phenylethylamine (2FPEA) by Molecular Beam Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy in the frequency range 6-18 GHz and ab initio calculations at the MP2/6311++G** level. The aim is to obtain information on the spatial arrangement of the ethylamine side chain and the effects of fluorination on the energy landscape. The conformational space is dominated by low energy gauche conformations stabilized by weak interactions between the aminic hydrogens and the electron cloud of the benzene ring and anti conformations higher in energy. In 2FPEA the presence of the fluorine atom almost duplicate the number of possible conformation with respect to 4FPEA. We observed two conformers of 4FPEA and five conformers of 2FPEA which have been classified with the guide provided by accurate ab initio calculations. The identification of the conformational species was helped by the analysis of the quadrupole hyperfine pattern which is greatly influenced by the orientation of the amino group and acts as a fingerprint for each conformation. The orientation of the dipole moment within the principal axis frame and the order of stability of the different conformations are other independent pieces of evidence for the unambiguous assignment and identification of the conformers. The order of stability was

  20. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters.

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    Bucher, Elizabeth S; Wightman, R Mark

    2015-01-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  1. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2015-07-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  2. Neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gether, Ulrik; Andersen, Peter H; Larsson, Orla M

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of neurotransmitters in the extracellular space is tightly controlled by distinct classes of membrane transport proteins. This review focuses on the molecular function of two major classes of neurotransmitter transporter that are present in the cell membrane of neurons and....../or glial cells: the solute carrier (SLC)1 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of glutamate, and the SLC6 transporter family, which includes the transporters that mediate the Na(+)-dependent uptake of dopamine, 5-HT, norepinephrine, glycine and GABA....... Recent research has provided substantial insight into the structure and function of these transporters. In particular, the recent crystallizations of bacterial homologs are of the utmost importance, enabling the first reliable structural models of the mammalian neurotransmitter transporters...

  3. Modeling and dynamics of the inward-facing state of a Na+/Cl- dependent neurotransmitter transporter homologue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saher Afshan Shaikh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The leucine transporter (LeuT has recently commanded exceptional attention due mainly to two distinctions; it provides the only crystal structures available for a protein homologous to the pharmacologically relevant neurotransmitter: sodium symporters (NSS, and, it exhibits a hallmark 5-TM inverted repeat ("LeuT-fold", a fold recently discovered to also exist in several secondary transporter families, underscoring its general role in transporter function. Constructing the transport cycle of "LeuT-fold" transporters requires detailed structural and dynamic descriptions of the outward-facing (OF and inward-facing (IF states, as well as the intermediate states. To this end, we have modeled the structurally unknown IF state of LeuT, based on the known crystal structures of the OF state of LeuT and the IF state of vSGLT, a "LeuT-fold" transporter. The detailed methodology developed for the study combines structure-based alignment, threading, targeted MD and equilibrium MD, and can be applied to other proteins. The resulting IF-state models maintain the secondary structural features of LeuT. Water penetration and solvent accessibility calculations show that TM1, TM3, TM6 and TM8 line the substrate binding/unbinding pathway with TM10 and its pseudosymmetric partner, TM5, participating in the extracellular and intracellular halves of the lumen, respectively. We report conformational hotspots where notable changes in interactions occur between the IF and OF states. We observe Na2 exiting the LeuT-substrate- complex in the IF state, mainly due to TM1 bending. Inducing a transition in only one of the two pseudosymmetric domains, while allowing the second to respond dynamically, is found to be sufficient to induce the formation of the IF state. We also propose that TM2 and TM7 may be facilitators of TM1 and TM6 motion. Thus, this study not only presents a novel modeling methodology applied to obtain the IF state of LeuT, but also describes structural

  4. Modeling and dynamics of the inward-facing state of a Na+/Cl- dependent neurotransmitter transporter homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Saher Afshan; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-08-26

    The leucine transporter (LeuT) has recently commanded exceptional attention due mainly to two distinctions; it provides the only crystal structures available for a protein homologous to the pharmacologically relevant neurotransmitter: sodium symporters (NSS), and, it exhibits a hallmark 5-TM inverted repeat ("LeuT-fold"), a fold recently discovered to also exist in several secondary transporter families, underscoring its general role in transporter function. Constructing the transport cycle of "LeuT-fold" transporters requires detailed structural and dynamic descriptions of the outward-facing (OF) and inward-facing (IF) states, as well as the intermediate states. To this end, we have modeled the structurally unknown IF state of LeuT, based on the known crystal structures of the OF state of LeuT and the IF state of vSGLT, a "LeuT-fold" transporter. The detailed methodology developed for the study combines structure-based alignment, threading, targeted MD and equilibrium MD, and can be applied to other proteins. The resulting IF-state models maintain the secondary structural features of LeuT. Water penetration and solvent accessibility calculations show that TM1, TM3, TM6 and TM8 line the substrate binding/unbinding pathway with TM10 and its pseudosymmetric partner, TM5, participating in the extracellular and intracellular halves of the lumen, respectively. We report conformational hotspots where notable changes in interactions occur between the IF and OF states. We observe Na2 exiting the LeuT-substrate- complex in the IF state, mainly due to TM1 bending. Inducing a transition in only one of the two pseudosymmetric domains, while allowing the second to respond dynamically, is found to be sufficient to induce the formation of the IF state. We also propose that TM2 and TM7 may be facilitators of TM1 and TM6 motion. Thus, this study not only presents a novel modeling methodology applied to obtain the IF state of LeuT, but also describes structural elements involved in

  5. Accelerated molecular dynamics and protein conformational change: a theoretical and practical guide using a membrane embedded model neurotransmitter transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedeon, Patrick C; Thomas, James R; Madura, Jeffry D

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation provides a powerful and accurate method to model protein conformational change, yet timescale limitations often prevent direct assessment of the kinetic properties of interest. A large number of molecular dynamic steps are necessary for rare events to occur, which allow a system to overcome energy barriers and conformationally transition from one potential energy minimum to another. For many proteins, the energy landscape is further complicated by a multitude of potential energy wells, each separated by high free-energy barriers and each potentially representative of a functionally important protein conformation. To overcome these obstacles, accelerated molecular dynamics utilizes a robust bias potential function to simulate the transition between different potential energy minima. This straightforward approach more efficiently samples conformational space in comparison to classical molecular dynamics simulation, does not require advanced knowledge of the potential energy landscape and converges to the proper canonical distribution. Here, we review the theory behind accelerated molecular dynamics and discuss the approach in the context of modeling protein conformational change. As a practical example, we provide a detailed, step-by-step explanation of how to perform an accelerated molecular dynamics simulation using a model neurotransmitter transporter embedded in a lipid cell membrane. Changes in protein conformation of relevance to the substrate transport cycle are then examined using principle component analysis.

  6. Spatial organization and dynamic properties of neurotransmitter release sites in the enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Berghe, P; Klingauf, J

    2007-03-02

    Synaptic communication requires an efficient coupling of vesicle fusion to release neurotransmitter and vesicle retrieval to repopulate the synapse. In synapses of the CNS many proteins involved in exocytosis, endocytosis and refilling of vesicles have been identified. However, little is known about the organization and functioning of synaptic contacts in the enteric nervous system (ENS). We used fluorescent antibodies against presynaptic proteins (synaptobrevin, synaptophysin, synaptotagmin and bassoon) to identify synaptic contacts not only in guinea-pig enteric ganglia but also in the interconnecting fiber strands. Staining patterns were not altered by colchicine (100 microM), ruling out a contribution of protein transport at the time of fixation. Active release sites at fiber intersections and around neuronal cell bodies were labeled with FM1-43 (10 microM) by high K+ or electric field stimulation (EFS). During a second round of EFS, vesicles were reused, as reflected by dye loss. Destaining rates increased with stimulus frequency (2-30 Hz), reaching a maximum at about 15 Hz, likely caused by synaptic depression at higher frequencies. Tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 microM) as well as nominally zero external Ca2+ (2 mM EGTA) prevented all destaining. The readily releasable pool (RRP, a subset of vesicles docked at the membrane and ready to fuse upon [Ca2+]i increase) can be specifically released by a hypertonic challenge (500 mM sucrose). We measured this pool to be approximately 27% of the total recycling pool, remarkably similar to synapses in the CNS. In whole-mount preparations, FM1-43 also reliably labeled active release sites in ganglia, fiber strands and in muscle bundles. The staining pattern indicated that the presynaptic antibodies mainly labeled active sites. The presence of numerous release sites suggests information processing capability within interconnecting fibers. With FM imaging, enteric synaptic function can be monitored independent of any postsynaptic

  7. Amyloid-β acts as a regulator of neurotransmitter release disrupting the interaction between synaptophysin and VAMP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Russell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is becoming increasingly evident that deficits in the cortex and hippocampus at early stages of dementia in Alzheimer's disease (AD are associated with synaptic damage caused by oligomers of the toxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42. However, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms behind these deficits are not fully understood. Here we provide evidence of a mechanism by which Aβ42 affects synaptic transmission regulating neurotransmitter release. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We first showed that application of 50 nM Aβ42 in cultured neurones is followed by its internalisation and translocation to synaptic contacts. Interestingly, our results demonstrate that with time, Aβ42 can be detected at the presynaptic terminals where it interacts with Synaptophysin. Furthermore, data from dissociated hippocampal neurons as well as biochemical data provide evidence that Aβ42 disrupts the complex formed between Synaptophysin and VAMP2 increasing the amount of primed vesicles and exocytosis. Finally, electrophysiology recordings in brain slices confirmed that Aβ42 affects baseline transmission. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations provide a necessary and timely insight into cellular mechanisms that underlie the initial pathological events that lead to synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Our results demonstrate a new mechanism by which Aβ42 affects synaptic activity.

  8. Dynamics of interacting diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz, Joaquín; Meloni, Sandro; Moreno, Yamir

    2014-01-01

    Current modeling of infectious diseases allows for the study of complex and realistic scenarios that go from the population to the individual level of description. Most epidemic models however assume that the spreading process takes place on a single level (be it a single population, a meta-population system or a network of contacts). The latter is in part a consequence of our still limited knowledge about the interdependency of the many mechanisms and factors involved in disease spreading. In particular, interdependent contagion phenomena can only be addressed if we go beyond the scheme one pathogen-one network. In this paper, we study a model that allows describing the spreading dynamics of two concurrent diseases and apply it to a paradigmatic case of disease-disease interaction: the interaction between AIDS and Tuberculosis. Specifically, we characterize analytically the epidemic thresholds of the two diseases for different scenarios and also compute the temporal evolution characterizing the unfolding dyn...

  9. Interactive molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Daniel V

    2015-01-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in HTML5 and JavaScript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  10. Interactive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  11. System dynamics with interaction discontinuity

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2015-01-01

    This book describes system dynamics with discontinuity caused by system interactions and presents the theory of flow singularity and switchability at the boundary in discontinuous dynamical systems. Based on such a theory, the authors address dynamics and motion mechanism of engineering discontinuous systems due to interaction. Stability and bifurcations of fixed points in nonlinear discrete dynamical systems are presented, and mapping dynamics are developed for analytical predictions of periodic motions in engineering discontinuous dynamical systems. Ultimately, the book provides an alternative way to discuss the periodic and chaotic behaviors in discontinuous dynamical systems.

  12. Affinity of four polar neurotransmitters for lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Chunhua; Ye, Fengbin; Valardez, Gustavo F.

    2011-01-01

    Weak interactions of neurotransmitters and the lipid matrix in the synaptic membrane have been hypothesized to play a role in synaptic transmission of nerve signals, particularly with respect to receptor desensitization (Cantor, R. S. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 11891). The strength of such interactions......, however, was not measured, and this is an obvious impediment for further evaluation and understanding of a possible role for desensitization. We have used dialysis equilibrium to directly measure the net affinity of selected neurotransmitters for lipid membranes and analyzed this affinity data...... with respect to calorimetric measurements and molecular dynamics simulations. We studied an anionic (glutamate), a cationic (acetylcholine), and two zwitterionic (-aminobutyric acid and glycine) neurotransmitters, and membranes of pure dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), DMPC doped with 10% anionic lipid...

  13. Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, Granino A

    2010-01-01

    Showing you how to use personal computers for modeling and simulation, Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation, Second Edition provides a practical tutorial on interactive dynamic-system modeling and simulation. It discusses how to effectively simulate dynamical systems, such as aerospace vehicles, power plants, chemical processes, control systems, and physiological systems. Written by a pioneer in simulation, the book introduces dynamic-system models and explains how software for solving differential equations works. After demonstrating real simulation programs with simple examples, the author

  14. Dynamic reservoir well interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, W.L.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Wolfswinkel, O. van; Peters, M.C.A.M.; Verhelst, F.J.P.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop smart well control systems for unstable oil wells, realistic modeling of the dynamics of the well is essential. Most dynamic well models use a semi-steady state inflow model to describe the inflow of oil and gas from the reservoir. On the other hand, reservoir models use steady s

  15. Dynamical Properties of Interaction Data

    CERN Document Server

    Bramson, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Network dynamics are typically presented as a time series of network properties captured at each period. The current approach examines the dynamical properties of transmission via novel measures on an integrated, temporally extended network representation of interaction data across time. Because it encodes time and interactions as network connections, static network measures can be applied to this "temporal web" to reveal features of the dynamics themselves. Here we provide the technical details and apply it to agent-based implementations of the well-known SEIR and SEIS epidemiological models.

  16. SDI: Statistical dynamic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blann, M.; Mustafa, M.G. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Peilert, G.; Stoecker, H.; Greiner, W. (Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1991-04-01

    We focus on the combined statistical and dynamical aspects of heavy ion induced reactions. The overall picture is illustrated by considering the reaction {sup 36}Ar + {sup 238}U at a projectile energy of 35 MeV/nucleon. We illustrate the time dependent bound excitation energy due to the fusion/relaxation dynamics as calculated with the Boltzmann master equation. An estimate of the mass, charge and excitation of an equilibrated nucleus surviving the fast (dynamic) fusion-relaxation process is used as input into an evaporation calculation which includes 20 heavy fragment exit channels. The distribution of excitations between residue and clusters is explicitly calculated, as is the further deexcitation of clusters to bound nuclei. These results are compared with the exclusive cluster multiplicity measurements of Kim et al., and are found to give excellent agreement. We consider also an equilibrated residue system at 25% lower initial excitation, which gives an unsatisfactory exclusive multiplicity distribution. This illustrates that exclusive fragment multiplicity may provide a thermometer for system excitation. This analysis of data involves successive binary decay with no compressional effects nor phase transitions. Several examples of primary versus final (stable) cluster decay probabilities for an A = 100 nucleus at excitations of 100 to 800 MeV are presented. From these results a large change in multifragmentation patterns may be understood as a simple phase space consequence, invoking neither phase transitions, nor equation of state information. These results are used to illustrate physical quantities which are ambiguous to deduce from experimental fragment measurements. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Infrared spectrum of the cold ortho-fluorinated protonated neurotransmitter 2-phenylethylamine: competition between NH(+)π and NH(+)F interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Markus; Bouchet, Aude; Dopfer, Otto

    2016-09-29

    Halogenation of pharmaceutical molecules is a common tool to modify their physiological properties. The geometric, vibrational, and electronic properties of the ortho-fluorinated protonated neurotransmitter 2-phenylethylamine (oF-H(+)PEA) are characterized by infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectroscopy in the NH stretch range using the messenger technique and dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP-D3/aug-cc-pVTZ level to elucidate the drastic effect of site-specific ortho-fluorination. The IRPD spectra of cold oF-H(+)PEA-Rg dimers (Rg = Ne, Ar) are assigned to the most stable gauche conformer (Gf1) of oF-H(+)PEA, which benefits from both NH(+)π and NH(+)F interactions. A minor contribution (∼5%) of the slightly less stable Gf2 gauche conformer (E0 = +1.1 kJ mol(-1)) is also identified. Comparison of oF-H(+)PEA with unsubstituted H(+)PEA reveals a much stronger NH(+)π interaction in H(+)PEA resulting in a large red shift of the bonded NH stretch frequency. This behavior is confirmed by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and noncovalent interaction (NCI) calculations. The Rg ligand prefers a binding site at which it can maximize the interaction with the aromatic π electron system and the ammonium group. Although the intermolecular interactions with the Rg atoms can compete with the noncovalent intramolecular bonds, they induce only minor spectral shifts in the NH stretch range.

  18. Dynamic Soil-Structure-Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellezi, Lindita

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate and develop alternative methods of analyzing problems in dynamic soil-structure-interaction. The main focus is the major difficulty posed by such an analysis - the phenomenon of waves which radiate outward from the excited structures towards infinity...... transmitting boundary at the edges of the computational mesh. To start with, an investigation of the main effects of the interaction phenomena is carried out employing a widely used model, considering dynamic stiffness of the unbounded soil as frequency independent. Then a complete description...... represents an attempt to construct a local stiffness for the unbounded soil domain....

  19. [Axolemmal transporters for neurotransmitter uptake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, M

    Neurotransmission is a fundamental process in interneuronal communication. It starts with the release of the neurotransmitter following a nerve impulse and ends either by uptake by specific specific transporters or by metabolization to an inactive compound. In this review we will consider the molecular, ion dependence and electrogenic properties of the axolemal transporters for neurotransmitters and also the pathological consequences of their impairment as well as the drugs that can interact with them. Most axolemmal transporters have been cloned and grouped into two large families according to their molecular characteristics and electrogenic properties: 1. Those dependent on Na+/Cl- include transporters of GABA, noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, choline, proline, betaine, glycine and taurine, and 2. Those dependent on Na+/K+, which include the transporters of glutamate, alanine, serine and cysteine. The clonation of transporters has permitted (and will continue to permit) the correlation of molecular alterations of transporters with different neuro-degenerative disorders (e.g. multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease), with brain lesions (e.g. cerebral ischemia, status epilepticus) and with psychiatric alterations (e.g. schizophrenia, depression). In this respect, chemical synthesis of new selective drugs which interact with the different systems for uptake of neurotransmitters will offer new approaches to the treatment of many disorders of the central nervous system which still have no satisfactory drug treatment.

  20. Focus On: Neurotransmitter Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Puglia, Michael P.; Zucca, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Neurotransmitter systems have been long recognized as important targets of the developmental actions of alcohol (i.e., ethanol). Short- and long-term effects of ethanol on amino acid (e.g., γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate) and biogenic amine (e.g., serotonin and dopamine) neurotransmitters have been demonstrated in animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Researchers have detected ethanol effects after exposure during developmental periods equivalent to the first, second, a...

  1. Interactions between bacteria and the gut mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on the mucosal epithelium influence intestinal colonization or infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These include ...

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of Na+/Cl--dependent neurotransmitter transporters in a membrane-aqueous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne Marie; Tagmose, L.; Jørgensen, A.M.M.

    2007-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a homology model of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) in a membrane environment and in complex with either the natural substrate S-HT or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitaloprom. We have also included a transporter homologue...

  3. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction as a preconcentration tool for the simultaneous determination of the panel of underivatized neurotransmitters in human urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczna, Lucyna; Roszkowska, Anna; Niedźwiecki, Maciej; Bączek, Tomasz

    2016-01-29

    A simple and sensitive method using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) followed by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with a hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) column was developed for the simultaneous determination of 13 compounds of different polarities, comprising monoamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine and serotonin) along with their respective precursors and metabolites, in human urine samples. The microextraction procedure was based on the fast injection of a mixture of ethanol (disperser solvent) and dichloromethane (extraction solvent) into a human urine sample, forming a cloudy solution in the Eppendorf tube. After centrifugation, the sedimented phase was collected and subsequently analyzed by LC-HILIC-MS in about 12min without a derivatization step. The separation was performed on an XBridge Amide™ BEH column 3.0×100mm, 3.5mm and the mobile phase consisted of phase A: 10mM ammonium formate buffer in water pH 3.0 and phase B: 10 mM ammonium formate buffer in acetonitrile, under gradient program elution. Tyrosine, tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, serotonin, 3-methoxytyramine, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine and norvaline (internal standard) were detected in the positive ionization mode. While vanillylmandelic acid, homovanillic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxybenzylamine (internal standard) were detected in the negative ionization mode. Parameters influencing DLLME and LC-HILIC-MS were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the proposed method exhibited a low detection limit (5-10ngmL(-1)), and good linearity with R between 0.9991 and 0.9998. The recoveries in human urine samples were 99.0%±3.6%. for the 13 studied biogenic amines with intra- and inter-day RSDs of 0.24-9.55% and 0.31-10.0%, respectively. The developed DLLME-LC-MS method could be successfully applied for the

  4. Nonlinear dynamics of interacting populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bazykin, Alexander D

    1998-01-01

    This book contains a systematic study of ecological communities of two or three interacting populations. Starting from the Lotka-Volterra system, various regulating factors are considered, such as rates of birth and death, predation and competition. The different factors can have a stabilizing or a destabilizing effect on the community, and their interplay leads to increasingly complicated behavior. Studying and understanding this path to greater dynamical complexity of ecological systems constitutes the backbone of this book. On the mathematical side, the tool of choice is the qualitative the

  5. Neurotransmitters affecting time perception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:It has been demonstrated that dopamine and acetylcholine are the main neurotransmitters that affect time perception,which is also affected by other neurotransmitters.OBJECTIVE:To summarize how the neurotransmitter affect the time perception,and put forward the perspectives for further study on time perception.RETRIEVE STRATEGY:An online search for related literatures published in English was conducted in Elsevier SDOL(ScienceDirect Online)database from May 1990 to March 2007 using key words of "timing neurotransmitter".Totally 69 literatures were collected,and they were primarily checked.Inclusive criteria:Reviews and experimental studies;correlative studies of timing neurotransmitter.Exclusive criteria:Repeated studies.LITERATURE EVALUATION:The literatures were mainly sourced from Cognitive Brain Research and Neuroscience,and they were analyzed according to the inclusive criteria.Nineteen of them were involved,and all were experimental studies and reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS:The studies on time perception are developed mainly concentrating on dopamine and acetylcholine.Dopamine D2 receptors mainly affect the speed of internal clock.Dopamine receptors play an important role in both timing excitation and inhibition,which suggests the bi-directional regulation of dopamine.Injection of dopamine agonist can affect the attention to timing information.Injection of BW813U(antagonist of acetylcholine) can induce memory disorder,which indicates the effect of acetylcholine on timing memory,and further study shows that it is the effect of acetylcholine in precentral medial area.In a word,the study on the neurotransmitters affecting time perception is still at the primary stage.CONCLUSION:Dopamine and acetylcholine are the neurotransmitters known to be related to time perception.Dopamine in the basal ganglia is related to internal-clock in the range of seconds and minutes;Acetylcholine in prefrontal cortex is related to the mechanisms of temporal memory and attention

  6. Wigner method dynamics in the interaction picture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Dahl, Jens Peder; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of introducing an interaction picture in the semiclassical Wigner method is investigated. This is done with an interaction Picture description of the density operator dynamics as starting point. We show that the dynamics of the density operator dynamics as starting point. We show ...... integration of the Schrodinger equation....

  7. Dynamical symmetry and higher-order interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Isacker, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1999-07-01

    It is shown that the concept of dynamical symmetry is enriched by increasing the order the interactions between the constituent particles of a given many-body-system. The idea is illustrated with an analysis of higher-order interactions in the interacting boson model. (author)

  8. Neurotransmitter Switching? No Surprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2015-06-03

    Among the many forms of brain plasticity, changes in synaptic strength and changes in synapse number are particularly prominent. However, evidence for neurotransmitter respecification or switching has been accumulating steadily, both in the developing nervous system and in the adult brain, with observations of transmitter addition, loss, or replacement of one transmitter with another. Natural stimuli can drive these changes in transmitter identity, with matching changes in postsynaptic transmitter receptors. Strikingly, they often convert the synapse from excitatory to inhibitory or vice versa, providing a basis for changes in behavior in those cases in which it has been examined. Progress has been made in identifying the factors that induce transmitter switching and in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which it is achieved. There are many intriguing questions to be addressed.

  9. Extracellular Neurotransmitter Receptor Clustering: Think Outside the Box

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias Kneussel

    2010-01-01

    @@ Postsynaptic submembrane scaffolds cluster neurotransmitter receptors through intracellular protein-protein interactions. Growing evidence supports the view that extracellular factors can be almost as important to trigger synaptic receptor aggregation.

  10. Sensing dynamic interaction with the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, P.H.; Kortier, H.G.; Schepers, H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Study of the dynamic interaction with the environment and loading of the human body is important in ergonomics, sports and rehabilititation. This paper presents a method to estimate power transfer between the human body and the environment during short interactions and relatively arbitrary movements

  11. Sensing dynamic interaction with the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, P.H.; Kortier, H.G.; Schepers, H.M.; Bussmann, J.B.J; Horemans, H.L.D.; Hurkmans, H.L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Study of the dynamic interaction with the environment and loading of the human body is important in ergonomics, sports and rehabilitation. This paper presents a method to estimate power transfer between the human body and the environment during short interactions and relatively arbitrary movements u

  12. Simultaneous determination of the repertoire of classical neurotransmitters released from embryonal carcinoma stem cells using online microdialysis coupled with hydrophilic interaction chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ya-Bin [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Sun, Fan [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Teng, Lin [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Department of Cardiology and Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, The First College of Clinical Medical Sciences, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 443000, Hubei (China); Li, Wen-Bin; An, Shi-Min [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang, Chun; Yang, Xin-Jie; Lv, Hao-Yu; Ding, Xu-Ping [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhu, Liang, E-mail: zhuliang17@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); and others

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • An online MD-HILIC–MS/MS method for simultaneously measuring the repertoire of classical transmitters was developed and validated. • Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) was successfully employed to online system. • Stable isotope labeled internal standards and authentic matrix have been applied to guarantee reliable results. • The method features simple procedure (no sample preparation), high recovery (≥73%), high accuracy (89.36% ≤ RE ≤ 116.89%), good reproducibility (2.18% ≤ RSD ≤ 14.56%), and sensitive limits of detection (2 pg for acetylcholine, serotonin, and glutamate, 10 pg for dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, and glycine). - Abstract: Dynamic, continuous, and simultaneous multi-analysis of transmitters is important for the delineation of the complex interactions between the neuronal and intercellular communications. But the analysis of the whole repertoire of classical transmitters of diverse structure is challenging due to their different physico-chemical properties and to their high polarity feature which leads to poor retention in traditional reversed-phase columns during LC–MS analysis. Here, an online microdialysis coupled with hydrophilic interaction chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (online MD-HILIC–MS/MS) detection method was developed for the simultaneous measurement of the repertoire of classical transmitters (acetylcholine, serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, GABA, and glycine). Stable isotope labeled internal standards and authentic matrix have been applied to guarantee reliable results. The method was successfully employed to reveal the characteristics of transmitter release from embryonal carcinoma stem cells. The method features simple procedure (no sample preparation), high recovery (≥73%), high accuracy (89.36% ≤ RE ≤ 116.89%), good reproducibility (2.18% ≤ RSD ≤ 14.56%), and sensitive limits of detection (2 pg for acetylcholine, serotonin, and glutamate, 10 pg

  13. Dynamical Models of Dyadic Interactions with Delay

    CERN Document Server

    Bielczyk, Natalia; Płatkowski, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    When interpersonal interactions between individuals are described by the (discrete or continuous) dynamical systems, the interactions are usually assumed to be instantaneous: the rates of change of the actual states of the actors at given instant of time are assumed to depend on their states at the same time. In reality the natural time delay should be included in the corresponding models. We investigate a general class of linear models of dyadic interactions with a constant discrete time delay. We prove that in such models the changes of stability of the stationary points from instability to stability or vice versa occur for various intervals of the parameters which determine the intensity of interactions. The conditions guaranteeing arbitrary number (zero, one ore more) of switches are formulated and the relevant theorems are proved. A systematic analysis of all generic cases is carried out. It is obvious that the dynamics of interactions depend both on the strength of reactions of partners on their own sta...

  14. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  15. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny P Bartsch

    Full Text Available We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS, we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  16. Dynamics of interacting dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Urena-Lopez, L Arturo

    2008-01-01

    Dark energy and dark matter are only indirectly measured via their gravitational effects. It is possible that there is an exchange of energy within the dark sector, and this offers an interesting alternative approach to the coincidence problem. We consider two broad classes of interacting models where the energy exchange is a linear combination of the dark sector densities. The first class has been previously investigated, but we define new variables and find a new exact solution, which allows for a more direct, transparent and comprehensive analysis. The second class has not been investigated in general form before. We give general conditions on the parameters in both classes to avoid unphysical behavior (such as negative energy densities).

  17. Dynamics of deceptive interactions in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Barrio, Rafael A; Dunbar, Robin; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Kaski, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we examine the role of lies in human social relations by implementing some salient characteristics of deceptive interactions into an opinion formation model, so as to describe the dynamical behaviour of a social network more realistically. In this model we take into account such basic properties of social networks as the dynamics of the intensity of interactions, the influence of public opinion, and the fact that in every human interaction it might be convenient to deceive or withhold information depending on the instantaneous situation of each individual in the network. We find that lies shape the topology of social networks, especially the formation of tightly linked, small communities with loose connections between them. We also find that agents with a larger proportion of deceptive interactions are the ones that connect communities of different opinion, and in this sense they have substantial centrality in the network. We then discuss the consequences of these results for the social behaviou...

  18. Strong preferences of dopamine and l-dopa towards lipid head group: importance of lipid composition and implication for neurotransmitter metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlowski, A.; Grzybek, M.; Bunker, A.

    2012-01-01

    J. Neurochem. (2012) 122, 681690. Abstract The interactions of the neurotransmitter dopamine, and its precursor l-dopa, with membrane lipids were investigated through a set of molecular dynamic simulations with all atom resolution. The results obtained indicate that both dopamine and l-dopa have...

  19. Dynamical and bursty interactions in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Stehle, Juliette; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2010-01-01

    We present a modeling framework for dynamical and bursty contact networks made of agents in social interaction. We consider agents' behavior at short time scales, in which the contact network is formed by disconnected cliques of different sizes. At each time a random agent can make a transition from being isolated to being part of a group, or vice-versa. Different distributions of contact times and inter-contact times between individuals are obtained by considering transition probabilities with memory effects, i.e. the transition probabilities for each agent depend both on its state (isolated or interacting) and on the time elapsed since the last change of state. The model lends itself to analytical and numerical investigations. The modeling framework can be easily extended, and paves the way for systematic investigations of dynamical processes occurring on rapidly evolving dynamical networks, such as the propagation of an information, or spreading of diseases.

  20. Interactions Dominate the Dynamics of Visual Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Damian G.; Mirman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Many cognitive theories have described behavior as the summation of independent contributions from separate components. Contrasting views have emphasized the importance of multiplicative interactions and emergent structure. We describe a statistical approach to distinguishing additive and multiplicative processes and apply it to the dynamics of eye movements during classic visual cognitive tasks. The results reveal interaction-dominant dynamics in eye movements in each of the three tasks, and that fine-grained eye movements are modulated by task constraints. These findings reveal the interactive nature of cognitive processing and are consistent with theories that view cognition as an emergent property of processes that are broadly distributed over many scales of space and time rather than a componential assembly line. PMID:20070957

  1. Interactive macroeconomics stochastic aggregate dynamics with heterogeneous and interacting agents

    CERN Document Server

    Di Guilmi, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    One of the major problems of macroeconomic theory is the way in which the people exchange goods in decentralized market economies. There are major disagreements among macroeconomists regarding tools to influence required outcomes. Since the mainstream efficient market theory fails to provide an internal coherent framework, there is a need for an alternative theory. The book provides an innovative approach for the analysis of agent based models, populated by the heterogeneous and interacting agents in the field of financial fragility. The text is divided in two parts; the first presents analytical developments of stochastic aggregation and macro-dynamics inference methods. The second part introduces macroeconomic models of financial fragility for complex systems populated by heterogeneous and interacting agents. The concepts of financial fragility and macroeconomic dynamics are explained in detail in separate chapters. The statistical physics approach is applied to explain theories of macroeconomic modelling a...

  2. Dynamical Symmetries Reflected in Realistic Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sviratcheva, K.D.; Draayer, J.P.; /Louisiana State U.; Vary, J.P.; /Iowa State U. /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC

    2007-04-06

    Realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions, derived within the framework of meson theory or more recently in terms of chiral effective field theory, yield new possibilities for achieving a unified microscopic description of atomic nuclei. Based on spectral distribution methods, a comparison of these interactions to a most general Sp(4) dynamically symmetric interaction, which previously we found to reproduce well that part of the interaction that is responsible for shaping pairing-governed isobaric analog 0{sup +} states, can determine the extent to which this significantly simpler model Hamiltonian can be used to obtain an approximate, yet very good description of low-lying nuclear structure. And furthermore, one can apply this model in situations that would otherwise be prohibitive because of the size of the model space. In addition, we introduce a Sp(4) symmetry breaking term by including the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in the analysis and examining the capacity of this extended model interaction to imitate realistic interactions. This provides a further step towards gaining a better understanding of the underlying foundation of realistic interactions and their ability to reproduce striking features of nuclei such as strong pairing correlations or collective rotational motion.

  3. Non-Linear Dynamics and Fundamental Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Khanna, Faqir

    2006-01-01

    The book is directed to researchers and graduate students pursuing an advanced degree. It provides details of techniques directed towards solving problems in non-linear dynamics and chos that are, in general, not amenable to a perturbative treatment. The consideration of fundamental interactions is a prime example where non-perturbative techniques are needed. Extension of these techniques to finite temperature problems is considered. At present these ideas are primarily used in a perturbative context. However, non-perturbative techniques have been considered in some specific cases. Experts in the field on non-linear dynamics and chaos and fundamental interactions elaborate the techniques and provide a critical look at the present status and explore future directions that may be fruitful. The text of the main talks will be very useful to young graduate students who are starting their studies in these areas.

  4. Dynamic interactions between microbubbles in water

    OpenAIRE

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Manica, Rogerio; Tang, Xiaosong; O’Shea, Sean J.; Stevens, Geoffrey W.; Grieser, Franz; Raymond R. Dagastine; Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between moving bubbles, vapor voids in liquid, can arguably represent the simplest dynamical system in continuum mechanics as only a liquid and its vapor phase are involved. Surprisingly, and perhaps because of the ephemeral nature of bubbles, there has been no direct measurement of the time-dependent force between colliding bubbles which probes the effects of surface deformations and hydrodynamic flow on length scales down to nanometers. Using ultrasonically generated microbu...

  5. The Molecular Basis of Memory. Part 3: Tagging with emotive neurotransmitters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard eMarx

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission. The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix (neural extracellular matrix (nECM+ diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the neutrix. Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo, metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory.Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device.The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with > 10 NMs and > 90 NTs for encoding (flavoring cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology.

  6. Competing dynamical processes on two interacting networks

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Zuzek, L G; Braunstein, L A; Vazquez, F

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study a model for the competition between two different dynamical processes, one for opinion formation and the other for decision making, on two interconnected networks. The networks represent two interacting social groups, the society and the Congress. An opinion formation process takes place on the society, where the opinion S of each individual can take one of four possible values (S=-2,-1,1,2), describing its level of agreement on a given issue, from totally against (S=-2) to totally in favor (S=2). The dynamics is controlled by a reinforcement parameter r, which measures the ratio between the likelihood to become an extremist or a moderate. The dynamics of the Congress is akin to that of the Abrams-Strogatz model, where congressmen can adopt one of two possible positions, to be either in favor (+) or against (-) the issue. The probability that a congressman changes his decision is proportional to the fraction of interacting neighbors that hold the opposite opinion raised to a power $\\beta$...

  7. A dynamical system for interacting flapping swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Anand; Ramananarivo, Sophie; Ristroph, Leif; Shelley, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation into the dynamics of interacting flapping swimmers. Our study is motivated by the recent experiments of Becker et al., who studied a one-dimensional array of self-propelled flapping wings that swim within each other's wakes in a water tank. They discovered that the system adopts certain ``schooling modes'' characterized by specific spatial phase relationships between swimmers. To rationalize these phenomena, we develop a discrete dynamical system in which the swimmers are modeled as heaving airfoils that shed point vortices during each flapping cycle. We then apply our model to recent experiments in the Applied Math Lab, in which two tandem flapping airfoils are free to choose both their speed and relative positions. We expect that our model may be used to understand how schooling behavior is influenced by hydrodynamics in more general contexts. Thanks to the NSF for its support.

  8. Multiphase Flow Dynamics 3 Thermal Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    Multi-phase flows are part of our natural environment such as tornadoes, typhoons, air and water pollution and volcanic activities as well as part of industrial technology such as power plants, combustion engines, propulsion systems, or chemical and biological industry. The industrial use of multi-phase systems requires analytical and numerical strategies for predicting their behavior. .In its fourth extended edition the successful monograph package “Multiphase Flow Daynmics” contains theory, methods and practical experience for describing complex transient multi-phase processes in arbitrary geometrical configurations, providing a systematic presentation of the theory and practice of numerical multi-phase fluid dynamics. In the present third volume methods for describing of the thermal interactions in multiphase dynamics are provided. In addition a large number of valuable experiments is collected and predicted using the methods introduced in this monograph. In this way the accuracy of the methods is reve...

  9. Multiphase Flow Dynamics 2 Mechanical Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    Multi-phase flows are part of our natural environment such as tornadoes, typhoons, air and water pollution and volcanic activities as well as part of industrial technology such as power plants, combustion engines, propulsion systems, or chemical and biological industry. The industrial use of multi-phase systems requires analytical and numerical strategies for predicting their behavior. .In its fourth extended edition the successful monograph package “Multiphase Flow Daynmics” contains theory, methods and practical experience for describing complex transient multi-phase processes in arbitrary geometrical configurations, providing a systematic presentation of the theory and practice of numerical multi-phase fluid dynamics. In the present second volume the methods for describing the mechanical interactions in multiphase dynamics are provided. This fourth edition includes various updates, extensions, improvements and corrections.   "The literature in the field of multiphase flows is numerous. Therefore, it i...

  10. Modal interactions in dynamical and structural systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, A.H.; Balachandran, B. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The authors review theoretical and experimental studies of the influence of modal interactions on the nonlinear response of harmonically excited structural and dynamical systems. In particular, they discuss the response of pendulums, ships, rings, shells, arches, beam structures, surface waves, and the similarities in the qualitative behavior of these systems. The systems are characterized by quadratic nonlinearities which may lead to two-to-one and combination autoparametric resonances. These resonances give rise to a coupling between the modes involved in the resonance leading to nonlinear periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic motions.

  11. 受体-受体相互作用:神经递质受体功能的一种重要调控机制%Receptor-receptor interaction: a critical mechanism for the regulation of neurotransmitter receptor function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳

    2011-01-01

    1 Introduction Neurotransmitter receptors are proteins embedded in the synaptic plasma membrane where they play a dual role in synaptic transmission.First,receptors have domains that extend into the synpatic cleft and bind neurotransmitters/agonists that are released into this space from the presynaptic neuron.Second,the binding of neurotransmitters to these domains open or close ion channels directly or indirectly in the postsynaptic membrane,or activate signalling events in the postsynaptic neuron,thus mediating the transfer of information across the synapse[1 ].

  12. Neurotransmitter: Sodium Symporters: Caught in the Act!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinauskaite, Lina

    The neurotransmitter: sodium symporters in the neurons. Communication between neurons is mediated by the release of molecules called neurotransmitters (blue dots) from first neuron and sensed by receptors on the surface of the second (purple sphere). The signal is ended by active reuptake...... of these neurotransmitters by a family of proteins called neurotransmitter: sodium symporters (NSS), which are driven using the large concentration difference of sodium (orange dots) between the outside and the inside of the cell...

  13. Characterizing Enzymatic Deposition for Microelectrode Neurotransmitter Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosein, W. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yorita, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tolosa, V. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-12

    The enzyme immobilization process, one step in creating an enzymatic biosensor, was characterized and analyzed as a function of its physical properties. The neural glutamic biosensor is a flexible device, effectively minimizing trauma to the area of implantation. The Multielectrode Array (MEA) is composed primarily of a proprietary polymer which has been successfully implanted into human subjects in recent years. This polymer allows the device the pliability that other devices normally lack, though this poses some challenges to implantation. The electrodes are made of Platinum (Pt), and can range in number from eight to thirty two electrodes per device. These electrodes are electroplated with a semipermeable polymer layer to improve selectivity of the electrode to the neurotransmitter of interest, in this case glutamate. A signal is created from the interaction of glutamate in the brain with the glutamate oxidase (GluOx) which is immobilized on the surface of the electrode by using crosslinking chemistry in conjunction with glutaraldehyde and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). The glutamate is oxidized by glutamate oxidase, producing α-ketoglutarate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a by-product. The production of H2O2 is crucial for detection of the presence of the glutamate within the enzymatic coating, as it diffuses through the enzyme layer and oxidizes at the surface of the electrode. This oxidation is detectable by measurable change in the current using amperometry. Hence, the MEA allows for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitter activity in real time. The sensitivity of the sensor to these neurotransmitters is dependent on the thickness of the layer, which is investigated in these experiments in order to optimize the efficacy of the device to detecting the substrate, once implanted.

  14. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion......Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most...

  15. New activity pattern in human interactive dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formentin, Marco; Lovison, Alberto; Maritan, Amos; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the response function of human agents as demonstrated by written correspondence, uncovering a new pattern for how the reactive dynamics of individuals is distributed across the set of each agent’s contacts. In long-term empirical data on email, we find that the set of response times considered separately for the messages to each different correspondent of a given writer, generate a family of heavy-tailed distributions, which have largely the same features for all agents, and whose characteristic times grow exponentially with the rank of each correspondent. We furthermore show that this new behavioral pattern emerges robustly by considering weighted moving averages of the priority-conditioned response-time probabilities generated by a basic prioritization model. Our findings clarify how the range of priorities in the inputs from one’s environment underpin and shape the dynamics of agents embedded in a net of reactive relations. These newly revealed activity patterns might be universal, being present in other general interactive environments, and constrain future models of communication and interaction networks, affecting their architecture and evolution.

  16. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantcheva, Adriana K; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Nissen, Poul

    2013-05-21

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding.

  17. A Tribute to Mary C. McKenna: Glutamate as Energy Substrate and Neurotransmitter-Functional Interaction Between Neurons and Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schousboe, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate metabolism in the brain is extremely complex not only involving a large variety of enzymes but also a tight partnership between neurons and astrocytes, the latter cells being in control of de novo synthesis of glutamate. This review provides an account of the processes involved, i.e. pyruvate carboxylation and recycling as well as the glutamate-glutamine cycle, focusing on the many seminal contributions from Dr. Mary McKenna. The ramification of the astrocytic end feet allowing contact and control of hundreds of thousands of synapses at the same time obviously puts these cells in a prominent position to regulate neural activity. Additionally, the astrocytes take active part in the neurotransmission processes by releasing a variety of gliotransmitters including glutamate. Hence, the term "the tripartite synapse", in which there is an active and dynamic interplay between the pre- and post-synaptic neurons and the ensheathing astrocytes, has been coined. The studies of Mary McKenna and her colleagues over several decades have been of paramount importance for the elucidation of compartmentation in astrocytes and synaptic terminals and the intricate metabolic processes underlying the glutamatergic neurotransmission process.

  18. Pluto-Charon solar wind interaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, J. P. M.; Paty, C. S.

    2017-05-01

    This work studies Charon's effects on the Pluto-solar wind interaction using a multifluid MHD model which simulates the interactions of Pluto and Charon with the solar wind as well as with each other. Specifically, it investigates the ionospheric dynamics of a two body system in which either one or both bodies possess an ionosphere. Configurations in which Charon is directly upstream and directly downstream of Pluto are considered. Depending on ionospheric and solar wind conditions, Charon could periodically pass into the solar wind flow upstream of Pluto. The results of this study demonstrate that in these circumstances Charon modifies the upstream flow, both in the case in which Charon possesses an ionosphere, and in the case in which Charon is without an ionosphere. This modification amounts to a change in the gross structure of the interaction region when Charon possesses an ionosphere but is more localized when Charon lacks an ionosphere. Furthermore, evidence is shown that supports Charon acting to partially shield Pluto from the solar wind when it is upstream of Pluto, resulting in a decrease in ionospheric loss by Pluto.

  19. The Top 5 Neurotransmitters from a Clinical Neurologist's Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Neurologists are proficient in neuroanatomy and -physiology but their understanding of neurochemistry tends to be mediocre. As a rule, we do not think in biochemical pathways and complex metabolic interactions but rather associate a few neurotransmitters with well-known brain diseases or drugs th...

  20. Interactions between nonlinear spur gear dynamics and surface wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Huali; Kahraman, Ahmet

    2007-11-01

    In this study, two different dynamic models, a finite elements-based deformable-body model and a simplified discrete model, and a surface wear model are combined to study the interaction between gear surface wear and gear dynamic response. The proposed dynamic gear wear model includes the influence of worn surface profiles on dynamic tooth forces and transmission error as well as the influence of dynamic tooth forces on wear profiles. This paper first introduces the nonlinear dynamic models that include gear backlash and time-varying gear mesh stiffness, and a wear model separately. It presents a comparison to experiments for validation of the dynamic models. The dynamic models are combined with the wear model to study the interaction of surface wear and dynamic behavior in both linear and nonlinear response regimes. At the end, several sets of simulation results are used to demonstrate the two-way relationship between nonlinear gear dynamics and surface wear.

  1. Neurotransmitters, Pharmacologic Synergy, and Clinical Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stark, Martha

    2006-01-01

    ... of neurotransmitters and their receptor sites, more ingenious methods of drug administration, and more creative combinations of the various drugs, more than half our patients have psychiatric sympto...

  2. Dynamical instabilities in disc-planet interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Min-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Protoplanetary discs may become dynamically unstable due to structure induced by an embedded giant planet. In this thesis, I discuss the stability of such systems and explore the consequence of instability on planetary migration. I begin with non-self-gravitating, low viscosity discs and show that giant planets induce shocks inside its co-orbital region, leading to a profile unstable to vortex formation around a potential vorticity minimum. This instability is commonly known as the vortex or Rossby wave instability. Vortex-planet interaction lead to episodic phases of migration, which can be understood in the framework of type III migration. I then examine the effect of disc self-gravity on gap stability. The linear theory of the Rossby wave instability is extended to include disc gravity, which shows that self-gravity is effective at stabilising the vortex instability at small azimuthal wavenumber. This is consistent with the observation that more vortices develop with increasing disc mass in hydrodynamic si...

  3. Dynamic interactions between microbubbles in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Manica, Rogerio; Tang, Xiaosong; O'Shea, Sean J; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C

    2010-06-22

    The interaction between moving bubbles, vapor voids in liquid, can arguably represent the simplest dynamical system in continuum mechanics as only a liquid and its vapor phase are involved. Surprisingly, and perhaps because of the ephemeral nature of bubbles, there has been no direct measurement of the time-dependent force between colliding bubbles which probes the effects of surface deformations and hydrodynamic flow on length scales down to nanometers. Using ultrasonically generated microbubbles (approximately 100 microm size) that have been accurately positioned in an atomic force microscope, we have made direct measurements of the force between two bubbles in water under controlled collision conditions that are similar to Brownian particles in solution. The experimental results together with detailed modeling reveal the nature of hydrodynamic boundary conditions at the air/water interface, the importance of the coupling of hydrodynamic flow, attractive van der Waals-Lifshitz forces, and bubble deformation in determining the conditions and mechanisms that lead to bubble coalescence. The observed behavior differs from intuitions gained from previous studies conducted using rigid particles. These direct force measurements reveal no specific ion effects at high ionic strengths or any special role of thermal fluctuations in film thickness in triggering the onset of bubble coalescence.

