WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic network modules

  1. Identify Dynamic Network Modules with Temporal and Spatial Constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, R; McCallen, S; Liu, C; Almaas, E; Zhou, X J

    2007-09-24

    Despite the rapid accumulation of systems-level biological data, understanding the dynamic nature of cellular activity remains a difficult task. The reason is that most biological data are static, or only correspond to snapshots of cellular activity. In this study, we explicitly attempt to detangle the temporal complexity of biological networks by using compilations of time-series gene expression profiling data.We define a dynamic network module to be a set of proteins satisfying two conditions: (1) they form a connected component in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network; and (2) their expression profiles form certain structures in the temporal domain. We develop the first efficient mining algorithm to discover dynamic modules in a temporal network, as well as frequently occurring dynamic modules across many temporal networks. Using yeast as a model system, we demonstrate that the majority of the identified dynamic modules are functionally homogeneous. Additionally, many of them provide insight into the sequential ordering of molecular events in cellular systems. We further demonstrate that identifying frequent dynamic network modules can significantly increase the signal to noise separation, despite the fact that most dynamic network modules are highly condition-specific. Finally, we note that the applicability of our algorithm is not limited to the study of PPI systems, instead it is generally applicable to the combination of any type of network and time-series data.

  2. Trajectory generation and modulation using dynamic neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers, P; Sundareshan, M K

    2003-01-01

    Generation of desired trajectory behavior using neural networks involves a particularly challenging spatio-temporal learning problem. This paper introduces a novel solution, i.e., designing a dynamic system whose terminal behavior emulates a prespecified spatio-temporal pattern independently of its initial conditions. The proposed solution uses a dynamic neural network (DNN), a hybrid architecture that employs a recurrent neural network (RNN) in cascade with a nonrecurrent neural network (NRNN). The RNN generates a simple limit cycle, which the NRNN reshapes into the desired trajectory. This architecture is simple to train. A systematic synthesis procedure based on the design of relay control systems is developed for configuring an RNN that can produce a limit cycle of elementary complexity. It is further shown that a cascade arrangement of this RNN and an appropriately trained NRNN can emulate any desired trajectory behavior irrespective of its complexity. An interesting solution to the trajectory modulation problem, i.e., online modulation of the generated trajectories using external inputs, is also presented. Results of several experiments are included to demonstrate the capabilities and performance of the DNN in handling trajectory generation and modulation problems.

  3. Dismissing Attachment Characteristics Dynamically Modulate Brain Networks Subserving Social Aversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Anna Linda; Borchardt, Viola; Li, Meng; van Tol, Marie-José; Demenescu, Liliana Ramona; Strauss, Bernhard; Kirchmann, Helmut; Buchheim, Anna; Metzger, Coraline D.; Nolte, Tobias; Walter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Attachment patterns influence actions, thoughts and feeling through a person’s “inner working model”. Speech charged with attachment-dependent content was proposed to modulate the activation of cognitive-emotional schemata in listeners. We performed a 7 Tesla rest-task-rest functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-experiment, presenting auditory narratives prototypical of dismissing attachment representations to investigate their effect on 23 healthy males. We then examined effects of participants’ attachment style and childhood trauma on brain state changes using seed-based functional connectivity (FC) analyses, and finally tested whether subjective differences in responsivity to narratives could be predicted by baseline network states. In comparison to a baseline state, we observed increased FC in a previously described “social aversion network” including dorsal anterior cingulated cortex (dACC) and left anterior middle temporal gyrus (aMTG) specifically after exposure to insecure-dismissing attachment narratives. Increased dACC-seeded FC within the social aversion network was positively related to the participants’ avoidant attachment style and presence of a history of childhood trauma. Anxious attachment style on the other hand was positively correlated with FC between the dACC and a region outside of the “social aversion network”, namely the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which suggests decreased network segregation as a function of anxious attachment. Finally, the extent of subjective experience of friendliness towards the dismissing narrative was predicted by low baseline FC-values between hippocampus and inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Taken together, our study demonstrates an activation of networks related to social aversion in terms of increased connectivity after listening to insecure-dismissing attachment narratives. A causal interrelation of brain state changes and subsequent changes in social reactivity was further supported by

  4. Dismissing attachment characteristics dynamically modulate brain networks subserving social aversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Linda eKrause

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Attachment patterns influence actions, thoughts and feeling through a person’s ‘Inner Working Model’. Speech charged with attachment-dependent content was proposed to modulate the activation of cognitive-emotional schemata in listeners. We performed a 7 Tesla rest-task-rest fMRI-experiment, presenting auditory narratives prototypical of dismissing attachment representations to investigate their effect on 23 healthy males. We then examined effects of participants’ attachment style and childhood trauma on brain state changes using seed-based functional connectivity (FC analyses, and finally tested whether subjective differences in responsivity to narratives could be predicted by baseline network states. In comparison to a baseline state, we observed increased FC in a previously described ‘social aversion network’ including dorsal anterior cingulated cortex (dACC and left anterior middle temporal gyrus (aMTG specifically after exposure to insecure-dismissing attachment narratives. Increased dACC-seeded FC within the social aversion network was positively related to the participants’ avoidant attachment style and presence of a history of childhood trauma. Anxious attachment style on the other hand was positively correlated with FC between the dACC and a region outside of the ‘social aversion network’, namely the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which suggests decreased network segregation as a function of anxious attachment. Finally, the extent of subjective experience of friendliness towards the dismissing narrative was predicted by low baseline FC-values between hippocampus and inferior parietal lobule. Taken together, our study demonstrates an activation of networks related to social aversion in terms of increased connectivity after listening to insecure-dismissing attachment narratives. A causal interrelation of brain state changes and subsequent changes in social reactivity was further supported by our observation of direct

  5. Network burst dynamics under heterogeneous cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneous synaptic connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudstrup, Scott; Zochowski, Michal; Booth, Victoria

    2016-05-01

    The characteristics of neural network activity depend on intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity in the network. In brain networks, both of these properties are critically affected by the type and levels of neuromodulators present. The expression of many of the most powerful neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), varies tonically and phasically with behavioural state, leading to dynamic, heterogeneous changes in intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity properties. Namely, ACh significantly alters neural firing properties as measured by the phase response curve in a manner that has been shown to alter the propensity for network synchronization. The aim of this simulation study was to build an understanding of how heterogeneity in cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneity in synaptic connectivity affect the initiation and maintenance of synchronous network bursting in excitatory networks. We show that cells that display different levels of ACh modulation have differential roles in generating network activity: weakly modulated cells are necessary for burst initiation and provide synchronizing drive to the rest of the network, whereas strongly modulated cells provide the overall activity level necessary to sustain burst firing. By applying several quantitative measures of network activity, we further show that the existence of network bursting and its characteristics, such as burst duration and intraburst synchrony, are dependent on the fraction of cell types providing the synaptic connections in the network. These results suggest mechanisms underlying ACh modulation of brain oscillations and the modulation of seizure activity during sleep states.

  6. Dynamic modulation of the Action Observation Network by movement familiarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardner, T.; Goulden, N.; Cross, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    When watching another person's actions, a network of sensorimotor brain regions, collectively termed the action observation network (AON), is engaged. Previous research suggests that the AON is more responsive when watching familiar compared with unfamiliar actions. However, most research into AON

  7. Dismissing Attachment Characteristics Dynamically Modulate Brain Networks Subserving Social Aversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, Anna Linda; Borchardt, Viola; Li, Meng; van Tol, Marie-José; Demenescu, L.R.; Strauss, Bernhard; Kirchmann, Helmut; Buchheim, Anna; Metzger, Coraline D; Nolte, Tobias; Walter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Attachment patterns influence actions, thoughts and feeling through a person's "inner working model". Speech charged with attachment-dependent content was proposed to modulate the activation of cognitive-emotional schemata in listeners. We performed a 7 Tesla rest-task-rest functional magnetic reson

  8. Externally induced frontoparietal synchronization modulates network dynamics and enhances working memory performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante, Ines R; Li, Lucia M; Carmichael, David W; Lorenz, Romy; Leech, Robert; Hampshire, Adam; Rothwell, John C; Sharp, David J

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive functions such as working memory (WM) are emergent properties of large-scale network interactions. Synchronisation of oscillatory activity might contribute to WM by enabling the coordination of long-range processes. However, causal evidence for the way oscillatory activity shapes network dynamics and behavior in humans is limited. Here we applied transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to exogenously modulate oscillatory activity in a right frontoparietal network that supports WM. Externally induced synchronization improved performance when cognitive demands were high. Simultaneously collected fMRI data reveals tACS effects dependent on the relative phase of the stimulation and the internal cognitive processing state. Specifically, synchronous tACS during the verbal WM task increased parietal activity, which correlated with behavioral performance. Furthermore, functional connectivity results indicate that the relative phase of frontoparietal stimulation influences information flow within the WM network. Overall, our findings demonstrate a link between behavioral performance in a demanding WM task and large-scale brain synchronization. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22001.001 PMID:28288700

  9. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eBengoetxea

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane. We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal

  10. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana M; Dan, Bernard; McIntyre, Joseph; Cheron, Guy

    2014-01-01

    In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane). We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others elliciting patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal directions.

  11. A framework for identification of brain network dynamics using a novel binary noise modulated electrical stimulation pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxiao; Shanechi, Maryam M

    2015-01-01

    Modeling and identification of brain network dynamics is of great importance both for understanding brain function and for closed-loop control of brain states. In this work, we present a multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) linear state-space model (LSSM) to describe the brain network dynamics in response to electrical stimulation. The LSSM maps the parameters of electrical stimulation, such as frequency, amplitude and pulse-width to recorded brain signals such as electrocorticography (ECoG) and electroencephalography (EEG). Effective identification of the LSSM in open-loop stimulation experiments, however, is strongly dependent on the open-loop input stimulation design. We propose a novel input design to accurately identify the LSSM by integrating the concept of binary noise (BN) with practical constraints on stimulation waveforms. The designed input pattern is a pulse train modulated by stochastic BN parameters. We show that this input pattern both satisfies the necessary spectral condition for accurate system identification and can incorporate any desired pulse shape. Using numerical experiments, we show that the quality of identification depends heavily on the input signal pattern and the proposed binary noise modulated pattern achieves satisfactory identification results, reducing the relative estimation error more than 300 times compared with step sequence modulated, single-sinusoid modulated and multi-sinusoids modulated input patterns.

  12. Imagined gait modulates neuronal network dynamics in the human pedunculopontine nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Timothy L; Stratton, Peter G; Coyne, Terry J; Cook, Raymond; Silberstein, Paul; Silburn, Peter A; Windels, François; Sah, Pankaj

    2014-03-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a part of the mesencephalic locomotor region and is thought to be important for the initiation and maintenance of gait. Lesions of the PPN induce gait deficits, and the PPN has therefore emerged as a target for deep brain stimulation for the control of gait and postural disability. However, the role of the PPN in gait control is not understood. Using extracellular single-unit recordings in awake patients, we found that neurons in the PPN discharged as synchronous functional networks whose activity was phase locked to alpha oscillations. Neurons in the PPN responded to limb movement and imagined gait by dynamically changing network activity and decreasing alpha phase locking. Our results indicate that different synchronous networks are activated during initial motor planning and actual motion, and suggest that changes in gait initiation in Parkinson's disease may result from disrupted network activity in the PPN.

  13. Detection of dynamic brain networks modulated by acupuncture using a graph theory model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Bai; Wei Qin; Jie Tian; Jianping Dai; Wanhai Yang

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies involving acute acupuncture manipulation have already demonstrated significant modulatory effects on wide limbic/paralimbic nuclei, subcortical gray structures and the neocortical system of the brain. Due to the sustained effect of acupuncture, however, knowledge on the organization of such large-scale cortical networks behind the active needle stimulation phase is lacking. In this study, we originally adopted a network model analysis from graph theory to evaluate the functional connectivity among multiple brain regions during the post-stimulus phase. Evidence from our findings clearly supported the existence of a large organized functional connectivity network related to acupuncture function in the resting brain. More importantly, acupuncture can change such a network into a functional state underlying both pain perception and modulation, which is exhibited by significant changes in the functional con-nectivity of some brain regions. This analysis may help us to better understand the long-lasting effects of acupuncture on brain function, as well as the potential benefits of clinical treatments.

  14. Optical Vector Network Analyzer with an Improved Dynamic Range Based on a Polarization Multiplexing Electro-Optic Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Wen-Ting; Chen, Wei; Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhu, Ning-Hua

    2017-05-01

    We present a new method to achieve an optical vector network analyzer (OVNA) based on a polarization multiplexing electro-optic modulator (PM-EOM) without an optical bandpass filter. Optical single sideband (OSSB) modulated signals with a tunable optical carrier-sideband ratio (OCSR) are obtained at the output of the PM-EOM. The OCSR can be flexibly tuned by controlling bias voltages of the PM-EOM. The dynamic range of the OVNA is expanded by taking the improvement of the OCSR into account. The transmission response of an optical device under test (ODUT) is measured based on one-to-one mapping from optical domain to electrical domain. By optimizing the OCSR of the OSSB modulated signals, the dynamic range of the OVNA can be effectively improved with 3.7 dB. An analytical model is derived to describe the transfer function of the ODUT. The magnitude and phase responses of a fiber Bragg grating are characterized with a large dynamic range. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 61377070, 61090391 and 61675196, and the National High-Technology Research and Development Program of China under Grant No 2013AA014203.

  15. Dynamic Network Models

    CERN Document Server

    Armbruster, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze random networks that change over time. First we analyze a dynamic Erdos-Renyi model, whose edges change over time. We describe its stationary distribution, its convergence thereto, and the SI contact process on the network, which has relevance for connectivity and the spread of infections. Second, we analyze the effect of node turnover, when nodes enter and leave the network, which has relevance for network models incorporating births, deaths, aging, and other demographic factors.

  16. Assimilation Dynamic Network (ADN) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Assimilation Dynamic Network (ADN) is a dynamic inter-processor communication network that spans heterogeneous processor architectures, unifying components,...

  17. Airborne Network Optimization with Dynamic Network Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    AIRBORNE NETWORK OPTIMIZATION WITH DYNAMIC NETWORK UPDATE THESIS Bradly S. Paul, Capt, USAF AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-030 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR...to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-030 AIRBORNE NETWORK OPTIMIZATION WITH DYNAMIC NETWORK UPDATE THESIS Presented to the...NETWORK OPTIMIZATION WITH DYNAMIC NETWORK UPDATE Bradly S. Paul, B.S.C.P. Capt, USAF Committee Membership: Maj Thomas E. Dube Chair Dr. Kenneth M. Hopkinson

  18. Network-behavior dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, René; Dijkstra, Jan; Steglich, Christian; Van Zalk, Maarten H. W.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in disentangling selection and influence processes. This literature review provides context for the special issue on network-behavior dynamics. It brings together important conceptual, methodological, and empirical contributions focusing on longitudina

  19. A multi-layered protein network stabilizes the Escherichia coli FtsZ-ring and modulates constriction dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Buss

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The prokaryotic tubulin homolog, FtsZ, forms a ring-like structure (FtsZ-ring at midcell. The FtsZ-ring establishes the division plane and enables the assembly of the macromolecular division machinery (divisome. Although many molecular components of the divisome have been identified and their interactions extensively characterized, the spatial organization of these proteins within the divisome is unclear. Consequently, the physical mechanisms that drive divisome assembly, maintenance, and constriction remain elusive. Here we applied single-molecule based superresolution imaging, combined with genetic and biophysical investigations, to reveal the spatial organization of cellular structures formed by four important divisome proteins in E. coli: FtsZ, ZapA, ZapB and MatP. We show that these interacting proteins are arranged into a multi-layered protein network extending from the cell membrane to the chromosome, each with unique structural and dynamic properties. Further, we find that this protein network stabilizes the FtsZ-ring, and unexpectedly, slows down cell constriction, suggesting a new, unrecognized role for this network in bacterial cell division. Our results provide new insight into the structure and function of the divisome, and highlight the importance of coordinated cell constriction and chromosome segregation.

  20. Identification of Topological Network Modules in Perturbed Protein Interaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Groppe, Brad; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Biological networks consist of functional modules, however detecting and characterizing such modules in networks remains challenging. Perturbing networks is one strategy for identifying modules. Here we used an advanced mathematical approach named topological data analysis (TDA) to interrogate two perturbed networks. In one, we disrupted the S. cerevisiae INO80 protein interaction network by isolating complexes after protein complex components were deleted from the genome. In the second, we reanalyzed previously published data demonstrating the disruption of the human Sin3 network with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Here we show that disrupted networks contained topological network modules (TNMs) with shared properties that mapped onto distinct locations in networks. We define TMNs as proteins that occupy close network positions depending on their coordinates in a topological space. TNMs provide new insight into networks by capturing proteins from different categories including proteins within a complex, proteins with shared biological functions, and proteins disrupted across networks. PMID:28272416

  1. Evolution Properties of Modules in Complex Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-Ping; GAO Zi-You

    2008-01-01

    In complex networks, network modules play a center role, which carry out a key function. In this paper, we introduce the spatial correlation function to describe the relationships among the network modules. Our focus is to investigate how the network modules evolve, and what the evolution properties of the modules are. In order to test the proposed method, as the examples, we use our method to analyze and discuss the ER random network and scale-free network. Rigorous analysis of the existing data shows that the introduced correlation function is suitable for describing the evolution properties of network modules. Remarkably, the numerical simulations indicate that the ER random network and scale-free network have different evolution properties.

  2. Dynamics on modular networks with heterogeneous correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Sergey; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.; Gleeson, James P.

    2014-06-01

    We develop a new ensemble of modular random graphs in which degree-degree correlations can be different in each module, and the inter-module connections are defined by the joint degree-degree distribution of nodes for each pair of modules. We present an analytical approach that allows one to analyze several types of binary dynamics operating on such networks, and we illustrate our approach using bond percolation, site percolation, and the Watts threshold model. The new network ensemble generalizes existing models (e.g., the well-known configuration model and Lancichinetti-Fortunato-Radicchi networks) by allowing a heterogeneous distribution of degree-degree correlations across modules, which is important for the consideration of nonidentical interacting networks.

  3. Identifying Functional Modules in Complex Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method that enables us to detect and describe the functional modules in complex networks. Using the proposed method, we can classify the nodes of networks into different modules according to their pattern of intra- and extra-module links. We use our method to analyze the modular structures of the ER random networks. We find that different modules of networks have different structure properties, such as the clustering coefficient. Moreover, at the same time, many nodes of networks participate different modules. Remarkably, we find that in the ER random networks, when the probability p is small, different modules or different roles of nodes can be identified by different regionsin the c-p parameter space.

  4. Dynamic Network Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    detection methods is presented; the cumulative sum ( CUSUM ), the exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA), and a scan statistic (SS). Statistical...minimizing the risk of false alarms. Three common SPC methods that we consider here are the CUSUM (Page, 1961), EWMA (Roberts, 1959), and the SS...successive dynamic network measures are then used to calculate the statistics for the CUSUM , the EWMA, and the SS. These are then compared to decision

  5. Wireless sensor networks dynamic runtime configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulman, S.O.; Hofmeijer, T.J.; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Current Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) use fixed layered architectures, that can be modified only at compile time. Using a non-layered architecture, which allows dynamic loading of modules and automatic reconfiguration to adapt to the surrounding environment was believed to be too resource consuming

  6. via dynamic neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Reyes-Reyes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive technique is suggested to provide the passivity property for a class of partially known SISO nonlinear systems. A simple Dynamic Neural Network (DNN, containing only two neurons and without any hidden-layers, is used to identify the unknown nonlinear system. By means of a Lyapunov-like analysis the new learning law for this DNN, guarantying both successful identification and passivation effects, is derived. Based on this adaptive DNN model, an adaptive feedback controller, serving for wide class of nonlinear systems with an a priori incomplete model description, is designed. Two typical examples illustrate the effectiveness of the suggested approach.

  7. SYNCHRONIZATION IN COMPLEX DYNAMICAL NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaofan; CHEN Guanrong

    2003-01-01

    In the past few years, the discovery of small-world and scale-free properties of many natural and artificial complex networks has stimulated increasing interest in further studying the underlying organizing principles of various complex networks. This has led to significant advances in understanding the relationship between the topology and the dynamics of such complex networks. This paper reviews some recent research works on the synchronization phenomenon in various dynamical networks with small-world and scalefree connections.

  8. Epidemic dynamics on complex networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Tao; FU Zhongqian; WANG Binghong

    2006-01-01

    Recently, motivated by the pioneer work in revealing the small-world effect and scale-free property of various real-life networks, many scientists devote themselves to studying complex networks. One of the ultimate goals is to understand how the topological structures affect the dynamics upon networks. In this paper, we give a brief review on the studies of epidemic dynamics on complex networks, including the description of classical epidemic models, the epidemic spread on small-world and scale-free networks, and network immunization. Finally, perspectives and some interesting problems are proposed.

  9. Complex Dynamics in Communication Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kocarev, Ljupco

    2005-01-01

    Computer and communication networks are among society's most important infrastructures. The internet, in particular, is a giant global network of networks without central control or administration. It is a paradigm of a complex system, where complexity may arise from different sources: topological structure, network evolution, connection and node diversity, or dynamical evolution. The present volume is the first book entirely devoted to the new and emerging field of nonlinear dynamics of TCP/IP networks. It addresses both scientists and engineers working in the general field of communication networks.

  10. Eigenvector dynamics under perturbation of modular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Somwrita; Robinson, Peter A; Fortunato, Santo

    2015-01-01

    Rotation dynamics of eigenvectors of modular network adjacency matrices under random perturbations are presented. In the presence of $q$ communities, the number of eigenvectors corresponding to the $q$ largest eigenvalues form a "community" eigenspace and rotate together, but separately from that of the "bulk" eigenspace spanned by all the other eigenvectors. Using this property, the number of modules or clusters in a network can be estimated in an algorithm-independent way. A general derivation for the theoretical detectability limit for sparse modular networks with $q$ communities is presented, beyond which modularity persists in the system but cannot be detected, and estimation results are shown to hold right to this limit.

  11. Dynamic holography using pixelated light modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Susanne; Haist, Tobias; Warber, Michael; Osten, Wolfgang

    2010-09-01

    Dynamic holography using spatial light modulators is a very flexible technique that offers various new applications compared to static holography. We give an overview on the technical background of dynamic holography focusing on pixelated spatial light modulators and their technical restrictions, and we present a selection of the numerous applications of dynamic holography.

  12. Dynamic ad hoc networks

    CERN Document Server

    Rashvand, Habib

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the exciting new application paradigm of using amalgamated technologies of the Internet and wireless, the next generation communication networks (also called 'ubiquitous', 'complex' and 'unstructured' networking) are changing the way we develop and apply our future systems and services at home and on local, national and global scales. Whatever the interconnection - a WiMAX enabled networked mobile vehicle, MEMS or nanotechnology enabled distributed sensor systems, Vehicular Ad hoc Networking (VANET) or Mobile Ad hoc Networking (MANET) - all can be classified under new networking s

  13. Wireless Local Area Network Adaptive Modulation and Coding Technology Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zeng-you; SUN Xiao-fan

    2012-01-01

      Expound the existing modulation mode of the present wireless local area network. Directing at the problem that when single modulation method conveys data with high speed in the frequency selective fading channel, the system throughput will be declined and the efficiency of the spectrum will be lowered . Put forward the scheme that the OFDM sub-carrier will use differ⁃ent modulation modes after dynamic groups by amplitude frequency response. Simulation results show that the scheme will lower the complexity of the system achievement, and can get a higher spectrum efficiency.

  14. Cognitive Dynamic Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Miguel, Ignacio; Duran, Ramon J.; Lorenzo, Ruben M.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive networks are a promising solution for the control of heterogeneous optical networks. We review their fundamentals as well as a number of applications developed in the framework of the EU FP7 CHRON project.......Cognitive networks are a promising solution for the control of heterogeneous optical networks. We review their fundamentals as well as a number of applications developed in the framework of the EU FP7 CHRON project....

  15. Eigenvector dynamics under perturbation of modular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Somwrita; Chawla, Sanjay; Robinson, P. A.; Fortunato, Santo

    2016-06-01

    Rotation dynamics of eigenvectors of modular network adjacency matrices under random perturbations are presented. In the presence of q communities, the number of eigenvectors corresponding to the q largest eigenvalues form a "community" eigenspace and rotate together, but separately from that of the "bulk" eigenspace spanned by all the other eigenvectors. Using this property, the number of modules or clusters in a network can be estimated in an algorithm-independent way. A general argument and derivation for the theoretical detectability limit for sparse modular networks with q communities is presented, beyond which modularity persists in the system but cannot be detected. It is shown that for detecting the clusters or modules using the adjacency matrix, there is a "band" in which it is hard to detect the clusters even before the theoretical detectability limit is reached, and for which the theoretically predicted detectability limit forms the sufficient upper bound. Analytic estimations of these bounds are presented and empirically demonstrated.

  16. Directed network discovery with dynamic network modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzellotti, Stefano; Kliemann, Dorit; Jacoby, Nir; Saxe, Rebecca

    2017-05-01

    Cognitive tasks recruit multiple brain regions. Understanding how these regions influence each other (the network structure) is an important step to characterize the neural basis of cognitive processes. Often, limited evidence is available to restrict the range of hypotheses a priori, and techniques that sift efficiently through a large number of possible network structures are needed (network discovery). This article introduces a novel modelling technique for network discovery (Dynamic Network Modelling or DNM) that builds on ideas from Granger Causality and Dynamic Causal Modelling introducing three key changes: (1) efficient network discovery is implemented with statistical tests on the consistency of model parameters across participants, (2) the tests take into account the magnitude and sign of each influence, and (3) variance explained in independent data is used as an absolute (rather than relative) measure of the quality of the network model. In this article, we outline the functioning of DNM, we validate DNM in simulated data for which the ground truth is known, and we report an example of its application to the investigation of influences between regions during emotion recognition, revealing top-down influences from brain regions encoding abstract representations of emotions (medial prefrontal cortex and superior temporal sulcus) onto regions engaged in the perceptual analysis of facial expressions (occipital face area and fusiform face area) when participants are asked to switch between reporting the emotional valence and the age of a face. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cognitive Dynamic Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Miguel, Ignacio; Duran, Ramon J.; Jimenez, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    learning with the aim of improving performance. In this paper, we review the fundamentals of cognitive networks and focus on their application to the optical networking area. In particular, a number of cognitive network architectures proposed so far, as well as their associated supporting technologies......The use of cognition is a promising element for the control of heterogeneous optical networks. Not only are cognitive networks able to sense current network conditions and act according to them, but they also take into account the knowledge acquired through past experiences; that is, they include......, are reviewed. Moreover, several applications, mainly developed in the framework of the EU FP7 Cognitive Heterogeneous Reconfigurable Optical Network (CHRON) project, are also described....

  18. Nonlinear Dynamics on Interconnected Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Alex; De Domenico, Manlio

    2016-06-01

    Networks of dynamical interacting units can represent many complex systems, from the human brain to transportation systems and societies. The study of these complex networks, when accounting for different types of interactions has become a subject of interest in the last few years, especially because its representational power in the description of users' interactions in diverse online social platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.) [1], or in representing different transportation modes in urban networks [2,3]. The general name coined for these networks is multilayer networks, where each layer accounts for a type of interaction (see Fig. 1).

  19. Tensor networks for dynamic spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    May, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Existing tensor network models of holography are limited to representing the geometry of constant time slices of static spacetimes. We study the possibility of describing the geometry of a dynamic spacetime using tensor networks. We find it is necessary to give a new definition of length in the network, and propose a definition based on the mutual information. We show that by associating a set of networks with a single quantum state and making use of the mutual information based definition of length, a network analogue of the maximin formula can be used to calculate the entropy of boundary regions.

  20. Structurally Dynamic Spin Market Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Denis; Kuscsik, Zoltán

    The agent-based model of stock price dynamics on a directed evolving complex network is suggested and studied by direct simulation. The stationary regime is maintained as a result of the balance between the extremal dynamics, adaptivity of strategic variables and reconnection rules. The inherent structure of node agent "brain" is modeled by a recursive neural network with local and global inputs and feedback connections. For specific parametric combination the complex network displays small-world phenomenon combined with scale-free behavior. The identification of a local leader (network hub, agent whose strategies are frequently adapted by its neighbors) is carried out by repeated random walk process through network. The simulations show empirically relevant dynamics of price returns and volatility clustering. The additional emerging aspects of stylized market statistics are Zipfian distributions of fitness.

  1. Dynamical Convergence Trajectory in Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Ning; ZHANG Yun-Jun; OUYANG Qi; GENG Zhi

    2005-01-01

    @@ It is well known that topology and dynamics are two major aspects to determine the function of a network. We study one of the dynamic properties of a network: trajectory convergence, i.e. how a system converges to its steady state. Using numerical and analytical methods, we show that in a logical-like dynamical model, the occurrence of convergent trajectory in a network depends mainly on the type of the fixed point and the ratio between activation and inhibition links. We analytically proof that this property is induced by the competition between two types of state transition structures in phase space: tree-like transition structure and star-like transition structure. We show that the biological networks, such as the cell cycle network in budding yeast, prefers the tree-like transition structures and suggest that this type of convergence trajectories may be universal.

  2. Studying Dynamics in Business Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Anderson, Helen; Havila, Virpi;

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a theory on network dynamics using the concepts of role and position from sociological theory. Moreover, the theory is further tested using case studies from Denmark and Finland...

  3. Multi-equilibrium property of metabolic networks: SSI module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Ji-Feng; Chen, Luonan

    2011-06-20

    Revealing the multi-equilibrium property of a metabolic network is a fundamental and important topic in systems biology. Due to the complexity of the metabolic network, it is generally a difficult task to study the problem as a whole from both analytical and numerical viewpoint. On the other hand, the structure-oriented modularization idea is a good choice to overcome such a difficulty, i.e. decomposing the network into several basic building blocks and then studying the whole network through investigating the dynamical characteristics of the basic building blocks and their interactions. Single substrate and single product with inhibition (SSI) metabolic module is one type of the basic building blocks of metabolic networks, and its multi-equilibrium property has important influence on that of the whole metabolic networks. In this paper, we describe what the SSI metabolic module is, characterize the rates of the metabolic reactions by Hill kinetics and give a unified model for SSI modules by using a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations with multi-variables. Specifically, a sufficient and necessary condition is first given to describe the injectivity of a class of nonlinear systems, and then, the sufficient condition is used to study the multi-equilibrium property of SSI modules. As a main theoretical result, for the SSI modules in which each reaction has no more than one inhibitor, a sufficient condition is derived to rule out multiple equilibria, i.e. the Jacobian matrix of its rate function is nonsingular everywhere. In summary, we describe SSI modules and give a general modeling framework based on Hill kinetics, and provide a sufficient condition for ruling out multiple equilibria of a key type of SSI module.

  4. Dynamic Object Identification with SOM-based neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Averkin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article a number of neural networks based on self-organizing maps, that can be successfully used for dynamic object identification, is described. Unique SOM-based modular neural networks with vector quantized associative memory and recurrent self-organizing maps as modules are presented. The structured algorithms of learning and operation of such SOM-based neural networks are described in details, also some experimental results and comparison with some other neural networks are given.

  5. Caffeine Modulates Attention Network Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a flanker task designed to test Posner's three visual attention network functions: alerting, orienting, and executive control [Posner, M. I. (2004). "Cognitive neuroscience of attention". New York, NY: Guilford Press]. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind…

  6. Caffeine Modulates Attention Network Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a flanker task designed to test Posner's three visual attention network functions: alerting, orienting, and executive control [Posner, M. I. (2004). "Cognitive neuroscience of attention". New York, NY: Guilford Press]. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind…

  7. Dynamics of coupled thalamocortical modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drover, Jonathan D; Schiff, Nicholas D; Victor, Jonathan D

    2010-06-01

    We develop a model of thalamocortical dynamics using a shared population of thalamic neurons to couple distant cortical regions. Behavior of the model is determined as a function of the connection strengths with shared and unshared populations in the thalamus, either within a relay nucleus or the reticular nucleus. When the coupling is via the reticular nucleus, we locate solutions of the model where distant cortical regions maintain the same activity level, and regions where one region maintains an elevated activity level, suppressing activity in the other. We locate and investigate a region where both types of solutions exist and are stable, yielding a mechanism for spontaneous changes in global activity patterns. Power spectra and coherence are computed, and marked differences in the coherence are found between the two kinds of modes. When, on the other hand, the coupling is via a shared relay nuclei, the features seen with the reticular coupling are absent. These considerations suggest a role for the reticular nucleus in modulating long distance cortical communication.

  8. Dynamic modulation of rTMS on functional connectivity and functional network connectivity to children with cerebral palsy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiwei; Xing, Guoqiang; He, Bin; Chen, Huaping; Ou, Jun; McClure, Morgan A; Liu, Hua; Wang, Yunfeng; Mu, Qiwen

    2016-03-02

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive treatment tool for the recovery of cerebral palsy (CP). This report describes the modulation effect of rTMS to functional connectivity, functional network connectivity, motor, and cognitive ability following treatment in a child with mild ataxia CP. After receiving 8 months of 0.5 Hz rTMS treatment over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the child showed a gradual improvement in motor and cognitive-related functional connectivity and functional network connectivity following treatment as well as improved motor, cognitive functions. These pilot results provide the first evidence of the efficiency of 0.5 Hz of rTMS on a child with CP. Further large sample studies are needed to verify and expand the present findings.

  9. Structure and dynamics of core-periphery networks

    CERN Document Server

    Csermely, Peter; Wu, Ling-Yun; Uzzi, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies uncovered important core/periphery network structures characterizing complex sets of cooperative and competitive interactions between network nodes, be they proteins, cells, species or humans. Better characterization of the structure, dynamics and function of core/periphery networks is a key step of our understanding cellular functions, species adaptation, social and market changes. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the structure and dynamics of "traditional" core/periphery networks, rich-clubs, nested, bow-tie and onion networks. Comparing core/periphery structures with network modules, we discriminate between global and local cores. The core/periphery network organization lies in the middle of several extreme properties, such as random/condensed structures, clique/star configurations, network symmetry/asymmetry, network assortativity/disassortativity, as well as network hierarchy/anti-hierarchy. These properties of high complexity together with the large degeneracy of core pathways e...

  10. Dynamical detection of network communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles, Marcos G.; Macau, Elbert E. N.; Rubido, Nicolás

    2016-05-01

    A prominent feature of complex networks is the appearance of communities, also known as modular structures. Specifically, communities are groups of nodes that are densely connected among each other but connect sparsely with others. However, detecting communities in networks is so far a major challenge, in particular, when networks evolve in time. Here, we propose a change in the community detection approach. It underlies in defining an intrinsic dynamic for the nodes of the network as interacting particles (based on diffusive equations of motion and on the topological properties of the network) that results in a fast convergence of the particle system into clustered patterns. The resulting patterns correspond to the communities of the network. Since our detection of communities is constructed from a dynamical process, it is able to analyse time-varying networks straightforwardly. Moreover, for static networks, our numerical experiments show that our approach achieves similar results as the methodologies currently recognized as the most efficient ones. Also, since our approach defines an N-body problem, it allows for efficient numerical implementations using parallel computations that increase its speed performance.

  11. The Dynamics of Semilattice Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Veliz-Cuba, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Time-discrete dynamical systems on a finite state space have been used with great success to model natural and engineered systems such as biological networks, social networks, and engineered control systems. They have the advantage of being intuitive and models can be easily simulated on a computer in most cases; however, few analytical tools beyond simulation are available. The motivation for this paper is to develop such tools for the analysis of models in biology. In this paper we have identified a broad class of discrete dynamical systems with a finite phase space for which one can derive strong results about their long-term dynamics in terms of properties of their dependency graphs. We classify completely the limit cycles of semilattice networks with strongly connected dependency graph and provide polynomial upper and lower bounds in the general case.

  12. Structurally dynamic spin market networks

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, D

    2007-01-01

    The agent-based model of price dynamics on a directed evolving complex network is suggested and studied by direct simulation. The resulting stationary regime is maintained as a result of the balance between the extremal dynamics, adaptivity of strategic variables and reconnection rules. For some properly selected parametric combination the network displays small-world phenomenon with high mean clustering coefficient and power-law node degree distribution. The mechanism of repeated random walk through network combined with a fitness recognition is proposed and tested to generate modular multi-leader market. The simulations suggest that dynamics of fitness is the slowest process that manifests itself in the volatility clustering of the log-price returns.

  13. Asymmetric Modulation Gains in Network Coded Relay Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Fitzek, Frank

    2015-01-01

    –to–end throughput by (i) using network coding to control the use of the relay in an effective manner, and (ii) leveraging asymmetric modulation to enable the source to efficiently allocate its resources. We provide mathematical analysis and a simple optimization mechanism. Numerical results for the case of fading...

  14. The dynamics of modulated wave trains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelman, A.; Sandstede, B.; Scheel, A.; Schneider, G.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of weakly-modulated nonlinear wave trains. For reaction-diffusion systems and for the complex Ginzburg--Landau equation, we establish rigorously that slowly varying modulations of wave trains are well approximated by solutions to Burgers equation over the natural time sca

  15. Spontaneous recovery in dynamical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdandzic, Antonio; Podobnik, Boris; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Kenett, Dror Y.; Havlin, Shlomo; Eugene Stanley, H.

    2014-01-01

    Much research has been carried out to explore the structural properties and vulnerability of complex networks. Of particular interest are abrupt dynamic events that cause networks to irreversibly fail. However, in many real-world phenomena, such as brain seizures in neuroscience or sudden market crashes in finance, after an inactive period of time a significant part of the damaged network is capable of spontaneously becoming active again. The process often occurs repeatedly. To model this marked network recovery, we examine the effect of local node recoveries and stochastic contiguous spreading, and find that they can lead to the spontaneous emergence of macroscopic `phase-flipping' phenomena. As the network is of finite size and is stochastic, the fraction of active nodes z switches back and forth between the two network collective modes characterized by high network activity and low network activity. Furthermore, the system exhibits a strong hysteresis behaviour analogous to phase transitions near a critical point. We present real-world network data exhibiting phase switching behaviour in accord with the predictions of the model.

  16. Complex networks: Dynamics and security

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ying-Cheng Lai; Adilson Motter; Takashi Nishikawa; Kwangho Park; Liang Zhao

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a perspective in the study of complex networks by focusing on how dynamics may affect network security under attacks. In particular, we review two related problems: attack-induced cascading breakdown and range-based attacks on links. A cascade in a network means the failure of a substantial fraction of the entire network in a cascading manner, which can be induced by the failure of or attacks on only a few nodes. These have been reported for the internet and for the power grid (e.g., the August 10, 1996 failure of the western United States power grid). We study a mechanism for cascades in complex networks by constructing a model incorporating the flows of information and physical quantities in the network. Using this model we can also show that the cascading phenomenon can be understood as a phase transition in terms of the key parameter characterizing the node capacity. For a parameter value below the phase-transition point, cascading failures can cause the network to disintegrate almost entirely. We will show how to obtain a theoretical estimate for the phase-transition point. The second problem is motivated by the fact that most existing works on the security of complex networks consider attacks on nodes rather than on links. We address attacks on links. Our investigation leads to the finding that many scale-free networks are more sensitive to attacks on short-range than on long-range links. Considering that the small-world phenomenon in complex networks has been identified as being due to the presence of long-range links, i.e., links connecting nodes that would otherwise be separated by a long node-to-node distance, our result, besides its importance concerning network efficiency and security, has the striking implication that the small-world property of scale-free networks is mainly due to short-range links.

  17. Polarization dynamics in optical ground wire network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeson, Jesse; Bao, Xiaoyi; Côté, Alain

    2009-04-20

    We report the polarization dynamics in an optical ground wire (OPGW) network for a summer period and a fall period for what is believed to be the first time. To better observe the surrounding magnetic fields contribution to modulating the state of polarization (SOP) we installed a Faraday rotating mirror to correct reciprocal birefringence from quasi-static changes. We also monitored the OPGW while no electrical current was present in the towers' electrical conductors. The spectral analysis, the arc length mapped out over a given time interval on a Poincaré sphere, histograms of the arc length, and the SOP autocorrelation function are calculated to analyze the SOP changes. Ambient temperature changes, wind, Sun-induced temperature gradients, and electrical current all have a significant impact on the SOP drift in an OPGW network. Wind-generated cable oscillations and Sun-induced temperature gradients are shown to be the dominant slow SOP modulations, while Aeolian vibrations and electrical current are shown to be the dominant fast SOP modulations. The spectral analysis revealed that the electrical current gives the fastest SOP modulation to be 300 Hz for the sampling frequency of 1 KHz. This has set the upper speed limit for real-time polarization mode dispersion compensation devices.

  18. Energy Efficiency Analysis for Dynamic Routing in Optical Transport Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vizcaíno, Jorge López; Ye, Yabin; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2012-01-01

    The energy efficiency in telecommunication networks is gaining more relevance as the Internet traffic is growing. The introduction of OFDM and dynamic operation opens new horizons in the operation of optical networks, improving the network flexibility and its efficiency. In this paper, we compare...... the performance in terms of energy efficiency of a flexible-grid OFDM-based solution with a fixed-grid WDM network in a dynamic scenario with time-varying connections. We highlight the benefits that the bandwidth elasticity and the flexibility of selecting different modulation formats can offer compared...

  19. Unifying evolutionary and network dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Samarth; Gasser, Les

    2007-06-01

    Many important real-world networks manifest small-world properties such as scale-free degree distributions, small diameters, and clustering. The most common model of growth for these networks is preferential attachment, where nodes acquire new links with probability proportional to the number of links they already have. We show that preferential attachment is a special case of the process of molecular evolution. We present a single-parameter model of network growth that unifies varieties of preferential attachment with the quasispecies equation (which models molecular evolution), and also with the Erdős-Rényi random graph model. We suggest some properties of evolutionary models that might be applied to the study of networks. We also derive the form of the degree distribution resulting from our algorithm, and we show through simulations that the process also models aspects of network growth. The unification allows mathematical machinery developed for evolutionary dynamics to be applied in the study of network dynamics, and vice versa.

  20. On Functional Module Detection in Metabolic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Koch

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models.

  1. Wealth dynamics on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlaschelli, Diego; Loffredo, Maria I.

    2004-07-01

    We study a model of wealth dynamics (Physica A 282 (2000) 536) which mimics transactions among economic agents. The outcomes of the model are shown to depend strongly on the topological properties of the underlying transaction network. The extreme cases of a fully connected and a fully disconnected network yield power-law and log-normal forms of the wealth distribution, respectively. We perform numerical simulations in order to test the model on more complex network topologies. We show that the mixed form of most empirical distributions (displaying a non-smooth transition from a log-normal to a power-law form) can be traced back to a heterogeneous topology with varying link density, which on the other hand is a recently observed property of real networks.

  2. Decoding network dynamics in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linding, Rune

    2014-01-01

    models through computational integration of systematic, large-scale, high-dimensional quantitative data sets. I will review our latest advances in methods for exploring phosphorylation networks. In particular I will discuss how the combination of quantitative mass-spectrometry, systems...... in comparative phospho-proteomics and network evolution [Tan et al. Science Signaling 2009, Tan et al. Science 2009, Tan et al. Science 2011]. Finally, I will discuss our most recent work in analyzing genomic sequencing data from NGS studies and how we have developed new powerful algorithms to predict the impact......Biological systems are composed of highly dynamic and interconnected molecular networks that drive biological decision processes. The goal of network biology is to describe, quantify and predict the information flow and functional behaviour of living systems in a formal language...

  3. Distributed Queuing in Dynamic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokarna Sharma

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of forming a distributed queue in the adversarial dynamic network model of Kuhn, Lynch, and Oshman (STOC 2010 in which the network topology changes from round to round but the network stays connected. This is a synchronous model in which network nodes are assumed to be fixed, the communication links for each round are chosen by an adversary, and nodes do not know who their neighbors are for the current round before they broadcast their messages. Queue requests may arrive over rounds at arbitrary nodes and the goal is to eventually enqueue them in a distributed queue. We present two algorithms that give a total distributed ordering of queue requests in this model. We measure the performance of our algorithms through round complexity, which is the total number of rounds needed to solve the distributed queuing problem. We show that in 1-interval connected graphs, where the communication links change arbitrarily between every round, it is possible to solve the distributed queueing problem in O(nk rounds using O(log n size messages, where n is the number of nodes in the network and k 0 is the concurrency level parameter that captures the minimum number of active queue requests in the system in any round. These results hold in any arbitrary (sequential, one-shot concurrent, or dynamic arrival of k queue requests in the system. Moreover, our algorithms ensure correctness in the sense that each queue request is eventually enqueued in the distributed queue after it is issued and each queue request is enqueued exactly once. We also provide an impossibility result for this distributed queuing problem in this model. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first solutions to the distributed queuing problem in adversarial dynamic networks.

  4. Dynamics of network motifs in genetic regulatory networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ying; Liu Zeng-Rong; Zhang Jian-Bao

    2007-01-01

    Network motifs hold a very important status in genetic regulatory networks. This paper aims to analyse the dynamical property of the network motifs in genetic regulatory networks. The main result we obtained is that the dynamical property of a single motif is very simple with only an asymptotically stable equilibrium point, but the combination of several motifs can make more complicated dynamical properties emerge such as limit cycles. The above-mentioned result shows that network motif is a stable substructure in genetic regulatory networks while their combinations make the genetic regulatory network more complicated.

  5. Green Modulation in Proactive Wireless Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Abouei, Jamshid; Pasupathy, Subbarayan

    2009-01-01

    Due to unique characteristics of sensor nodes, choosing energy-efficient modulation scheme with low-complexity implementation (refereed to as green modulation) is a critical factor in the physical layer of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). This paper presents (to the best of our knowledge) the first in-depth analysis of energy efficiency of various modulation schemes using realistic models in IEEE 802.15.4 standard and present state-of-the art technology, to find the best scheme in a proactive WSN over Rayleigh and Rician flat-fading channel models with path-loss. For this purpose, we describe the system model according to a pre-determined time-based process in practical sensor nodes. The present analysis also includes the effect of bandwidth and active mode duration on energy efficiency of popular modulation designs in the pass-band and Ultra-WideBand (UWB) categories. Experimental results show that among various pass-band and UWB modulation schemes, Non-Coherent M-ary Frequency Shift Keying (NC-MFSK) with sm...

  6. Dynamic Intelligent Feedback Scheduling in Networked Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-ying Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For the networked control system with limited bandwidth and flexible workload, a dynamic intelligent feedback scheduling strategy is proposed. Firstly, a monitor is used to acquire the current available network bandwidth. Then, the new available bandwidth in the next interval is predicted by using LS_SVM approach. At the same time, the dynamic performance indices of all control loops are obtained with a two-dimensional fuzzy logic modulator. Finally, the predicted network bandwidth is dynamically allocated by the bandwidth manager and the priority allocator in terms of the loops' dynamic performance indices. Simulation results show that the sampling periods and priorities of control loops are adjusted timely according to the network workload condition and the dynamic performance of control loops, which make the system running in the optimal state all the time.

  7. Asynchronous networks and event driven dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Christian; Field, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Real-world networks in technology, engineering and biology often exhibit dynamics that cannot be adequately reproduced using network models given by smooth dynamical systems and a fixed network topology. Asynchronous networks give a theoretical and conceptual framework for the study of network dynamics where nodes can evolve independently of one another, be constrained, stop, and later restart, and where the interaction between different components of the network may depend on time, state, and stochastic effects. This framework is sufficiently general to encompass a wide range of applications ranging from engineering to neuroscience. Typically, dynamics is piecewise smooth and there are relationships with Filippov systems. In this paper, we give examples of asynchronous networks, and describe the basic formalism and structure. In the following companion paper, we make the notion of a functional asynchronous network rigorous, discuss the phenomenon of dynamical locks, and present a foundational result on the spatiotemporal factorization of the dynamics for a large class of functional asynchronous networks.

  8. Competitive Dynamics on Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jiuhua; Wang, Xiaofan

    2014-01-01

    We consider a dynamical network model in which two competitors have fixed and different states, and each normal agent adjusts its state according to a distributed consensus protocol. The state of each normal agent converges to a steady value which is a convex combination of the competitors' states, and is independent of the initial states of agents. This implies that the competition result is fully determined by the network structure and positions of competitors in the network. We compute an Influence Matrix (IM) in which each element characterizing the influence of an agent on another agent in the network. We use the IM to predict the bias of each normal agent and thus predict which competitor will win. Furthermore, we compare the IM criterion with seven node centrality measures to predict the winner. We find that the competitor with higher Katz Centrality in an undirected network or higher PageRank in a directed network is much more likely to be the winner. These findings may shed new light on the role of n...

  9. Dynamic network structure of interhemispheric coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron, Karl W; Bassett, Danielle S; Gazzaniga, Michael S

    2012-11-13

    Fifty years ago Gazzaniga and coworkers published a seminal article that discussed the separate roles of the cerebral hemispheres in humans. Today, the study of interhemispheric communication is facilitated by a battery of novel data analysis techniques drawn from across disciplinary boundaries, including dynamic systems theory and network theory. These techniques enable the characterization of dynamic changes in the brain's functional connectivity, thereby providing an unprecedented means of decoding interhemispheric communication. Here, we illustrate the use of these techniques to examine interhemispheric coordination in healthy human participants performing a split visual field experiment in which they process lexical stimuli. We find that interhemispheric coordination is greater when lexical information is introduced to the right hemisphere and must subsequently be transferred to the left hemisphere for language processing than when it is directly introduced to the language-dominant (left) hemisphere. Further, we find that putative functional modules defined by coherent interhemispheric coordination come online in a transient manner, highlighting the underlying dynamic nature of brain communication. Our work illustrates that recently developed dynamic, network-based analysis techniques can provide novel and previously unapproachable insights into the role of interhemispheric coordination in cognition.

  10. Bridging the gap between modules in isolation and as part of networks: A systems framework for elucidating interaction and regulation of signalling modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Govind; Krishnan, J

    2016-07-21

    While signalling and biochemical modules have been the focus of numerous studies, they are typically studied in isolation, with no examination of the effects of the ambient network. In this paper we formulate and develop a systems framework, rooted in dynamical systems, to understand such effects, by studying the interaction of signalling modules. The modules we consider are (i) basic covalent modification, (ii) monostable switches, (iii) bistable switches, (iv) adaptive modules, and (v) oscillatory modules. We systematically examine the interaction of these modules by analyzing (a) sequential interaction without shared components, (b) sequential interaction with shared components, and (c) oblique interactions. Our studies reveal that the behaviour of a module in isolation may be substantially different from that in a network, and explicitly demonstrate how the behaviour of a given module, the characteristics of the ambient network, and the possibility of shared components can result in new effects. Our global approach illuminates different aspects of the structure and functioning of modules, revealing the importance of dynamical characteristics as well as biochemical features; this provides a methodological platform for investigating the complexity of natural modules shaped by evolution, elucidating the effects of ambient networks on a module in multiple cellular contexts, and highlighting the capabilities and constraints for engineering robust synthetic modules. Overall, such a systems framework provides a platform for bridging the gap between non-linear information processing modules, in isolation and as parts of networks, and a basis for understanding new aspects of natural and engineered cellular networks.

  11. Bridging the gap between modules in isolation and as part of networks: A systems framework for elucidating interaction and regulation of signalling modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Govind; Krishnan, J.

    2016-07-01

    While signalling and biochemical modules have been the focus of numerous studies, they are typically studied in isolation, with no examination of the effects of the ambient network. In this paper we formulate and develop a systems framework, rooted in dynamical systems, to understand such effects, by studying the interaction of signalling modules. The modules we consider are (i) basic covalent modification, (ii) monostable switches, (iii) bistable switches, (iv) adaptive modules, and (v) oscillatory modules. We systematically examine the interaction of these modules by analyzing (a) sequential interaction without shared components, (b) sequential interaction with shared components, and (c) oblique interactions. Our studies reveal that the behaviour of a module in isolation may be substantially different from that in a network, and explicitly demonstrate how the behaviour of a given module, the characteristics of the ambient network, and the possibility of shared components can result in new effects. Our global approach illuminates different aspects of the structure and functioning of modules, revealing the importance of dynamical characteristics as well as biochemical features; this provides a methodological platform for investigating the complexity of natural modules shaped by evolution, elucidating the effects of ambient networks on a module in multiple cellular contexts, and highlighting the capabilities and constraints for engineering robust synthetic modules. Overall, such a systems framework provides a platform for bridging the gap between non-linear information processing modules, in isolation and as parts of networks, and a basis for understanding new aspects of natural and engineered cellular networks.

  12. Coordination Games on Dynamical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enea Pestelacci

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a model in which agents of a population interacting according to a network of contacts play games of coordination with each other and can also dynamically break and redirect links to neighbors if they are unsatisfied. As a result, there is co-evolution of strategies in the population and of the graph that represents the network of contacts. We apply the model to the class of pure and general coordination games. For pure coordination games, the networks co-evolve towards the polarization of different strategies. In the case of general coordination games our results show that the possibility of refusing neighbors and choosing different partners increases the success rate of the Pareto-dominant equilibrium.

  13. Complex networks for streamflow dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sivakumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Streamflow modeling is an enormously challenging problem, due to the complex and nonlinear interactions between climate inputs and landscape characteristics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A basic idea in streamflow studies is to establish connections that generally exist, but attempts to identify such connections are largely dictated by the problem at hand and the system components in place. While numerous approaches have been proposed in the literature, our understanding of these connections remains far from adequate. The present study introduces the theory of networks, and in particular complex networks, to examine the connections in streamflow dynamics, with a particular focus on spatial connections. Monthly streamflow data observed over a period of 52 years from a large network of 639 monitoring stations in the contiguous United States are studied. The connections in this streamflow network are examined using the concept of clustering coefficient, which is a measure of local density and quantifies the network's tendency to cluster. The clustering coefficient analysis is performed with several different threshold levels, which are based on correlations in streamflow data between the stations. The clustering coefficient values of the 639 stations are used to obtain important information about the connections in the network and their extent, similarity and differences between stations/regions, and the influence of thresholds. The relationship of the clustering coefficient with the number of links/actual links in the network and the number of neighbors is also addressed. The results clearly indicate the usefulness of the network-based approach for examining connections in streamflow, with important implications for interpolation and extrapolation, classification of catchments, and predictions in ungaged basins.

  14. Network dynamics and systems biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrell, Johannes A.

    The physics of complex systems has grown considerably as a field in recent decades, largely due to improved computational technology and increased availability of systems level data. One area in which physics is of growing relevance is molecular biology. A new field, systems biology, investigates features of biological systems as a whole, a strategy of particular importance for understanding emergent properties that result from a complex network of interactions. Due to the complicated nature of the systems under study, the physics of complex systems has a significant role to play in elucidating the collective behavior. In this dissertation, we explore three problems in the physics of complex systems, motivated in part by systems biology. The first of these concerns the applicability of Boolean models as an approximation of continuous systems. Studies of gene regulatory networks have employed both continuous and Boolean models to analyze the system dynamics, and the two have been found produce similar results in the cases analyzed. We ask whether or not Boolean models can generically reproduce the qualitative attractor dynamics of networks of continuously valued elements. Using a combination of analytical techniques and numerical simulations, we find that continuous networks exhibit two effects---an asymmetry between on and off states, and a decaying memory of events in each element's inputs---that are absent from synchronously updated Boolean models. We show that in simple loops these effects produce exactly the attractors that one would predict with an analysis of the stability of Boolean attractors, but in slightly more complicated topologies, they can destabilize solutions that are stable in the Boolean approximation, and can stabilize new attractors. Second, we investigate ensembles of large, random networks. Of particular interest is the transition between ordered and disordered dynamics, which is well characterized in Boolean systems. Networks at the

  15. Deciphering modular and dynamic behaviors of transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ming

    2007-01-01

    The coordinated and dynamic modulation or interaction of genes or proteins acts as an important mechanism used by a cell in functional regulation. Recent studies have shown that many transcriptional networks exhibit a scale-free topology and hierarchical modular architecture. It has also been shown that transcriptional networks or pathways are dynamic and behave only in certain ways and controlled manners in response to disease development, changing cellular conditions, and different environmental factors. Moreover, evolutionarily conserved and divergent transcriptional modules underline fundamental and species-specific molecular mechanisms controlling disease development or cellular phenotypes. Various computational algorithms have been developed to explore transcriptional networks and modules from gene expression data. In silico studies have also been made to mimic the dynamic behavior of regulatory networks, analyzing how disease or cellular phenotypes arise from the connectivity or networks of genes and their products. Here, we review the recent development in computational biology research on deciphering modular and dynamic behaviors of transcriptional networks, highlighting important findings. We also demonstrate how these computational algorithms can be applied in systems biology studies as on disease, stem cells, and drug discovery.

  16. Anomaly Detection in Dynamic Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Melissa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Anomaly detection in dynamic communication networks has many important security applications. These networks can be extremely large and so detecting any changes in their structure can be computationally challenging; hence, computationally fast, parallelisable methods for monitoring the network are paramount. For this reason the methods presented here use independent node and edge based models to detect locally anomalous substructures within communication networks. As a first stage, the aim is to detect changes in the data streams arising from node or edge communications. Throughout the thesis simple, conjugate Bayesian models for counting processes are used to model these data streams. A second stage of analysis can then be performed on a much reduced subset of the network comprising nodes and edges which have been identified as potentially anomalous in the first stage. The first method assumes communications in a network arise from an inhomogeneous Poisson process with piecewise constant intensity. Anomaly detection is then treated as a changepoint problem on the intensities. The changepoint model is extended to incorporate seasonal behavior inherent in communication networks. This seasonal behavior is also viewed as a changepoint problem acting on a piecewise constant Poisson process. In a static time frame, inference is made on this extended model via a Gibbs sampling strategy. In a sequential time frame, where the data arrive as a stream, a novel, fast Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm is introduced to sample from the sequence of posterior distributions of the change points over time. A second method is considered for monitoring communications in a large scale computer network. The usage patterns in these types of networks are very bursty in nature and don’t fit a Poisson process model. For tractable inference, discrete time models are considered, where the data are aggregated into discrete time periods and probability models are fitted to the

  17. Perspective: network-guided pattern formation of neural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Kaiser, Marcus; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2014-10-05

    The understanding of neural activity patterns is fundamentally linked to an understanding of how the brain's network architecture shapes dynamical processes. Established approaches rely mostly on deviations of a given network from certain classes of random graphs. Hypotheses about the supposed role of prominent topological features (for instance, the roles of modularity, network motifs or hierarchical network organization) are derived from these deviations. An alternative strategy could be to study deviations of network architectures from regular graphs (rings and lattices) and consider the implications of such deviations for self-organized dynamic patterns on the network. Following this strategy, we draw on the theory of spatio-temporal pattern formation and propose a novel perspective for analysing dynamics on networks, by evaluating how the self-organized dynamics are confined by network architecture to a small set of permissible collective states. In particular, we discuss the role of prominent topological features of brain connectivity, such as hubs, modules and hierarchy, in shaping activity patterns. We illustrate the notion of network-guided pattern formation with numerical simulations and outline how it can facilitate the understanding of neural dynamics. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Sensitive dependence of network dynamics on network structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E

    2016-01-01

    The relation between network structure and dynamics is determinant for the behavior of complex systems in numerous domains. An important longstanding problem concerns the properties of the networks that optimize the dynamics with respect to a given performance measure. Here we show that such optimization can lead to sensitive dependence of the dynamics on the structure of the network. Specifically, we demonstrate that the stability of the dynamical state, as determined by the maximum Lyapunov exponent, can exhibit a cusp-like dependence on the number of nodes and links as well as on the size of perturbations applied to the network structure. As mechanisms underlying this sensitivity, we identify discontinuous transitions occurring in the complement of optimal networks and the prevalence of eigenvector degeneracy in these networks. These findings establish a unified characterization of networks optimized for dynamical stability in diffusively coupled systems, which we illustrate using Turing instability in act...

  19. Dynamic properties of network motifs contribute to biological network organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Prill

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological networks, such as those describing gene regulation, signal transduction, and neural synapses, are representations of large-scale dynamic systems. Discovery of organizing principles of biological networks can be enhanced by embracing the notion that there is a deep interplay between network structure and system dynamics. Recently, many structural characteristics of these non-random networks have been identified, but dynamical implications of the features have not been explored comprehensively. We demonstrate by exhaustive computational analysis that a dynamical property--stability or robustness to small perturbations--is highly correlated with the relative abundance of small subnetworks (network motifs in several previously determined biological networks. We propose that robust dynamical stability is an influential property that can determine the non-random structure of biological networks.

  20. Modeling of Carrier Dynamics in Electroabsorption Modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højfeldt, Sune

    2002-01-01

    and a phenomenological model for the carrier sweep-out dynamics, we investigate all-optical wavelength conversion, all-optical signal regeneration, and all-optical demultiplexing. A detailed drift-diffusion type model for the sweerp-out of photo-excited carriers in electroabsorption modulators is presented. We use...... the model to calclulate absorption spectra and steady-state carrier distributions in different modulator structures. This allows us to investigate a number of important properties of electroabsorption modulators, such as the electroabsorption effect and th saturation properties. We also investigate...... the influence that carrier recapture has on the device properties, and we discuss the recapture process on a more fundamental level. The model is also used to investigate in detail the carrier sweep-out process in electroabsorption modulators. We investigate how the intrinsic-region width, the separate...

  1. Network dynamics in nanofilled polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Guilhem P.; Dessi, Claudia; Costanzo, Salvatore; Zhao, Dan; Gong, Shushan; Alegria, Angel; Colby, Ralph H.; Rubinstein, Michael; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2016-04-01

    It is well accepted that adding nanoparticles (NPs) to polymer melts can result in significant property improvements. Here we focus on the causes of mechanical reinforcement and present rheological measurements on favourably interacting mixtures of spherical silica NPs and poly(2-vinylpyridine), complemented by several dynamic and structural probes. While the system dynamics are polymer-like with increased friction for low silica loadings, they turn network-like when the mean face-to-face separation between NPs becomes smaller than the entanglement tube diameter. Gel-like dynamics with a Williams-Landel-Ferry temperature dependence then result. This dependence turns particle dominated, that is, Arrhenius-like, when the silica loading increases to ~31 vol%, namely, when the average nearest distance between NP faces becomes comparable to the polymer's Kuhn length. Our results demonstrate that the flow properties of nanocomposites are complex and can be tuned via changes in filler loading, that is, the character of polymer bridges which `tie' NPs together into a network.

  2. Dynamic network management and service integration for airborne network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei; Li, Weihua

    2009-12-01

    The development of airborne network is conducive to resource sharing, flight management and interoperability in civilian and military aviation fields. To enhance the integrated ability of airborne network, the paper focuses on dynamic network management and service integration architecture for airborne network (DNMSIAN). Adaptive routing based on the mapping mechanism between connection identification and routing identification can provide diversified network access, and ensure the credibility and mobility of the aviation information exchange. Dynamic network management based on trustworthy cluster can ensure dynamic airborne network controllable and safe. Service integration based on semantic web and ontology can meet the customized and diversified needs for aviation information services. The DNMSIAN simulation platform demonstrates that our proposed methods can effectively perform dynamic network management and service integration.

  3. Factorial graphical lasso for dynamic networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, E. C.; Abbruzzo, A.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic networks models describe a growing number of important scientific processes, from cell biology and epidemiology to sociology and finance. There are many aspects of dynamical networks that require statistical considerations. In this paper we focus on determining network structure. Estimating

  4. Elements and modulation of functional dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Alan C

    2014-10-09

    The existing structure-function paradigm of drug discovery has been evolving toward the essential incorporation of dynamics data. This new functional dynamics paradigm emphasizes conformational entropy as a driving force of protein function and intermolecular recognition. Conformational dynamics (a proxy of conformational entropy) impacts the degree of protein (dis)order and the constitution of the conformational ensemble, the mechanisms of allostery and drug resistance, and the free energy of ligand binding. Specific protein and ligand conformations facilitate favorable, reciprocal interactions. The number of protein and ligand conformers that exhibit favorable binding interactions will vary from system to system. All binding scenarios can modulate protein dynamics by various levels of enthalpic and entropic contribution, with significant influence on the functional dynamics of the system. Analysis and consideration of resulting changes of activity, signaling, catalysis, and subsequent phenotypic outcome are powerful motivations in the drug design process.

  5. An effective method for network module extraction from microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahanta Priyakshi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of high-throughput Microarray technologies has provided various opportunities to systematically characterize diverse types of computational biological networks. Co-expression network have become popular in the analysis of microarray data, such as for detecting functional gene modules. Results This paper presents a method to build a co-expression network (CEN and to detect network modules from the built network. We use an effective gene expression similarity measure called NMRS (Normalized mean residue similarity to construct the CEN. We have tested our method on five publicly available benchmark microarray datasets. The network modules extracted by our algorithm have been biologically validated in terms of Q value and p value. Conclusions Our results show that the technique is capable of detecting biologically significant network modules from the co-expression network. Biologist can use this technique to find groups of genes with similar functionality based on their expression information.

  6. Self-organized Collaboration Network Model Based on Module Emerging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongyong; Lu, Lan; Liu, Qiming

    Recently, the studies of the complex network have gone deep into many scientific fields, such as computer science, physics, mathematics, sociology, etc. These researches enrich the realization for complex network, and increase understands for the new characteristic of complex network. Based on the evolvement characteristic of the author collaboration in the scientific thesis, a self-organized network model of the scientific cooperation network is presented by module emerging. By applying the theoretical analysis, it is shown that this network model is a scale-free network, and the strength degree distribution and the module degree distribution of the network nodes have the same power law. In order to make sure the validity of the theoretical analysis for the network model, we create the computer simulation and demonstration collaboration network. By analyzing the data of the network, the results of the demonstration network and the computer simulation are consistent with that of the theoretical analysis of the model.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Network Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabold, David A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction and Background * History and use of MD * The role of the potential * Scope of the method * Use of a priori information * Appraising a model * MD Method * Equations of motion * Energy minimization and equilibration * Deeper or global minima * Simulated annealing * Genetic algorithms * Activation-relaxation technique * Alternate dynamics * Modeling infinite systems: Periodic boundary conditions * The Interatomic Interactions * Overview * Empirical classical potentials * Potentials from electronic structure * The tight-binding method * Approximate methods based on tight-binding * First principles * Local basis: "ab initio tight binding" * Plane-waves: Car-Parrinello methods * Efficient ab initio methods for large systems * The need for locality of electron states in real space * Avoiding explicit orthogonalization * Connecting Simulation to Experiment * Structure * Network dynamics * Computing the harmonic modes * Dynamical autocorrelation functions * Dynamical structure factor * Electronic structure * Density of states * Thermal modulation of the electron states * Transport * Applications * g-GeSe2 * g-GexSe1-x glasses * Amorphous carbon surface * Where to Get Codes to Get Started * Acknowledgments * References

  8. Security in Wireless Sensor Networks: Key Management Module in SOOAWSN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Abuhelaleh

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to high restrictions in wireless sensor networks, where the resources are limited, clustering protocolsfor routing organization have been proposed in much research for increasing system throughput,decreasing system delay and saving energy. Even these algorithms have proposed some levels of security,but because of their dynamic nature of communication, most of their security solutions are not suitable. Inthis paper we focus on how to achieve the highest possible level of security by applying new keymanagement technique that can be used during wireless sensor networks communications. For ourproposal to be more effective and applicable to a large number of wireless sensor networks applications,we work on a special kind of architecture that have been proposed to cluster hierarchy of wireless sensornetworks and we pick one of the most interesting protocols that have been proposed for this kind ofarchitecture, which is LEACH. This proposal is a module of a complete solution that we are developing tocover all the aspects of wireless sensor networks communication which is labeled Secure Object OrientedArchitecture for Wireless Sensor Networks (SOOAWSN .

  9. Factorial graphical lasso for dynamic networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wit, E C

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic networks models describe a growing number of important scientific processes, from cell biology and epidemiology to sociology and finance. There are many aspects of dynamical networks that require statistical considerations. In this paper we focus on determining network structure. Estimating dynamic networks is a difficult task since the number of components involved in the system is very large. As a result, the number of parameters to be estimated is bigger than the number of observations. However, a characteristic of many networks is that they are sparse. For example, the molecular structure of genes make interactions with other components a highly-structured and therefore sparse process. Penalized Gaussian graphical models have been used to estimate sparse networks. However, the literature has focussed on static networks, which lack specific temporal constraints. We propose a structured Gaussian dynamical graphical model, where structures can consist of specific time dynamics, known presence or abse...

  10. Tourism-planning network knowledge dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dredge, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    , network agents, network boundaries and network resources. A case study of the development of the Next Generation Tourism Handbook (Queensland, Australia), a policy initiative that sought to bring tourism and land use planning knowledge closer together is presented. The case study illustrates...... that the tourism policy and land use planning networks operate in very different spheres and that context, network agents, network boundaries and network resources have a significant influence not only on knowledge dynamics but also on the capacity of network agents to overcome barriers to learning and to innovate.......This chapter explores the characteristics and functions of tourism networks as a first step in understanding how networks facilitate and reproduce knowledge. A framework to progress understandings of knowledge dynamics in tourism networks is presented that includes four key dimensions: context...

  11. Dynamic reorganization of brain functional networks during cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, Michał; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2015-07-01

    How does cognition emerge from neural dynamics? The dominant hypothesis states that interactions among distributed brain regions through phase synchronization give basis for cognitive processing. Such phase-synchronized networks are transient and dynamic, established on the timescale of milliseconds in order to perform specific cognitive operations. But unlike resting-state networks, the complex organization of transient cognitive networks is typically not characterized within the graph theory framework. Thus, it is not known whether cognitive processing merely changes the strength of functional connections or, conversely, requires qualitatively new topological arrangements of functional networks. To address this question, we recorded high-density EEG while subjects performed a visual discrimination task. We conducted an event-related network analysis (ERNA) where source-space weighted functional networks were characterized with graph measures. ERNA revealed rapid, transient, and frequency-specific reorganization of the network's topology during cognition. Specifically, cognitive networks were characterized by strong clustering, low modularity, and strong interactions between hub-nodes. Our findings suggest that dense and clustered connectivity between the hub nodes belonging to different modules is the "network fingerprint" of cognition. Such reorganization patterns might facilitate global integration of information and provide a substrate for a "global workspace" necessary for cognition and consciousness to occur. Thus, characterizing topology of the event-related networks opens new vistas to interpret cognitive dynamics in the broader conceptual framework of graph theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Attractor dynamics in local neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe eThivierge

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of synaptic connectivity in various regions of the brain are characterized by the presence of synaptic motifs, defined as unidirectional and bidirectional synaptic contacts that follow a particular configuration and link together small groups of neurons. Recent computational work proposes that a relay network (two populations communicating via a third, relay population of neurons can generate precise patterns of neural synchronization. Here, we employ two distinct models of neuronal dynamics and show that simulated neural circuits designed in this way are caught in a global attractor of activity that prevents neurons from modulating their response on the basis of incoming stimuli. To circumvent the emergence of a fixed global attractor, we propose a mechanism of selective gain inhibition that promotes flexible responses to external stimuli. We suggest that local neuronal circuits may employ this mechanism to generate precise patterns of neural synchronization whose transient nature delimits the occurrence of a brief stimulus.

  13. Strength dynamics of weighted evolving networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jian-Jun; Gao Zi-You; Sun Hui-Jun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a simple model for the strength dynamics of weighted evolving networks is proposed to characterize the weighted networks. By considering the congestion effects, this approach can yield power law strength distribution appeared on the many real weighted networks, such as traffic networks, internet networks. Besides, the relationship between strength and degree is given. Numerical simulations indicate that the strength distribution is strongly related to the strength dynamics decline. The model also provides us with a better description of the real weighted networks.

  14. A dynamic network model for interbank market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; He, Jianmin; Li, Shouwei

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a dynamic network model based on agent behavior is introduced to explain the formation mechanism of interbank market network. We investigate the impact of credit lending preference on interbank market network topology, the evolution of interbank market network and stability of interbank market. Experimental results demonstrate that interbank market network is a small-world network and cumulative degree follows the power-law distribution. We find that the interbank network structure keeps dynamic stability in the network evolution process. With the increase of bank credit lending preference, network clustering coefficient increases and average shortest path length decreases monotonously, which improves the stability of the network structure. External shocks are main threats for the interbank market and the reduction of bank external investment yield rate and deposits fluctuations contribute to improve the resilience of the banking system.

  15. Bayesian Overlapping Community Detection in Dynamic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ghorbani, Mahsa; Khodadadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Detecting community structures in social networks has gained considerable attention in recent years. However, lack of prior knowledge about the number of communities, and their overlapping nature have made community detection a challenging problem. Moreover, many of the existing methods only consider static networks, while most of real world networks are dynamic and evolve over time. Hence, finding consistent overlapping communities in dynamic networks without any prior knowledge about the number of communities is still an interesting open research problem. In this paper, we present an overlapping community detection method for dynamic networks called Dynamic Bayesian Overlapping Community Detector (DBOCD). DBOCD assumes that in every snapshot of network, overlapping parts of communities are dense areas and utilizes link communities instead of common node communities. Using Recurrent Chinese Restaurant Process and community structure of the network in the last snapshot, DBOCD simultaneously extracts the numbe...