  4. Controls of interaction dynamics of orbital assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Renjeng

    1991-01-01

    Building structures and spacecraft in orbit will require technologies for positioning, docking/berthing, and joining orbital structures. A fundamental problem underlying the operation of docking and berthing is that of controlling the contact dynamics of mechanical structures actuated by active mechanisms such as robotic devices. Control systems must be designed to control these active mechanisms so that both the free space motions and contact motions are stable and satisfy specifications on position accuracy and bounds on contact forces. For the large orbital structures of the future, the problem of interactive dynamics and control is fundamentally different in several ways than it was for spacecraft docking in the past. First, future space structures must be treated as flexible structures - the operations of docking, berthing, and assembly will need to respect the vibrations of the structures. Second, the assembly of these structures will require multiple-point contact, rather than the essentially single-point positioning of conventional spacecraft docking. Third, some assembly operations require the subassemblies to be brought and held in contact so that successful joining can be accomplished. A preliminary study of contact stability and compliance control design has resulted in the development of an analytical method and a design method to analyze stability. The analytical method analyzes the problem of stability when an actively-controlled structure contacts a passive structure. This method makes it possible to accurately estimate the stiffness of the passive structures with which the contact motion will become unstable. The analytic results suggest that passivity is neither achievable in practice, nor necessary as a design concept. A contact control system need only be passive up to a certain frequency; beyond that frequency the system can be stabilized with sufficiently small gains. With this concept the Center developed a design methodology for achieving

  5. Dynamics simulations for engineering macromolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Shinar, Tamar; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The predictable engineering of well-behaved transcriptional circuits is a central goal of synthetic biology. The artificial attachment of promoters to transcription factor genes usually results in noisy or chaotic behaviors, and such systems are unlikely to be useful in practical applications. Natural transcriptional regulation relies extensively on protein-protein interactions to insure tightly controlled behavior, but such tight control has been elusive in engineered systems. To help engineer protein-protein interactions, we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation framework that simplifies features of proteins moving by constrained Brownian motion, with the goal of performing long simulations. The behavior of a simulated protein system is determined by summation of forces that include a Brownian force, a drag force, excluded volume constraints, relative position constraints, and binding constraints that relate to experimentally determined on-rates and off-rates for chosen protein elements in a system. Proteins are abstracted as spheres. Binding surfaces are defined radially within a protein. Peptide linkers are abstracted as small protein-like spheres with rigid connections. To address whether our framework could generate useful predictions, we simulated the behavior of an engineered fusion protein consisting of two 20 000 Da proteins attached by flexible glycine/serine-type linkers. The two protein elements remained closely associated, as if constrained by a random walk in three dimensions of the peptide linker, as opposed to showing a distribution of distances expected if movement were dominated by Brownian motion of the protein domains only. We also simulated the behavior of fluorescent proteins tethered by a linker of varying length, compared the predicted Förster resonance energy transfer with previous experimental observations, and obtained a good correspondence. Finally, we simulated the binding behavior of a fusion of two ligands that could

  6. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs...

  7. Bound to be different: neurotransmitter transporters meet their bacterial cousins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, L Keith; Meiler, Jens; Blakely, Randy D

    2007-12-01

    The neurotransmitter transporters belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family, including the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GAT), norepinephrine (NET), serotonin (SERT) and dopamine (DAT) transporters are extremely important drug targets of great clinical relevance. These Na+, Cl(-)-dependent transporters primarily function following neurotransmission to reset neuronal signaling by transporting neurotransmitter out of the synapse and back into the pre-synaptic neuron. Recent studies have tracked down an elusive binding site for Cl(-) that facilitates neurotransmitter transport using structural differences evident with bacterial family members (e.g., the Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter LeuT Aa) that lack Cl(-) dependence. Additionally, the crystal structures of antidepressant-bound LeuT Aa reveals a surprising mode of drug interaction that may have relevance for medication development. The study of sequence and structural divergence between LeuT Aa and human SLC6 family transporters can thus inform us as to how and why neurotransmitter transporters evolved a reliance on extracellular Cl(-) to propel the transport cycle; what residue changes and helical rearrangements give rise to recognition of different substrates; and how drugs such as antidepressants, cocaine, and amphetamines halt (or reverse) the transport process.

  8. Analysis of the dynamic interaction between SVOCs and airborne particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cong; Shi, Shanshan; Weschler, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    A proper quantitative understanding of the dynamic interaction between gas-phase semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and airborne particles is important for human exposure assessment and risk evaluation. Questions regarding how to properly address gas/particle interactions have introduced...... uncertainty when predicting SVOC concentrations and assessing exposures to these compounds. In this study, we have developed a dimensionless description for the dynamic interaction between SVOCs and organic particles. A better criterion to judge whether the internal resistance (diffusion in and out...

  9. Theoretical Analysis of Dynamic Processes for Interacting Molecular Motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-13

    Biological transport is supported by collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by analyzing a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes where interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. It allows us to connect explicitly microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. Theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on interactions, and correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motors transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  10. The dynamic multisite interactions between two intrinsically disordered proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Shaowen

    2017-05-11

    Protein interactions involving intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) comprise a variety of binding modes, from the well characterized folding upon binding to dynamic fuzzy complex. To date, most studies concern the binding of an IDP to a structured protein, while the Interaction between two IDPs is poorly understood. In this study, we combined NMR, smFRET, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to characterize the interaction between two IDPs, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of protein 4.1G and the nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. It is revealed that CTD and NuMA form a fuzzy complex with remaining structural disorder. Multiple binding sites on both proteins were identified by MD and mutagenesis studies. Our study provides an atomic scenario in which two IDPs bearing multiple binding sites interact with each other in dynamic equilibrium. The combined approach employed here could be widely applicable for investigating IDPs and their dynamic interactions.

  11. Dynamic Stall Analysis Utilizing Interactive Computer Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    Blade-Vortex Interaction (BV[) studies. solkes the two-dimen i,)nal, unsteady, compressible Euler and Napier -Stokes equations in strong conservation...requirements, interactive computer graphics workstations have been evolved to complement the super -computer. Workstation capabilities, in terms of

  12. Dynamics of social positioning patterns in group-robot interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Vroon, Jered; Joosse, Michiel; Lohse, Manja; Kolkmeier, Jan; Kim, Jaebok; Truong, Khiet; Englebienne, Gwenn; Heylen, Dirk; Evers, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    When a mobile robot interacts with a group of people, it has to consider its position and orientation. We introduce a novel study aimed at generating hypotheses on suitable behavior for such social positioning, explicitly focusing on interaction with small groups of users and allowing for the temporal and social dynamics inherent in most interactions. In particular, the interactions we look at are approach, converse and retreat. In this study, groups of three participants and a telepresence r...

  13. Revealing physical interaction networks from statistics of collective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Mor; Casadiego, Jose; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Revealing physical interactions in complex systems from observed collective dynamics constitutes a fundamental inverse problem in science. Current reconstruction methods require access to a system’s model or dynamical data at a level of detail often not available. We exploit changes in invariant measures, in particular distributions of sampled states of the system in response to driving signals, and use compressed sensing to reveal physical interaction networks. Dynamical observations following driving suffice to infer physical connectivity even if they are temporally disordered, are acquired at large sampling intervals, and stem from different experiments. Testing various nonlinear dynamic processes emerging on artificial and real network topologies indicates high reconstruction quality for existence as well as type of interactions. These results advance our ability to reveal physical interaction networks in complex synthetic and natural systems. PMID:28246630

  14. Dynamics of Interacting Tachyonic Teleparallel Dark Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Banijamali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a tachyon scalar field which is nonminimally coupled to gravity in the framework of teleparallel gravity. We analyze the phase-space of the model, known as tachyonic teleparallel dark energy, in the presence of an interaction between dark energy and background matter. We find that although there exist some late-time accelerated attractor solutions, there is no scaling attractor. So, unfortunately interacting tachyonic teleparallel dark energy cannot alleviate the coincidence problem.

  15. Isotropic Forms of Dynamics in the Relativistic Direct Interaction Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Duviryak, A A; Tretyak, V I

    1998-01-01

    The Lagrangian relativistic direct interaction theory in the various forms of dynamics is formulated and its connections with the Fokker-type action theory and with the constrained Hamiltonian mechanics are established. The motion of classical two-particle system with relativistic direct interaction is analysed within the framework of isotropic forms of dynamics in the two- and four-dimensional space-time. Some relativistic exactly solvable quantum-mechanical models are also discussed.

  16. Understanding positivity within dynamic team interactions: A statistical discourse analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Chiu, M.M.; Lei, Z.; Kauffeld, S.

    2017-01-01

    Positivity has been heralded for its individual benefits. However, how positivity dynamically unfolds within the temporal flow of team interactions remains unclear. This is an important oversight, as positivity can be key to team problem-solving and performance. In this study, we examine how team micro-processes affect the likelihood of positivity occurring within dynamic team interactions. In doing so, we build on and expand previous work on individual positivity and integrate theory on temp...

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on structured populations: A review

    CERN Document Server

    Perc, Matjaz; Szolnoki, Attila; Floría, Luis M; Moreno, Yamir; 10.1098/rsif.2012.0997

    2013-01-01

    Interactions among living organisms, from bacteria colonies to human societies, are inherently more complex than interactions among particles and nonliving matter. Group interactions are a particularly important and widespread class, representative of which is the public goods game. In addition, methods of statistical physics have proven valuable for studying pattern formation, equilibrium selection, and self-organisation in evolutionary games. Here we review recent advances in the study of evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on structured populations, including lattices, complex networks and coevolutionary models. We also compare these results with those obtained on well-mixed populations. The review particularly highlights that the study of the dynamics of group interactions, like several other important equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamical processes in biological, economical and social sciences, benefits from the synergy between statistical physics, network science and evolutionary game theory...

  18. Cubic Derivative Interactions and Asymptotic Dynamics of the Galileon Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    De Arcia, Roberto; León, Genly; Nucamendi, Ulises; Quiros, Israel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we apply the tools of the dynamical systems theory in order to uncover the whole asymptotic structure of the vacuum interactions of a galileon model with a cubic derivative interaction term. It is shown that, contrary to what occurs in the presence of background matter, the galileon interactions of vacuum appreciably modify the late-time cosmic dynamics. In particular, a local late-time attractor representing phantom behavior arises which is inevitably associated with a big rip singularity. It seems that the gravitational interactions of the background matter with the galileon screen the effects of the gravitational self-interactions of the galileon, thus erasing any potential modification of the late-time dynamics by the galileon vacuum processes. Unlike other galileon models inspired in the DGP scenario, self-accelerating solutions do not arise in this model.

  19. Unitarity, Feedback, Interactions -- Dynamics Emergent from Repeated Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Altamirano, Natacha; Mann, Robert B; Zych, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the recent efforts to describe the gravitational interaction as a classical channel arising from continuous quantum measurements, we study what types of dynamics can emerge from a model of repeated short interactions of a system with a set of ancillae. We show that contingent on the model parameters the resulting dynamics ranges from exact unitarity to arbitrary fast decoherence (quantum Zeno effect). For a series of measurements the effective dynamics includes feedback-control, which for a composite system yields effective interactions between the subsystems. We quantify the amount of decoherence accompanying such induced interactions, generalizing the lower bound of the gravitational example. However, by allowing multipartite measurements, the interactions can be induced with arbitrary low decoherence. Our results have implications for gravity-inspired decoherence models and the simple framework used in the present study can find applications in devising novel quantum control protocols, or quan...

  20. Exciton-Phonon Dynamics with Long-Range Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Laskin, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Exciton-phonon dynamics on a 1D lattice with long-range exciton-exciton interaction have been introduced and elaborated. Long-range interaction leads to a nonlocal integral term in the motion equation of the exciton subsystem if we go from discrete to continuous space. In some particular cases for power-law interaction, the integral term can be expressed through a fractional order spatial derivative. A system of two coupled equations has been obtained, one is a fractional differential equation for the exciton subsystem, the other is a standard differential equation for the phonon subsystem. These two equations present a new fundamental framework to study nonlinear dynamics with long-range interaction. New approaches to model the impact of long-range interaction on nonlinear dynamics are: fractional generalization of Zakharov system, Hilbert-Zakharov system, Hilbert-Ginzburg-Landau equation and nonlinear Hilbert-Schrodinger equation. Nonlinear fractional Schrodinger equation and fractional Ginzburg-Landau equa...

  1. Dynamic contact interactions of fractal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Tamonash; Mitra, Anirban; Sahoo, Prasanta

    2017-01-01

    Roughness parameters and material properties have significant influence on the static and dynamic properties of a rough surface. In the present paper, fractal surface is generated using the modified two-variable Weierstrass-Mandelbrot function in MATLAB and the same is imported to ANSYS to construct the finite element model of the rough surface. The force-deflection relationship between the deformable rough fractal surface and a contacting rigid flat is studied by finite element analysis. For the dynamic analysis, the contacting system is represented by a single degree of freedom spring mass-damper-system. The static force-normal displacement relationship obtained from FE analysis is used to determine the dynamic characteristics of the rough surface for free, as well as for forced damped vibration using numerical methods. The influence of fractal surface parameters and the material properties on the dynamics of the rough surface is also analyzed. The system exhibits softening property for linear elastic surface and the softening nature increases with rougher topography. The softening nature of the system increases with increase in tangent modulus value. Above a certain value of yield strength the nature of the frequency response curve is observed to change its nature from softening to hardening.

  2. Stability and dynamics of magnetocapillary interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Chinomona, Rujeko; Mitchell, William H; Yao, Yao; Spagnolie, Saverio E

    2014-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that floating ferromagnetic beads, under the influence of an oscillating background magnetic field, can move along a liquid-air interface in a sustained periodic locomotion [Lumay et al., Soft Matter, 2013, 9, 2420]. Dynamic activity arises from a periodically induced dipole-dipole repulsion between the beads acting in concert with capillary attraction. We investigate analytically and numerically the stability and dynamics of this magnetocapillary swimming, and explore other related topics including the steady and periodic equilibrium configurations of two and three beads. The swimming speed and system stability depend on a dimensionless measure of the relative repulsive and attractive forces which we term the magnetocapillary number. An oscillatory magnetic field may stabilize an otherwise unstable collinear configuration, and striking behaviors are observed in fast transitions to and from locomotory states, offering insight into the behavior and self-assembly of interface-bound...

  3. Universal activity pattern in human interactive dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Formentin, Marco; Maritan, Amos; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the response function of human agents as demonstrated by written correspondence, uncovering a new universal pattern for how the reactive dynamics of individuals is distributed across the set of each agent's contacts. In long-term empirical data on email, we find that the set of response times considered separately for the messages to each different correspondent of a given writer, generate a family of heavy-tailed distributions, which have largely the same features for all agents, and whose characteristic times grow exponentially with the rank of each correspondent. We show this universal behavioral pattern emerges robustly by considering weighted moving averages of the priority-conditioned response-time probabilities generated by a basic prioritization model. Our findings clarify how the range of priorities in the inputs from one's environment underpin and shape the dynamics of agents embedded in a net of reactive relations. These newly revealed activity patterns constrain future models of com...

  4. Electron dynamics controlled via self-interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Tamburini, Matteo; Di Piazza, Antonino

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of an electron in a strong laser field can be significantly altered by radiation reaction. This usually results in a strongly damped motion, with the electron losing a large fraction of its initial energy. Here we show that the electron dynamics in a bichromatic laser pulse can be indirectly controlled by a comparatively small radiation reaction force through its interplay with the Lorentz force. By changing the relative phase between the two frequency components of the bichromatic laser field, an ultrarelativistic electron bunch colliding head-on with the laser pulse can be deflected in a controlled way, with the deflection angle being independent of the initial electron energy. The effect is predicted to be observable with intensities available at upcoming laser facilities.

  5. High Performance Interactive System Dynamics Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, Brian W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gruchalla, Kenny M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duckworth, Jonathan C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-14

    This brochure describes a system dynamics simulation (SD) framework that supports an end-to-end analysis workflow that is optimized for deployment on ESIF facilities(Peregrine and the Insight Center). It includes (I) parallel and distributed simulation of SD models, (ii) real-time 3D visualization of running simulations, and (iii) comprehensive database-oriented persistence of simulation metadata, inputs, and outputs.

  6. High Performance Interactive System Dynamics Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, Brian W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gruchalla, Kenny M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duckworth, Jonathan C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-14

    This presentation describes a system dynamics simulation (SD) framework that supports an end-to-end analysis workflow that is optimized for deployment on ESIF facilities(Peregrine and the Insight Center). It includes (I) parallel and distributed simulation of SD models, (ii) real-time 3D visualization of running simulations, and (iii) comprehensive database-oriented persistence of simulation metadata, inputs, and outputs.

  7. Simulation of Gas-Surface Dynamical Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Brenig, Z. Phys. B 36, 81 (1979). [39] J. Böheim and W. Brenig, Z. Phys. B 41, 243 (1981). [40] G. B. Arfken and H. J. Weber, Mathematical Methods for...excitation of the substrate have to be taken into account. In this lecture, the quantum and classical methods required for the simulation of gas-surface...well-defined conditions [2]. In this chapter, I will briefly review the theoretical methods necessary to determine the dynamics of processes at surfaces

  8. Dynamical Equilibrium of Interacting Ant Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Leok, B T M

    1996-01-01

    The sustainable biodiversity associated with a specific ecological niche as a function of land area is analysed computationally by considering the interaction of ant societies over a collection of islands. A power law relationship between sustainable species and land area is observed. We will further consider the effect a perturbative inflow of ants has upon the model.

  9. Interactive Dynamics of Imagination in a Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilppö, Jaakko; Rajala, Antti; Zittoun, Tania; Kumpulainen, Kristiina; Lipponen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a conceptual framework for researching the dynamics of imagination in science classroom interactions. While educational interest in imagination has recently increased, prior research has not adequately accounted for how imagination is realized in and through classroom interactions, nor has it created a framework for its…

  10. Approximate Solutions of Interactive Dynamic Influence Diagrams Using Model Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yifeng; Doshi, Prashant; Qiongyu, Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Interactive dynamic influence diagrams (I-DIDs) offer a transparent and semantically clear representation for the sequential decision-making problem over multiple time steps in the presence of other interacting agents. Solving I-DIDs exactly involves knowing the solutions of possible models...

  11. A new scenario of the universe dynamics with interacting fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Aydiner, Ekrem

    2016-01-01

    In this study, I discuss universe dynamics by considering mutual and self-interactions between fluid components such as dark energy, dark, matter etc, in the the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space-time. I show that dynamics of the interacting two-fluid with linear EoS can be given by Lotka-Volterra equations. On the other hand, I show that interacting two-fluid model with quadratic EoS can be transformed to the self-interacting Lotka-Volterra equations. Finally I show that these equations can be generalized to $N$ interacting Lotka-Volterra equations for more interacting fluids. Also I find fixed points of these equations and discuss the dynamics of universe. Even though present model needs to be confirmed experimentally, obtained results clearly show that dynamics of universe at large scale and within the time may have stable, unstable or chaotic behaviour in the presence of the interaction and self-interaction in between dark energy, dark matter, matter and others components of the universe unl...

  12. Models for the dynamics of interacting magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Mørup, Steen

    1998-01-01

    A critical review of models for the dynamics of interacting magnetic nanoparticles is given. It is shown that the basic assumptions in the Dormann-Bessais-Fiorani model are unrealistic. The experimental observations on systems of interacting magnetic nanoparticles can, at least qualitatively...

  13. Approximate Solutions of Interactive Dynamic Influence Diagrams Using Model Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yifeng; Doshi, Prashant; Qiongyu, Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Interactive dynamic influence diagrams (I-DIDs) offer a transparent and semantically clear representation for the sequential decision-making problem over multiple time steps in the presence of other interacting agents. Solving I-DIDs exactly involves knowing the solutions of possible models of th....... We discuss the error bound of the approximation technique and demonstrate its empirical performance....

  14. Dynamical equilibration in strongly-interacting parton-hadron matter

    CERN Document Server

    Ozvenchuk, Vitalii; Linnyk, Olena; Gorenstein, Mark; Cassing, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in 'infinite' parton-hadron matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics transport approach, which is based on a dynamical quasiparticle model for partons matched to reproduce lattice-QCD results - including the partonic equation of state - in thermodynamic equilibrium. The 'infinite' matter is simulated within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions initialized at different baryon density (or chemical potential) and energy density. The transition from initially pure partonic matter to hadronic degrees of freedom (or vice versa) occurs dynamically by interactions. Different thermodynamical distributions of the strongly-interacting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP) are addressed and discussed.

  15. Interfacial interaction between polypropylene and nanotube: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danhui; Yang, Houbo; Liu, Zhongkui; Liu, Anmin; Li, Yunfang

    2017-09-01

    The interfacial interaction between polypropylene (PE) and single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The result showed that the PE chain could stabilize the SWCNT and then extended along the direction of SWCNT. The mechanism of interfacial interaction between PE and SWCNT was also discussed. Furthermore, the interfacial interaction between more PE and SWCNT was also investigated and the position also deeply influenced the interaction. This will be beneficial to understanding the interfacial interaction between polymer and CNT in solution, and also guiding the fabrication of high performance polymer/CNT nanocomposites.

  16. Modeling the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks

    CERN Document Server

    Marceau, Vincent; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Allard, Antoine; Dubé, Louis J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemics seldom occur as isolated phenomena. Typically, two or more viral agents spread within the same host population and may interact dynamically with each other. We present a general model where two viral agents interact via an immunity mechanism as they propagate simultaneously on two networks connecting the same set of nodes. Exploiting a correspondence between the propagation dynamics and a dynamical process performing progressive network generation, we develop an analytic approach that accurately captures the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks. The formalism allows for overlay networks with arbitrary joint degree distribution and overlap. To illustrate the versatility of our approach, we consider a hypothetical delayed intervention scenario in which an immunizing agent is disseminated in a host population to hinder the propagation of an undesirable agent (e.g. the spread of preventive information in the context of an emerging infectious disease).

  17. Pedestrian-bridge dynamic interaction, including human participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, J. W.; Law, S. S.; Yang, Q. S.; Yang, N.

    2013-02-01

    The pedestrian-bridge dynamic interaction problem based on bipedal walking model and damped compliant legs is presented in this work. A time-variant damper is modeled at a given walking speed. A control force is applied by the pedestrian to compensate for energy dissipated with the system damping in walking and to regulate the walking performance of the pedestrian. The effects of stiffness, damping of the leg and the landing angle of attack are investigated in the numerical studies. Simulation results show that the dynamic interaction will increase with a larger vibration level of structure. More external energy must be input to maintain steady walking and uniform dynamic behavior of the pedestrian in the process. The simple bipedal walking model could well describe the human-structure dynamic interaction.

  18. Detonations in white dwarf dynamical interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aznar-Siguán, Gabriela; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo; José, Jordi; Isern, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    In old, dense stellar systems collisions of white dwarfs are a rather frequent phenomenon. Here we present the results of a comprehensive set of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations of close encounters of white dwarfs aimed to explore the outcome of the interaction and the nature of the final remnants for different initial conditions. Depending on the initial conditions and the white dwarf masses, three different outcomes are possible. Specifically, the outcome of the interaction can be either a direct or a lateral collision or the interaction can result in the formation of an eccentric binary system. In those cases in which a collision occurs, the infalling material is compressed and heated such that the physical conditions for a detonation may be reached during the most violent phases of the merger. While we find that detonations occur in a significant number of our simulations, in some of them the temperature increase in the shocked region rapidly lifts degeneracy, leading to the quenching of the bu...

  19. Spin, Isospin and Strong Interaction Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The structure of spin and isospin is analyzed. Although both spin and isospin are related to the same SU(2 group, they represent different dynamical effects. The Wigner-Racah algebra is used for providing a description of bound states of several Dirac particles in general and of the proton state in particular. Isospin states of the four ∆ (1232 baryons are discussed. The work explains the small contribution of quarks spin to the overall proton spin (the proton spin crisis. It is also proved that the addition of QCD’s color is not required for a construction of an antisymmetric state for the ∆ ++ (1232 baryon.

  20. Modeling human dynamics of face-to-face interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Starnini, Michele; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2013-01-01

    Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of inter-conversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents which perform a random walk in a two dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks.

  1. Mimicking Neurotransmitter Release in Chemical Synapses via Hysteresis Engineering in MoS2 Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Andrew J; Razavieh, Ali; Nasr, Joseph R; Schulman, Daniel S; Eichfeld, Chad M; Das, Saptarshi

    2017-03-10

    Neurotransmitter release in chemical synapses is fundamental to diverse brain functions such as motor action, learning, cognition, emotion, perception, and consciousness. Moreover, improper functioning or abnormal release of neurotransmitter is associated with numerous neurological disorders such as epilepsy, sclerosis, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. We have utilized hysteresis engineering in a back-gated MoS2 field effect transistor (FET) in order to mimic such neurotransmitter release dynamics in chemical synapses. All three essential features, i.e., quantal, stochastic, and excitatory or inhibitory nature of neurotransmitter release, were accurately captured in our experimental demonstration. We also mimicked an important phenomenon called long-term potentiation (LTP), which forms the basis of human memory. Finally, we demonstrated how to engineer the LTP time by operating the MoS2 FET in different regimes. Our findings could provide a critical component toward the design of next-generation smart and intelligent human-like machines and human-machine interfaces.

  2. Electrochemical techniques for subsecond neurotransmitter detection in live rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hascup, Kevin N; Hascup, Erin R

    2014-08-01

    Alterations in neurotransmission have been implicated in numerous neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Unfortunately, few techniques support the measurement of real-time changes in neurotransmitter levels over multiple days, as is essential for ethologic and pharmacodynamic testing. Microdialysis is commonly used for these research paradigms, but its poor temporal and spatial resolution make this technique inadequate for measuring the rapid dynamics (milliseconds to seconds) of fast signaling neurotransmitters, such as glutamate and acetylcholine. Enzymatic microelectrode arrays (biosensors) coupled with electrochemical recording techniques have demonstrated fast temporal resolution (less than 1 s), excellent spatial resolution (micron-scale), low detection limits (≤200 nM), and minimal damage (50 to 100 μm) to surrounding brain tissue. Here we discuss the benefits, methods, and animal welfare considerations of using platinum microelectrodes on a ceramic substrate for enzyme-based electrochemical recording techniques for real-time in vivo neurotransmitter recordings in both anesthetized and awake, freely moving rodents.

  3. Dynamic multibody protein interactions suggest versatile pathways for copper trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Aaron M; Benítez, Jaime J; Klarin, Derek; Zhong, Linghao; Goldfogel, Matthew; Yang, Feng; Chen, Tai-Yen; Chen, Peng

    2012-05-30

    As part of intracellular copper trafficking pathways, the human copper chaperone Hah1 delivers Cu(+) to the Wilson's Disease Protein (WDP) via weak and dynamic protein-protein interactions. WDP contains six homologous metal binding domains (MBDs) connected by flexible linkers, and these MBDs all can receive Cu(+) from Hah1. The functional roles of the MBD multiplicity in Cu(+) trafficking are not well understood. Building on our previous study of the dynamic interactions between Hah1 and the isolated fourth MBD of WDP, here we study how Hah1 interacts with MBD34, a double-domain WDP construct, using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) combined with vesicle trapping. By alternating the positions of the smFRET donor and acceptor, we systematically probed Hah1-MBD3, Hah1-MBD4, and MBD3-MBD4 interaction dynamics within the multidomain system. We found that the two interconverting interaction geometries were conserved in both intermolecular Hah1-MBD and intramolecular MBD-MBD interactions. The Hah1-MBD interactions within MBD34 are stabilized by an order of magnitude relative to the isolated single-MBDs, and thermodynamic and kinetic evidence suggest that Hah1 can interact with both MBDs simultaneously. The enhanced interaction stability of Hah1 with the multi-MBD system, the dynamic intramolecular MBD-MBD interactions, and the ability of Hah1 to interact with multiple MBDs simultaneously suggest an efficient and versatile mechanism for the Hah1-to-WDP pathway to transport Cu(+).

  4. Five challenges in modelling interacting strain dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikramaratna, Paul S; Kurcharski, Adam; Gupta, Sunetra

    2015-01-01

    Population epidemiological models where hosts can be infected sequentially by different strains have the potential to help us understand many important diseases. Researchers have in recent years started to develop and use such models, but the extra layer of complexity from multiple strains brings...... with it many technical challenges. It is therefore hard to build models which have realistic assumptions yet are tractable. Here we outline some of the main challenges in this area. First we begin with the fundamental question of how to translate from complex small-scale dynamics within a host to useful...... population models. Next we consider the nature of so-called “strain space”. We describe two key types of host heterogeneities, and explain how models could help generate a better understanding of their effects. Finally, for diseases with many strains, we consider the challenge of modelling how immunity...

  5. NEUROTRANSMITTERS AND IMMUNITY: 1. DOPAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hritcu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine is one of the principal neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNC, and its neuronal pathways are involved in several key functions such as behavior (Hefco et al., 2003a,b, control of movement, endocrine regulation, immune response (Fiserova et al., 2002; Levite et al., 2001, Hritcu et al., 2006a,b,c, and cardiovascular function. Dopamine has at least five G-protein, coupled receptor subtypes, D1-D5, each arising from a different gene (Sibley et al., 1993. Traditionally, these receptors have been classified into D1-like (the D1 and D5 and D2-like (D2, D3 and D4 receptors subtypes, primarily according to their ability to stimulate or inhibit adenylate cyclase, respectively, and to their pharmacological characteristics (Seeman et al., 1993. Receptors for dopamine (particularly of D2 subclass are the primary therapeutic target in a number of neuropathological disorders including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s chorea (Seeman et al., 1987. Neither dopamine by itself, nor dopaminergic agonists by themselves, has been shown to activate T cell function. Nevertheless, lymphocytes are most probably exposed to dopamine since the primary and secondary lymphoid organs of various mammals are markedly innervated, and contain nerve fibers which stain for tyrosine hydroxylase (Weihe et al., 1991, the enzyme responsible for dopamine synthesis. Moreover, cathecolamines and their metabolites are present in single lymphocytes and in extracts of T and B cell clones, and pharmacological inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase reduces catecholamine levels, suggesting catecholamine synthesis by lymphocytes (Bergquist et al., 1994. The existence of putative dopamine receptors of D2, D3, D4 and D5 subtypes on immune cells has been proposed of several authors, primarily on the basis of dopaminergic ligand binding assays and specific mRNA expression as monitored by reverse transcription-PCR. Several experiments evoked the idea of a

  6. Virtual Partner Interaction (VPI: exploring novel behaviors via coordination dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J A Scott Kelso

    Full Text Available Inspired by the dynamic clamp of cellular neuroscience, this paper introduces VPI -- Virtual Partner Interaction -- a coupled dynamical system for studying real time interaction between a human and a machine. In this proof of concept study, human subjects coordinate hand movements with a virtual partner, an avatar of a hand whose movements are driven by a computerized version of the Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB equations that have been shown to govern basic forms of human coordination. As a surrogate system for human social coordination, VPI allows one to examine regions of the parameter space not typically explored during live interactions. A number of novel behaviors never previously observed are uncovered and accounted for. Having its basis in an empirically derived theory of human coordination, VPI offers a principled approach to human-machine interaction and opens up new ways to understand how humans interact with human-like machines including identification of underlying neural mechanisms.

  7. Evolutionary dynamics of time-resolved social interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardillo, Alessio; Petri, Giovanni; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Sinatra, Roberta; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Latora, Vito

    2014-11-01

    Cooperation among unrelated individuals is frequently observed in social groups when their members combine efforts and resources to obtain a shared benefit that is unachievable by an individual alone. However, understanding why cooperation arises despite the natural tendency of individuals toward selfish behavior is still an open problem and represents one of the most fascinating challenges in evolutionary dynamics. Recently, the structural characterization of the networks in which social interactions take place has shed some light on the mechanisms by which cooperative behavior emerges and eventually overcomes the natural temptation to defect. In particular, it has been found that the heterogeneity in the number of social ties and the presence of tightly knit communities lead to a significant increase in cooperation as compared with the unstructured and homogeneous connection patterns considered in classical evolutionary dynamics. Here, we investigate the role of social-ties dynamics for the emergence of cooperation in a family of social dilemmas. Social interactions are in fact intrinsically dynamic, fluctuating, and intermittent over time, and they can be represented by time-varying networks. By considering two experimental data sets of human interactions with detailed time information, we show that the temporal dynamics of social ties has a dramatic impact on the evolution of cooperation: the dynamics of pairwise interactions favors selfish behavior.

  8. Interaction Dynamics of Singular Wave Fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, Darryl D

    2013-01-01

    Some of the most impressive singular wave fronts seen in Nature are the transbasin oceanic internal waves, which may be observed from the Space Shuttle as they propagate and interact with each other, for example, in the South China Sea. The characteristic feature of these strongly nonlinear wavefronts is that they reconnect when two of them collide transversely. We derive the EPDiff equation, and use it to model this phenomenon as elastic collisions between singular wave fronts (solitons) whose momentum is distributed along curves moving in the plane. Numerical methods for EPDiff based on compatible differencing algorithms (CDAs) are used for simulating these collisions among curves. The numerical results show the same nonlinear behavior of wavefront reconnections as that observed for internal waves in the South China Sea. We generalize the singular solutions of EPDiff for other applications, in computational anatomy and in imaging science, where the singular wavefronts are evolving image outlines, whose mome...

  9. Effect of Coulomb interaction on multi-electronwave packet dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiokawa, T. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8571 (Japan); Takada, Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Chiyoda, Tokyo, 102-0073, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Konabe, S.; Hatsugai, Y. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8571, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Muraguchi, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Endoh, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579, Japan and Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Shiraishi, K. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8571, Japan and Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8577, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan)

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the effect of Coulomb interaction on electron transport in a one-dimensional nanoscale structure using a multi-electron wave packet approach. To study the time evolution, we numerically solve the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation, finding that the electron wave packet dynamics strongly depends on the Coulomb interaction strength. When the Coulomb interaction is large, each electron wave packet moves separately in the presence of an electric field. With weak Coulomb interaction, however, the electron wave packets overlap, forming and moving as one collective wave packet.

  10. Interaction of collagen with carbon nanotube: a molecular dynamics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, R; Subramanian, V

    2011-02-01

    In variety of biological applications carbon nano materials interact with different biological macromolecules, such as proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. In this study carbon nanotube (CNT) has been used as the model for carbon nanomaterials. Since, collagen is a large protein; model collagen like peptide (CPs) has been used to understand the interaction between CNT and collagen. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that the hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction of the CNT-CPs play a crucial role in attracting the CPs towards the CNT. No structural aberrations occured in collagen upon interaction with CNT and hence CNT can be employed in the tissue engineering applications.

  11. Zn2+ modulation of neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, K.; Gether, U.

    2006-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters located at the presynaptic or glial cell membrane are responsible for the stringent and rapid clearance of the transmitter from the synapse, and hence they terminate signaling and control the duration of synaptic inputs in the brain. Two distinct families of neurotra......Neurotransmitter transporters located at the presynaptic or glial cell membrane are responsible for the stringent and rapid clearance of the transmitter from the synapse, and hence they terminate signaling and control the duration of synaptic inputs in the brain. Two distinct families...... of neurotransmitter transporters have been identified based on sequence homology: (1) the neurotransmitter sodium symporter family (NSS), which includes the Na+/C1(-)-dependent transporters for dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin; and (2) the dicarboxylate/amino acid cation symporter family (DAACS), which...... indirectly suggested the possibility that several of the transporters are modulated by Zn2+ in vivo, and thus that Zn2+ can play a role as a neuromodulator by affecting the function of neurotransmitter transporters....

  12. Transcriptional coordination of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratsios, Paschalis; Pinan-Lucarré, Bérangère; Kerk, Sze Yen; Weinreb, Alexis; Bessereau, Jean-Louis; Hobert, Oliver

    2015-05-18

    During nervous system development, postmitotic neurons face the challenge of generating and structurally organizing specific synapses with appropriate synaptic partners. An important unexplored question is whether the process of synaptogenesis is coordinated with the adoption of specific signaling properties of a neuron. Such signaling properties are defined by the neurotransmitter system that a neuron uses to communicate with postsynaptic partners, the neurotransmitter receptor type used to receive input from presynaptic neurons, and, potentially, other sensory receptors that activate a neuron. Elucidating the mechanisms that coordinate synaptogenesis, neuronal activation, and neurotransmitter signaling in a postmitotic neuron represents one key approach to understanding how neurons develop as functional units. Using the SAB class of Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons as a model system, we show here that the phylogenetically conserved COE-type transcription factor UNC-3 is required for synaptogenesis. UNC-3 directly controls the expression of the ADAMTS-like protein MADD-4/Punctin, a presynaptically secreted synapse-organizing molecule that clusters postsynaptic receptors. UNC-3 also controls the assembly of presynaptic specializations and ensures the coordinated expression of enzymes and transporters that define the cholinergic neurotransmitter identity of the SAB neurons. Furthermore, synaptic output properties of the SAB neurons are coordinated with neuronal activation and synaptic input, as evidenced by UNC-3 also regulating the expression of ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors and putative stretch receptors. Our study shows how synaptogenesis and distinct, function-defining signaling features of a postmitotic neuron are hardwired together through coordinated transcriptional control.

  13. Dynamic Analysis of Wind Turbines Including Soil-Structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, M.; Basu, B.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the along-wind forced vibration response of an onshore wind turbine. The study includes the dynamic interaction effects between the foundation and the underlying soil, as softer soils can influence the dynamic response of wind turbines. A Multi-Degree-of-Freedom (MDOF...... rotational speed (3P effects). The effect of dynamic soil-structure interaction on the rotation of the foundation has also been investigated.......) horizontal axes onshore wind turbine model is developed for dynamic analysis using an Euler–Lagrangian approach. The model is comprised of a rotor blade system, a nacelle and a flexible tower connected to a foundation system using a substructuring approach. The rotor blade system consists of three rotating...

  14. Growth cone neurotransmitter receptor activation modulates electric field-guided nerve growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, L; McCaig, C D

    1995-10-01

    We have studied the interactions between two nerve guidance cues, which alone induce substantial growth cone turning: endogenous neurotransmitters and small dc electric fields. d-tubocurarine, a nicotinic AChR (acetylcholine receptor) antagonist, inhibited field-induced cathodal orientation of cultured neurites, whereas atropine, a muscarinic AChR blocker, and suramin, a P2-purinoceptor antagonist, markedly enhanced the guidance properties of the applied field. These experiments implicate the activation of growth cone nicotinic AChRs by self-released acetylcholine in the mechanism underpinning electric field-induced neurite orientation and raise the possibility that growth cones release neurotransmitter prior to target interaction in order to assist their own pathfinding. Additionally, they provide the first evidence that coactivation of several neurotransmitter receptors may interact to regulate directed nerve growth. Such interaction in vivo, where guidance signals coexist, would add further levels of control to neurite guidance.

  15. Interaction Dynamics in AEC Global Teamwork

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renate Fruchter; Shubashri Swaminathan; Naohiro Matsumura; Yukio Ohsawa

    2008-01-01

    Architecture,engineering,and construction (AEC) global project teamwork is communication in-tensive and relies heavily on synchronous and asynchronous information and collaboration technologies (ICT).We explore in this paper how an asynchronous ICT,called ThinkTank,reshaped the work practice of design-construction global teams.and how the interaction with this ICT reshaped the purpose and benefits of its use.ThinkTank is a web-based asynchronous collaboration and discussion forum.We introduce the influence diffusion model (IDM) that formalizes the process of identifying the influence of people,messages,and terms mathematically.Discovering who the influence leaders in project teams are can be beneficial and critical from a corporate management perspective.since they can guide or motivate the team towards suc-cessful actions and outcomes.We present the ThinkTank-IDM integrated system and its validation with a testbed of 53 AEC global team project archived in ThinkTank over 8 years.

  16. Social Dynamics in Web Page through Inter-Agent Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yugo; Katagiri, Yasuhiro

    Social persuasion abounds in human-human interactions. Attitudes and behaviors of people are invariably influenced by the attitudes and behaviors of other people as well as our social roles/relationships toward them. In the pedagogic scene, the relationship between teacher and learner produces one of the most typical interactions, in which the teacher makes the learner spontaneously study what he/she teaches. This study is an attempt to elucidate the nature and effectiveness of social persuasion in human-computer interaction environments. We focus on the social dynamics of multi-party interactions that involve both human-agent and inter-agent interactions. An experiment is conducted in a virtual web-instruction setting employing two types of agents: conductor agents who accompany and guide each learner throughout his/her learning sessions, and domain-expert agents who provide explanations and instructions for each stage of the instructional materials. In this experiment, subjects are assigned two experimental conditions: the authorized condition, in which an agent respectfully interacts with another agent, and the non-authorized condition, in which an agent carelessly interacts with another agent. The results indicate performance improvements in the authorized condition of inter-agent interactions. An analysis is given from the perspective of the transfer of authority from inter-agent to human-agent interactions based on social conformity. We argue for pedagogic advantages of social dynamics created by multiple animated character agents.

  17. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Hirschfeld

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design: In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion: Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown.

  18. Identifying the interactions in a colored dynamical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴召艳; 弓晓利

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of a colored dynamical network play a great role in its dynamical behaviour and are denoted by outer and inner coupling matrices. In this paper, the outer and inner coupling matrices are assumed to be unknown and need to be identified. A corresponding network estimator is designed for identifying the unknown interactions by adopting proper adaptive laws. Based on the Lyapunov function method and Barbalat’s lemma, the obtained result is analytically proved. A colored network coupled with chaotic Lorenz, Chen, and L ¨u systems is considered as a numerical example to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. DynTG: A tool for Interactive, Dynamic Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, M; May, J; Gyllenhaal, J

    2005-02-16

    With the increasing complexity of today's systems, detailed performance analysis is more important than ever. We have developed DynTG, a tool for interactive, dynamic instrumentation. It uses performance module plugins to reconfigure the data acquisition and provides a source browser that allows users to insert any probe functionality provided by the modules dynamically into the target application. Any instrumentation can be added both before and during the application's execution and the acquired data is presented in realtime within the source viewer. This enables users to monitor their applications' progress and interactively control and adapt the instrumentation based on their observations.

  20. Bubble interaction dynamics in Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskii, Yurii A; Hamilton, Mark F; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A

    2007-02-01

    Two models of interacting bubble dynamics are presented, a coupled system of second-order differential equations based on Lagrangian mechanics, and a first-order system based on Hamiltonian mechanics. Both account for pulsation and translation of an arbitrary number of spherical bubbles. For large numbers of interacting bubbles, numerical solution of the Hamiltonian equations provides greater stability. The presence of external acoustic sources is taken into account explicitly in the derivation of both sets of equations. In addition to the acoustic pressure and its gradient, it is found that the particle velocity associated with external sources appears in the dynamical equations.

  1. Multiple dynamical regimes in colloidal polymer suspension with competing interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sunita; Kishore, Suhasini; Narayanan, Suresh; Bhatia, Surita

    2014-03-01

    We present combined x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and rheometry study of dynamical transitions in colloidal polymer suspension with short range attraction and long range repulsion. Our system is based on aqueous dispersions of laponite®nanoplatelets where the range and magnitude of competing short range depletion attraction and long range repulsion interparticle interaction, were tuned by varying the concentration and molecular weight of the adsorbing poly(ethylene oxide) chains. We observed three distinct dynamical regime: a state of slow dynamics consisting of finite clusters for which interparticle interactions are predominantly repulsive, second dynamical regime, at above saturation concentration of added polymer in which small clusters of nanoparticles are held by short range depleting attraction and third regime of percolating network in which nanoclusters diffuse freely in a network with characteristic length larger than the size of the cluster. Through our experiments we demonstrate experimental parameters to control the macroscopic mechanical and dynamical properties in colloidal suspension by manipulating the interparticle interactions at nanoscale.

  2. Interaction dynamics of multiple mobile robots with simple navigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P. K. C.

    1989-01-01

    The global dynamic behavior of multiple interacting autonomous mobile robots with simple navigation strategies is studied. Here, the effective spatial domain of each robot is taken to be a closed ball about its mass center. It is assumed that each robot has a specified cone of visibility such that interaction with other robots takes place only when they enter its visibility cone. Based on a particle model for the robots, various simple homing and collision-avoidance navigation strategies are derived. Then, an analysis of the dynamical behavior of the interacting robots in unbounded spatial domains is made. The article concludes with the results of computer simulations studies of two or more interacting robots.

  3. A Contribution to Documenting and Validating Dynamic Interaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    On structures carrying humans (e.g. floors, grandstands in stadia etc.) there may be two different types of crowds present: Active and passive crowds of people. The active crowd, comprising people in motion, may generate dynamic loads causing the structure to vibrate. The passive (stationary) crowd....... Controlled laboratory tests, employing a vibrating test floor carrying stationary crowds of people, are designed and carried out to investigate the dynamic interaction. The paper describes the tests and the modal identification procedures employed for the assessment of model validity. Besides from aspects...... and a floor in vertical motion. The mechanism of crowd-structure interaction is not well understood and the primary aim of the paper is to present results of experimental investigations documenting effects of crowd-structure interaction and to exploring the validity of a crowd-structure interaction model...

  4. Galaxy Zoo: Mergers - Dynamical Models of Interacting Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Holincheck, Anthony J; Borne, Kirk; Fortson, Lucy; Lintott, Chris; Smith, Arfon M; Bamford, Steven; Keel, William C; Parrish, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical history of most merging galaxies is not well understood. Correlations between galaxy interaction and star formation have been found in previous studies, but require the context of the physical history of merging systems for full insight into the processes that lead to enhanced star formation. We present the results of simulations that reconstruct the orbit trajectories and disturbed morphologies of pairs of interacting galaxies. With the use of a restricted three-body simulation code and the help of Citizen Scientists, we sample 10^5 points in parameter space for each system. We demonstrate a successful recreation of the morphologies of 62 pairs of interacting galaxies through the review of more than 3 million simulations. We examine the level of convergence and uniqueness of the dynamical properties of each system. These simulations represent the largest collection of models of interacting galaxies to date, providing a valuable resource for the investigation of mergers. This paper presents the ...

  5. Dynamical Transport Property through an Interacting Quantum Wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Fang; ZHOU Guang-Hui

    2005-01-01

    @@ Using the equation of motion, we investigate theoretically the dynamical ac conductance of a clean Luttingerliquid quantum wire adiabatically coupled to Fermi liquid electron reservoirs in the presence of short-ranged electron-electron interactions. For a perfect single mode quantum wire, in the limit of zero-ranged interaction we conclude that the static dc conductance of ω→ 0 is e2/h, which is independent of the electron interactions. While in the dynamical case of ω≠ 0, the ac conductance oscillates with the amplitude e2/h and the period which depends on the interaction strength and the driving frequency as well as the position in the wire.

  6. Interactive dynamics of imagination in a science classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Hilppö, Jaakko Antero; Rajala, Antti; Zittoun, Tania; Kumpulainen, Kristiina; Lipponen, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a conceptual framework for researching the dynamics of imagination in science classroom interactions. While educational interest in imagination has recently increased, prior research has not adequately accounted for how imagination is realized in and through classroom interactions, nor has it created a framework for its empirical investigation. Drawing on a theory of imagination situated in cultural psychology (Zittoun et al., 2013; Zittoun & Gillespie, 2016), we p...

  7. On the possible observational signatures of white dwarf dynamical interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Aznar-Siguán, G.; García-Berro, E.; Magnien, M.; Lorén-Aguilar, P.

    2014-01-01

    We compute the possible observational signatures of white dwarf dynamical interactions in dense stellar environments. Specifically, we compute the emission of gravitational waves, and we compare it with the sensitivity curves of planned space-borne gravitational wave detectors. We also compute the light curves for those interactions in which a detonation occurs, and one of the stars is destroyed, as well as the corresponding neutrino luminosities. We find that for the three possible outcomes ...

  8. Overlay Share Mesh for Interactive Group Communication with High Dynamic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yan-hua; CAI Yun-ze; XU Xiao-ming

    2007-01-01

    An overlay share mesh infrastructure is presented for high dynamic group communication systems, such as distributed interactive simulation (DIS) and distributed virtual environments (DVE). Overlay share mesh infrastructure can own better adapting ability for high dynamic group than tradition multi-tree multicast infrastructure by sharing links among different groups. The mechanism of overlay share mesh based on area of interest (AOI) was discussed in detail in this paper. A large number of simulation experiments were done and the permance of mesh infrastructure was studied. Experiments results proved that overlay mesh infrastructure owns better adaptability than traditional multi-tree infrastructure for high dynamic group communication systems.

  9. Entanglement Growth in Quench Dynamics with Variable Range Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schachenmayer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Studying entanglement growth in quantum dynamics provides both insight into the underlying microscopic processes and information about the complexity of the quantum states, which is related to the efficiency of simulations on classical computers. Recently, experiments with trapped ions, polar molecules, and Rydberg excitations have provided new opportunities to observe dynamics with long-range interactions. We explore nonequilibrium coherent dynamics after a quantum quench in such systems, identifying qualitatively different behavior as the exponent of algebraically decaying spin-spin interactions in a transverse Ising chain is varied. Computing the buildup of bipartite entanglement as well as mutual information between distant spins, we identify linear growth of entanglement entropy corresponding to propagation of quasiparticles for shorter-range interactions, with the maximum rate of growth occurring when the Hamiltonian parameters match those for the quantum phase transition. Counterintuitively, the growth of bipartite entanglement for long-range interactions is only logarithmic for most regimes, i.e., substantially slower than for shorter-range interactions. Experiments with trapped ions allow for the realization of this system with a tunable interaction range, and we show that the different phenomena are robust for finite system sizes and in the presence of noise. These results can act as a direct guide for the generation of large-scale entanglement in such experiments, towards a regime where the entanglement growth can render existing classical simulations inefficient.

  10. Interaction Network, State Space and Control in Social Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Aydogdu, Aylin; McQuade, Sean; Piccoli, Benedetto; Duteil, Nastassia Pouradier; Rossi, Francesco; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    In the present chapter we study the emergence of global patterns in large groups in first and second-order multi-agent systems, focusing on two ingredients that influence the dynamics: the interaction network and the state space. The state space determines the types of equilibrium that can be reached by the system. Meanwhile, convergence to specific equilibria depends on the connectivity of the interaction network and on the interaction potential. When the system does not satisfy the necessary conditions for convergence to the desired equilibrium, control can be exerted, both on finite-dimensional systems and on their mean-field limit.

  11. Device and method for measuring the dynamic interaction between bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Petrus H.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a device for measuring the dynamic interaction, in particular power transfer and work performed, between a first and a second body, in particular during relatively random movements. The device comprises a housing in which at least one kinematic sensor and at least one

  12. Nonequilibrium dynamics in an interacting Fe-C nanoparticle system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, P.; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Nordblad, P.

    2000-01-01

    Nonequilibrium dynamics in an interacting Fe-C nanoparticle sample, exhibiting a low-temperature spin-glass-like phase, has been studied by low-frequency ac susceptibility and magnetic relaxation experiments. The nonequilibrium behavior shows characteristic spin-glass features, but some qualitative...

  13. Understanding positivity within dynamic team interactions: A statistical discourse analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Chiu, M.M.; Lei, Z.; Kauffeld, S.

    2016-01-01

    Positivity has been heralded for its individual benefits. However, how positivity dynamically unfolds within the temporal flow of team interactions remains unclear. This is an important oversight, as positivity can be key to team problem-solving and performance. In this study, we examine how team mi

  14. Understanding positivity within dynamic team interactions: A statistical discourse analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Chiu, M.M.; Lei, Z.; Kauffeld, S.

    2017-01-01

    Positivity has been heralded for its individual benefits. However, how positivity dynamically unfolds within the temporal flow of team interactions remains unclear. This is an important oversight, as positivity can be key to team problem-solving and performance. In this study, we examine how team mi

  15. The dynamics of hydrophobic interaction : A microwave dielectric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallenga, Klaas

    1972-01-01

    To investigate the relation between the structure of liquid water and hydrophobic interaction the dielectric relaxation of water in dilute aqueous solutions has been studied. After an introduction of the problem in which the dynamic aspects of water structure are emphasized, a theoretical analysis o

  16. Dynamic modularity in protein interaction networks predicts breast cancer outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Ian W; Linding, Rune; Warde-Farley, David

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the biochemical wiring of oncogenic cells drives phenotypic transformations that directly affect disease outcome. Here we examine the dynamic structure of the human protein interaction network (interactome) to determine whether changes in the organization of the interactome can be used...

  17. Pacemaker interactions induce reentrant wave dynamics in engineered cardiac culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Bartłomiej; Shajahan, T. K.; Gabriels, James; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Pacemaker interactions can lead to complex wave dynamics seen in certain types of cardiac arrhythmias. We use experimental and mathematical models of pacemakers in heterogeneous excitable media to investigate how pacemaker interactions can be a mechanism for wave break and reentrant wave dynamics. Embryonic chick ventricular cells are cultured invitro so as to create a dominant central pacemaker site that entrains other pacemakers in the medium. Exposure of those cultures to a potassium channel blocker, E-4031, leads to emergence of peripheral pacemakers that compete with each other and with the central pacemaker. Waves emitted by faster pacemakers break up over the slower pacemaker to form reentrant waves. Similar dynamics are observed in a modified FitzHugh-Nagumo model of heterogeneous excitable media with two distinct sites of pacemaking. These findings elucidate a mechanism of pacemaker-induced reentry in excitable media.

  18. Dynamical equilibration in strongly-interacting parton-hadron matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorenstein M.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in 'infinite' parton-hadron matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics transport approach, which is based on a dynamical quasiparticle model for partons matched to reproduce lattice-QCD results – including the partonic equation of state – in thermodynamic equilibrium. The 'infinite' matter is simulated within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions initialized at different baryon density (or chemical potential and energy density. The transition from initially pure partonic matter to hadronic degrees of freedom (or vice versa occurs dynamically by interactions. Different thermody-namical distributions of the strongly-interacting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP are addressed and discussed.

  19. Steered molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Yechun; SHEN; Jianhua; LUO; Xiaomin; SHEN; Xu; CHEN; Ka

    2004-01-01

    Studies of protein-ligand interactions are helpful to elucidating the mechanisms of ligands, providing clues for rational drug design. The currently developed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) is a complementary approach to experimental techniques in investigating the biochemical processes occurring at microsecond or second time scale, thus SMD may provide dynamical and kinetic processes of ligand-receptor binding and unbinding, which cannot be accessed by the experimental methods. In this article, the methodology of SMD is described, and the applications of SMD simulations for obtaining dynamic insights into protein-ligand interactions are illustrated through two of our own examples. One is associated with the simulations of binding and unbinding processes between huperzine A and acetylcholinesterase, and the other is concerned with the unbinding process of α-APA from HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  20. Strategy selection in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shaolin; Feng, Shasha; Wang, Pei; Chen, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Evolutionary game theory provides an appropriate tool for investigating the competition and diffusion of behavioral traits in biological or social populations. A core challenge in evolutionary game theory is the strategy selection problem: Given two strategies, which one is favored by the population? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends not only on the payoff functions of strategies but also on the interaction structure of the population. Group interactions are one of the fundamental interactive modes within populations. This work aims to investigate the strategy selection problem in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks. In detail, the strategy selection conditions are obtained for some typical networks with group interactions. Furthermore, the obtained conditions are applied to investigate selection between cooperation and defection in populations. The conditions for evolution of cooperation are derived for both the public goods game and volunteer's dilemma game. Numerical experiments validate the above analytical results.

  1. Detection and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Dialysates

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Denoroy, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Sensitive analytical methods are needed for the separation and quantification of neurotransmitters obtained in microdialysate studies. This unit describes methods that permit quantification of nanomolar concentrations of monoamines and their metabolites (high-pressure liquid chromatography electrochemical detection), acetylcholine (HPLC-coupled to an enzyme reactor), and amino acids (HPLC-fluorescence detection; capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection).

  2. Simulating market dynamics: interactions between consumer psychology and social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Marco A; Jager, Wander

    2003-01-01

    Markets can show different types of dynamics, from quiet markets dominated by one or a few products, to markets with continual penetration of new and reintroduced products. In a previous article we explored the dynamics of markets from a psychological perspective using a multi-agent simulation model. The main results indicated that the behavioral rules dominating the artificial consumer's decision making determine the resulting market dynamics, such as fashions, lock-in, and unstable renewal. Results also show the importance of psychological variables like social networks, preferences, and the need for identity to explain the dynamics of markets. In this article we extend this work in two directions. First, we will focus on a more systematic investigation of the effects of different network structures. The previous article was based on Watts and Strogatz's approach, which describes the small-world and clustering characteristics in networks. More recent research demonstrated that many large networks display a scale-free power-law distribution for node connectivity. In terms of market dynamics this may imply that a small proportion of consumers may have an exceptional influence on the consumptive behavior of others (hubs, or early adapters). We show that market dynamics is a self-organized property depending on the interaction between the agents' decision-making process (heuristics), the product characteristics (degree of satisfaction of unit of consumption, visibility), and the structure of interactions between agents (size of network and hubs in a social network).

  3. Rethinking the logistic approach for population dynamics of mutualistic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Algarra, Javier; Galeano, Javier; Pastor, Juan Manuel; Iriondo, José María; Ramasco, José J

    2014-12-21

    Mutualistic communities have an internal structure that makes them resilient to external perturbations. Late research has focused on their stability and the topology of the relations between the different organisms to explain the reasons of the system robustness. Much less attention has been invested in analyzing the systems dynamics. The main population models in use are modifications of the r-K formulation of logistic equation with additional terms to account for the benefits produced by the interspecific interactions. These models have shortcomings as the so-called r-K formulation diverges under some conditions. In this work, we introduce a model for population dynamics under mutualism that preserves the original logistic formulation. It is mathematically simpler than the widely used type II models, although it shows similar complexity in terms of fixed points and stability of the dynamics. We perform an analytical stability analysis and numerical simulations to study the model behavior in general interaction scenarios including tests of the resilience of its dynamics under external perturbations. Despite its simplicity, our results indicate that the model dynamics shows an important richness that can be used to gain further insights in the dynamics of mutualistic communities.

  4. Dynamic stiffness matrix of partial-interaction composite beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjian Bao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Composite beams have a wide application in building and bridge engineering because of their advantages of mechanical properties, constructability and economic performance. Unlike static characteristics, the methods of studying the dynamic characteristics of partial-interaction composite beams were limited, especially dynamic stiffness matrix method. In this article, the dynamic stiffness matrix of partial-interaction composite beams was derived based on the assumption of the Euler–Bernoulli beam theory, and then it was used to predict the frequencies of the free vibration of the single-span composite beams with various boundary conditions or different axial forces. The corresponding vibration modes and buckling loads were also obtained. From the comparison with the existing results, the numerical results obtained by the proposed method agreed reasonably with those in the literatures. The dynamic stiffness matrix method is an accurate method which can determine natural vibration frequencies and vibration mode shapes in any precision theoretically. As a result, when the higher precision or natural frequencies of higher order are required, the dynamic stiffness matrix method is superior when compared to other approximate and numerical methods. The dynamic stiffness matrix method can also be combined with the finite-element method to calculate the free vibration frequencies and natural mode shapes of composite beams in complex conditions.

  5. Major component analysis of dynamic networks of physiologic organ interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-09-01

    The human organism is a complex network of interconnected organ systems, where the behavior of one system affects the dynamics of other systems. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse physiologic systems under varied conditions is a challenge due to the complexity in the output dynamics of the individual systems and the transient and nonlinear characteristics of their coupling. We introduce a novel computational method based on the concept of time delay stability and major component analysis to investigate how organ systems interact as a network to coordinate their functions. We analyze a large database of continuously recorded multi-channel physiologic signals from healthy young subjects during night-time sleep. We identify a network of dynamic interactions between key physiologic systems in the human organism. Further, we find that each physiologic state is characterized by a distinct network structure with different relative contribution from individual organ systems to the global network dynamics. Specifically, we observe a gradual decrease in the strength of coupling of heart and respiration to the rest of the network with transition from wake to deep sleep, and in contrast, an increased relative contribution to network dynamics from chin and leg muscle tone and eye movement, demonstrating a robust association between network topology and physiologic function.

  6. Galaxy Zoo: Mergers - Dynamical models of interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holincheck, Anthony J.; Wallin, John F.; Borne, Kirk; Fortson, Lucy; Lintott, Chris; Smith, Arfon M.; Bamford, Steven; Keel, William C.; Parrish, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The dynamical history of most merging galaxies is not well understood. Correlations between galaxy interaction and star formation have been found in previous studies, but require the context of the physical history of merging systems for full insight into the processes that lead to enhanced star formation. We present the results of simulations that reconstruct the orbit trajectories and disturbed morphologies of pairs of interacting galaxies. With the use of a restricted three-body simulation code and the help of citizen scientists, we sample 105 points in parameter space for each system. We demonstrate a successful recreation of the morphologies of 62 pairs of interacting galaxies through the review of more than 3 million simulations. We examine the level of convergence and uniqueness of the dynamical properties of each system. These simulations represent the largest collection of models of interacting galaxies to date, providing a valuable resource for the investigation of mergers. This paper presents the simulation parameters generated by the project. They are now publicly available in electronic format at http://data.galaxyzoo.org/mergers.html. Though our best-fitting model parameters are not an exact match to previously published models, our method for determining uncertainty measurements will aid future comparisons between models. The dynamical clocks from our models agree with previous results of the time since the onset of star formation from starburst models in interacting systems and suggest that tidally induced star formation is triggered very soon after closest approach.

  7. Ab initio dynamical exchange interactions in frustrated antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Jacopo; Stamenova, Maria; Sanvito, Stefano

    2017-08-01

    The ultrafast response to an optical pulse excitation of the spin-spin exchange interaction in transition metal antiferromagnets is studied within the framework of the time-dependent spin-density functional theory. We propose a formulation for the full dynamical exchange interaction, which is nonlocal in space, and it is derived starting from ab initio arguments. Then, we investigate the effect of the laser pulse on the onset of the dynamical process. It is found that we can distinguish two types of excitations, both activated immediately after the action of the laser pulse. While the first one can be associated to a Stoner-like excitation and involves the transfer of spin from one site to another, the second one is related to the ultrafast modification of a Heisenberg-like exchange interaction and can trigger the formation of spin waves in the first few hundred femtoseconds of the time evolution.

  8. Nonlinear dynamic susceptibilities of interacting and noninteracting magnetic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Joensson, P; García-Palacios, J L; Svedlindh, P

    2000-01-01

    The linear and cubic dynamic susceptibilities of solid dispersions of nanosized maghemite gamma-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 particles have been measured for three samples with a volume concentration of magnetic particles ranging from 0.3% to 17%, in order to study the effect of dipole-dipole interactions. Significant differences between the dynamic response of the samples are observed. While the linear and cubic dynamic susceptibilities of the most dilute sample compare reasonably well with the corresponding expressions proposed by Raikher and Stepanov for noninteracting particles, the nonlinear dynamic response of the most concentrated sample exhibits at low temperatures similar features as observed in a Ag(11 at% Mn) spin glass.

  9. Dynamic tube/support interaction in heat exchanger tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    The supports for heat exchanger tubes are usually plates with drilled holes; other types of supports also have been used. To facilitate manufacture and to allow for thermal expansion of the tubes, small clearances are used between tubes and tube supports. The dynamics of tube/support interaction in heat exchangers is fairly complicated. Understanding tube dynamics and its effects is important for heat exchangers. This paper summarizes the current state of the art on this subject and to identify future research needs. Specifically, the following topics are discussed: dynamics of loosely supported tubes, tube/support gap dynamics, tube response in flow, tube damage and wear, design considerations, and future research needs. 55 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Dynamic density functional theory with hydrodynamic interactions and fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donev, Aleksandar, E-mail: donev@courant.nyu.edu; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric, E-mail: eve2@courant.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    We derive a closed equation for the empirical concentration of colloidal particles in the presence of both hydrodynamic and direct interactions. The ensemble average of our functional Langevin equation reproduces known deterministic Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT) [M. Rex and H. Löwen, “Dynamical density functional theory with hydrodynamic interactions and colloids in unstable traps,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 101(14), 148302 (2008)], and, at the same time, it also describes the microscopic fluctuations around the mean behavior. We suggest separating the ideal (non-interacting) contribution from additional corrections due to pairwise interactions. We find that, for an incompressible fluid and in the absence of direct interactions, the mean concentration follows Fick's law just as for uncorrelated walkers. At the same time, the nature of the stochastic terms in fluctuating DDFT is shown to be distinctly different for hydrodynamically-correlated and uncorrelated walkers. This leads to striking differences in the behavior of the fluctuations around Fick's law, even in the absence of pairwise interactions. We connect our own prior work [A. Donev, T. G. Fai, and E. Vanden-Eijnden, “A reversible mesoscopic model of diffusion in liquids: from giant fluctuations to Fick's law,” J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2014) P04004] on fluctuating hydrodynamics of diffusion in liquids to the DDFT literature, and demonstrate that the fluid cannot easily be eliminated from consideration if one wants to describe the collective diffusion in colloidal suspensions.

  11. Thin film microelectrodes for electrochemical detection of neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Tylsgaard

    An important signaling process in the nervous system is the release of chemical messengers called neurotransmitters from neurons. In this thesis alternative thin film electrode materials for applications targeting electrochemical detection of neurotransmitters in chip devices were evaluated...

  12. Altered neurotransmitter metabolism in adolescents with high-functioning autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, G.S.; Barendse, E.M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Veenendaal, T. van; Puts, N.A.J.; Edden, R.A.E.; Zinger, S.; Thoonen, G.H.J.; Hendriks, M.P.H.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Jansen, J.F.A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that alterations in excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmitters might play a crucial role in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) can provide valuable information about abnormal brain metabolism and neurotransmitter concentration

  13. Dynamical density functional theory with hydrodynamic interactions in confined geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, B. D.; Nold, A.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-12-01

    We study the dynamics of colloidal fluids in both unconfined geometries and when confined by a hard wall. Under minimal assumptions, we derive a dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) which includes hydrodynamic interactions (HI; bath-mediated forces). By using an efficient numerical scheme based on pseudospectral methods for integro-differential equations, we demonstrate its excellent agreement with the full underlying Langevin equations for systems of hard disks in partial confinement. We further use the derived DDFT formalism to elucidate the crucial effects of HI in confined systems.

  14. Relative species abundance of replicator dynamics with sparse interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Obuchi, Tomoyuki; Tokita, Kei

    2016-01-01

    A theory of relative species abundance on sparsely-connected networks is presented by investigating the replicator dynamics with symmetric interactions. Sparseness of a network involves difficulty in analyzing the fixed points of the equation, and we avoid this problem by treating large self interaction $u$, which allows us to construct a perturbative expansion. Based on this perturbation, we find that the nature of the interactions is directly connected to the abundance distribution, and some characteristic behaviors, such as multiple peaks in the abundance distribution and all species coexistence at moderate values of $u$, are discovered in a wide class of the distribution of the interactions. The all species coexistence collapses at a critical value of $u$, $u_c$, and this collapsing is regarded as a phase transition. To get more quantitative information, we also construct a non-perturbative theory on random graphs based on techniques of statistical mechanics. The result shows those characteristic behavior...

  15. Brownian dynamics simulations with hard-body interactions: Spherical particles

    CERN Document Server

    Behringer, Hans; 10.1063/1.4761827

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to account for hard-body interactions in (overdamped) Brownian dynamics simulations is proposed for systems with non-vanishing force fields. The scheme exploits the analytically known transition probability for a Brownian particle on a one-dimensional half-line. The motion of a Brownian particle is decomposed into a component that is affected by hard-body interactions and into components that are unaffected. The hard-body interactions are incorporated by replacing the affected component of motion by the evolution on a half-line. It is discussed under which circumstances this approach is justified. In particular, the algorithm is developed and formulated for systems with space-fixed obstacles and for systems comprising spherical particles. The validity and justification of the algorithm is investigated numerically by looking at exemplary model systems of soft matter, namely at colloids in flow fields and at protein interactions. Furthermore, a thorough discussion of properties of other heurist...

  16. Introduction to weak interaction theories with dynamical symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, K.D.; Peskin, M.E.

    1980-07-01

    A straightforward introduction to theories of the weak interactions with dynamical symmetry breaking-theories of technicolor or hypercolor is presented. The intent is to inform experimentalists, but also to goad theorists. The motivation for considering theories of this type is described. The structure that such a theory must possess, including new gauge interactions at mass scales of 1-100 TeV is then outlined. Despite their reliance on phenomena at such enormous energies, these theories contain new phenomena observable at currently accessible energies. Three such effects which are especially likely to be observed are described.

  17. Dynamics Models of Interacting Torques of Hydrodynamic Retarder Braking Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhao Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic retarder is a kind of assist braking device, which can transfer the vehicle kinetic energy into the heat energy of working medium. There are complicated three-dimensional viscous incompressible turbulent flows in hydrodynamic retarder, so that it is difficult to represent the parameters changing phenomenon and investigate the interactional law. In order to develop a kind of reliable theoretical model for internal flow field, in this study, the dynamics models of interacting torques between impellers and working fluid were constructed based on braking energy transfer principle by using Euler theory to describe the flow state in view of time scale. The model can truly represent the dynamic braking process.

  18. A Numerical Study on Hydrodynamic Interactions between Dynamic Positioning Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Doo Hwa; Lee, Sang Wook [University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we conducted computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the unsteady hydrodynamic interaction of multiple thrusters by solving Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A commercial CFD software, STAR-CCM+ was used for all simulations by employing a ducted thruster model with combination of a propeller and No. 19a duct. A sliding mesh technique was used to treat dynamic motion of propeller rotation and non-conformal hexahedral grid system was considered. Four different combinations in tilting and azimuth angles of the thrusters were considered to investigate the effects on the propulsion performance. We could find that thruster-hull and thruster-thruster interactions has significant effect on propulsion performance and further study will be required for the optimal configurations with the best tilting and relative azimuth angle between thrusters.

  19. Fluid-dynamical aspects of laser-metal interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantello, M.; Menin, R.; Donati, V.; Garifo, L.; La Rocca, A. V.; Onorato, M.

    During the interaction of a high-power laser beam with a material surface many fluid-dynamical phenomena arise. The produced flow field interacts with the beam and affects the thermal coupling between the laser energy and the target metal. In this paper the fluid-dynamical aspects of these phenomena are discussed and new experimental results are illustrated. The experiments have been performed in conditions of interest for industrial laser processes with a 15-kW CW CO2 laser. The development and the motion of bright clouds ignited from metal targets at incident laser power up to 11.6 kW, using an f/18 focusing system, have been studied by high speed photographic records. The properties of the cloud have been examined by spectroscopic analysis and absorption measurements.

  20. Dynamic fluctuations of protein-carbohydrate interactions promote protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Voynov

    Full Text Available Protein-carbohydrate interactions are important for glycoprotein structure and function. Antibodies of the IgG class, with increasing significance as therapeutics, are glycosylated at a conserved site in the constant Fc region. We hypothesized that disruption of protein-carbohydrate interactions in the glycosylated domain of antibodies leads to the exposure of aggregation-prone motifs. Aggregation is one of the main problems in protein-based therapeutics because of immunogenicity concerns and decreased efficacy. To explore the significance of intramolecular interactions between aromatic amino acids and carbohydrates in the IgG glycosylated domain, we utilized computer simulations, fluorescence analysis, and site-directed mutagenesis. We find that the surface exposure of one aromatic amino acid increases due to dynamic fluctuations. Moreover, protein-carbohydrate interactions decrease upon stress, while protein-protein and carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions increase. Substitution of the carbohydrate-interacting aromatic amino acids with non-aromatic residues leads to a significantly lower stability than wild type, and to compromised binding to Fc receptors. Our results support a mechanism for antibody aggregation via decreased protein-carbohydrate interactions, leading to the exposure of aggregation-prone regions, and to aggregation.

  1. Simultaneous Interaction of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solvents with Ethylamino Neurotransmitter Radical Cations: Infrared Spectra of Tryptamine(+)-(H2O)m-(N2)n Clusters (m,n ≤ 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Markus; Sakota, Kenji; Moritz, Raphael; Schmies, Matthias; Ikeda, Takamasa; Sekiya, Hiroshi; Dopfer, Otto

    2015-10-01

    Solvation of biomolecules by a hydrophilic and hydrophobic environment strongly affects their structure and function. Here, the structural, vibrational, and energetic properties of size-selected clusters of the microhydrated tryptamine cation with N2 ligands, TRA(+)-(H2O)m-(N2)n (m,n ≤ 3), are characterized by infrared photodissociation spectroscopy in the 2800-3800 cm(-1) range and dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations at the ωB97X-D/cc-pVTZ level to investigate the simultaneous solvation of this prototypical neurotransmitter by dipolar water and quadrupolar N2 ligands. In the global minimum structure of TRA(+)-H2O generated by electron ionization, H2O is strongly hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) as proton acceptor to the acidic indolic NH group. In the TRA(+)-H2O-(N2)n clusters, the weakly bonded N2 ligands do not affect the H-bonding motif of TRA(+)-H2O and are preferentially H-bonded to the OH groups of the H2O ligand, whereas stacking to the aromatic π electron system of the pyrrole ring of TRA(+) is less favorable. The natural bond orbital analysis reveals that the H-bond between the N2 ligand and the OH group of H2O cooperatively strengthens the adjacent H-bond between the indolic NH group of TRA(+) and H2O, while π stacking is slightly noncooperative. In the larger TRA(+)-(H2O)m clusters, the H2O ligands form a H-bonded solvent network attached to the indolic NH proton, again stabilized by strong cooperative effects arising from the nearby positive charge. Comparison with the corresponding neutral TRA-(H2O)m clusters illustrates the strong impact of the excess positive charge on the structure of the microhydration network.

  2. Fluid-Solid Interaction and Multiscale Dynamic Processes: Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Spina, Laura; Mendo-Pérez, Gerardo M.; Guzmán-Vázquez, Enrique; Scheu, Bettina; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    The speed and the style of a pressure drop in fluid-filled conduits determines the dynamics of multiscale processes and the elastic interaction between the fluid and the confining solid. To observe this dynamics we performed experiments using fluid-filled transparent tubes (15-50 cm long, 2-4 cm diameter and 0.3-1 cm thickness) instrumented with high-dynamic piezoelectric sensors and filmed the evolution of these processes with a high speed camera. We analyzed the response of Newtonian fluids to slow and sudden pressure drops from 3 bar-10 MPa to ambient pressure. We used fluids with viscosities of mafic to intermediate silicate melts of 1 to 1000 Pa s and water. The processes observed are fluid mass expansion, fluid flow, jets, bubbles nucleation, growth, coalescence and collapse, degassing, foam building at the surface and vertical wagging. All these processes (in fine and coarse scales) are triggered by the pressure drop and are sequentially coupled in time while interacting with the solid. During slow decompression, the multiscale processes are recognized occurring within specific pressure intervals, and exhibit a localized distribution along the conduit. In this, degassing predominates near the surface and may present piston-like oscillations. In contrast, during sudden decompression the fluid-flow reaches higher velocities, the dynamics is dominated by a sequence of gas-packet pulses driving jets of the gas-fluid mixture. The evolution of this multiscale phenomenon generates complex non-stationary microseismic signals recorded along the conduit. We discuss distinctive characteristics of these signals depending on the decompression style and compare them with synthetics. These synthetics are obtained numerically under an averaging modeling scheme, that accounted for the stress-strain of the cyclic dynamic interaction between the fluid and the solid wall, assuming an incompressible and viscous fluid that flows while the elastic solid responds oscillating

  3. Dynamic patterns and their interactions in networks of excitable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Pulin; Steel, Harrison; Robinson, Peter; Qi, Yang

    2013-10-01

    Formation of localized propagating patterns is a fascinating self-organizing phenomenon that happens in a wide range of spatially extended, excitable systems in which individual elements have resting, activated, and refractory states. Here we study a type of stochastic three-state excitable network model that has been recently developed; this model is able to generate a rich range of pattern dynamics, including localized wandering patterns and localized propagating patterns with crescent shapes and long-range propagation. The collective dynamics of these localized patterns have anomalous subdiffusive dynamics before symmetry breaking and anomalous superdiffusive dynamics after that, showing long-range spatiotemporal coherence in the system. In this study, the stability of the localized wandering patterns is analyzed by treating an individual localized pattern as a subpopulation to develop its average response function. This stability analysis indicates that when the average refractory period is greater than a certain value, there are too many elements in the refractory state after being activated to allow the subpopulation to support a self-sustained pattern; this is consistent with symmetry breaking identified by using an order parameter. Furthermore, in a broad parameter space, the simple network model is able to generate a range of interactions between different localized propagating patterns including repulsive collisions and partial and full annihilations, and interactions between localized propagating patterns and the refractory wake behind others; in this study, these interaction dynamics are systematically quantified based on their relative propagation directions and the resultant angles between them before and after their collisions. These results suggest that the model potentially provides a modeling framework to understand the formation of localized propagating patterns in a broad class of systems with excitable properties.

  4. Device and method for measuring the dynamic interaction between bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Veltink, Petrus H.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a device for measuring the dynamic interaction, in particular power transfer and work performed, between a first and a second body, in particular during relatively random movements. The device comprises a housing in which at least one kinematic sensor and at least one kinetic sensor is arranged, in addition to processing means for processing the signals from the sensors, and communication means for data exchange with the outside world. The invention also relates to a ...

  5. Flight Dynamic Simulation with Nonlinear Aeroelastic Interaction using the ROM-ROM Procedure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc. proposes to develop an integrated flight dynamics simulation capability with nonlinear aeroelastic interactions by combining a flight dynamics...

  6. Evolutionary dynamics of time-resolved social interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cardillo, Alessio; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Sinatra, Roberta; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Latora, Vito

    2013-01-01

    Cooperation among unrelated individuals is frequently observed in social groups when their members join efforts and resources to obtain a shared benefit which is unachievable by singles. However, understanding why cooperation arises despite the natural tendency of individuals towards selfish behaviors is still an open problem and represents one of the most fascinating challenges in volutionary dynamics. Very recently, the structural characterization of the networks upon which social interactions take place has shed some light on the mechanisms by which cooperative behaviours emerge and eventually overcome the individual temptation to defect. In particular, it has been found that the heterogeneity in the number of social ties and the presence of tightly-knit communities lead to a significant increase of cooperation as compared with the unstructured and homogeneous connection patterns considered in classical evolutionary dynamics. Here we investigate the role of social ties dynamics for the emergence of coopera...

  7. Magnetic dynamics of weakly and strongly interacting hematite nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bender Koch, Christian; Mørup, Steen

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic dynamics of two differently treated samples of hematite nanoparticles from the same batch with a particle size of about 20 nm have been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy. The dynamics of the first sample, in which the particles are coated and dispersed in water, is in accordance.......3(-0.8)(+1.0) x 10(-10) s for a rotation of the sublattice magnetization directions in the rhombohedral (111) plane. The corresponding median superparamagnetic blocking temperature is about 150 K. The dynamics of the second, dry sample, in which the particles are uncoated and thus allowed to aggregate, is slowed...... down by interparticle interactions and a magnetically split spectrum is retained at room temperature. The temperature variation or the magnetic hyperfine field, corresponding to different quantiles in the hyperfine field distribution, can be consistently described by a mean field model...

  8. Dynamic interaction of fingertip skin and pin of tactile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigas, Vytautas; Tolocka, Rymantas T.; Ziliukas, Pranas

    2007-12-01

    The present paper deals with investigations performed with the aim to study transmitting tactile information into the area of mechanoreceptors of the fingertip skin segment and to estimate the dynamic properties and behavior of the skin by performing numerical analysis. A computational finite element model consisting of four main layers of skin was used for transient analysis of contact dynamic interaction when loading the skin by a moving pin, as well as for modal analysis of skin and analysis of skin stress-strain state under harmonic loading (a plane strain case was studied). Material properties of the skin were assumed as linear elastic because of a very small excitation signal level. The efficiency of the regime of the skin dynamic loading in terms of the tactile signal level was defined on the basis of the strain level in the dermis zone where mechanoreceptors are placed. The possibilities of using vibratory control signal were analyzed.

  9. The Role of Neurotrophins in Neurotransmitter Release

    OpenAIRE

    William J Tyler; Perrett, Stephen P.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas D.

    2002-01-01

    The neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been shown to elicit pronounced effects on quantal neurotransmitter release at both central and peripheral nervous system synapses. Due to their activity-dependent release, as well as the subcellular localization of both protein and receptor, NTs are ideally suited to modify the strength of neuronal connections by “fine-tuning” synaptic activity through direct actions at presynaptic terminals. Here, using BDNF as a prototypical example, the authors provid...

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of neurotransmitter disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L; Hartka, Thomas R; Taylor, Jacob

    2006-11-01

    The neurotransmitter disorders represent an enigmatic and enlarging group of neurometabolic conditions caused by abnormal neurotransmitter metabolism or transport. A high index of clinical suspicion is important, given the availability of therapeutic strategies. This article covers disorders of monoamine (catecholamine and serotonin) synthesis, glycine catabolism, pyridoxine dependency, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. The technological aspects of appropriate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection, shipment, study, and interpretation merit special consideration. Diagnosis of disorders of monoamines requires analysis of CSF homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, ortho-methyldopa, BH4, and neopterin. The delineation of new disorders with important therapeutic implications, such as cerebral folate deficiency and PNPO deficiency, serves to highlight the value of measuring CSF neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites. The impressive responsiveness of Segawa fluctuating dystonia to levodopa is a hallmark feature of previously unrecognized neurologic morbidity becoming treatable at any age. Aromatic amino acid decarboxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency have more severe phenotypes and show variable responsiveness to levodopa. Glycine encephalopathy usually has a poor outcome; benzoate therapy may be helpful in less affected cases. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures are a refractory but treatable group of neonatal and infantile seizures; rare cases require pyridoxal-5-phosphate. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency is relatively common in comparison to the remainder of this group of disorders. Treatment directed at the metabolic defect with vigabatrin has been disappointing, and multiple therapies are targeted toward specific but protean symptoms. Other disorders of GABA metabolism, as is true of the wide spectrum of neurotransmitter disorders, will require increasing use of CSF analysis for diagnosis, and ultimately, treatment.

  11. [Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release facilitation in strontium solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamed'iarov, M A; Kochunova, Iu O; Telina, E N; Zefirov, A L

    2008-02-01

    Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release facilitation were studied using electrophysiological recording of end-plate currents (EPC) and nerve ending (NE) responses after substitution of extracellular Ca ions with Sr ions at the frog neuromuscular junction. The solutions with 0.5 mM concentration of Ca ions (calcium solution) or 1 mM concentration of Sr ions (strontium solution) were used where baseline neurotransmitter release (at low-frequency stimulation) is equal. Decay of paired-pulse facilitation of EPC at calcium solutions with increase of interpulse interval from 5 to 500 ms was well described by three-exponential function consisting of early, first and second components. Facilitation at strontium solutions was significantly diminished due mainly to decrease of early and first components. At the same time, EPC facilitation with rhythmic stimulation (10 or 50 imp/s) at strontium solutions was significantly increased. Also more pronounced decrease of NE response 3rd phase, reflecting potassium currents was detected under rhythmic stimulation of 50 imp/s at strontium solutions comparing to calcium solutions. It was concluded that facilitation sites underlying first and early components had lower affinity to Sr ions than to Ca ions. The enhancement of frequency facilitation at strontium solutions is mediated by two mechanisms: more pronounced broadening of NE action potential and increase of bivalent cation influx due to feebly marked activation of Ca(2+)-dependent potassium current by Sr ions, and slower dynamics of Sr(2+) removal from NE axoplasm comparing to Ca(2+).

  12. Mapping neurotransmitter networks with PET: an example on serotonin and opioid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Lauri; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Raitakari, Olli; Hietala, Jarmo

    2014-05-01

    All functions of the human brain are consequences of altered activity of specific neural pathways and neurotransmitter systems. Although the knowledge of "system level" connectivity in the brain is increasing rapidly, we lack "molecular level" information on brain networks and connectivity patterns. We introduce novel voxel-based positron emission tomography (PET) methods for studying internal neurotransmitter network structure and intercorrelations of different neurotransmitter systems in the human brain. We chose serotonin transporter and μ-opioid receptor for this analysis because of their functional interaction at the cellular level and similar regional distribution in the brain. Twenty-one healthy subjects underwent two consecutive PET scans using [(11)C]MADAM, a serotonin transporter tracer, and [(11)C]carfentanil, a μ-opioid receptor tracer. First, voxel-by-voxel "intracorrelations" (hub and seed analyses) were used to study the internal structure of opioid and serotonin systems. Second, voxel-level opioid-serotonin intercorrelations (between neurotransmitters) were computed. Regional μ-opioid receptor binding potentials were uniformly correlated throughout the brain. However, our analyses revealed nonuniformity in the serotonin transporter intracorrelations and identified a highly connected local network (midbrain-striatum-thalamus-amygdala). Regionally specific intercorrelations between the opioid and serotonin tracers were found in anteromedial thalamus, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left parietal cortex, i.e., in areas relevant for several neuropsychiatric disorders, especially affective disorders. This methodology enables in vivo mapping of connectivity patterns within and between neurotransmitter systems. Quantification of functional neurotransmitter balances may be a useful approach in etiological studies of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in drug development as a biomarker-based rationale for targeted

  13. An Aspect of Dynamic Human-structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    . Focus is on how modal characteristics of the structure, i.e. its frequency and damping, are influenced by the presence of stationary humans. Vertical vibrations are considered, and particular focus is given the influence of human posture on modal characteristics of the supporting structure. Insight......It is known that humans and structures interact. Humans can cause structures to vibrate, and excessive vibrations may occur if the motion frequency of humans coincides with a resonant frequency of the structural system. It is also known that stationary humans (such as humans sitting or standing...... on the structure) influence the dynamic behaviour and modal characteristics of the structure carrying them, whether being a grandstand, an office floor or similar. However, the interaction between the stationary humans and the structure is generally not well understood, and the paper addresses this interaction...

  14. On the possible observational signatures of white dwarf dynamical interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aznar-Siguán, G; Magnien, M; Lorén-Aguilar, P

    2014-01-01

    We compute the possible observational signatures of white dwarf dynamical interactions in dense stellar environments. Specifically, we compute the emission of gravitational waves, and we compare it with the sensitivity curves of planned space-borne gravitational wave detectors. We also compute the light curves for those interactions in which a detonation occurs, and one of the stars is destroyed, as well as the corresponding neutrino luminosities. We find that for the three possible outcomes of these interactions - which are the formation of an eccentric binary system, a lateral collision in which several mass transfer episodes occur, and a direct one in which just a single mass transfer episode takes place - only those in which an eccentric binary are formed are likely to be detected by the planned gravitational wave mission eLISA, while more sensitive detectors would be able to detect the signals emitted in lateral collisions. On the other hand, the light curves (and the thermal neutrino emission) of these ...

  15. COMPLEX FLARE DYNAMICS INITIATED BY A FILAMENT–FILAMENT INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chunming; McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, NM 88003 (United States); Liu, Rui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Alexander, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, TX 77005 (United States); Sun, Xudong, E-mail: czhu@nmsu.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We report on an eruption involving a relatively rare filament–filament interaction on 2013 June 21, observed by SDO and STEREO-B. The two filaments were separated in height with a “double-decker” configuration. The eruption of the lower filament began simultaneously with a descent of the upper filament, resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction was accompanied by the heating of surrounding plasma and an apparent crossing of a loop-like structure through the upper filament. The subsequent coalescence of the filaments drove a bright front ahead of the erupting structures. The whole process was associated with a C3.0 flare followed immediately by an M2.9 flare. Shrinking loops and descending dark voids were observed during the M2.9 flare at different locations above a C-shaped flare arcade as part of the energy release, giving us unique insight into the flare dynamics.

  16. A Study on Dynamic Response of Cable-Seabed Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fei; HUANG Guo-liang; DENG De-heng; TU Xing-hua

    2009-01-01

    A numerical method is developed to investigate the dynamic response of cable-seabed interaction in this paper. The motion of cable is described by the Lumped Parameter Method, while the seabed, unlike the prevailing simplified model of elastic foundation, is modeled as an irregular continuous rigid surface with rebound and friction existing, and the forces exerted by the seabed consist of normal counterforce and isotropic tangential Coulomb friction resistance. To describe the detailed dynamic response, two coefficients are introduced by analogy with the theory of rigid body collision with friction. The cable-seabed kinematic and dynamic contact conditions are formulated subsequently, and are used to incorporate the seabed effect into the cable dynamics to produce a set of ordinary differential governing equations. In this paper, we employ 4th order Runge-Kutta method to solve these equations. Several simulation cases are presented to illustrate the seabed effect. The results show that friction and impact have a prominent influence on the statics and dynamics of the cable.

  17. Receptor desensitization by neurotransmitters in membranes: are neurotransmitters the endogenous anesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Robert S

    2003-10-21

    A mechanism of anesthesia is proposed that addresses one of the most troubling peculiarities of general anesthesia: the remarkably small variability of sensitivity within the human population and across a broad range of animal phyla. It is hypothesized that in addition to the rapid, saturable binding of a neurotransmitter to its receptor that results in activation, the neurotransmitter also acts indirectly on the receptor by diffusing into the postsynaptic membrane and changing its physical properties, causing a shift in receptor conformational equilibrium (desensitization). Unlike binding, this slower indirect mechanism is nonspecific: each neurotransmitter will, in principle, affect all receptors in the membrane. For proteins modeled as having only resting and active conformational states, time-dependent ion currents are predicted that exhibit many characteristics of desensitization for both inhibitory and excitatory channels. If receptors have been engineered to regulate the time course of ion currents by this mechanism, then (a) mutations that significantly alter receptor sensitivity to this effect would be lethal and (b) by design, excitatory receptors would be inhibited, but inhibitory receptors activated, so that their effects are not counterproductive. The wide range of exogenous molecules that affect the physical properties of membranes as do neurotransmitters, but that do not bind to receptors, would thus inhibit excitatory channels and activate inhibitory channels, i.e., they would act as anesthesics. The endogenous anesthetics would thus be the neurotransmitters, the survival advantage conferred by their proper membrane-mediated desensitization of receptors explaining the selection pressure for anesthesic sensitivity.

  18. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  19. Mechanism of the Association between Na+ Binding and Conformations at the Intracellular Gate in Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; Gotfryd, Kamil; Khelashvili, George; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J; Javitch, Jonathan A; Noskov, Sergei; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2015-05-29

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na(+)-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na(+)-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. We describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na(+) binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na(+) with Li(+) or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na(+) cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na(+) dependence. Thus, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na(+) binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. That the AIN between the Na(+) binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function.

  20. The interaction of cannibalism and omnivory: consequences for community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Volker H W

    2007-11-01

    Although cannibalism is ubiquitous in food webs and frequent in systems where a predator and its prey also share a common resource (intraguild predation, IGP), its impacts on species interactions and the dynamics and structure of communities are still poorly understood. In addition, the few existing studies on cannibalism have generally focused on cannibalism in the top-predator, ignoring that it is frequent at intermediate trophic levels. A set of structured models shows that cannibalism can completely alter the dynamics and structure of three-species IGP systems depending on the trophic position where cannibalism occurs. Contrary to the expectations of simple models, the IG predator can exploit the resources more efficiently when it is cannibalistic, enabling the predator to persist at lower resource densities than the IG prey. Cannibalism in the IG predator can also alter the effect of enrichment, preventing predator-mediated extinction of the IG prey at high productivities predicted by simple models. Cannibalism in the IG prey can reverse the effect of top-down cascades, leading to an increase in the resource with decreasing IG predator density. These predictions are consistent with current data. Overall, cannibalism promotes the coexistence of the IG predator and IG prey. These results indicate that including cannibalism in current models can overcome the discrepancy between theory and empirical data. Thus, we need to measure and account for cannibalistic interactions to reliably predict the structure and dynamics of communities.

  1. Unveiling protein functions through the dynamics of the interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Sendiña-Nadal

    Full Text Available Protein interaction networks have become a tool to study biological processes, either for predicting molecular functions or for designing proper new drugs to regulate the main biological interactions. Furthermore, such networks are known to be organized in sub-networks of proteins contributing to the same cellular function. However, the protein function prediction is not accurate and each protein has traditionally been assigned to only one function by the network formalism. By considering the network of the physical interactions between proteins of the yeast together with a manual and single functional classification scheme, we introduce a method able to reveal important information on protein function, at both micro- and macro-scale. In particular, the inspection of the properties of oscillatory dynamics on top of the protein interaction network leads to the identification of misclassification problems in protein function assignments, as well as to unveil correct identification of protein functions. We also demonstrate that our approach can give a network representation of the meta-organization of biological processes by unraveling the interactions between different functional classes.

  2. Interacting Ghost Dark Energy Model: Dynamical System Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Golchin, Hanif; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil

    2016-01-01

    We study the impacts of interaction between dark matter and dark energy in the context of ghost dark energy model. Using the dynamical system analysis, we obtain the fixed points of the system for different types of interactions while the universe is filled with radiation, matter (including dark matter and luminous matter) and dark energy components. We consider the stability of the fixed points in details for different cases. In all cases there is an unstable matter dominated epoch and a stable late time dark energy dominated phase. However, we find that adding the linear interaction, the evolution of ghost dark energy model does not contain the radiation dominated epoch in the early times which is a necessary point in any cosmic model. This failure resolved when we add the non-linear interaction to the model. We also find an upper bound for the value of the coupling constant of the interaction between dark matter and dark energy as b < 0.57 . This bound is necessary to have a decelerating and unstable ma...

  3. Excitation dynamics of interacting Rydberg atoms in small lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, G., E-mail: gwu@physnet.uni-hamburg.de [Zentrum für Optische Quantentechnologien, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kurz, M.; Liebchen, B. [Zentrum für Optische Quantentechnologien, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Schmelcher, P. [Zentrum für Optische Quantentechnologien, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-01-23

    We study the Rydberg excitation dynamics of laser-driven atoms confined in a one-dimensional three-site lattice with open boundary conditions. Different regular excitation patterns are obtained within various parameter regimes. In the case of a weak Rydberg–Rydberg interaction, the excitation probability possesses a nodal structure which is characterized by an envelope with a period inversely proportional to the interaction. For strong Rydberg interaction we observe dipole blockade and antiblockade effects and an appropriate detuning leads to an overall oscillatory behavior of the Rydberg probability density which is modulated only by small oscillations. Besides an exact diagonalization procedure we study the system by performing first and second order perturbation theory as well as a spectral analysis. - Highlights: • We study Rydberg excitation in small 1-d lattices. • For weak Rydberg interaction, the excitation probability possesses an envelope structure. • For strong Rydberg interaction, we observe dipole blockade and antiblockade effects. • A specific detuning leads to degeneracy and regular oscillatory behavior of the Rydberg density.

  4. Dynamics of the diffusive DM-DE interaction--dynamical system approach

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Zbigniew; Szydlowski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    We discuss dynamics of a model of an energy transfer between dark energy (DE) and dark matter (DM). The energy transfer is determined by a non-conservation law resulting from a diffusion of dark matter in an environment of dark energy. The relativistic invariance defines the diffusion in a unique way. The system can contain baryonic matter and radiation which do not interact with the dark sector. We treat the Friedman equation and the conservation laws as a closed dynamical system. The dynamics of the model is examined using the dynamical systems methods for demonstration how solutions depend on initial conditions. We also fit the model parameters using astronomical observation: SNIa, $H(z)$, BAO and Alcock-Paczynski test. We show that the model with diffuse DM-DE is consistent with the data.

  5. Driven-dissipative dynamics of a strongly interacting Rydberg gas

    CERN Document Server

    Glaetzle, A W; Zhao, B; Pupillo, G; Zoller, P

    2012-01-01

    We study the non-equilibrium many-body dynamics of a cold gas of ground state alkali atoms weakly admixed by Rydberg states with laser light. On a timescale shorter than the lifetime of the dressed states, effective dipole-dipole or van der Waals interactions between atoms can lead to the formation of strongly correlated phases, such as atomic crystals. Using a semiclassical approach, we study the long-time dynamics where decoherence and dissipative processes due to spontaneous emission and blackbody radiation dominate, leading to heating and melting of atomic crystals as well as particle losses. These effects can be substantially mitigated by performing active laser cooling in the presence of atomic dressing.

  6. Dynamic soil-structure interaction of monopod and polypod foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2016-01-01

    The paper concerns the importance of through–soil coupling for structures having foundations with more footings. First, a model for dynamic analysis of polypod footings is established in the frequency domain, employing Green’s function for wave propagation in a layered half-space. To allow analysis...... manner. As a computational example, the dynamic response of a plane frame structure with two footings is compared for two cases: one with and one without the cross coupling. Homogeneous as well as layered soil is considered....... within the time domain, frequency-independent lumped-parameter models are developed. The paper proposes a decision criterion for determination of which components must be included within a lumped-parameter model in order to account for the structure–soil–structure interaction in an adequate and efficient...

  7. Vortex dynamics and their interactions in quantum trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniacki, D A [Departamento de Fisica ' J. J. Giambiagi' , FCEN, UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pujals, E R [IMPA-OS, Dona Castorina 110, 22460-320, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Borondo, F [Departamento de Quimica C-IX, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-12-30

    Vortices are known to play a key role in many important processes in physics and chemistry. Here, we study vortices in connection with the quantum trajectories that can be defined in the framework provided by the de Broglie-Bohm formalism of quantum mechanics. In a previous work, it was shown that the presence of a single moving vortex is enough to induce chaos in these trajectories. Here, this situation is explored in more detail by discussing the relationship between Lyapunov exponents and the parameters characterizing the vortex dynamics. We also consider the issue when more than one vortex exists. In this case, the interaction among them can annihilate or create pairs of vortices with opposite vorticity. This phenomenon is analyzed from a dynamical point of view, showing how the size of the regular regions in phase space grows, as vortices disappear.