  16. Controlling edge dynamics in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Nepusz, Tamás

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of distinct units in physical, social, biological and technological systems naturally gives rise to complex network structures. Networks have constantly been in the focus of research for the last decade, with considerable advances in the description of their structural and dynamical properties. However, much less effort has been devoted to studying the controllability of the dynamics taking place on them. Here we introduce and evaluate a dynamical process defined on the edges of a network, and demonstrate that the controllability properties of this process significantly differ from simple nodal dynamics. Evaluation of real-world networks indicates that most of them are more controllable than their randomized counterparts. We also find that transcriptional regulatory networks are particularly easy to control. Analytic calculations show that networks with scale-free degree distributions have better controllability properties than uncorrelated networks, and positively correlated in- and out-degre...

  17. Dynamic information routing in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, Christoph; Timme, Marc; Battaglia, Demian

    2016-01-01

    Flexible information routing fundamentally underlies the function of many biological and artificial networks. Yet, how such systems may specifically communicate and dynamically route information is not well understood. Here we identify a generic mechanism to route information on top of collective dynamical reference states in complex networks. Switching between collective dynamics induces flexible reorganization of information sharing and routing patterns, as quantified by delayed mutual information and transfer entropy measures between activities of a network's units. We demonstrate the power of this mechanism specifically for oscillatory dynamics and analyse how individual unit properties, the network topology and external inputs co-act to systematically organize information routing. For multi-scale, modular architectures, we resolve routing patterns at all levels. Interestingly, local interventions within one sub-network may remotely determine nonlocal network-wide communication. These results help understanding and designing information routing patterns across systems where collective dynamics co-occurs with a communication function. PMID:27067257

  18. Dynamic information routing in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, Christoph; Timme, Marc; Battaglia, Demian

    2016-04-01

    Flexible information routing fundamentally underlies the function of many biological and artificial networks. Yet, how such systems may specifically communicate and dynamically route information is not well understood. Here we identify a generic mechanism to route information on top of collective dynamical reference states in complex networks. Switching between collective dynamics induces flexible reorganization of information sharing and routing patterns, as quantified by delayed mutual information and transfer entropy measures between activities of a network's units. We demonstrate the power of this mechanism specifically for oscillatory dynamics and analyse how individual unit properties, the network topology and external inputs co-act to systematically organize information routing. For multi-scale, modular architectures, we resolve routing patterns at all levels. Interestingly, local interventions within one sub-network may remotely determine nonlocal network-wide communication. These results help understanding and designing information routing patterns across systems where collective dynamics co-occurs with a communication function.

  19. Network models of frequency modulated sweep detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Skorheim

    Full Text Available Frequency modulated (FM sweeps are common in species-specific vocalizations, including human speech. Auditory neurons selective for the direction and rate of frequency change in FM sweeps are present across species, but the synaptic mechanisms underlying such selectivity are only beginning to be understood. Even less is known about mechanisms of experience-dependent changes in FM sweep selectivity. We present three network models of synaptic mechanisms of FM sweep direction and rate selectivity that explains experimental data: (1 The 'facilitation' model contains frequency selective cells operating as coincidence detectors, summing up multiple excitatory inputs with different time delays. (2 The 'duration tuned' model depends on interactions between delayed excitation and early inhibition. The strength of delayed excitation determines the preferred duration. Inhibitory rebound can reinforce the delayed excitation. (3 The 'inhibitory sideband' model uses frequency selective inputs to a network of excitatory and inhibitory cells. The strength and asymmetry of these connections results in neurons responsive to sweeps in a single direction of sufficient sweep rate. Variations of these properties, can explain the diversity of rate-dependent direction selectivity seen across species. We show that the inhibitory sideband model can be trained using spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP to develop direction selectivity from a non-selective network. These models provide a means to compare the proposed synaptic and spectrotemporal mechanisms of FM sweep processing and can be utilized to explore cellular mechanisms underlying experience- or training-dependent changes in spectrotemporal processing across animal models. Given the analogy between FM sweeps and visual motion, these models can serve a broader function in studying stimulus movement across sensory epithelia.

  20. Hybrid Dynamic Network Data Envelopment Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional DEA models make no hypothesis concerning the internal operations in a static situation. To open the “black box” and work with dynamic assessment issues synchronously, we put forward a hybrid model for evaluating the relative efficiencies of a set of DMUs over an observed time period with a composite of network DEA and dynamic DEA. We vertically deal with intermediate products between divisions with assignable inputs in the network structure and, horizontally, we extend network structure by means of a dynamic pattern with unrelated activities between two succeeding periods. The hybrid dynamic network DEA model proposed in this paper enables us to (i pry into the internal operations of DEA by another network structure, (ii obtain dynamic change of period efficiency, and (iii gain the overall dynamic efficiency of DMUs over the entire observed periods. We finally illustrate the calculation procedure of the proposed approach by a numerical example.

  1. 40G and 100G modules enable next generation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jin; Schmidt, Ted; Traverso, Matt; Yoshikazu, Era

    2009-11-01

    With the wide scale deployment of 40Gbps in carrier networks underway and 100Gbps products on the horizon, 40Gbps and 100Gbps modules based on Multi Source Agreements (MSA) are gaining considerable interest and market acceptance. This paper discusses developments in 40Gbps and 100Gbps line side DWDM MSA modules and CFP based client side MSA modules as suppliers strive to address various system and network applications.

  2. Opinion dynamics with disagreement and modulated information

    CERN Document Server

    Sîrbu, Alina; Servedio, Vito D P; Tria, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Opinion dynamics concerns social processes through which populations or groups of individuals agree or disagree on specific issues. As such, modelling opinion dynamics represents an important research area that has been progressively acquiring relevance in many different domains. Existing approaches have mostly represented opinions through discrete binary or continuous variables by exploring a whole panoply of cases: e.g. independence, noise, external effects, multiple issues. In most of these cases the crucial ingredient is an attractive dynamics through which similar or similar enough agents get closer. Only rarely the possibility of explicit disagreement has been taken into account (i.e., the possibility for a repulsive interaction among individuals' opinions), and mostly for discrete or 1-dimensional opinions, through the introduction of additional model parameters. Here we introduce a new model of opinion formation, which focuses on the interplay between the possibility of explicit disagreement, modulate...

  3. Capacity Analysis for Dynamic Space Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Lu; Bo Li; Wenjing Kang; Gongliang Liu; Xueting Li

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate transmission rate of highly dynamic space networks, a new method for studying space network capacity is proposed in this paper. Using graph theory, network capacity is defined as the maximum amount of flows ground stations can receive per unit time. Combined with a hybrid constellation model, network capacity is calculated and further analyzed for practical cases. Simulation results show that network capacity will increase to different extents as link capacity, minimum ground elevation constraint and satellite onboard processing capability change. Considering the efficiency and reliability of communication networks, how to scientifically design satellite networks is also discussed.

  4. Revealing networks from dynamics: an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Timme, Marc

    2014-01-01

    What can we learn from the collective dynamics of a complex network about its interaction topology? Taking the perspective from nonlinear dynamics, we briefly review recent progress on how to infer structural connectivity (direct interactions) from accessing the dynamics of the units. Potential applications range from interaction networks in physics, to chemical and metabolic reactions, protein and gene regulatory networks as well as neural circuits in biology and electric power grids or wireless sensor networks in engineering. Moreover, we briefly mention some standard ways of inferring effective or functional connectivity.

  5. Learning dynamic Bayesian networks with mixed variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttcher, Susanne Gammelgaard

    This paper considers dynamic Bayesian networks for discrete and continuous variables. We only treat the case, where the distribution of the variables is conditional Gaussian. We show how to learn the parameters and structure of a dynamic Bayesian network and also how the Markov order can be learn....... An automated procedure for specifying prior distributions for the parameters in a dynamic Bayesian network is presented. It is a simple extension of the procedure for the ordinary Bayesian networks. Finally the W¨olfer?s sunspot numbers are analyzed....

  6. Dynamic information routing in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kirst, Christoph; Battaglia, Demian

    2015-01-01

    Flexible information routing fundamentally underlies the function of many biological and artificial networks. Yet, how such systems may specifically communicate and dynamically route information is not well understood. Here we identify a generic mechanism to route information on top of collective dynamical reference states in complex networks. Switching between collective dynamics induces flexible reorganization of information sharing and routing patterns, as quantified by delayed mutual information and transfer entropy measures between activities of a network's units. We demonstrate the power of this generic mechanism specifically for oscillatory dynamics and analyze how individual unit properties, the network topology and external inputs coact to systematically organize information routing. For multi-scale, modular architectures, we resolve routing patterns at all levels. Interestingly, local interventions within one sub-network may remotely determine non-local network-wide communication. These results help...

  7. Dynamic Analysis of Structures Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ahmadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, neural networks are considered as the best candidate for fast approximation with arbitrary accuracy in the time consuming problems. Dynamic analysis of structures against earthquake has the time consuming process. We employed two kinds of neural networks: Generalized Regression neural network (GR and Back-Propagation Wavenet neural network (BPW, for approximating of dynamic time history response of frame structures. GR is a traditional radial basis function neural network while BPW categorized as a wavelet neural network. In BPW, sigmoid activation functions of hidden layer neurons are substituted with wavelets and weights training are achieved using Scaled Conjugate Gradient (SCG algorithm. Comparison the results of BPW with those of GR in the dynamic analysis of eight story steel frame indicates that accuracy of the properly trained BPW was better than that of GR and therefore, BPW can be efficiently used for approximate dynamic analysis of structures.

  8. Synchronization of Intermittently Coupled Dynamical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the synchronization phenomenon of an intermittently coupled dynamical network in which the coupling among nodes can occur only at discrete instants and the coupling configuration of the network is time varying. A model of intermittently coupled dynamical network consisting of identical nodes is introduced. Based on the stability theory for impulsive differential equations, some synchronization criteria for intermittently coupled dynamical networks are derived. The network synchronizability is shown to be related to the second largest and the smallest eigenvalues of the coupling matrix, the coupling strength, and the impulsive intervals. Using the chaotic Chua system and Lorenz system as nodes of a dynamical network for simulation, respectively, the theoretical results are verified and illustrated.

  9. MODELS FOR NETWORK DYNAMICS - A MARKOVIAN FRAMEWORK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LEENDERS, RTAJ

    1995-01-01

    A question not very often addressed in social network analysis relates to network dynamics and focuses on how networks arise and change. It alludes to the idea that ties do not arise or vanish randomly, but (partly) as a consequence of human behavior and preferences. Statistical models for modeling

  10. A system dynamics model for communications networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awcock, A. J.; King, T. E. G.

    1985-09-01

    An abstract model of a communications network in system dynamics terminology is developed as implementation of this model by a FORTRAN program package developed at RSRE is discussed. The result of this work is a high-level simulation package in which the performance of adaptive routing algorithms and other network controls may be assessed for a network of arbitrary topology.

  11. Using Network Dynamical Influence to Drive Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzo, Giuliano; Young, George F.; MacDonald, Malcolm; Leonard, Naomi E.

    2016-05-01

    Consensus and decision-making are often analysed in the context of networks, with many studies focusing attention on ranking the nodes of a network depending on their relative importance to information routing. Dynamical influence ranks the nodes with respect to their ability to influence the evolution of the associated network dynamical system. In this study it is shown that dynamical influence not only ranks the nodes, but also provides a naturally optimised distribution of effort to steer a network from one state to another. An example is provided where the “steering” refers to the physical change in velocity of self-propelled agents interacting through a network. Distinct from other works on this subject, this study looks at directed and hence more general graphs. The findings are presented with a theoretical angle, without targeting particular applications or networked systems; however, the framework and results offer parallels with biological flocks and swarms and opportunities for design of technological networks.

  12. Forced synchronization of autonomous dynamical Boolean networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Durón, R. R., E-mail: roberto.rivera@ipicyt.edu.mx; Campos-Cantón, E., E-mail: eric.campos@ipicyt.edu.mx [División de Matemáticas Aplicadas, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A. C., Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4 Sección, C.P. 78216, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Campos-Cantón, I. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón 64, C.P. 78000, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Gauthier, Daniel J. [Department of Physics and Center for Nonlinear and Complex Systems, Duke University, Box 90305, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We present the design of an autonomous time-delay Boolean network realized with readily available electronic components. Through simulations and experiments that account for the detailed nonlinear response of each circuit element, we demonstrate that a network with five Boolean nodes displays complex behavior. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics of two identical networks display near-instantaneous synchronization to a periodic state when forced by a common periodic Boolean signal. A theoretical analysis of the network reveals the conditions under which complex behavior is expected in an individual network and the occurrence of synchronization in the forced networks. This research will enable future experiments on autonomous time-delay networks using readily available electronic components with dynamics on a slow enough time-scale so that inexpensive data collection systems can faithfully record the dynamics.

  13. Forced synchronization of autonomous dynamical Boolean networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Durón, R R; Campos-Cantón, E; Campos-Cantón, I; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2015-08-01

    We present the design of an autonomous time-delay Boolean network realized with readily available electronic components. Through simulations and experiments that account for the detailed nonlinear response of each circuit element, we demonstrate that a network with five Boolean nodes displays complex behavior. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics of two identical networks display near-instantaneous synchronization to a periodic state when forced by a common periodic Boolean signal. A theoretical analysis of the network reveals the conditions under which complex behavior is expected in an individual network and the occurrence of synchronization in the forced networks. This research will enable future experiments on autonomous time-delay networks using readily available electronic components with dynamics on a slow enough time-scale so that inexpensive data collection systems can faithfully record the dynamics.

  14. Dynamic Multi-class Network Loading Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic network loading problem (DNLP) consists in determining on a congested network, timedependent arc volumes, together with arc and path travel times, given the time varying path flow departure rates over a finite time horizon. The objective of this paper is to present the formulation of an analytical dynamic multiclass network loading model. The model does not require the assumption of the FIFO condition. The existence of a solution to the model is shown.

  15. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau eCelada

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT, acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by 1 modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and 2 varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3 and inhibitory (5-HT1A receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the

  16. Dynamic channel assignment scheme for multi-radio wireless mesh networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kareem, TR

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the challenges involve in designing a dynamic channel assignment (DCA) scheme for wireless mesh networks, particularly for multi-radio systems. It motivates the need for fast switching and process coordination modules...

  17. How Attention Modulates Encoding of Dynamic Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Noga; Shapira-Lichter, Irit; Lerner, Yulia; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Hendler, Talma; Giladi, Nir; Ash, Elissa L.

    2016-01-01

    When encoding a real-life, continuous stimulus, the same neural circuits support processing and integration of prior as well as new incoming information. This ongoing interplay is modulated by attention, and is evident in regions such as the prefrontal cortex section of the task positive network (TPN), and in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a hub of the default mode network (DMN). Yet the exact nature of such modulation is still unclear. To investigate this issue, we utilized an fMRI task that employed movies as the encoded stimuli and manipulated attentional load via an easy or hard secondary task that was performed simultaneously with encoding. Results showed increased intersubject correlation (inter-SC) levels when encoding movies in a condition of high, as compared to low attentional load. This was evident in bilateral ventrolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices and the dorsal PCC (dPCC). These regions became more attuned to the combination of the movie and the secondary task as the attentional demand of the latter increased. Activation analyses revealed that at higher load the prefrontal TPN regions were more activated, whereas the dPCC was more deactivated. Attentional load also influenced connectivity within and between the networks. At high load the dPCC was anti-correlated to the prefrontal regions, which were more functionally coherent amongst themselves. Finally and critically, greater inter-SC in the dPCC at high load during encoding predicted lower memory strength when that information was retrieved. This association between inter-SC levels and memory strength suggest that as attentional demands increased, the dPCC was more attuned to the secondary task at the expense of the encoded stimulus, thus weakening memory for the encoded stimulus. Together, our findings show that attentional load modulated the function of core TPN and DMN regions. Furthermore, the observed relationship between memory strength and the modulation of the dPCC points

  18. Charge transport network dynamics in molecular aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Nicholas E. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Chen, Lin X. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Science and Engineering Division; Ratner, Mark A. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-07-20

    Due to the nonperiodic nature of charge transport in disordered systems, generating insight into static charge transport networks, as well as analyzing the network dynamics, can be challenging. Here, we apply time-dependent network analysis to scrutinize the charge transport networks of two representative molecular semiconductors: a rigid n-type molecule, perylenediimide, and a flexible p-type molecule, bBDT(TDPP)2. Simulations reveal the relevant timescale for local transfer integral decorrelation to be ~100 fs, which is shown to be faster than that of a crystalline morphology of the same molecule. Using a simple graph metric, global network changes are observed over timescales competitive with charge carrier lifetimes. These insights demonstrate that static charge transport networks are qualitatively inadequate, whereas average networks often overestimate network connectivity. Finally, a simple methodology for tracking dynamic charge transport properties is proposed.

  19. Aberrant intra-salience network dynamic functional connectivity impairs large-scale network interactions in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangpeng; Zhang, Wenwen; Sun, Yujing; Hu, Min; Chen, Antao

    2016-12-01

    Aberrant functional interactions between several large-scale networks, especially the central executive network (CEN), the default mode network (DMN) and the salience network (SN), have been postulated as core pathophysiologic features of schizophrenia; however, the attributing factors of which remain unclear. The study employed resting-state fMRI with 77 participants (42 patients and 35 controls). We performed dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) and functional connectivity (FC) analyses to explore the connectivity patterns of these networks. Furthermore, we performed a structural equation model (SEM) analysis to explore the possible role of the SN in modulating network interactions. The results were as follows: (1) The inter-network connectivity showed decreased connectivity strength and increased time-varying instability in schizophrenia; (2) The SN manifested schizophrenic intra-network dysfunctions in both the FC and DFC patterns; (3) The connectivity properties of the SN were effective in discriminating controls from patients; (4) In patients, the dynamic intra-SN connectivity negatively predicted the inter-network FC, and this effect was mediated by intra-SN connectivity strength. These findings suggest that schizophrenia show systematic deficits in temporal stability of large-scale network connectivity. Furthermore, aberrant network interactions in schizophrenia could be attributed to instable intra-SN connectivity and the dysfunction of the SN may be an intrinsic biomarker of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Controlling edge dynamics in complex networks

    OpenAIRE

    Nepusz, Tamás; Vicsek, Tamás

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of distinct units in physical, social, biological and technological systems naturally gives rise to complex network structures. Networks have constantly been in the focus of research for the last decade, with considerable advances in the description of their structural and dynamical properties. However, much less effort has been devoted to studying the controllability of the dynamics taking place on them. Here we introduce and evaluate a dynamical process defined on the edges ...

  1. Identification of biochemical network modules based on shortest retroactive distances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautham Vivek Sridharan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Modularity analysis offers a route to better understand the organization of cellular biochemical networks as well as to derive practically useful, simplified models of these complex systems. While there is general agreement regarding the qualitative properties of a biochemical module, there is no clear consensus on the quantitative criteria that may be used to systematically derive these modules. In this work, we investigate cyclical interactions as the defining characteristic of a biochemical module. We utilize a round trip distance metric, termed Shortest Retroactive Distance (ShReD, to characterize the retroactive connectivity between any two reactions in a biochemical network and to group together network components that mutually influence each other. We evaluate the metric on two types of networks that feature feedback interactions: (i epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling and (ii liver metabolism supporting drug transformation. For both networks, the ShReD partitions found hierarchically arranged modules that confirm biological intuition. In addition, the partitions also revealed modules that are less intuitive. In particular, ShReD-based partition of the metabolic network identified a 'redox' module that couples reactions of glucose, pyruvate, lipid and drug metabolism through shared production and consumption of NADPH. Our results suggest that retroactive interactions arising from feedback loops and metabolic cycles significantly contribute to the modularity of biochemical networks. For metabolic networks, cofactors play an important role as allosteric effectors that mediate the retroactive interactions.

  2. Irrelevant stimulus processing in ADHD: catecholamine dynamics and attentional networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eAboitiz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A cardinal symptom of Attenion Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a general distractibility where children and adults shift their attentional focus to stimuli that are irrelevant to the ongoing behavior. This has been attributed to a deficit in dopaminergic signaling in cortico-striatal networks that regulate goal-directed behavior. Furthermore, recent imaging evidence points to an impairment of large scale, antagonistic brain networks that normally contribute to attentional engagement and disengagement, such as the task-positive networks and the Default Mode Network (DMN. Related networks are the ventral attentional network (VAN involved in attentional shifting, and the salience network (SN related to task expectancy. Here we discuss the tonic-phasic dynamics of catecholaminergic signaling in the brain, and attempt to provide a link between this and the activities of the large-scale cortical networks that regulate behavior. More specifically, we propose that a disbalance of tonic catecholamine levels during task performance produce an emphasis of phasic signaling and increased excitability of the VAN, yielding distractibility symptoms. Likewise, immaturity of the SN may relate to abnormal tonic signaling and an incapacity to build up a proper executive system during task performance. We discuss different lines of evidence including pharmacology, brain imaging and electrophysiology, that are consistent with our proposal. Finally, restoring the pharmacodynamics of catecholaminergic signaling seems crucial to alleviate ADHD symptoms; however, the possibility is open to explore cognitive rehabilitation strategies to top-down modulate network dynamics compensating the pharmacological deficits.

  3. Irrelevant stimulus processing in ADHD: catecholamine dynamics and attentional networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboitiz, Francisco; Ossandón, Tomás; Zamorano, Francisco; Palma, Bárbara; Carrasco, Ximena

    2014-01-01

    A cardinal symptom of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a general distractibility where children and adults shift their attentional focus to stimuli that are irrelevant to the ongoing behavior. This has been attributed to a deficit in dopaminergic signaling in cortico-striatal networks that regulate goal-directed behavior. Furthermore, recent imaging evidence points to an impairment of large scale, antagonistic brain networks that normally contribute to attentional engagement and disengagement, such as the task-positive networks and the default mode network (DMN). Related networks are the ventral attentional network (VAN) involved in attentional shifting, and the salience network (SN) related to task expectancy. Here we discuss the tonic–phasic dynamics of catecholaminergic signaling in the brain, and attempt to provide a link between this and the activities of the large-scale cortical networks that regulate behavior. More specifically, we propose that a disbalance of tonic catecholamine levels during task performance produces an emphasis of phasic signaling and increased excitability of the VAN, yielding distractibility symptoms. Likewise, immaturity of the SN may relate to abnormal tonic signaling and an incapacity to build up a proper executive system during task performance. We discuss different lines of evidence including pharmacology, brain imaging and electrophysiology, that are consistent with our proposal. Finally, restoring the pharmacodynamics of catecholaminergic signaling seems crucial to alleviate ADHD symptoms; however, the possibility is open to explore cognitive rehabilitation strategies to top-down modulate network dynamics compensating the pharmacological deficits. PMID:24723897

  4. Microtubules Modulate F-actin Dynamics during Neuronal Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Meka, Durga Praveen; Scharrenberg, Robin; König, Theresa; Schwanke, Birgit; Kobler, Oliver; Windhorst, Sabine; Kreutz, Michael R; Mikhaylova, Marina; Calderon de Anda, Froylan

    2017-08-29

    Neuronal polarization is reflected by different dynamics of microtubule and filamentous actin (F-actin). Axonal microtubules are more stable than those in the remaining neurites, while dynamics of F-actin in axonal growth cones clearly exceed those in their dendritic counterparts. However, whether a functional interplay exists between the microtubule network and F-actin dynamics in growing axons and whether this interplay is instrumental for breaking cellular symmetry is currently unknown. Here, we show that an increment on microtubule stability or number of microtubules is associated with increased F-actin dynamics. Moreover, we show that Drebrin E, an F-actin and microtubule plus-end binding protein, mediates this cross talk. Drebrin E segregates preferentially to growth cones with a higher F-actin treadmilling rate, where more microtubule plus-ends are found. Interruption of the interaction of Drebrin E with microtubules decreases F-actin dynamics and arrests neuronal polarization. Collectively the data show that microtubules modulate F-actin dynamics for initial axon extension during neuronal development.

  5. Temporal fidelity in dynamic social networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Pentland, Alex ‘Sandy’

    2015-01-01

    of the network dynamics can be used to inform the process of measuring social networks. The details of measurement are of particular importance when considering dynamic processes where minute-to-minute details are important, because collection of physical proximity interactions with high temporal resolution......It has recently become possible to record detailed social interactions in large social systems with high resolution. As we study these datasets, human social interactions display patterns that emerge at multiple time scales, from minutes to months. On a fundamental level, understanding...... is difficult and expensive. Here, we consider the dynamic network of proximity-interactions between approximately 500 individuals participating in the Copenhagen Networks Study. We show that in order to accurately model spreading processes in the network, the dynamic processes that occur on the order...

  6. Genome-wide system analysis reveals stable yet flexible network dynamics in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, M; Hörnquist, M; Björkegren, J; Tegnér, J

    2009-07-01

    Recently, important insights into static network topology for biological systems have been obtained, but still global dynamical network properties determining stability and system responsiveness have not been accessible for analysis. Herein, we explore a genome-wide gene-to-gene regulatory network based on expression data from the cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisae (budding yeast). We recover static properties like hubs (genes having several out-going connections), network motifs and modules, which have previously been derived from multiple data sources such as whole-genome expression measurements, literature mining, protein-protein and transcription factor binding data. Further, our analysis uncovers some novel dynamical design principles; hubs are both repressed and repressors, and the intra-modular dynamics are either strongly activating or repressing whereas inter-modular couplings are weak. Finally, taking advantage of the inferred strength and direction of all interactions, we perform a global dynamical systems analysis of the network. Our inferred dynamics of hubs, motifs and modules produce a more stable network than what is expected given randomised versions. The main contribution of the repressed hubs is to increase system stability, while higher order dynamic effects (e.g. module dynamics) mainly increase system flexibility. Altogether, the presence of hubs, motifs and modules induce few flexible modes, to which the network is extra sensitive to an external signal. We believe that our approach, and the inferred biological mode of strong flexibility and stability, will also apply to other cellular networks and adaptive systems.

  7. Pinning Synchronization of Switched Complex Dynamical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Du

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Network topology and node dynamics play a key role in forming synchronization of complex networks. Unfortunately there is no effective synchronization criterion for pinning synchronization of complex dynamical networks with switching topology. In this paper, pinning synchronization of complex dynamical networks with switching topology is studied. Two basic problems are considered: one is pinning synchronization of switched complex networks under arbitrary switching; the other is pinning synchronization of switched complex networks by design of switching when synchronization cannot achieved by using any individual connection topology alone. For the two problems, common Lyapunov function method and single Lyapunov function method are used respectively, some global synchronization criteria are proposed and the designed switching law is given. Finally, simulation results verify the validity of the results.

  8. Psychology and social networks: a dynamic network theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaby, James D; Pfaff, Danielle L; Redding, Nicholas

    2014-04-01

    Research on social networks has grown exponentially in recent years. However, despite its relevance, the field of psychology has been relatively slow to explain the underlying goal pursuit and resistance processes influencing social networks in the first place. In this vein, this article aims to demonstrate how a dynamic network theory perspective explains the way in which social networks influence these processes and related outcomes, such as goal achievement, performance, learning, and emotional contagion at the interpersonal level of analysis. The theory integrates goal pursuit, motivation, and conflict conceptualizations from psychology with social network concepts from sociology and organizational science to provide a taxonomy of social network role behaviors, such as goal striving, system supporting, goal preventing, system negating, and observing. This theoretical perspective provides psychologists with new tools to map social networks (e.g., dynamic network charts), which can help inform the development of change interventions. Implications for social, industrial-organizational, and counseling psychology as well as conflict resolution are discussed, and new opportunities for research are highlighted, such as those related to dynamic network intelligence (also known as cognitive accuracy), levels of analysis, methodological/ethical issues, and the need to theoretically broaden the study of social networking and social media behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Quasispecies dynamics with network constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Valmir C; Donangelo, Raul; Souza, Sergio R

    2012-11-07

    A quasispecies is a set of interrelated genotypes that have reached a stationary state while evolving according to the usual Darwinian principles of selection and mutation. Quasispecies studies invariably assume that it is possible for any genotype to mutate into any other, but recent finds indicate that this assumption is not necessarily true. Here we revisit the traditional quasispecies theory by adopting a network structure to constrain the occurrence of mutations. Such structure is governed by a random-graph model, whose single parameter (a probability p) controls both the graph's density and the dynamics of mutation. We contribute two further modifications to the theory, one to account for the fact that different loci in a genotype may be differently susceptible to the occurrence of mutations, the other to allow for a more plausible description of the transition from adaptation to degeneracy of the quasispecies as p is increased. We give analytical and simulation results for the usual case of binary genotypes, assuming the fitness landscape in which a genotype's fitness decays exponentially with its Hamming distance to the wild type. These results support the theory's assertions regarding the adaptation of the quasispecies to the fitness landscape and also its possible demise as a function of p.

  10. Emergent Opinion Dynamics on Endogenous Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gulyás, L; Dugundji, Elenna R.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years networks have gained unprecedented attention in studying a broad range of topics, among them in complex systems research. In particular, multi-agent systems have seen an increased recognition of the importance of the interaction topology. It is now widely recognized that emergent phenomena can be highly sensitive to the structure of the interaction network connecting the system's components, and there is a growing body of abstract network classes, whose contributions to emergent dynamics are well-understood. However, much less understanding have yet been gained about the effects of network dynamics, especially in cases when the emergent phenomena feeds back to and changes the underlying network topology. Our work starts with the application of the network approach to discrete choice analysis, a standard method in econometric estimation, where the classic approach is grounded in individual choice and lacks social network influences. In this paper, we extend our earlier results by considering th...

  11. Global Synchronization of General Delayed Dynamical Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi

    2007-01-01

    Global synchronization of general delayed dynamical networks with linear coupling are investigated. A sufficient condition for the global synchronization is obtained by using the linear matrix inequality and introducing a reference state. This condition is simply given based on the maximum nonzero eigenvalue of the network coupling matrix. Moreover, we show how to construct the coupling matrix to guarantee global synchronization of network,which is very convenient to use. A two-dimension system with delay as a dynamical node in network with global coupling is finally presented to verify the theoretical results of the proposed global synchronization scheme.

  12. A mathematical programming approach for sequential clustering of dynamic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jonathan C.; Bennett, Laura; Papageorgiou, Lazaros G.; Tsoka, Sophia

    2016-02-01

    A common analysis performed on dynamic networks is community structure detection, a challenging problem that aims to track the temporal evolution of network modules. An emerging area in this field is evolutionary clustering, where the community structure of a network snapshot is identified by taking into account both its current state as well as previous time points. Based on this concept, we have developed a mixed integer non-linear programming (MINLP) model, SeqMod, that sequentially clusters each snapshot of a dynamic network. The modularity metric is used to determine the quality of community structure of the current snapshot and the historical cost is accounted for by optimising the number of node pairs co-clustered at the previous time point that remain so in the current snapshot partition. Our method is tested on social networks of interactions among high school students, college students and members of the Brazilian Congress. We show that, for an adequate parameter setting, our algorithm detects the classes that these students belong more accurately than partitioning each time step individually or by partitioning the aggregated snapshots. Our method also detects drastic discontinuities in interaction patterns across network snapshots. Finally, we present comparative results with similar community detection methods for time-dependent networks from the literature. Overall, we illustrate the applicability of mathematical programming as a flexible, adaptable and systematic approach for these community detection problems. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Temporal Network Theory and Applications", edited by Petter Holme.

  13. Symmetry in Critical Random Boolean Networks Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassler, Kevin E.; Hossein, Shabnam

    2014-03-01

    Using Boolean networks as prototypical examples, the role of symmetry in the dynamics of heterogeneous complex systems is explored. We show that symmetry of the dynamics, especially in critical states, is a controlling feature that can be used to both greatly simplify analysis and to characterize different types of dynamics. Symmetry in Boolean networks is found by determining the frequency at which the various Boolean output functions occur. Classes of functions occur at the same frequency. These classes are orbits of the controlling symmetry group. We find the nature of the symmetry that controls the dynamics of critical random Boolean networks by determining the frequency of output functions utilized by nodes that remain active on dynamical attractors. This symmetry preserves canalization, a form of network robustness. We compare it to a different symmetry known to control the dynamics of an evolutionary process that allows Boolean networks to organize into a critical state. Our results demonstrate the usefulness and power of using symmetry to characterize complex network dynamics, and introduce a novel approach to the analysis of heterogeneous complex systems. This work was supported by the NSF through grants DMR-0908286 and DMR-1206839, and by the AFSOR and DARPA through grant FA9550-12-1-0405.

  14. Complex networks repair strategies: Dynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chaoqi; Wang, Ying; Gao, Yangjun; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2017-09-01

    Network repair strategies are tactical methods that restore the efficiency of damaged networks; however, unreasonable repair strategies not only waste resources, they are also ineffective for network recovery. Most extant research on network repair focuses on static networks, but results and findings on static networks cannot be applied to evolutionary dynamic networks because, in dynamic models, complex network repair has completely different characteristics. For instance, repaired nodes face more severe challenges, and require strategic repair methods in order to have a significant effect. In this study, we propose the Shell Repair Strategy (SRS) to minimize the risk of secondary node failures due to the cascading effect. Our proposed method includes the identification of a set of vital nodes that have a significant impact on network repair and defense. Our identification of these vital nodes reduces the number of switching nodes that face the risk of secondary failures during the dynamic repair process. This is positively correlated with the size of the average degree and enhances network invulnerability.

  15. Network games theory, models, and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ozdaglar, Asu

    2011-01-01

    Traditional network optimization focuses on a single control objective in a network populated by obedient users and limited dispersion of information. However, most of today's networks are large-scale with lack of access to centralized information, consist of users with diverse requirements, and are subject to dynamic changes. These factors naturally motivate a new distributed control paradigm, where the network infrastructure is kept simple and the network control functions are delegated to individual agents which make their decisions independently (""selfishly""). The interaction of multiple

  16. Dynamics of comb-of-comb networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxiao; Lin, Yuan; Dolgushev, Maxim; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of complex networks, a current hot topic in many scientific fields, is often coded through the corresponding Laplacian matrix. The spectrum of this matrix carries the main features of the networks' dynamics. Here we consider the deterministic networks which can be viewed as "comb-of-comb" iterative structures. For their Laplacian spectra we find analytical equations involving Chebyshev polynomials whose properties allow one to analyze the spectra in deep. Here, in particular, we find that in the infinite size limit the corresponding spectral dimension goes as ds→2 . The ds leaves its fingerprint on many dynamical processes, as we exemplarily show by considering the dynamical properties of polymer networks, including single monomer displacement under a constant force, mechanical relaxation, and fluorescence depolarization.

  17. Identifying Community Structures in Dynamic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Alvari, Hamidreza; Sukthankar, Gita; Lakkaraju, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Most real-world social networks are inherently dynamic, composed of communities that are constantly changing in membership. To track these evolving communities, we need dynamic community detection techniques. This article evaluates the performance of a set of game theoretic approaches for identifying communities in dynamic networks. Our method, D-GT (Dynamic Game Theoretic community detection), models each network node as a rational agent who periodically plays a community membership game with its neighbors. During game play, nodes seek to maximize their local utility by joining or leaving the communities of network neighbors. The community structure emerges after the game reaches a Nash equilibrium. Compared to the benchmark community detection methods, D-GT more accurately predicts the number of communities and finds community assignments with a higher normalized mutual information, while retaining a good modularity.

  18. Boolean networks with reliable dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Peixoto, Tiago P

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the properties of Boolean networks that follow a given reliable trajectory in state space. A reliable trajectory is defined as a sequence of states which is independent of the order in which the nodes are updated. We explored numerically the topology, the update functions, and the state space structure of these networks, which we constructed using a minimum number of links and the simplest update functions. We found that the clustering coefficient is larger than in random networks, and that the probability distribution of three-node motifs is similar to that found in gene regulation networks. Among the update functions, only a subset of all possible functions occur, and they can be classified according to their probability. More homogeneous functions occur more often, leading to a dominance of canalyzing functions. Finally, we studied the entire state space of the networks. We observed that with increasing systems size, fixed points become more dominant, moving the networks close to the frozen...

  19. Diffusion Dynamics with Changing Network Composition

    CERN Document Server

    Baños, Raquel A; Wang, Ning; Moreno, Yamir; González-Bailón, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    We analyze information diffusion using empirical data that tracks online communication around two instances of mass political mobilization, including the year that lapsed in-between the protests. We compare the global properties of the topological and dynamic networks through which communication took place as well as local changes in network composition. We show that changes in network structure underlie aggregated differences on how information diffused: an increase in network hierarchy is accompanied by a reduction in the average size of cascades. The increasing hierarchy affects not only the underlying communication topology but also the more dynamic structure of information exchange; the increase is especially noticeable amongst certain categories of nodes (or users). This suggests that the relationship between the structure of networks and their function in diffusing information is not as straightforward as some theoretical models of diffusion in networks imply.