  8. Dynamic soil-structure interaction of monopod and polypod foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2016-01-01

    within the time domain, frequency-independent lumped-parameter models are developed. The paper proposes a decision criterion for determination of which components must be included within a lumped-parameter model in order to account for the structure–soil–structure interaction in an adequate and efficient......The paper concerns the importance of through–soil coupling for structures having foundations with more footings. First, a model for dynamic analysis of polypod footings is established in the frequency domain, employing Green’s function for wave propagation in a layered half-space. To allow analysis...... manner. As a computational example, the dynamic response of a plane frame structure with two footings is compared for two cases: one with and one without the cross coupling. Homogeneous as well as layered soil is considered....

  9. Aging dynamics in interacting many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Lloyd P; Lizana, Ludvig; Fogelmark, Karl; Metzler, Ralf; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Low-dimensional, complex systems are often characterized by logarithmically slow dynamics. We study the generic motion of a labeled particle in an ensemble of identical diffusing particles with hardcore interactions in a strongly disordered, one-dimensional environment. Each particle in this single file is trapped for a random waiting time $\\tau$ with power law distribution $\\psi(\\tau)\\simeq\\tau^{-1- \\alpha}$, such that the $\\tau$ values are independent, local quantities for all particles. From scaling arguments and simulations, we find that for the scale-free waiting time case $02$ we recover Harris law $\\simeq t^{1/2}$.

  10. Hamiltonian dynamics of several rigid bodies interacting with point vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Weissmann, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a Hamiltonian description for the dynamics of several rigid bodies interacting with point vortices in an inviscid, incompressible fluid. We adopt the idea of Vankerschaver et al. (2009) to derive the Hamiltonian formulation via symplectic reduction of a canonical Hamiltonian system on a principle fibre bundle. On the reduced phase space we determine the magnetic symplectic form directly, without resorting to the machinery of mechanical connections on principle fibre bundles. We derive the equations of motion for the general case, and also for the special Lie-Poisson case of a single rigid body and zero total vorticity. Finally we give a partly degenerate Lagrangian formulation for the system.

  11. Fault Diagnosis in Dynamic Systems Using Fuzzy Interacting Observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kolesov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of fault diagnosis in dynamic systems based on a fuzzy approach is proposed. The new method possesses two basic specific features which distinguish it from the other known fuzzy methods based on the application of fuzzy logic and a bank of state observers. First, this method uses a bank of interacting observers instead of traditional independent observers. The second specific feature of the proposed method is the assumption that there is no strict boundary between the serviceable and disabled technical states of the system, which makes it possible to specify a decision making rule for fault diagnosis.

  12. Dynamics of vortex interactions in two-dimensional flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, A.H.; Naulin, V.

    2002-01-01

    a critical value, a(c). Using the Weiss-field, a(c) is estimated for vortex patches. Introducing an effective radius for vortices with distributed vorticity, we find that 3.3 a(c) ...The dynamics and interaction of like-signed vortex structures in two dimensional flows are investigated by means of direct numerical solutions of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Two vortices with distributed vorticity merge when their distance relative to their radius, d/R-0l. is below...

  13. Interacting Dark Fluid in Anisotropic Universe with Dynamical Deceleration Parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhav, K. S.; Bokey, V. D.; Bansod, A. S.; Munde, S. L.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we have studied the anisotropic and homogeneous Bianchi Type-I and V universe filled with Interacting Dark Matter and Holographic Dark Energy. The solutions of field equations are obtained for both models under the assumption of linearly varying deceleration parameter which yields dynamical deceleration parameter. It has been observed that the anisotropy of expansion dies out very quickly (soon after inflation) in both models (B-I, B-V). The physical and geometrical parameters for the both models have been obtained and discussed in details.

  14. Emotional Contagion and Proto-Organizing in Human Interaction Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Hazy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper combines the complexity notions of phase transitions and tipping points with recent advances in cognitive neuroscience to propose a general theory of human proto-organizing. It takes as a premise that a necessary prerequisite for organizing, or proto-organizing, occurs through emotional contagion in subpopulations of human interaction dynamics in complex ecosystems. Emotional contagion is posited to engender emotional understanding and identification with others, a social process that acts as a mechanism that enables (or precludes cooperative responses to opportunities and risks. Propositions are offered and further research is suggested.

  15. High resolution dynamical mapping of social interactions with active RFID

    CERN Document Server

    Barrat, Alain; Colizza, Vittoria; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Broeck, Wouter Van den; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental framework to gather data on face-to-face social interactions between individuals, with a high spatial and temporal resolution. We use active Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) devices that assess contacts with one another by exchanging low-power radio packets. When individuals wear the beacons as a badge, a persistent radio contact between the RFID devices can be used as a proxy for a social interaction between individuals. We present the results of a pilot study %recently performed during a conference, and a subsequent preliminary data analysis, that provides an assessment of our method and highlights its versatility and applicability in many areas concerned with human dynamics.

  16. Dynamic RKKY interaction between magnetic moments in graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, F. S. M.; Duffy, J.; Costa, A. T.; Muniz, R. B.; Ferreira, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Graphene has been identified as a promising material with numerous applications, particularly in spintronics. In this paper we investigate the peculiar features of spin excitations of magnetic units deposited on graphene nanoribbons and how they can couple through a dynamical interaction mediated by spin currents. We examine in detail the spin lifetimes and identify a pattern caused by vanishing density of states sites in pristine ribbons with armchair borders. Impurities located on these sites become practically invisible to the interaction but can be made accessible by a gate voltage or doping. We also demonstrate that the coupling between impurities can be turned on or off using this characteristic, which may be used to control the transfer of information in transistorlike devices.

  17. Non Covalent Interactions and Internal Dynamics in Adducts of Freons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminati, Walther; Gou, Qian; Evangelisti, Luca; Feng, Gang; Spada, Lorenzo; Vallejo-López, Montserrat; Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J.

    2014-06-01

    The complexation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) with atmospheric water and pollutants of the atmosphere affects their reactivity and it seems to accelerate, for example, the decomposition rate of freons in the atmosphere [1]. For this reason we characterized shapes, stabilities, nature of the non-covalent interactions, structures and internal dynamics of a number of complexes of CFCs with water and of their dimers or oligomers by rotational spectroscopy. It has been found that hydrogenated CFCs form adducts with other molecules through weak hydrogen bonds (WHBs). Their C-H groups can act as proton donors, enhanced by the electron withdrawing of the halogen atoms, interacting with the electron rich regions of the partner molecules [2]. Also in adducts or oligomers of hydrogenated CFCs the monomer units are held together by nets of WHBs [3]. When CFCs are perhalogenated, the positive electrostatic region ("σ-hole") can interact electrostatically with negative sites of another, or of the same molecular entity, giving rise, according to IUPAC, to the so called halogen bond (HaB). However, it has been observed that when the perhalogenated CFCs has a Π electron system, a lone pair•••Π interaction (Bürgi-Dunitz) is favoured [4]. We describe here the HaBs that CF4 and CF3Cl form with a variety of partner molecules such as water, ammonia, dimethyl ether, etc. Important spectroscopic features outline strong dynamics effects taking place in this kind of complex. References [1] V. Vaida, H. G. Kjaergaard, K. J. Feierabend, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 22 (2003) 203. [2] See, for example: W. Caminati, S. Melandri, A. Maris, P. Ottaviani, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 45 (2006) 2438. [3] G. Feng, L. Evangelisti, I. Cacelli, L. Carbonaro, G. Prampolini, W. Caminati, Chem. Commun. 50 (2014) 171. [4] Q. Gou, G. Feng, L. Evangelisti, W. Caminati, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52 (2013) 52 11888.

  18. Relative species abundance of replicator dynamics with sparse interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchi, Tomoyuki; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki; Tokita, Kei

    2016-11-01

    A theory of relative species abundance on sparsely-connected networks is presented by investigating the replicator dynamics with symmetric interactions. Sparseness of a network involves difficulty in analyzing the fixed points of the equation, and we avoid this problem by treating large self interaction u, which allows us to construct a perturbative expansion. Based on this perturbation, we find that the nature of the interactions is directly connected to the abundance distribution, and some characteristic behaviors, such as multiple peaks in the abundance distribution and all species coexistence at moderate values of u, are discovered in a wide class of the distribution of the interactions. The all species coexistence collapses at a critical value of u, u c , and this collapsing is regarded as a phase transition. To get more quantitative information, we also construct a non-perturbative theory on random graphs based on techniques of statistical mechanics. The result shows those characteristic behaviors are sustained well even for not large u. For even smaller values of u, extinct species start to appear and the abundance distribution becomes rounded and closer to a standard functional form. Another interesting finding is the non-monotonic behavior of diversity, which quantifies the number of coexisting species, when changing the ratio of mutualistic relations Δ . These results are examined by numerical simulations, which show that our theory is exact for the case without extinct species, but becomes less and less precise as the proportion of extinct species grows.

  19. Vortex dynamics in 3D shock-bubble interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazialhosseini, Babak; Rossinelli, Diego; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of shock-bubble interaction involve an interplay of vortex stretching, dilation, and baroclinic vorticity generation. Here, we quantify the interplay of these contributions through high resolution 3D simulations for several Mach and Atwood numbers. We present a volume rendering of density and vorticity magnitude fields of shock-bubble interaction at M = 3 and air/helium density ratio η = 7.25 to elucidate the evolution of the flow structures. We distinguish the vorticity growth rates due to baroclinicity, stretching, and dilatation at low and high Mach numbers as well as the late time evolution of the circulation. The results demonstrate that a number of analytical models need to be revised in order to predict the late time circulation of shock-bubble interactions at high Mach numbers. To this effect, we propose a simple model for the dependence of the circulation to Mach number and ambient to bubble density ratio for air/helium shock-bubble interactions.

  20. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems - i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, - play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist.

  1. Molecular Dynamics of "Fuzzy" Transcriptional Activator-Coactivator Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie S Scholes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional activation domains (ADs are generally thought to be intrinsically unstructured, but capable of adopting limited secondary structure upon interaction with a coactivator surface. The indeterminate nature of this interface made it hitherto difficult to study structure/function relationships of such contacts. Here we used atomistic accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD simulations to study the conformational changes of the GCN4 AD and variants thereof, either free in solution, or bound to the GAL11 coactivator surface. We show that the AD-coactivator interactions are highly dynamic while obeying distinct rules. The data provide insights into the constant and variable aspects of orientation of ADs relative to the coactivator, changes in secondary structure and energetic contributions stabilizing the various conformers at different time points. We also demonstrate that a prediction of α-helical propensity correlates directly with the experimentally measured transactivation potential of a large set of mutagenized ADs. The link between α-helical propensity and the stimulatory activity of ADs has fundamental practical and theoretical implications concerning the recruitment of ADs to coactivators.

  2. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-05-27

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems - i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, - play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist.

  3. The Role of Neurotrophins in Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, William J.; Perrett, Stephen P.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas D.

    2009-01-01

    The neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been shown to elicit pronounced effects on quantal neurotransmitter release at both central and peripheral nervous system synapses. Due to their activity-dependent release, as well as the subcellular localization of both protein and receptor, NTs are ideally suited to modify the strength of neuronal connections by “fine-tuning” synaptic activity through direct actions at presynaptic terminals. Here, using BDNF as a prototypical example, the authors provide an update of recent evidence demonstrating that NTs enhance quantal neurotransmitter release at synapses through presynaptic mechanisms. The authors further propose that a potential target for NT actions at presynaptic terminals is the mechanism by which terminals retrieve synaptic vesicles after exocytosis. Depending on the temporal demands placed on synapses during high-frequency synaptic transmission, synapses may use two alternative modes of synaptic vesicle retrieval, the conventional slow endosomal recycling or a faster rapid retrieval at the active zone, referred to as “kiss-and-run.” By modulating Ca2+ microdomains associated with voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at active zones, NTs may elicit a switch from the slow to the fast mode of endocytosis of vesicles at presynaptic terminals during high-frequency synaptic transmission, allowing more reliable information transfer and neuronal signaling in the central nervous system. PMID:12467374

  4. Dynamical Interactions Make Hot Jupiters in Open Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Shara, Michael M; Mardling, Rosemary A

    2014-01-01

    Explaining the origin and evolution of exoplanetary "hot Jupiters" remains a significant challenge. One possible mechanism for their production is planet-planet interactions, which produces hot Jupiters from planets born far from their host stars but near their dynamical stability limits. In the much more likely case of planets born far from their dynamical stability limits, can hot Jupiters can be formed in star clusters? Our N-body simulations of planetary systems inside star clusters answer this question in the affirmative, and show that hot Jupiter formation is not a rare event. We detail three case studies of the dynamics-induced births of hot Jupiters on highly eccentric orbits that can only occur inside star clusters. The hot Jupiters' orbits bear remarkable similarities to those of some of the most extreme exoplanets known: HAT-P-32 b, HAT-P-2 b, HD 80606 b and GJ 876 d. If stellar perturbations formed these hot Jupiters then our simulations predict that these very hot, inner planets are sometimes acc...

  5. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC

  6. ARE THE FIVE ASEAN STOCK PRICE INDICES DYNAMICALLY INTERACTED?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adwin Surja Atmadja

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to examine the dynamic interactions of stock price indices in five ASEAN countries, Indonesia; Malaysia; the Philippines; Singapore; and Thailand with particular attention to the 1997 Asian financial crisis and period onwards. Using monthly time series data of the stock price indices countries, a vector error correction model (VECM is employed to empirically examine the interaction among the variables. The finding is that the five ASEAN stock market prices were found to be integrated with two cointegrating vectors during the sample period, and that accounting innovation analyses show the short run dynamic interactions among those stock markets. The important implication might be drawn from the finding is that portfolio diversification across the five ASEAN stock markets is unlikely to reduce investment risk due to high degree of financial integration of these markets. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Studi ini bertujuan meneliti interaksi dinamis antara indeks harga saham yang terdapat di lima negara ASEAN, yaitu Indonesia, Malaysia, Filipina, Singapura, dan Thailan yang terjadi selama masa krisis finansial Asia tahun 1997 dan periode sesudahnya. Dengan menggunakan data time series bulanan indeks harga saham dari kelima negara tersebut selama periode penelitian, suatu vector error correction model (VECM diaplikasikan untuk meneliti secara empiris interaksi dinamis yang terjadi diantara berbagai variabel yang dipergunakan dalam penelitian ini. Dari hasil penelitian ditemukan dua vektor kointegrasi (cointegration vector selama masa penelitian, dan analisa inovasi akuntansi (accounting innovation analyses menunjukan adanya interaksi dinamis jangka pendek diantara pasar saham tersebut. Implikasi penting yang mungkin perlu diperhatikan dari penemuan ini adalah bahwa diversifikasi portofolio saham pada lima pasar saham tersebut agaknya tidak akan secara signifikan mengurangi tingkat resiko investasi. Hal ini dikarenakan oleh tingginya

  7. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of multiple-droplet interaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenchao; Loney, Drew; Fedorov, Andrei G.; Degertekin, F. Levent; Rosen, David W.

    2014-03-01

    A lattice Boltzmann (LB) formulation, which is consistent with the phase-field model for two-phase incompressible fluid, is proposed to model the interface dynamics of droplet impingement. The interparticle force is derived by comparing the macroscopic transport equations recovered from LB equations with the governing equations of the continuous phase-field model. The inconsistency between the existing LB implementations and the phase-field model in calculating the relaxation time at the phase interface is identified and an approximation is proposed to ensure the consistency with the phase-field model. It is also shown that the commonly used equilibrium velocity boundary for the binary fluid LB scheme does not conserve momentum at the wall boundary and a modified scheme is developed to ensure the momentum conservation at the boundary. In addition, a geometric formulation of the wetting boundary condition is proposed to replace the popular surface energy formulation and results show that the geometric approach enforces the prescribed contact angle better than the surface energy formulation in both static and dynamic wetting. The proposed LB formulation is applied to simulating droplet impingement dynamics in three dimensions and results are compared to those obtained with the continuous phase-field model, the LB simulations reported in the literature, and experimental data from the literature. The results show that the proposed LB simulation approach yields not only a significant speed improvement over the phase-field model in simulating droplet impingement dynamics on a submillimeter length scale, but also better accuracy than both the phase-field model and the previously reported LB techniques when compared to experimental data. Upon validation, the proposed LB modeling methodology is applied to the study of multiple-droplet impingement and interactions in three dimensions, which demonstrates its powerful capability of simulating extremely complex interface

  8. Molecular dynamics, spin dynamics study of phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Dilina; Landau, David P.; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Nicholson, Don; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi

    2013-03-01

    By combining an atomistic many-body potential (Finnis-Sinclair) with a classical Heisenberg-like spin Hamiltonian, we perform combined molecular and spin dynamics simulations to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron. The coupling between atomic and spin degrees of freedom is established via a distance dependent exchange interaction derived from first principles electronic structure calculations. Coupled equations of motion are integrated using a second order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of the exponential time evolution operator. To investigate the effect of lattice vibrations on spin wave spectrum, we calculate spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors S(q, ω), and compare that to the results obtained from pure spin dynamics simulations performed on a rigid lattice. In the presence of lattice vibrations, we observe an additional peak in the longitudinal spin-spin dynamic structure factor which coincides with the peak position in density-density dynanmic structure factor. Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, ''Center for Defect Physics,'' an Energy Frontier Research Center

  9. Dynamic Ice-Water Interactions Form Europa's Chaos Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, D. D.; Schmidt, B. E.; Patterson, G. W.; Schenk, P.

    2011-12-01

    Unique to the surface of Europa, chaos terrain is diagnostic of the properties and dynamics of its icy shell. We present a new model that suggests large melt lenses form within the shell and that water-ice interactions above and within these lenses drive the production of chaos. This model is consistent with key observations of chaos, predicts observables for future missions, and indicates that the surface is likely still active today[1]. We apply lessons from ice-water interaction in the terrestrial cryosphere to hypothesize a dynamic lense-collapse model to for Europa's chaos terrain. Chaos terrain morphology, like that of Conamara chaos and Thera Macula, suggests a four-phase formation [1]: 1) Surface deflection occurs as ice melts over ascending thermal plumes, as regularly occurs on Earth as subglacial volcanoes activate. The same process can occur at Europa if thermal plumes cause pressure melt as they cross ice-impurity eutectics. 2) Resulting hydraulic gradients and driving forces produce a sealed, pressurized melt lense, akin to the hydraulic sealing of subglacial caldera lakes. On Europa, the water cannot escape the lense due to the horizontally continuous ice shell. 3) Extension of the brittle ice lid above the lense opens cracks, allowing for the ice to be hydrofractured by pressurized water. Fracture, brine injection and percolation within the ice and possible iceberg toppling produces ice-melange-like granular matrix material. 4) Refreezing of the melt lense and brine-filled pores and cracks within the matrix results in raised chaos. Brine soaking and injection concentrates the ice in brines and adds water volume to the shell. As this englacial water freezes, the now water-filled ice will expand, not unlike the process of forming pingos and other "expansion ice" phenomena on Earth. The refreezing can raise the surface and create the oft-observed matrix "domes" In this presentation, we describe how catastrophic ice-water interactions on Earth have

  10. On the dynamics of a shock-bubble interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, James J.; Karni, Smadar

    1994-01-01

    We present a detailed numerical study of the interaction of a weak shock wave with an isolated cylindrical gas inhomogenity. Such interactions have been studied experimentally in an attempt to elucidate the mechanisms whereby shock waves propagating through random media enhance mixing. Our study concentrates on the early phases of the interaction process which are dominated by repeated refractions of acoustic fronts at the bubble interface. Specifically, we have reproduced two of the experiments performed by Haas and Sturtevant : M(sub s) = 1.22 planar shock wave, moving through air, impinges on a cylindrical bubble which contains either helium or Refrigerant 22. These flows are modelled using the two-dimensional, compressible Euler equations for a two component fluid (air-helium or air-Refrigerant 22). Although simulations of shock wave phenomena are now fairly commonplace, they are mostly restricted to single component flows. Unfortunately, multi-component extensions of successful single component schemes often suffer from spurious oscillations which are generated at material interfaces. Here we avoid such problems by employing a novel, nonconservative shock-capturing scheme. In addition, we have utilized a sophisticated adaptive mesh refinement algorithm which enables extremely high resolution simulations to be performed relatively cheaply. Thus we have been able to reproduce numerically all the intricate mechanisms that were observed experimentally (e.g., transitions from regular to irregular refraction, cusp formation and shock wave focusing, multi-shock and Mach shock structures, jet formation, etc.), and we can now present an updated description for the dynamics of a shock-bubble interaction.

  11. Influence of solid-liquid interactions on dynamic wetting: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Emilie; Blake, Terence D.; De Coninck, Joël

    2009-11-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid drops spreading on a solid substrate have been carried out for a very wide range of solid-liquid interactions and equilibrium contact angles. The results for these systems are shown to be consistent with the molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) of dynamic wetting, which emphasizes the role of contact-line friction as the principal channel of energy dissipation. Several predictions have been confirmed. These include a quantitative link between the dynamics of wetting and the work of adhesion and the existence of an optimum equilibrium contact angle that maximizes the speed of wetting. A feature of the new work is that key parameters (κ0 and λ), normally accessible only by fitting the MKT to dynamic contact angle data, are also obtained directly from the simulations, with good agreement between the two sources. This validates the MKT at some fundamental level. Further verification is provided by contact angle relaxation studies, which also lend support to the interfacial tension relaxation process invoked in Shikhmurzaev's hydrodynamic model of dynamic wetting.

  12. An iterative method for hydrodynamic interactions in Brownian dynamics simulations of polymer dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Linling; Young, Charles D.; Sing, Charles E.

    2017-07-01

    Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations are a standard tool for understanding the dynamics of polymers in and out of equilibrium. Quantitative comparison can be made to rheological measurements of dilute polymer solutions, as well as direct visual observations of fluorescently labeled DNA. The primary computational challenge with BD is the expensive calculation of hydrodynamic interactions (HI), which are necessary to capture physically realistic dynamics. The full HI calculation, performed via a Cholesky decomposition every time step, scales with the length of the polymer as O(N3). This limits the calculation to a few hundred simulated particles. A number of approximations in the literature can lower this scaling to O(N2 - N2.25), and explicit solvent methods scale as O(N); however both incur a significant constant per-time step computational cost. Despite this progress, there remains a need for new or alternative methods of calculating hydrodynamic interactions; large polymer chains or semidilute polymer solutions remain computationally expensive. In this paper, we introduce an alternative method for calculating approximate hydrodynamic interactions. Our method relies on an iterative scheme to establish self-consistency between a hydrodynamic matrix that is averaged over simulation and the hydrodynamic matrix used to run the simulation. Comparison to standard BD simulation and polymer theory results demonstrates that this method quantitatively captures both equilibrium and steady-state dynamics after only a few iterations. The use of an averaged hydrodynamic matrix allows the computationally expensive Brownian noise calculation to be performed infrequently, so that it is no longer the bottleneck of the simulation calculations. We also investigate limitations of this conformational averaging approach in ring polymers.

  13. Short-Term Dynamical Interactions Among Extrasolar Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Chambers, J E

    2001-01-01

    We show that short-tem perturbations among massive planets in multiple planet systems can result in radial velocity variations of the central star which differ substantially from velocity variations derived assuming the planets are executing independent Keplerian motions. We discuss two alternate fitting methods which can lead to an improved dynamical description of multiple planet systems. In the first method, the osculating orbital elements are determined via a Levenberg-Marquardt minimization scheme driving an N-body integrator. The second method is an improved analytic model in which orbital elements such as the periods and longitudes of periastron are allowed to vary according to a simple model for resonant interactions between the planets. Both of these methods can potentially determine the true masses for the planets by eliminating the sin(i) degeneracy inherent in fits that assume independent Keplerian motions. As more radial velocity data is accumulated from stars such as GJ 876, these methods should...

  14. A Dynamic and Interactive Monitoring System of Data Center Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ling-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To maximize the utilization and effectiveness of resources, it is very necessary to have a well suited management system for modern data centers. Traditional approaches to resource provisioning and service requests have proven to be ill suited for virtualization and cloud computing. The manual handoffs between technology teams were also highly inefficient and poorly documented. In this paper, a dynamic and interactive monitoring system for data center resources, ResourceView, is presented. By consolidating all data center management functionality into a single interface, ResourceView shares a common view of the timeline metric status, while providing comprehensive, centralized monitoring of data center physical and virtual IT assets including power, cooling, physical space and VMs, so that to improve availability and efficiency. In addition, servers and VMs can be monitored from several viewpoints such as clusters, racks and projects, which is very convenient for users.

  15. Vortex dynamics in superfluids governed by an interacting gauge theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Salvatore; Valiente, Manuel; Öhberg, Patrik

    2016-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a vortex in a quasi two-dimensional Bose gas consisting of light-matter coupled atoms forming two-component pseudo spins. The gas is subject to a density dependent gauge potential, hence governed by an interacting gauge theory, which stems from a collisionally induced detuning between the incident laser frequency and the atomic energy levels. This provides a back-action between the synthetic gauge potential and the matter field. A Lagrangian approach is used to derive an expression for the force acting on a vortex in such a gas. We discuss the similarities between this force and the one predicted by Iordanskii, Lifshitz and Pitaevskii when scattering between a superfluid vortex and the thermal component is taken into account.

  16. Complexity multiscale asynchrony measure and behavior for interacting financial dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ge; Wang, Jun; Niu, Hongli

    2016-08-01

    A stochastic financial price process is proposed and investigated by the finite-range multitype contact dynamical system, in an attempt to study the nonlinear behaviors of real asset markets. The viruses spreading process in a finite-range multitype system is used to imitate the interacting behaviors of diverse investment attitudes in a financial market, and the empirical research on descriptive statistics and autocorrelation behaviors of return time series is performed for different values of propagation rates. Then the multiscale entropy analysis is adopted to study several different shuffled return series, including the original return series, the corresponding reversal series, the random shuffled series, the volatility shuffled series and the Zipf-type shuffled series. Furthermore, we propose and compare the multiscale cross-sample entropy and its modification algorithm called composite multiscale cross-sample entropy. We apply them to study the asynchrony of pairs of time series under different time scales.

  17. Dynamic interaction potential and the scattering cross sections of the semiclassical plasma particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Shalenov, E. O.; Gabdullina, G. L. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71al Farabi Street, Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-04-15

    The dynamic model of the charged particles interaction in non-ideal semiclassical plasma is presented. This model takes into account the quantum mechanical diffraction effect and the dynamic screening effect. On the basis of the dynamic interaction potential, the electron scattering cross sections are investigated. Comparison with the results obtained on the basis of other models and conclusions were made.

  18. Marine Toxins Potently Affecting Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Frédéric A.; Mattei, César; Molgó, Jordi

    Synapses are specialised structures where interneuronal communication takes place. Not only brain function is absolutely dependent on synaptic activity, but also most of our organs are intimately controlled by synaptic activity. Synapses re therefore an ideal target to act upon and poisonous species have evolved fascinating neurotoxins capable of shutting down neuronal communication by blocking or activating essential components of the synapse. By hijacking key proteins of the communication machinery, neurotoxins are therefore extremely valuable tools that have, in turn, greatly helped our understanding of synaptic biology. Moreover, analysis and understanding of the molecular strategy used by certain neurotoxins has allowed the design of entirely new classes of drugs acting on specific targets with high selectivity and efficacy. This chapter will discuss the different classes of marine neurotoxins, their effects on neurotransmitter release and how they act to incapacitate key steps in the process leading to synaptic vesicle fusion.

  19. Cryptic population dynamics: rapid evolution masks trophic interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehito Yoshida

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Trophic relationships, such as those between predator and prey or between pathogen and host, are key interactions linking species in ecological food webs. The structure of these links and their strengths have major consequences for the dynamics and stability of food webs. The existence and strength of particular trophic links has often been assessed using observational data on changes in species abundance through time. Here we show that very strong links can be completely missed by these kinds of analyses when changes in population abundance are accompanied by contemporaneous rapid evolution in the prey or host species. Experimental observations, in rotifer-alga and phage-bacteria chemostats, show that the predator or pathogen can exhibit large-amplitude cycles while the abundance of the prey or host remains essentially constant. We know that the species are tightly linked in these experimental microcosms, but without this knowledge, we would infer from observed patterns in abundance that the species are weakly or not at all linked. Mathematical modeling shows that this kind of cryptic dynamics occurs when there is rapid prey or host evolution for traits conferring defense against attack, and the cost of defense (in terms of tradeoffs with other fitness components is low. Several predictions of the theory that we developed to explain the rotifer-alga experiments are confirmed in the phage-bacteria experiments, where bacterial evolution could be tracked. Modeling suggests that rapid evolution may also confound experimental approaches to measuring interaction strength, but it identifies certain experimental designs as being more robust against potential confounding by rapid evolution.

  20. Cortical oscillatory dynamics in a social interaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Slobodskoj-Plusnin, Jaroslav Y; Bocharov, Andrey V; Pylkova, Liudmila V

    2013-03-15

    In this study we sought to investigate cortical oscillatory dynamics accompanying three major kinds of social behavior: aggressive, friendly, and avoidant. Behavioral and EEG data were collected in 48 participants during a computer game modeling social interactions with virtual 'persons'. 3D source reconstruction and independent component analysis were applied to EEG data. Results showed that social behavior was partly reactive and partly proactive with subject's personality playing an important role in shaping this behavior. Most salient differences were found between avoidance and approach behaviors, whereas the two kinds of approach behavior (i.e., aggression and friendship) did not differ from each other. Comparative to avoidance, approach behaviors were associated with higher induced responses in most frequency bands which were mostly observed in cortical areas overlapping with the default mode network. The difference between approach- and avoidance-related oscillatory dynamics was more salient in subjects predisposed to approach behaviors (i.e., in aggressive or sociable subjects) and was less pronounced in subjects predisposed to avoidance behavior (i.e., in high trait anxiety scorers). There was a trend to higher low frequency phase-locking in motor area in approach than in avoid condition. Results are discussed in light of the concept linking induced responses with top-down and evoked responses with bottom-up processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stochastic dynamics of interacting haematopoietic stem cell niche lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Székely

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since we still know very little about stem cells in their natural environment, it is useful to explore their dynamics through modelling and simulation, as well as experimentally. Most models of stem cell systems are based on deterministic differential equations that ignore the natural heterogeneity of stem cell populations. This is not appropriate at the level of individual cells and niches, when randomness is more likely to affect dynamics. In this paper, we introduce a fast stochastic method for simulating a metapopulation of stem cell niche lineages, that is, many sub-populations that together form a heterogeneous metapopulation, over time. By selecting the common limiting timestep, our method ensures that the entire metapopulation is simulated synchronously. This is important, as it allows us to introduce interactions between separate niche lineages, which would otherwise be impossible. We expand our method to enable the coupling of many lineages into niche groups, where differentiated cells are pooled within each niche group. Using this method, we explore the dynamics of the haematopoietic system from a demand control system perspective. We find that coupling together niche lineages allows the organism to regulate blood cell numbers as closely as possible to the homeostatic optimum. Furthermore, coupled lineages respond better than uncoupled ones to random perturbations, here the loss of some myeloid cells. This could imply that it is advantageous for an organism to connect together its niche lineages into groups. Our results suggest that a potential fruitful empirical direction will be to understand how stem cell descendants communicate with the niche and how cancer may arise as a result of a failure of such communication.

  2. Fractional Dynamics of Network Growth Constrained by Aging Node Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiseh Safdari

    Full Text Available In many social complex systems, in which agents are linked by non-linear interactions, the history of events strongly influences the whole network dynamics. However, a class of "commonly accepted beliefs" seems rarely studied. In this paper, we examine how the growth process of a (social network is influenced by past circumstances. In order to tackle this cause, we simply modify the well known preferential attachment mechanism by imposing a time dependent kernel function in the network evolution equation. This approach leads to a fractional order Barabási-Albert (BA differential equation, generalizing the BA model. Our results show that, with passing time, an aging process is observed for the network dynamics. The aging process leads to a decay for the node degree values, thereby creating an opposing process to the preferential attachment mechanism. On one hand, based on the preferential attachment mechanism, nodes with a high degree are more likely to absorb links; but, on the other hand, a node's age has a reduced chance for new connections. This competitive scenario allows an increased chance for younger members to become a hub. Simulations of such a network growth with aging constraint confirm the results found from solving the fractional BA equation. We also report, as an exemplary application, an investigation of the collaboration network between Hollywood movie actors. It is undubiously shown that a decay in the dynamics of their collaboration rate is found, even including a sex difference. Such findings suggest a widely universal application of the so generalized BA model.

  3. Fractional Dynamics of Network Growth Constrained by Aging Node Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Hadiseh; Zare Kamali, Milad; Shirazi, Amirhossein; Khalighi, Moein; Jafari, Gholamreza; Ausloos, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    In many social complex systems, in which agents are linked by non-linear interactions, the history of events strongly influences the whole network dynamics. However, a class of “commonly accepted beliefs” seems rarely studied. In this paper, we examine how the growth process of a (social) network is influenced by past circumstances. In order to tackle this cause, we simply modify the well known preferential attachment mechanism by imposing a time dependent kernel function in the network evolution equation. This approach leads to a fractional order Barabási-Albert (BA) differential equation, generalizing the BA model. Our results show that, with passing time, an aging process is observed for the network dynamics. The aging process leads to a decay for the node degree values, thereby creating an opposing process to the preferential attachment mechanism. On one hand, based on the preferential attachment mechanism, nodes with a high degree are more likely to absorb links; but, on the other hand, a node’s age has a reduced chance for new connections. This competitive scenario allows an increased chance for younger members to become a hub. Simulations of such a network growth with aging constraint confirm the results found from solving the fractional BA equation. We also report, as an exemplary application, an investigation of the collaboration network between Hollywood movie actors. It is undubiously shown that a decay in the dynamics of their collaboration rate is found, even including a sex difference. Such findings suggest a widely universal application of the so generalized BA model. PMID:27171424

  4. Framework to study dynamic dependencies in networks of interacting processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicharro, Daniel; Ledberg, Anders

    2012-10-01

    The analysis of dynamic dependencies in complex systems such as the brain helps to understand how emerging properties arise from interactions. Here we propose an information-theoretic framework to analyze the dynamic dependencies in multivariate time-evolving systems. This framework constitutes a fully multivariate extension and unification of previous approaches based on bivariate or conditional mutual information and Granger causality or transfer entropy. We define multi-information measures that allow us to study the global statistical structure of the system as a whole, the total dependence between subsystems, and the temporal statistical structure of each subsystem. We develop a stationary and a nonstationary formulation of the framework. We then examine different decompositions of these multi-information measures. The transfer entropy naturally appears as a term in some of these decompositions. This allows us to examine its properties not as an isolated measure of interdependence but in the context of the complete framework. More generally we use causal graphs to study the specificity and sensitivity of all the measures appearing in these decompositions to different sources of statistical dependence arising from the causal connections between the subsystems. We illustrate that there is no straightforward relation between the strength of specific connections and specific terms in the decompositions. Furthermore, causal and noncausal statistical dependencies are not separable. In particular, the transfer entropy can be nonmonotonic in dependence on the connectivity strength between subsystems and is also sensitive to internal changes of the subsystems, so it should not be interpreted as a measure of connectivity strength. Altogether, in comparison to an analysis based on single isolated measures of interdependence, this framework is more powerful to analyze emergent properties in multivariate systems and to characterize functionally relevant changes in the

  5. Robust Generation of Dynamic Data Structure Visualizations with Multiple Interaction Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, James H., II; Hendrix, T. Dean; Umphress, David A.; Barowski, Larry A.; Jain, Jhilmil; Montgomery, Lacey N.

    2009-01-01

    jGRASP has three integrated approaches for interacting with its dynamic viewers for data structures: debugger, workbench, and text-based interactions that allow individual Java statements and expressions to be executed/evaluated. These approaches can be used together to provide a complementary set of interactions with the dynamic viewers. Data…

  6. Accessing Wireless Sensor Networks Via Dynamically Reconfigurable Interaction Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Gomes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs technology is already perceived as fundamental for science across many domains, since it provides a low cost solution for environment monitoring. WSNs representation via the service concept and its inclusion in Web environments, e.g. through Web services, supports particularly their open/standard access and integration. Although such Web enabled WSNs simplify data access, network parameterization and aggregation, the existing interaction models and run-time adaptation mechanisms available to clients are still scarce. Nevertheless, applications increasingly demand richer and more flexible accesses besides the traditional client/server. For instance, applications may require a streaming model in order to avoid sequential data requests, or the asynchronous notification of subscribed data through the publish/subscriber. Moreover, the possibility to automatically switch between such models at runtime allows applications to define flexible context-based data acquisition. To this extent, this paper discusses the relevance of the session and pattern abstractions on the design of a middleware prototype providing richer and dynamically reconfigurable interaction models to Web enabled WSNs.

  7. Visualising interactive flood risk maps in a dynamic Geobrowser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaw Manful, Desmond; He, Yi; Cloke, Hannah; Pappenberger, Florian; Li, Zhijia; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Huang, Yingchun; Hu, Yuzhong

    2010-05-01

    Communicating flood forecast products effectively to end-users is the final step in the flood event simulation process. A prototype of the Novel Flood Early Warning System (NEWS) based on the TIGGE (THORPEX Interactive Grand Global Ensemble) database explores new avenues to visualise flood forecast products in a dynamic and interactive manner. One of the possibilities NEWS is currently assessing is Google Maps. Google Maps is a basic web mapping service application and technology provided by Google, free (for non-commercial use). It powers many map-based services including maps embedded on third-party websites via the Google Maps API. Creating a customized map interface requires adding the Google JavaScript code to a page, and then using Javascript functions to add points to the map. Flood maps allow end-users to visualise and navigate a world that is too large and complex to be seen directly. The NEWS software will attempt to deal with the following issues: • Uncertainty visualization in hazards maps • Visualizing uncertainty for sector specific risk managers • Uncertainty representation of point and linear data The objective is improve the information content of flood risk maps making them more useful to specific end-users.

  8. Examining the dynamic interactions on volatilities of paired stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Shean; Sek, Siok Kun

    2015-02-01

    We conduct empirical analyses to investigate the interaction between volatilities of paired stock markets. The main objective of this study is to reveal possibility of spillover effects among stock markets which can determine the performances of stock returns and trade volumes of stocks. In particular, we seek to investigate if there exist two-way causal relationships on the volatilities in two stock markets in two groups of countries, i.e. between emerging markets of ASEAN-5 and between emerging and advanced countries. Our study is focused in Malaysia stock market and the paired relationship with its neighbouring countries (ASEAN5) and advanced countries (Japan and U.S.) respectively. The multivariate GARCH(1,1) model is applied in studying the interactions on the volatilities of paired stock markets. The results are compared between neighbouring countries and with that of advanced countries. The results are expected to reveal linkages between volatilities of stock markets and the dynamic relationships across markets. The results provide useful information in studying the performances of stock markets and predicting the stock movements by incorporating the external impacts from foreign stock markets.

  9. ARCHITECTURAL LARGE CONSTRUCTED ENVIRONMENT. MODELING AND INTERACTION USING DYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fiamma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How to use for the architectural design, the simulation coming from a large size data model? The topic is related to the phase coming usually after the acquisition of the data, during the construction of the model and especially after, when designers must have an interaction with the simulation, in order to develop and verify their idea. In the case of study, the concept of interaction includes the concept of real time "flows". The work develops contents and results that can be part of the large debate about the current connection between "architecture" and "movement". The focus of the work, is to realize a collaborative and participative virtual environment on which different specialist actors, client and final users can share knowledge, targets and constraints to better gain the aimed result. The goal is to have used a dynamic micro simulation digital resource that allows all the actors to explore the model in powerful and realistic way and to have a new type of interaction in a complex architectural scenario. On the one hand, the work represents a base of knowledge that can be implemented more and more; on the other hand the work represents a dealt to understand the large constructed architecture simulation as a way of life, a way of being in time and space. The architectural design before, and the architectural fact after, both happen in a sort of "Spatial Analysis System". The way is open to offer to this "system", knowledge and theories, that can support architectural design work for every application and scale. We think that the presented work represents a dealt to understand the large constructed architecture simulation as a way of life, a way of being in time and space. Architecture like a spatial configuration, that can be reconfigurable too through designing.

  10. Secondary Abnormalities of Neurotransmitters in Infants with Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cazorla, A.; Serrano, M.; Perez-Duenas, B.; Gonzalez, V.; Ormazabal, A.; Pineda, M.; Fernandez-Alvarez, E.; Campistol, J. M. D.; Artuch, R. M. D.

    2007-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential in young children for differentiation and neuronal growth of the developing nervous system. We aimed to identify possible factors related to secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities in pediatric patients with neurological disorders. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and biogenic amine metabolites in 56 infants…

  11. Modelling social interaction as perceptual crossing: an investigation into the dynamics of the interaction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Tom; Di Paolo, Ezequiel A.

    2010-03-01

    This paper continues efforts to establish a mutually informative dialogue between psychology and evolutionary robotics in order to investigate the dynamics of social interaction. We replicate a recent simulation model of a minimalist experiment in perceptual crossing and confirm the results with significantly simpler artificial agents. A series of psycho-physical tests of their behaviour informs a hypothetical circuit model of their internal operation. However, a detailed study of the actual internal dynamics reveals this circuit model to be unfounded, thereby offering a tale of caution for those hypothesising about sub-personal processes in terms of behavioural observations. In particular, it is shown that the behaviour of the agents largely emerges out of the interaction process itself rather than being an individual achievement alone. We also extend the original simulation model in two novel directions in order to test further the extent to which perceptual crossing between agents can self-organise in a robust manner. These modelling results suggest new hypotheses that can become the basis for further psychological experiments.

  12. Stress, strain, and structural dynamics an interactive handbook of formulas, solutions, and Matlab toolboxes

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Bingen

    2005-01-01

    Stress, Strain, and Structural Dynamics is a comprehensive and definitive reference to statics and dynamics of solids and structures, including mechanics of materials, structural mechanics, elasticity, rigid-body dynamics, vibrations, structural dynamics, and structural controls. This text integrates the development of fundamental theories, formulas and mathematical models with user-friendly interactive computer programs, written in the powerful and popular MATLAB. This unique merger of technical referencing and interactive computing allows instant solution of a variety of engineering problems

  13. Flight Dynamic Simulation with Nonlinear Aeroelastic Interaction using the ROM-ROM Procedure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc. (ZONA) proposes to develop an integrated flight dynamics simulation capability with nonlinear aeroelastic interactions by combining a flight...

  14. Empathy, engagement, entrainment: the interaction dynamics of aesthetic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinck, Ingar

    2017-04-08

    A recent version of the view that aesthetic experience is based in empathy as inner imitation explains aesthetic experience as the automatic simulation of actions, emotions, and bodily sensations depicted in an artwork by motor neurons in the brain. Criticizing the simulation theory for committing to an erroneous concept of empathy and failing to distinguish regular from aesthetic experiences of art, I advance an alternative, dynamic approach and claim that aesthetic experience is enacted and skillful, based in the recognition of others' experiences as distinct from one's own. In combining insights from mainly psychology, phenomenology, and cognitive science, the dynamic approach aims to explain the emergence of aesthetic experience in terms of the reciprocal interaction between viewer and artwork. I argue that aesthetic experience emerges by participatory sense-making and revolves around movement as a means for creating meaning. While entrainment merely plays a preparatory part in this, aesthetic engagement constitutes the phenomenological side of coupling to an artwork and provides the context for exploration, and eventually for moving, seeing, and feeling with art. I submit that aesthetic experience emerges from bodily and emotional engagement with works of art via the complementary processes of the perception-action and motion-emotion loops. The former involves the embodied visual exploration of an artwork in physical space, and progressively structures and organizes visual experience by way of perceptual feedback from body movements made in response to the artwork. The latter concerns the movement qualities and shapes of implicit and explicit bodily responses to an artwork that cue emotion and thereby modulate over-all affect and attitude. The two processes cause the viewer to bodily and emotionally move with and be moved by individual works of art, and consequently to recognize another psychological orientation than her own, which explains how art can cause

  15. Dynamic Interaction between Cap & Trade and Electricity Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeev, Kumar

    Greenhouse Gases (GHG), such as Carbon-Dioxide (CO2), which is released in the atmosphere due to anthropogenic activities like power production, are now accepted as the main culprits for global warming. The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), an initiative of the North East and Mid-Atlantic States of the United States (US) for limiting the emission of GHG, has developed a regional cap-and-trade program for CO2 emissions for power plants. Existing cap-and-trade programs in US and Europe for Greenhouse Gases have recently been plagued by over-allocation. Carbon prices recently collapsed in all these markets during the global recession. Since then, there have been significant policy changes, which have resulted in the adoption of aggressive emission cap targets by most major carbon emission markets. This is expected to make carbon emissions availability more restrictive, raising the prices of these credits. These emissions markets are expected to have a major impact on the wholesale electricity markets. Two models to study the interaction of these two markets are presented. These models assess the impact of the emissions market on wholesale electricity prices. The first model characterizes the competition between two types of power plants (coal and gas) in both the electricity and emissions markets as a dynamic game using the Cournot approximation. Under this approximation, we find that in the Nash equilibrium the plants increase their permit allocation to high-demand periods and the marginal value of each credit for a plant is identical in all periods under their optimal equilibrium strategy. The second numerical model allows us to explicitly evaluate the closed loop equilibrium of the dynamic interaction of two competitors in these markets. We find that plants often try to corner the market and push prices all the way to the price cap. Power plants derive most of their profits from these extreme price regimes. In the experiments where trading is allowed

  16. REM sleep at its core—Circuits, neurotransmitters and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ePeever

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available REM sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle paralysis and cortical activation. REM sleep paralysis is initiated when glutamatergic SubC activate neurons in the ventral medial medulla (VMM, which causes release of GABA and glycine onto skeletal motoneurons. REM sleep timing is controlled by activity of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG and dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi as well as melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH neurons in the hypothalamus and cholinergic cells in the laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculo-pontine tegmentum (PPT in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie cataplexy/narcolepsy and REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD. This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD.

  17. REM Sleep at its Core – Circuits, Neurotransmitters, and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraigne, Jimmy J.; Torontali, Zoltan A.; Snow, Matthew B.; Peever, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain, and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC) or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle paralysis and cortical activation. REM sleep paralysis is initiated when glutamatergic SubC cells activate neurons in the ventral medial medulla, which causes release of GABA and glycine onto skeletal motoneurons. REM sleep timing is controlled by activity of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray and dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus as well as melanin-concentrating hormone neurons in the hypothalamus and cholinergic cells in the laterodorsal and pedunculo-pontine tegmentum in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie narcolepsy/cataplexy and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD. PMID:26074874

  18. Cytoplasmic permeation pathway of neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Gary

    2011-09-06

    Ion-coupled solute transporters are responsible for transporting nutrients, ions, and signaling molecules across a variety of biological membranes. Recent high-resolution crystal structures of several transporters from protein families that were previously thought to be unrelated show common structural features indicating a large structural family representing transporters from all kingdoms of life. This review describes studies that led to an understanding of the conformational changes required for solute transport in this family. The first structure in this family showed the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, which is homologous to neurotransmitter transporters, in an extracellularly oriented conformation with a molecule of leucine occluded at the substrate site. Studies with the mammalian serotonin transporter identified positions, buried in the LeuT structure, that defined a potential pathway leading from the cytoplasm to the substrate binding site. Modeling studies utilized an inverted structural repeat within the LeuT crystal structure to predict the conformation of LeuT in which the cytoplasmic permeation pathway, consisting of positions identified in SERT, was open for diffusion of the substrate to the cytoplasm. From the difference between the model and the crystal structures, a simple "rocking bundle" mechanism was proposed, in which a four-helix bundle changed its orientation with respect to the rest of the protein to close the extracellular pathway and open the cytoplasmic one. Subsequent crystal structures from structurally related proteins provide evidence supporting this model for transport.