  20. Dynamical Adaptation in Terrorist Cells/Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Ahmed, Zaki

    2010-01-01

    Typical terrorist cells/networks have dynamical structure as they evolve or adapt to changes which may occur due to capturing or killing of a member of the cell/network. Analytical measures in graph theory like degree centrality, betweenness and closeness centralities are very common and have long...

  1. Collective dynamics of active cytoskeletal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, Simone; Bausch, Andreas R

    2011-01-01

    Self organization mechanisms are essential for the cytoskeleton to adapt to the requirements of living cells. They rely on the intricate interplay of cytoskeletal filaments, crosslinking proteins and molecular motors. Here we present an in vitro minimal model system consisting of actin filaments, fascin and myosin-II filaments exhibiting pulsative collective long range dynamics. The reorganizations in the highly dynamic steady state of the active gel are characterized by alternating periods of runs and stalls resulting in a superdiffusive dynamics of the network's constituents. They are dominated by the complex competition of crosslinking molecules and motor filaments in the network: Collective dynamics are only observed if the relative strength of the binding of myosin-II filaments to the actin network allows exerting high enough forces to unbind actin/fascin crosslinks. The feedback between structure formation and dynamics can be resolved by combining these experiments with phenomenological simulations base...

  2. Symmetry in critical random Boolean network dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein, Shabnam; Reichl, Matthew D.; Bassler, Kevin E.

    2014-04-01

    Using Boolean networks as prototypical examples, the role of symmetry in the dynamics of heterogeneous complex systems is explored. We show that symmetry of the dynamics, especially in critical states, is a controlling feature that can be used both to greatly simplify analysis and to characterize different types of dynamics. Symmetry in Boolean networks is found by determining the frequency at which the various Boolean output functions occur. There are classes of functions that consist of Boolean functions that behave similarly. These classes are orbits of the controlling symmetry group. We find that the symmetry that controls the critical random Boolean networks is expressed through the frequency by which output functions are utilized by nodes that remain active on dynamical attractors. This symmetry preserves canalization, a form of network robustness. We compare it to a different symmetry known to control the dynamics of an evolutionary process that allows Boolean networks to organize into a critical state. Our results demonstrate the usefulness and power of using the symmetry of the behavior of the nodes to characterize complex network dynamics, and introduce an alternative approach to the analysis of heterogeneous complex systems.

  3. Symmetry in critical random Boolean network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein, Shabnam; Reichl, Matthew D; Bassler, Kevin E

    2014-04-01

    Using Boolean networks as prototypical examples, the role of symmetry in the dynamics of heterogeneous complex systems is explored. We show that symmetry of the dynamics, especially in critical states, is a controlling feature that can be used both to greatly simplify analysis and to characterize different types of dynamics. Symmetry in Boolean networks is found by determining the frequency at which the various Boolean output functions occur. There are classes of functions that consist of Boolean functions that behave similarly. These classes are orbits of the controlling symmetry group. We find that the symmetry that controls the critical random Boolean networks is expressed through the frequency by which output functions are utilized by nodes that remain active on dynamical attractors. This symmetry preserves canalization, a form of network robustness. We compare it to a different symmetry known to control the dynamics of an evolutionary process that allows Boolean networks to organize into a critical state. Our results demonstrate the usefulness and power of using the symmetry of the behavior of the nodes to characterize complex network dynamics, and introduce an alternative approach to the analysis of heterogeneous complex systems.

  4. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  5. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny P Bartsch

    Full Text Available We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS, we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  6. Local Checkability in Dynamic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Förster, Klaus-Tycho; Richter, Oliver; Seidel, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    In this work we study local checkability of network properties considering inconsistency throughout the verification process. We use disappearing and appearing edges to model inconsistency and prover-verifier-pairs (PVPs) for verification. We say that a network property N is locally checkable und...

  7. Attentional load modulates large-scale functional brain connectivity beyond the core attention networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnæs, Dag; Kaufmann, Tobias; Richard, Geneviève; Duff, Eugene P; Sneve, Markus H; Endestad, Tor; Nordvik, Jan Egil; Andreassen, Ole A; Smith, Stephen M; Westlye, Lars T

    2015-04-01

    In line with the notion of a continuously active and dynamic brain, functional networks identified during rest correspond with those revealed by task-fMRI. Characterizing the dynamic cross-talk between these network nodes is key to understanding the successful implementation of effortful cognitive processing in healthy individuals and its breakdown in a variety of conditions involving aberrant brain biology and cognitive dysfunction. We employed advanced network modeling on fMRI data collected during a task involving sustained attentive tracking of objects at two load levels and during rest. Using multivariate techniques, we demonstrate that attentional load levels can be significantly discriminated, and from a resting-state condition, the accuracy approaches 100%, by means of estimates of between-node functional connectivity. Several network edges were modulated during task engagement: The dorsal attention network increased connectivity with a visual node, while decreasing connectivity with motor and sensory nodes. Also, we observed a decoupling between left and right hemisphere dorsal visual streams. These results support the notion of dynamic network reconfigurations based on attentional effort. No simple correspondence between node signal amplitude change and node connectivity modulations was found, thus network modeling provides novel information beyond what is revealed by conventional task-fMRI analysis. The current decoding of attentional states confirms that edge connectivity contains highly predictive information about the mental state of the individual, and the approach shows promise for the utilization in clinical contexts.

  8. Effect of signal modulating noise in bistable stochastic dynamical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖方红; 闫桂荣; 张新武

    2003-01-01

    The effect of signal modulating noise in bistable stochastic dynamical systems is studied.The concept of instan taneous steady state is proposed for bistable dynamical systems.By making a dynamical analysis of bistable stochastic systems,we find that global and local effect of signal modulating noise as well as stochastic resonance can occur in bistable dynamical systems on which both a weak sinusoidal signal and noise are forced.The effect is demonstrated by numerical simulation.

  9. A method for identifying hierarchical sub-networks / modules and weighting network links based on their similarity in sub-network / module affiliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Some networks, including biological networks, consist of hierarchical sub-networks / modules. Based on my previous study, in present study a method for both identifying hierarchical sub-networks / modules and weighting network links is proposed. It is based on the cluster analysis in which between-node similarity in sets of adjacency nodes is used. Two matrices, linkWeightMat and linkClusterIDs, are achieved by using the algorithm. Two links with both the same weight in linkWeightMat and the same cluster ID in linkClusterIDs belong to the same sub-network / module. Two links with the same weight in linkWeightMat but different cluster IDs in linkClusterIDs belong to two sub-networks / modules at the same hirarchical level. However, a link with an unique cluster ID in linkClusterIDs does not belong to any sub-networks / modules. A sub-network / module of the greater weight is the more connected sub-network / modules. Matlab codes of the algorithm are presented.

  10. Metric projection for dynamic multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jurman, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Evolving multiplex networks are a powerful model for representing the dynamics along time of different phenomena, such as social networks, power grids, biological pathways. However, exploring the structure of the multiplex network time series is still an open problem. Here we propose a two-steps strategy to tackle this problem based on the concept of distance (metric) between networks. Given a multiplex graph, first a network of networks is built for each time steps, and then a real valued time series is obtained by the sequence of (simple) networks by evaluating the distance from the first element of the series. The effectiveness of this approach in detecting the occurring changes along the original time series is shown on a synthetic example first, and then on the Gulf dataset of political events.

  11. Dynamic bandwidth allocation in GPON networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozimkiewiez, J.; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Dittmann, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Two Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation algorithms used for coordination of the available bandwidth between end users in a GPON network have been simulated using OPNET to determine and compare the performance, scalability and efficiency of status reporting and non status reporting dynamic bandwidth allo...

  12. Traffic dynamics on dynamical networks: The connection between network lifetime and traffic congestion

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xianxia; Yan, Meichen; Sharafat, Rajput Ramiz; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    For many power-limited networks, such as wireless sensor networks and mobile ad hoc networks, maximizing the network lifetime is the first concern in the related designing and maintaining activities. We study the network lifetime from the perspective of network science. In our dynamic network, nodes are assigned a fixed amount of energy initially and consume the energy in the delivery of packets. We divided the network traffic flow into four states: no, slow, fast, and absolute congestion states. We derive the network lifetime by considering the state of the traffic flow. We find that the network lifetime is generally opposite to traffic congestion in that the more congested traffic, the less network lifetime. We also find the impacts of factors such as packet generation rate, communication radius, node moving speed, etc., on network lifetime and traffic congestion.

  13. Dynamic GABAergic afferent modulation of AgRP neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Alastair S; Shah, Bhavik P; Burgess, Christian R; Li, Monica M; Li, Chia; Steger, Jennifer S; Madara, Joseph C; Campbell, John N; Kroeger, Daniel; Scammell, Thomas E; Tannous, Bakhos A; Myers, Martin G; Andermann, Mark L; Krashes, Michael J; Lowell, Bradford B

    2017-01-01

    Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) promote homeostatic feeding at times of caloric insufficiency, yet they are rapidly suppressed by food-related sensory cues prior to ingestion. Here we identify a highly selective inhibitory afferent to AgRP neurons that serves as a neural determinant of this rapid modulation. Specifically, GABAergic projections arising from the ventral compartment of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (vDMH) contribute to the pre-consummatory modulation of ARCAgRP neurons. In a manner reciprocal to ARCAgRP neurons, ARC-projecting leptin receptor (LepR)-expressing GABAergic DMH neurons exhibit rapid activation upon availability of food that additionally reflects the relative value of the food. Thus, DMHLepR neurons form part of the sensory network that relays real-time information about the nature and availability of food to dynamically modulate ARCAgRP neuron activity and feeding behavior. PMID:27643429

  14. Identification of melanoma biomarkers based on network modules by integrating the human signaling network with microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyun Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melanoma is a leading cause of cancer death. Thus, accurate prognostic biomarkers that will assist rational treatment planning need to be identified. Methods: Microarray analysis of melanoma and normal tissue samples was performed to identify differentially expressed modules (DEMs from the signaling network and ultimately detect molecular markers to support histological examination. Network motifs were extracted from the human signaling network. Then, significant expression-correlation differential modules were identified by comparing the network module expression-correlation differential scores under normal and disease conditions using the gene expression datasets. Finally, we obtained DEMs by the Wilcoxon rank test and considered the average gene expression level in these modules as the classification features for diagnosing melanoma. Results: In total, 99 functional DEMs were identified from the signaling network and gene expression profiles. The area under the curve scores for cancer module genes, melanoma module genes, and whole network modules are 92.4%, 90.44%, and 88.45%, respectively. The classification efficiency rates for nonmodule features are 71.04% and 79.38%, which correspond to the features of cancer genes and melanoma cancer genes, respectively. Finally, we acquired six significant molecular biomarkers, namely, module 10 (CALM3, Ca 2+ , PKC, PDGFRA, phospholipase-g, PIB5PA, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, module 14 (SRC, Src homology 2 domain-containing [SHC], SAM68, GIT1, transcription factor-4, CBLB, GRB2, VAV2, LCK, YES, PTCH2, downstream of tyrosine kinase [DOK], and KIT, module 16 (ELK3, p85beta, SHC, ZFYVE9, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, CITED1, SH3KBP1, HCK, DOK, and KIT, module 45 (RB, CCND3, CCNA2, CDK4, and CDK6, module 75 (PCNA, CDK4, and CCND1, and module 114 (PSD93, NMDAR, and FYN. Conclusion: We explored the gene expression profile and signaling network in a global view and identified DEMs that can be used as

  15. Identification of unstable network modules reveals disease modules associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Kikuchi

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, the most common cause of dementia, is associated with aging, and it leads to neuron death. Deposits of amyloid β and aberrantly phosphorylated tau protein are known as pathological hallmarks of AD, but the underlying mechanisms have not yet been revealed. A high-throughput gene expression analysis previously showed that differentially expressed genes accompanying the progression of AD were more down-regulated than up-regulated in the later stages of AD. This suggested that the molecular networks and their constituent modules collapsed along with AD progression. In this study, by using gene expression profiles and protein interaction networks (PINs, we identified the PINs expressed in three brain regions: the entorhinal cortex (EC, hippocampus (HIP and superior frontal gyrus (SFG. Dividing the expressed PINs into modules, we examined the stability of the modules with AD progression and with normal aging. We found that in the AD modules, the constituent proteins, interactions and cellular functions were not maintained between consecutive stages through all brain regions. Interestingly, the modules were collapsed with AD progression, specifically in the EC region. By identifying the modules that were affected by AD pathology, we found the transcriptional regulation-associated modules that interact with the proteasome-associated module via UCHL5 hub protein, which is a deubiquitinating enzyme. Considering PINs as a system made of network modules, we found that the modules relevant to the transcriptional regulation are disrupted in the EC region, which affects the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  16. A developmental transcriptional network for maize defines coexpression modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Gregory S; Bi, Yong-Mei; Colasanti, Joseph; Wu, Wenqing; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Tong; Rothstein, Steven J; Lukens, Lewis N

    2013-04-01

    Here, we present a genome-wide overview of transcriptional circuits in the agriculturally significant crop species maize (Zea mays). We examined transcript abundance data at 50 developmental stages, from embryogenesis to senescence, for 34,876 gene models and classified genes into 24 robust coexpression modules. Modules were strongly associated with tissue types and related biological processes. Sixteen of the 24 modules (67%) have preferential transcript abundance within specific tissues. One-third of modules had an absence of gene expression in specific tissues. Genes within a number of modules also correlated with the developmental age of tissues. Coexpression of genes is likely due to transcriptional control. For a number of modules, key genes involved in transcriptional control have expression profiles that mimic the expression profiles of module genes, although the expression of transcriptional control genes is not unusually representative of module gene expression. Known regulatory motifs are enriched in several modules. Finally, of the 13 network modules with more than 200 genes, three contain genes that are notably clustered (P < 0.05) within the genome. This work, based on a carefully selected set of major tissues representing diverse stages of maize development, demonstrates the remarkable power of transcript-level coexpression networks to identify underlying biological processes and their molecular components.

  17. Markovian dynamics on complex reaction networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutsias, J., E-mail: goutsias@jhu.edu; Jenkinson, G., E-mail: jenkinson@jhu.edu

    2013-08-10

    Complex networks, comprised of individual elements that interact with each other through reaction channels, are ubiquitous across many scientific and engineering disciplines. Examples include biochemical, pharmacokinetic, epidemiological, ecological, social, neural, and multi-agent networks. A common approach to modeling such networks is by a master equation that governs the dynamic evolution of the joint probability mass function of the underlying population process and naturally leads to Markovian dynamics for such process. Due however to the nonlinear nature of most reactions and the large size of the underlying state-spaces, computation and analysis of the resulting stochastic population dynamics is a difficult task. This review article provides a coherent and comprehensive coverage of recently developed approaches and methods to tackle this problem. After reviewing a general framework for modeling Markovian reaction networks and giving specific examples, the authors present numerical and computational techniques capable of evaluating or approximating the solution of the master equation, discuss a recently developed approach for studying the stationary behavior of Markovian reaction networks using a potential energy landscape perspective, and provide an introduction to the emerging theory of thermodynamic analysis of such networks. Three representative problems of opinion formation, transcription regulation, and neural network dynamics are used as illustrative examples.

  18. Markovian Dynamics on Complex Reaction Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Goutsias, John

    2012-01-01

    Complex networks, comprised of individual elements that interact with each other through reaction channels, are ubiquitous across many scientific and engineering disciplines. Examples include biochemical, pharmacokinetic, epidemiological, ecological, social, neural, and multi-agent networks. A common approach to modeling such networks is by a master equation that governs the dynamic evolution of the joint probability mass function of the underling population process and naturally leads to Markovian dynamics for such process. Due however to the nonlinear nature of most reactions, the computation and analysis of the resulting stochastic population dynamics is a difficult task. This review article provides a coherent and comprehensive coverage of recently developed approaches and methods to tackle this problem. After reviewing a general framework for modeling Markovian reaction networks and giving specific examples, the authors present numerical and computational techniques capable of evaluating or approximating...

  19. Using relaxational dynamics to reduce network congestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontti, Ana L. Pastore y.; La Rocca, Cristian E.; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Braunstein, Lidia A.; Macri, Pablo A.; López, Eduardo

    2008-09-01

    We study the effects of relaxational dynamics on congestion pressure in scale-free (SF) networks by analyzing the properties of the corresponding gradient networks (Toroczkai and Bassler 2004 Nature 428 716). Using the Family model (Family and Bassler 1986 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 19 L441) from surface-growth physics as single-step load-balancing dynamics, we show that the congestion pressure considerably drops on SF networks when compared with the same dynamics on random graphs. This is due to a structural transition of the corresponding gradient network clusters, which self-organize so as to reduce the congestion pressure. This reduction is enhanced when lowering the value of the connectivity exponent λ towards 2.

  20. Cognitive radio networks dynamic resource allocation schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shaowei

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief presents a survey of dynamic resource allocation schemes in Cognitive Radio (CR) Systems, focusing on the spectral-efficiency and energy-efficiency in wireless networks. It also introduces a variety of dynamic resource allocation schemes for CR networks and provides a concise introduction of the landscape of CR technology. The author covers in detail the dynamic resource allocation problem for the motivations and challenges in CR systems. The Spectral- and Energy-Efficient resource allocation schemes are comprehensively investigated, including new insights into the trade-off

  1. Evolution of cooperation on stochastic dynamical networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    Full Text Available Cooperative behavior that increases the fitness of others at a cost to oneself can be promoted by natural selection only in the presence of an additional mechanism. One such mechanism is based on population structure, which can lead to clustering of cooperating agents. Recently, the focus has turned to complex dynamical population structures such as social networks, where the nodes represent individuals and links represent social relationships. We investigate how the dynamics of a social network can change the level of cooperation in the network. Individuals either update their strategies by imitating their partners or adjust their social ties. For the dynamics of the network structure, a random link is selected and breaks with a probability determined by the adjacent individuals. Once it is broken, a new one is established. This linking dynamics can be conveniently characterized by a Markov chain in the configuration space of an ever-changing network of interacting agents. Our model can be analytically solved provided the dynamics of links proceeds much faster than the dynamics of strategies. This leads to a simple rule for the evolution of cooperation: The more fragile links between cooperating players and non-cooperating players are (or the more robust links between cooperators are, the more likely cooperation prevails. Our approach may pave the way for analytically investigating coevolution of strategy and structure.

  2. Complexity, dynamic cellular network, and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, P

    1997-01-01

    A holistic approach to tumorigenesis is proposed. The main element of the model is the existence of dynamic cellular network. This network comprises a molecular and an energetistic structure of a cell connected through the multidirectional flow of information. The interactions within dynamic cellular network are complex, stochastic, nonlinear, and also involve quantum effects. From this non-reductionist perspective, neither tumorigenesis can be limited to the genetic aspect, nor the initial event must be of molecular nature, nor mutations and epigenetic factors are mutually exclusive, nor a link between cause and effect can be established. Due to complexity, an unstable stationary state of dynamic cellular network rather than a group of unrelated genes determines the phenotype of normal and transformed cells. This implies relativity of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. A bifurcation point is defined as an unstable state of dynamic cellular network leading to the other phenotype-stationary state. In particular, the bifurcation point may be determined by a change of expression of a single gene. Then, the gene is called bifurcation point gene. The unstable stationary state facilitates the chaotic dynamics. This may result in a fractal dimension of both normal and tumor tissues. The co-existence of chaotic dynamics and complexity is the essence of cellular processes and shapes differentiation, morphogenesis, and tumorigenesis. In consequence, tumorigenesis is a complex, unpredictable process driven by the interplay between self-organisation and selection.

  3. Competing dynamic phases of active polymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Simon; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R.

    Recent experiments on in-vitro reconstituted assemblies of F-actin, myosin-II motors, and cross-linking proteins show that tuning local network properties can changes the fundamental biomechanical behavior of the system. For example, by varying cross-linker density and actin bundle rigidity, one can switch between contractile networks useful for reshaping cells, polarity sorted networks ideal for directed molecular transport, and frustrated networks with robust structural properties. To efficiently investigate the dynamic phases of actomyosin networks, we developed a coarse grained non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of model semiflexible filaments, molecular motors, and cross-linkers with phenomenologically defined interactions. The simulation's accuracy was verified by benchmarking the mechanical properties of its individual components and collective behavior against experimental results at the molecular and network scales. By adjusting the model's parameters, we can reproduce the qualitative phases observed in experiment and predict the protein characteristics where phase crossovers could occur in collective network dynamics. Our model provides a framework for understanding cells' multiple uses of actomyosin networks and their applicability in materials research. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  4. Dynamics of deceptive interactions in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Barrio, Rafael A; Dunbar, Robin; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Kaski, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we examine the role of lies in human social relations by implementing some salient characteristics of deceptive interactions into an opinion formation model, so as to describe the dynamical behaviour of a social network more realistically. In this model we take into account such basic properties of social networks as the dynamics of the intensity of interactions, the influence of public opinion, and the fact that in every human interaction it might be convenient to deceive or withhold information depending on the instantaneous situation of each individual in the network. We find that lies shape the topology of social networks, especially the formation of tightly linked, small communities with loose connections between them. We also find that agents with a larger proportion of deceptive interactions are the ones that connect communities of different opinion, and in this sense they have substantial centrality in the network. We then discuss the consequences of these results for the social behaviou...

  5. Control theory of digitally networked dynamic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lunze, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The book gives an introduction to networked control systems and describes new modeling paradigms, analysis methods for event-driven, digitally networked systems, and design methods for distributed estimation and control. Networked model predictive control is developed as a means to tolerate time delays and packet loss brought about by the communication network. In event-based control the traditional periodic sampling is replaced by state-dependent triggering schemes. Novel methods for multi-agent systems ensure complete or clustered synchrony of agents with identical or with individual dynamic

  6. Dynamical networks reconstructed from time series

    CERN Document Server

    Levnajić, Zoran

    2012-01-01

    Novel method of reconstructing dynamical networks from empirically measured time series is proposed. By statistically examining the correlations between motions displayed by network nodes, we derive a simple equation that directly yields the adjacency matrix, assuming the intra-network interaction functions to be known. We illustrate the method's implementation on a simple example and discuss the dependence of the reconstruction precision on the properties of time series. Our method is applicable to any network, allowing for reconstruction precision to be maximized, and errors to be estimated.

  7. Synchronization of fractional order complex dynamical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Tianzeng

    2015-06-01

    In this letter the synchronization of complex dynamical networks with fractional order chaotic nodes is studied. A fractional order controller for synchronization of complex network is presented. Some new sufficient synchronization criteria are proposed based on the Lyapunov stability theory and the LaSalle invariance principle. These synchronization criteria can apply to an arbitrary fractional order complex network in which the coupling-configuration matrix and the inner-coupling matrix are not assumed to be symmetric or irreducible. It means that this method is more general and effective. Numerical simulations of two fractional order complex networks demonstrate the universality and the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Protein interaction networks--more than mere modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Pinkert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely believed that the modular organization of cellular function is reflected in a modular structure of molecular networks. A common view is that a "module" in a network is a cohesively linked group of nodes, densely connected internally and sparsely interacting with the rest of the network. Many algorithms try to identify functional modules in protein-interaction networks (PIN by searching for such cohesive groups of proteins. Here, we present an alternative approach independent of any prior definition of what actually constitutes a "module". In a self-consistent manner, proteins are grouped into "functional roles" if they interact in similar ways with other proteins according to their functional roles. Such grouping may well result in cohesive modules again, but only if the network structure actually supports this. We applied our method to the PIN from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD and found that a representation of the network in terms of cohesive modules, at least on a global scale, does not optimally represent the network's structure because it focuses on finding independent groups of proteins. In contrast, a decomposition into functional roles is able to depict the structure much better as it also takes into account the interdependencies between roles and even allows groupings based on the absence of interactions between proteins in the same functional role. This, for example, is the case for transmembrane proteins, which could never be recognized as a cohesive group of nodes in a PIN. When mapping experimental methods onto the groups, we identified profound differences in the coverage suggesting that our method is able to capture experimental bias in the data, too. For example yeast-two-hybrid data were highly overrepresented in one particular group. Thus, there is more structure in protein-interaction networks than cohesive modules alone and we believe this finding can significantly improve automated function

  9. Network modules help the identification of key transport routes, signaling pathways in cellular and other networks

    CERN Document Server

    Palotai, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Complex systems are successfully reduced to interacting elements via the network concept. Transport plays a key role in the survival of networks. For example the specialized signaling cascades of cellular networks filter noise and efficiently adapt the network structure to new stimuli. However, our general understanding of transport mechanisms and signaling pathways in complex systems is yet limited. Here we summarize the key network structures involved in transport, list the solutions available to overloaded systems for relaxing their load and outline a possible method for the computational determination of signaling pathways. We highlight that in addition to hubs, bridges and the network skeleton, the overlapping modular structure is also essential in network transport. Moreover, by locating network elements in the space of overlapping network modules and evaluating their distance in this "module space", it may be possible to approximate signaling pathways computationally, which, in turn could serve the ide...

  10. New simple feed network for an array module of four microstrip elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhart, M. L.; Lo, Y. T.; Lee, R. Q. H.

    1987-01-01

    A simple microstripline feed network for an array module comprising four microstrip elements is described. The advantages and disadvantages of the network are discussed as well as a theoretical explanation for the radiation characteristics of array modules using the network.

  11. Evolutionary dynamics of prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan Babu, M; Teichmann, Sarah A; Aravind, L

    2006-04-28

    The structure of complex transcriptional regulatory networks has been studied extensively in certain model organisms. However, the evolutionary dynamics of these networks across organisms, which would reveal important principles of adaptive regulatory changes, are poorly understood. We use the known transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli to analyse the conservation patterns of this network across 175 prokaryotic genomes, and predict components of the regulatory networks for these organisms. We observe that transcription factors are typically less conserved than their target genes and evolve independently of them, with different organisms evolving distinct repertoires of transcription factors responding to specific signals. We show that prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks have evolved principally through widespread tinkering of transcriptional interactions at the local level by embedding orthologous genes in different types of regulatory motifs. Different transcription factors have emerged independently as dominant regulatory hubs in various organisms, suggesting that they have convergently acquired similar network structures approximating a scale-free topology. We note that organisms with similar lifestyles across a wide phylogenetic range tend to conserve equivalent interactions and network motifs. Thus, organism-specific optimal network designs appear to have evolved due to selection for specific transcription factors and transcriptional interactions, allowing responses to prevalent environmental stimuli. The methods for biological network analysis introduced here can be applied generally to study other networks, and these predictions can be used to guide specific experiments.

  12. Phase resetting reveals network dynamics underlying a bacterial cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihan Lin

    Full Text Available Genomic and proteomic methods yield networks of biological regulatory interactions but do not provide direct insight into how those interactions are organized into functional modules, or how information flows from one module to another. In this work we introduce an approach that provides this complementary information and apply it to the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, a paradigm for cell-cycle control. Operationally, we use an inducible promoter to express the essential transcriptional regulatory gene ctrA in a periodic, pulsed fashion. This chemical perturbation causes the population of cells to divide synchronously, and we use the resulting advance or delay of the division times of single cells to construct a phase resetting curve. We find that delay is strongly favored over advance. This finding is surprising since it does not follow from the temporal expression profile of CtrA and, in turn, simulations of existing network models. We propose a phenomenological model that suggests that the cell-cycle network comprises two distinct functional modules that oscillate autonomously and couple in a highly asymmetric fashion. These features collectively provide a new mechanism for tight temporal control of the cell cycle in C. crescentus. We discuss how the procedure can serve as the basis for a general approach for probing network dynamics, which we term chemical perturbation spectroscopy (CPS.

  13. Resolution enhancement in neural networks with dynamical synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Alan Fung

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, information is represented by spike rates in the neural system. Here, we consider the ability of temporally modulated activities in neuronal networks to carry information extra to spike rates. These temporal modulations, commonly known as population spikes, are due to the presence of synaptic depression in a neuronal network model. We discuss its relevance to an experiment on transparent motions in macaque monkeys by Treue et al. in 2000. They found that if the moving directions of objects are too close, the firing rate profile will be very similar to that with one direction. As the difference in the moving directions of objects is large enough, the neuronal system would respond in such a way that the network enhances the resolution in the moving directions of the objects. In this paper, we propose that this behavior can be reproduced by neural networks with dynamical synapses when there are multiple external inputs. We will demonstrate how resolution enhancement can be achieved, and discuss the conditions under which temporally modulated activities are able to enhance information processing performances in general.

  14. Dynamic simulation of regulatory networks using SQUAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenarios Ioannis

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ambition of most molecular biologists is the understanding of the intricate network of molecular interactions that control biological systems. As scientists uncover the components and the connectivity of these networks, it becomes possible to study their dynamical behavior as a whole and discover what is the specific role of each of their components. Since the behavior of a network is by no means intuitive, it becomes necessary to use computational models to understand its behavior and to be able to make predictions about it. Unfortunately, most current computational models describe small networks due to the scarcity of kinetic data available. To overcome this problem, we previously published a methodology to convert a signaling network into a dynamical system, even in the total absence of kinetic information. In this paper we present a software implementation of such methodology. Results We developed SQUAD, a software for the dynamic simulation of signaling networks using the standardized qualitative dynamical systems approach. SQUAD converts the network into a discrete dynamical system, and it uses a binary decision diagram algorithm to identify all the steady states of the system. Then, the software creates a continuous dynamical system and localizes its steady states which are located near the steady states of the discrete system. The software permits to make simulations on the continuous system, allowing for the modification of several parameters. Importantly, SQUAD includes a framework for perturbing networks in a manner similar to what is performed in experimental laboratory protocols, for example by activating receptors or knocking out molecular components. Using this software we have been able to successfully reproduce the behavior of the regulatory network implicated in T-helper cell differentiation. Conclusion The simulation of regulatory networks aims at predicting the behavior of a whole system when subject

  15. Failure dynamics of the global risk network

    CERN Document Server

    Szymanski, Boleslaw K; Asztalos, Andrea; Sreenivasan, Sameet

    2013-01-01

    The risks faced by modern societies form an intricately interconnected network that often underlies crisis situations. Yet, little is known about the ways in which risks materializing across different domains influence each other. Here we present an approach in which experts' assessment of network dynamics is mapped into state transition probabilities in the model of network evolution. This approach enables us to analyze difficult to quantify risks, such as geo-political or social. The model is optimized using historical data on risk materialization. We apply this approach to the World Economic Forum Global Risk Network to quantify the adverse effects of risk interdependency. The optimized model can predict how changes in risk characteristics impact future states of the risk network. Thus, our approach facilitates actionable insights for mitigating globally networked risks.

  16. Random graph models for dynamic networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiao; Newman, M E J

    2016-01-01

    We propose generalizations of a number of standard network models, including the classic random graph, the configuration model, and the stochastic block model, to the case of time-varying networks. We assume that the presence and absence of edges are governed by continuous-time Markov processes with rate parameters that can depend on properties of the nodes. In addition to computing equilibrium properties of these models, we demonstrate their use in data analysis and statistical inference, giving efficient algorithms for fitting them to observed network data. This allows us, for instance, to estimate the time constants of network evolution or infer community structure from temporal network data using cues embedded both in the probabilities over time that node pairs are connected by edges and in the characteristic dynamics of edge appearance and disappearance. We illustrate our methods with a selection of applications, both to computer-generated test networks and real-world examples.

  17. Relevance of Dynamic Clustering to Biological Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, K

    1993-01-01

    Abstract Network of nonlinear dynamical elements often show clustering of synchronization by chaotic instability. Relevance of the clustering to ecological, immune, neural, and cellular networks is discussed, with the emphasis of partially ordered states with chaotic itinerancy. First, clustering with bit structures in a hypercubic lattice is studied. Spontaneous formation and destruction of relevant bits are found, which give self-organizing, and chaotic genetic algorithms. When spontaneous changes of effective couplings are introduced, chaotic itinerancy of clusterings is widely seen through a feedback mechanism, which supports dynamic stability allowing for complexity and diversity, known as homeochaos. Second, synaptic dynamics of couplings is studied in relation with neural dynamics. The clustering structure is formed with a balance between external inputs and internal dynamics. Last, an extension allowing for the growth of the number of elements is given, in connection with cell differentiation. Effecti...

  18. Dynamics-based centrality for directed networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Kori, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    Determining the relative importance of nodes in directed networks is important in, for example, ranking websites, publications, and sports teams, and for understanding signal flows in systems biology. A prevailing centrality measure in this respect is the PageRank. In this work, we focus on another class of centrality derived from the Laplacian of the network. We extend the Laplacian-based centrality, which has mainly been applied to strongly connected networks, to the case of general directed networks such that we can quantitatively compare arbitrary nodes. Toward this end, we adopt the idea used in the PageRank to introduce global connectivity between all the pairs of nodes with a certain strength. Numerical simulations are carried out on some networks. We also offer interpretations of the Laplacian-based centrality for general directed networks in terms of various dynamical and structural properties of networks. Importantly, the Laplacian-based centrality defined as the stationary density of the continuous-time random walk with random jumps is shown to be equivalent to the absorption probability of the random walk with sinks at each node but without random jumps. Similarly, the proposed centrality represents the importance of nodes in dynamics on the original network supplied with sinks but not with random jumps.

  19. Agent-based modeling and network dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Namatame, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The book integrates agent-based modeling and network science. It is divided into three parts, namely, foundations, primary dynamics on and of social networks, and applications. The book begins with the network origin of agent-based models, known as cellular automata, and introduce a number of classic models, such as Schelling’s segregation model and Axelrod’s spatial game. The essence of the foundation part is the network-based agent-based models in which agents follow network-based decision rules. Under the influence of the substantial progress in network science in late 1990s, these models have been extended from using lattices into using small-world networks, scale-free networks, etc. The book also shows that the modern network science mainly driven by game-theorists and sociophysicists has inspired agent-based social scientists to develop alternative formation algorithms, known as agent-based social networks. The book reviews a number of pioneering and representative models in this family. Upon the gi...

  20. Laser dynamics: The system dynamics and network theory of optoelectronic integrated circuit design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarng, Tom Shinming-T. K.

    Laser dynamics is the system dynamics, communication and network theory for the design of opto-electronic integrated circuit (OEIC). Combining the optical network theory and optical communication theory, the system analysis and design for the OEIC fundamental building blocks is considered. These building blocks include the direct current modulation, inject light modulation, wideband filter, super-gain optical amplifier, E/O and O/O optical bistability and current-controlled optical oscillator. Based on the rate equations, the phase diagram and phase portrait analysis is applied to the theoretical studies and numerical simulation. The OEIC system design methodologies are developed for the OEIC design. Stimulating-field-dependent rate equations are used to model the line-width narrowing/broadening mechanism for the CW mode and frequency chirp of semiconductor lasers. The momentary spectra are carrier-density-dependent. Furthermore, the phase portrait analysis and the nonlinear refractive index is used to simulate the single mode frequency chirp. The average spectra of chaos, period doubling, period pulsing, multi-loops and analog modulation are generated and analyzed. The bifurcation-chirp design chart with modulation depth and modulation frequency as parameters is provided for design purpose.

  1. The dynamics of transmission and the dynamics of networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farine, Damien

    2017-05-01

    A toy example depicted here highlighting the results of a study in this issue of the Journal of Animal Ecology that investigates the impact of network dynamics on potential disease outbreaks. Infections (stars) that spread by contact only (left) reduce the predicted outbreak size compared to situations where individuals can become infected by moving through areas that previously contained infected individuals (right). This is potentially important in species where individuals, or in this case groups, have overlapping ranges (as depicted on the top right). Incorporating network dynamics that maintain information about the ordering of contacts (central blocks; including the ordering of spatial overlap as noted by the arrows that highlight the blue group arriving after the red group in top-right of the figure) is important for capturing how a disease might not have the opportunity to spread to all individuals. By contrast, a static or 'average' network (lower blocks) does not capture any of these dynamics. Interestingly, although static networks generally predict larger outbreak sizes, the authors find that in cases when transmission probability is low, this prediction can switch as a result of changes in the estimated intensity of contacts among individuals. [Colour figure can be viewed at wileyonlinelibrary.com]. Springer, A., Kappeler, P.M. & Nunn, C.L. (2017) Dynamic vs. static social networks in models of parasite transmission: Predicting Cryptosporidium spread in wild lemurs. Journal of Animal Ecology, 86, 419-433. The spread of disease or information through networks can be affected by several factors. Whether and how these factors are accounted for can fundamentally change the predicted impact of a spreading epidemic. Springer, Kappeler & Nunn () investigate the role of different modes of transmission and network dynamics on the predicted size of a disease outbreak across several groups of Verreaux's sifakas, a group-living species of lemur. While some factors

  2. Transportation dynamics on networks of mobile agents

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Han-Xin; Xie, Yan-Bo; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Most existing works on transportation dynamics focus on networks of a fixed structure, but networks whose nodes are mobile have become widespread, such as cell-phone networks. We introduce a model to explore the basic physics of transportation on mobile networks. Of particular interest are the dependence of the throughput on the speed of agent movement and communication range. Our computations reveal a hierarchical dependence for the former while, for the latter, we find an algebraic power law between the throughput and the communication range with an exponent determined by the speed. We develop a physical theory based on the Fokker-Planck equation to explain these phenomena. Our findings provide insights into complex transportation dynamics arising commonly in natural and engineering systems.

  3. Cascading Edge Failures: A Dynamic Network Process

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, June

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the dynamics of edges in a network. The Dynamic Bond Percolation (DBP) process models, through stochastic local rules, the dependence of an edge $(a,b)$ in a network on the states of its neighboring edges. Unlike previous models, DBP does not assume statistical independence between different edges. In applications, this means for example that failures of transmission lines in a power grid are not statistically independent, or alternatively, relationships between individuals (dyads) can lead to changes in other dyads in a social network. We consider the time evolution of the probability distribution of the network state, the collective states of all the edges (bonds), and show that it converges to a stationary distribution. We use this distribution to study the emergence of global behaviors like consensus (i.e., catastrophic failure or full recovery of the entire grid) or coexistence (i.e., some failed and some operating substructures in the grid). In particular, we show that, depending on...

  4. Competition and cooperation in dynamic replication networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadon, Zehavit; Wagner, Nathaniel; Alasibi, Samaa; Samiappan, Manickasundaram; Mukherjee, Rakesh; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2015-01-07

    The simultaneous replication of six coiled-coil peptide mutants by reversible thiol-thioester exchange reactions is described. Experimental analysis of the time dependent evolution of networks formed by the peptides under different conditions reveals a complex web of molecular interactions and consequent mutant replication, governed by competition for resources and by autocatalytic and/or cross-catalytic template-assisted reactions. A kinetic model, first of its kind, is then introduced, allowing simulation of varied network behaviour as a consequence of changing competition and cooperation scenarios. We suggest that by clarifying the kinetic description of these relatively complex dynamic networks, both at early stages of the reaction far from equilibrium and at later stages approaching equilibrium, one lays the foundation for studying dynamic networks out-of-equilibrium in the near future.

  5. Dynamical and bursty interactions in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Stehle, Juliette; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2010-01-01

    We present a modeling framework for dynamical and bursty contact networks made of agents in social interaction. We consider agents' behavior at short time scales, in which the contact network is formed by disconnected cliques of different sizes. At each time a random agent can make a transition from being isolated to being part of a group, or vice-versa. Different distributions of contact times and inter-contact times between individuals are obtained by considering transition probabilities with memory effects, i.e. the transition probabilities for each agent depend both on its state (isolated or interacting) and on the time elapsed since the last change of state. The model lends itself to analytical and numerical investigations. The modeling framework can be easily extended, and paves the way for systematic investigations of dynamical processes occurring on rapidly evolving dynamical networks, such as the propagation of an information, or spreading of diseases.

  6. Dynamic queuing transmission model for dynamic network loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raovic, Nevena; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new macroscopic multi-class dynamic network loading model called Dynamic Queuing Transmission Model (DQTM). The model utilizes ‘good’ properties of the Dynamic Queuing Model (DQM) and the Link Transmission Model (LTM) by offering a DQM consistent with the kinematic wave theory...... and allowing for the representation of multiple vehicle classes, queue spillbacks and shock waves. The model assumes that a link is split into a moving part plus a queuing part, and p that traffic dynamics are given by a triangular fundamental diagram. A case-study is investigated and the DQTM is compared...

  7. Module network inference from a cancer gene expression data set identifies microRNA regulated modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bonnet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small RNAs that recognize and regulate mRNA target genes. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that they are key regulators of numerous critical functions in development and disease, including cancer. However, defining the place and function of miRNAs in complex regulatory networks is not straightforward. Systems approaches, like the inference of a module network from expression data, can help to achieve this goal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During the last decade, much progress has been made in the development of robust and powerful module network inference algorithms. In this study, we analyze and assess experimentally a module network inferred from both miRNA and mRNA expression data, using our recently developed module network inference algorithm based on probabilistic optimization techniques. We show that several miRNAs are predicted as statistically significant regulators for various modules of tightly co-expressed genes. A detailed analysis of three of those modules demonstrates that the specific assignment of miRNAs is functionally coherent and supported by literature. We further designed a set of experiments to test the assignment of miR-200a as the top regulator of a small module of nine genes. The results strongly suggest that miR-200a is regulating the module genes via the transcription factor ZEB1. Interestingly, this module is most likely involved in epithelial homeostasis and its dysregulation might contribute to the malignant process in cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that a robust module network analysis of expression data can provide novel insights of miRNA function in important cellular processes. Such a computational approach, starting from expression data alone, can be helpful in the process of identifying the function of miRNAs by suggesting modules of co-expressed genes in which they play a regulatory role. As shown in this study, those modules can then be

  8. Dynamical behavior of disordered spring networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yucht, M. G.; Sheinman, M.; Broedersz, C. P.

    2013-01-01

    We study the dynamical rheology of spring networks with a percolation model constructed by bond dilution in a two-dimensional triangular lattice. Hydrodynamic interactions are implemented by a Stokesian viscous coupling between the network nodes and a uniformly deforming liquid. Our simulations show that in a critical connectivity regime, these systems display weak power law rheology in which the complex shear modulus scales with frequency as G^* ~ (i * omega)^Delta where Delta = 0.41, in dis...

  9. Dynamics of Abusive IPv6 Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS DYNAMICS OF ABUSIVE IPV6 NETWORKS by Mark J. Turner September 2014 Thesis Advisor: Robert... IPV6 NETWORKS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS CNS-1111445 6. AUTHOR(S) Mark J. Turner 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School... IPv6 . As IPv6 becomes more commonplace, it permits abusive and malicious parties to exploit both new and existing vulnerabilities. Among such

  10. Dynamic Protection of Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruepp, Sarah Renée

    2008-01-01

    This thesis deals with making optical networks resilient to failures. The recovery performance of path, segment and span restoration is evaluated in a network with limited wavelength conversion capability using both standard and enhanced wavelength assignment schemes. The enhanced wavelength...... assignment scheme is based on the Suggested Vector (SV), which is a Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) compliant signalling extension aiming at wavelength conversion minimization. To increase the recovery percentage, two modifcations of the signalling session are proposed and evaluated...... through simulation. By resolving wavelength contention, the blocking reduction scheme reduces the number of necessary recovery retries and thereby the restoration time and control plane load. The stub-awareness schemes avoids wavelength conversions when merging the restoration segment to the connection...

  11. Spreading dynamics in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Pei, Sen

    2013-01-01

    Searching for influential spreaders in complex networks is an issue of great significance for applications across various domains, ranging from the epidemic control, innovation diffusion, viral marketing, social movement to idea propagation. In this paper, we first display some of the most important theoretical models that describe spreading processes, and then discuss the problem of locating both the individual and multiple influential spreaders respectively. Recent approaches in these two topics are presented. For the identification of privileged single spreaders, we summarize several widely used centralities, such as degree, betweenness centrality, PageRank, k-shell, etc. We investigate the empirical diffusion data in a large scale online social community -- LiveJournal. With this extensive dataset, we find that various measures can convey very distinct information of nodes. Of all the users in LiveJournal social network, only a small fraction of them involve in spreading. For the spreading processes in Li...

  12. Hydrogen application dynamics and networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E. [Air Liquide Large Industries, Champigny-sur-Marne (France)

    2010-12-30

    The Chemical Industry consumes large volumes of hydrogen as raw material for the manufacture of numerous products (e.g. polyamides and polyurethanes account for 60% of hydrogen demand). The hydrogen demand was in the recent past and will continue to be driven by the polyurethane family. China will host about 60% of new hydrogen needs over the period 2010-2015 becoming the first hydrogen market next year and reaching 25% of market share by 2015 (vs. only 4% in 2001). Air Liquide supplies large volumes of Hydrogen (and other Industrial Gases) to customers by on-site plants and through pipeline networks which offer significant benefits such as higher safety, reliability and flexibility of supply. Thanks to its long term strategy and heavy investment in large units and pipeline networks, Air Liquide is the Industrial Gas leader in most of the world class Petrochemical basins (Rotterdam, Antwerp, US Gulf Coast, Yosu, Caojing,..) (orig.)

  13. Dynamics in online social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowicz, Przemyslaw A; Eguiluz, Victor M

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of today's social interactions occurs using online social media as communication channels. Some online social networks have become extremely popular in the last decade. They differ among themselves in the character of the service they provide to online users. For instance, Facebook can be seen mainly as a platform for keeping in touch with close friends and relatives, Twitter is used to propagate and receive news, LinkedIn facilitates the maintenance of professional contacts, Flickr gathers amateurs and professionals of photography, etc. Albeit different, all these online platforms share an ingredient that pervades all their applications. There exists an underlying social network that allows their users to keep in touch with each other and helps to engage them in common activities or interactions leading to a better fulfillment of the service's purposes. This is the reason why these platforms share a good number of functionalities, e.g., personal communication channels, broadcasted status...

  14. Network-Configurations of Dynamic Friction Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2012-01-01

    The complex configurations of dynamic friction patterns-regarding real time contact areas- are transformed into appropriate networks. With this transformation of a system to network space, many properties can be inferred about the structure and dynamics of the system. Here, we analyze the dynamics of static friction, i.e. nucleation processes, with respect to "friction networks". We show that networks can successfully capture the crack-like shear ruptures and possible corresponding acoustic features. We found that the fraction of triangles remarkably scales with the detachment fronts. There is a universal power law between nodes' degree and motifs frequency (for triangles, it reads T(k)\\proptok{\\beta} ({\\beta} \\approx2\\pm0.4)). We confirmed the obtained universality in aperture-based friction networks. Based on the achieved results, we extracted a possible friction law in terms of network parameters and compared it with the rate and state friction laws. In particular, the evolutions of loops are scaled with p...

  15. Failure and recovery in dynamical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, L.; Luković, M.; Nagler, J.; Havlin, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Failure, damage spread and recovery crucially underlie many spatially embedded networked systems ranging from transportation structures to the human body. Here we study the interplay between spontaneous damage, induced failure and recovery in both embedded and non-embedded networks. In our model the network’s components follow three realistic processes that capture these features: (i) spontaneous failure of a component independent of the neighborhood (internal failure), (ii) failure induced by failed neighboring nodes (external failure) and (iii) spontaneous recovery of a component. We identify a metastable domain in the global network phase diagram spanned by the model’s control parameters where dramatic hysteresis effects and random switching between two coexisting states are observed. This dynamics depends on the characteristic link length of the embedded system. For the Euclidean lattice in particular, hysteresis and switching only occur in an extremely narrow region of the parameter space compared to random networks. We develop a unifying theory which links the dynamics of our model to contact processes. Our unifying framework may help to better understand controllability in spatially embedded and random networks where spontaneous recovery of components can mitigate spontaneous failure and damage spread in dynamical networks. PMID:28155876

  16. Dynamic Dilution Effects in Polymeric Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    processes, namely the reptation of linear species within the network and the arm withdrawal process of star arms in the sol fraction and of dangling single-chain ends attached to the network. The relaxation spectra are influenced by the stoichiometry to a large extent due to dynamic dilution effects caused...... by the change in the amount of dangling arms and solubles with stoichiometry. The star arm relaxation is suppressed by washing out the sol fraction which is seen as a clear example of the dynamic dilution effect arising from the small amount of non-reactive PDMS....

  17. Dynamics of High-Resolution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekara, Vedran

    NETWORKS are everywhere. From the smallest confines of the cells within our bodies to the webs of social relations across the globe. Networks are not static, they constantly change, adapt, and evolve to suit new conditions. In order to understand the fundamental laws that govern networks we need...... the unprecedented amounts of information collected by mobile phones to gain detailed insight into the dynamics of social systems. This dissertation presents an unparalleled data collection campaign, collecting highly detailed traces for approximately 1000 people over the course of multiple years. The availability...

  18. Module detection in complex networks using integer optimisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsoka Sophia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of modules or community structure is widely used to reveal the underlying properties of complex networks in biology, as well as physical and social sciences. Since the adoption of modularity as a measure of network topological properties, several methodologies for the discovery of community structure based on modularity maximisation have been developed. However, satisfactory partitions of large graphs with modest computational resources are particularly challenging due to the NP-hard nature of the related optimisation problem. Furthermore, it has been suggested that optimising the modularity metric can reach a resolution limit whereby the algorithm fails to detect smaller communities than a specific size in large networks. Results We present a novel solution approach to identify community structure in large complex networks and address resolution limitations in module detection. The proposed algorithm employs modularity to express network community structure and it is based on mixed integer optimisation models. The solution procedure is extended through an iterative procedure to diminish effects that tend to agglomerate smaller modules (resolution limitations. Conclusions A comprehensive comparative analysis of methodologies for module detection based on modularity maximisation shows that our approach outperforms previously reported methods. Furthermore, in contrast to previous reports, we propose a strategy to handle resolution limitations in modularity maximisation. Overall, we illustrate ways to improve existing methodologies for community structure identification so as to increase its efficiency and applicability.

  19. Unified Analysis of SWIPT Relay Networks with Noncoherent Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohjazi, Lina; Muhaidat, Sami; Dianati, Mehrdad; Al-Qutayri, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous wireless information and power transfer (SWIPT) relay networks represent a paradigm shift in the development of wireless networks, enabling simultaneous radio frequency (RF) energy harvesting (EH) and information processing. Different from conventional SWIPT relaying schemes, which typically assume the availability of perfect channel state information (CSI), here we consider the application of noncoherent modulation in order to avoid the need of instantaneous CSI estimation/track...

  20. Structural and dynamical properties of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Gourab

    Recent years have witnessed a substantial amount of interest within the physics community in the properties of networks. Techniques from statistical physics coupled with the widespread availability of computing resources have facilitated studies ranging from large scale empirical analysis of the worldwide web, social networks, biological systems, to the development of theoretical models and tools to explore the various properties of these systems. Following these developments, in this dissertation, we present and solve for a diverse set of new problems, investigating the structural and dynamical properties of both model and real world networks. We start by defining a new metric to measure the stability of network structure to disruptions, and then using a combination of theory and simulation study its properties in detail on artificially generated networks; we then compare our results to a selection of networks from the real world and find good agreement in most cases. In the following chapter, we propose a mathematical model that mimics the structure of popular file-sharing websites such as Flickr and CiteULike and demonstrate that many of its properties can solved exactly in the limit of large network size. The remaining part of the dissertation primarily focuses on the dynamical properties of networks. We first formulate a model of a network that evolves under the addition and deletion of vertices and edges, and solve for the equilibrium degree distribution for a variety of cases of interest. We then consider networks whose structure can be manipulated by adjusting the rules by which vertices enter and leave the network. We focus in particular on degree distributions and show that, with some mild constraints, it is possible by a suitable choice of rules to arrange for the network to have any degree distribution we desire. In addition we define a simple local algorithm by which appropriate rules can be implemented in practice. Finally, we conclude our

  1. Fundamental structures of dynamic social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekara, Vedran; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Lehmann, Sune

    2016-09-06

    Social systems are in a constant state of flux, with dynamics spanning from minute-by-minute changes to patterns present on the timescale of years. Accurate models of social dynamics are important for understanding the spreading of influence or diseases, formation of friendships, and the productivity of teams. Although there has been much progress on understanding complex networks over the past decade, little is known about the regularities governing the microdynamics of social networks. Here, we explore the dynamic social network of a densely-connected population of ∼1,000 individuals and their interactions in the network of real-world person-to-person proximity measured via Bluetooth, as well as their telecommunication networks, online social media contacts, geolocation, and demographic data. These high-resolution data allow us to observe social groups directly, rendering community detection unnecessary. Starting from 5-min time slices, we uncover dynamic social structures expressed on multiple timescales. On the hourly timescale, we find that gatherings are fluid, with members coming and going, but organized via a stable core of individuals. Each core represents a social context. Cores exhibit a pattern of recurring meetings across weeks and months, each with varying degrees of regularity. Taken together, these findings provide a powerful simplification of the social network, where cores represent fundamental structures expressed with strong temporal and spatial regularity. Using this framework, we explore the complex interplay between social and geospatial behavior, documenting how the formation of cores is preceded by coordination behavior in the communication networks and demonstrating that social behavior can be predicted with high precision.

  2. Spreading dynamics in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Sen; Makse, Hernán A.

    2013-12-01

    Searching for influential spreaders in complex networks is an issue of great significance for applications across various domains, ranging from epidemic control, innovation diffusion, viral marketing, and social movement to idea propagation. In this paper, we first display some of the most important theoretical models that describe spreading processes, and then discuss the problem of locating both the individual and multiple influential spreaders respectively. Recent approaches in these two topics are presented. For the identification of privileged single spreaders, we summarize several widely used centralities, such as degree, betweenness centrality, PageRank, k-shell, etc. We investigate the empirical diffusion data in a large scale online social community—LiveJournal. With this extensive dataset, we find that various measures can convey very distinct information of nodes. Of all the users in the LiveJournal social network, only a small fraction of them are involved in spreading. For the spreading processes in LiveJournal, while degree can locate nodes participating in information diffusion with higher probability, k-shell is more effective in finding nodes with a large influence. Our results should provide useful information for designing efficient spreading strategies in reality.

  3. Early diagnosis of complex diseases by molecular biomarkers, network biomarkers, and dynamical network biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Xiangdong; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Chen, Luonan

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have been carried out for early diagnosis of complex diseases by finding accurate and robust biomarkers specific to respective diseases. In particular, recent rapid advance of high-throughput technologies provides unprecedented rich information to characterize various disease genotypes and phenotypes in a global and also dynamical manner, which significantly accelerates the study of biomarkers from both theoretical and clinical perspectives. Traditionally, molecular biomarkers that distinguish disease samples from normal samples are widely adopted in clinical practices due to their ease of data measurement. However, many of them suffer from low coverage and high false-positive rates or high false-negative rates, which seriously limit their further clinical applications. To overcome those difficulties, network biomarkers (or module biomarkers) attract much attention and also achieve better performance because a network (or subnetwork) is considered to be a more robust form to characterize diseases than individual molecules. But, both molecular biomarkers and network biomarkers mainly distinguish disease samples from normal samples, and they generally cannot ensure to identify predisease samples due to their static nature, thereby lacking ability to early diagnosis. Based on nonlinear dynamical theory and complex network theory, a new concept of dynamical network biomarkers (DNBs, or a dynamical network of biomarkers) has been developed, which is different from traditional static approaches, and the DNB is able to distinguish a predisease state from normal and disease states by even a small number of samples, and therefore has great potential to achieve "real" early diagnosis of complex diseases. In this paper, we comprehensively review the recent advances and developments on molecular biomarkers, network biomarkers, and DNBs in particular, focusing on the biomarkers for early diagnosis of complex diseases considering a small number of samples and high

  4. Dynamic Shortest Path Monitoring in Spatial Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo Shang; Lisi Chen; Zhe-Wei Wei; Dan-Huai Guo; Ji-Rong Wen

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing availability of real-time traffic information, dynamic spatial networks are pervasive nowa-days and path planning in dynamic spatial networks becomes an important issue. In this light, we propose and investigate a novel problem of dynamically monitoring shortest paths in spatial networks (DSPM query). When a traveler aims to a des-tination, his/her shortest path to the destination may change due to two reasons: 1) the travel costs of some edges have been updated and 2) the traveler deviates from the pre-planned path. Our target is to accelerate the shortest path computing in dynamic spatial networks, and we believe that this study may be useful in many mobile applications, such as route planning and recommendation, car navigation and tracking, and location-based services in general. This problem is challenging due to two reasons: 1) how to maintain and reuse the existing computation results to accelerate the following computations, and 2) how to prune the search space effectively. To overcome these challenges, filter-and-refinement paradigm is adopted. We maintain an expansion tree and define a pair of upper and lower bounds to prune the search space. A series of optimization techniques are developed to accelerate the shortest path computing. The performance of the developed methods is studied in extensive experiments based on real spatial data.

  5. The fundamental structures of dynamic social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sekara, Vedran; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    Networks provide a powerful mathematical framework for analyzing the structure and dynamics of complex systems (1-3). The study of group behavior has deep roots in the social science literature (4,5) and community detection is a central part of modern network science. Network communities have been found to be highly overlapping and organized in a hierarchical structure (6-9). Recent technological advances have provided a toolset for measuring the detailed social dynamics at scale (10,11). In spite of great progress, a quantitative description of the complex temporal behavior of social groups-with dynamics spanning from minute-by-minute changes to patterns expressed on the timescale of years-is still absent. Here we uncover a class of fundamental structures embedded within highly dynamic social networks. On the shortest time-scale, we find that social gatherings are fluid, with members coming and going, but organized via a stable core of individuals. We show that cores represent social contexts (9), with recur...

  6. Dynamical networks with topological self-organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    2001-01-01

    Coupled evolution of state and topology of dynamical networks is introduced. Due to the well organized tensor structure, the governing equations are presented in a canonical form, and required attractors as well as their basins can be easily implanted and controlled.

  7. Distributed dynamic load balancing in wireless networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Borst (Sem); I. Saniee; P.A. Whiting

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractSpatial and temporal load variations, e.g. flash overloads and traffic hot spots that persist for minutes to hours, are intrinsic features of wireless networks, and give rise to potentially huge performance repercussions. Dynamic load balancing strategies provide a natural mechanism for

  8. Filtering in hybrid dynamic Bayesian networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Nonboe; Andersen, Rasmus Ørum; Wheeler, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that inference in a complex hybrid Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) is possible using the 2-Time Slice DBN (2T-DBN) from (Koller & Lerner, 2000) to model fault detection in a watertank system. In (Koller & Lerner, 2000) a generic Particle Filter (PF) is used for infere...

  9. Filtering in hybrid dynamic Bayesian networks (left)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Nonboe; Andersen, Rasmus Ørum; Wheeler, Kevin

    We demonstrate experimentally that inference in a complex hybrid Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) is possible using the 2-Time Slice DBN (2T-DBN) from (Koller & Lerner, 2000) to model fault detection in a watertank system. In (Koller & Lerner, 2000) a generic Particle Filter (PF) is used for infere...

  10. Filtering in hybrid dynamic Bayesian networks (center)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Nonboe; Andersen, Rasmus Ørum; Wheeler, Kevin

    We demonstrate experimentally that inference in a complex hybrid Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) is possible using the 2-Time Slice DBN (2T-DBN) from (Koller & Lerner, 2000) to model fault detection in a watertank system. In (Koller & Lerner, 2000) a generic Particle Filter (PF) is used for infere...

  11. Dynamical networks with topological self-organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    2001-01-01

    Coupled evolution of state and topology of dynamical networks is introduced. Due to the well organized tensor structure, the governing equations are presented in a canonical form, and required attractors as well as their basins can be easily implanted and controlled.

  12. Remote synchronization reveals network symmetries and functional modules

    CERN Document Server

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Chavez, Mario; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; Latora, Vito

    2012-01-01

    We study a Kuramoto model in which the oscillators are associated to the nodes of a complex network and the interactions include a phase frustration, thus preventing full synchronization. The system organizes into a regime of remote synchronization where pairs of nodes with the same network symmetry are fully synchronized, despite their distance on the graph. We provide analytical arguments to explain this result and we show how the frustration parameter affects the distribution of phases. An application to brain networks suggests that anatomical symmetry plays a role in neural synchronization by determining correlated functional modules across distant locations.

  13. Dynamic multicast traffic grooming in WDM networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiao-jun; GE Ning; FENG Chong-xi

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic multicast traffic grooming in wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks was analyzed to minimize networkwide costs and to increase the network resource utilization.A network model was developed for dynamic multicast traffic grooming with resource constraints and an algorithm that can provide quality of service (QoS)was proposed.The QoS is measured by the maximum number of lightpaths passing between the source and the destinations.The blocking probability of the algorithm was assessed in simulations.The results show that a higher QoS requirement results in higher blocking probability,and when the QoS requirement is low,changes in the QoS requirements have only small effects on the blocking probability.

  14. Dynamical systems on networks a tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Porter, Mason A

    2016-01-01

    This volume is a tutorial for the study of dynamical systems on networks. It discusses both methodology and models, including spreading models for social and biological contagions. The authors focus especially on “simple” situations that are analytically tractable, because they are insightful and provide useful springboards for the study of more complicated scenarios. This tutorial, which also includes key pointers to the literature, should be helpful for junior and senior undergraduate students, graduate students, and researchers from mathematics, physics, and engineering who seek to study dynamical systems on networks but who may not have prior experience with graph theory or networks. Mason A. Porter is Professor of Nonlinear and Complex Systems at the Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, UK. He is also a member of the CABDyN Complexity Centre and a Tutorial Fellow of Somerville College. James P. Gleeson is Professor of Industrial and Appli...

  15. Power Aware Dynamic Provisioning of HPC Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groves, Taylor [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grant, Ryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Future exascale systems are under increased pressure to find power savings. The network, while it consumes a considerable amount of power is often left out of the picture when discussing total system power. Even when network power is being considered, the references are frequently a decade or older and rely on models that lack validation on modern inter- connects. In this work we explore how dynamic mechanisms of an Infiniband network save power and at what granularity we can engage these features. We explore this within the context of the host controller adapter (HCA) on the node and for the fabric, i.e. switches, using three different mechanisms of dynamic link width, frequency and disabling of links for QLogic and Mellanox systems. Our results show that while there is some potential for modest power savings, real world systems need to improved responsiveness to adjustments in order to fully leverage these savings. This page intentionally left blank.

  16. Modeling epidemics dynamics on heterogenous networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zion, Yossi; Cohen, Yahel; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2010-05-21

    The dynamics of the SIS process on heterogenous networks, where different local communities are connected by airlines, is studied. We suggest a new modeling technique for travelers movement, in which the movement does not affect the demographic parameters characterizing the metapopulation. A solution to the deterministic reaction-diffusion equations that emerges from this model on a general network is presented. A typical example of a heterogenous network, the star structure, is studied in detail both analytically and using agent-based simulations. The interplay between demographic stochasticity, spatial heterogeneity and the infection dynamics is shown to produce some counterintuitive effects. In particular it was found that, while movement always increases the chance of an outbreak, it may decrease the steady-state fraction of sick individuals. The importance of the modeling technique in estimating the outcomes of a vaccination campaign is demonstrated.

  17. Asymmetric Modulation Gains in Network Coded Relay Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Fitzek, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Wireless relays have usually been considered in two ways. On the one hand, a physical layer approach focused on per-packet reliability and involving the relay on each packet transmission. On the other, recent approaches have relied on the judicious activation of the relay at the network level to ...

  18. SEASONAL MODULE DYNAMICS IN SARGASSUM SUBREPANDUM (FUCALES, PHAEOPHYTA)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateweberhan, Mebrahtu; Bruggemann, J Henrich; Breeman, And Anneke M

    2008-04-01

    Module dynamics of the fucoid alga SARGASSUM SUBREPANDUM (Forssk.) C. Agardh was studied in the southern Red Sea. Seasonal variation in thallus density and size was determined, and the initiation, growth, reproduction, and shedding of modules (primary laterals) were ascertained, using a tagging approach. Possible effects of different size-related parameters on module initiation, growth, reproduction, and shedding were analyzed in the context of contradicting results for other macroalgae, in comparison with terrestrial plants. Thallus density varied little; most of the seasonal variation occurred at the modular level. A restricted period of new module formation early in the cooler season was followed by fast growth and reproduction. Massive shedding of modules occurred toward the end of the cooler season leading to strongly reduced biomass in summer. There was some evidence that high module numbers inhibited new module formation and enhanced the maximum module elongation rate (fastest-growing module per thallus). On the other hand, elongation rates generally decreased, and apical tissue losses increased with increasing module length. This response was observed over a wide size range, suggesting grazing losses. There was no evidence of suppressed growth in small modules due to intraspecific competition. Elongation rates remained unaffected by reproductive status, indicating that there was no direct trade-off between growth and reproduction. Module survivorship was independent of module number and size, but fertile modules were more persistent than vegetative ones. We conclude that module dynamics are determined by seasonal changes in the environment, size-dependent processes, and interactions among the modules. © 2008 Phycological Society of America.

  19. Dynamic analysis of biochemical network using complex network method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the stochastic biochemical reaction model is proposed based on the law of mass action and complex network theory. The dynamics of biochemical reaction system is presented as a set of non-linear differential equations and analyzed at the molecular-scale. Given the initial state and the evolution rules of the biochemical reaction system, the system can achieve homeostasis. Compared with random graph, the biochemical reaction network has larger information capacity and is more efficient in information transmission. This is consistent with theory of evolution.

  20. Identifying module biomarkers from gastric cancer by differential correlation network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoping Liu,1–3,* Xiao Chang1,3,* 1College of Statistics and Applied Mathematics, Anhui University of Finance and Economics, Bengbu, Anhui Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Key Laboratory of Systems Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Collaborative Research Center for Innovative Mathematical Modeling, Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Gastric cancer (stomach cancer is a severe disease caused by dysregulation of many functionally correlated genes or pathways instead of the mutation of individual genes. Systematic identification of gastric cancer biomarkers can provide insights into the mechanisms underlying this deadly disease and help in the development of new drugs. In this paper, we present a novel network-based approach to predict module biomarkers of gastric cancer that can effectively distinguish the disease from normal samples. Specifically, by assuming that gastric cancer has mainly resulted from dysfunction of biomolecular networks rather than individual genes in an organism, the genes in the module biomarkers are potentially related to gastric cancer. Finally, we identified a module biomarker with 27 genes, and by comparing the module biomarker with known gastric cancer biomarkers, we found that our module biomarker exhibited a greater ability to diagnose the samples with gastric cancer. Keywords: biomarkers, gastric cancer, stomach cancer, differential network

  1. Water dynamics in rigid ionomer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, N. C.; Etampawala, T. N.; Shrestha, U. M.; Aryal, D.; Tyagi, M.; Diallo, S. O.; Mamontov, E.; Cornelius, C. J.; Perahia, D.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics of water within ionic polymer networks formed by sulfonated poly(phenylene) (SPP), as revealed by quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS), is presented. These polymers are distinguished from other ionic macromolecules by their rigidity and therefore in their network structure. QENS measurements as a function of temperature as the fraction of ionic groups and humidity were varied have shown that the polymer molecules are immobile while absorbed water molecules remain dynamic. The water molecules occupy multiple sites, either bound or loosely constrained, and bounce between the two. With increasing temperature and hydration levels, the system becomes more dynamic. Water molecules remain mobile even at subzero temperatures, illustrating the applicability of the SPP membrane for selective transport over a broad temperature range.

  2. A neural network model of attention-modulated neurodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuqiao; Liljenström, Hans

    2007-12-01

    Visual attention appears to modulate cortical neurodynamics and synchronization through various cholinergic mechanisms. In order to study these mechanisms, we have developed a neural network model of visual cortex area V4, based on psychophysical, anatomical and physiological data. With this model, we want to link selective visual information processing to neural circuits within V4, bottom-up sensory input pathways, top-down attention input pathways, and to cholinergic modulation from the prefrontal lobe. We investigate cellular and network mechanisms underlying some recent analytical results from visual attention experimental data. Our model can reproduce the experimental findings that attention to a stimulus causes increased gamma-frequency synchronization in the superficial layers. Computer simulations and STA power analysis also demonstrate different effects of the different cholinergic attention modulation action mechanisms.

  3. Performance Evaluation of Passive Optical Network Using Different Modulation Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ravneet; Dewra, Sanjeev

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the performance of passive optical network is analyzed and compared for different modulation formats such as non-return to zero (NRZ), return to zero (RZ) at 2.5 Gb/s bit rate with 16 optical network units. This system is investigated in terms of quality (Q)-factor, optical received power and eye height at different transmission distances. NRZ achieves maximum transmission distance up to 48 km having Q-factor of 6.18 and RZ achieves the maximum transmission distance up to 41 km having Q-factor of 6.21. Furthermore, it is found that NRZ modulation format is more superior and covers more distance as compared to RZ modulation format.

  4. Vascular Dynamics Aid a Coupled Neurovascular Network Learn Sparse Independent Features: A Computational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Ryan T; Chhabria, Karishma; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vascular dynamics are generally thought to be controlled by neural activity in a unidirectional fashion. However, both computational modeling and experimental evidence point to the feedback effects of vascular dynamics on neural activity. Vascular feedback in the form of glucose and oxygen controls neuronal ATP, either directly or via the agency of astrocytes, which in turn modulates neural firing. Recently, a detailed model of the neuron-astrocyte-vessel system has shown how vasomotion can modulate neural firing. Similarly, arguing from known cerebrovascular physiology, an approach known as "hemoneural hypothesis" postulates functional modulation of neural activity by vascular feedback. To instantiate this perspective, we present a computational model in which a network of "vascular units" supplies energy to a neural network. The complex dynamics of the vascular network, modeled by a network of oscillators, turns neurons ON and OFF randomly. The informational consequence of such dynamics is explored in the context of an auto-encoder network. In the proposed model, each vascular unit supplies energy to a subset of hidden neurons of an autoencoder network, which constitutes its "projective field." Neurons that receive adequate energy in a given trial have reduced threshold, and thus are prone to fire. Dynamics of the vascular network are governed by changes in the reconstruction error of the auto-encoder network, interpreted as the neuronal demand. Vascular feedback causes random inactivation of a subset of hidden neurons in every trial. We observe that, under conditions of desynchronized vascular dynamics, the output reconstruction error is low and the feature vectors learnt are sparse and independent. Our earlier modeling study highlighted the link between desynchronized vascular dynamics and efficient energy delivery in skeletal muscle. We now show that desynchronized vascular dynamics leads to efficient training in an auto-encoder neural network.

  5. DYNAMIC CONGESTION CONTROL IN WDM OPTICAL NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita Samajpati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM optical networking. In this optical networking, prior to data transfer, lightpath establishment between source and destination nodes is usually carried out through a wavelength reservation protocol. This wavelength is reserved corresponding to a route between the source and destination and the route is chosen following any standard routing protocol based on shortest path. The backward reservation protocol is implemented initially. A fixed connected and weighted network is considered. The inputs of this implementation are the fixed network itself and its corresponding shortest path matrix. After this initial level of implementation, the average node usage over a time period is calculated and various thresholds for node usage are considered. Above threshold value, request arriving at that path selects its next shortest path. This concept is implemented on various wavelengths. The output represents the performance issues of dynamic congestion control.

  6. Complex Dynamics in Information Sharing Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Bruce

    This study examines the roll-out of an electronic knowledge base in a medium-sized professional services firm over a six year period. The efficiency of such implementation is a key business problem in IT systems of this type. Data from usage logs provides the basis for analysis of the dynamic evolution of social networks around the depository during this time. The adoption pattern follows an "s-curve" and usage exhibits something of a power law distribution, both attributable to network effects, and network position is associated with organisational performance on a number of indicators. But periodicity in usage is evident and the usage distribution displays an exponential cut-off. Further analysis provides some evidence of mathematical complexity in the periodicity. Some implications of complex patterns in social network data for research and management are discussed. The study provides a case study demonstrating the utility of the broad methodological approach.

  7. Innovation networking between stability and political dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    2004-01-01

    of the contribution is to challenge and transcend these notions and develop an understanding of innovation networks as an interplay between stable and dynamic elements, where political processes in innovation are much more than a disruptive and even a counterproductive feature. It reviews the growing number......This contribution views innovation as a social activity of building networks, using software product development in multicompany alliances and networks as example. Innovation networks are frequently understood as quite stable arrangements characterised by high trust among the participants. The aim...... of studies that highlight the political aspect of innovation. The paper reports on a study of innovation processes conducted within the EU—TSER-programme and a study made under the banner of management of technology. Intensive field studies in two constellations of enterprises were carried out. One...

  8. Traffic Dynamics of Computer Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fekete, Attila

    2008-01-01

    Two important aspects of the Internet, namely the properties of its topology and the characteristics of its data traffic, have attracted growing attention of the physics community. My thesis has considered problems of both aspects. First I studied the stochastic behavior of TCP, the primary algorithm governing traffic in the current Internet, in an elementary network scenario consisting of a standalone infinite-sized buffer and an access link. The effect of the fast recovery and fast retransmission (FR/FR) algorithms is also considered. I showed that my model can be extended further to involve the effect of link propagation delay, characteristic of WAN. I continued my thesis with the investigation of finite-sized semi-bottleneck buffers, where packets can be dropped not only at the link, but also at the buffer. I demonstrated that the behavior of the system depends only on a certain combination of the parameters. Moreover, an analytic formula was derived that gives the ratio of packet loss rate at the buffer ...