  19. Dirty electricity, chronic stress, neurotransmitters and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milham, Samuel; Stetzer, David

    2013-12-01

    Dirty electricity, also called electrical pollution, is high-frequency voltage transients riding along the 50 or 60 Hz electricity provided by the electric utilities. It is generated by arcing, by sparking and by any device that interrupts current flow, especially switching power supplies. It has been associated with cancer, diabetes and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans. Epidemiological evidence also links dirty electricity to most of the diseases of civilization including cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and suicide, beginning at the turn of the twentieth century. The dirty electricity level in a public library was reduced from over 10 000 Graham/Stetzer (G/S) units to below 50 G/S units by installing plug-in capacitive filters. Before cleanup, the urinary dopamine level of only one of seven volunteers was within normal levels, while four of seven phenylethylamine levels were normal. After an initial decline, over the next 18 weeks the dopamine levels gradually increased to an average of over 215 μg/g creatinine, which is well above 170 μg/g creatinine, the high normal level for the lab. Average phenylethylamine levels also rose gradually to slightly above 70 μg/g creatinine, the high normal level for the lab. Neurotransmitters may be biomarkers for dirty electricity and other electromagnetic field exposures. We believe that dirty electricity is a chronic stressor of electrified populations and is responsible for many of their disease patterns.

  20. Cable dynamics under non-ideal support excitations: Nonlinear dynamic interactions and asymptotic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tieding; Kang, Houjun; Wang, Lianhua; Zhao, Yueyu

    2016-12-01

    Cable dynamics under ideal longitudinal support motions/excitations assumes that the support's mass, stiffness and mechanical energy are infinite. However, for many long/slender support structures, their finite mass and stiffness should be taken into account and the cable-support dynamic interactions should be modelled and evaluated. These moving supports are non-ideal support excitations, deserving a proper coupling analysis. For systems with a large support/cable mass ratio, using the multiple scale method and asymptotic approximations, a cable-support coupled reduced model, with both cable's geometric nonlinearity and cable-support coupling nonlinearity included, is established asymptotically and validated numerically in this paper. Based upon the reduced model, cable's nonlinear responses under non-ideal support excitations(and also the coupled responses) are found, with stability and bifurcation characteristics determined. By finding the modifications caused by the support/cable mass ratio, boundary damping, and internal detuning, full investigations into coupling-induced dynamic effects on the cable are conducted. Finally, the approximate analytical results based on the reduced model are verified by numerical results from the original full model.

  1. Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics using soft-core interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritz, Jozef; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2008-04-14

    To overcome the problem of insufficient conformational sampling within biomolecular simulations, we have developed a novel Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (H-REMD) scheme that uses soft-core interactions between those parts of the system that contribute most to high energy barriers. The advantage of this approach over other H-REMD schemes is the possibility to use a relatively small number of replicas with locally larger differences between the individual Hamiltonians. Because soft-core potentials are almost the same as regular ones at longer distances, most of the interactions between atoms of perturbed parts will only be slightly changed. Rather, the strong repulsion between atoms that are close in space, which in many cases results in high energy barriers, is weakened within higher replicas of our proposed scheme. In addition to the soft-core interactions, we proposed to include multiple replicas using the same Hamiltonian/level of softness. We have tested the new protocol on the GTP and 8-Br-GTP molecules, which are known to have high energy barriers between the anti and syn conformation of the base with respect to the sugar moiety. During two 25 ns MD simulations of both systems the transition from the more stable to the less stable (but still experimentally observed) conformation is not seen at all. Also temperature REMD over 50 replicas for 1 ns did not show any transition at room temperature. On the other hand, more than 20 of such transitions are observed in H-REMD using six replicas (at three different Hamiltonians) during 6.8 ns per replica for GTP and 12 replicas (at six different Hamiltonians) during 8.7 ns per replica for 8-Br-GTP. The large increase in sampling efficiency was obtained from an optimized H-REMD scheme involving soft-core potentials, with multiple simulations using the same level of softness. The optimization of the scheme was performed by fast mimicking [J. Hritz and C. Oostenbrink, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 204104 (2007)].

  2. Short-Term Dynamical Interactions Among Extrasolar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Chambers, John E.; DiVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We show that short-term perturbations among massive planets in multiple planet systems can result in radial velocity variations of the central star which differ substantially from velocity variations derived assuming the planets are executing independent Keplerian motions. We discuss two alternate fitting methods which can lead to an improved dynamical description of multiple planet systems. In the first method, the osculating orbital elements are determined via a Levenberg-Marquardt minimization scheme driving an N-body integrator. The second method is an improved analytic model in which orbital elements such as the periods and longitudes of periastron are allowed to vary according to a simple model for resonant interactions between the planets. Both of these methods can potentially determine the true masses for the planets by eliminating the sin(i) degeneracy inherent in fits that assume independent Keplerian motions. As more radial velocity data is accumulated from stars such as GJ876, these methods should allow for unambiguous determination of the planetary masses and relative inclinations.

  3. Star-planet interactions and dynamical evolution of exoplanetary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiani Cilia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical evolution of planetary systems, after the evaporation of the accretion disk, is the result of the competition between tidal dissipation and the net angular momentum loss of the system. The description of the diversity of orbital configurations, and correlations between parameters of the observed system (e.g. in the case of hot jupiters, is still limited by our understanding of the transport of angular momentum within the stars, and its effective loss by magnetic braking. After discussing the challenges of modelling tidal evolution for exoplanets, I will review recent results showing the importance of tidal interactions to test models of planetary formation. This kind of studies rely on the determination of stellar radii, masses and ages. Major advances will thus be obtained with the results of the PLATO 2.0 mission, selected as the next M-class mission of ESA’s Cosmic Vision plan, that will allow the complete characterisation of host stars using asteroseismology.

  4. Dynamics of particle--turbulence interaction at the dissipative scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Dam, Nico; van de Water, Willem; JM Burgerscentrum Collaboration; COST Action, Particles in Turbulence Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present results of a novel phosphorescent tagging technique that is particularly suited to study particle-laden flows. Using phosphorescent droplets we probe the dynamics of particle-turbulence interaction at the dissipative length scales. We create a cloud of droplets within a chamber capable of generating homogeneous, isotropic turbulence with zero-mean flow. The droplets have Stokes number St ~ 1 , and the flow is intensely turbulent, with Reynolds number Reλ ~ 500 . Using a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser, we can tag a variety of volumes, such as thin slabs or thin, pencil-like cylinders. The droplets in these volumes glow during a few Kolmogorov times. By tracking the fate of pencil-shaped clouds using a fast (5 kHz) camera, we come to the surprising conclusion that they disperse faster than fluid elements, with a spreading rate reaching a maximum at St ~ 2 . Sheets of tagged droplets display preferential concentration at work; we discuss statistical quantities that can capture these events. This project is funded by Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM).

  5. Geometrical Constructions in Dynamic and Interactive Mathematics Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margo Kondratieva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns teaching Euclidean geometry at the university level. It is based on the authors’ personal experience. It describes a sequence of learning activities that combine geometrical constructions with explorations, observations, and explanations of facts related to the geometry of triangle. Within this approach, a discussion of the Euler and Nigel lines receives a unified treatment via employment of a plane transformation that maps a triangle into its medial triangle. I conclude that during this course delivery, the role of constructions in dynamic and interactive environment was significant for students’ genuine understanding of the subject. In particular, it helped them to work with concrete figures and develop their own preformal approaches before learning general theorems and proofs. At the same time it was essential to follow such strategies as gradually lead students from basic to advanced constructions, from making simple analogies to generalizations based on critical ideas and unified principles, and emphasize structural interconnectedness of the problems each of which adds a new element into a bigger picture.

  6. The Dynamics of Interactions Among Immune and Glioblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Katalin; Kalman, Bernadette

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common intracranial malignancy that constitutes about 50 % of all gliomas. Despite aggressive, multimodal therapy consisting of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, the outcome of patients with glioblastoma remains poor with 5-year survival rates of immune mediators may represent a critical contributor to this resistance. The tumor microenvironment contains innate and adaptive immune cells in addition to the cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. These various cells communicate with each other by means of direct cell-cell contact or by soluble factors including cytokines and chemokines, and act in autocrine and paracrine manners to modulate tumor growth. There are dynamic interactions among the local immune elements and the tumor cells, where primarily the protective immune cells attempt to overcome the malignant cells. However, by developing somatic mutations and epigenetic modifications, the glioblastoma tumor cells acquire the capability of counteracting the local immune responses, and even exploit the immune cells and products for their own growth benefits. In this review, we survey those immune mechanisms that likely contribute to glioblastoma pathogenesis and may serve as a basis for novel treatment strategies.

  7. Escape dynamics in a binary system of interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    The escape dynamics in an analytical gravitational model which describes the motion of stars in a binary system of interacting dwarf spheroidal galaxies is investigated in detail. We conduct a numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. In order to distinguish safely and with certainty between ordered and chaotic motion, we apply the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins through the openings around the collinear Lagrangian points $L_1$ and $L_2$ and relate them with the corresponding spatial distribution of the escape times of the orbits. Our exploration takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the galactic system. Our numerical analysis reveals the strong dependence of the properties of the con...

  8. OTEC Cold Water Pipe-Platform Subsystem Dynamic Interaction Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, Robert [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Manassas, VA (United States); Halkyard, John [John Halkyard and Associates, Houston, TX (United States); Johnson, Peter [BMT Scientific Marine Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shi, Shan [Houston Offshore Engineering, Houston, TX (United States); Marinho, Thiago [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). LabOceano

    2014-05-09

    A commercial floating 100-megawatt (MW) ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power plant will require a cold water pipe (CWP) with a diameter of 10-meter (m) and length of up to 1,000 m. The mass of the cold water pipe, including entrained water, can exceed the mass of the platform supporting it. The offshore industry uses software-modeling tools to develop platform and riser (pipe) designs to survive the offshore environment. These tools are typically validated by scale model tests in facilities able to replicate real at-sea meteorological and ocean (metocean) conditions to provide the understanding and confidence to proceed to final design and full-scale fabrication. However, today’s offshore platforms (similar to and usually larger than those needed for OTEC applications) incorporate risers (or pipes) with diameters well under one meter. Secondly, the preferred construction method for large diameter OTEC CWPs is the use of composite materials, primarily a form of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP). The use of these material results in relatively low pipe stiffness and large strains compared to steel construction. These factors suggest the need for further validation of offshore industry software tools. The purpose of this project was to validate the ability to model numerically the dynamic interaction between a large cold water-filled fiberglass pipe and a floating OTEC platform excited by metocean weather conditions using measurements from a scale model tested in an ocean basin test facility.

  9. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (IBM VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  10. Synthesis of symmetrical and non-symmetrical bivalent neurotransmitter ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Andersen, Jacob; Thygesen, Mikkel Boas

    2016-01-01

    A novel procedure for synthesis of bivalent neurotransmitter ligands was developed by reacting O-benzyl protected N-nosylated dopamine and serotonin with alkyl- or PEG-linked diols under Fukuyama-Mitsunobu conditions in the presence of DIAD/PPh3 generating three different bivalent neurotransmitter...... ligands in a one-pot reaction. The methodol. establishes a facile route towards bivalent neurotransmitter ligands, and libraries of in total 40 sym. and non-sym. bivalent and monovalent dopamine and serotonin compds. linked through alkyl or PEG spacers of varying length were prepd. Interestingly...

  11. Associations between Purine Metabolites and Monoamine Neurotransmitters in First-Episode Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey K Yao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SZ is a biochemically complex disorder characterized by widespread defects in multiple metabolic pathways whose dynamic interactions, until recently, have been difficult to examine. Rather, evidence for these alterations has been collected piecemeal, limiting the potential to inform our understanding of the interactions amongst relevant biochemical pathways. We herein review perturbations in purine and neurotransmitter metabolism observed in early SZ using a metabolomic approach. Purine catabolism is an underappreciated, but important component of the homeostatic response of mitochondria to oxidant stress. We have observed a homeostatic imbalance of purine catabolism in first-episode neuroleptic-naive patients with SZ (FENNS. Precursor and product relationships within purine pathways are tightly correlated. Although some of these correlations persist across disease or medication status, others appear to be lost among FENNS suggesting that steady formation of the antioxidant uric acid via purine catabolism is altered early in the course of illness. As is the case for within-pathway correlations, there are also significant cross-pathway correlations between respective purine and tryptophan pathway metabolites. By contrast, purine metabolites show significant cross-pathway correlation only with tyrosine, and not with its metabolites. Furthermore, several purine metabolites (uric acid, guanosine, or xanthine are each significantly correlated with 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA in healthy controls, but not in FENNS at baseline or 4-week after antipsychotic treatment. Taken together, the above findings suggest that purine catabolism strongly associates with the tryptophan pathways leading to serotonin (5-HT and kynurenine metabolites. The Lack of a significant correlation between purine metabolites and 5-HIAA, suggests alterations in key 5-HT pathways that may both be modified by and contribute to oxidative stress via purine

  12. Mechanism for alternating access in neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Lucy R; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Jacobs, Miriam T; Gesmonde, Joan; Xie, Li; Honig, Barry H; Rudnick, Gary

    2008-07-29

    Crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters, show a molecule of bound substrate that is essentially exposed to the extracellular space but occluded from the cytoplasm. Thus, there must exist an alternate conformation for LeuT in which the substrate is accessible to the cytoplasm and a corresponding mechanism that switches accessibility from one side of the membrane to the other. Here, we identify the cytoplasmic accessibility pathway of the alternate conformation in a mammalian serotonin transporter (SERT) (a member of the same transporter family as LeuT). We also propose a model for the cytoplasmic-facing state that exploits the internal pseudosymmetry observed in the crystal structure. LeuT contains two structurally similar repeats (TMs1-5 and TMs 6-10) that are inverted with respect to the plane of the membrane. The conformational differences between them result in the formation of the extracellular pathway. Our model for the cytoplasm-facing state exchanges the conformations of the two repeats and thus exposes the substrate and ion-binding sites to the cytoplasm. The conformational change that connects the two states primarily involves the tilting of a 4-helix bundle composed of transmembrane helices 1, 2, 6, and 7. Switching the tilt angle of this bundle is essentially equivalent to switching the conformation of the two repeats. Extensive mutagenesis of SERT and accessibility measurements, using cysteine reagents, are accommodated by our model. These observations may be of relevance to other transporter families, many of which contain internal inverted repeats.

  13. Atomistic interactions of clusters on surfaces using molecular dynamics and hyper molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz-Navarro, C F

    2002-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis describes the results of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations applied to the interaction of silver clusters with graphite surfaces and some numerical and theoretical methods concerning the extension of MD simulations to longer time scales (hyper-MD). The first part of this thesis studies the implantation of clusters at normal incidence onto a graphite surface in order to determine the scaling of the penetration depth (PD) against the impact energy. A comparison with experimental results is made with good agreement. The main physical observations of the impact process are described and analysed. It is shown that there is a threshold impact velocity above which the linear dependence on PD on impact energy changes to a linear dependence on velocity. Implantation of silver clusters at oblique incidence is also considered. The second part of this work analyses the validity and feasibility of the three minimisation methods for the hyper-MD simulation method whereby time scales of an...

  14. Land use and land cover dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon: understanding human-environmental interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza Soler, de L.

    2014-01-01

    Land use and land cover dynamics are a result of the interactions between human activities and the environment. The objective of this thesis is to analyze Amazonian land use and land cover pattern dynamics in order to identify the underlying system dynamics. By combining empirical statistical models

  15. Interaction of the Space Shuttle on-orbit autopilot with tether dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Edward V.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of Orbiter flight control on tether dynamics is studied by simulation. Open-loop effects of Orbiter jet firing on tether dynamics are shown, and the potential for closed-loop interaction between tether dynamics and Orbiter flight control is determined. The significance of these effects on Orbiter flight control and tether control is assessed.

  16. SLC6 Neurotransmitter Transporters: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Andersen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Trine N

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) gene family (also referred to as the neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter family or Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent transporters) comprise a group of nine sodium- and chloride-dependent plasma membrane transporters for the monoa......The neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) gene family (also referred to as the neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter family or Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent transporters) comprise a group of nine sodium- and chloride-dependent plasma membrane transporters....... Furthermore, psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines have the SLC6 NTTs as primary targets. Beginning with the determination of a high-resolution structure of a prokaryotic homolog of the mammalian SLC6 transporters in 2005, the understanding of the molecular structure, function, and pharmacology...

  17. Potential Antidepressant Role of Neurotransmitter CART: Implications for Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhong Mao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is one of the most prevalent and debilitating public health concerns. Although no single cause of depression has been identified, it appears that interaction among genetic, epigenetic, biochemical, environmental, and psychosocial factors may explain its etiology. Further, only a fraction of depressed patients show full remission while using current antidepressants. Therefore, identifying common pathways of the disorder and using that knowledge to develop more effective pharmacological treatments are two primary targets of research in this field. Brain-enriched neurotransmitter CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript has multiple functions related to emotions. It is a potential neurotrophic factor and is involved in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and stress response as well as in energy homeostasis. CART is also highly expressed in limbic system, which is considered to have an important role in regulating mood. Notably, adolescents carrying a missense mutation in the CART gene exhibit increased depression and anxiety. Hence, CART peptide may be a novel promising antidepressant agent. In this paper, we summarize recent progress in depression and CART. In particular, we emphasize a new antidepressant function for CART.

  18. Analysis of neurotransmitters, neurosteroids and their metabolites in biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters and neurosteroids are compounds that regulate the functions of the brain. The neurotransmitters dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) play a role in several psychological conditions, including schizophrenia, depression and anxiety. DA also has an important role in Parkinson s disease. Neurosteroids are involved in neurodegenerative diseases. In Alzheimer s disease and multiple sclerosis, the levels of neurosteroids are decreased in certain areas of the brain. Neurosteroids diff...

  19. FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release and synaptic information transmission by modulating action potential duration via BK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2013-02-20

    Loss of FMRP causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx, and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel's regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology.

  20. Radiotracers for PET and SPECT studies of neurotransmitter systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    The study of neurotransmitter systems is one of the major thrusts in emission tomography today. The current generation of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) radiotracers examines neurotransmitter properties from a number of different perspectives including their pre and post synaptic sites and the activity of the enzymes which regulate their concentration. Although the dopamine system has been the most extensively investigated, other neurotransmitter systems including the acetylcholine muscarine, serotonin, benzodiazepine, opiate, NMDA and others are also under intensive development. Enzymes involved in the synthesis and regulation of neurotransmitter concentration, for example monoamine oxidase and amino acid decarboxylase has also been probed in vivo. Medical applications range from the study of normal function and the characterization of neurotransmitter activity in neurological and psychiatric diseases and in heart disease and cancer to the study of the binding of therapeutic drugs and substances of abuse. This chapter will provide an overview of the current generation of radiotracers for PET and SPECT studies of neurotransmitter systems including radiotracer design, synthesis localization mechanisms and applications in emission tomography. 60 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Selected hormonal and neurotransmitter mechanisms regulating feed intake in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartin, J L; Daniel, J A; Whitlock, B K; Wilborn, R R

    2010-11-01

    Appetite control is a major issue in normal growth and in suboptimal growth performance settings. A number of hormones, in particular leptin, activate or inhibit orexigenic or anorexigenic neurotransmitters within the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, where feed intake regulation is integrated. Examples of appetite regulatory neurotransmitters are the stimulatory neurotransmitters neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP), orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone and the inhibitory neurotransmitter, melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH). Examination of messenger RNA (using in situ hybridization and real-time PCR) and proteins (using immunohistochemistry) for these neurotransmitters in ruminants has indicated that physiological regulation occurs in response to fasting for several of these critical genes and proteins, especially AgRP and NPY. Moreover, intracerebroventricular injection of each of the four stimulatory neurotransmitters can increase feed intake in sheep and may also regulate either growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, cortisol or other hormones. In contrast, both leptin and MSH are inhibitory to feed intake in ruminants. Interestingly, the natural melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) antagonist, AgRP, as well as NPY can prevent the inhibition of feed intake after injection of endotoxin (to model disease suppression of appetite). Thus, knowledge of the mechanisms regulating feed intake in the hypothalamus may lead to mechanisms to increase feed intake in normal growing animals and prevent the wasting effects of severe disease in animals.

  2. Quasi-classical dynamics of interacting Bose condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Salgueiro, A N; Sampaio, M D; De Toledo di Piza, A F R

    1998-01-01

    The dynamics of the composition of uniform Bose condensates involving two species capable of reciprocal interconversion is treated in terms of a collective quasi-spin model. This collective model quickly reduces to classical form towards the thermodynamic limit. Quantum solutions are easily obtained numerically short of this limit which give insight into the dynamically relevant correlation processes.

  3. Simulating market dynamics : Interactions between consumer psychology and social networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, MA; Jager, W

    2003-01-01

    Markets can show different types of dynamics, from quiet markets dominated by one or a few products, to markets with continual penetration of new and reintroduced products. in a previous article we explored the dynamics of markets from a psychological perspective using a multi-agent simulation model

  4. Proofreading of Peptide-MHC Complexes through Dynamic Multivalent Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Tampé, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is able to detect and destroy cells that are malignantly transformed or infected by intracellular pathogens. Specific immune responses against these cells are elicited by antigenic peptides that are presented on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules and recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes at the cell surface. Since these MHC I-presented peptides are generated in the cytosol by proteasomal protein degradation, they can be metaphorically described as a window providing immune cells with insights into the state of the cellular proteome. A crucial element of MHC I antigen presentation is the peptide-loading complex (PLC), a multisubunit machinery, which contains as key constituents the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and the MHC I-specific chaperone tapasin (Tsn). While TAP recognizes and shuttles the cytosolic antigenic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Tsn samples peptides in the ER for their ability to form stable complexes with MHC I, a process called peptide proofreading or peptide editing. Through its selection of peptides that improve MHC I stability, Tsn contributes to the hierarchy of immunodominant peptide epitopes. Despite the fact that it concerns a key event in adaptive immunity, insights into the catalytic mechanism of peptide proofreading carried out by Tsn have only lately been gained via biochemical, biophysical, and structural studies. Furthermore, a Tsn homolog called TAP-binding protein-related (TAPBPR) has only recently been demonstrated to function as a second MHC I-specific chaperone and peptide proofreader. Although TAPBPR is PLC-independent and has a distinct allomorph specificity, it is likely to share a common catalytic mechanism with Tsn. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the multivalent protein-protein interactions and the concomitant dynamic molecular processes underlying peptide-proofreading catalysis. We do not only derive a model that

  5. Proofreading of Peptide—MHC Complexes through Dynamic Multivalent Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Tampé, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is able to detect and destroy cells that are malignantly transformed or infected by intracellular pathogens. Specific immune responses against these cells are elicited by antigenic peptides that are presented on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules and recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes at the cell surface. Since these MHC I-presented peptides are generated in the cytosol by proteasomal protein degradation, they can be metaphorically described as a window providing immune cells with insights into the state of the cellular proteome. A crucial element of MHC I antigen presentation is the peptide-loading complex (PLC), a multisubunit machinery, which contains as key constituents the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and the MHC I-specific chaperone tapasin (Tsn). While TAP recognizes and shuttles the cytosolic antigenic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Tsn samples peptides in the ER for their ability to form stable complexes with MHC I, a process called peptide proofreading or peptide editing. Through its selection of peptides that improve MHC I stability, Tsn contributes to the hierarchy of immunodominant peptide epitopes. Despite the fact that it concerns a key event in adaptive immunity, insights into the catalytic mechanism of peptide proofreading carried out by Tsn have only lately been gained via biochemical, biophysical, and structural studies. Furthermore, a Tsn homolog called TAP-binding protein-related (TAPBPR) has only recently been demonstrated to function as a second MHC I-specific chaperone and peptide proofreader. Although TAPBPR is PLC-independent and has a distinct allomorph specificity, it is likely to share a common catalytic mechanism with Tsn. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the multivalent protein–protein interactions and the concomitant dynamic molecular processes underlying peptide-proofreading catalysis. We do not only derive a model that

  6. Diet-dependent modular dynamic interactions of the equine cecal microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Camilla; Jensen, Rasmus Bovbjerg; Avershina, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on dynamic interactions in microbiota is pivotal for understanding the role of bacteria in the gut. We herein present comprehensive dynamic models of the horse cecal microbiota, which include short-chained fatty acids, carbohydrate metabolic networks, and taxonomy. Dynamic models were...... diets. We observed marked differences in the microbial dynamic interaction patterns for Fibrobacter succinogenes, Lachnospiraceae, Streptococcus, Treponema, Anaerostipes, and Anaerovibrio between the two diet groups. Fluctuations and microbiota interactions were the most pronounced for the starch rich...... sugars for the starch-rich diet and monosaccharides for the fiber-rich diet. In conclusion, diet may not only affect the composition of the cecal microbiota, but also dynamic interactions and metabolic cross-feeding....

  7. Long-range Interactions, Stochasticity and Fractional Dynamics Dedicated to George M Zaslavsky (1935–2008)

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2011-01-01

    In memory of Dr. George Zaslavsky, "Long-range Interactions, Stochasticity and Fractional Dynamics" covers the recent developments of long-range interaction, fractional dynamics, brain dynamics and stochastic theory of turbulence, each chapter was written by established scientists in the field. The book is dedicated to Dr. George Zaslavsky, who was one of three founders of the theory of Hamiltonian chaos. The book discusses self-similarity and stochasticity and fractionality for discrete and continuous dynamical systems, as well as long-range interactions and diluted networks. A comprehensive theory for brain dynamics is also presented. In addition, the complexity and stochasticity for soliton chains and turbulence are addressed. The book is intended for researchers in the field of nonlinear dynamics in mathematics, physics and engineering. Dr. Albert C.J. Luo is a Professor at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, USA. Dr. Valentin Afraimovich is a Professor at San Luis Potosi University, Mexico.

  8. Interacting relativistic quantum dynamics for multi-time wave functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lienert Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report on recent progress about a rigorous and manifestly covariant interacting model for two Dirac particles in 1+1 dimensions [9, 10]. It is formulated using the multi-time formalism of Dirac, Tomonaga and Schwinger. The mechanism of interaction is a relativistic generalization of contact interactions, and it is achieved going beyond the usual functional-analytic Hamiltonian method.

  9. Interacting relativistic quantum dynamics for multi-time wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienert, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we report on recent progress about a rigorous and manifestly covariant interacting model for two Dirac particles in 1+1 dimensions [9, 10]. It is formulated using the multi-time formalism of Dirac, Tomonaga and Schwinger. The mechanism of interaction is a relativistic generalization of contact interactions, and it is achieved going beyond the usual functional-analytic Hamiltonian method.

  10. Dynamic gap generation in graphene under the long-range Coulomb interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jingrong; Liu Guozhu, E-mail: wangjr@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: gzliu@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China)

    2011-08-31

    Dynamic gap generation in graphene under the long-range Coulomb interaction is studied by the Dyson-Schwinger gap equation beyond the instantaneous approximation. Once the dependence of the dynamic gap on the energy has been considered, the critical interaction strength {alpha}{sub c} decreases to 0.542. If the renormalization of the fermion velocity is considered, {alpha}{sub c} will become {alpha}{sub c} = 1.02. This indicates that the dependence on the energy and the renormalization of the fermion velocity are both important for dynamic gap generation in graphene under long-range Coulomb interaction. (paper)

  11. Modeling complex spatial dynamics of two-population interaction in urbanization process

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2013-01-01

    This paper is mainly devoted to lay an empirical foundation for further research on complex spatial dynamics of two-population interaction. Based on the US population census data, a rural and urban population interaction model is developed. Subsequently a logistic equation on percentage urban is derived from the urbanization model so that spatial interaction can be connected mathematically with logistic growth. The numerical experiment by using the discretized urban-rural population interaction model of urbanization shows a period-doubling bifurcation and chaotic behavior, which is identical in patterns to those from the simple mathematical models of logistic growth in ecology. This suggests that the complicated dynamics of logistic growth may come from some kind of the nonlinear interaction. The results from this study help to understand urbanization, urban-rural population interaction, chaotic dynamics, and spatial complexity of geographical systems.

  12. Wine microbiome: A dynamic world of microbial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Youzhong; Rousseaux, Sandrine; Tourdot-Maréchal, Raphaëlle; Sadoudi, Mohand; Gougeon, Régis; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Alexandre, Hervé

    2017-03-04

    Most fermented products are generated by a mixture of microbes. These microbial consortia perform various biological activities responsible for the nutritional, hygienic, and aromatic qualities of the product. Wine is no exception. Substantial yeast and bacterial biodiversity is observed on grapes, and in both must and wine. The diverse microorganisms present interact throughout the winemaking process. The interactions modulate the hygienic and sensorial properties of the wine. Many studies have been conducted to elucidate the nature of these interactions, with the aim of establishing better control of the two fermentations occurring during wine processing. However, wine is a very complex medium making such studies difficult. In this review, we present the current state of research on microbial interactions in wines. We consider the different kinds of interactions between different microorganisms together with the consequences of these interactions. We underline the major challenges to obtaining a better understanding of how microbes interact. Finally, strategies and methodologies that may help unravel microbe interactions in wine are suggested.

  13. Critical dynamics of an interacting magnetic nanoparticle system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Jonsson, P.E.; Nordblad, P.

    2002-01-01

    Effects of dipole-dipole interactions on the magnetic relaxation have been investigated for three Fe-C nanoparticle samples with volume concentrations of 0.06, 5 and 17 vol%. While both the 5 and 17 vol% samples exhibit collective behaviour due to dipolar interactions, only the 17 vol% sample...

  14. Excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the generation and degeneration of hippocampal neuroarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, M P; Kater, S B

    1989-01-30

    The possibility that excitatory and inhibitory inputs to neurons can affect the generation and degeneration of neuroarchitecture was examined in hippocampal pyramidal neurons in isolated cell culture. Dendritic outgrowth and cell survival were directly monitored in neurons exposed to: the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, the inhibitory transmitter GABA, anticonvulsants or combinations of these agents. Glutamate caused a graded series of changes in pyramidal neuron cytoarchitecture: a selective inhibition in dendritic outgrowth and dendritic pruning was observed with subtoxic levels of glutamate while cell death was induced by higher levels. Low levels of GABA alone or in combination with diazepam, carbamazepine, phenobarbital or phenytoin were without effect on dendrite outgrowth while higher levels caused moderate reductions in outgrowth. Neither GABA nor the anticonvulsants affected cell survival. GABA plus diazepam, phenobarbital, carbamazepine and phenytoin each significantly reduced the dendritic regression and cell death normally caused by glutamate. Elevation of extracellular K+ to 50 mM caused dendritic regression and 100 mM K+ caused cell death; these effects were greatly reduced by GABA and anticonvulsants. The calcium channel blocker Co2+ prevented the dendritic regression and cell death caused by both glutamate and K+ indicating that calcium influx was required for the neuroarchitectural responses. Taken together, these results demonstrate that neurotransmitters and neuromodulatory drugs can have direct and interactive effects on both neurite outgrowth and cell survival. Such neurotransmitter actions may play roles in both the formation and degeneration of the neuronal circuits in which they participate in information coding.

  15. Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Studies of Neurotransmitters and Their Metabolites in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Uutela, PÀivi

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters transfer chemically the electrical impulse from one neuron to another in the brain. The concentration of neurotransmitters in many neurological disorders is altered. The measurement of neurotransmitters in the brain is needed to understand how these diseases develop and how they can be treated. Neurotransmitters can be extracted from the brains of freely moving, alert animals by microdialysis technique. The concentration of neurotransmitters and their metabolites in brain mi...

  16. A heart for interaction: Shared physiological dynamics and behavioral coordination in a collective, creative construction task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Bjørndahl, Johanne S; Roepstorff, Andreas; Tylén, Kristian

    2016-09-01

    Interpersonally shared physiological dynamics are increasingly argued to underlie rapport, empathy, and even team performance. Inspired by the model of interpersonal synergy, we critically investigate the presence, temporal development, possible mechanisms and impact of shared interpersonal heart rate (HR) dynamics during individual and collective creative LEGO® construction tasks. In Study 1 we show how shared HR dynamics are driven by a plurality of sources, including task constraints and behavioral coordination. Generally, shared HR dynamics are more prevalent in individual trials (involving participants doing the same things) than in collective ones (involving participants taking turns and performing complementary actions). However, when contrasted against virtual pairs, collective trials display more stable shared HR dynamics suggesting that online social interaction plays an important role. Furthermore, in contrast to individual trials, shared HR dynamics are found to increase across collective trials. Study 2 investigates which aspects of social interaction might drive these effects. We show that shared HR dynamics are statistically predicted by interpersonal speech and building coordination. In Study 3, we explore the relation between HR dynamics, behavioral coordination, and self-reported measures of rapport and group competence. Although behavioral coordination predicts rapport and group competence, shared HR dynamics do not. Although shared physiological dynamics were reliably observed in our study, our results warrant not to consider HR dynamics a general driving mechanism of social coordination. Behavioral coordination-on the other hand-seems to be more informative of both shared physiological dynamics and collective experience. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. GABA not only a neurotransmitter: osmotic regulation by GABAAR signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana eCesetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In neurons the anionic channel γ-aminobutyric (GABA A receptor (GABAAR plays a central role in mediating both the neurotrophic and neurotransmitter role of GABA. Activation of this receptor by GABA also affects the function of non-neuronal cells in the central nervous system (CNS, as GABAARs are expressed in mature macroglia and in almost all progenitor types, including neural stem cells. The relevance of GABA signalling in non-neuronal cells has been comparatively less investigated than in neurons. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that these cells are direct targets of GABA regulation. In non-neuronal cells GABAAR activation leads to influx or efflux of chloride (Cl- depending on the electrochemical gradient. Ion transport is indissolubly associated to water fluxes across the plasma membrane and plays a key role in brain physiology. Therefore, GABAAR could affect osmotic tension in the brain by modulating ion gradients. In addition, since water movements also occur through specialized water channels and transporters, GABAAR signalling could affect the movement of water also by regulating the function of the channels and transporters involved, thereby affecting not only the direction of the water fluxes but also their dynamics. This regulation has consequences at the cellular level as it modulates cell volume and activates multiple intracellular signalling mechanisms important for cell proliferation, maturation and survival. It may also have consequences at the systemic level. For example, it may indirectly control neuronal excitability, by regulating the extracellular space and interstitial concentration of Cl-, and contribute to brain water homeostasis. Therefore, GABAergic osmotic regulation should be taken into account during the treatment of pathologies requiring the administration of GABAAR modulators and for the development of therapies for diseases causing water unbalance in the brain.

  18. Cochlear Damage Affects Neurotransmitter Chemistry in the Central Auditory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Albert Godfrey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, the perception of a monotonous sound not actually present in the environment, affects nearly 20% of the population of the United States. Although there has been great progress in tinnitus research over the past 25 years, the neurochemical basis of tinnitus is still poorly understood. We review current research about the effects of various types of cochlear damage on the neurotransmitter chemistry in the central auditory system and document evidence that different changes in this chemistry can underlie similar behaviorally measured tinnitus symptoms. Most available data have been obtained from rodents following cochlear damage produced by cochlear ablation, loud sound, or ototoxic drugs. Effects on neurotransmitter systems have been measured as changes in neurotransmitter level, synthesis, release, uptake, and receptors. In this review, magnitudes of changes are presented for neurotransmitter-related amino acids, acetylcholine, and serotonin. A variety of effects have been found in these studies that may be related to animal model, survival time, type of cochlear damage, or methodology. The overall impression from the evidence presented is that any imbalance of neurotransmitter-related chemistry could disrupt auditory processing in such a way as to produce tinnitus.

  19. Gene x environment interactions as dynamical systems: clinical implications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarah S. Knox

    2015-01-01

    The etiology and progression of the chronic diseases that account for the highest rates of mortality in the US, namely, cardiovascular diseases and cancers, involve complex gene x environment interactions...

  20. How interactions between animal movement and landscape processes modify range dynamics and extinction risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range dynamics models now incorporate many of the mechanisms and interactions that drive species distributions. However, connectivity continues to be studied using overly simple distance-based dispersal models with little consideration of how the individual behavior of dispersin...

  1. Self-interacting scalar field trapped in a DGP brane: The dynamical systems perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiros, Israel [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Central de Las Villas, 54830 Santa Clara (Cuba)], E-mail: israel@uclv.edu.cu; Garcia-Salcedo, Ricardo [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-Legaria del IPN, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: rigarcias@ipn.mx; Matos, Tonatiuh [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, A.P. 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: tmatos@fis.cinvestav.mx; Moreno, Claudia [Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierias, Corregidora 500 S.R., Universidad de Guadalajara, 44420 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)], E-mail: claudia.moreno@cucei.udg.mx

    2009-01-05

    We apply the dynamical systems tools to study the linear dynamics of a self-interacting scalar field trapped on a DGP brane. The simplest kinds of self-interaction potentials are investigated: (a) constant potential, and (b) exponential potential. It is shown that the dynamics of DGP models can be very rich and complex. One of the most interesting results of this study shows that dynamical screening of the scalar field self-interaction potential, occurring within the Minkowski cosmological phase of the DGP model and that mimics 4D phantom behaviour, is an attractor solution for a constant self-interaction potential but not for the exponential one. In the latter case gravitational screening is not even a critical point of the corresponding autonomous system of ordinary differential equations.

  2. Incorporating bacteria as a living component in supramolecular self-assembled monolayers through dynamic nanoscale interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan; Kiren, Mustafa Can; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular assemblies, formed through noncovalent interactions, has become particularly attractive to develop dynamic and responsive architectures to address living systems at the nanoscale. Cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]), a pumpkin shaped macrocylic host molecule, has been successfully used to constru

  3. Incorporating bacteria as a living component in supramolecular self-assembled monolayers through dynamic nanoscale interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankaran, S.; Kiren, Mustafa Can; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular assemblies, formed through noncovalent interactions, has become particularly attractive to develop dynamic and responsive architectures to address living systems at the nanoscale. Cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]), a pumpkin shaped macrocylic host molecule, has been successfully used to

  4. A Heart for Interaction: Shared Physiological Dynamics and Behavioral Coordination in a Collective, Creative Construction Task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Stege Bjørndahl, Johanne; Roepstorff, Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    participants doing the same things) than in collective ones (involving participants taking turns and performing complementary actions). However, when contrasted against virtual pairs, collective trials display more stable shared HR dynamics suggesting that online social interaction plays an important role...

  5. Asymmetrically interacting spreading dynamics on complex layered networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Hui; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lee, GyuWon

    2014-01-01

    The spread of disease through a physical-contact network and the spread of information about the disease on a communication network are two intimately related dynamical processes. We investigate the asymmetrical interplay between the two types of spreading dynamics, each occurring on its own layer, by focusing on the two fundamental quantities underlying any spreading process: epidemic threshold and the final infection ratio. We find that an epidemic outbreak on the contact layer can induce an outbreak on the communication layer, and information spreading can effectively raise the epidemic threshold. When structural correlation exists between the two layers, the information threshold remains unchanged but the epidemic threshold can be enhanced, making the contact layer more resilient to epidemic outbreak. We develop a physical theory to understand the intricate interplay between the two types of spreading dynamics.

  6. Asymmetrically interacting spreading dynamics on complex layered networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Tang, Ming; Yang, Hui; Younghae Do; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lee, Gyuwon

    2014-05-01

    The spread of disease through a physical-contact network and the spread of information about the disease on a communication network are two intimately related dynamical processes. We investigate the asymmetrical interplay between the two types of spreading dynamics, each occurring on its own layer, by focusing on the two fundamental quantities underlying any spreading process: epidemic threshold and the final infection ratio. We find that an epidemic outbreak on the contact layer can induce an outbreak on the communication layer, and information spreading can effectively raise the epidemic threshold. When structural correlation exists between the two layers, the information threshold remains unchanged but the epidemic threshold can be enhanced, making the contact layer more resilient to epidemic outbreak. We develop a physical theory to understand the intricate interplay between the two types of spreading dynamics.

  7. Tidal interactions - crude body model in dynamical investigations

    CERN Document Server

    Gabryszewski, Ryszard

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents results of investigations of small bodies dynamics in a vicinity of giant planets. We used the most simple body model: gravitationally bounded, rotating contact binary affected by the tidal force acting from a planet. Spin variations of such binaries were extensively studied during planetary close encounters. Two main types of dynamical behaviour were observed: (i) huge but interim fluctuations of the angular velocity and (ii) permanent changes of a rotation during a close approach. The first type is observed mainly for fast rotators, while the second one was encountered in a population of slowly spinning objects with periods longer than 12 hours. Conclusions on usability of such crude physical body models in dynamical investigations and a comparison to previous results were attached. The results allow us to formulate a thesis explaining the phenomenon of creation of the extremely slow rotators and an observational excess of such type of objects.

  8. Interacting trophic forcing and the population dynamics of herring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Martin; Ostman, Orjan; Gardmark, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Small pelagic fish occupy a central position in marine ecosystems worldwide, largely by determining the energy transfer from lower trophic levels to predators at the top of the food web, including humans. Population dynamics of small pelagic fish may therefore be regulated neither strictly bottom......-up nor top-down, but rather through multiple external and internal drivers. While in many studies single drivers have been identified, potential synergies of multiple factors, as well as their relative importance in regulating population dynamics of small pelagic fish, is a largely unresolved issue....... Using a statistical, age-structured modeling approach, we demonstrate the relative importance and influence of bottom-up (e.g., climate, zooplankton availability) and top-down (i.e., fishing and predation) factors on the population dynamics of Bothnian Sea herring (Clupea harengus) throughout its life...

  9. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Dynamical Magnetic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B0 = 0.5.

  10. Electron Dynamics During High-Power, Short-Pulsed Laser Interactions with Solids and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    PAPER ALSO RECEIVED EXTERNAL MEDIA COVERENCE FROM SIGNAL MAGAZINE : http://www.afcea.org/content/?q=Article-scientists-harness- energy -heat Edited...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0234 Electron Dynamics During High- Power , Short-Pulsed Laser Interactions with Solids and Interfaces Patrick Hopkins...Dynamics During High- Power , Short-Pulsed Laser Interactions with Solids and Interfaces 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-13-1-0067 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  11. On the interaction between wheels and rails in railway dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slivsgaard, Eva Charlotte

    is such that no oscillating solutions occur below this vehicle speed. The difference between a linear and a nonlinear analysis is hereby pointed out. The oscillating solutions found are analysed by applying methods from the nonlinear dynamics. By this periodic and chaotic solutions are described, for instance a scenario...

  12. Multiphase flow dynamics 2 thermal and mechanical interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay I

    2007-01-01

    The industrial use of multi-phase systems requires analytical and numerical strategies for predicting their behavior. This book contains theory, methods and practical experience for describing complex transient multi-phase processes. It provides a systematic presentation of the theory and practice of numerical multi-phase fluid dynamics.

  13. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Several Rigid Bodies Interacting with Point Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weißmann, Steffen

    2014-04-01

    We derive the dynamics of several rigid bodies of arbitrary shape in a two-dimensional inviscid and incompressible fluid, whose vorticity is given by point vortices. We adopt the idea of Vankerschaver et al. (J. Geom. Mech. 1(2): 223-226, 2009) to derive the Hamiltonian formulation via symplectic reduction from a canonical Hamiltonian system. The reduced system is described by a noncanonical symplectic form, which has previously been derived for a single circular disk using heavy differential-geometric machinery in an infinite-dimensional setting. In contrast, our derivation makes use of the fact that the dynamics of the fluid, and thus the point vortex dynamics, is determined from first principles. Using this knowledge we can directly determine the dynamics on the reduced, finite-dimensional phase space, using only classical mechanics. Furthermore, our approach easily handles several bodies of arbitrary shape. From the Hamiltonian description we derive a Lagrangian formulation, which enables the system for variational time integrators. We briefly describe how to implement such a numerical scheme and simulate different configurations for validation.

  14. Delivering Interactive Multimedia Services in Dynamic Pervasive Computing Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselman, C.; Cesar Garcia, P.S.; Vaishnavi, I.; Boussard, M.; Kernchen, R.; Meissner, S.; Spedalieri, A.; Sinfreu, A.; Raeck, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a distributed system for next generation multimedia support in dynamically changing pervasive computing environments. The overall goal is to enhance the experience of mobile users by intelligently adapting the way a service is presented, in particular by adapting the way the us

  15. Optimal Passive Dynamics for Physical Interaction: Catching a Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Kemper

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available For manipulation tasks in uncertain environments, intentionally designed series impedance in mechanical systems can provide significant benefits that cannot be achieved in software. Traditionally, the design of actuated systems revolves around sizing torques, speeds, and control strategies without considering the system’s passive dynamics. However, the passive dynamics of the mechanical system, including inertia, stiffness, and damping along with other parameters such as torque and stroke limits often impose performance limitations that cannot be overcome with software control. In this paper, we develop relationships between an actuator’s passive dynamics and the resulting performance for the purpose of better understanding how to tune the passive dynamics for catching an unexpected object. We use a mathematically optimal controller subject to force limitations to stop the incoming object without breaking contact and bouncing. The use of an optimal controller is important so that our results directly reflect the physical system’s performance. We analytically calculate the maximum velocity that can be caught by a realistic actuator with limitations such as force and stroke limits. The results show that in order to maximize the velocity of an object that can be caught without exceeding the actuator’s torque and stroke limits, a soft spring along with a strong damper will be desired.

  16. Dynamic Adaptation in Child-Adult Language Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Marijn; van Geert, Paul; Korecky-Kröll, Katharina; Maillochon, Isabelle; Laaha, Sabine; Dressler, Wolfgang U.; Bassano, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    When speaking to young children, adults adapt their language to that of the child. In this article, we suggest that this child-directed speech (CDS) is the result of a transactional process of dynamic adaptation between the child and the adult. The study compares developmental trajectories of three children to those of the CDS of their caregivers.…

  17. Dynamic Adaptation in Child-Adult Language Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Marijn; van Geert, Paul; Korecky-Kroell, Katharina; Maillochon, Isabelle; Laaha, Sabine; Dressler, Wolfgang U.; Bassano, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    When speaking to young children, adults adapt their language to that of the child. In this article, we suggest that this child-directed speech (CDS) is the result of a transactional process of dynamic adaptation between the child and the adult. The study compares developmental trajectories of three

  18. Resource use dynamics and interactions in the tropics: Scaling up in space and time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giller, K.E.; Rowe, E.C.; Ridder, de N.; Keulen, van H.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the temporal and spatial dynamics of nutrient resources and water within cropping and livestock systems, their interactions and those with other resources such as labour. Short-term dynamics (within season) revolve around nutrient availability and losses as a function of soil moisture dyn

  19. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Induces Neurotransmitter Switching in Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, Bruce A.; Masters, Brian A.; Hoyle, Gary W.; Brinster, Ralph L.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    1994-08-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine growth factor that induces rat sympathetic neurons to switch their neurotransmitter phenotype from noradrenergic to cholinergic in vitro. To test whether LIF can influence neuronal differentiation in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that expressed LIF in pancreatic islets under the control of the insulin promoter and evaluated the neurotransmitter phenotype of the pancreatic sympathetic innervation. We also used the insulin promoter to coexpress nerve growth factor in the islets, which greatly increased the density of sympathetic innervation and facilitated analysis of the effects of LIF. Our data demonstrate that tyrosine hydroxylase and catecholamines declined and choline acetyltransferase increased in response to LIF. We conclude that LIF can induce neurotransmitter switching of sympathetic neurons in vivo.

  20. [Effect of occupational stress on neurotransmitters in petroleum workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Lian, Yulong; Tao, Ning; Ge, Hua; Liu, Jiwen

    2015-09-01

    To explore the effects of occupational stress on neurotransmitters in petroleum workers. 178 petroleum workers with the length of service ≥ 1 year were recruited to the subjects by the questionnaire of OSI-R. The levels of 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and substance P (SP) in serum were measured. The subjects were classified into 3 groups according to the scores of occupational stress. The levels of 5-HT NE and SP for over 15 working years were higher than those of less than 15 years (P petroleum workers (P petroleum workers is correlated with serum monoamine and neuropeptides neurotransmitters, and it may affect serum levels of monoamine and neuropeptides neurotransmitters.

  1. The molecular mechanism for overcoming the rate-limiting step in monoamine neurotransmitter transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinning, Steffen; Said, Saida; Malinauskaite, Lina

    structures of the bacterial homolog, LeuT, captured in a new conformation without substrate or sodium bound shows a dramatic rotation of an absolutely conserved leucine into the substrate site. Molecular dynamics simulations combined with functional studies on SERT support that this leucine must act...... membrane. The rate-limiting step in monoamine reuptake is the return of the empty transporter from an inward-facing to an outward-facing conformation without neurotransmitter and sodium bound. The molecular mechanism underlying this important conformational transition has not been described. Crystal...

  2. Dynamics of the Random Ising Model with Long-Range Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yuan; LI Zhi-Bing; FANG Hai; HE Shun-Shan; SITU Shu-Ping

    2001-01-01

    Critical dynamics of the random Ising model with long-range interaction decaying as r-(d+σ) where d is the dimensionality) is studied by the theoretic renormalization-group approach. The system is released to an evolution within a model A dynamics. Asymptotic scaling laws are studied in a frame of the expansion in = 2σ - d. In dimensions d < 2σ. the dynamic exponent z is calculated to the second order in at the random fixed point.``

  3. Statistical mechanics of neocortical interactions - Dynamics of synaptic modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, L.