  9. Seasonal module dynamics in Sargassum subrepandum (Fucales, Phaeophyta)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ateweberhan, Mebrahtu; Bruggemann, J. Henrich; Breeman, Anneke M.

    2008-01-01

    Module dynamics of the fucoid alga Sargassum subrepandum (Forssk.) C. Agardh was studied in the southern Red Sea. Seasonal variation in thallus density and size was determined, and the initiation, growth, reproduction, and shedding of modules (primary laterals) were ascertained, using a tagging appr

  10. Implementation of intensity modulation with dynamic multileaf collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J.W.; Yu, C.; Jaffray, D. [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The computer-controlled multileaf collimator (MLC) marks one of the most important advances in radiation therapy. The device efficiently replaces manual blocking to shape fields and can be used to modulate beam intensity. The results of a research programme at William Beaumont Hospital, aimed at bringing dynamic intensity modulation into clinical use, are discussed.

  11. Seasonal module dynamics in Sargassum subrepandum (Fucales, Phaeophyta)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ateweberhan, Mebrahtu; Bruggemann, J. Henrich; Breeman, Anneke M.

    Module dynamics of the fucoid alga Sargassum subrepandum (Forssk.) C. Agardh was studied in the southern Red Sea. Seasonal variation in thallus density and size was determined, and the initiation, growth, reproduction, and shedding of modules (primary laterals) were ascertained, using a tagging

  12. Nonparametric inference of network structure and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Tiago P.

    The network structure of complex systems determine their function and serve as evidence for the evolutionary mechanisms that lie behind them. Despite considerable effort in recent years, it remains an open challenge to formulate general descriptions of the large-scale structure of network systems, and how to reliably extract such information from data. Although many approaches have been proposed, few methods attempt to gauge the statistical significance of the uncovered structures, and hence the majority cannot reliably separate actual structure from stochastic fluctuations. Due to the sheer size and high-dimensionality of many networks, this represents a major limitation that prevents meaningful interpretations of the results obtained with such nonstatistical methods. In this talk, I will show how these issues can be tackled in a principled and efficient fashion by formulating appropriate generative models of network structure that can have their parameters inferred from data. By employing a Bayesian description of such models, the inference can be performed in a nonparametric fashion, that does not require any a priori knowledge or ad hoc assumptions about the data. I will show how this approach can be used to perform model comparison, and how hierarchical models yield the most appropriate trade-off between model complexity and quality of fit based on the statistical evidence present in the data. I will also show how this general approach can be elegantly extended to networks with edge attributes, that are embedded in latent spaces, and that change in time. The latter is obtained via a fully dynamic generative network model, based on arbitrary-order Markov chains, that can also be inferred in a nonparametric fashion. Throughout the talk I will illustrate the application of the methods with many empirical networks such as the internet at the autonomous systems level, the global airport network, the network of actors and films, social networks, citations among

  13. Dynamic pricing by hopfield neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lusajo M Minga; FENG Yu-qiang(冯玉强); LI Yi-jun(李一军); LU Yang(路杨); Kimutai Kimeli

    2004-01-01

    The increase in the number of shopbots users in e-commerce has triggered flexibility of sellers in their pricing strategies. Sellers see the importance of automated price setting which provides efficient services to a large number of buyers who are using shopbots. This paper studies the characteristic of decreasing energy with time in a continuous model of a Hopfield neural network that is the decreasing of errors in the network with respect to time. The characteristic shows that it is possible to use Hopfield neural network to get the main factor of dynamic pricing; the least variable cost, from production function principles. The least variable cost is obtained by reducing or increasing the input combination factors, and then making the comparison of the network output with the desired output, where the difference between the network output and desired output will be decreasing in the same manner as in the Hopfield neural network energy. Hopfield neural network will simplify the rapid change of prices in e-commerce during transaction that depends on the demand quantity for demand sensitive model of pricing.

  14. Advances in dynamic network modeling in complex transportation systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ukkusuri, Satish V

    2013-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest in dynamic network modeling, including route guidance and traffic control in transportation systems and other complex infrastructure networks. Covers dynamic traffic assignment, flow modeling, mobile sensor deployment and more.

  15. Population Dynamics of Genetic Regulatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Erez

    2005-03-01

    Unlike common objects in physics, a biological cell processes information. The cell interprets its genome and transforms the genomic information content, through the action of genetic regulatory networks, into proteins which in turn dictate its metabolism, functionality and morphology. Understanding the dynamics of a population of biological cells presents a unique challenge. It requires to link the intracellular dynamics of gene regulation, through the mechanism of cell division, to the level of the population. We present experiments studying adaptive dynamics of populations of genetically homogeneous microorganisms (yeast), grown for long durations under steady conditions. We focus on population dynamics that do not involve random genetic mutations. Our experiments follow the long-term dynamics of the population distributions and allow to quantify the correlations among generations. We focus on three interconnected issues: adaptation of genetically homogeneous populations following environmental changes, selection processes on the population and population variability and expression distributions. We show that while the population exhibits specific short-term responses to environmental inputs, it eventually adapts to a robust steady-state, largely independent of external conditions. Cycles of medium-switch show that the adapted state is imprinted in the population and that this memory is maintained for many generations. To further study population adaptation, we utilize the process of gene recruitment whereby a gene naturally regulated by a specific promoter is placed under a different regulatory system. This naturally occurring process has been recognized as a major driving force in evolution. We have recruited an essential gene to a foreign regulatory network and followed the population long-term dynamics. Rewiring of the regulatory network allows us to expose their complex dynamics and phase space structure.

  16. Dynamic motifs in socio-economic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Shao, Shuai; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2014-12-01

    Socio-economic networks are of central importance in economic life. We develop a method of identifying and studying motifs in socio-economic networks by focusing on “dynamic motifs,” i.e., evolutionary connection patterns that, because of “node acquaintances” in the network, occur much more frequently than random patterns. We examine two evolving bi-partite networks: i) the world-wide commercial ship chartering market and ii) the ship build-to-order market. We find similar dynamic motifs in both bipartite networks, even though they describe different economic activities. We also find that “influence” and “persistence” are strong factors in the interaction behavior of organizations. When two companies are doing business with the same customer, it is highly probable that another customer who currently only has business relationship with one of these two companies, will become customer of the second in the future. This is the effect of influence. Persistence means that companies with close business ties to customers tend to maintain their relationships over a long period of time.

  17. Dopamine: A parallel pathway for modulation of locomotor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eSharples

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The spinal cord contains networks of neurons that can produce locomotor patterns. To readily respond to environmental conditions, these networks must be flexible yet at the same time robust. Neuromodulators play a key role in contributing to network flexibility in a variety of invertebrate and vertebrate networks. For example, neuromodulators contribute to altering intrinsic properties and synaptic weights that, in extreme cases, can lead to neurons switching between networks. Here we focus on the role of dopamine in the control of stepping networks in the spinal cord. We first review the role of dopamine in modulating rhythmic activity in the stomatogastric ganglion and the leech, since work from these preparations provides a foundation to understand its role in vertebrate systems. We then move to a discussion of dopamine’s role in modulation of swimming in aquatic species such as the larval xenopus, lamprey and zebrafish. The control of terrestrial walking in vertebrates by dopamine is less studied and we review current evidence in mammals with a focus on rodent species. We discuss data suggesting that the source of dopamine within the spinal cord is mainly from the A11 area of the diencephalon, and then turn to a discussion of dopamine’s role in modulating walking patterns from both in vivo and in vitro preparations. Similar to the descending serotonergic system, the dopaminergic system may serve as a potential target to promote recovery of locomotor function following spinal cord injury; evidence suggests that dopaminergic agonists can promote recovery of function following spinal cord injury (SCI. We discuss pharmacogenetic and optogenetic approaches that could be deployed in SCI and their potential tractability. Throughout the review we draw parallels with both noradrenergic and serotonergic modulatory effects on spinal cord networks. In all likelihood, a complementary monoaminergic enhancement strategy should be deployed following

  18. Mean field methods for cortical network dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, J.; Lerchner, Alexander; Ahmadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    We review the use of mean field theory for describing the dynamics of dense, randomly connected cortical circuits. For a simple network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate- and-fire neurons, we can show how the firing irregularity, as measured by the Fano factor, increases...... with the strength of the synapses in the network and with the value to which the membrane potential is reset after a spike. Generalizing the model to include conductance-based synapses gives insight into the connection between the firing statistics and the high- conductance state observed experimentally in visual...

  19. Personality traits and ego-network dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centellegher, Simone; López, Eduardo; Saramäki, Jari; Lepri, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Strong and supportive social relationships are fundamental to our well-being. However, there are costs to their maintenance, resulting in a trade-off between quality and quantity, a typical strategy being to put a lot of effort on a few high-intensity relationships while maintaining larger numbers of less close relationships. It has also been shown that there are persistent individual differences in this pattern; some individuals allocate their efforts more uniformly across their networks, while others strongly focus on their closest relationships. Furthermore, some individuals maintain more stable networks than others. Here, we focus on how personality traits of individuals affect this picture, using mobile phone calls records and survey data from the Mobile Territorial Lab (MTL) study. In particular, we look at the relationship between personality traits and the (i) persistence of social signatures, namely the similarity of the social signature shape of an individual measured in different time intervals; (ii) the turnover in egocentric networks, that is, differences in the set of alters present at two consecutive temporal intervals; and (iii) the rank dynamics defined as the variation of alter rankings in egocentric networks in consecutive intervals. We observe that some traits have effects on the stability of the social signatures as well as network turnover and rank dynamics. As an example, individuals who score highly in the Openness to Experience trait tend to have higher levels of network turnover and larger alter rank variations. On broader terms, our study shows that personality traits clearly affect the ways in which individuals maintain their personal networks. PMID:28253333

  20. Personality traits and ego-network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centellegher, Simone; López, Eduardo; Saramäki, Jari; Lepri, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Strong and supportive social relationships are fundamental to our well-being. However, there are costs to their maintenance, resulting in a trade-off between quality and quantity, a typical strategy being to put a lot of effort on a few high-intensity relationships while maintaining larger numbers of less close relationships. It has also been shown that there are persistent individual differences in this pattern; some individuals allocate their efforts more uniformly across their networks, while others strongly focus on their closest relationships. Furthermore, some individuals maintain more stable networks than others. Here, we focus on how personality traits of individuals affect this picture, using mobile phone calls records and survey data from the Mobile Territorial Lab (MTL) study. In particular, we look at the relationship between personality traits and the (i) persistence of social signatures, namely the similarity of the social signature shape of an individual measured in different time intervals; (ii) the turnover in egocentric networks, that is, differences in the set of alters present at two consecutive temporal intervals; and (iii) the rank dynamics defined as the variation of alter rankings in egocentric networks in consecutive intervals. We observe that some traits have effects on the stability of the social signatures as well as network turnover and rank dynamics. As an example, individuals who score highly in the Openness to Experience trait tend to have higher levels of network turnover and larger alter rank variations. On broader terms, our study shows that personality traits clearly affect the ways in which individuals maintain their personal networks.

  1. Traffic chaotic dynamics modeling and analysis of deterministic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiqiang; Huang, Ning; Wu, Zhitao

    2016-07-01

    Network traffic is an important and direct acting factor of network reliability and performance. To understand the behaviors of network traffic, chaotic dynamics models were proposed and helped to analyze nondeterministic network a lot. The previous research thought that the chaotic dynamics behavior was caused by random factors, and the deterministic networks would not exhibit chaotic dynamics behavior because of lacking of random factors. In this paper, we first adopted chaos theory to analyze traffic data collected from a typical deterministic network testbed — avionics full duplex switched Ethernet (AFDX, a typical deterministic network) testbed, and found that the chaotic dynamics behavior also existed in deterministic network. Then in order to explore the chaos generating mechanism, we applied the mean field theory to construct the traffic dynamics equation (TDE) for deterministic network traffic modeling without any network random factors. Through studying the derived TDE, we proposed that chaotic dynamics was one of the nature properties of network traffic, and it also could be looked as the action effect of TDE control parameters. A network simulation was performed and the results verified that the network congestion resulted in the chaotic dynamics for a deterministic network, which was identical with expectation of TDE. Our research will be helpful to analyze the traffic complicated dynamics behavior for deterministic network and contribute to network reliability designing and analysis.

  2. Dynamic Trust Management for Mobile Networks and Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Fenye

    2013-01-01

    Trust management in mobile networks is challenging due to dynamically changing network environments and the lack of a centralized trusted authority. In this dissertation research, we "design" and "validate" a class of dynamic trust management protocols for mobile networks, and demonstrate the utility of dynamic trust management…

  3. Activating and inhibiting connections in biological network dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight Rob

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies of biochemical networks have analyzed network topology. Such work has suggested that specific types of network wiring may increase network robustness and therefore confer a selective advantage. However, knowledge of network topology does not allow one to predict network dynamical behavior – for example, whether deleting a protein from a signaling network would maintain the network's dynamical behavior, or induce oscillations or chaos. Results Here we report that the balance between activating and inhibiting connections is important in determining whether network dynamics reach steady state or oscillate. We use a simple dynamical model of a network of interacting genes or proteins. Using the model, we study random networks, networks selected for robust dynamics, and examples of biological network topologies. The fraction of activating connections influences whether the network dynamics reach steady state or oscillate. Conclusion The activating fraction may predispose a network to oscillate or reach steady state, and neutral evolution or selection of this parameter may affect the behavior of biological networks. This principle may unify the dynamics of a wide range of cellular networks. Reviewers Reviewed by Sergei Maslov, Eugene Koonin, and Yu (Brandon Xia (nominated by Mark Gerstein. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  4. Study of the structure and dynamics of complex biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Areejit

    2008-12-01

    In this thesis, we have studied the large scale structure and system level dynamics of certain biological networks using tools from graph theory, computational biology and dynamical systems. We study the structure and dynamics of large scale metabolic networks inside three organisms, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Staphylococcus aureus. We also study the dynamics of the large scale genetic network controlling E. coli metabolism. We have tried to explain the observed system level dynamical properties of these networks in terms of their underlying structure. Our studies of the system level dynamics of these large scale biological networks provide a different perspective on their functioning compared to that obtained from purely structural studies. Our study also leads to some new insights on features such as robustness, fragility and modularity of these large scale biological networks. We also shed light on how different networks inside the cell such as metabolic networks and genetic networks are interrelated to each other.

  5. A network-based dynamical ranking system

    CERN Document Server

    Motegi, Shun

    2012-01-01

    Ranking players or teams in sports is of practical interests. From the viewpoint of networks, a ranking system is equivalent a centrality measure for sports networks, whereby a directed link represents the result of a single game. Previously proposed network-based ranking systems are derived from static networks, i.e., aggregation of the results of games over time. However, the score (i.e., strength) of a player, for example, depends on time. Defeating a renowned player in the peak performance is intuitively more rewarding than defeating the same player in other periods. To account for this factor, we propose a dynamic variant of such a network-based ranking system and apply it to professional men's tennis data. Our ranking system, also interpreted as a centrality measure for directed temporal networks, has two parameters. One parameter represents the exponential decay rate of the past score, and the other parameter controls the effect of indirect wins on the score. We derive a set of linear online update equ...

  6. Physical Proximity and Spreading in Dynamic Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    Most infectious diseases spread on a dynamic network of human interactions. Recent studies of social dynamics have provided evidence that spreading patterns may depend strongly on detailed micro-dynamics of the social system. We have recorded every single interaction within a large population, mapping out---for the first time at scale---the complete proximity network for a densely-connected system. Here we show the striking impact of interaction-distance on the network structure and dynamics of spreading processes. We create networks supporting close (intimate network, up to ~1m) and longer distance (ambient network, up to ~10m) modes of transmission. The intimate network is fragmented, with weak ties bridging densely-connected neighborhoods, whereas the ambient network supports spread driven by random contacts between strangers. While there is no trivial mapping from the micro-dynamics of proximity networks to empirical epidemics, these networks provide a telling approximation of droplet and airborne modes o...

  7. Modules of human micro-RNA co-target network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Mahashweta; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.; Mohanty, P. K.

    2011-05-01

    Human micro RNAs (miRNAs) target about 90% of the coding genes and form a complex regulatory network. We study the community structure of the miRNA co-target network considering miRNAs as the nodes which are connected by weighted links. The weight of link that connects a pair of miRNAs denote the total number of common transcripts targeted by that pair. We argue that the network consists of about 74 modules, quite similar to the components (or clusters) obtained earlier [Online J Bioinformatics, 10,280], indicating that the components of the miRNA co-target network are self organized in a way to maximize the modularity.

  8. Programming the dynamics of biochemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmel, Friedrich C

    2013-01-22

    The development of complex self-organizing molecular systems for future nanotechnology requires not only robust formation of molecular structures by self-assembly but also precise control over their temporal dynamics. As an exquisite example of such control, in this issue of ACS Nano, Fujii and Rondelez demonstrate a particularly compact realization of a molecular "predator-prey" ecosystem consisting of only three DNA species and three enzymes. The system displays pronounced oscillatory dynamics, in good agreement with the predictions of a simple theoretical model. Moreover, its considerable modularity also allows for ecological studies of competition and cooperation within molecular networks.

  9. Disordered proteins and network disorder in network descriptions of protein structure, dynamics and function: hypotheses and a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csermely, Peter; Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh; Hazai, Eszter; Hoksza, Zsolt; Kiss, Huba J M; Miozzo, Federico; Veres, Dániel V; Piazza, Francesco; Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    During the last decade, network approaches became a powerful tool to describe protein structure and dynamics. Here we review the links between disordered proteins and the associated networks, and describe the consequences of local, mesoscopic and global network disorder on changes in protein structure and dynamics. We introduce a new classification of protein networks into 'cumulus-type', i.e., those similar to puffy (white) clouds, and 'stratus-type', i.e., those similar to flat, dense (dark) low-lying clouds, and relate these network types to protein disorder dynamics and to differences in energy transmission processes. In the first class, there is limited overlap between the modules, which implies higher rigidity of the individual units; there the conformational changes can be described by an 'energy transfer' mechanism. In the second class, the topology presents a compact structure with significant overlap between the modules; there the conformational changes can be described by 'multi-trajectories'; that is, multiple highly populated pathways. We further propose that disordered protein regions evolved to help other protein segments reach 'rarely visited' but functionally-related states. We also show the role of disorder in 'spatial games' of amino acids; highlight the effects of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) on cellular networks and list some possible studies linking protein disorder and protein structure networks.

  10. Force Factor Modulation in Electro Dynamic Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risbo, Lars; Agerkvist, Finn T.; Tinggaard, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the non-linear phenomenon of ’reluctance force’ and the position dependency of the voice coil inductance was established in 1949 by Cunningham, who called it ’magnetic attraction force’. This paper revisits Cunningham’s analysis and expands it into a generalised form...... that includes the frequency dependency and applies to coils with non-inductive (lossy) blocked impedance. The paper also demonstrates that Cunningham’s force can be explained physically as a modulation of the force factor which again is directly linked to modulation of the flux of the coil. A verification based...... on both experiments and simulations is presented along discussions of the impact of force factor modulation for various motor topologies. Finally, it is shown that the popular L2R2 coil impedance model does not correctly predict the force unless the new analysis is applied....

  11. Force Factor Modulation in Electro Dynamic Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risbo, Lars; Agerkvist, Finn T.; Tinggaard, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the non-linear phenomenon of ’reluctance force’ and the position dependency of the voice coil inductance was established in 1949 by Cunningham, who called it ’magnetic attraction force’. This paper revisits Cunningham’s analysis and expands it into a generalised form that...... on both experiments and simulations is presented along discussions of the impact of force factor modulation for various motor topologies. Finally, it is shown that the popular L2R2 coil impedance model does not correctly predict the force unless the new analysis is applied....... that includes the frequency dependency and applies to coils with non-inductive (lossy) blocked impedance. The paper also demonstrates that Cunningham’s force can be explained physically as a modulation of the force factor which again is directly linked to modulation of the flux of the coil. A verification based...

  12. Evolutionary epistemology and dynamical virtual learning networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giani, Umberto

    2004-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to define the main features of a new educational model aimed at satisfying the needs of a rapidly changing society. The evolutionary epistemology paradigm of culture diffusion in human groups could be the conceptual ground for the development of this model. Multidimensionality, multi-disciplinarity, complexity, connectivity, critical thinking, creative thinking, constructivism, flexible learning, contextual learning, are the dimensions that should characterize distance learning models aimed at increasing the epistemological variability of learning communities. Two multimedia educational software, Dynamic Knowledge Networks (DKN) and Dynamic Virtual Learning Networks (DVLN) are described. These two complementary tools instantiate these dimensions, and were tested in almost 150 online courses. Even if the examples are framed in the medical context, the analysis of the shortcomings of the traditional educational systems and the proposed solutions can be applied to the vast majority of the educational contexts.

  13. Dynamic behavior and complexity of modulated optical micro ring resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Yang; Wei Pan; Bin Luo; ShuiYing Xiang; Ning Jiang

    2011-01-01

    @@ The dynamic behavior of an optical micro ring resonator (OMRR) with an amplitude modulator positioned in the micro ring is investigated quantitatively by adopting a recently introduced quantifier, the permutation entropy (PE).The effects of modulation depth are focused on, and the roles of input power are considered.The two-dimensional (2D) maps of PE showing dependence on both modulation depth and input power are presented as well.PE values nearly increase with modulation depth.On the other hand, the optimal value of input power is achieved when the PE reaches its maximum.Thus, PE can successfully quantify the dynamics of modulated OMRR.Selecting the parameters in the region with high PE values would contribute to the complexity-enhanced OMRR-based chaotic communication systems.%The dynamic behavior of an optical micro ring resonator (OMRR) with an amplitude modulator positioned in the micro ring is investigated quantitatively by adopting a recently introduced quantifier, the permutation entropy (PE). The effects of modulation depth are focused on, and the roles of input power are considered. The two-dimensional (2D) maps of PE showing dependence on both modulation depth and input power are presented as well. PE values nearly increase with modulation depth. On the other hand, the optimal value of input power is achieved when the PE reaches its maximum. Thus, PE can successfully quantify the dynamics of modulated OMRR. Selecting the parameters in the region with high PE values would contribute to the complexity-enhanced OMRR-based chaotic communication systems.

  14. Message Passing for Dynamic Network Energy Management

    CERN Document Server

    Kraning, Matt; Lavaei, Javad; Boyd, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    We consider a network of devices, such as generators, fixed loads, deferrable loads, and storage devices, each with its own dynamic constraints and objective, connected by lossy capacitated lines. The problem is to minimize the total network objective subject to the device and line constraints, over a given time horizon. This is a large optimization problem, with variables for consumption or generation in each time period for each device. In this paper we develop a decentralized method for solving this problem. The method is iterative: At each step, each device exchanges simple messages with its neighbors in the network and then solves its own optimization problem, minimizing its own objective function, augmented by a term determined by the messages it has received. We show that this message passing method converges to a solution when the device objective and constraints are convex. The method is completely decentralized, and needs no global coordination other than synchronizing iterations; the problems to be...

  15. Dynamic Spectrum Leasing to Cooperating Secondary Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Cuilian

    2008-01-01

    We propose and analyze a dynamic implementation of the property-rights model of cognitive radio, whereby a primary link has the possibility to lease the owned spectrum to a MAC network of secondary nodes in exchange for cooperation in the form of distributed space-time coding. On one hand, the primary link attempts to maximize its quality of service in terms of Signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR), accounting for the possible contribution from cooperation. On the other hand, nodes in the secondary network compete among themselves for transmission within the leased time-slot following a distributed heterogeneous opportunistic power control mechanism. The cooperation and competition between the primary and secondary network are cast in the framework of sequential game. We give consider both a baseline model with complete information and a more practical version with incomplete information, Using the backward induction approach for the former and providing approximating algorithm for the latter. Analys...

  16. Information spreading on dynamic social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chuang

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, information spreading on social networks has triggered an explosive attention in various disciplines. Most of previous related works in this area mainly focus on discussing the effects of spreading probability or immunization strategy on static networks. However, in real systems, the peer-to-peer network structure changes constantly according to frequently social activities of users. In order to capture this dynamical property and study its impact on information spreading, in this Letter, a link rewiring strategy based on the Fermi function is introduced. In the present model, the informed individuals tend to break old links and reconnect to ones with more uninformed neighbors. Simulation results on the susceptible-infected (\\textit{SI}) model with non-redundancy contacts indicate that the information spread more faster and broader with the rewiring strategy. Extensive analyses of the information cascading show that the spreading process of the initial steps plays a very important role, that is to s...

  17. Time-Varying Graphs and Dynamic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Casteigts, Arnaud; Quattrociocchi, Walter; Santoro, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    The past few years have seen intensive research efforts carried out in some apparently unrelated areas of dynamic systems -- delay-tolerant networks, opportunistic-mobility networks, social networks -- obtaining closely related insights. Indeed, the concepts discovered in these investigations can be viewed as parts of the same conceptual universe; and the formal models proposed so far to express some specific concepts can be viewed as fragments of a larger formal description of this universe. The main contribution of this paper is to integrate the existing partial models proposed in the literature into a unified framework, which we call TVG (for time-varying graphs). Using this framework, it is possible to express directly in the same formalism not only the concepts common to all those different areas, but also those specific to each. As part of the framework definition, we identify a hierarchy of classes of TVGs, defined with respects to basic properties to which correspond necessary conditions and impossibi...

  18. Dynamic Network Analysis for Robust Uncertainty Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    kpc , kgc are controller gains and A" is a constant skew symmetric matrix. Please see [11] for more details on the potential and gyroscropic...distilled from the study of statistical physics such as the small-world and the scale-free network (10,11), begin to see their application in gene ...dynamics of the nuclear factor NFKB, which regulates various genes important for pathogen or cytokine inflammation, immune re- 4 170 B.6. UNFOLDING

  19. Mean field methods for cortical network dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, J.; Lerchner, Alexander; Ahmadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    We review the use of mean field theory for describing the dynamics of dense, randomly connected cortical circuits. For a simple network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate- and-fire neurons, we can show how the firing irregularity, as measured by the Fano factor, increases with the stren...... cortex. Finally, an extension of the model to describe an orientation hypercolumn provides understanding of how cortical interactions sharpen orientation tuning, in a way that is consistent with observed firing statistics...

  20. Synchronization of coupled chaotic dynamics on networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R E Amritkar; Sarika Jalan

    2005-03-01

    We review some recent work on the synchronization of coupled dynamical systems on a variety of networks. When nodes show synchronized behaviour, two interesting phenomena can be observed. First, there are some nodes of the floating type that show intermittent behaviour between getting attached to some clusters and evolving independently. Secondly, two different ways of cluster formation can be identified, namely self-organized clusters which have mostly intra-cluster couplings and driven clusters which have mostly inter-cluster couplings.

  1. Neural Networks in Chemical Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Raff, Lionel; Hagan, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This monograph presents recent advances in neural network (NN) approaches and applications to chemical reaction dynamics. Topics covered include: (i) the development of ab initio potential-energy surfaces (PES) for complex multichannel systems using modified novelty sampling and feedforward NNs; (ii) methods for sampling the configuration space of critical importance, such as trajectory and novelty sampling methods and gradient fitting methods; (iii) parametrization of interatomic potential functions using a genetic algorithm accelerated with a NN; (iv) parametrization of analytic interatomic

  2. Dynamic congestion control mechanisms for MPLS networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holness, Felicia; Phillips, Chris I.

    2001-02-01

    Considerable interest has arisen in congestion control through traffic engineering from the knowledge that although sensible provisioning of the network infrastructure is needed, together with sufficient underlying capacity, these are not sufficient to deliver the Quality of Service required for new applications. This is due to dynamic variations in load. In operational Internet Protocol (IP) networks, it has been difficult to incorporate effective traffic engineering due to the limited capabilities of the IP technology. In principle, Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS), which is a connection-oriented label swapping technology, offers new possibilities in addressing the limitations by allowing the operator to use sophisticated traffic control mechanisms. This paper presents a novel scheme to dynamically manage traffic flows through the network by re-balancing streams during periods of congestion. It proposes management-based algorithms that will allow label switched routers within the network to utilize mechanisms within MPLS to indicate when flows are starting to experience frame/packet loss and then to react accordingly. Based upon knowledge of the customer's Service Level Agreement, together with instantaneous flow information, the label edge routers can then instigate changes to the LSP route and circumvent congestion that would hitherto violate the customer contacts.

  3. Water losses dynamic modelling in water distribution networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puleo, Valeria; Milici, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In the last decades, one of the main concerns of the water system managers have been the minimisation of water losses, that frequently reach values of 30% or even 70% of the volume supplying the water distribution network. The economic and social costs associated with water losses in modern water supply systems are rapidly rising to unacceptably high levels. Furthermore, the problem of the water losses assumes more and more importance mainly when periods of water scarcity occur or when not sufficient water supply takes part in areas with fast growth. In the present analysis, a dynamic model was used for estimating real and apparent losses of a real case study. A specific nodal demand model reflecting the user's tank installation and a specific apparent losses module were implemented. The results from the dynamic model were compared with the modelling estimation based on a steady-state approach.

  4. Dynamic Pathloss Model for Future Mobile Communication Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Ambuj; Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova; Prasad, Ramjee

    2016-01-01

    — Future mobile communication networks (MCNs) are expected to be more intelligent and proactive based on new capabilities that increase agility and performance. However, for any successful mobile network service, the dexterity in network deployment is a key factor. The efficiency of the network...... that incorporates the environmental dynamics factor in the propagation model for intelligent and proactively iterative networks...

  5. High Dimensional Modulation and MIMO Techniques for Access Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binti Othman, Maisara

    the capacity per wavelength of the femto-cell network. Bit rate up to 1.59 Gbps with fiber-wireless transmission over 1 m air distance is demonstrated. The results presented in this thesis demonstrate the feasibility of high dimensionality CAP in increasing the number of dimensions and their potentially......Exploration of advanced modulation formats and multiplexing techniques for next generation optical access networks are of interest as promising solutions for delivering multiple services to end-users. This thesis addresses this from two different angles: high dimensionality carrierless...... amplitudephase (CAP) and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radio-over-fiber (RoF) systems. High dimensionality CAP modulation has been investigated in optical fiber systems. In this project we conducted the first experimental demonstration of 3 and 4 dimensional CAP with bit rates up to 10 Gb...

  6. Asymmetrical Modulation for Uplink Communication in Cooperative Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qi; Fitzek, Frank H.P.; Iversen, Villy Bæk

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a spectrum efficient uplink communication method for cooperative wireless networks is presented. In cellular controlled peer to peer (CCP2P) cooperative wireless networks the mobile device is logically connected over cellular links with the base station and simultaneously over short......-range links with neighboring mobile devices to form cooperative clusters. So far the physical communication over cellular links and over short-range links are separated in time or in frequency. Beyond this state of the art, we exploit a method, referred to as asymmetrical modulation, where a mobile device...... information, the neighboring devices are getting the fine grained information reading between the lines. Our analytical analysis and simulation results show that asymmetrical modulation can improve the spectrum efficiency and reduce the data queuing delay with neither degrading the symbol error rate...

  7. 人工内分泌系统调节人工神经网络的控制模型%A dynamic control model for modulating using artificial neural networks using the artificial endocrine system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林广栋; 王煦法

    2012-01-01

    人体的内分泌系统是一个复杂的控制系统,与神经系统、免疫系统一起维持机体的内平衡.受内分泌系统与神经系统的相互作用机制启发,提出一种内分泌系统调节神经网络系统的EMNCS(endocrine modulated neural control system)控制模型.EMNCS模型中,内分泌系统可以根据环境变化动态调节神经网络系统,达到动态控制的目的.把该模型应用于动态环境下的机器人控制系统,实验表明,EMNCS模型能有效提高机器人在动态环境下的适应能力.%The endocrine system in the human body is a complex control system and cooperates with the neural and immune systems to maintain homeostasis. Inspired by the mechanism by which the endocrine system interacts with neural system, an EMNCS (endocrine modulated neural control system) model was proposed in which the artificial endocrine system modulated and artificial neural system. In EMNCS, the endocrine system could modulate the parameters and structures of the neural system in order to achieve dynamic control. The algorithm was applied in the robot system and experimental results show that EMNCS model can improve performance and enhance its adaptability.

  8. Dynamics of the ethanolamine glycerophospholipid remodeling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    Full Text Available Acyl chain remodeling in lipids is a critical biochemical process that plays a central role in disease. However, remodeling remains poorly understood, despite massive increases in lipidomic data. In this work, we determine the dynamic network of ethanolamine glycerophospholipid (PE remodeling, using data from pulse-chase experiments and a novel bioinformatic network inference approach. The model uses a set of ordinary differential equations based on the assumptions that (1 sn1 and sn2 acyl positions are independently remodeled; (2 remodeling reaction rates are constant over time; and (3 acyl donor concentrations are constant. We use a novel fast and accurate two-step algorithm to automatically infer model parameters and their values. This is the first such method applicable to dynamic phospholipid lipidomic data. Our inference procedure closely fits experimental measurements and shows strong cross-validation across six independent experiments with distinct deuterium-labeled PE precursors, demonstrating the validity of our assumptions. In contrast, fits of randomized data or fits using random model parameters are worse. A key outcome is that we are able to robustly distinguish deacylation and reacylation kinetics of individual acyl chain types at the sn1 and sn2 positions, explaining the established prevalence of saturated and unsaturated chains in the respective positions. The present study thus demonstrates that dynamic acyl chain remodeling processes can be reliably determined from dynamic lipidomic data.

  9. Implementation of quantum key distribution network simulation module in the network simulator NS-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehic, Miralem; Maurhart, Oliver; Rass, Stefan; Voznak, Miroslav

    2017-10-01

    As the research in quantum key distribution (QKD) technology grows larger and becomes more complex, the need for highly accurate and scalable simulation technologies becomes important to assess the practical feasibility and foresee difficulties in the practical implementation of theoretical achievements. Due to the specificity of the QKD link which requires optical and Internet connection between the network nodes, to deploy a complete testbed containing multiple network hosts and links to validate and verify a certain network algorithm or protocol would be very costly. Network simulators in these circumstances save vast amounts of money and time in accomplishing such a task. The simulation environment offers the creation of complex network topologies, a high degree of control and repeatable experiments, which in turn allows researchers to conduct experiments and confirm their results. In this paper, we described the design of the QKD network simulation module which was developed in the network simulator of version 3 (NS-3). The module supports simulation of the QKD network in an overlay mode or in a single TCP/IP mode. Therefore, it can be used to simulate other network technologies regardless of QKD.

  10. Universal structural estimator and dynamics approximator for complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Revealing the structure and dynamics of complex networked systems from observed data is of fundamental importance to science, engineering, and society. Is it possible to develop a universal, completely data driven framework to decipher the network structure and different types of dynamical processes on complex networks, regardless of their details? We develop a Markov network based model, sparse dynamical Boltzmann machine (SDBM), as a universal network structural estimator and dynamics approximator. The SDBM attains its topology according to that of the original system and is capable of simulating the original dynamical process. We develop a fully automated method based on compressive sensing and machine learning to find the SDBM. We demonstrate, for a large variety of representative dynamical processes on model and real world complex networks, that the equivalent SDBM can recover the network structure of the original system and predicts its dynamical behavior with high precision.

  11. Pro-cognitive drug effects modulate functional brain network organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten eGiessing

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies document that cholinergic and noradrenergic drugs improve attention, memory and cognitive control in healthy subjects and patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. In humans neural mechanisms of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation have mainly been analyzed by investigating drug-induced changes of task-related neural activity measured with fMRI. Endogenous neural activity has often been neglected. Further, although drugs affect the coupling between neurons, only a few human studies have explicitly addressed how drugs modulate the functional connectome, i.e. the functional neural interactions within the brain. These studies have mainly focused on synchronization or correlation of brain activations. Recently, there are some drug studies using graph theory and other new mathematical approaches to model the brain as a complex network of interconnected processing nodes. Using such measures it is possible to detect not only focal, but also subtle, widely distributed drug effects on functional network topology. Most important, graph theoretical measures also quantify whether drug-induced changes in topology or network organization facilitate or hinder information processing. Several studies could show that functional brain integration is highly correlated with behavioral performance suggesting that cholinergic and noradrenergic drugs which improve measures of cognitive performance should increase functional network integration. The purpose of this paper is to show that graph theory provides a mathematical tool to develop theory-driven biomarkers of pro-cognitive drug effects, and also to discuss how these approaches can contribute to the understanding of the role of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation in the human brain. Finally we discuss the global workspace theory as a theoretical framework of pro-cognitive drug effects and argue that pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic and noradrenergic drugs might be related to higher

  12. Dynamic Accuracy of Inertial Magnetic Sensor Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    interpolate function to replace the repeating values to ensure the RMS value was only calculated with the ground truth data obtained directly from...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Magnetic, angular rate, and gravity (MARG) sensor modules have extensive applications in inertial...and gravity , MARG, micro-electro-mechanical systems, MEMS, quaternion 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 147 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  13. Discrete Opinion Dynamics on Online Social Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yan-Li; BAI Liang; ZHANG Wei-Ming

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the dynamics of binary opinions {+1,-1} on online social networks consisting of heterogeneous actors.In our model,actors update their opinions under the interplay of social influence and selfaffirmation,which leads to rich dynamical behaviors on online social networks.We find that the opinion leading to the consensus features an advantage of the initially weighted fraction based on actors' strength over the other,instead of the population.For the role of specific actors,the consensus converges towards the opinion that a small fraction of high-strength actors hold,and individual diversity of self-affirmation slows down the ordering process of consensus.These indicate that high-strength actors play an essential role in opinion formation with strong social influence as well as high persistence.Further investigations show that the initial fraction of high-strength actors to dominate the evolution depends on the heterogeneity of the strength distribution,and less high-strength actors are needed in the case of a smaller exponent of power-law distribution of actors' strength.Our study provides deep insights into the role of social influence and self-affirmation on opinion formation on online social networks.

  14. Two-mode dynamics in pulse-modulated control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhusubaliyev, Z.T.; Yanochkina, O.O.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2010-01-01

    as an example the paper provides a survey of three new mechanisms of torus bifurcation that can be observed in pulse-modulated control systems. The paper concludes with a discussion of the influence that operation in the torus regimes will have on the efficiency of the converter......Pulse-modulated converter systems play an important role in modern power electronics. Systems of this type also deserve considerable theoretical interest because of the complex interplay they exhibit between ordinary (smooth) bifurcations and so-called border-collision bifurcations generated...... by the switching dynamics. Particularly interesting are the unusual transitions to torus dynamics, i.e., to a mode of behavior in which the regular switching dynamics is modulated by another oscillatory mode that may arise through instability in the feedback control. Using the model of a two-level DC/DC converter...

  15. Manycast routing, modulation level and spectrum assignment over elastic optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Xue; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Jie; Ji, Yuefeng; Wang, Huitao; Wang, Taili

    2017-07-01

    Manycast is a point to multi-point transmission framework that requires a subset of destination nodes successfully reached. It is particularly applicable for dealing with large amounts of data simultaneously in bandwidth-hungry, dynamic and cloud-based applications. As rapid increasing of traffics in these applications, the elastic optical networks (EONs) may be relied on to achieve high throughput manycast. In terms of finer spectrum granularity, the EONs could reach flexible accessing to network spectrum and efficient providing exact spectrum resource to demands. In this paper, we focus on the manycast routing, modulation level and spectrum assignment (MA-RMLSA) problem in EONs. Both EONs planning with static manycast traffic and EONs provisioning with dynamic manycast traffic are investigated. An integer linear programming (ILP) model is formulated to derive MA-RMLSA problem in static manycast scenario. Then corresponding heuristic algorithm called manycast routing, modulation level and spectrum assignment genetic algorithm (MA-RMLSA-GA) is proposed to adapt for both static and dynamic manycast scenarios. The MA-RMLSA-GA optimizes MA-RMLSA problem in destination nodes selection, routing light-tree constitution, modulation level allocation and spectrum resource assignment jointly, to achieve an effective improvement in network performance. Simulation results reveal that MA-RMLSA strategies offered by MA-RMLSA-GA have slightly disparity from the optimal solutions provided by ILP model in static scenario. Moreover, the results demonstrate that MA-RMLSA-GA realizes a highly efficient MA-RMLSA strategy with the lowest blocking probability in dynamic scenario compared with benchmark algorithms.

  16. Competing dynamical processes on two interacting networks

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Zuzek, L G; Braunstein, L A; Vazquez, F

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study a model for the competition between two different dynamical processes, one for opinion formation and the other for decision making, on two interconnected networks. The networks represent two interacting social groups, the society and the Congress. An opinion formation process takes place on the society, where the opinion S of each individual can take one of four possible values (S=-2,-1,1,2), describing its level of agreement on a given issue, from totally against (S=-2) to totally in favor (S=2). The dynamics is controlled by a reinforcement parameter r, which measures the ratio between the likelihood to become an extremist or a moderate. The dynamics of the Congress is akin to that of the Abrams-Strogatz model, where congressmen can adopt one of two possible positions, to be either in favor (+) or against (-) the issue. The probability that a congressman changes his decision is proportional to the fraction of interacting neighbors that hold the opposite opinion raised to a power $\\beta$...

  17. Persistence and periodicity in a dynamic proximity network

    CERN Document Server

    Clauset, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    The topology of social networks can be understood as being inherently dynamic, with edges having a distinct position in time. Most characterizations of dynamic networks discretize time by converting temporal information into a sequence of network "snapshots" for further analysis. Here we study a highly resolved data set of a dynamic proximity network of 66 individuals. We show that the topology of this network evolves over a very broad distribution of time scales, that its behavior is characterized by strong periodicities driven by external calendar cycles, and that the conversion of inherently continuous-time data into a sequence of snapshots can produce highly biased estimates of network structure. We suggest that dynamic social networks exhibit a natural time scale \\Delta_{nat}, and that the best conversion of such dynamic data to a discrete sequence of networks is done at this natural rate.

  18. Modeling Dynamic Evolution of Online Friendship Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴联仁; 闫强

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study the dynamic evolution of friendship network in SNS (Social Networking Site).Our analysis suggests that an individual joining a community depends not only on the number of friends he or she has within the community,but also on the friendship network generated by those friends.In addition,we propose a model which is based on two processes:first,connecting nearest neighbors;second,strength driven attachment mechanism.The model reflects two facts:first,in the social network it is a universal phenomenon that two nodes are connected when they have at least one common neighbor;second,new nodes connect more likely to nodes which have larger weights and interactions,a phenomenon called strength driven attachment (also called weight driven attachment).From the simulation results,we find that degree distribution P(k),strength distribution P(s),and degree-strength correlation are all consistent with empirical data.

  19. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  20. High Dimensional ODEs Coupled with Mixed-Effects Modeling Techniques for Dynamic Gene Regulatory Network Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Liang, Hua; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Hulin

    2011-01-01

    Gene regulation is a complicated process. The interaction of many genes and their products forms an intricate biological network. Identification of this dynamic network will help us understand the biological process in a systematic way. However, the construction of such a dynamic network is very challenging for a high-dimensional system. In this article we propose to use a set of ordinary differential equations (ODE), coupled with dimensional reduction by clustering and mixed-effects modeling techniques, to model the dynamic gene regulatory network (GRN). The ODE models allow us to quantify both positive and negative gene regulations as well as feedback effects of one set of genes in a functional module on the dynamic expression changes of the genes in another functional module, which results in a directed graph network. A five-step procedure, Clustering, Smoothing, regulation Identification, parameter Estimates refining and Function enrichment analysis (CSIEF) is developed to identify the ODE-based dynamic GRN. In the proposed CSIEF procedure, a series of cutting-edge statistical methods and techniques are employed, that include non-parametric mixed-effects models with a mixture distribution for clustering, nonparametric mixed-effects smoothing-based methods for ODE models, the smoothly clipped absolute deviation (SCAD)-based variable selection, and stochastic approximation EM (SAEM) approach for mixed-effects ODE model parameter estimation. The key step, the SCAD-based variable selection of the proposed procedure is justified by investigating its asymptotic properties and validated by Monte Carlo simulations. We apply the proposed method to identify the dynamic GRN for yeast cell cycle progression data. We are able to annotate the identified modules through function enrichment analyses. Some interesting biological findings are discussed. The proposed procedure is a promising tool for constructing a general dynamic GRN and more complicated dynamic networks.

  1. Collective dynamics of active cytoskeletal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Köhler

    Full Text Available Self organization mechanisms are essential for the cytoskeleton to adapt to the requirements of living cells. They rely on the intricate interplay of cytoskeletal filaments, crosslinking proteins and molecular motors. Here we present an in vitro minimal model system consisting of actin filaments, fascin and myosin-II filaments exhibiting pulsatile collective dynamics and superdiffusive transport properties. Both phenomena rely on the complex competition of crosslinking molecules and motor filaments in the network. They are only observed if the relative strength of the binding of myosin-II filaments to the actin network allows exerting high enough forces to unbind actin/fascin crosslinks. This is shown by varying the binding strength of the acto-myosin bond and by combining the experiments with phenomenological simulations based on simple interaction rules.

  2. Dynamics of neural networks with continuous attractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, C. C. Alan; Wong, K. Y. Michael; Wu, Si

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of continuous attractor neural networks (CANNs). Due to the translational invariance of their neuronal interactions, CANNs can hold a continuous family of stationary states. We systematically explore how their neutral stability facilitates the tracking performance of a CANN, which is believed to have wide applications in brain functions. We develop a perturbative approach that utilizes the dominant movement of the network stationary states in the state space. We quantify the distortions of the bump shape during tracking, and study their effects on the tracking performance. Results are obtained on the maximum speed for a moving stimulus to be trackable, and the reaction time to catch up an abrupt change in stimulus.

  3. Stochastic epidemic dynamics on extremely heterogeneous networks

    CERN Document Server

    Parra-Rojas, César; McKane, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Networks of contacts capable of spreading infectious diseases are often observed to be highly heterogeneous, with the majority of individuals having fewer contacts than the mean, and a significant minority having relatively very many contacts. We derive a two-dimensional diffusion model for the full temporal behavior of the stochastic susceptible-infectious-recovered (SIR) model on such a network, by making use of a time-scale separation in the deterministic limit of the dynamics. This low-dimensional process is an accurate approximation to the full model in the limit of large populations, even for cases when the time-scale separation is not too pronounced, provided the maximum degree is not of the order of the population size.

  4. Stochastic epidemic dynamics on extremely heterogeneous networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Rojas, César; House, Thomas; McKane, Alan J.

    2016-12-01

    Networks of contacts capable of spreading infectious diseases are often observed to be highly heterogeneous, with the majority of individuals having fewer contacts than the mean, and a significant minority having relatively very many contacts. We derive a two-dimensional diffusion model for the full temporal behavior of the stochastic susceptible-infectious-recovered (SIR) model on such a network, by making use of a time-scale separation in the deterministic limit of the dynamics. This low-dimensional process is an accurate approximation to the full model in the limit of large populations, even for cases when the time-scale separation is not too pronounced, provided the maximum degree is not of the order of the population size.

  5. The Dynamics of Initiative in Communication Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mollgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Human social interaction is often intermittent. Two acquainted persons can have extended periods without social interaction punctuated by periods of repeated interaction. In this case, the repeated interaction can be characterized by a seed initiative by either of the persons and a number of follow-up interactions. The tendency to initiate social interaction plays an important role in the formation of social networks and is in general not symmetric between persons. In this paper, we study the dynamics of initiative by analysing and modeling a detailed call and text message network sampled from a group of 700 individuals. We show that in an average relationship between two individuals, one part is almost twice as likely to initiate communication compared to the other part. The asymmetry has social consequences and ultimately might lead to the discontinuation of a relationship. We explain the observed asymmetry by a positive feedback mechanism where individuals already taking initiative are more likely to take ...

  6. Creative Cognition and Brain Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Roger E.; Benedek, Mathias; Silvia, Paul J.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Creative thinking is central to the arts, sciences, and everyday life. How does the brain produce creative thought? A series of recently published papers has begun to provide insight into this question, reporting a strikingly similar pattern of brain activity and connectivity across a range of creative tasks and domains, from divergent thinking to poetry composition to musical improvisation. This research suggests that creative thought involves dynamic interactions of large-scale brain systems, with the most compelling finding being that the default and executive control networks, which can show an antagonistic relationship, actually cooperate during creative cognition and artistic performance. These findings have implications for understanding how brain networks interact to support complex cognitive processes, particularly those involving goal-directed, self-generated thought. PMID:26553223

  7. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinta, Tinkara; Kogovšek, Tjaša; Malej, Alenka; Turk, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into possible changes in

  8. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Tinta

    Full Text Available Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into

  9. Steady-state and dynamic network modes for perceptual expectation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Uk-Su; Sung, Yul-Wan; Ogawa, Seiji

    2017-01-12

    Perceptual expectation can attenuate repetition suppression, the stimulus-induced neuronal response generated by repeated stimulation, suggesting that repetition suppression is a top-down modulatory phenomenon. However, it is still unclear which high-level brain areas are involved and how they interact with low-level brain areas. Further, the temporal range over which perceptual expectation can effectively attenuate repetition suppression effects remains unclear. To elucidate the details of this top-down modulatory process, we used two short and long inter-stimulus intervals for a perceptual expectation paradigm of paired stimulation. We found that top-down modulation enhanced the response to the unexpected stimulus when repetition suppression was weak and that the effect disappeared at 1,000 ms prior to stimulus exposure. The high-level areas involved in this process included the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG_L) and left parietal lobule (IPL_L). We also found two systems providing modulatory input to the right fusiform face area (FFA_R): one from IFG_L and the other from IPL_L. Most importantly, we identified two states of networks through which perceptual expectation modulates sensory responses: one is a dynamic state and the other is a steady state. Our results provide the first functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) evidence of temporally nested networks in brain processing.

  10. Dynamic Homeostasis in Packet Switching Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Mizuki; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the adaptation and robustness of a packet switching network (PSN), the fundamental architecture of the Internet. We claim that the adaptation introduced by a transmission control protocol (TCP) congestion control mechanism is interpretable as the self-organization of multiple attractors and stability to switch from one attractor to another. To discuss this argument quantitatively, we study the adaptation of the Internet by simulating a PSN using ns-2. Our hypothesis is that the robustness and fragility of the Internet can be attributed to the inherent dynamics of the PSN feedback mechanism called the congestion window size, or \\textit{cwnd}. By varying the data input into the PSN system, we investigate the possible self-organization of attractors in cwnd temporal dynamics and discuss the adaptability and robustness of PSNs. The present study provides an example of Ashby's Law of Requisite Variety in action.

  11. Sensory Coding with Dynamically Competitive Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Rabinovich, M I; Volkovskii, A R; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Laurent, G; Abarbanel, Henry D I

    1999-01-01

    Studies of insect olfactory processing indicate that odors are represented by rich spatio-temporal patterns of neural activity. These patterns are very difficult to predict a priori, yet they are stimulus specific and reliable upon repeated stimulation with the same input. We formulate here a theoretical framework in which we can interpret these experimental results. We propose a paradigm of ``dynamic competition'' in which inputs (odors) are represented by internally competing neural assemblies. Each pattern is the result of dynamical motion within the network and does not involve a ``winner'' among competing possibilities. The model produces spatio-temporal patterns with strong resemblance to those observed experimentally and possesses many of the general features one desires for pattern classifiers: large information capacity, reliability, specific responses to specific inputs, and reduced sensitivity to initial conditions or influence of noise. This form of neural processing may thus describe the organiza...

  12. A functional network module for Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girirajan, S; Truong, H T; Blanchard, C L; Elsea, S H

    2009-04-01

    Disorders with overlapping diagnostic features are grouped into a network module. Based on phenotypic similarities or differential diagnoses, it is possible to identify functional pathways leading to individual features. We generated a Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS)-specific network module utilizing patient clinical data, text mining from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, and in vitro functional analysis. We tested our module by functional studies based on a hypothesis that RAI1 acts through phenotype-specific pathways involving several downstream genes, which are altered due to RAI1 haploinsufficiency. A preliminary genome-wide gene expression study was performed using microarrays on RAI1 haploinsufficient cells created by RNAi-based approximately 50% knockdown of RAI1 in HEK293T cells. The top dysregulated genes were involved in growth signaling and insulin sensitivity, neuronal differentiation, lipid biosynthesis and fat mobilization, circadian activity, behavior, renal, cardiovascular and skeletal development, gene expression, and cell-cycle regulation and recombination, reflecting the spectrum of clinical features observed in SMS. Validation using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction confirmed the gene expression profile of 75% of the selected genes analyzed in both HEK293T RAI1 knockdown cells and SMS lymphoblastoid cell lines. Overall, these data support a method for identifying genes and pathways responsible for individual clinical features in a complex disorder such as SMS.

  13. Development of Active External Network Topology Module for Floodlight SDN Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Noskov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional network architecture is inflexible and complicated. This observation has led to a paradigm shift towards software-defined networking (SDN, where network management level is separated from data forwarding level. This change was made possible by control plane transfer from the switching equipment to software modules that run on a dedicated server, called the controller (or network operating system, or network applications, that work with this controller. Methods of representation, storage and communication interfaces with network topology elements are the most important aspects of network operating systems available to SDN user because performance of some key controller modules is heavily dependent on internal representation of the network topology. Notably, firewall and routing modules are examples of such modules. This article describes the methods used for presentation and storage of network topologies, as well as interface to the corresponding Floodlight modules. An alternative algorithm has been suggested and developed for message exchange conveying network topology alterations between the controller and network applications. Proposed algorithm makes implementation of module alerting based on subscription to the relevant events. API for interaction between controller and network applications has been developed. This algorithm and API formed the base for Topology Tracker module capable to inform network applications about the changes that had occurred in the network topology and also stores compact representation of the network to speed up the interaction process.

  14. Regulatory Snapshots: integrative mining of regulatory modules from expression time series and regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana P Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Explaining regulatory mechanisms is crucial to understand complex cellular responses leading to system perturbations. Some strategies reverse engineer regulatory interactions from experimental data, while others identify functional regulatory units (modules under the assumption that biological systems yield a modular organization. Most modular studies focus on network structure and static properties, ignoring that gene regulation is largely driven by stimulus-response behavior. Expression time series are key to gain insight into dynamics, but have been insufficiently explored by current methods, which often (1 apply generic algorithms unsuited for expression analysis over time, due to inability to maintain the chronology of events or incorporate time dependency; (2 ignore local patterns, abundant in most interesting cases of transcriptional activity; (3 neglect physical binding or lack automatic association of regulators, focusing mainly on expression patterns; or (4 limit the discovery to a predefined number of modules. We propose Regulatory Snapshots, an integrative mining approach to identify regulatory modules over time by combining transcriptional control with response, while overcoming the above challenges. Temporal biclustering is first used to reveal transcriptional modules composed of genes showing coherent expression profiles over time. Personalized ranking is then applied to prioritize prominent regulators targeting the modules at each time point using a network of documented regulatory associations and the expression data. Custom graphics are finally depicted to expose the regulatory activity in a module at consecutive time points (snapshots. Regulatory Snapshots successfully unraveled modules underlying yeast response to heat shock and human epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on regulations documented in the YEASTRACT and JASPAR databases, respectively, and available expression data. Regulatory players involved in

  15. A dynamic network in a dynamic population: asymptotic properties

    CERN Document Server

    Britton, Tom; Turova, Tatyana

    2011-01-01

    We derive asymptotic properties for a stochastic dynamic network model in a stochastic dynamic population. In the model, nodes give birth to new nodes until they die, each node being equipped with a social index given at birth. During the life of a node it creates edges to other nodes, nodes with high social index at higher rate, and edges disappear randomly in time. For this model we derive criterion for when a giant connected component exists after the process has evolved for a long period of time, assuming the node population grows to infinity. We also obtain an explicit expression for the degree correlation $\\rho$ (of neighbouring nodes) which shows that $\\rho$ is always positive irrespective of parameter values in one of the two treated submodels, and may be either positive or negative in the other model, depending on the parameters.

  16. Dynamic Processes in Network Goods: Modeling, Analysis and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paothong, Arnut

    2013-01-01

    The network externality function plays a very important role in the study of economic network industries. Moreover, the consumer group dynamic interactions coupled with network externality concept is going to play a dominant role in the network goods in the 21st century. The existing literature is stemmed on a choice of externality function with…

  17. Precise temporal modulation in the response of the SOS DNA repair network in individual bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Friedman

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The SOS genetic network is responsible for the repair/bypass of DNA damage in bacterial cells. While the initial stages of the response have been well characterized, less is known about the dynamics of the response after induction and its shutoff. To address this, we followed the response of the SOS network in living individual Escherichia coli cells. The promoter activity (PA of SOS genes was monitored using fluorescent protein-promoter fusions, with high temporal resolution, after ultraviolet irradiation activation. We find a temporal pattern of discrete activity peaks masked in studies of cell populations. The number of peaks increases, while their amplitude reaches saturation, as the damage level is increased. Peak timing is highly precise from cell to cell and is independent of the stage in the cell cycle at the time of damage. Evidence is presented for the involvement of the umuDC operon in maintaining the pattern of PA and its temporal precision, providing further evidence for the role UmuD cleavage plays in effecting a timed pause during the SOS response, as previously proposed. The modulations in PA we observe share many features in common with the oscillatory behavior recently observed in a mammalian DNA damage response. Our results, which reveal a hitherto unknown modulation of the SOS response, underscore the importance of carrying out dynamic measurements at the level of individual living cells in order to unravel how a natural genetic network operates at the systems level.

  18. Imaging complex nutrient dynamics in mycelial networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, M D; Lee, J A; Bebber, D P; Tlalka, M; Hynes, J; Darrah, P R; Watkinson, S C; Boddy, L

    2008-08-01

    techniques shows that as the colony forms, it self-organizes into well demarcated domains that are identifiable by differences in the phase relationship of the pulses. On the centimetre to metre scale, we have begun to use techniques borrowed from graph theory to characterize the development and dynamics of the network, and used these abstracted network models to predict the transport characteristics, resilience, and cost of the network.

  19. Dynamic Coverage of Mobile Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Benyuan; Nain, Philippe; Towsley, Don

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the dynamic aspects of the coverage of a mobile sensor network resulting from continuous movement of sensors. As sensors move around, initially uncovered locations are likely to be covered at a later time. A larger area is covered as time continues, and intruders that might never be detected in a stationary sensor network can now be detected by moving sensors. However, this improvement in coverage is achieved at the cost that a location is covered only part of the time, alternating between covered and not covered. We characterize area coverage at specific time instants and during time intervals, as well as the time durations that a location is covered and uncovered. We further characterize the time it takes to detect a randomly located intruder. For mobile intruders, we take a game theoretic approach and derive optimal mobility strategies for both sensors and intruders. Our results show that sensor mobility brings about unique dynamic coverage properties not present in a stationary sens...

  20. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  1. Dynamic Localization Schemes in Malicious Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiqi Xiong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSN have recently shown many potential military and civilian applications, especially those used in hostile environments where malicious adversaries can be present. The accuracy of location information is critical for such applications. It is impractical to have a GPS device on each sensor in WSN due to costs. Most of the existing location discovery schemes can only be used in the trusted environment. Recent research has addressed security issues in sensor network localization, but to the best of our knowledge, none have completely solved the secure localization problem. In this paper, we propose novel schemes for secure dynamic localization in sensor networks. These proposed schemes can tolerate up to 50% of beacon nodes being malicious, and they have linear computation time with respect to the number of reference nodes. Our security analysis has showed that our schemes are applicable and resilient to attacks from adversaries. We have further conducted simulations to analyze and compare the performance of these schemes, and to indicate when each should be used. The efficiencies of each method shows why we needed to propose multiple methods.

  2. Theoretical research progress in complexity of complex dynamical networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Jinqing

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the main progress in dynamical complexity of theoretical models for nonlinear complex networks proposed by our Joint Complex Network Research Group (JCNRG). The topological and dynamical properties of these theoretical models are numerically and analytically studied. Several findings are useful for understanding and deeply studying complex networks from macroscopic to microscopic levels and have a potential of applications in real-world networks.

  3. Agent Based Modeling on Organizational Dynamics of Terrorist Network

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Li; Duoyong Sun; Renqi Zhu; Ze Li

    2015-01-01

    Modeling organizational dynamics of terrorist network is a critical issue in computational analysis of terrorism research. The first step for effective counterterrorism and strategic intervention is to investigate how the terrorists operate with the relational network and what affects the performance. In this paper, we investigate the organizational dynamics by employing a computational experimentation methodology. The hierarchical cellular network model and the organizational dynamics model ...

  4. Identifying the topology of networks with discrete-time dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shu-Juan; Fu, Xin-Chu

    2010-07-01

    We suggest a method for identifying the topology of networks with discrete-time dynamics based on the dynamical evolution supported by the networks. The Frobenius matrix norm and Lasalle's invariance principle are used in this work. The network concerned can be directed or undirected, weighted or unweighted, and the local dynamics of each node can be nonidentical. The connections among the nodes can be all unknown or partially known. Finally, several examples are illustrated to verify the theoretical results.

  5. Identifying the topology of networks with discrete-time dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Shujuan [School of Physics and Mathematics, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Fu Xinchu, E-mail: sjguo1@gmail.co, E-mail: enxcfu@gmail.co [Department of Mathematics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2010-07-23

    We suggest a method for identifying the topology of networks with discrete-time dynamics based on the dynamical evolution supported by the networks. The Frobenius matrix norm and Lasalle's invariance principle are used in this work. The network concerned can be directed or undirected, weighted or unweighted, and the local dynamics of each node can be nonidentical. The connections among the nodes can be all unknown or partially known. Finally, several examples are illustrated to verify the theoretical results.

  6. Quantifying the dynamics of coupled networks of switches and oscillators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Francis

    Full Text Available Complex network dynamics have been analyzed with models of systems of coupled switches or systems of coupled oscillators. However, many complex systems are composed of components with diverse dynamics whose interactions drive the system's evolution. We, therefore, introduce a new modeling framework that describes the dynamics of networks composed of both oscillators and switches. Both oscillator synchronization and switch stability are preserved in these heterogeneous, coupled networks. Furthermore, this model recapitulates the qualitative dynamics for the yeast cell cycle consistent with the hypothesized dynamics resulting from decomposition of the regulatory network into dynamic motifs. Introducing feedback into the cell-cycle network induces qualitative dynamics analogous to limitless replicative potential that is a hallmark of cancer. As a result, the proposed model of switch and oscillator coupling provides the ability to incorporate mechanisms that underlie the synchronized stimulus response ubiquitous in biochemical systems.

  7. Complex Dynamical Network Control for Trajectory Tracking Using Delayed Recurrent Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose P. Perez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of trajectory tracking is studied. Based on the V-stability and Lyapunov theory, a control law that achieves the global asymptotic stability of the tracking error between a delayed recurrent neural network and a complex dynamical network is obtained. To illustrate the analytic results, we present a tracking simulation of a dynamical network with each node being just one Lorenz’s dynamical system and three identical Chen’s dynamical systems.

  8. M-ARRAY QUADRATURE AMPLITUDE MODULATION WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK MODULATOR RELIABILITY AND ACCURACY ANALYZE IN CIVIL SHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammud Ershadul Haque

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Network (WSN is the new invention applying for assessment the damage of the historical or high rise civil building structural health. Technical challenges affecting deployment of wireless sensor network including the range of the transmission problem, low data transmission rate of the existing SHM strategies. The most vital factor of SHM wireless sensor systems is the modulator accuracy and reliability that qualify the wireless communication system to assess large building structure health Information. The objective of this article is to provide solution to measure both reliability and accuracy of the wireless sensor network modulator. we computed M-array QAM modulator BER and compare the simulation result with theoretical to find out optimum modulation technique for transmission System with considering maximum data rate, AWGN channel and also measured modulator accuracy based on ZigBee by computing M-array modulator Error Vector Magnitude (EVM to quantify the transmitter quality.

  9. Matrix stiffness modulates formation and activity of neuronal networks of controlled architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantoine, Joséphine; Grevesse, Thomas; Villers, Agnès; Delhaye, Geoffrey; Mestdagh, Camille; Versaevel, Marie; Mohammed, Danahe; Bruyère, Céline; Alaimo, Laura; Lacour, Stéphanie P; Ris, Laurence; Gabriele, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    The ability to construct easily in vitro networks of primary neurons organized with imposed topologies is required for neural tissue engineering as well as for the development of neuronal interfaces with desirable characteristics. However, accumulating evidence suggests that the mechanical properties of the culture matrix can modulate important neuronal functions such as growth, extension, branching and activity. Here we designed robust and reproducible laminin-polylysine grid micropatterns on cell culture substrates that have similar biochemical properties but a 100-fold difference in Young's modulus to investigate the role of the matrix rigidity on the formation and activity of cortical neuronal networks. We found that cell bodies of primary cortical neurons gradually accumulate in circular islands, whereas axonal extensions spread on linear tracks to connect circular islands. Our findings indicate that migration of cortical neurons is enhanced on soft substrates, leading to a faster formation of neuronal networks. Furthermore, the pre-synaptic density was two times higher on stiff substrates and consistently the number of action potentials and miniature synaptic currents was enhanced on stiff substrates. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence to indicate that matrix stiffness is a key parameter to modulate the growth dynamics, synaptic density and electrophysiological activity of cortical neuronal networks, thus providing useful information on scaffold design for neural tissue engineering.

  10. Social Balance on Networks: The Dynamics of Friendship and Enmity

    CERN Document Server

    Antal, T; Redner, S

    2006-01-01

    How do social networks evolve when both friendly and unfriendly relations exist? Here we propose a simple dynamics for social networks in which the sense of a relationship can change so as to eliminate imbalanced triads--relationship triangles that contains 1 or 3 unfriendly links. In this dynamics, a friendly link changes to unfriendly or vice versa in an imbalanced triad to make the triad balanced. Such networks undergo a dynamic phase transition from a steady state to "utopia"--all friendly links--as the amount of network friendliness is changed. Basic features of the long-time dynamics and the phase transition are discussed.

  11. FUMET: A fuzzy network module extraction technique for gene expression data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Priyakshi Mahanta; Hasin Afzal Ahmed; Dhruba Kumar Bhattacharyya; Ashish Ghosh

    2014-06-01

    Construction of co-expression network and extraction of network modules have been an appealing area of bioinformatics research. This article presents a co-expression network construction and a biologically relevant network module extraction technique based on fuzzy set theoretic approach. The technique is able to handle both positive and negative correlations among genes. The constructed network for some benchmark gene expression datasets have been validated using topological internal and external measures. The effectiveness of network module extraction technique has been established in terms of well-known p-value, Q-value and topological statistics.

  12. Dynamics of Electrically Modulated Colloidal Droplet Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ranabir; Ghosh, Udita Uday; Chakraborty, Suman; DasGupta, Sunando

    2015-10-20

    Electrically actuated transport dynamics of colloidal droplets, on a hydrophobic dielectric film covering an array of electrodes, is studied here. Specifically, the effects of the size and electrical properties (zeta-potential) of the colloidal particles on such transport characteristics are investigated. For the colloidal droplets, the application of an electrical voltage leads to additional attenuation of the local dielectric-droplet interfacial tension. This is due to the electrically triggered enhanced colloidal particle adsorption at the dielectric-droplet interface, in the immediate vicinity of the droplet three-phase contact line (TPCL). The extent of such interfacial particle adsorption, and hence, the extent of the consequential reduction in the interfacial tension, is dictated by the combined effects of the three-phase contact line spreading, particle size, the interfacial electrostatic interaction between the colloidal particles (if charged) and the charged dielectric surface above the activated electrode, and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The electrical driving force of varying magnitude, stemming from this altered solid-liquid interfacial tension gradient in the presence of the colloidal particles, culminates in different droplet transport velocity and droplet transfer frequency for different colloidal droplets. We substantiate the inferences from our experimental results by a quasi-steady state force balance model for colloidal droplet transport. We believe that the present work will provide an accurate framework for determining the optimal design and operational parameters for digital microfluidic chips handling colloidal droplets, as encountered in a plethora of applications.

  13. Eigengene networks for studying the relationships between co-expression modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvath Steve

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that genes and their protein products are organized into functional modules according to cellular processes and pathways. Gene co-expression networks have been used to describe the relationships between gene transcripts. Ample literature exists on how to detect biologically meaningful modules in networks but there is a need for methods that allow one to study the relationships between modules. Results We show that network methods can also be used to describe the relationships between co-expression modules and present the following methodology. First, we describe several methods for detecting modules that are shared by two or more networks (referred to as consensus modules. We represent the gene expression profiles of each module by an eigengene. Second, we propose a method for constructing an eigengene network, where the edges are undirected but maintain information on the sign of the co-expression information. Third, we propose methods for differential eigengene network analysis that allow one to assess the preservation of network properties across different data sets. We illustrate the value of eigengene networks in studying the relationships between consensus modules in human and chimpanzee brains; the relationships between consensus modules in brain, muscle, liver, and adipose mouse tissues; and the relationships between male-female mouse consensus modules and clinical traits. In some applications, we find that module eigengenes can be organized into higher level clusters which we refer to as meta-modules. Conclusion Eigengene networks can be effective and biologically meaningful tools for studying the relationships between modules of a gene co-expression network. The proposed methods may reveal a higher order organization of the transcriptome. R software tutorials, the data, and supplementary material can be found at the following webpage: http://www.genetics.ucla.edu/labs/horvath/CoexpressionNetwork/EigengeneNetwork.

  14. Google matrix, dynamical attractors, and Ulam networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelyansky, D. L.; Zhirov, O. V.

    2010-03-01

    We study the properties of the Google matrix generated by a coarse-grained Perron-Frobenius operator of the Chirikov typical map with dissipation. The finite-size matrix approximant of this operator is constructed by the Ulam method. This method applied to the simple dynamical model generates directed Ulam networks with approximate scale-free scaling and characteristics being in certain features similar to those of the world wide web with approximate scale-free degree distributions as well as two characteristics similar to the web: a power-law decay in PageRank that mirrors the decay of PageRank on the world wide web and a sensitivity to the value α in PageRank. The simple dynamical attractors play here the role of popular websites with a strong concentration of PageRank. A variation in the Google parameter α or other parameters of the dynamical map can drive the PageRank of the Google matrix to a delocalized phase with a strange attractor where the Google search becomes inefficient.

  15. Dynamics on networks: competition of temporal and topological correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Artime, Oriol; Miguel, Maxi San

    2016-01-01

    Links in many real-world networks activate and deactivate in correspondence to the sporadic interactions between the elements of the system. The activation patterns may be irregular or bursty and play an important role on the dynamics of processes taking place in the network. Social networks and information or disease spreading processes are paradigmatic examples of this situation. Besides the burstiness, several other correlations may appear in the network dynamics. The activation of links connecting to the same node can be synchronized or the existence of communities in the network may mediate the activation patterns of internal an external links. Here we study the competition of topological and temporal correlations in link activation and how they affect the dynamics of systems running on the network. Interestingly, both types of correlations by separate have opposite effects: one (topological) delays the dynamics of processes on the network, while the other (temporal) accelerates it. When they occur toget...

  16. Interestingness-Driven Diffusion Process Summarization in Dynamic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Qiang; Liu, Siyuan; Jensen, Christian S.

    2014-01-01

    tool in this regard is data summarization. However, few existing studies aim to summarize graphs/networks for dynamics. Dynamic networks raise new challenges not found in static settings, including time sensitivity and the needs for online interestingness evaluation and summary traceability, which......The widespread use of social networks enables the rapid diffusion of information, e.g., news, among users in very large communities. It is a substantial challenge to be able to observe and understand such diffusion processes, which may be modeled as networks that are both large and dynamic. A key...... render existing techniques inapplicable. We study the topic of dynamic network summarization: how to summarize dynamic networks with millions of nodes by only capturing the few most interesting nodes or edges over time, and we address the problem by finding interestingness-driven diffusion processes...

  17. Self-organization of complex networks as a dynamical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Yawata, Koichiro; Aoyagi, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    To understand the dynamics of real-world networks, we investigate a mathematical model of the interplay between the dynamics of random walkers on a weighted network and the link weights driven by a resource carried by the walkers. Our numerical studies reveal that, under suitable conditions, the co-evolving dynamics lead to the emergence of stationary power-law distributions of the resource and link weights, while the resource quantity at each node ceaselessly changes with time. We analyze the network organization as a deterministic dynamical system and find that the system exhibits multistability, with numerous fixed points, limit cycles, and chaotic states. The chaotic behavior of the system leads to the continual changes in the microscopic network dynamics in the absence of any external random noises. We conclude that the intrinsic interplay between the states of the nodes and network reformation constitutes a major factor in the vicissitudes of real-world networks.