    1983-01-01

    A recent study has demonstrated that several scales of neocortical interactions can be consistently analyzed with the use of methods of modern nonlinear nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The formation, stability, and interaction of spatial-temporal patterns of columnar firings are explicitly calculated, to test hypothesized mechanisms relating to information processing. In this context, most probable patterns of columnar firings are associated with chemical and electrical synaptic modifications. It is stressed that synaptic modifications and shifts in most-probable firing patterns are highly nonlinear and interactive sets of phenomena. A detailed scenario of information processing is calculated of columnar coding of external stimuli, short-term storage via hysteresis, and long-term storage via synaptic modification.

  4. Solving the dark matter problem by dynamic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Hofer, Werner A

    2015-01-01

    Due to the renewed interest in dark matter after the upgrade of the large hadron collider and its dedication to dark matter research it is timely to reassess the whole problem. Dark matter is one way to reconcile the discrepancy between the velocity of matter in the outer regions of galaxies and the observed galactic mass. So far, no credible candidate for dark matter has been identified. Here, we develop a model accounting for observations by rotations and interactions between rotating objects analogous to magnetic fields and interactions with moving charges. The magnitude of these fields is described by a fundamental constant of the order 10-41kg-1. The same interactions can be observed in the solar system where they lead to small changes of planetary orbits.

  5. Interaction dynamics of spatially separated cavitation bubbles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinne, Nadine; Schumacher, Silvia; Nuzzo, Valeria; Arnold, Cord L.; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ripken, Tammo

    2010-11-01

    We present a high-speed photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles generated in two spatially separated regions by femtosecond laser-induced optical breakdown in water. Depending on the relative energies of the femtosecond laser pulses and their spatial separation, different kinds of interactions, such as a flattening and deformation of the bubbles, asymmetric water flows, and jet formation were observed. The results presented have a strong impact on understanding and optimizing the cutting effect of modern femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates (>1 MHz).

  6. Dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking due to strong Yukawa interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneš, Petr; Brauner, Tomáš; Smetana, Adam

    2009-11-01

    We present a new mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) based on a strong Yukawa dynamics. We consider an SU(2)L × U(1)Y gauge invariant model endowed with the usual Standard Model fermion multiplets and with two massive scalar doublets. We show that, unlike in the Standard Model, EWSB is possible even with vanishing vacuum expectation values of the scalars. Such EWSB is achieved dynamically by means of the (presumably strong) Yukawa couplings and manifests itself by the emergence of fermion and gauge boson masses and scalar mass splittings, which are expressed in a closed form in terms of the fermion and scalar proper self-energies. The 'would-be' Nambu-Goldstone bosons are shown to be composites of both the fermions and the scalars. We demonstrate that the simplest version of the model is compatible with basic experimental constraints.

  7. Dynamic Socio-technical System Design based on Stakeholder Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Fleischmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to directly involve stakeholders in socio-technical system design, we argue for streamlining executable process specifications with business process modeling. Due to current agility requirements of organizations, socio-technical system development is considered one of the key activities of members of the organizations. Dynamic process adaptation enable handling the volatility of business operation and IT infrastructure. Subject-oriented process representations are key enablers to dynamic adaptation due to their capability for stakeholders to create directly executable models. In this way stakeholder can be involved in change management pro-actively. Subject-oriented models (i represent all relevant features required for system control and decision making, and (ii are executable on demand. This effectiveness enables organizational change in a creative and efficient way, while establishing innovative design and change management tools. Subject-oriented Business Process Management capabilities are reflected in this realm revealing benefits and potential for further research.

  8. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Nonlinear Anisotropic Dynamical Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Heusen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate test-particle diffusion in dynamical turbulence based on a numerical approach presented before. For the turbulence we employ the nonlinear anisotropic dynamical turbulence model which takes into account wave propagation effects as well as damping effects. We compute numerically diffusion coefficients of energetic particles along and across the mean magnetic field. We focus on turbulence and particle parameters which should be relevant for the solar system and compare our findings with different interplanetary observations. We vary different parameters such as the dissipation range spectral index, the ratio of the turbulence bendover scales, and the magnetic field strength in order to explore the relevance of the different parameters. We show that the bendover scales as well as the magnetic field ratio have a strong influence on diffusion coefficients whereas the influence of the dissipation range spectral index is weak. The best agreement with solar wind observations can be found for equal bend...

  9. Simulating disk galaxies and interactions in Milgromian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Thies, Ingo; Famaey, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Since its publication 1983, Milgromian dynamics (aka MOND) has been very successful in modeling the gravitational potential of galaxies from baryonic matter alone. However, the dynamical modeling has long been an unsolved issue. In particular, the setup of a stable galaxy for Milgromian N-body calculations has been a major challenge. Here, I will show a way to set up disc galaxies in MOND for calculations in the PHANTOM OF RAMSES (PoR) code by L\\"ughausen (2015) and Teyssier (2002). The method is done by solving the QUMOND Poisson equations based on a baryonic and a phantom dark matter component. The resulting galaxy models are stable after a brief settling period for a large mass and size range. Simulations of single galaxies as well as colliding galaxies are shown.

  10. Lily Pad: Towards Real-time Interactive Computational Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Weymouth, Gabriel D

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is now (relatively) fast and freely available, it is still amazingly difficult to use. Inaccessible software imposes a significant entry barrier on students and junior engineers, and even senior researchers spend less time developing insights and more time on software issues. Lily Pad was developed as an initial attempt to address some of these problems. The goal of Lily Pad is to lower the barrier to CFD by adopting simple high-speed methods, utilising modern programming features and environments, and giving immediate visual feed-back to the user. The resulting software focuses on the fluid dynamics instead of the computation, making it useful for both education and research. LilyPad is open source and available online at https://github.com/weymouth/lily-pad for all use under the MIT license.

  11. Dynamical supersymmetry of the spin particle-magnetic field interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngome, J-P; Horvathy, P A [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et de Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson, CNRS Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Van Holten, J W, E-mail: juste.ngome@lmpt.univ-tours.f, E-mail: horvathy@lmpt.univ-tours.f, E-mail: t32@nikhef.n [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-07-16

    We study the dynamical and supersymmetries of a fermion in a D = d = 3-dimensional monopole background. The Hamiltonian also involves an additional spin-orbit coupling term, which is parameterized by the gyromagnetic ratio. We construct the superinvariants associated with the system using a SUSY extension of a previously proposed algorithm, based on Grassmann-valued Killing tensors. Conserved quantities arise for certain definite values of the gyromagnetic factor: N=1 SUSY requires g = 2; a Kepler-type dynamical symmetry only arises, however, for the anomalous values g = 0 and g = 4. The two anomalous systems can be unified into an N=2 SUSY system built by doubling the number of Grassmann variables. For D = d = 2, the planar system also exhibits an N=2 supersymmetry without Grassmann variable doubling.

  12. Molecular dynamics modeling of a nanomaterials-water surface interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Keramati, Ramtin; Abdi, Ahmad; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we study the formation of nanomeniscus around a nanoneedle using molecular dynamics simulation approach. The results reveal three distinct phases in the time-evolution of meniscus before equilibrium according to the contact angle, meniscus height, and potential energy. In addition, we investigated the correlation between the nanoneedle diameter and nanomeniscus characteristics. The results have applications in various fields such as scanning probe microscopy and rheological measurements.

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy of dynamic protein DNA interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van Simon Johannes Theodorus

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis a dedicated Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) setup is used for imaging biochemical reactions with molecular resolution. The basis for the high resolution of AFM is the combination of a small probe, close proximity to the sample and a short-range interaction between the probe and the samp

  14. A theory and dynamic model of dyadic interaction : Concerns, appraisals, and contagiousness in a developmental context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, Henderien W.; van Geert, Paul L. C.

    A theory of the dynamics of dyadic interaction is presented, based on the concepts of "concern" (i.e., intentions, goals, and interests), "appraisal" and "contagiousness". Differences between children who participate in a specific interaction are linked to differences in social competence and social

  15. Dynamic strength of the interaction between lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) and saccharide ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Esben; Dreyer, Jakob K; Simonsen, Adam C

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the dynamic strength of the interaction between lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) and different sugars, maltose, mannose, glucose, and galactose, we have used an atomic force microscope to monitor the interaction on a single molecule scale. The experiment is performed by me...

  16. Correlations and Symmetry of Interactions Influence Collective Dynamics of Molecular Motors

    CERN Document Server

    Celis-Garza, Daniel; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic molecules that actively support many cellular processes, including transport, cell division and cell motility, are known as motor proteins or molecular motors. Experimental studies indicate that they interact with each other and they frequently work together in large groups. To understand the mechanisms of collective behavior of motor proteins we study the effect of interactions in the transport of molecular motors along linear filaments. It is done by analyzing a recently introduced class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes that takes into account the intermolecular interactions via thermodynamically consistent approach. We develop a new theoretical method that allows us to compute analytically all dynamic properties of the system. Our analysis shows that correlations play important role in dynamics of interacting molecular motors. Surprisingly, we find that the correlations for repulsive interactions are weaker and more short-range than the correlations for the attractive interactions. In ad...

  17. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  18. Dynamic hubs show competitive and static hubs non-competitive regulation of their interaction partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurv Goel

    Full Text Available Date hub proteins have 1 or 2 interaction interfaces but many interaction partners. This raises the question of whether all partner proteins compete for the interaction interface of the hub or if the cell carefully regulates aspects of this process? Here, we have used real-time rendering of protein interaction networks to analyse the interactions of all the 1 or 2 interface hubs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the cell cycle. By integrating previously determined structural and gene expression data, and visually hiding the nodes (proteins and their edges (interactions during their troughs of expression, we predict when interactions of hubs and their partners are likely to exist. This revealed that 20 out of all 36 one- or two- interface hubs in the yeast interactome fell within two main groups. The first was dynamic hubs with static partners, which can be considered as 'competitive hubs'. Their interaction partners will compete for the interaction interface of the hub and the success of any interaction will be dictated by the kinetics of interaction (abundance and affinity and subcellular localisation. The second was static hubs with dynamic partners, which we term 'non-competitive hubs'. Regulatory mechanisms are finely tuned to lessen the presence and/or effects of competition between the interaction partners of the hub. It is possible that these regulatory processes may also be used by the cell for the regulation of other, non-cell cycle processes.

  19. Support for Dynamic Service Composition with Role-Based Interaction Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to present a role-based interaction model for dynamic service composition in Grid environments. Assigning roles to a service means to associate with it capabilities that describes all the operations the service intends to perform. When all of the services can be recognized by their roles, the appropriate services can be selected. Based on the interaction policy, a role-based interaction model not only facilitates access control, but also offers flexible interaction mechanism for adapting service-oriented applications. This interaction model adopts programmable reactive tuple space to facilitate context-dependent coordination.

  20. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wallach

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc. contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner.

  1. Collective Dynamics of Interacting Particles in Unsteady Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Abedi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    We use the Fokker-Planck equation and its moment equations to study the collective behavior of interacting particles in unsteady one-dimensional flows. Particles interact according to a long-range attractive and a short-range repulsive potential field known as Morse potential. We assume Stokesian drag force between particles and their carrier fluid, and find analytic single-peaked traveling solutions for the spatial density of particles in the catastrophic phase. In steady flow conditions the streaming velocity of particles is identical to their carrier fluid, but we show that particle streaming is asynchronous with an unsteady carrier fluid. Using linear perturbation analysis, the stability of traveling solutions is investigated in unsteady conditions. It is shown that the resulting dispersion relation is an integral equation of the Fredholm type, and yields two general families of stable modes: singular modes whose eigenvalues form a continuous spectrum, and a finite number of discrete global modes. Dependi...

  2. The dynamic reactance interaction – How vested interests affect people’s experience, behavior, and cognition in social interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eSteindl

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In social interactions, individuals may sometimes pursue their own interests at the expense of their interaction partner. Such self-interested behaviors impose a threat to the interaction partner’s freedom to act. The current article investigates this threat in the context of interdependence and reactance theory. We explore how vested interests influence reactance process stages of an advisor-client interaction. We aim to explore the interactional process that evolves. In two studies, participants took the perspective of a doctor (advisor or a patient (client. In both studies we incorporated a vested interest. In Study 1 (N=82 we found that in response to a vested interest of their interaction partner, patients indicated a stronger experience of reactance, more aggressive behavioral intentions, and more biased cognitions than doctors. A serial multiple mediation revealed that a vested interest engendered mistrust toward the interaction partner and this mistrust led to an emerging reactance process. Study 2 (N=207 further demonstrated that doctors expressed their reactance in a subtle way: They revealed a classic confirmation bias when searching for additional information on their preliminary decision preference, indicating stronger defense motivation. We discuss how these findings can help us to understand how social interactions develop dynamically.

  3. Analyzing protein-ligand interactions by dynamic NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittermaier, Anthony; Meneses, Erick

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide detailed information on protein-ligand interactions that is inaccessible using other biophysical techniques. This chapter focuses on NMR-based approaches for extracting affinity and rate constants for weakly binding transient protein complexes with lifetimes of less than about a second. Several pulse sequences and analytical techniques are discussed, including line-shape simulations, spin-echo relaxation dispersion methods (CPMG), and magnetization exchange (EXSY) experiments.

  4. Uncovering the dynamics of interaction in development cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejerskov, Adam Moe; Lundsgaarde, Erik; Cold-Ravnkilde, Signe

    constellations, relationships and ideas. Specifically, it addresses the extent to which the commonly-used binary concepts of development cooperation provider groups adequately capture relevant distinctions among the actors and add analytical value to research on development cooperation. The paper advocates...... adopting more analytically and conceptually diverse approaches to study the interaction between heterogeneous development actors and homogenising forces in the field of development cooperation, recognising the complexity and (dis)continuities of stability and change in this arena....

  5. Quantum dynamics and topological excitations in interacting dipolar particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Ana

    2016-05-01

    Dipole-dipole interactions, long-range and anisotropic interactions that arise due to the virtual exchange of photons, are of fundamental importance in optical physics, and are enabling a range of new quantum technologies including quantum networks and optical lattice atomic clocks. In this talk I will first discuss how arrays of dipolar particles with a simple J = 0- J = 1 internal level structure can naturally host topological and chiral excitations including Weyl quasi-particles. Weyl fermions were first predicted to exist in the context of high energy physics but only recently have been observed in solid state systems. I will discuss a proposal of using Mott insulators of Sr atoms to observe and probe the Weyl excitation spectrum and its non-trivial chirality. Finally I will report on a recent experiment done at JILA which validates the underlying microscopic model that predicts the existence of these excitations. The experiment measured the collective emission from a coherently driven gas of ultracold 88 Sr atoms and observed a highly directional and anisotropic emission intensity and a substantial broadening of the atomic spectral lines. All of the measurements are well reproduced by the theoretical model. These investigations open the door for the exploration of novel quantum many-body systems involving strongly interacting atoms and photons, and are useful guides for further developments of optical atomic clocks and other applications involving dense atomic ensembles. AFOSR, MURI-AFOSR, ARO,NSF-PHY-1521080, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844.

  6. Dynamism of Transportation and Land Use Interaction in Urban Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Rajesh J.; Katti, B. K.

    2012-10-01

    Transportation in urban areas is highly complex and the urban transport system is intricately linked with urban form and spatial structure. Urban transit is an important dimension of mobility, notably in high density areas. The spatial separation of human activities which creates the need for travel and goods transport is the underlying principle of transport analysis and forecasting. To understand the complex relationships between transportation and land use and to help the urban planning process, several models have been developed. Many theories, models are developed by different authors on land use and transportation interaction, which clearly indicate that change in land use transformation have a greater impact on transportation. Similarly, introducing new transportation facility or strengthening of existing transport facility makes an impact on the abutting land. In cities like Delhi, Navi Mumbai, Ahmedabad, introducing of new mass transport system or strengthening of existing transportation system had given greater impact on surrounding development. In this Paper the major theoretical approaches to explain the two-way interaction of land use and transport in metropolitan areas are summarized. The paper also reviews research on the two-way interaction between urban land use and transport, i.e. the location and mobility responses of private actors (households and firms, travelers) to changes in the urban land use and transport system at the urban regional level.

  7. DyNet: visualization and analysis of dynamic molecular interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenawan, Ivan H; Bryan, Kenneth; Lynn, David J

    2016-09-01

    : The ability to experimentally determine molecular interactions on an almost proteome-wide scale under different conditions is enabling researchers to move from static to dynamic network analysis, uncovering new insights into how interaction networks are physically rewired in response to different stimuli and in disease. Dynamic interaction data presents a special challenge in network biology. Here, we present DyNet, a Cytoscape application that provides a range of functionalities for the visualization, real-time synchronization and analysis of large multi-state dynamic molecular interaction networks enabling users to quickly identify and analyze the most 'rewired' nodes across many network states. DyNet is available at the Cytoscape (3.2+) App Store (http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/dynet). david.lynn@sahmri.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Interacting bosons in a disordered lattice: Dynamical characterization of the quantum phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonsante, Pierfrancesco; Pezzè, Luca; Smerzi, Augusto

    2015-03-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of interacting bosons in a three-dimensional disordered lattice. We show that the superfluid current induced by an adiabatic acceleration of the disordered lattice undergoes a dynamical instability signaling the onset of the Bose-glass phase. The dynamical superfluid-Bose-glass phase diagram is found in very good agreement with static superfluid fraction calculation. A different boundary is obtained when the disorder is suddenly quenched in a moving periodic lattice. In this case we do not observe a dynamical instability but rather a depletion of the superfluid density. Our analysis is based on a dynamical Gutzwiller approach which we show to reproduce the quantum Monte Carlo static phase diagram in the strong interaction limit.

  9. Direct Observation of Dynamical Quantum Phase Transitions in an Interacting Many-Body System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurcevic, P.; Shen, H.; Hauke, P.; Maier, C.; Brydges, T.; Hempel, C.; Lanyon, B. P.; Heyl, M.; Blatt, R.; Roos, C. F.

    2017-08-01

    The theory of phase transitions represents a central concept for the characterization of equilibrium matter. In this work we study experimentally an extension of this theory to the nonequilibrium dynamical regime termed dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs). We investigate and measure DQPTs in a string of ions simulating interacting transverse-field Ising models. During the nonequilibrium dynamics induced by a quantum quench we show for strings of up to 10 ions the direct detection of DQPTs by revealing nonanalytic behavior in time. Moreover, we provide a link between DQPTs and the dynamics of other quantities such as the magnetization, and we establish a connection between DQPTs and entanglement production.

  10. Statics and Dynamics of Selfish Interactions in Distributed Service Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Altarelli

    Full Text Available We study a class of games which models the competition among agents to access some service provided by distributed service units and which exhibits congestion and frustration phenomena when service units have limited capacity. We propose a technique, based on the cavity method of statistical physics, to characterize the full spectrum of Nash equilibria of the game. The analysis reveals a large variety of equilibria, with very different statistical properties. Natural selfish dynamics, such as best-response, usually tend to large-utility equilibria, even though those of smaller utility are exponentially more numerous. Interestingly, the latter actually can be reached by selecting the initial conditions of the best-response dynamics close to the saturation limit of the service unit capacities. We also study a more realistic stochastic variant of the game by means of a simple and effective approximation of the average over the random parameters, showing that the properties of the average-case Nash equilibria are qualitatively similar to the deterministic ones.

  11. Statics and Dynamics of Selfish Interactions in Distributed Service Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarelli, Fabrizio; Braunstein, Alfredo; Dall'Asta, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We study a class of games which models the competition among agents to access some service provided by distributed service units and which exhibits congestion and frustration phenomena when service units have limited capacity. We propose a technique, based on the cavity method of statistical physics, to characterize the full spectrum of Nash equilibria of the game. The analysis reveals a large variety of equilibria, with very different statistical properties. Natural selfish dynamics, such as best-response, usually tend to large-utility equilibria, even though those of smaller utility are exponentially more numerous. Interestingly, the latter actually can be reached by selecting the initial conditions of the best-response dynamics close to the saturation limit of the service unit capacities. We also study a more realistic stochastic variant of the game by means of a simple and effective approximation of the average over the random parameters, showing that the properties of the average-case Nash equilibria are qualitatively similar to the deterministic ones.

  12. Interaction between dynamics and thermodynamics during tropical cyclogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gjorgjievska

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Observational data of tropical disturbances are analyzed in order to investigate tropical cyclogenesis. Data from 31 cases observed during two field campaigns are used to investigate possible correlations between various dynamic and thermodynamic variables. The results show that a strong mid-level vortex is necessary to promote spin up of the low-level vortex in a tropical cyclone. This paper presents a theory on the mechanism of this process; the mid-level vortex creates a thermodynamic environment conducive to convection with a more bottom-heavy mass flux profile that exhibits a strong positive vertical gradient in a shallow layer near the surface. Mass continuity then implies that the strongest horizontal mass and vorticity convergence occur near the surface. This results in low-level vortex intensification. For two of the disturbances that were observed during several consecutive days, evolution of the dynamics and thermodynamics is documented. One of these disturbances, Karl, was observed in the period before it intensified into a tropical storm; the other one, Gaston, was observed after it unexpectedly decayed from a tropical storm to a tropical disturbance. A hypothesis on its decay is presented.

  13. Ricardo Miledi and the calcium hypothesis of neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Jade-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Ricardo Miledi has made significant contributions to our basic understanding of how synapses work. Here I discuss aspects of Miledi's research that helped to establish the requirement of presynaptic calcium for neurotransmitter release, from his earliest scientific studies to his classic experiments in the squid giant synapse.

  14. Inherited disorders of brain neurotransmitters: pathogenesis and diagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Krystyna; Kuśmierska, Katarzyna; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters (NTs) play a central role in the efficient communication between neurons necessary for normal functioning of the nervous system. NTs can be divided into two groups: small molecule NTs and larger neuropeptide NTs. Inherited disorders of NTs result from a primary disturbance of NTs metabolism or transport. This group of disorders requires sophisticated diagnostic procedures. In this review we discuss disturbances in the metabolism of tetrahydrobiopterin, biogenic amines, γ-aminobutyric acid, foliate, pyridoxine-dependent enzymes, and also the glycine-dependent encephalopathy. We point to pathologic alterations of proteins involved in synaptic neurotransmission that may cause neurological and psychiatric symptoms. We postulate that synaptic receptors and transporter proteins for neurotransmitters should be investigated in unresolved cases. Patients with inherited neurotransmitters disorders present various clinical presentations such as mental retardation, refractory seizures, pyramidal and extrapyramidal syndromes, impaired locomotor patterns, and progressive encephalopathy. Every patient with suspected inherited neurotransmitter disorder should undergo a structured interview and a careful examination including neurological, biochemical, and imaging.

  15. In situ oxygen dynamics in coral-algal interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wangpraseurt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral reefs degrade globally at an alarming rate, with benthic algae often replacing corals. However, the extent to which benthic algae contribute to coral mortality, and the potential mechanisms involved, remain disputed. Recent laboratory studies suggested that algae kill corals by inducing hypoxia on the coral surface, through stimulated microbial respiration. METHODS/FINDINGS: We examined the main premise of this hypothesis by measuring in situ oxygen microenvironments at the contact interface between the massive coral Porites spp. and turf algae, and between Porites spp. and crustose coralline algae (CCA. Oxygen levels at the interface were similar to healthy coral tissue and ranged between 300-400 µM during the day. At night, the interface was hypoxic (~70 µM in coral-turf interactions and close to anoxic (~2 µM in coral-CCA interactions, but these values were not significantly different from healthy tissue. The diffusive boundary layer (DBL was about three times thicker at the interface than above healthy tissue, due to a depression in the local topography. A numerical model, developed to analyze the oxygen profiles above the irregular interface, revealed strongly reduced net photosynthesis and dark respiration rates at the coral-algal interface compared to unaffected tissue during the day and at night, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that hypoxia was not a consistent feature in the microenvironment of the coral-algal interface under in situ conditions. Therefore, hypoxia alone is unlikely to be the cause of coral mortality. Due to the modified topography, the interaction zone is distinguished by a thicker diffusive boundary layer, which limits the local metabolic activity and likely promotes accumulation of potentially harmful metabolic products (e.g., allelochemicals and protons. Our study highlights the importance of mass transfer phenomena and the need for direct in situ measurements of

  16. In situ oxygen dynamics in coral-algal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangpraseurt, Daniel; Weber, Miriam; Røy, Hans; Polerecky, Lubos; de Beer, Dirk; Suharsono; Nugues, Maggy M

    2012-01-01

    Coral reefs degrade globally at an alarming rate, with benthic algae often replacing corals. However, the extent to which benthic algae contribute to coral mortality, and the potential mechanisms involved, remain disputed. Recent laboratory studies suggested that algae kill corals by inducing hypoxia on the coral surface, through stimulated microbial respiration. We examined the main premise of this hypothesis by measuring in situ oxygen microenvironments at the contact interface between the massive coral Porites spp. and turf algae, and between Porites spp. and crustose coralline algae (CCA). Oxygen levels at the interface were similar to healthy coral tissue and ranged between 300-400 µM during the day. At night, the interface was hypoxic (~70 µM) in coral-turf interactions and close to anoxic (~2 µM) in coral-CCA interactions, but these values were not significantly different from healthy tissue. The diffusive boundary layer (DBL) was about three times thicker at the interface than above healthy tissue, due to a depression in the local topography. A numerical model, developed to analyze the oxygen profiles above the irregular interface, revealed strongly reduced net photosynthesis and dark respiration rates at the coral-algal interface compared to unaffected tissue during the day and at night, respectively. Our results showed that hypoxia was not a consistent feature in the microenvironment of the coral-algal interface under in situ conditions. Therefore, hypoxia alone is unlikely to be the cause of coral mortality. Due to the modified topography, the interaction zone is distinguished by a thicker diffusive boundary layer, which limits the local metabolic activity and likely promotes accumulation of potentially harmful metabolic products (e.g., allelochemicals and protons). Our study highlights the importance of mass transfer phenomena and the need for direct in situ measurements of microenvironmental conditions in studies on coral stress.

  17. Quantum Discord Dynamics of Two Atoms Interacting with Two Quantized Field Modes through a Raman Interaction with Phase Decoherence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Yi; XU Jing-Bo

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the quantum discord dynamics of two effective two-level atoms independently interacting with two quantized field modes through a Raman interaction in the presence of phase decoherence.The influence of the phase decoherence and detuning on the evolution of the quantum discord and entanglement between two atoms is discussed.It is found that the quantum discord is more robust than the entanglement under the phase decoherence,and the amount of discord and entanglement between two atoms can be increased by adjusting the detuning.

  18. Particle Dynamics under Quasi-linear Interaction with Electromagnetic Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castejon, F.; Eguilior, S.

    2003-07-01

    Langevin equations for quasi-linear wave particle interaction are obtained taking advantage of the unique vocal equivalence between Fokker-Plank equation and the former ones. Langevin equations are solved numerically and, hence, the evolution of a single particle embedded in an electromagnetic field in momentum space is obtained. The equations are relativistic and valid for any wave. It is also shown that the stochastic part of the equations is negligible in comparison with the deterministic term, except for the momentum to the resonance condition for the main parallel refractive index. (Author) 24 refs.

  19. Interactions in charged colloidal suspensions: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padidela, Uday Kumar; Behera, Raghu Nath

    2017-07-01

    Colloidal suspensions are extensively used in everyday life and find several applications in the pharmaceutical, chemical, food industries, etc. We present the classical molecular dynamics simulation results of the structural and transport properties of charged colloidal suspensions as a function of its size, charge and concentration. The system is viewed as a two-component (colloids and counterions) primitive model consisting of spherical colloid particle (macroion) and the counterions (micro-particles), which are treated explicitly. The solvent is treated as dielectric continuum. A systematic trend in the radial distribution functions g(r), potential of mean force W(r), different thermodynamic properties and diffusion coefficients is obtained as a function of colloid charge, size and concentration. An attractive minimum in W(r) is obtained at short interparticle distance.

  20. Human Machine Interaction by Simulation of Dynamics of Construction Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Thomas Heegaard

    This industrial Ph.D. project concerns whole-body vibrations in human operated construction machinery. The emissions of these vibrations is closely related to the subjective experience of comfort and in some cases these vibrations can occur in a level which can cause the operator back disorders...... on long term basis. Whole-body vibrations are potential damaging for the human operator in a frequency range for which the dynamics of the machines are dominated by the inputs of the operator. The objective of this project is to reduce the amount of potential damaging wholebody vibrations for two...... different kinds of machinery; an articulated backhoe loader and an articulated dump truck. In this work a standardized procedure containing a set of duty cycles for measuring and declaring whole-body vibrations has been proposed for both of these machines. The result of the measuring is important...

  1. Dynamic Soil-Pile Interaction for large diameter monopile foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zania, Varvara

    2013-01-01

    fatigue may be problematic. In the third case except from the cost increase, the wind induced fatigue is an additional issue to be dealt with. The second concept is the one prevailing in current design practice and it actually sets the natural frequency of vibration of the OWT inside the narrow margin......Monopile foundations have been used in a large extent to support offshore wind turbines (OWT), being considered as a reliable and cost effective design solution. The accurate estimation of their dynamic response characteristics is essential, since the design of support structures for OWTs has been......’ rule and are usually reported in double terms of the stiffness of the OWT and the foundation, i.e. soft –soft, soft – stiff, and stiff – stiff design approaches. In the first case the eigenfrequency of the system is reduced to excessively low values, where the cost reduction is considerable but wave...

  2. Dynamics of energy harvesting backpack with human being interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yue; Zuo, Lei

    2016-04-01

    In last ten years, a lot of researchers have begun to look into obtaining electricity from the movement between human and their backpack that occurs during walking. In this paper, an innovative, elastically-suspended backpack with mechanical motion rectifier (MMR) based energy harvester is developed to generate electricity with high efficiency and reliability. Up to 28 Watts peak electrical power can be produced by the MMR based backpack energy harvester. A dynamic model for the system is presented along with experimental results. Three dual mass models for different distinct harvesters: pure viscous, non MMR, and MMR, are proposed, and a comparison in the output power and human comfort between the three models is discussed.

  3. Dynamical issues in interactive representation of physical objects

    CERN Document Server

    Florens, Jean-Loup; Urma, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    The quality of a simulator equipped with a haptic interface is given by the dynamical properties of its components: haptic interface, simulator and control system. Some application areas of such kind of simulator like musical synthesis, animation or more general, instrumental art have specific requirements as for the "haptic rendering" of small movements that go beyond the usual haptic interfaces allow. Object properties variability and different situations of object combination represent important aspects of such type of application which makes that the user can be interested as much in the restitution of certain global properties of an entire object domain as in the restitution of properties that are specific to an isolate object. In the traditional approaches, the usual criteria are founded on the paradigm of transparency and are related to the impedance error introduced by the technical aspects of the system. As a general aim, rather than to minimize these effects, we look to characterize them by physical...

  4. The dynamics of interacting nonlinearities governing long wavelength driftwave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    Because of the ubiquitous nature of turbulence and the vast array of different systems which have turbulent solutions, the study of turbulence is an area of active research. Much present day understanding of turbulence is rooted in the well established properties of homogeneous Navier-Stokes turbulence, which, due to its relative simplicity, allows for approximate analytic solutions. This work examines a group of turbulent systems with marked differences from Navier-Stokes turbulence, and attempts to quantify some of their properties. This group of systems represents a variety of drift wave fluctuations believed to be of fundamental importance in laboratory fusion devices. From extensive simulation of simple local fluid models of long wavelength drift wave turbulence in tokamaks, a reasonably complete picture of the basic properties of spectral transfer and saturation has emerged. These studies indicate that many conventional notions concerning directions of cascades, locality and isotropy of transfer, frequencies of fluctuations, and stationarity of saturation are not valid for moderate to long wavelengths. In particular, spectral energy transfer at long wavelengths is dominated by the E {times} B nonlinearity, which carries energy to short scale in a manner that is highly nonlocal and anisotropic. In marked contrast to the canonical self-similar cascade dynamics of Kolmogorov, energy is efficiently passed between modes separated by the entire spectrum range in a correlation time. At short wavelengths, transfer is dominated by the polarization drift nonlinearity. While the standard dual cascade applies in this subrange, it is found that finite spectrum size can produce cascades that are reverse directed and are nonconservative in enstrophy and energy similarity ranges. In regions where both nonlinearities are important, cross-coupling between the nolinearities gives rise to large no frequency shifts as well as changes in the spectral dynamics.

  5. Dynamics simulation of the interaction between serine and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Ying-Bo; Han, Sheng-Hao; Yu, Hui

    2013-05-01

    Using the first principles density functional theory (DFT), we simulated the neutron scattering spectra of the hydration dynamics of serine. Experimental data analyses have shown that dissociative H2O molecules were more likely to form hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) with an -OH group in monohydrated serine and easily shift to a -NH_3 ^ + group at a higher hydration level [P. Zhang, Y. Zhang, S. H. Han, Q. W. Yan, R. C. Ford, and J. C. Li, J. Phys. Chem. A 110, 5000 (2006), 10.1021/jp0569741]. We set the 1:1 ratio hydrated compounds at the two positions and found that the H2O could be optimized to form H-bonds with -OH and -NH3+ separately. When the simulated phonon signals of the -OH…H2O and -NH3+…H2O combinations were summed on a 3:1 scale, the calculating spectra were in good agreement with the experimental results, especially for the peak at 423 cm-1 of the -OH…H2O combination and the peak at 367 cm-1 of the -NH3+…H2O combination, which mutually complemented the real spectrum. We confirm that H2O may break the intermolecular H-bonds of the interlaced binding -OH to form a new structure, and that with the skeleton deformation of serine, H2O forms stronger H-bonds more often with the -NH3+ side indicating the flexible dynamic mechanism of the serine hydration process.

  6. Dynamics of elastic interactions in soft and biological matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuval, Janni; Safran, Samuel A.

    2013-04-01

    Cells probe their mechanical environment and can change the organization of their cytoskeletons when the elastic and viscous properties of their environment are modified. We use a model in which the forces exerted by small, contractile acto-myosin filaments (e.g., nascent stress fibers in stem cells) on the extracellular matrix are modeled as local force dipoles. In some cases, the strain field caused by these force dipoles propagates quickly enough so that only static elastic interactions need be considered. On the other hand, in the case of significant energy dissipation, strain propagation is slower and may be eliminated completely by the relaxation of the cellular cytoskeleton (e.g., by cross-link dissociation). Here, we consider several dissipative mechanisms that affect the propagation of the strain field in adhered cells and consider these effects on the interaction between force dipoles and their resulting mutual orientations. This is a first step in understanding the development of orientational (nematic) or layering (smectic) order in the cytoskeleton. We use the theory to estimate the propagation time of the strain fields over a cellular distance for different mechanisms and find that in some cases it can be of the order of seconds, thus competing with the cytoskeletal relaxation time. Furthermore, for a simple system of two force dipoles, we predict that in some cases the orientation of force dipoles might change significantly with time, e.g., for short times the dipoles exhibit parallel alignment while for later times they align perpendicularly.

  7. Plume head - trench interaction: impact on subduction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, P. G.; Moresi, L. N.; Mason, W. G.; Willis, D.

    2013-12-01

    The geologic record provides numerous examples where plumes and their associated buoyancy swell have disrupted convergent plate margins. These interactions have produced a variety of responses in the overriding plate including transient episodes of arc amagmatism, transient episodes of crustal shortening followed by plume-related magmatism in the overriding plate. The latter observation implies the plume must have transitioned from the subducting plate to the overriding plate. We present several 3D Underworld numerical models of plume heads of variable dimension and buoyancy interacting with a subduction trench. The models indicate that plume heads impact enormously on trench geometry. Arcuate trenches are created as the trench retreats around the edges of the plume head, whereas trench advance occurs in front of the plume resulting in transient crustal shortening in the overriding plate. Stalling of subduction when the plume head impacts the trench causes slab windowing. The size of the slab window is dependent on the size and buoyancy of the plume. The creation of the slab window provides a potential conduit for plume migration to the overriding plate. Alternatively, the plume head may be transferred to the overriding plate as subduction is re-established behind the plume. Models with "strong" slabs, characterized by high yield strengths, display different behavior. Plume-heads are entrained in the slab and are subducted without the development of a slab window.

  8. The endogenous dynamics of financial markets: Interaction and information dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, ChunXia; Hu, Sen; Xia, BingYing

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the process that different interactions between investors will prompt information to propagate along a differentiated path and construct a financial market model. As information spreads, increasingly investors are attracted to participate in trading, then the “herding effect” is magnified gradually, which will induce the topology of market network to change and the price to fluctuate. Especially, under different initial conditions or parameters, the peak and fat-tail property is produced and the obtained statistic values coincide with empirical results: the power-law exponents between the peak value of return probability distribution and the time scales range from 0.579 to 0.747, and the exponents between the accumulation distribution and the return on the tail are close to 3. Besides, the extent of volatility clustering in our produced price series is close to that of S&P 500 and locates between NASDAQ and HSI. All the results obtained here indicate that the continuous variation of the “herding effect” resulting from information propagation among interacting investors may be the origin of stylized facts of price fluctuations.

  9. Continuum dynamics of the intention field under weakly cohesive social interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Degond, Pierre; Merino-Aceituno, Sara; Tardiveau, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the long-time dynamics of an opinion formation model inspired by a work by Borghesi, Bouchaud and Jensen. Firstly, we derive a Fokker-Planck type equation under the assumption that interactions between individuals produce little consensus of opinion (grazing collision approximation). Secondly, we study conditions under which the Fokker-Planck equation has non-trivial equilibria and derive the macroscopic limit (corresponding to the long-time dynamics and spatially localized interactions) for the evolution of the mean opinion. Finally, we compare two different types of interaction rates: the original one given in the work of Borghesi, Bouchaud and Jensen (symmetric binary interactions) and one inspired from works by Motsch and Tadmor (non-symmetric binary interactions). We show that the first case leads to a conservative model for the density of the mean opinion whereas the second case leads to a non-conservative equation. We also show that the speed at which consensus is reached asymptotically ...

  10. A Train-Bridge Dynamic Interaction Analysis Method and Its Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The train-bridge dynamic interaction problem began with the development of railway technology, and requires an evaluation method for bridge design in order to ensure the safety and stability of the bridge and the running train. This problem is studied using theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental study. In the train-bridge dynamic interaction system proposed in this paper, the train vehicle model is established by the rigid-body dynamics method, the bridge model is established by the finite element method, and the wheel/rail vertical and lateral interaction are simulated by the corresponding assumption and the Kalker linear creep theory, respectively. Track irregularity, structure deformation, wind load, collision load, structural damage, foundation scouring, and earthquake action are regarded as the excitation for the system. The train-bridge dynamic interaction system is solved by inter-history iteration. A case study of the dynamic response of a CRH380BL high-speed train running through a standard-design bridge in China is discussed. The dynamic responses of the vehicle and of the bridge subsystems are obtained for speeds ranging from 200 km·h−1 to 400 km·h−1, and the vibration mechanism are analyzed.

  11. Regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc eDo-Rego

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic pathways leading to the synthesis of bioactive steroids in the brain are now almost completely elucidated in various groups of vertebrates and, during the last decade, the neuronal mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurosteroid production have received increasing attention. This report reviews the current knowledge concerning the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones and neuropeptides on the biosynthesis of neurosteroids. Anatomical studies have been carried out to visualize the neurotransmitter- or neuropeptide-containing fibers contacting steroid-synthesizing neurons as well as the neurotransmitter, peptide hormones or neuropeptide receptors expressed in these neurons. Biochemical experiments have been conducted to investigate the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones or neuropeptides on neurosteroid biosynthesis, and to characterize the type of receptors involved. Thus, it has been found that glutamate, acting through kainate and/or AMPA receptors, rapidly inactivates P450arom, and that melatonin produced by the pineal gland and eye inhibits the biosynthesis of 7-hydroxypregnenolone (7-OH-5P, while prolactin produced by the adenohypophysis enhances the formation of 7-OH-5P. It has also been demonstrated that the biosynthesis of neurosteroids is inhibited by GABA, acting through GABAA receptors, and neuropeptide Y, acting through Y1 receptors. In contrast, it has been shown that the octadecaneuropetide ODN, acting through central-type benzodiazepine receptors, the triakontatetraneuropeptide TTN, acting though peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, and vasotocine, acting through V1a-like receptors, stimulate the production of neurosteroids. Since neurosteroids are implicated in the control of various neurophysiological and behavioral processes, these data suggest that some of the neurophysiological effects exerted by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides may be mediated via the regulation

  12. Neutrino-nucleus interactions: from nuclear dynamics to neutrino oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martini M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a theory of neutrino interactions with nuclei aimed at the description of several partial cross sections, namely quasielastic and multinucleon emission, coherent and incoherent single-pion production. We put a special emphasis on the multinucleon emission channel which is related to the two particle-two hole excitations. As we suggested, this channel can account in particular for the unexpected behavior of the quasielastic cross section measured by MiniBooNE. The impact of the multinucleon emission channel on the neutrino energy reconstruction procedure hence on the determination on the neutrino oscillation parameters, is also analyzed in connection with the recent T2K and MiniBooNE results.

  13. Interactive Correspondence Analysis in a Dynamic Object-Oriented Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Bond

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available A highly interactive, user-friendly object-oriented software package written in LispStat is introduced that performs simple and multiple correspondence analysis, and profile analysis. These three techniques are integrated into a single environment driven by a user-friendly graphical interface that takes advantage of Lisp-Stat's advanced graphical capabilities. Techniques that assess the stability of the solution are also introduced. Some of the features of the package include colored graphics, incremental graph zooming capabilities, manual point separation to determine identities of overlapping points, and stability and fit measures. The features of the package are used to show some interesting trends in a large educational dataset.

  14. Neurotransmitter segregation: functional and plastic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sámano, Cynthia; Cifuentes, Fredy; Morales, Miguel Angel

    2012-06-01

    Synaptic cotransmission is the ability of neurons to use more than one transmitter to convey synaptic signals. Cotransmission was originally described as the presence of a classic transmitter, which conveys main signal, along one or more cotransmitters that modulate transmission, later on, it was found cotransmission of classic transmitters. It has been generally accepted that neurons store and release the same set of transmitters in all their synaptic processes. However, some findings that show axon endings of individual neurons storing and releasing different sets of transmitters, are not in accordance with this assumption, and give support to the hypothesis that neurons can segregate transmitters to different synapses. Here, we review the studies showing segregation of transmitters in invertebrate and mammalian central nervous system neurons, and correlate them with our results obtained in sympathetic neurons. Our data show that these neurons segregate even classic transmitters to separated axons. Based on our data we suggest that segregation is a plastic phenomenon and responds to functional synaptic requirements, and to 'environmental' cues such as neurotrophins. We propose that neurons have the machinery to guide the different molecules required in synaptic transmission through axons and sort them to different axon endings. We believe that transmitter segregation improves neuron interactions during cotransmission and gives them selective and better control of synaptic plasticity.

  15. Anomalous effect of turning off long-range mobility interactions in Stokesian Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Adam K Townsend Helen J

    2016-01-01

    In Stokesian Dynamics, particles are assumed to interact in two ways: through long-range mobility interactions and through short-range lubrication interactions. To speed up computations, in concentrated suspensions it is common to consider only lubrication. We show that, although this approximation provides acceptable results in monodisperse suspensions, in bidisperse suspensions it produces physically unreasonable results - "bunching" - whenever external forces are applied. We suggest that this problem could be mitigated by a careful choice of pairs of particles on which lubrication interactions should be included.

  16. Consistent gauge interaction involving dynamical coupling and anomalous current

    CERN Document Server

    Guendelman, Eduardo I

    2015-01-01

    We show a possible way to construct a consistent formalism where the effective electric charge can change with space and time without destroying the invariance. In the previous work [1][2] we took the gauge coupling to be of the form $g(\\phi)j_\\mu (A^{\\mu} +\\partial^{\\mu}B)$ where $B$ is an auxiliary field, $ \\phi $ is a scalar field and the current $j_\\mu$ is the Dirac current. This term produces a constraint $ (\\partial_{\\mu}\\phi) j^{\\mu}=0 $ which can be related to M.I.T bag model by boundary condition. In this paper we show that when we use the term $ g(\\phi)j_{\\mu}(A^{\\mu} - \\partial^{\\mu}(\\frac{1}{\\square}\\partial_{\\rho}A^{\\rho})) $, instead of the auxiliary field $ B $, there is a possibility to produce a theory with dynamical coupling constant, which does not produce any constraint or confinement. The coupling $ j_{\\mu}^{A}(A^{\\mu} - \\partial^{\\mu}(\\frac{1}{\\square}\\partial_{\\rho}A^{\\rho})) $ where $ j_{\\mu}^{A} $ is an anomalous current also discussed.

  17. Dynamical system analysis for DBI dark energy interacting with dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Mahata, Nilanjana

    2015-01-01

    A dynamical system analysis related to Dirac Born Infeld (DBI) cosmological model has been investigated in this present work. For spatially flat FRW space time, the Einstein field equation for DBI scenario has been used to study the dynamics of DBI dark energy interacting with dark matter. The DBI dark energy model is considered as a scalar field with a nonstandard kinetic energy term. An interaction between the DBI dark energy and dark matter is considered through a phenomenological interaction between DBI scalar field and the dark matter fluid. The field equations are reduced to an autonomous dynamical system by a suitable redefinition of the basic variables. The potential of the DBI scalar field is assumed to be exponential. Finally, critical points are determined, their nature have been analyzed and corresponding cosmological scenario has been discussed.

  18. Dynamics of coupled mutualistic and antagonistic interactions, and their implications for ecosystem management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgelin, E; Loeuille, N

    2014-04-07

    Understanding the interplay of antagonistic and mutualistic interactions is an important challenge for predicting the fate of ecological communities. So far, studies of propagation of disturbances have focused on a single interaction type (antagonistic or mutualistic), leaving out part of the natural diversity. We develop a model that describes the dynamics of a plant species interacting with one antagonistic (e.g. an herbivore) and one mutualistic (e.g. a pollinator) species confronted to a perturbation to assess how each interaction type will affect the other. We analyze the effect of additional mortality as a press perturbation acting on the plant's partners. We study how the intensity of the disturbance and the relative sensitivities of partner species determine community structure, as well as extinction orders. We show that due to indirect effects between the two types of interactions, additional mortality on both pollinators and herbivores can either decrease or increase their densities. The presence of pollinators can stabilize the antagonistic interaction by preventing cyclic dynamics in the plant-herbivore system. We propose explanatory mechanisms based on indirect effects and discuss the implications of our results for the conservation of interactions and communities. Our results suggest that, in agricultural landscapes, direct effects of insecticides on herbivore densities can be fully offset by indirect effects mediated through pollinators. The loss of pollinators, due to insecticide use, can also destabilize the dynamics of insect herbivores.

  19. Drum-mate: interaction dynamics and gestures in human-humanoid drumming experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose-Bagci, Hatice; Dautenhahn, Kerstin; Syrdal, Dag S.; Nehaniv, Chrystopher L.

    2010-06-01

    This article investigates the role of interaction kinesics in human-robot interaction (HRI). We adopted a bottom-up, synthetic approach towards interactive competencies in robots using simple, minimal computational models underlying the robot's interaction dynamics. We present two empirical, exploratory studies investigating a drumming experience with a humanoid robot (KASPAR) and a human. In the first experiment, the turn-taking behaviour of the humanoid is deterministic and the non-verbal gestures of the robot accompany its drumming to assess the impact of non-verbal gestures on the interaction. The second experiment studies a computational framework that facilitates emergent turn-taking dynamics, whereby the particular dynamics of turn-taking emerge from the social interaction between the human and the humanoid. The results from the HRI experiments are presented and analysed qualitatively (in terms of the participants' subjective experiences) and quantitatively (concerning the drumming performance of the human-robot pair). The results point out a trade-off between the subjective evaluation of the drumming experience from the perspective of the participants and the objective evaluation of the drumming performance. A certain number of gestures was preferred as a motivational factor in the interaction. The participants preferred the models underlying the robot's turn-taking which enable the robot and human to interact more and provide turn-taking closer to 'natural' human-human conversations, despite differences in objective measures of drumming behaviour. The results are consistent with the temporal behaviour matching hypothesis previously proposed in the literature which concerns the effect that the participants adapt their own interaction dynamics to the robot's.

  20. Dynamic analysis methods for detecting anomalies in asynchronously interacting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Akshat; Solis, John Hector; Matschke, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Detecting modifications to digital system designs, whether malicious or benign, is problematic due to the complexity of the systems being analyzed. Moreover, static analysis techniques and tools can only be used during the initial design and implementation phases to verify safety and liveness properties. It is computationally intractable to guarantee that any previously verified properties still hold after a system, or even a single component, has been produced by a third-party manufacturer. In this paper we explore new approaches for creating a robust system design by investigating highly-structured computational models that simplify verification and analysis. Our approach avoids the need to fully reconstruct the implemented system by incorporating a small verification component that dynamically detects for deviations from the design specification at run-time. The first approach encodes information extracted from the original system design algebraically into a verification component. During run-time this component randomly queries the implementation for trace information and verifies that no design-level properties have been violated. If any deviation is detected then a pre-specified fail-safe or notification behavior is triggered. Our second approach utilizes a partitioning methodology to view liveness and safety properties as a distributed decision task and the implementation as a proposed protocol that solves this task. Thus the problem of verifying safety and liveness properties is translated to that of verifying that the implementation solves the associated decision task. We develop upon results from distributed systems and algebraic topology to construct a learning mechanism for verifying safety and liveness properties from samples of run-time executions.

  1. Galaxy interactions: dark matter vs. Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND)

    CERN Document Server

    Bílek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    (doctoral thesis of Michal Bilek, finished on June 19, 2015) MOND is an observational rule for predicting the acceleration of stars and galaxies from the distribution of the visible matter. It possibly stems from a new law of physics. I list the theoretical aspects of MOND, its achievements and problems. MOND has been tested mainly in disc galaxies so far. Its tests in elliptical galaxies are rare because the MOND effects are small for them in the parts observable by the conventional methods. In the thesis, I explain the methods and ideas I developed for testing MOND in the ellipticals using stellar shells. Moreover, the shells enable us to test MOND for stars in radial orbits for the first time. The shells are results of galactic interactions. I discuss the shell formation mechanisms and summarize the findings from shell observations and simulations. The thesis contains as yet unpublished results mainly in: 1) the introduction of Sect. 3 (the expected differences in the shell morphology in the Newtonian dyna...

  2. Bepaling van enkele neurotransmitters, monoaminen, en metabolieten, met behulp van Continuous Flowapparatuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eigeman L; Schonewille F; Borst M; van der Laan JW

    1986-01-01

    Bij het onderzoek in de psychofarmacologie kan kennis van de effecten van stoffen op de omzettingssnelheid van neurotransmitters een belangrijk aspect zijn. Met de huidige psychofarmaca lijken vooral de klassieke neurotransmitters zoals de monoaminen, noradrenaline, dopamine en serotonine van

  3. Interactive affective sharing versus non-interactive affective sharing in work groups : Comparative effects of group affect on work group performance and dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klep, Annefloor; Wisse, Barbara; Van Der Flier, Henk

    2011-01-01

    This study explores whether the dynamic path to group affect, which is characterized by interactive affective sharing processes, yields different effects on task performance and group dynamics than the static path to group affect, which arises from non-interactive affective sharing. The results of o

  4. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 3: Structure Medium Interaction, Case Studies in Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Structure and medium interactions topics are addressed. Topics include: a failure analysis of underground concrete structures subjected to blast loadings, an optimization design procedure for concrete slabs, and a discussion of the transient response of a cylindrical shell submerged in a fluid. Case studies in dynamics are presented which include an examination of a shock isolation platform for a seasparrow launcher, a discussion of hydrofoil fatigue load environments, and an investigation of the dynamic characteristics of turbine generators and low tuned foundations.

  5. A New Application of Multi-Body System Dynamics in Vehicle-Road Interaction Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RenWei-qun; ZhangYun-qing; JinGuo-dong

    2003-01-01

    In vehicle-road interaction simulation, multibody system (MBS) dynamics as well as the corresponding software ADAMS has been employed to model the nonlinear vehicle in more detail. The simulation method has been validated by the test data, and been compared to the former simple models. This method can be used for estimating the effects of dynamic tire forces and other vehicle features on road damage so that the “road-friendliness” can be assessed in vehicle design process.

  6. Cofactor-dependent conformational heterogeneity of GAD65 and its role in autoimmunity and neurotransmitter homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Itamar; Hoke, David E; Costa, Mauricio G S; Reboul, Cyril F; Porebski, Benjamin T; Cowieson, Nathan P; Leh, Hervé; Pennacchietti, Eugenia; McCoey, Julia; Kleifeld, Oded; Borri Voltattorni, Carla; Langley, David; Roome, Brendan; Mackay, Ian R; Christ, Daniel; Perahia, David; Buckle, Malcolm; Paiardini, Alessandro; De Biase, Daniela; Buckle, Ashley M

    2014-06-24

    The human neuroendocrine enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyses the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor. GAD exists as two isoforms named according to their respective molecular weights: GAD65 and GAD67. Although cytosolic GAD67 is typically saturated with the cofactor (holoGAD67) and constitutively active to produce basal levels of GABA, the membrane-associated GAD65 exists mainly as the inactive apo form. GAD65, but not GAD67, is a prevalent autoantigen, with autoantibodies to GAD65 being detected at high frequency in patients with autoimmune (type 1) diabetes and certain other autoimmune disorders. The significance of GAD65 autoinactivation into the apo form for regulation of neurotransmitter levels and autoantibody reactivity is not understood. We have used computational and experimental approaches to decipher the nature of the holo → apo conversion in GAD65 and thus, its mechanism of autoinactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations of GAD65 reveal coupling between the C-terminal domain, catalytic loop, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-binding domain that drives structural rearrangement, dimer opening, and autoinactivation, consistent with limited proteolysis fragmentation patterns. Together with small-angle X-ray scattering and fluorescence spectroscopy data, our findings are consistent with apoGAD65 existing as an ensemble of conformations. Antibody-binding kinetics suggest a mechanism of mutually induced conformational changes, implicating the flexibility of apoGAD65 in its autoantigenicity. Although conformational diversity may provide a mechanism for cofactor-controlled regulation of neurotransmitter biosynthesis, it may also come at a cost of insufficient development of immune self-tolerance that favors the production of GAD65 autoantibodies.

  7. Ecological dynamics and complex interactions of Agrobacterium megaplasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gene Platt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available As with many pathogenic bacteria, agrobacterial plant pathogens carry most of their virulence functions on a horizontally transmissible genetic element. The tumor-inducing (Ti plasmid encodes the majority of virulence functions for the crown gall agent Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This includes the vir genes which drive genetic transformation of host cells and the catabolic genes needed to utilize the opines produced by infected plants. The Ti plasmid also encodes, an opine-dependent quorum sensing system that tightly regulates Ti plasmid copy number and its conjugal transfer to other agrobacteria. Many natural agrobacteria are avirulent, lacking the Ti plasmid. The burden of harboring the Ti plasmid depends on the environmental context. Away from diseased hosts, plasmid costs are low but the benefit of the plasmid is also absent. Consequently, plasmidless genotypes are favored. On infected plants the costs of the Ti plasmid can be very high, but balanced by the opine benefits, locally favoring plasmid bearing cells. Cheating derivatives which do not incur virulence costs but can benefit from opines are favored on infected plants and in most other environments, and these are frequently isolated from nature. Many agrobacteria also harbor an At plasmid which can stably coexist with a Ti plasmid. At plasmid genes are less well characterized but in general facilitate metabolic activities in the rhizosphere and bulk soil, such as the ability to breakdown plant exudates. Examination of A. tumefaciens C58, revealed that harboring it’s At plasmid is much more costly than harboring it’s Ti plasmid, but conversely the At plasmid is extremely difficult to cure. The interactions between these co-resident plasmids are complex, and depend on environmental context. However, the presence of a Ti plasmid appears to mitigate At plasmid costs, consistent with the high frequency with which they are found together.

  8. Dynamic Dipole-Dipole Interactions between Excitons in Quantum Dots of Different Sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsueda, Hideaki; Leosson, Kristjan; Xu, Zhangcheng

    2005-01-01

    Micro-photoluminescence spectra of GaAs/AlGaAs coupled quantum dots (QDs) are given, and proposed to be analyzed by our resonance dynamic dipole-dipole interaction (RDDDI) model, based on parity inheritance and exchange of virtual photons among QDs of different sizes.......Micro-photoluminescence spectra of GaAs/AlGaAs coupled quantum dots (QDs) are given, and proposed to be analyzed by our resonance dynamic dipole-dipole interaction (RDDDI) model, based on parity inheritance and exchange of virtual photons among QDs of different sizes....

  9. Dynamic Dipole-Dipole Interactions between Excitons in Quantum Dots of Different Sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsueda, Hideaki; Leosson, Kristjan; Xu, Zhangcheng;

    2005-01-01

    Micro-photoluminescence spectra of GaAs/AlGaAs coupled quantum dots (QDs) are given, and proposed to be analyzed by our resonance dynamic dipole-dipole interaction (RDDDI) model, based on parity inheritance and exchange of virtual photons among QDs of different sizes.......Micro-photoluminescence spectra of GaAs/AlGaAs coupled quantum dots (QDs) are given, and proposed to be analyzed by our resonance dynamic dipole-dipole interaction (RDDDI) model, based on parity inheritance and exchange of virtual photons among QDs of different sizes....

  10. Equilibration Dynamics of Strongly Interacting Bosons in 2D Lattices with Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mi; Hui, Hoi-Yin; Rigol, Marcos; Scarola, V. W.

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by recent optical lattice experiments [J.-y. Choi et al., Science 352, 1547 (2016), 10.1126/science.aaf8834], we study the dynamics of strongly interacting bosons in the presence of disorder in two dimensions. We show that Gutzwiller mean-field theory (GMFT) captures the main experimental observations, which are a result of the competition between disorder and interactions. Our findings highlight the difficulty in distinguishing glassy dynamics, which can be captured by GMFT, and many-body localization, which cannot be captured by GMFT, and indicate the need for further experimental studies of this system.

  11. Hydrodynamic Interaction Between a Platelet and an Erythrocyte: Effect of Erythrocyte Deformability, Dynamics, and Wall Proximity

    OpenAIRE

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Diamond, Scott L.; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2013-01-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of hydrodynamic interaction between a red blood cell (RBC) and a platelet in a wall-bounded shear flow. The dynamics and large deformation of the RBC are fully resolved in the simulations using a front-tracking method. The objective is to quantify the influence of tank treading and tumbling dynamics of the RBC, and the presence of a bounding wall on the deflection of platelet trajectories. We observe two types of interaction: A crossing event...

  12. Macroscopic properties and dynamical large deviations of the boundary driven Kawasaki process with long range interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Mourragui, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    We consider a boundary driven exclusion process associated to particles evolving under Kawasaki (conservative) dynamics and long range interaction in a regime in which at equilibrium phase separation might occur. We show that the empirical density under the diffusive scaling solves a non linear integro differential evolution equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions and we prove the associated dynamical large deviations principle. Further, tuning suitable the intensity of the interaction, in the uniqueness phase regime, we show that under the stationary measure the empirical density solves a non local, stationary, transport equation.

  13. Evaluation of Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction and Dynamic Seismic Soil Pressures Acting on It Subjected to Strong Earthquake Motions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to clarify the damage mechanism of the subway structure, the dynamic soil-structure interaction and the dynamic forces acting on the structure, a series of shaking table tests and simulation analyses were performed. The seismic response of the structure and the dynamic forces acting on the structure due to sinusoidal and random waves were investigated with special attention to the dynamic soil-structure interaction. The result shows that the compression seismic soil pressures and extension seismic soil pressures simultaneously act on the sidewalls, and big shear stress also acts on the ceiling slab due to horizontal excitation. The seismic soil pressure could be approximated to hyperbola curve, and reached a peak value with increase of the shear strain of the model ground. In addition, a slide and exfoliation phenomenon between the structure and the surrounding ground was simulated, using the nonlinear analyses. The foundation is provided for amending the calculation method of seismic soil pressure and improving the anti-earthquake designing level of underground structure.

  14. Dynamics of electron currents in nanojunctions with time-varying components and interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuansing, Eduardo C.; Bayocboc, Francis A.; Laurio, Christian M.

    2017-08-01

    We study the dynamics of the electron current in nanodevices where there are time-varying components and interactions. These devices are a nanojunction attached to heat baths and with dynamical electron-phonon interactions, and a nanojunction with photon beams incident and reflected at the channel. We use the two-time nonequilibrium Green's functions technique to calculate the time-dependent electron current flowing across the devices. We find that whenever a sudden change occurs in the device, the current takes time to react to the abrupt change, overshoots, oscillates, and eventually settles down to a steady value. With dynamical electron-phonon interactions, the interaction gives rise to a net resistance that reduces the flow of current across the device when a source-drain bias potential is attached. In the presence of dynamical electron-photon interactions, the photons drive the electrons to flow. The direction of flow, however, depends on the frequencies of the incident photons. Furthermore, the direction of electron flow in one lead is exactly opposite to the direction of flow in the other lead thereby resulting in no net change in current flowing across the device.

  15. The use of LeuT as a model in elucidating binding sites for substrates and inhibitors in neurotransmitter transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løland, Claus Juul

    2015-01-01

    Background: The mammalian neurotransmitter transporters are complex proteins playing a central role in synaptic transmission between neurons by rapid reuptake of neurotransmitters. The proteins which transport dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin belong to the Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters...

  16. Coupled quintessence and the impossibility of an interaction: a dynamical analysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardi, Fabrizio F.; Landim, Ricardo G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    We analyze the coupled quintessence in the light of the linear dynamical systems theory, with two different interactions: (1) proportional to the energy density of the dark energy and (2) proportional to the sum of the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy. The results presented here enlarge the previous analyses in the literature, wherein the interaction has been only proportional to the energy density of the dark matter. In the first case it is possible to get the well-known sequence of cosmological eras. For the second interaction only the radiation and the dark-energy era can be described by the fixed points. Therefore, from the point of view of dynamical system theory, the interaction proportional to the sum of the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy does not describe the universe we live in. (orig.)

  17. Contact point generation for convex polytopes in interactive rigid body dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silcowitz-Hansen, Morten; Abel, Sarah Maria Niebe; Erleben, Kenny

    When computing contact forces in rigid body dynamics systems, most state-of-the-art solutions use iterative methods such as the projected Gauss–Seidel (PGS) method. Methods such as the PGS method are preferred for their robustness. However, the time-critical nature of interactive applications...... for convex polytopes. A novel contact point generation method is presented, which is based on growth distances and Gauss maps. We demonstrate improvements when using our method in the context of interactive rigid body simulation...

  18. Discourse-voice regulatory strategies in the psychotherapeutic interaction: a state-space dynamics analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tomicic,Alemka; Martínez, Claudio; PÉREZ,J. CAROLA; Hollenstein, Tom; Angulo, Salvador; Gerstmann, Adam; Barroux, Isabelle; Krause, Mariane

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to provide evidence of the dynamics associated with the configurations of discourse-voice regulatory strategies in patient–therapist interactions in relevant episodes within psychotherapeutic sessions. Its central assumption is that discourses manifest themselves differently in terms of their prosodic characteristics according to their regulatory functions in a system of interactions. The association between discourse and vocal quality in patients and therapists was analyzed ...

  19. Discourse-Voice Regulatory Strategies in the Psychotherapeutic Interaction: A State-Space Dynamics Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alemka eTomicic; Claudio eMartínez; J. Carola ePérez; Tom eHollenstein; Salvador eAngulo; Adam eGerstmann; Isabelle eBarroux; Mariane eKrause

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to provide evidence of the dynamics associated with the configurations of discourse-voice regulatory strategies in patient-therapist interactions in relevant episodes within psychotherapeutic sessions. Its central assumption is that discourses manifest themselves differently in terms of their prosodic characteristics according to their regulatory functions in a system of interactions. The association between discourse and vocal quality in patients and therapists was analyzed ...

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study on the Carbon Nanotube Interacting with a Polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Leton C.; Mian, Shabeer A.; Jang, Joon Kyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Using molecular dynamics simulation method, we studied the carbon nanotube (CNT) non-covalently interacting with a polymer. As the polymer coiled around the CNT, the diameter of CNT deformed by more than 40% of its original value within 50 ps. By considering three different polymers, we conclude that the interaction between the CNT and polymer is governed by the number of repeating units in the polymer, not by the molecular weight of polymer

  1. Interactions between DNA and histones- a dynamic process of nucleosome formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 王鹏业; 窦硕星; 童培庆

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the dynamic process of interactions between a DNA chain and a histone octamer by numerical simulations. It is found that DNA indeed may wrap around the histone octaner about two turns as in the actual situations. The simulation shows that the interaction potential between DNA and histone is a key factor for the wrapping of DNA, and the temperature is also an important parameter in the process.

  2. Population Dynamics in Cold Gases Resulting from the Long-Range Dipole-Dipole Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Mandilara, A; Pillet, P

    2009-01-01

    We consider the effect of the long range dipole-dipole interaction on the excitation exchange dynamics of cold two-level atomic gase in the conditions where the size of the atomic cloud is large as compared to the wavelength of the dipole transition. We show that this interaction results in population redistribution across the atomic cloud and in specific spectra of the spontaneous photons emitted at different angles with respect to the direction of atomic polarization.

  3. Brownian dynamics simulations of a flexible polymer chain which includes continuous resistance and multibody hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jason E.; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2005-01-01

    Using methods adapted from the simulation of suspension dynamics, we have developed a Brownian dynamics algorithm with multibody hydrodynamic interactions for simulating the dynamics of polymer molecules. The polymer molecule is modeled as a chain composed of a series of inextensible, rigid rods with constraints at each joint to ensure continuity of the chain. The linear and rotational velocities of each segment of the polymer chain are described by the slender-body theory of Batchelor [J. Fluid Mech. 44, 419 (1970)]. To include hydrodynamic interactions between the segments of the chain, the line distribution of forces on each segment is approximated by making a Legendre polynomial expansion of the disturbance velocity on the segment, where the first two terms of the expansion are retained in the calculation. Thus, the resulting linear force distribution is specified by a center of mass force, couple, and stresslet on each segment. This method for calculating the hydrodynamic interactions has been successfully used to simulate the dynamics of noncolloidal suspensions of rigid fibers [O. G. Harlen, R. R. Sundararajakumar, and D. L. Koch, J. Fluid Mech. 388, 355 (1999); J. E. Butler and E. S. G. Shaqfeh, J. Fluid Mech. 468, 204 (2002)]. The longest relaxation time and center of mass diffusivity are among the quantities calculated with the simulation technique. Comparisons are made for different levels of approximation of the hydrodynamic interactions, including multibody interactions, two-body interactions, and the "freely draining" case with no interactions. For the short polymer chains studied in this paper, the results indicate a difference in the apparent scaling of diffusivity with polymer length for the multibody versus two-body level of approximation for the hydrodynamic interactions.

  4. Early dynamics of guest-host interaction in dye-doped liquid crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Thai V; Xu, Lei; Shen, Y R

    2003-05-16

    We have studied in detail the early dynamics of laser-induced molecular reorientation in a dye-doped liquid crystalline (LC) medium that exhibits a significant enhancement of the optical Kerr nonlinearity due to guest-host interaction. Experimental results agree quantitatively with theory based on a model in which the anisotropic dye excitation helps reorient the LC molecules through a mean-field intermolecular interaction.

  5. Low-Dimensional Dynamical Characteristics of Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-16

    Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows FA9550-11-1-0203 Dr. Charles E. Tinney, Aerospace Engineering and Engineering...Low-Dimensional Dynamical Characteristics of Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows Contract/Grant Number: FA9550-11-1-0203...driven by transonic resonance (Zaman et al, 2002). What is common about many of these planar nozzle studies is that there is just one single

  6. Dynamical aspects on FEL interaction in single passage and storage ring devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, G.; Renieri, A. [ENEA, Frascati (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    The dynamical behaviour of the free-electron lasers is investigated using appropriate scaling relations valid for devices operating in the low and high gain regimes, including saturation. The analysis is applied to both single passage and storage ring configurations. In the latter case the interplay between the interaction of the electron bean with the laser field and with the accelerator environment is investigated. In particular we discuss the effect of FEL interaction on the microwave instability.

  7. Dynamics of the chain of forced oscillators with long-range interaction: From synchronization to chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, G. M.; Edelman, M.; Tarasov, V. E.

    2007-12-01

    We consider a chain of nonlinear oscillators with long-range interaction of the type 1/l1+α, where l is a distance between oscillators and 0continuous limit, the system's dynamics is described by a fractional generalization of the Ginzburg-Landau equation with complex coefficients. Such a system has a new parameter α that is responsible for the complexity of the medium and that strongly influences possible regimes of the dynamics, especially near α =2 and α =1. We study different spatiotemporal patterns of the dynamics depending on α and show transitions from synchronization of the motion to broad-spectrum oscillations and to chaos.

  8. A Structural Dynamics Approach to the Simulation of Spacecraft Control/Structure Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A relatively simple approach to the analysis of linear spacecraft control/structure interaction problems is presented. The approach uses a commercially available structural system dynamic analysis package for both controller and plant dynamics, thus obviating the need to transfer data between separate programs. The unilateral coupling between components in the control system block diagram is simulated using sparse matrix stiffness and damping elements available in the structural dynamic code. The approach is illustrated with a series of simple tutorial examples of a rigid spacecraft core with flexible appendages.

  9. Interaction of short-term depression and firing dynamics in shaping single neuron encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh eMohan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how the two properties short-term synaptic depression of afferent input and postsynaptic firing dynamics combine to determine the operating mode of a neuron. While several computational roles have been ascribed to either, their interaction has not been studied. We considered two types of short-term synaptic dynamics (release-dependent and release-independent depression and two classes of firing dynamics (regular firing and firing with spike-frequency adaptation. The input-output transformation of the four possible combinations of pre- and postsynaptic dynamics was characterized. Adapting neurons receiving input from release-dependent synapses functioned largely as coincidence detectors. The other three configurations showed properties consistent with integrators, each with distinct features. These results suggest that the operating mode of a neuron is determined by both the pre- and postsynaptic dynamics and that studying them together is necessary to understand emergent properties and their implications for neuronal coding.

  10. The Dynamics of Unfolded versus Folder tRNA: The Role of Electrostatic Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, J H [University of Maryland; Tyagi, M. [NCNR and University of Maryland; Briber, R M [University of Maryland; Woodson, S.A. [Johns Hopkins University; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of RNA contributes to its biological functions such as ligand recognition and catalysis. Using quasielastic neutron scattering spectroscopy, we show that Mg2+ greatly increases the picosecond to nanosecond dynamics of hydrated tRNA while stabilizing its folded structure. Analyses of the atomic mean-squared displacement, relaxation time, persistence length, and fraction of mobile atoms showed that unfolded tRNA is more rigid than folded tRNA. This same result was found for a sulfonated polystyrene, indicating that the increased dynamics in Mg2+ arises from improved charge screening of the polyelectrolyte rather than specific interactions with the folded tRNA. These results are opposite to the relationship between structural compactness and internal dynamics for proteins in which the folded state is more rigid than the denatured state. We conclude that RNA dynamics are strongly influenced by the electrostatic environment, in addition to the motions of local waters.

  11. Multiscale modeling of dislocation-precipitate interactions in Fe: From molecular dynamics to discrete dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Arttu; Granberg, Fredric; Laurson, Lasse; Nordlund, Kai; Alava, Mikko J

    2016-01-01

    The stress-driven motion of dislocations in crystalline solids, and thus the ensuing plastic deformation process, is greatly influenced by the presence or absence of various pointlike defects such as precipitates or solute atoms. These defects act as obstacles for dislocation motion and hence affect the mechanical properties of the material. Here we combine molecular dynamics studies with three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to model the interaction between different kinds of precipitates and a 1/2〈111〉{110} edge dislocation in BCC iron. We have implemented immobile spherical precipitates into the ParaDis discrete dislocation dynamics code, with the dislocations interacting with the precipitates via a Gaussian potential, generating a normal force acting on the dislocation segments. The parameters used in the discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for the precipitate potential, the dislocation mobility, shear modulus, and dislocation core energy are obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. We compare the critical stresses needed to unpin the dislocation from the precipitate in molecular dynamics and discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to fit the two methods together and discuss the variety of the relevant pinning and depinning mechanisms.

  12. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study on the Interactions between Carboxylate Ions and Metal Ions in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehandzhiyski, Aleksandar Y; Riccardi, Enrico; van Erp, Titus S; Trinh, Thuat T; Grimes, Brian A

    2015-08-20

    The interaction between a carboxylate anion (deprotonated propanoic acid) and the divalent Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+) metal ions is studied via ab initio molecular dynamics. The main focus of the study is the selectivity of the carboxylate-metal ion interaction in aqueous solution. The interaction is modeled by explicitly accounting for the solvent molecules on a DFT level. The hydration energies of the metal ions along with their diffusion and mobility coefficients are determined and a trend correlated with their ionic radius is found. Subsequently, a series of 16 constrained molecular dynamics simulations for every ion is performed, and the interaction free energy is obtained from thermodynamic integration of the forces between the metal ion and the carboxylate ion. The results indicate that the magnesium ion interacts most strongly with the carboxylate, followed by calcium, strontium, and barium. Because the interaction free energy is not enough to explain the selectivity of the reaction observed experimentally, more detailed analysis is performed on the simulation trajectories to understand the steric changes in the reaction complex during dissociation. The solvent dynamics appear to play an important role during the dissociation of the complex and also in the observed selectivity behavior of the divalent ions.

  13. Determining the neurotransmitter concentration profile at active synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scimemi, Annalisa; Beato, Marco

    2009-12-01

    Establishing the temporal and concentration profiles of neurotransmitters during synaptic release is an essential step towards understanding the basic properties of inter-neuronal communication in the central nervous system. A variety of ingenious attempts has been made to gain insights into this process, but the general inaccessibility of central synapses, intrinsic limitations of the techniques used, and natural variety of different synaptic environments have hindered a comprehensive description of this fundamental phenomenon. Here, we describe a number of experimental and theoretical findings that has been instrumental for advancing our knowledge of various features of neurotransmitter release, as well as newly developed tools that could overcome some limits of traditional pharmacological approaches and bring new impetus to the description of the complex mechanisms of synaptic transmission.

  14. Appearance and distribution of peptidergic neurotransmitters in hippocampal primary culture

    OpenAIRE

    Thiele, Theodor

    2012-01-01

    The internal structure of the hippocampus, especially the development of neuronal circuits, is the subject of current research. The hippocampal primary culture represents a suitable model to study neuronal development and the impact of isolated stimuli and noxious. Focus of the following considerations are the neurons of the hippocampus, especially the peptidergic neurotransmitters somatostatin (SS), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and cholecystokinin (CCK). By us...

  15. Application of PEDOT-CNT Microelectrodes for Neurotransmitter Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Samba, Ramona; Fuchsberber, Kai; Matiychyn, Ilona; Epple, Sebastian; Kiesel, Lydia; Stett, Alfred; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Stelzle, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, composite microelectrodes from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and carbon nanotubes (CNT) are characterized as electrochemical sensing material for neurotransmitters. Dopamine can be detected using square wave voltammetry at these microelectrodes. The CNTs improve the sensitivity by a factor of two. In addition, the selectivity towards dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid was examined. While both electrodes, PEDOT and PEDOT-CNT are able to detect all ...

  16. Terahertz identification and quantification of neurotransmitter and neurotrophy mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yan; Yuan, Xiaorong; Zou, Xiang; Chen, Wanqing; Huang, Hui; Zhao, Hongwei; Song, Bo; Chen, Liang; Zhu, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy has been widely used for investigating the fingerprint spectrum of different substances. For cancerous tissues, the greatest difficulty is the absorption peaks of various substances contained in tissues overlap with each other, which are hard to identify and quantitative analyze. As a result, it is very hard to measure the presence of cancer cell and then to diagnose accurately. In this paper, we select three typical neurotransmitters (γ-aminobutyric acid, L-glutamic ac...

  17. The Role of TM5 in Na2 Release and the Conformational Transition of Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters toward the Inward-Open State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Li, Zheng; Quick, Matthias; Malinauskaite, Lina; Nissen, Poul; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Shi, Lei

    2017-03-20

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) terminate neurotransmission by the reuptake of released neurotransmitters. This active accumulation of substrate against its concentration gradient is driven by the transmembrane Na+ gradient and requires that the transporter traverses several conformational states. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS homolog, has been crystallized in outward-open, outward-occluded and inward-open states. Two crystal structures of another prokaryotic NSS homolog, the multi-hydrophobic amino acid transporter (MhsT) from Bacillus halodurans have been resolved in novel inward-occluded states, with the extracellular vestibule closed and the intracellular portion of TM5 (TM5i) in either an unwound or a helical conformation. We have investigated the potential involvement of TM5i in binding and unbinding of Na2, i.e. the Na(+) bound in the Na2 site, by carrying out comparative molecular dynamics simulations of the models derived from the two MhsT structures. We find that the helical TM5i conformation is associated with a higher propensity for Na2 release, which leads to the repositioning of the N terminus (NT) and transition to an inward-open state. By using comparative interaction network analysis, we also identify allosteric pathways connecting TM5i and the Na2 binding site to the extracellular and intracellular regions. Based on our combined computational and mutagenesis studies of MhsT and LeuT, we propose that TM5i plays a key role in Na2 binding and release associated with the conformational transition toward the inward-open state, a role that is likely to be shared across the NSS family.

  18. Role of antioxidants in the protection of the nitrergic neurotransmitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpaert, Erwin E; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2002-06-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway generates the non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) neurotransmitter which mediates smooth muscle relaxation in a variety of nitrergically-innervated tissues. However, one strange aspect of this nitrergic neurotransmission process is that certain drugs (i.e. superoxide generators and NO-scavengers) powerfully inhibit relaxations to exogenous NO, but have little or no effect on relaxations to electrical field stimulation. This thesis examined the possibility that in the nitrergically-innervated gastric fundus of the pig tissue antioxidants present in the neuroeffector junction might protect the endogenous nitrergic neurotransmitter (free radical NO) from attack by superoxide anions and scavenging activity, while exogenous NO would still be vulnerable before it reaches the nitrergic synapses within the tissue. We found that several antioxidants (in casu Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, bilirubin) exerted a partial or complete protection of the relaxation induced by exogenous NO against the differentiating drugs under investigation. A close interrelationship between the endogenous nitrergic neurotransmitter and the antioxidants Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and bilirubin (produced by the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase system) was corroborated by immunohistochemical data showing the presence of these latter defense systems in all nitrergic neurons. Pharmacological depletion further established a role for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase in peripheral nitrergic neurotransmission. For glutathione, only a partial depletion could be obtained and this did not influence nitrergic neurotransmission.

  19. Profiling neurotransmitter receptor expression in the Ambystoma mexicanum brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Korn, Matthew J; Nakamura, Paul A; Shirkey, Nicole J; Wong, Jamie K; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-03-22

    Ability to regenerate limbs and central nervous system (CNS) is unique to few vertebrates, most notably the axolotl (Ambystoma sp.). However, despite the fact the neurotransmitter receptors are involved in axonal regeneration, little is known regarding its expression profile. In this project, RT-PCR and qPCR were performed to gain insight into the neurotransmitter receptors present in Ambystoma. Its functional ability was studied by expressing axolotl receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes by either injection of mRNA or by direct microtransplantation of brain membranes. Oocytes injected with axolotl mRNA expressed ionotropic receptors activated by GABA, aspartate+glycine and kainate, as well as metabotropic receptors activated by acetylcholine and glutamate. Interestingly, we did not see responses following the application of serotonin. Membranes from the axolotl brain were efficiently microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes and two types of native GABA receptors that differed in the temporal course of their responses and affinities to GABA were observed. Results of this study are necessary for further characterization of axolotl neurotransmitter receptors and may be useful for guiding experiments aimed at understanding activity-dependant limb and CNS regeneration.

  20. Neurotransmitter receptor-mediated signaling pathways as modulators of carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system with its two antagonistic branches, the sympathicus and the parasympathicus, regulates the activities of all body functions that are not under voluntary control. While the autonomic regulation of organ functions has been extensively studied, little attention has been given to the potential role of neurohumoral transmission at the cellular level in the development of cancer. Studies conducted by our laboratory first showed that binding of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, as well as nicotine or its nitrosated cancer-causing derivative, NNK, to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors comprised of alpha7 subunits activated a mitogenic signal transduction pathway in normal and neoplastic pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. On the other hand, beta-adrenergic receptors (Beta-ARs), which transmit signals initiated by binding of the catecholamine neurotransmitters of the sympathicus, were identified by our laboratory as important regulators of cell proliferation in cell lines derived from human adenocarcinomas of the lungs, pancreas, and breast. The tobacco-specific carcinogen NNK bound with high affinity to Beta1- and Beta2-ARs, thus activating cAMP, protein kinase A, and the transcription factor CREB. Collectively, neurotransmitter receptors of the nicotinic and Beta-adrenergic families appear to regulate cellular functions essential for the development and survival of the most common human cancers.

  1. Entanglement dynamics of a Heisenberg chain with Dzyaloshinski-Moriya interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng qiang; Zhang Xiao-Ping; Zhi Qi-Jun; Ren Zhong-Zhou

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the entanglement dynamics of the system,composed of two qubits A and B with Heisenberg XX spin interactation.There is a third controller qubit C,which only has Dzyaloshiuskii-Moriya (DM) spin-orbit interaction with the qubit B.It is found that depending on the initial state of the controller qubit C and DM interaction,the entanglement of the system displays amplification and sudden birth effects.These effects indicate that one can control the entanglement of the system,which may be helpful for quantum information processing.

  2. Effect of Coulomb Interaction on Dynamical Localization in a Two-Electron Quantum-Dot Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-Min; DUAN Su-Qing; ZHAO Xian-Geng; LIU Cheng-Shi

    2004-01-01

    The combined interaction of Coulomb interaction and ac fields with two electrons in a quantum dot molecule is studied respectively with numerical simulation, perturbation theory and the approximation of driven two-level model. The dynamical localization occurs with the ac field whose ratio of the amplitude to the angular frequency is a root of n-order Bessel functions, where n is determined by the Coulomb interaction energy. Such results are explained with either the driven two-level approximation or the degenerated three-level model and verified by the numerical simulations.

  3. Learning of embodied interaction dynamics with recurrent neural networks: some exploratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oubbati, Mohamed; Kord, Bahram; Koprinkova-Hristova, Petia; Palm, Günther

    2014-04-01

    The new tendency of artificial intelligence suggests that intelligence must be seen as a result of the interaction between brains, bodies and environments. This view implies that designing sophisticated behaviour requires a primary focus on how agents are functionally coupled to their environments. Under this perspective, we present early results with the application of reservoir computing as an efficient tool to understand how behaviour emerges from interaction. Specifically, we present reservoir computing models, that are inspired by imitation learning designs, to extract the essential components of behaviour that results from agent-environment interaction dynamics. Experimental results using a mobile robot are reported to validate the learning architectures.

  4. Time lags and the balance of positive and negative interactions in driving grassland community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, Emily C; Goldberg, Deborah E; King, Aaron A

    2010-02-01

    Both facilitative and competitive interactions occur simultaneously among plants, and the net balance between them can vary over time. Despite this, recent model-fitting studies have found that negative interactions predominate. This suggests that more complex models may be necessary to uncover facilitation. Here we fitted models including seasonality, interannual variation, and time lags to survey data to test for patterns in positive and negative interactions among plants in a Michigan dry sand prairie. We hypothesized that interactions would be generally facilitative in this dry environment. Results indicate that most immediate (direct) interactions among dominant species are actually competitive, although interactions were more facilitative over the drier summer season. Interestingly, lagged density dependence was strong for all species in both seasons; it was positive for conspecific interactions and both positive and negative for heterospecific interactions. Observed lagged density dependence is likely due to effects from litter and/or past storage in rhizomes. Conspecific immediate and lagged interactions tended to be stronger than heterospecific interactions, suggesting that population dynamics in this community are driven mostly by conspecifics. Overall, the presence of strong lagged density dependence in this system suggests that it may be more widespread in plants than previously thought.

  5. Biophysical Approaches to the Study of LeuT, a Prokaryotic Homolog of Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satinder K; Pal, Aritra

    2015-01-01

    Ion-coupled secondary transport is utilized by multiple integral membrane proteins as a means of achieving the thermodynamically unfavorable translocation of solute molecules across the lipid bilayer. The chemical nature of these molecules is diverse and includes sugars, amino acids, neurotransmitters, and other ions. LeuT is a sodium-coupled, nonpolar amino acid symporter and eubacterial member of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family of Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters. Eukaryotic counterparts encompass the clinically and pharmacologically significant transporters for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), dopamine (DA), and norepinephrine (NE). Since the crystal structure of LeuT was first solved in 2005, subsequent crystallographic, binding, flux, and spectroscopic studies, complemented with homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations, have allowed this protein to emerge as a remarkable mechanistic paradigm for both the SLC6 class as well as several other sequence-unrelated SLCs whose members possess astonishingly similar architectures. Despite yielding groundbreaking conceptual advances, this vast treasure trove of data has also been the source of contentious hypotheses. This chapter will present a historical scientific overview of SLC6s; recount how the initial and subsequent LeuT structures were solved, describing the insights they each provided; detail the accompanying functional techniques, emphasizing how they either supported or refuted the static crystallographic data; and assemble these individual findings into a mechanism of transport and inhibition. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transition metal ion FRET uncovers K+ regulation of a neurotransmitter/sodium symporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billesbølle, Christian B.; Mortensen, Jonas S.; Sohail, Azmat; Schmidt, Solveig G.; Shi, Lei; Sitte, Harald H.; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) are responsible for Na+-dependent reuptake of neurotransmitters and represent key targets for antidepressants and psychostimulants. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS protein, constitutes a primary structural model for these transporters. Here we show that K+ inhibits Na+-dependent binding of substrate to LeuT, promotes an outward-closed/inward-facing conformation of the transporter and increases uptake. To assess K+-induced conformational dynamics we measured fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescein site-specifically attached to inserted cysteines and Ni2+ bound to engineered di-histidine motifs (transition metal ion FRET). The measurements supported K+-induced closure of the transporter to the outside, which was counteracted by Na+ and substrate. Promoting an outward-open conformation of LeuT by mutation abolished the K+-effect. The K+-effect depended on an intact Na1 site and mutating the Na2 site potentiated K+ binding by facilitating transition to the inward-facing state. The data reveal an unrecognized ability of K+ to regulate the LeuT transport cycle. PMID:27678200

  7. Transition metal ion FRET uncovers K(+) regulation of a neurotransmitter/sodium symporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billesbølle, Christian B; Mortensen, Jonas S; Sohail, Azmat; Schmidt, Solveig G; Shi, Lei; Sitte, Harald H; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J

    2016-09-28

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) are responsible for Na(+)-dependent reuptake of neurotransmitters and represent key targets for antidepressants and psychostimulants. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS protein, constitutes a primary structural model for these transporters. Here we show that K(+) inhibits Na(+)-dependent binding of substrate to LeuT, promotes an outward-closed/inward-facing conformation of the transporter and increases uptake. To assess K(+)-induced conformational dynamics we measured fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescein site-specifically attached to inserted cysteines and Ni(2+) bound to engineered di-histidine motifs (transition metal ion FRET). The measurements supported K(+)-induced closure of the transporter to the outside, which was counteracted by Na(+) and substrate. Promoting an outward-open conformation of LeuT by mutation abolished the K(+)-effect. The K(+)-effect depended on an intact Na1 site and mutating the Na2 site potentiated K(+) binding by facilitating transition to the inward-facing state. The data reveal an unrecognized ability of K(+) to regulate the LeuT transport cycle.

  8. Biophysical Approaches to the Study of LeuT, a Prokaryotic Homolog of Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satinder K.; Pal, Aritra

    2016-01-01

    Ion-coupled secondary transport is utilized by multiple integral membrane proteins as a means of achieving the thermodynamically unfavorable translocation of solute molecules across the lipid bilayer. The chemical nature of these molecules is diverse and includes sugars, amino acids, neurotransmitters, and other ions. LeuT is a sodium-coupled, nonpolar amino acid symporter and eubacterial member of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family of Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporters. Eukaryotic counterparts encompass the clinically and pharmacologically significant transporters for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), dopamine (DA), and norepinephrine (NE). Since the crystal structure of LeuT was first solved in 2005, subsequent crystallographic, binding, flux, and spectroscopic studies, complemented with homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations, have allowed this protein to emerge as a remarkable mechanistic paradigm for both the SLC6 class as well as several other sequence-unrelated SLCs whose members possess astonishingly similar architectures. Despite yielding groundbreaking conceptual advances, this vast treasure trove of data has also been the source of contentious hypotheses. This chapter will present a historical scientific overview of SLC6s; recount how the initial and subsequent LeuT structures were solved, describing the insights they each provided; detail the accompanying functional techniques, emphasizing how they either supported or refuted the static crystallographic data; and assemble these individual findings into a mechanism of transport and inhibition. PMID:25950965

  9. Multilevel summation with B-spline interpolation for pairwise interactions in molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, David J; Wolff, Matthew A; Xia, Jianlin; Schulten, Klaus; Skeel, Robert D

    2016-03-21

    The multilevel summation method for calculating electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations constructs an approximation to a pairwise interaction kernel and its gradient, which can be evaluated at a cost that scales linearly with the number of atoms. The method smoothly splits the kernel into a sum of partial kernels of increasing range and decreasing variability with the longer-range parts interpolated from grids of increasing coarseness. Multilevel summation is especially appropriate in the context of dynamics and minimization, because it can produce continuous gradients. This article explores the use of B-splines to increase the accuracy of the multilevel summation method (for nonperiodic boundaries) without incurring additional computation other than a preprocessing step (whose cost also scales linearly). To obtain accurate results efficiently involves technical difficulties, which are overcome by a novel preprocessing algorithm. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the resulting method offers substantial improvements in accuracy and that its performance is competitive with an implementation of the fast multipole method in general and markedly better for Hamiltonian formulations of molecular dynamics. The improvement is great enough to establish multilevel summation as a serious contender for calculating pairwise interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, the method appears to be uniquely capable for molecular dynamics in two situations, nonperiodic boundary conditions and massively parallel computation, where the fast Fourier transform employed in the particle-mesh Ewald method falls short.

  10. Focus: Structure and dynamics of the interfacial layer in polymer nanocomposites with attractive interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Carroll, Bobby; Bocharova, Vera; Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2017-05-01

    In recent years it has become clear that the interfacial layer formed around nanoparticles in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) is critical for controlling their macroscopic properties. The interfacial layer occupies a significant volume fraction of the polymer matrix in PNCs and creates strong intrinsic heterogeneity in their structure and dynamics. Here, we focus on analysis of the structure and dynamics of the interfacial region in model PNCs with well-dispersed, spherical nanoparticles with attractive interactions. First, we discuss several experimental techniques that provide structural and dynamic information on the interfacial region in PNCs. Then, we discuss the role of various microscopic parameters in controlling structure and dynamics of the interfacial layer. The analysis presented emphasizes the importance of the polymer-nanoparticle interactions for the slowing down dynamics in the interfacial region, while the thickness of the interfacial layer appears to be dependent on chain rigidity, and has been shown to increase with cooling upon approaching the glass transition. Aside from chain rigidity and polymer-nanoparticle interactions, the interfacial layer properties are also affected by the molecular weight of the polymer and the size of the nanoparticles. In the final part of this focus article, we emphasize the important challenges in the field of polymer nanocomposites and a potential analogy with the behavior observed in thin films.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Study on the Biophysical Interactions of Seven Green Tea Catechins with Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the interactions of bioactive catechins (flavonoids) commonly found in green tea with lipid bilayers, as model for cell membranes. Previously, a number of experimental studies rationalized catechin’s anticarcinogenic, antibacterial, and other be...

  12. Distributed Hardware-in-the-loop simulator for autonomous continuous dynamical systems with spatially constrained interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, D.J.; Papp, Z.; Dorrepaal, M.

    2003-01-01

    The state-of-the-art intelligent vehicle, autonomous guided vehicle and mobile robotics application domains can be described as collection of interacting highly autonomous complex dynamical systems. Extensive formal analysis of these systems – except special cases – is not feasible, consequently the

  13. Towards Ultrafast Communications: Nonlinear Coupling Dynamics and Light-Semiconductor Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with some specific problems concerning the processing of ultrashort optical pulses and their interaction with semiconductors. It includes the investigation of the ultrashort optical pulse propagation and coupling dynamics in the nonlinear coupled waveguide, and the coherent and in

  14. Explicit and Dynamical Chiral Symmetry Bresking in an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宗红石; 吴小华; 侯丰尧; 赵恩广

    2004-01-01

    A method for obtaining the small current quark mass effect on the dressed quark propagator from an effective quark-quark interaction model is developed. Within this approach both the explicit and dynamical chiral symmetry breakings are analysed. A comparison with the previous results is given.

  15. Dynamic dipole-dipole interactions between excitons in quantum dots of different sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsueda, Hideaki; Leosson, Kristjan; Xu, Zhangcheng;

    2004-01-01

    A model of the resonance dynamic dipole-dipole interaction between excitons confined in quantum dots (QDs) of different sizes at close enough distance is given in terms of parity inheritance and exchange of virtual photons. Microphotoluminescence spectra of GaAs-AlGaAs coupled QDs are proposed to...

  16. Towards Ultrafast Communications: Nonlinear Coupling Dynamics and Light-Semiconductor Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with some specific problems concerning the processing of ultrashort optical pulses and their interaction with semiconductors. It includes the investigation of the ultrashort optical pulse propagation and coupling dynamics in the nonlinear coupled waveguide, and the coherent and

  17. On the role of inter-nucleosomal interactions and intrinsic nucleosome dynamics in chromatin function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladyslaw A. Krajewski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is emerging that many diseases result from defects in gene functions, which, in turn, depend on the local chromatin environment of a gene. However, it still remains not fully clear how chromatin activity code is ‘translated’ to the particular ‘activating’ or ‘repressing’ chromatin structural transition. Commonly, chromatin remodeling in vitro was studied using mononucleosomes as a model. However, recent data suggest that structural reorganization of a single mononucleosome is not equal to remodeling of a nucleosome particle under multinucleosomal content – such as, interaction of nucleosomes via flexible histone termini could significantly alter the mode (and the resulting products of nucleosome structural transitions. It is becoming evident that a nucleosome array does not constitute just a ‘polymer’ of individual ‘canonical’ nucleosomes due to multiple inter-nucleosomal interactions which affect nucleosome dynamics and structure. It could be hypothesized, that inter-nucleosomal interactions could act in cooperation with nucleosome inherent dynamics to orchestrate DNA-based processes and promote formation and stabilization of highly-dynamic, accessible structure of a nucleosome array. In the proposed paper we would like to discuss the nucleosome dynamics within the chromatin fiber mainly as it pertains to the roles of the structural changes mediated by inter-nucleosomal interactions.

  18. Dynamically generated resonances from the interaction of vector mesons with baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Oset, E; Vacas, M J Vicente; Ramos, A; Vijande, J; Sarkar, S; Sun, Bao Xi

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of the first calculations involving the interaction of vector mesons with baryons, by means of which one generates a large amount of dynamically generated resonances, many of which can be associated to known resonances, while others represent predictions for new states.

  19. Interactive and dynamic visualizations in teaching and learning of anatomy: A cognitive load perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, M.K.; Paas, Fred; Johnson, T.E.; Payer, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing use of computers in the classroom and the advancement of information technology, a requirement to investigate and evaluate different strategies for the presentation of verbal information in interactive and dynamic visualizations has risen to a high level of importance. There is a

  20. Interactive and dynamic visualizations in teaching and learning of anatomy: A cognitive load perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, M.K.; Paas, Fred; Johnson, T.E.; Payer, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing use of computers in the classroom and the advancement of information technology, a requirement to investigate and evaluate different strategies for the presentation of verbal information in interactive and dynamic visualizations has risen to a high level of importance. There is a

  1. Phonon-Magnon Interaction in Low Dimensional Quantum Magnets Observed by Dynamic Heat Transport Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montagnese, Matteo; Otter, Marian; Zotos, Xenophon; Fishman, Dmitry A.; Hlubek, Nikolai; Mityashkin, Oleg; Hess, Christian; Saint-Martin, Romuald; Singh, Surjeet; Revcolevschi, Alexandre; van Loosdrecht, Paul H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-five years ago, Sanders and Walton [Phys. Rev. B 15, 1489 (1977)] proposed a method to measure the phonon-magnon interaction in antiferromagnets through thermal transport which so far has not been verified experimentally. We show that a dynamical variant of this approach allows direct extract

  2. Lattice-ramp-induced dynamics in an interacting Bose-Bose mixture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Wernsdorfer; M. Snoek; W. Hofstetter

    2010-01-01

    We investigate a bosonic quantum gas consisting of two interacting species in an optical lattice at zero and finite temperature. The equilibrium properties and dynamics of this system are obtained by means of the Gutzwiller mean-field method. In particular we model recent experiments where the ramp-

  3. A molecular dynamics study on the interaction between epoxy and functionalized graphene sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melro, Liliana Sofia S. F. P.; Pyrz, Ryszard; Jensen, Lars Rosgaard

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between graphene and epoxy resin was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The interfacial shear strength and pull out force were calculated for functionalised graphene layers (carboxyl, carbonyl, and hydroxyl) and epoxy composites interfaces. The influence of functional...... and epoxy resin increases....

  4. The interacting effects of ungulates and fire on forest dynamics: an analysis using the model FORSPACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, K.; Groen, T.A.; Wieren, van S.E.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of interactions between the density of ungulates and forest fires on forest dynamics were studied on an area of 1188 ha called Planken Wambuis. The vegetation consists mainly of heathland and Scots pine forest but also includes oak, beech and birch, and parts of former arable land that i

  5. Phase 1 user instruction manual. A geological formation - drill string dynamic interaction finite element program (GEODYN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinianow, M.A.; Rotelli, R.L. Jr.; Baird, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    User instructions for the GEODYN Interactive Finite Element Computer Program are presented. The program is capable of performing the analysis of the three-dimensional transient dynamic response of a Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bit - Bit Sub arising from the intermittent contact of the bit with the downhole rock formations. The program accommodates non-linear, time dependent, loading and boundary conditions.

  6. Dynamics of Positive Interactions between General Education Students and Students with Special Needs: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examined the dynamics of positive interactions between general education students and students with special needs in elementary inclusion-based physical education settings. More specifically, this qualitative study used a phenomenological research methodology aimed to examine the multiple factors contributing to general education…

  7. Dynamical analysis of yeast protein interaction network during the sake brewing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzarezaee, Mitra; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Araabi, Babak N

    2011-12-01

    Proteins interact with each other for performing essential functions of an organism. They change partners to get involved in various processes at different times or locations. Studying variations of protein interactions within a specific process would help better understand the dynamic features of the protein interactions and their functions. We studied the protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) during the brewing of Japanese sake. In this process, yeast cells are exposed to several stresses. Analysis of protein interaction networks of yeast during this process helps to understand how protein interactions of yeast change during the sake brewing process. We used gene expression profiles of yeast cells for this purpose. Results of our experiments revealed some characteristics and behaviors of yeast hubs and non-hubs and their dynamical changes during the brewing process. We found that just a small portion of the proteins (12.8 to 21.6%) is responsible for the functional changes of the proteins in the sake brewing process. The changes in the number of edges and hubs of the yeast protein interaction networks increase in the first stages of the process and it then decreases at the final stages.

  8. Elastic responses of underground circular arches considering dynamic soil-structure interaction: A theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Long; Jin, Feng-Nian; Fan, Hua-Lin

    2013-02-01

    Due to the wide applications of arches in underground protective structures, dynamic analysis of circular arches including soil-structure interactions is important. In this paper, an exact solution of the forced vibration of circular arches subjected to subsurface denotation forces is obtained. The dynamic soil-structure interaction is considered with the introduction of an interfacial damping between the structure element and the surrounding soil into the equation of motion. By neglecting the influences of shear, rotary inertia and tangential forces and assuming the arch incompressible, the equations of motion of the buried arches were set up. Analytical solutions of the dynamic responses of the protective arches were deduced by means of modal superposition. Arches with different opening angles, acoustic impedances and rise-span ratios were analyzed to discuss their influences on an arch. The theoretical analysis suggests blast loads for elastic designs and predicts the potential failure modes for buried protective arches.

  9. Dynamics of self-interacting strings and energy-momentum conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Kurt

    2017-08-01

    Classical strings coupled to a metric, a dilaton and an axion, asconceived by superstring theory, suffer from ultraviolet divergences due to self-interactions. Consequently, as in the case ofradiating charged particles, the corresponding effective string dynamics cannotbe derived from an action principle. We propose a fundamental principle to build this dynamics, based on local energy-momentum conservation in terms of a well-defineddistribution-valued energy-momentum tensor. Its continuityequation implies a finite equation of motion for self-interacting strings. The construction is carried out explicitly for strings in uniform motion in arbitrary space-time dimensions, where we establish cancelations of ultraviolet divergences which parallel superstring non-renormalization theorems. The uniqueness properties of the resulting dynamics are analyzed.

  10. Dynamics of self-interacting strings and energy-momentum conservation

    CERN Document Server

    Lechner, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Classical strings coupled to a metric, a dilaton and an axion, as conceived by superstring theory, suffer from ultraviolet divergences due to self-interactions. Consequently, as in the case of radiating charged particles, the corresponding effective string dynamics can not be derived from an action principle. We propose a fundamental principle to build this dynamics, based on local energy-momentum conservation in terms of a well-defined distribution-valued energy-momentum tensor. Its continuity equation implies a finite equation of motion for self-interacting strings. The construction is carried out explicitly for strings in uniform motion in arbitrary space-time dimensions, where we establish cancelations of ultraviolet divergences which parallel superstring non-renormalization theorems. The uniqueness properties of the resulting dynamics are analyzed.

  11. The dynamics of meaningful social interactions and the emergence of collective knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankulov, Marija Mitrović; Melnik, Roderick; Tadić, Bosiljka

    2015-07-01

    Collective knowledge as a social value may arise in cooperation among actors whose individual expertise is limited. The process of knowledge creation requires meaningful, logically coordinated interactions, which represents a challenging problem to physics and social dynamics modeling. By combining two-scale dynamics model with empirical data analysis from a well-known Questions & Answers system Mathematics, we show that this process occurs as a collective phenomenon in an enlarged network (of actors and their artifacts) where the cognitive recognition interactions are properly encoded. The emergent behavior is quantified by the information divergence and innovation advancing of knowledge over time and the signatures of self-organization and knowledge sharing communities. These measures elucidate the impact of each cognitive element and the individual actor’s expertise in the collective dynamics. The results are relevant to stochastic processes involving smart components and to collaborative social endeavors, for instance, crowdsourcing scientific knowledge production with online games.

  12. Modeling the dynamics of tidally-interacting binary neutron stars up to merger

    CERN Document Server

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Dietrich, Tim; Damour, Thibault

    2014-01-01

    We propose an effective-one-body (EOB) model that describes the general relativistic dynamics of neutron star binaries from the early inspiral up to merger. Our EOB model incorporates an enhanced attractive tidal potential motivated by recent analytical advances in the post-Newtonian and gravitational self-force description of relativistic tidal interactions. No fitting parameters are introduced for the description of tidal interaction in the late, strong-field dynamics. We compare the model dynamics (described by the gauge invariant relation between binding energy and orbital angular momentum), and the gravitational wave phasing, with new high-resolution multi-orbit numerical relativity simulations of equal-mass configurations with different equations of state. We find agreement essentially within the uncertainty of the numerical data for all the configurations. Our model is the first semi-analytical model which captures the tidal amplification effects close to merger. It thereby provides the most accurate a...

  13. Dynamic protein-protein interaction subnetworks of lung cancer in cases with smoking history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; He, Li-Ran; Zhao, Yan-Chao; Chan, Man-Him; Zhang, Meng; He, Miao

    2013-02-01

    Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer and is linked to 85% of lung cancer cases. However, how lung cancer develops in patients with smoking history remains unclear. Systems approaches that combine human protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks and gene expression data are superior to traditional methods. We performed these systems to determine the role that smoking plays in lung cancer development and used the support vector machine (SVM) model to predict PPIs. By defining expression variance (EV), we found 520 dynamic proteins (EV>0.4) using data from the Human Protein Reference Database and Gene Expression Omnibus Database, and built 7 dynamic PPI subnetworks of lung cancer in patients with smoking history. We also determined the primary functions of each subnetwork: signal transduction, apoptosis, and cell migration and adhesion for subnetwork A; cell-sustained angiogenesis for subnetwork B; apoptosis for subnetwork C; and, finally, signal transduction and cell replication and proliferation for subnetworks D-G. The probability distribution of the degree of dynamic protein and static protein differed, clearly showing that the dynamic proteins were not the core proteins which widely connected with their neighbor proteins. There were high correlations among the dynamic proteins, suggesting that the dynamic proteins tend to form specific dynamic modules. We also found that the dynamic proteins were only correlated with the expression of selected proteins but not all neighbor proteins when cancer occurred.

  14. Neurotransmitters act as paracrine signals to regulate insulin secretion from the human pancreatic islet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Menegaz, Danusa; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2014-08-15

    In this symposium review we discuss the role of neurotransmitters as paracrine signals that regulate pancreatic islet function. A large number of neurotransmitters and their receptors has been identified in the islet, but relatively little is known about their involvement in islet biology. Interestingly, neurotransmitters initially thought to be present in autonomic axons innervating the islet are also present in endocrine cells of the human islet. These neurotransmitters can thus be released as paracrine signals to help control hormone release. Here we propose that the role of neurotransmitters may extend beyond controlling endocrine cell function to work as signals modulating vascular flow and immune responses within the islet.

  15. How LeuT shapes our understanding of the mechanisms of sodium-coupled neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penmatsa, Aravind; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters are ion-coupled symporters that drive the uptake of neurotransmitters from neural synapses. In the past decade, the structure of a bacterial amino acid transporter, leucine transporter (LeuT), has given valuable insights into the understanding of architecture and mechanism of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters. Different conformations of LeuT, including a substrate-free state, inward-open state, and competitive and non-competitive inhibitor-bound states, have revealed a mechanistic framework for the transport and transport inhibition of neurotransmitters. The current review integrates our understanding of the mechanistic and pharmacological properties of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters obtained through structural snapshots of LeuT.

  16. Effects of biotic and abiotic factors on the temporal dynamic of bat-fruit interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurindo, Rafael de Souza; Gregorin, Renato; Tavares, Davi Castro

    2017-08-01

    Mutualistic interactions between animals and plants vary over time and space based on the abundance of fruits or animals and seasonality. Little is known about this temporal dynamic and the influence of biotic and abiotic factors on the structure of interaction networks. We evaluated changes in the structure of network interactions between bats and fruits in relation to variations in rainfall. Our results suggest that fruit abundance is the main variable responsible for temporal changes in network attributes, such as network size, connectance, and number of interactions. In the same way, temperature positively affected the abundance of fruits and bats. An increase in temperature and alterations in rainfall patterns, due to human induced climate change, can cause changes in phenological patterns and fruit production, with negative consequences to biodiversity maintenance, ecological interactions, and ecosystem functioning.

  17. Examining the interaction of Europa with the Jovian magnetosphere using eruptive and multifluid plasma dynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paty, C. S.; Dufek, J.; Payan, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Jupiter's icy moon Europa provides a unique laboratory for understanding the physics of moon-magnetosphere interactions. Europa possesses a conductive subsurface ocean, the interaction of which with the locally varying Jovian magnetic field is expressed by the observed inductive response. This icy moon also boasts a dynamic exosphere as well as eruptive plumes, which interact with the Jovian plasma as expressed via ultraviolet aurora. We investigate a broad range of parameter space related to the interaction of this icy moon with the rapidly rotating magnetosphere of Jupiter, systematically working through and quantifying various physical effects using a multifluid plasma dynamic modeling framework. Aside from induction and interactions with the exosphere, we will also present preliminary result from incorporating a neutral plume generated by an eruptive simulation. We run conduit simulations to get at neutral gas and particle injection velocities, which are in turn used as a source for the plasma dynamic simulations. We then investigate the distribution of neutrals, ions, and charged grains as a function of altitude.

  18. Real-time monitoring of inhibitory effects on glutamate-induced neurotransmitter release using a potassium ion image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akiteru; Sakurai, Takashi; Hattori, Toshiaki; Okumura, Koichi; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2015-02-01

    To directly image the release of neurotransmitters from neurons, we combined a substance-selective layer with a 128 × 128-pixel ion image sensor based on CMOS technology. Using the substance-specific image sensors, we studied the dynamics of potassium ion ( K+) release from neurons and examined the effect of ouabain on K+ release. K+ transients were significantly inhibited by ouabain. The K+ image sensor used in this study demonstrated the dynamic analysis of ligand-operated signal release and the pharmacological assessment of secretagogues without requiring cell labeling.

  19. Brain-to-Brain Synchrony Tracks Real-World Dynamic Group Interactions in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikker, Suzanne; Wan, Lu; Davidesco, Ido; Kaggen, Lisa; Oostrik, Matthias; McClintock, James; Rowland, Jess; Michalareas, Georgios; Van Bavel, Jay J; Ding, Mingzhou; Poeppel, David

    2017-05-08

    The human brain has evolved for group living [1]. Yet we know so little about how it supports dynamic group interactions that the study of real-world social exchanges has been dubbed the "dark matter of social neuroscience" [2]. Recently, various studies have begun to approach this question by comparing brain responses of multiple individuals during a variety of (semi-naturalistic) tasks [3-15]. These experiments reveal how stimulus properties [13], individual differences [14], and contextual factors [15] may underpin similarities and differences in neural activity across people. However, most studies to date suffer from various limitations: they often lack direct face-to-face interaction between participants, are typically limited to dyads, do not investigate social dynamics across time, and, crucially, they rarely study social behavior under naturalistic circumstances. Here we extend such experimentation drastically, beyond dyads and beyond laboratory walls, to identify neural markers of group engagement during dynamic real-world group interactions. We used portable electroencephalogram (EEG) to simultaneously record brain activity from a class of 12 high school students over the course of a semester (11 classes) during regular classroom activities (Figures 1A-1C; Supplemental Experimental Procedures, section S1). A novel analysis technique to assess group-based neural coherence demonstrates that the extent to which brain activity is synchronized across students predicts both student class engagement and social dynamics. This suggests that brain-to-brain synchrony is a possible neural marker for dynamic social interactions, likely driven by shared attention mechanisms. This study validates a promising new method to investigate the neuroscience of group interactions in ecologically natural settings. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Neighborhood structure effects on the Dynamic response of soil-structure interaction by harmonic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Dan-guang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For realizing the variation of structural dynamic characteristics due to neighbor structure in buildings group, the surface structure is idealized as an equivalent single degree of freedom system with rigid base whose site consists of a single homogeneous layer. Based on the model, a equivalent method on the equivalent seismic excitation is proposed. Then, the differences of seismic response and equivalent seismic input between soil - structure interaction (SSI system and structure -soil-structure interaction (SSSI system are investigated by harmonic analysis. The numerical results show that dynamic responses would be underestimated in SSSI system when the forcing frequencies are close to the Natural frequency if the effects of neighborhood structure were ignored. Neighborhood structure would make the translational displacement increase and rocking vibration decrease. When establishing an effective seismic input, it is necessary to consider the impact of inertia interaction.

  1. Azimuthal asymmetry in collective electron dynamics in relativistically transparent laser-foil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, B.; Powell, H. W.; Carroll, D. C.; Murphy, C. D.; Stockhausen, L. C.; Rusby, D. R.; Scott, G. G.; Wilson, R.; Booth, N.; Symes, D. R.; Hawkes, S. J.; Torres, R.; Borghesi, M.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.

    2014-09-01

    Asymmetry in the collective dynamics of ponderomotively-driven electrons in the interaction of an ultraintense laser pulse with a relativistically transparent target is demonstrated experimentally. The 2D profile of the beam of accelerated electrons is shown to change from an ellipse aligned along the laser polarization direction in the case of limited transparency, to a double-lobe structure aligned perpendicular to it when a significant fraction of the laser pulse co-propagates with the electrons. The temporally-resolved dynamics of the interaction are investigated via particle-in-cell simulations. The results provide new insight into the collective response of charged particles to intense laser fields over an extended interaction volume, which is important for a wide range of applications, and in particular for the development of promising new ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration mechanisms involving ultrathin target foils.

  2. Modeling short-term dynamics and variability for realistic interactive facial animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoiber, Nicolas; Breton, Gaspard; Seguier, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    Modern modeling and rendering techniques have produced nearly photorealistic face models, but truly expressive digital faces also require natural-looking movements. Virtual characters in today's applications often display unrealistic facial expressions. Indeed, facial animation with traditional schemes such as keyframing and motion capture demands expertise. Moreover, the traditional schemes aren't adapted to interactive applications that require the real-time generation of context-dependent movements. A new animation system produces realistic expressive facial motion at interactive speed. The system relies on a set of motion models controlling facial-expression dynamics. The models are fitted on captured motion data and therefore retain the dynamic signature of human facial expressions. They also contain a nondeterministic component that ensures the variety of the long-term visual behavior. This system can efficiently animate any synthetic face. The video illustrates interactive use of a system that generates facial-animation sequences.

  3. Isobaric first-principles molecular dynamics of liquid water with nonlocal van der Waals interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Miceli, Giacomo; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the structural properties of liquid water at near ambient conditions using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations based on a semilocal density functional augmented with nonlocal van der Waals interactions. The adopted scheme offers the advantage of simulating liquid water at essentially the same computational cost of standard semilocal functionals. Applied to the water dimer and to ice Ih, we find that the hydrogen-bond energy is only slightly enhanced compared to a standard semilocal functional. We simulate liquid water through molecular dynamics in the NpH statistical ensemble allowing for fluctuations of the system density. The structure of the liquid departs from that found with a semilocal functional leading to more compact structural arrangements. This indicates that the directionality of the hydrogen-bond interaction has a diminished role as compared to the overall attractions, as expected when dispersion interactions are accounted for. This is substantiated through a detailed a...

  4. Accessing Rydberg-dressed interactions using many-body Ramsey dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Rick; Killian, Thomas C.; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate that Ramsey spectroscopy can be used to observe Rydberg-dressed interactions in a many-body system well within experimentally measured lifetimes, in contrast to previous research, which either focused on interactions near Förster resonances or on few-atom systems. We build a spin-1/2 from one level that is Rydberg-dressed and another that is not. These levels may be hyperfine or long-lived electronic states. An Ising spin model governs the Ramsey dynamics, which we demonstrate can be used to characterize the Rydberg-dressed interactions. Furthermore, the dynamics can differ significantly from that observed in other spin systems. As one example, spin echo can increase the rate at which coherence decays. The results also apply to bare (undressed) Rydberg states as a special case, for which we quantitatively reproduce recent ultrafast experiments without fitting.

  5. Dynamics of the guest-host orientational interaction in dye-doped liquid-crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Thai V; Xu, Lei; Shen, Y R

    2005-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study on the dynamics of laser-induced molecular reorientation in a dye-doped liquid crystalline (LC) medium that exhibits significant enhancement of the optical Kerr nonlinearity due to guest-host interaction. Using various techniques, we separately characterized the dynamical responses of the relevant molecular species present in the medium following photoexcitation and, thus, were able to follow the transient process in which photoexcitation of the dye molecules exert through guest-host interaction a net torque on the host LC material, leading to the observed enhanced optical Kerr nonlinearity. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the time-dependent theory based on a mean-field model of the guest-host interaction.

  6. Dynamics of Moment Neuronal Networks with Intra- and Inter-Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuyan Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A framework of moment neuronal networks with intra- and inter-interactions is presented. It is to show how the spontaneous activity is propagated across the homogeneous and heterogeneous network. The input-output firing relationship and the stability are first explored for a homogeneous network. For heterogeneous network without the constraint of the correlation coefficients between neurons, a more sophisticated dynamics is then explored. With random interactions, the network gets easily synchronized. However, desynchronization is produced by a lateral interaction such as Mexico hat function. It is the external intralayer input unit that offers a more sophisticated and unexpected dynamics over the predecessors. Hence, the work further opens up the possibility of carrying out a stochastic computation in neuronal networks.

  7. FMRP Regulates Neurotransmitter Release and Synaptic Information Transmission by Modulating Action Potential Duration via BK channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A.; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Klyachko, Vitaly A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation-independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel’s regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology. PMID:23439122

  8. Fine-tuning of defensive behaviors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray by atypical neurotransmitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Fogaça

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an up-to-date review of the evidence indicating that atypical neurotransmitters such as nitric oxide (NO and endocannabinoids (eCBs play an important role in the regulation of aversive responses in the periaqueductal gray (PAG. Among the results supporting this role, several studies have shown that inhibitors of neuronal NO synthase or cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor agonists cause clear anxiolytic responses when injected into this region. The nitrergic and eCB systems can regulate the activity of classical neurotransmitters such as glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA that control PAG activity. We propose that they exert a ‘fine-tuning’ regulatory control of defensive responses in this area. This control, however, is probably complex, which may explain the usually bell-shaped dose-response curves observed with drugs that act on NO- or CB1-mediated neurotransmission. Even if the mechanisms responsible for this complex interaction are still poorly understood, they are beginning to be recognized. For example, activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel (TRPV1 receptors by anandamide seems to counteract the anxiolytic effects induced by CB1 receptor activation caused by this compound. Further studies, however, are needed to identify other mechanisms responsible for this fine-tuning effect.

  9. Evolution of neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid,glutamate and their receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiheng GOU; Xiao WANG; Wen WANG

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate are two important amino acid neurotransmitters widely present in the nervous systems of ammals,insects,round worm,and platyhelminths,while their receptors are quite diversified across different animal phyla.However,the evolutionary mechanisms between the two conserved neurotransmitters and their diversified receptors remain elusive,and antagonistic interactions between GABA and glutamate signal transduction systems,in particular,have begun to attract significant attention.In this review,we summarize the extant results on the origin and evolution of GABA and glutamate,as well as their receptors,and analyze possible evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships of various GABAs and glutamate receptors.We further discuss the evolutionary history of Excitatory/Neutral Amino Acid Transporter (EAAT),a transport protein,which plays an important role in the GABA-glutamate "yin and yang" balanced regulation.Finally,based on current advances,we propose several potential directions of future research.

  10. Dynamic Stresses in a Francis Turbine Runner Based on Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Ruofu; WANG Zhengwei; LUO Yongyao

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue and cracks have occurred in many large hydraulic turbines after they were put into production.The cracks are thought to be due to dynamic stresses in the runner caused by hydraulic forces.Computational fluid dynamics(CFD)simulations that included the spiral case,stay vane,guide vane,runner vane.and draft tube were run at various operating points to analyze the pressure distribution on the runner surface and the stress characteristics in the runner due to the fluid-structure interactions(FSl).The dynamic stresses in the Francis turbine runner at the most dangerous operating point were then analyzed.The results show that the dynamic stresses caused by the hydraulic forces during off-design operating points are one of the main reasons for the fatigue and cracks in the runner blade.The results can be used to optimize the runner and to analyze other critical components in the hydraulic turbine.

  11. Complex-Dynamical Solution to Many-Body Interaction Problem and Its Applications in Fundamental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kirilyuk, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    We review the recently proposed unreduced, complex-dynamical solution to many-body problem with arbitrary interaction and its application to unified solution of fundamental problems, including foundations of causally complete quantum mechanics, relativity, particle properties and cosmology. We first analyse the universal properties of many-body problem solution without any perturbative reduction and show that the emerging new quality of fundamental dynamic multivaluedness (or redundance) of resulting system configuration leads to universal concept of dynamic complexity, chaoticity and fractality of any real system behaviour. We then consider unified features of this complex dynamics. Applications of that universal description to systems at various complexity levels have been performed and in this paper we review those at the lowest, fundamental complexity levels leading to causal understanding of unified origins of quantum mechanics, relativity (special and general), elementary particles, their intrinsic prop...

  12. Dynamical equilibration of strongly-interacting 'infinite' parton matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD) transport approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ozvenchuk, V; Gorenstein, M I; Bratkovskaya, E L; Cassing, W

    2012-01-01

    We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in `infinite' parton matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics off-shell transport approach, which is based on a dynamical quasiparticle model (DQPM) for partons matched to reproduce lattice QCD results -- including the partonic equation of state -- in thermodynamic equilibrium. The `infinite' parton matter is simulated by a system of quarks and gluons within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions, at different energy densities, initialized slightly out of kinetic and chemical equilibrium. We investigate the approach of the system to equilibrium and the time scales for the equilibration of different observables. We, furthermore, study particle distributions in the strongly-interacting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP) including partonic spectral functions, momentum distributions, abundances of the different parton species and their fluctuations (scaled variance, skewness, kurtosis) in equilibrium. We also compare the results of the microscopic calculations ...

  13. Temporal dynamics and impact of event interactions in cyber-social populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Qing; Li, Xiang

    2013-03-01

    The advance of information technologies provides powerful measures to digitize social interactions and facilitate quantitative investigations. To explore large-scale indoor interactions of a social population, we analyze 18 715 users' Wi-Fi access logs recorded in a Chinese university campus during 3 months, and define event interaction (EI) to characterize the concurrent interactions of multiple users inferred by their geographic coincidences—co-locating in the same small region at the same time. We propose three rules to construct a transmission graph, which depicts the topological and temporal features of event interactions. The vertex dynamics of transmission graph tells that the active durations of EIs fall into the truncated power-law distributions, which is independent on the number of involved individuals. The edge dynamics of transmission graph reports that the transmission durations present a truncated power-law pattern independent on the daily and weekly periodicities. Besides, in the aggregated transmission graph, low-degree vertices previously neglected in the aggregated static networks may participate in the large-degree EIs, which is verified by three data sets covering different sizes of social populations with various rendezvouses. This work highlights the temporal significance of event interactions in cyber-social populations.

  14. Approximate Inference for Time-Varying Interactions and Macroscopic Dynamics of Neural Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermayer, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The models in statistical physics such as an Ising model offer a convenient way to characterize stationary activity of neural populations. Such stationary activity of neurons may be expected for recordings from in vitro slices or anesthetized animals. However, modeling activity of cortical circuitries of awake animals has been more challenging because both spike-rates and interactions can change according to sensory stimulation, behavior, or an internal state of the brain. Previous approaches modeling the dynamics of neural interactions suffer from computational cost; therefore, its application was limited to only a dozen neurons. Here by introducing multiple analytic approximation methods to a state-space model of neural population activity, we make it possible to estimate dynamic pairwise interactions of up to 60 neurons. More specifically, we applied the pseudolikelihood approximation to the state-space model, and combined it with the Bethe or TAP mean-field approximation to make the sequential Bayesian estimation of the model parameters possible. The large-scale analysis allows us to investigate dynamics of macroscopic properties of neural circuitries underlying stimulus processing and behavior. We show that the model accurately estimates dynamics of network properties such as sparseness, entropy, and heat capacity by simulated data, and demonstrate utilities of these measures by analyzing activity of monkey V4 neurons as well as a simulated balanced network of spiking neurons. PMID:28095421

  15. Dynamic and interactive generation of object handling behaviors by a small humanoid robot using a dynamic neural network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masato; Noda, Kuniaki; Hoshino, Yukiko; Tani, Jun

    2006-04-01

    This study presents experiments on the learning of object handling behaviors by a small humanoid robot using a dynamic neural network model, the recurrent neural network with parametric bias (RNNPB). The first experiment showed that after the robot learned different types of ball handling behaviors using human direct teaching, the robot was able to generate adequate ball handling motor sequences situated to the relative position between the robot's hands and the ball. The same scheme was applied to a block handling learning task where it was shown that the robot can switch among learned different block handling sequences, situated to the ways of interaction by human supporters. Our analysis showed that entrainment of the internal memory structures of the RNNPB through the interactions of the objects and the human supporters are the essential mechanisms for those observed situated behaviors of the robot.

  16. Dynamic Interactions of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots with Cyclic Solvents Probed by Femtosecond Four-Wave Mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied dynamic interactions between CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs and cyclic solvents probed by femtosecond four-wave mixing. We found that the dynamic interactions of QDs strongly depend on the existence of π-bonds in solvent molecules.

  17. Spatial structure favors cooperative behavior in the snowdrift game with multiple interactive dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qi; Li, Aming; Wang, Long

    2017-02-01

    Spatial reciprocity is generally regarded as a positive rule facilitating the evolution of cooperation. However, a few recent studies show that, in the snowdrift game, spatial structure still could be detrimental to cooperation. Here we propose a model of multiple interactive dynamics, where each individual can cooperate and defect simultaneously against different neighbors. We realize individuals' multiple interactions simply by endowing them with strategies relevant to probabilities, and every one decides to cooperate or defect with a probability. With multiple interactive dynamics, the cooperation level in square lattices is higher than that in the well-mixed case for a wide range of cost-to-benefit ratio r, implying that spatial structure favors cooperative behavior in the snowdrift game. Moreover, in square lattices, the most favorable strategy follows a simple relation of r, which confers theoretically the average evolutionary frequency of cooperative behavior. We further extend our study to various homogeneous and heterogeneous networks, which demonstrates the robustness of our results. Here multiple interactive dynamics stabilizes the positive role of spatial structure on the evolution of cooperation and individuals' distinct reactions to different neighbors can be a new line in understanding the emergence of cooperation.

  18. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the interaction of melatonin with calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turjanski, Adrián G.; Estrin, Darío A.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.; McCormick, John E.; Martin, Stephen R.; Pastore, Annalisa; Biekofsky, Rodolfo R.; Martorana, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Pineal hormone melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is thought to modulate the calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway either by changing intracellular Ca2+ concentration via activation of its G-protein–coupled membrane receptors, or through a direct interaction with calmodulin (CaM). The present work studies the direct interaction of melatonin with intact calcium-saturated CaM both experimentally, by fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and theoretically, by molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the interaction is calcium-dependent. The affinity, as obtained from monitoring 15N and 1H chemical shift changes for a melatonin titration, is weak (in the millimolar range) and comparable for the N- and C-terminal domains. Partial replacement of diamagnetic Ca2+ by paramagnetic Tb3+ allowed the measurement of interdomain NMR pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings, indicating that each domain movement in the complex is not correlated with the other one. Molecular dynamics simulations allow us to follow the dynamics of melatonin in the binding pocket of CaM. Overall, this study provides an example of how a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches can shed light on a weakly interacting system of biological and pharmacological significance. PMID:15498938

  19. Discourse-voice regulatory strategies in the psychotherapeutic interaction: a state-space dynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomicic, Alemka; Martínez, Claudio; Pérez, J Carola; Hollenstein, Tom; Angulo, Salvador; Gerstmann, Adam; Barroux, Isabelle; Krause, Mariane

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to provide evidence of the dynamics associated with the configurations of discourse-voice regulatory strategies in patient-therapist interactions in relevant episodes within psychotherapeutic sessions. Its central assumption is that discourses manifest themselves differently in terms of their prosodic characteristics according to their regulatory functions in a system of interactions. The association between discourse and vocal quality in patients and therapists was analyzed in a sample of 153 relevant episodes taken from 164 sessions of five psychotherapies using the state space grid (SSG) method, a graphical tool based on the dynamic systems theory (DST). The results showed eight recurrent and stable discourse-voice regulatory strategies of the patients and three of the therapists. Also, four specific groups of these discourse-voice strategies were identified. The latter were interpreted as regulatory configurations, that is to say, as emergent self-organized groups of discourse-voice regulatory strategies constituting specific interactional systems. Both regulatory strategies and their configurations differed between two types of relevant episodes: Change Episodes and Rupture Episodes. As a whole, these results support the assumption that speaking and listening, as dimensions of the interaction that takes place during therapeutic conversation, occur at different levels. The study not only shows that these dimensions are dependent on each other, but also that they function as a complex and dynamic whole in therapeutic dialog, generating relational offers which allow the patient and the therapist to regulate each other and shape the psychotherapeutic process that characterizes each type of relevant episode.

  20. Complex ordering in spin networks: Critical role of adaptation rate for dynamically evolving interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Anand; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2015-09-01

    Many complex systems can be represented as networks of dynamical elements whose states evolve in response to interactions with neighboring elements, noise and external stimuli. The collective behavior of such systems can exhibit remarkable ordering phenomena such as chimera order corresponding to coexistence of ordered and disordered regions. Often, the interactions in such systems can also evolve over time responding to changes in the dynamical states of the elements. Link adaptation inspired by Hebbian learning, the dominant paradigm for neuronal plasticity, has been earlier shown to result in structural balance by removing any initial frustration in a system that arises through conflicting interactions. Here we show that the rate of the adaptive dynamics for the interactions is crucial in deciding the emergence of different ordering behavior (including chimera) and frustration in networks of Ising spins. In particular, we observe that small changes in the link adaptation rate about a critical value result in the system exhibiting radically different energy landscapes, viz., smooth landscape corresponding to balanced systems seen for fast learning, and rugged landscapes corresponding to frustrated systems seen for slow learning.

  1. Evolution, Interaction, and Intrinsic Properties of Dislocations in Intermetallics: Anisotropic 3D Dislocation Dynamics Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The generation, motion, and interaction of dislocations play key roles during the plastic deformation process of crystalline solids. 3D Dislocation Dynamics has been employed as a mesoscale simulation algorithm to investigate the collective and cooperative behavior of dislocations. Most current research on 3D Dislocation Dynamics is based on the solutions available in the framework of classical isotropic elasticity. However, due to some degree of elastic anisotropy in almost all crystalline solids, it is very necessary to extend 3D Dislocation Dynamics into anisotropic elasticity. In this study, first, the details of efficient and accurate incorporation of the fully anisotropic elasticity into 3D discrete Dislocation Dynamics by numerically evaluating the derivatives of Green's functions are described. Then the intrinsic properties of perfect dislocations, including their stability, their core properties and disassociation characteristics, in newly discovered rare earth-based intermetallics and in conventional intermetallics are investigated, within the framework of fully anisotropic elasticity supplemented with the atomistic information obtained from the ab initio calculations. Moreover, the evolution and interaction of dislocations in these intermetallics as well as the role of solute segregation are presented by utilizing fully anisotropic 3D dislocation dynamics. The results from this work clearly indicate the role and the importance of elastic anisotropy on the evolution of dislocation microstructures, the overall ductility and the hardening behavior in these systems.

  2. Dynamics and thermodynamics of systems with long-range dipole-type interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atenas, Boris; Curilef, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    A Hamiltonian mean field model, where the potential is inspired by dipole-dipole interactions, is proposed to characterize the behavior of systems with long-range interactions. The dynamics of the system remains in quasistationary states before arriving at equilibrium. The equilibrium is analytically derived from the canonical ensemble and coincides with that obtained from molecular dynamics simulations (microcanonical ensemble) at only long time scales. The dynamics of the system is characterized by the behavior of the mean value of the kinetic energy. The significance of the results, compared to others in the recent literature, is that two plateaus sequentially emerge in the evolution of the model under the special considerations of the initial conditions and systems of finite size. The first plateau decays to a different second one before the system reaches equilibrium, but the dynamics of the system is expected to have only one plateau when the thermodynamics limit is reached because the difference between them tends to disappear as N tends to infinity. Hence, the first plateau is a type of quasistationary state the lifetime of which depends on a power law of N and the second seems to be a true quasistationary state as reported in the literature. We characterize the general behavior of the model according to its dynamics and thermodynamics.

  3. Human-Structure Dynamic Interaction during Short-Distance Free Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shahabpoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic interactions of falling human bodies with civil structures, regardless of their potentially critical effects, have sparsely been researched in contact biomechanics. The physical contact models suggested in the existing literature, particularly for short-distant falls in home settings, assume the human body falls on a “rigid” (not vibrating ground. A similar assumption is usually made during laboratory-based fall tests, including force platforms. Based on observations from a set of pediatric head-first free fall tests, the present paper shows that the dynamics of the grounded force plate are not always negligible when doing fall test in a laboratory setting. By using a similar analogy for lightweight floor structures, it is shown that ignoring the dynamics of floors in the contact model can result in an up to 35% overestimation of the peak force experienced by a falling human. A nonlinear contact model is suggested, featuring an agent-based modelling approach, where the dynamics of the falling human and the impact object (force plate or a floor structure here are each modelled using a single-degree-of-freedom model to simulate their dynamic interactions. The findings of this research can have wide applications in areas such as impact biomechanics and sports science.

  4. Computer Simulation of Dynamic Interactions Between Vehicle and Long Span Box Girder Bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Gong; Moe S.Cheung

    2008-01-01

    Moving vehicle loads,associated with roadway traffic can induce significant dynamic effects on the structural behaviours of bridges,especially for long-span bridges.The main objective of current research is to study traffic induced dynamic responses of long-span box-girder bridges.The finite element method has been employed in this study to obtain a three-dimensional mathematical model for the bridge system.For vehicle-bridge dynamic interaction analysis,the vehicle is modeled as a more realistic three-axle,six-wheel system,and the corresponding dynamic interaction equations have been derived.The bridge-vehicle inter- action is affected by many factors.The current study has been focused on such factors as:vehicle speed, vehicle damping ratio,multiple traffic lanes,mass ratio of vehicle and bridge,and dynamic characteristics of bridge.Case studies have been conducted to investigate these factors by using several box girder bridge examples including Confederation Bridge,the longest box girder bridge in the world.

  5. Dynamics and thermodynamics of systems with long-range dipole-type interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atenas, Boris; Curilef, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    A Hamiltonian mean field model, where the potential is inspired by dipole-dipole interactions, is proposed to characterize the behavior of systems with long-range interactions. The dynamics of the system remains in quasistationary states before arriving at equilibrium. The equilibrium is analytically derived from the canonical ensemble and coincides with that obtained from molecular dynamics simulations (microcanonical ensemble) at only long time scales. The dynamics of the system is characterized by the behavior of the mean value of the kinetic energy. The significance of the results, compared to others in the recent literature, is that two plateaus sequentially emerge in the evolution of the model under the special considerations of the initial conditions and systems of finite size. The first plateau decays to a different second one before the system reaches equilibrium, but the dynamics of the system is expected to have only one plateau when the thermodynamics limit is reached because the difference between them tends to disappear as N tends to infinity. Hence, the first plateau is a type of quasistationary state the lifetime of which depends on a power law of N and the second seems to be a true quasistationary state as reported in the literature. We characterize the general behavior of the model according to its dynamics and thermodynamics.

  6. Specific non-local interactions are not necessary for recovering native protein dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Dasgupta

    Full Text Available The elastic network model (ENM is a widely used method to study native protein dynamics by normal mode analysis (NMA. In ENM we need information about all pairwise distances, and the distance between contacting atoms is restrained to the native value. Therefore ENM requires O(N2 information to realize its dynamics for a protein consisting of N amino acid residues. To see if (or to what extent such a large amount of specific structural information is required to realize native protein dynamics, here we introduce a novel model based on only O(N restraints. This model, named the 'contact number diffusion' model (CND, includes specific distance restraints for only local (along the amino acid sequence atom pairs, and semi-specific non-local restraints imposed on each atom, rather than atom pairs. The semi-specific non-local restraints are defined in terms of the non-local contact numbers of atoms. The CND model exhibits the dynamic characteristics comparable to ENM and more correlated with the explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulation than ENM. Moreover, unrealistic surface fluctuations often observed in ENM were suppressed in CND. On the other hand, in some ligand-bound structures CND showed larger fluctuations of buried protein atoms interacting with the ligand compared to ENM. In addition, fluctuations from CND and ENM show comparable correlations with the experimental B-factor. Although there are some indications of the importance of some specific non-local interactions, the semi-specific non-local interactions are mostly sufficient for reproducing the native protein dynamics.

  7. Specific non-local interactions are not necessary for recovering native protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Kasahara, Kota; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Nakamura, Haruki; Kinjo, Akira R

    2014-01-01

    The elastic network model (ENM) is a widely used method to study native protein dynamics by normal mode analysis (NMA). In ENM we need information about all pairwise distances, and the distance between contacting atoms is restrained to the native value. Therefore ENM requires O(N2) information to realize its dynamics for a protein consisting of N amino acid residues. To see if (or to what extent) such a large amount of specific structural information is required to realize native protein dynamics, here we introduce a novel model based on only O(N) restraints. This model, named the 'contact number diffusion' model (CND), includes specific distance restraints for only local (along the amino acid sequence) atom pairs, and semi-specific non-local restraints imposed on each atom, rather than atom pairs. The semi-specific non-local restraints are defined in terms of the non-local contact numbers of atoms. The CND model exhibits the dynamic characteristics comparable to ENM and more correlated with the explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulation than ENM. Moreover, unrealistic surface fluctuations often observed in ENM were suppressed in CND. On the other hand, in some ligand-bound structures CND showed larger fluctuations of buried protein atoms interacting with the ligand compared to ENM. In addition, fluctuations from CND and ENM show comparable correlations with the experimental B-factor. Although there are some indications of the importance of some specific non-local interactions, the semi-specific non-local interactions are mostly sufficient for reproducing the native protein dynamics.

  8. On the Convergence of Piecewise Linear Strategic Interaction Dynamics on Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Gharesifard, Bahman

    2015-09-11

    We prove that the piecewise linear best-response dynamical systems of strategic interactions are asymptotically convergent to their set of equilibria on any weighted undirected graph. We study various features of these dynamical systems, including the uniqueness and abundance properties of the set of equilibria and the emergence of unstable equilibria. We also introduce the novel notions of social equivalence and social dominance on directed graphs, and demonstrate some of their interesting implications, including their correspondence to consensus and chromatic number of partite graphs. Examples illustrate our results.

  9. The importance of including dynamic soil-structure interaction into wind turbine simulation codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    is examined. The optimal order of the models is determined and implemented into the aeroelastic code HAWC2, where the dynamic response of a 5.0 MW wind turbine is evaluated. In contrast to the fore-aft vibrations, the inclusion of soil-structure interaction is shown to be critical for the side-side vibrations......A rigorous numerical model, describing a wind turbine structure and subsoil, may contain thousands of degrees of freedom, making the approach computationally inefficient for fast time domain analysis. In order to meet the requirements of real-time calculations, the dynamic impedance...

  10. Dynamics of the interaction between the rotor and the induction zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaei, Mahmood; Meyer Forsting, Alexander Raul; Troldborg, Niels

    2016-01-01

    measurements are affected by the presence of the wind turbine, due to its induction zone. In this work, the dynamic coupling between changes in the wind turbine operating point and the velocities inside the induction zone is studied. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations are used to investigate...... this interaction. Thereafter, system identification is used to fit first order dynamic models to the simulation results. The parameters of the model are given for the turbine induction zone. These results possibly reduce the uncertainty in lidar measurements, arising from wind turbine blockage....

  11. A energy-based interaction model for population opinion dynamics with topic coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Noorazar, Hossein; Vixie, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    This article studies the opinion game dynamic from mathematical ground, the way people learn and consequently change their opinion towards or against a cause. The evolution of opinions are modeled by single interaction between two individuals and is determined by potential functions. Moreover, we model the case in which there are several topics being discussed in the system where topics are related and the opinion about one topic can change in response to change of that of another topic. Building the evolution based on mathematical ground gives the advantage of robust analysis of dynamics, getting connection between model structure and statistical properties, rather than statistical simulation based investigations.

  12. Mass spectrometry in structural biology and biophysics architecture, dynamics, and interaction of biomolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltashov, Igor A; Desiderio, Dominic M; Nibbering, Nico M

    2012-01-01

    The definitive guide to mass spectrometry techniques in biology and biophysics The use of mass spectrometry (MS) to study the architecture and dynamics of proteins is increasingly common within the biophysical community, and Mass Spectrometry in Structural Biology and Biophysics: Architecture, Dynamics, and Interaction of Biomolecules, Second Edition provides readers with detailed, systematic coverage of the current state of the art. Offering an unrivalled overview of modern MS-based armamentarium that can be used to solve the most challenging problems in biophysics, structural biol

  13. Dynamical stabilization by phonon-phonon interaction exemplified in cubic zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souvatsos, [etrps G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rudin, Sven P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconia exhibits a soft phonon mode (X{sup -}{sub 2}), which becomes dynamically unstable at low temperatures. Previous ab initio invest.igations into the temperature-induced stabilization of the soft mode treated it as an independent anharmonic oscillator. Calculations presented here, using the self consistent ab initio lattice dynamical (SCAILD) method to evaluate the phonons at 2570 K, show that the soft mode should not be treated independently of other phonon modes. Phonon-phonon interactions stabilize the X{sup -}{sub 2} mode. Furthermore, the effective potential experienced by the mode takes on a quadratic form.

  14. Ultrafast dynamics of ligand and substrate interaction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase under Soret excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chih-Chang; Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Chen, Pei-Feng; Liang, Keng S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of endothelial NOS oxygenase domain (eNOS-oxy) was performed to study dynamics of ligand or substrate interaction under Soret band excitation. Photo-excitation dissociates imidazole ligand in 4ps. The eNOS-oxy without additive is partially bound with water molecule, thus its photoexcited dynamics also shows ligand dissociation in <800fs. Then it followed by vibrational cooling coupled with charge transfer in 4.8ps, and recombination of ligand to distal side of heme in 12ps.

  15. A New Application of Multi- Body System Dynamics in Vehicle- Road Interaction Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Wei-qun; Zhang Yun-qing; Jin Guo-dong

    2003-01-01

    In vehicle-road interaction simulation, multi-body system (MBS) dynamics as well as the corresponding software ADAMS has been employed to model the nonlinear vehicle in more detail. The simulation method has been vali-dated by the test data, and been compared to the former sim-ple models. This method can be used for estimating the effects of dynamic tire forces and other vehicle features on road damage so that the "road- friend liness" can be assessed in vehicle design process.

  16. Phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron: A combined molecular and spin dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Dilina, E-mail: dilinanp@physast.uga.edu; Landau, David P. [Center for Simulational Physics, The University of Georgia, Georgia 30602 (United States); Nicholson, Don M.; Malcolm Stocks, G.; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Brown, Gregory [Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Combining an atomistic many-body potential with a classical spin Hamiltonian parameterized by first principles calculations, molecular-spin dynamics computer simulations were performed to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron. Results obtained for spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors show that noticeable softening and damping of magnon modes occur due to the presence of lattice vibrations. Furthermore, as a result of the phonon-magnon coupling, additional longitudinal spin wave excitations are observed, with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonon modes.

  17. Phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron: A combined molecular and spin dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N [ORNL; Landau, David P [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Eisenbach, Markus [ORNL; Yin, Junqi [ORNL; Brown, Greg [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Combining an atomistic many-body potential with a classical spin Hamiltonian pa- rameterized by first principles calculations, molecular-spin dynamics computer sim- ulations were performed to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron. Results obtained for spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors show that noticeable softening and damping of magnon modes occur due to the presence of lattice vibrations. Furthermore, as a result of the phonon-magnon coupling, addi- tional longitudinal spin wave excitations are observed, with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonon modes.

  18. Dynamic Variation in Protein-Small Molecule Interaction Observed by Double-Nanohole Optical Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Balushi, Ahmed Al

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of proteins with small molecules is fundamental to their function in living organisms and it is widely studied in drug development. Here we compare optical trapping dynamics of streptavidin and biotinylated streptavidin using a double nanohole optical trap in a metal film. Consistent and clearly distinct behavior is seen between the protein with and without the small molecule binding. The real-time dynamics at the single protein level are accessible with this technique, which also has advantages of not requiring tethering to a surface or the need for exogeneous markers.

  19. Dynamics of solitons in multicomponent long wave–short wave resonance interaction system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Kanna; K Sakkaravarthi; M Vijayajayanthi; M Lakshmanan

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we study the formation of solitons, their propagation and collision behaviour in an integrable multicomponent (2+1)-dimensional long wave–short wave resonance interaction (-LSRI) system. First, we briefly revisit the earlier results on the dynamics of bright solitons and demonstrate the fascinating energy exchange collision of bright solitons appearing in the short-wave components of the -LSRI system. Then, we explicitly construct the exact one-and two-multicomponent dark soliton solutions of the -LSRI system by using the Hirota’s direct method and explore its propagation dynamics. Also, we study the features of dark soliton collisions.

  20. The role of attractive interactions in the dynamics of molecules in liquids

    CERN Document Server

    You, X; Rick, S W

    2014-01-01

    The friction kernel (or memory function) $\\gamma(t)$ characterizing single-molecule dynamics in strongly bound liquids exhibits two distinct relaxations with the longer time-scale relaxation associated with attractive intermolecular forces. This observation identifies differing roles of repulsive and attractive interaction in the motions of molecules in equilibrium liquids, and thus provides a basis for a renewed investigation of a van der Waals picture of the transport properties of liquids. This conclusion is supported by extracting $\\gamma(t)$ from molecular dynamics simulation data for four common molecular liquids.