  18. SDN-Enabled Dynamic Feedback Control and Sensing in Agile Optical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Likun

    Fiber optic networks are no longer just pipelines for transporting data in the long haul backbone. Exponential growth in traffic in metro-regional areas has pushed higher capacity fiber toward the edge of the network, and highly dynamic patterns of heterogeneous traffic have emerged that are often bursty, severely stressing the historical "fat and dumb pipe" static optical network, which would need to be massively over-provisioned to deal with these loads. What is required is a more intelligent network with a span of control over the optical as well as electrical transport mechanisms which enables handling of service requests in a fast and efficient way that guarantees quality of service (QoS) while optimizing capacity efficiency. An "agile" optical network is a reconfigurable optical network comprised of high speed intelligent control system fed by real-time in situ network sensing. It provides fast response in the control and switching of optical signals in response to changing traffic demands and network conditions. This agile control of optical signals is enabled by pushing switching decisions downward in the network stack to the physical layer. Implementing such agility is challenging due to the response dynamics and interactions of signals in the physical layer. Control schemes must deal with issues such as dynamic power equalization, EDFA transients and cascaded noise effects, impairments due to self-phase modulation and dispersion, and channel-to-channel cross talk. If these issues are not properly predicted and mitigated, attempts at dynamic control can drive the optical network into an unstable state. In order to enable high speed actuation of signal modulators and switches, the network controller must be able to make decisions based on predictive models. In this thesis, we consider how to take advantage of Software Defined Networking (SDN) capabilities for network reconfiguration, combined with embedded models that access updates from deployed network

  19. Dynamical Analysis of Protein Regulatory Network in Budding Yeast Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fang-Ting; JIA Xun

    2006-01-01

    @@ Recent progresses in the protein regulatory network of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided a global picture of its protein network for further dynamical research. We simplify and modularize the protein regulatory networks in yeast nucleus, and study the dynamical properties of the core 37-node network by a Boolean network model, especially the evolution steps and final fixed points. Our simulation results show that the number of fixed points N(k) for a given size of the attraction basin k obeys a power-law distribution N(k)∝k-2.024. The yeast network is more similar to a scale-free network than a random network in the above dynamical properties.

  20. Mining Functional Modules in Heterogeneous Biological Networks Using Multiplex PageRank Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Patrick X

    2016-01-01

    Identification of functional modules/sub-networks in large-scale biological networks is one of the important research challenges in current bioinformatics and systems biology. Approaches have been developed to identify functional modules in single-class biological networks; however, methods for systematically and interactively mining multiple classes of heterogeneous biological networks are lacking. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm (called mPageRank) that utilizes the Multiplex PageRank approach to mine functional modules from two classes of biological networks. We demonstrate the capabilities of our approach by successfully mining functional biological modules through integrating expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks. We first compared the performance of our method with that of other methods using simulated data. We then applied our method to identify the cell division cycle related functional module and plant signaling defense-related functional module in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results demonstrated that the mPageRank method is effective for mining sub-networks in both expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks, and has the potential to be adapted for the discovery of functional modules/sub-networks in other heterogeneous biological networks. The mPageRank executable program, source code, the datasets and results of the presented two case studies are publicly and freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/MPageRank/.

  1. Chaotic Dynamics of a Periodically Modulated Josephson Junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qin; LI Fei

    2007-01-01

    We study the chaotic dynamics of a periodically modulated Josephson junction with damping. The general solution of the first-order perturbed equation is constructed by using the direct perturbation technique. It is theoretically found that the boundedness conditions of the general solution contain the Melnikov chaotic criterion.When the perturbation conditions cannot be satisfied, numerical simulations demonstrate that the system can step into chaos through a period doubling route with the increase of the amplitude of the modulating term.Regulating specific parameters can effectively suppress the chaos.

  2. A Random Laser as a Dynamical Network

    CERN Document Server

    Höfner, M; Henneberger, F

    2013-01-01

    The mode dynamics of a random laser is investigated in experiment and theory. The laser consists of a ZnCdO/ZnO multiple quantum well with air-holes that provide the necessary feedback. Time-resolved measurements reveal multimode spectra with individually developing features but no variation from shot to shot. These findings are qualitatively reproduced with a model that exploits the specifics of a dilute system of weak scatterers and can be interpreted in terms of a lasing network. Introducing the phase-sensitive node coherence reveals new aspects of the self-organization of the laser field. Lasing is carried by connected links between a subset of scatterers, the fields on which are oscillating coherently in phase. In addition, perturbing feedback with possibly unfitting phases from frustrated other scatterers is suppressed by destructive superposition. We believe that our findings are representative at least for weakly scattering random lasers. A generalization to random laser with dense and strong scattere...

  3. Magnetoencephalography from signals to dynamic cortical networks

    CERN Document Server

    Aine, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    "Magnetoencephalography (MEG) provides a time-accurate view into human brain function. The concerted action of neurons generates minute magnetic fields that can be detected---totally noninvasively---by sensitive multichannel magnetometers. The obtained millisecond accuracycomplements information obtained by other modern brain-imaging tools. Accurate timing is quintessential in normal brain function, often distorted in brain disorders. The noninvasiveness and time-sensitivityof MEG are great assets to developmental studies, as well. This multiauthored book covers an ambitiously wide range of MEG research from introductory to advanced level, from sensors to signals, and from focal sources to the dynamics of cortical networks. Written by active practioners of this multidisciplinary field, the book contains tutorials for newcomers and chapters of new challenging methods and emerging technologies to advanced MEG users. The reader will obtain a firm grasp of the possibilities of MEG in the study of audition, vision...

  4. Topological stabilization for synchronized dynamics on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencetti, Giulia; Bagnoli, Franco; Battistelli, Giorgio; Chisci, Luigi; Di Patti, Francesca; Fanelli, Duccio

    2017-01-01

    A general scheme is proposed and tested to control the symmetry breaking instability of a homogeneous solution of a spatially extended multispecies model, defined on a network. The inherent discreteness of the space makes it possible to act on the topology of the inter-nodes contacts to achieve the desired degree of stabilization, without altering the dynamical parameters of the model. Both symmetric and asymmetric couplings are considered. In this latter setting the web of contacts is assumed to be balanced, for the homogeneous equilibrium to exist. The performance of the proposed method are assessed, assuming the Complex Ginzburg-Landau equation as a reference model. In this case, the implemented control allows one to stabilize the synchronous limit cycle, hence time-dependent, uniform solution. A system of coupled real Ginzburg-Landau equations is also investigated to obtain the topological stabilization of a homogeneous and constant fixed point.

  5. Spatial Dynamics of Multilayer Cellular Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shi-Liang; Hsu, Cheng-Hsiung

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the spatial dynamics of one-dimensional multilayer cellular neural networks. We first establish the existence of rightward and leftward spreading speeds of the model. Then we show that the spreading speeds coincide with the minimum wave speeds of the traveling wave fronts in the right and left directions. Moreover, we obtain the asymptotic behavior of the traveling wave fronts when the wave speeds are positive and greater than the spreading speeds. According to the asymptotic behavior and using various kinds of comparison theorems, some front-like entire solutions are constructed by combining the rightward and leftward traveling wave fronts with different speeds and a spatially homogeneous solution of the model. Finally, various qualitative features of such entire solutions are investigated.

  6. Task modulates functional connectivity networks in free viewing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidkhani, Hossein; Nikolaev, Andrey R; Meghanathan, Radha Nila; Pezeshk, Hamid; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2017-08-03

    In free visual exploration, eye-movement is immediately followed by dynamic reconfiguration of brain functional connectivity. We studied the task-dependency of this process in a combined visual search-change detection experiment. Participants viewed two (nearly) same displays in succession. First time they had to find and remember multiple targets among distractors, so the ongoing task involved memory encoding. Second time they had to determine if a target had changed in orientation, so the ongoing task involved memory retrieval. From multichannel EEG recorded during 200 ms intervals time-locked to fixation onsets, we estimated the functional connectivity using a weighted phase lag index at the frequencies of theta, alpha, and beta bands, and derived global and local measures of the functional connectivity graphs. We found differences between both memory task conditions for several network measures, such as mean path length, radius, diameter, closeness and eccentricity, mainly in the alpha band. Both the local and the global measures indicated that encoding involved a more segregated mode of operation than retrieval. These differences arose immediately after fixation onset and persisted for the entire duration of the lambda complex, an evoked potential commonly associated with early visual perception. We concluded that encoding and retrieval differentially shape network configurations involved in early visual perception, affecting the way the visual input is processed at each fixation. These findings demonstrate that task requirements dynamically control the functional connectivity networks involved in early visual perception. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Filtering in Hybrid Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Morten Nonboe; Andersen, Rasmus Orum; Wheeler, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that inference in a complex hybrid Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) is possible using the 2 - T i e Slice DBN (2T-DBN) from [Koller & Lerner, 20001 to model fault detection in a watertank system. In [Koller & Lerner, 20001 a generic Particle Filter (PF) is used for inference. We extend the experiment and perform approximate inference using The Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and the Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF). Furthermore, we combine these techniques in a 'non-strict' Rao-Blackwellisation framework and apply it to the watertank system. We show that UKF and UKF in a PF framework outperfom the generic PF, EKF and EKF in a PF framework with respect to accuracy and robustness in terms of estimation RMSE. Especially we demonstrate the superiority of UKF in a PF framework when our beliefs of how data was generated are wrong. We also show that the choice of network structure is very important for the performance of the generic PF and the EKF algorithms, but not for the UKF algorithms. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of data noise in the water[ank simulation. Theory and implementation is based on the theory presented.

  8. Choice Shift in Opinion Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbay, Michael

    Choice shift is a phenomenon associated with small group dynamics whereby group discussion causes group members to shift their opinions in a more extreme direction so that the mean post-discussion opinion exceeds the mean pre-discussion opinion. Also known as group polarization, choice shift is a robust experimental phenomenon and has been well-studied within social psychology. In opinion network models, shifts toward extremism are typically produced by the presence of stubborn agents at the extremes of the opinion axis, whose opinions are much more resistant to change than moderate agents. However, we present a model in which choice shift can arise without the assumption of stubborn agents; the model evolves member opinions and uncertainties using coupled nonlinear differential equations. In addition, we briefly describe the results of a recent experiment conducted involving online group discussion concerning the outcome of National Football League games are described. The model predictions concerning the effects of network structure, disagreement level, and team choice (favorite or underdog) are in accord with the experimental results. This research was funded by the Office of Naval Research and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  9. Filtering in Hybrid Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Morten Nonboe; Andersen, Rasmus Orum; Wheeler, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    We implement a 2-time slice dynamic Bayesian network (2T-DBN) framework and make a 1-D state estimation simulation, an extension of the experiment in (v.d. Merwe et al., 2000) and compare different filtering techniques. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimentally that inference in a complex hybrid DBN is possible by simulating fault detection in a watertank system, an extension of the experiment in (Koller & Lerner, 2000) using a hybrid 2T-DBN. In both experiments, we perform approximate inference using standard filtering techniques, Monte Carlo methods and combinations of these. In the watertank simulation, we also demonstrate the use of 'non-strict' Rao-Blackwellisation. We show that the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and UKF in a particle filtering framework outperform the generic particle filter, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and EKF in a particle filtering framework with respect to accuracy in terms of estimation RMSE and sensitivity with respect to choice of network structure. Especially we demonstrate the superiority of UKF in a PF framework when our beliefs of how data was generated are wrong. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of data noise in the watertank simulation using UKF and PFUKD and show that the algorithms are more sensitive to changes in the measurement noise level that the process noise level. Theory and implementation is based on (v.d. Merwe et al., 2000).

  10. The Dynamics of Initiative in Communication Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollgaard, Anders; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Human social interaction is often intermittent. Two acquainted persons can have extended periods without social interaction punctuated by periods of repeated interaction. In this case, the repeated interaction can be characterized by a seed initiative by either of the persons and a number of follow-up interactions. The tendency to initiate social interaction plays an important role in the formation of social networks and is in general not symmetric between persons. In this paper, we study the dynamics of initiative by analysing and modeling a detailed call and text message network sampled from a group of 700 individuals. We show that in an average relationship between two individuals, one part is almost twice as likely to initiate communication compared to the other part. The asymmetry has social consequences and ultimately might lead to the discontinuation of a relationship. We explain the observed asymmetry by a positive feedback mechanism where individuals already taking initiative are more likely to take initiative in the future. In general, people with many initiatives receive attention from a broader spectrum of friends than people with few initiatives. Lastly, we compare the likelihood of taking initiative with the basic personality traits of the five factor model.

  11. The stochastic network dynamics underlying perceptual discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genis Prat-Ortega

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The brain is able to interpret streams of high-dimensional ambiguous information and yield coherent percepts. The mechanisms governing sensory integration have been extensively characterized using time-varying visual stimuli (Britten et al. 1996; Roitman and Shadlen 2002, but some of the basic principles regarding the network dynamics underlying this process remain largely unknown. We captured the basic features of a neural integrator using three canonical one-dimensional models: (1 the Drift Diffusion Model (DDM, (2 the Perfect Integrator (PI which is a particular case of the DDM where the bounds are set to infinity and (3 the double-well potential (DW which captures the dynamics of the attractor networks (Wang 2002; Roxin and Ledberg 2008. Although these models has been widely studied (Bogacz et al. 2006; Roxin and Ledberg 2008; Gold and Shadlen 2002, it has been difficult to experimentally discriminate among them because most of the observables measured are only quantitatively different among these models (e.g. psychometric curves. Here we aim to find experimentally measurable quantities that can yield qualitatively different behaviors depending on the nature of the underlying network dynamics. We examined the categorization dynamics of these models in response to fluctuating stimuli of different duration (T. On each time step, stimuli are drawn from a Gaussian distribution N(μ, σ and the two stimulus categories are defined by μ > 0 and μ < 0. Psychometric curves can therefore be obtained by quantifying the probability of the integrator to yield one category versus μ . We find however that varying σ can reveal more clearly the differences among the different integrators. In the small σ regime, both the DW and the DDM perform transient integration and exhibit a decaying stimulus reverse correlation kernel revealing a primacy effect (Nienborg and Cumming 2009; Wimmer et al. 2015 . In the large σ regime, the integration in the DDM

  12. A Network Partition Algorithm for Mining Gene Functional Modules of Colon Cancer from DNA Microarray Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Gang Ruan; Jin-Lian Wang; Jian-Geng Li

    2006-01-01

    Computational analysis is essential for transforming the masses of microarray data into a mechanistic understanding of cancer. Here we present a method for finding gene functional modules of cancer from microarray data and have applied it to colon cancer. First, a colon cancer gene network and a normal colon tissue gene network were constructed using correlations between the genes. Then the modules that tended to have a homogeneous functional composition were identified by splitting up the network. Analysis of both networks revealed that they are scale-free.Comparison of the gene functional modules for colon cancer and normal tissues showed that the modules' functions changed with their structures.

  13. Innovation networking between stability and political dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    2004-01-01

    This contribution views innovation as a social activity of building networks, using software product development in multicompany alliances and networks as example. Innovation networks are frequently understood as quite stable arrangements characterised by high trust among the participants. The aim...

  14. Fast paths in large-scale dynamic road networks

    CERN Document Server

    Nannicini, Giacomo; Barbier, Gilles; Krob, Daniel; Liberti, Leo

    2007-01-01

    Efficiently computing fast paths in large scale dynamic road networks (where dynamic traffic information is known over a part of the network) is a practical problem faced by several traffic information service providers who wish to offer a realistic fast path computation to GPS terminal enabled vehicles. The heuristic solution method we propose is based on a highway hierarchy-based shortest path algorithm for static large-scale networks; we maintain a static highway hierarchy and perform each query on the dynamically evaluated network.

  15. Adaptive Delta-Sigma Modulation for Enhanced Input Dynamic Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens M. Zierhofer

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive delta-sigma modulator of 1st order with one-bit quantization is presented. Adaptation is instantaneous and based on an exponential law. The feedback signal is a multibit discrete-level signal generated by a digital-to-analog converter (DAC. Compared to a nonadaptive delta-sigma modulator of 1st order, the input dynamic range is significantly enhanced. The gain in dynamic range is 6 dB per bit defining the feedback amplitude. The influence of nonideal DAC performance is discussed. It is demonstrated that an implementation of the system is realistic with standard CMOS technology. To relax the requirements to the one-bit quantizer, the quantizer input signal is amplified adaptively (Q-Switching.

  16. Adaptive Delta-Sigma Modulation for Enhanced Input Dynamic Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierhofer, Clemens M.

    2006-12-01

    An adaptive delta-sigma modulator of 1st order with one-bit quantization is presented. Adaptation is instantaneous and based on an exponential law. The feedback signal is a multibit discrete-level signal generated by a digital-to-analog converter (DAC). Compared to a nonadaptive delta-sigma modulator of 1st order, the input dynamic range is significantly enhanced. The gain in dynamic range is 6 dB per bit defining the feedback amplitude. The influence of nonideal DAC performance is discussed. It is demonstrated that an implementation of the system is realistic with standard CMOS technology. To relax the requirements to the one-bit quantizer, the quantizer input signal is amplified adaptively (Q-Switching).

  17. Dynamic Optical Grating Device and Associated Method for Modulating Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic optical grating device and associated method for modulating light is provided that is capable of controlling the spectral properties and propagation of light without moving mechanical components by the use of a dynamic electric and/or magnetic field. By changing the electric field and/or magnetic field, the index of refraction, the extinction coefficient, the transmittivity, and the reflectivity fo the optical grating device may be controlled in order to control the spectral properties of the light reflected or transmitted by the device.

  18. Dynamic Network Traffic Flow Prediction Model based on Modified Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongying Jin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at effectively predicting the dynamic network traffic flow based on quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm. Firstly, the dynamic network traffic flow prediction problem is analyzed through formal description. Secondly, the structure of the network traffic flow prediction model is given. In this structure, Users can used a computer to start the traffic flow prediction process, and data collecting module can collect and return the data through the destination device. Thirdly, the dynamic network traffic flow prediction model is implemented based on BP Neural Network. Particularly, in this paper, the BP Neural Network is trained by a modified quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization(QPSO. We modified the QPSO by utilizing chaos signals to implement typical logistic mapping and pursuing the fitness function of a particle by a set of optimal parameters. Afterwards, based on the above process, dynamic network traffic flow prediction model is illustrated. Finally, a series of experiments are conduct to make performance evaluation, and related analyses for experimental results are also given

  19. Dynamic Mobile IP routers in ad hoc networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kock, B.A.; Schmidt, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a concept combining mobile IP and ad hoc routing to create a robust mobile network. In this network all nodes are mobile and globally and locally reachable under the same IP address. Essential for implementing this network are the dynamic mobile IP routers. They act as gateways

  20. Optical-router-based dynamically reconfigurable photonic access network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Broadband photonics (BBP) project under the Freeband consortium of projects investigated the design of a dynamically reconfigurable photonic access network. Access networks form a key link in ensuring optimal bandwidth to the end user without which any improvements deeper in the network in the a

  1. Inferring slowly-changing dynamic gene-regulatory networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, Ernst C.; Abbruzzo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic gene-regulatory networks are complex since the interaction patterns between their components mean that it is impossible to study parts of the network in separation. This holistic character of gene-regulatory networks poses a real challenge to any type of modelling. Graphical models are a cla

  2. Dynamic Mobile IP routers in ad hoc networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kock, B.A.; Schmidt, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a concept combining mobile IP and ad hoc routing to create a robust mobile network. In this network all nodes are mobile and globally and locally reachable under the same IP address. Essential for implementing this network are the dynamic mobile IP routers. They act as gateways

  3. Optical-router-based dynamically reconfigurable photonic access network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    The Broadband photonics (BBP) project under the Freeband consortium of projects investigated the design of a dynamically reconfigurable photonic access network. Access networks form a key link in ensuring optimal bandwidth to the end user without which any improvements deeper in the network in the a

  4. Stochastic simulation of HIV population dynamics through complex network modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, P.M.A.; Ivanov, S.V.; Boukhanovsky, A.V.; van de Vijver, D.A.M.C.; Boucher, C.A.B.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new way to model HIV infection spreading through the use of dynamic complex networks. The heterogeneous population of HIV exposure groups is described through a unique network degree probability distribution. The time evolution of the network nodes is modelled by a Markov process and

  5. Stochastic simulation of HIV population dynamics through complex network modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, P. M. A.; Ivanov, S. V.; Boukhanovsky, A. V.; van de Vijver, D. A. M. C.; Boucher, C. A. B.

    We propose a new way to model HIV infection spreading through the use of dynamic complex networks. The heterogeneous population of HIV exposure groups is described through a unique network degree probability distribution. The time evolution of the network nodes is modelled by a Markov process and

  6. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, J. Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals propagating through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programs in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. In many cases, the dynamical performance of transcriptional re...

  7. Optical-router-based dynamically reconfigurable photonic access network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Broadband photonics (BBP) project under the Freeband consortium of projects investigated the design of a dynamically reconfigurable photonic access network. Access networks form a key link in ensuring optimal bandwidth to the end user without which any improvements deeper in the network in the

  8. Adaptive Synchronization in Small-World Dynamical Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Yan-li; ZHU Jie; LUO Xiao-shu

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive synchronization in NW small-world dynamical networks was studied. Firstly, an adaptive synchronization method is presented and explained. Then, it is applied to two different classes of dynamical networks,one is a class-B network, small-world connected R(o)ssler oscillators, the other is a class-A network, small-world connected Chua's circuits. The simulation verifies the validity of the presented method. It also shows that the adaptive synchronization method is robust to the variations of the node systems parameters. So the presented method can be used in networks whose node systems have unknown or time-varying parameters.

  9. NetworkPainter: dynamic intracellular pathway animation in Cytobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Jonathan R; Guturu, Harendra; Chen, Edward Y; Blair, Stuart L; Irish, Jonathan M; Kotecha, Nikesh; Covert, Markus W

    2015-05-25

    High-throughput technologies such as flow and mass cytometry have the potential to illuminate cellular networks. However, analyzing the data produced by these technologies is challenging. Visualization is needed to help researchers explore this data. We developed a web-based software program, NetworkPainter, to enable researchers to analyze dynamic cytometry data in the context of pathway diagrams. NetworkPainter provides researchers a graphical interface to draw and "paint" pathway diagrams with experimental data, producing animated diagrams which display the activity of each network node at each time point. NetworkPainter enables researchers to more fully explore multi-parameter, dynamical cytometry data.

  10. Topology Identification of General Dynamical Network with Distributed Time Delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhao-Yan; FU Xin-Chu

    2009-01-01

    General dynamical networks with distributed time delays are studied. The topology of the networks are viewed as unknown parameters, which need to be identified. Some auxiliary systems (also called the network estimators)are designed to achieve this goal. Both linear feedback control and adaptive strategy are applied in designing these network estimators. Based on linear matrix inequalities and the Lyapunov function method, the sufficient condition for the achievement of topology identification is obtained. This method can also better monitor the switching topology of dynamical networks. Illustrative examples are provided to show the effectiveness of this method.

  11. ADORA2A genotype modulates interoceptive and exteroceptive processing in a fronto-insular network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Maximilian J; Domschke, Katharina; Homola, György A; Schulz, Stefan M; Nowak, Johannes; Akhrif, Atae; Pauli, Paul; Deckert, Jürgen; Neufang, Susanne

    2016-08-01

    Facilitated processing of interoceptive and exteroceptive information in the salience network is suggested to promote the development of anxiety and anxiety disorders. Here, it was investigated whether the adenosine 2 A receptor gene (ADORA2A) 1976T/C (rs5751876) variant - previously associated with anxiety disorders and anxiety-related phenotypes as well as general attentional efficiency -was involved in the regulation of this network. In detail, fMRI recordings of 65 healthy participants (female=35) were analyzed regarding ADORA2A genotype effects on brain connectivity related to (1) interoceptive processing in terms of functional connectivity resting-state fMRI, and (2) exteroceptive processing using dynamic causal modeling in task-based fMRI. In a subsample, cardiac interoceptive accuracy was furthermore measured via the Mental Tracking Task. ADORA2A genotype was found to modulate a fronto-insular network at rest (interoceptive processing) and while performing an executive control task (exteroceptive processing). Across both modalities, the ADORA2A TT risk genotype was associated with increased connectivity between the insula and the prefrontal cortex. The strength in connectivity correlated with interoceptive accuracy. It is concluded that alterations in fronto-insular connectivity are modulated by both the adenosinergic system and interoceptive accuracy. Thus, fronto-insular connectivity in synopsis with ADORA2A genotypic information could serve as combined biomarkers for personalized treatment approaches in anxiety disorders targeting exteroceptive and interoceptive dysfunction.

  12. Quetiapine modulates functional connectivity in brain aggression networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Martin; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Schwenzer, Michael; Mathiak, Krystyna A; Sarkheil, Pegah; Weber, René; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-07-15

    Aggressive behavior is associated with dysfunctions in an affective regulation network encompassing amygdala and prefrontal areas such as orbitofrontal (OFC), anterior cingulate (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In particular, prefrontal regions have been postulated to control amygdala activity by inhibitory projections, and this process may be disrupted in aggressive individuals. The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine successfully attenuates aggressive behavior in various disorders; the underlying neural processes, however, are unknown. A strengthened functional coupling in the prefrontal-amygdala system may account for these anti-aggressive effects. An inhibition of this network has been reported for virtual aggression in violent video games as well. However, there have been so far no in-vivo observations of pharmacological influences on corticolimbic projections during human aggressive behavior. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, quetiapine and placebo were administered for three successive days prior to an fMRI experiment. In this experiment, functional brain connectivity was assessed during virtual aggressive behavior in a violent video game and an aggression-free control task in a non-violent modification. Quetiapine increased the functional connectivity of ACC and DLPFC with the amygdala during virtual aggression, whereas OFC-amygdala coupling was attenuated. These effects were observed neither for placebo nor for the non-violent control. These results demonstrate for the first time a pharmacological modification of aggression-related human brain networks in a naturalistic setting. The violence-specific modulation of prefrontal-amygdala networks appears to control aggressive behavior and provides a neurobiological model for the anti-aggressive effects of quetiapine.

  13. Arresting Strategy Based on Dynamic Criminal Networks Changing over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqing Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a sequence of dynamic criminal networks on a time series based on the dynamic network analysis (DNA. According to the change of networks’ structure, networks’ variation trend is analyzed to forecast its future structure. Finally, an optimal arresting time and priority list are designed based on our analysis. Better results can be expected than that based on social network analysis (SNA.

  14. Studying modulation on simultaneously activated SSVEP neural networks by a cognitive task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenghua

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP), it has been used in many fields. Numerous studies suggest that there exist three SSVEP neural networks in different frequency bands. An obvious phenomenon has been observed, that the amplitude and phase of SSVEP can be modulated by a cognitive task. Previous works have studied this modulation on separately activated SSVEP neural networks by a cognitive task. If two or more SSVEP neural networks are activated simultaneously in the process of a cognitive task, is the modulation on different SSVEP neural networks the same? In this study, two different SSVEP neural networks were activated simultaneously by two different frequency flickers, with a working memory task irrelevant to the flickers being conducted at the same time. The modulated SSVEP waves were compared with each other and to those only under one flicker in previous studies. The comparison results show that the cognitive task can modulate different SSVEP neural networks with a similar style.

  15. Rational Design of Transcranial Current Stimulation (TCS through Mechanistic Insights into Cortical Network Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio eFrohlich

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial current stimulation (TCS is a promising method of non-invasive brain stimulation to modulate cortical network dynamics. Preliminary studies have demonstrated the ability of TCS to enhance cognition and reduce symptoms in both neurological and psychiatric illnesses. Despite the encouraging results of these studies, the mechanisms by which TCS and endogenous network dynamics interact remain poorly understood. Here, we propose that the development of the next generation of TCS paradigms with increased efficacy requires such mechanistic understanding of how weak electric fields imposed by TCS interact with the nonlinear dynamics of large-scale cortical networks. We highlight key recent advances in the study of the interaction dynamics between TCS and cortical network activity. In particular, we demonstrate the opportunities provided by an interdisciplinary approach that bridges neurobiology and electrical engineering. We discuss the use of (1 hybrid biological-electronic experimental approaches to disentangle feedback interactions, (2 large-scale computer simulations for the study of weak global perturbations imposed by TCS, and (3 optogenetic manipulations informed by dynamics systems theory to probe network dynamics. Together, we here provide the foundation for the use of rational design for the development of the next generation of TCS neurotherapeutics.

  16. Multiple dynamical time-scales in networks with hierarchically nested modular organization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sitabhra Sinha; Swarup Poria

    2011-11-01

    Many natural and engineered complex networks have intricate mesoscopic organization, e.g., the clustering of the constituent nodes into several communities or modules. Often, such modularity is manifested at several different hierarchical levels, where the clusters defined at one level appear as elementary entities at the next higher level. Using a simple model of a hierarchical modular network, we show that such a topological structure gives rise to characteristic time-scale separation between dynamics occurring at different levels of the hierarchy. This generalizes our earlier result for simple modular networks, where fast intramodular and slow intermodular processes were clearly distinguished. Investigating the process of synchronization of oscillators in a hierarchical modular network, we show the existence of as many distinct time-scales as there are hierarchical levels in the system. This suggests a possible functional role of such mesoscopic organization principle in natural systems, viz., in the dynamical separation of events occurring at different spatial scales.

  17. Major component analysis of dynamic networks of physiologic organ interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-09-01

    The human organism is a complex network of interconnected organ systems, where the behavior of one system affects the dynamics of other systems. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse physiologic systems under varied conditions is a challenge due to the complexity in the output dynamics of the individual systems and the transient and nonlinear characteristics of their coupling. We introduce a novel computational method based on the concept of time delay stability and major component analysis to investigate how organ systems interact as a network to coordinate their functions. We analyze a large database of continuously recorded multi-channel physiologic signals from healthy young subjects during night-time sleep. We identify a network of dynamic interactions between key physiologic systems in the human organism. Further, we find that each physiologic state is characterized by a distinct network structure with different relative contribution from individual organ systems to the global network dynamics. Specifically, we observe a gradual decrease in the strength of coupling of heart and respiration to the rest of the network with transition from wake to deep sleep, and in contrast, an increased relative contribution to network dynamics from chin and leg muscle tone and eye movement, demonstrating a robust association between network topology and physiologic function.

  18. Spinal cellular and network properties modulate pain perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darbon Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that high levels of plasma glucocorticoids give rise to analgesia. However to our knowledge nothing has been reported regarding a direct non genomic modulation of neuronal spinal activity by peripheral CORT. In the present study, we used combined in vivo and in vitro electrophysiology approaches, associated with the measure of nociceptive mechanical sensitivity and plasma corticosterone level measurement to assess the impact of circulating CORT on rat nociception. We showed that CORT plasma level elevation produced analgesia via the reduction of nociceptive fiber mediated spinal responses. CORT is spinally reduced in the neuroactive metabolite THDOC that specifically enhances lamina II GABAergic synaptic transmission. The main consequence is a reduction of lamina II network excitability reflecting a selective decrease in processing of nociceptive inputs. The depressed neuronal activity at the spinal level then in turn leads to a weaker nociceptive message transmission to supraspinal structures and hence to an alleviation of pain.

  19. Temporal Dynamics of Connectivity and Epidemic Properties of Growing Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fotouhi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Traditional mathematical models of epidemic disease had for decades conventionally considered static structure for contacts. Recently, an upsurge of theoretical inquiry has strived towards rendering the models more realistic by incorporating the temporal aspects of networks of contacts, societal and online, that are of interest in the study of epidemics (and other similar diffusion processes). However, temporal dynamics have predominantly focused on link fluctuations and nodal activities, and less attention has been paid to the growth of the underlying network. Many real networks grow: online networks are evidently in constant growth, and societal networks can grow due to migration flux and reproduction. The effect of network growth on the epidemic properties of networks is hitherto unknown---mainly due to the predominant focus of the network growth literature on the so-called steady-state. This paper takes a step towards alleviating this gap. We analytically study the degree dynamics of a given arbitrary net...

  20. Higher-order structure and epidemic dynamics in clustered networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchie, Martin; House, Thomas; Kiss, Istvan Z

    2013-01-01

    Clustering is typically measured by the ratio of triangles to all triples, open or closed. Generating clustered networks, and how clustering affects dynamics on networks, is reasonably well understood for certain classes of networks \\cite{vmclust, karrerclust2010}, e.g., networks composed of lines and non-overlapping triangles. In this paper we show that it is possible to generate networks which, despite having the same degree distribution and equal clustering, exhibit different higher-order structure, specifically, overlapping triangles and other order-four (a closed network motif composed of four nodes) structures. To distinguish and quantify these additional structural features, we develop a new network metric capable of measuring order-four structure which, when used alongside traditional network metrics, allows us to more accurately describe a network's topology. Three network generation algorithms are considered: a modified configuration model and two rewiring algorithms. By generating homogeneous netwo...

  1. Common modulation of limbic network activation underlies musical emotions as they unfold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Neomi; Jacoby, Nori; Lin, Tamar; Raz, Gal; Shpigelman, Lavi; Gilam, Gadi; Granot, Roni Y; Hendler, Talma

    2016-11-01

    Music is a powerful means for communicating emotions among individuals. Here we reveal that this continuous stream of affective information is commonly represented in the brains of different listeners and that particular musical attributes mediate this link. We examined participants' brain responses to two naturalistic musical pieces using functional Magnetic Resonance imaging (fMRI). Following scanning, as participants listened to the musical pieces for a second time, they continuously indicated their emotional experience on scales of valence and arousal. These continuous reports were used along with a detailed annotation of the musical features, to predict a novel index of Dynamic Common Activation (DCA) derived from ten large-scale data-driven functional networks. We found an association between the unfolding music-induced emotionality and the DCA modulation within a vast network of limbic regions. The limbic-DCA modulation further corresponded with continuous changes in two temporal musical features: beat-strength and tempo. Remarkably, this "collective limbic sensitivity" to temporal features was found to mediate the link between limbic-DCA and the reported emotionality. An additional association with the emotional experience was found in a left fronto-parietal network, but only among a sub-group of participants with a high level of musical experience (>5years). These findings may indicate two processing-levels underlying the unfolding of common music emotionality; (1) a widely shared core-affective process that is confined to a limbic network and mediated by temporal regularities in music and (2) an experience based process that is rooted in a left fronto-parietal network that may involve functioning of the 'mirror-neuron system'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Adaptive Dynamics of Regulatory Networks: Size Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To accomplish adaptability, all living organisms are constructed of regulatory networks on different levels which are capable to differentially respond to a variety of environmental inputs. Structure of regulatory networks determines their phenotypical plasticity, that is, the degree of detail and appropriateness of regulatory replies to environmental or developmental challenges. This regulatory network structure is encoded within the genotype. Our conceptual simulation study investigates how network structure constrains the evolution of networks and their adaptive abilities. The focus is on the structural parameter network size. We show that small regulatory networks adapt fast, but not as good as larger networks in the longer perspective. Selection leads to an optimal network size dependent on heterogeneity of the environment and time pressure of adaptation. Optimal mutation rates are higher for smaller networks. We put special emphasis on discussing our simulation results on the background of functional observations from experimental and evolutionary biology.

  3. Adaptive Dynamics of Regulatory Networks: Size Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinetz Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To accomplish adaptability, all living organisms are constructed of regulatory networks on different levels which are capable to differentially respond to a variety of environmental inputs. Structure of regulatory networks determines their phenotypical plasticity, that is, the degree of detail and appropriateness of regulatory replies to environmental or developmental challenges. This regulatory network structure is encoded within the genotype. Our conceptual simulation study investigates how network structure constrains the evolution of networks and their adaptive abilities. The focus is on the structural parameter network size. We show that small regulatory networks adapt fast, but not as good as larger networks in the longer perspective. Selection leads to an optimal network size dependent on heterogeneity of the environment and time pressure of adaptation. Optimal mutation rates are higher for smaller networks. We put special emphasis on discussing our simulation results on the background of functional observations from experimental and evolutionary biology.

  4. Allosteric modulators for the treatment of schizophrenia: targeting glutamatergic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menniti, Frank S; Lindsley, Craig W; Conn, P Jeffrey; Pandit, Jayvardhan; Zagouras, Panayiotis; Volkmann, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly debilitating mental disorder which afflicts approximately 1% of the global population. Cognitive and negative deficits account for the lifelong disability associated with schizophrenia, whose symptoms are not effectively addressed by current treatments. New medicines are needed to treat these aspects of the disease. Neurodevelopmental, neuropathological, genetic, and behavioral pharmacological data indicate that schizophrenia stems from a dysfunction of glutamate synaptic transmission, particularly in frontal cortical networks. A number of novel pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms affecting glutamatergic synaptic transmission have emerged as viable targets for schizophrenia. While developing orthosteric glutamatergic agents for these targets has proven extremely difficult, targeting allosteric sites of these targets has emerged as a promising alternative. From a medicinal chemistry perspective, allosteric sites provide an opportunity of finding agents with better drug-like properties and greater target specificity. Furthermore, allosteric modulators are better suited to maintaining the highly precise temporal and spatial aspects of glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Herein, we review neuropathological and genomic/genetic evidence underscoring the importance of glutamate synaptic dysfunction in the etiology of schizophrenia and make a case for allosteric targets for therapeutic intervention. We review progress in identifying allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors, NMDA receptors, and metabotropic glutamate receptors, all with the aim of restoring physiological glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Challenges remain given the complexity of schizophrenia and the difficulty in studying cognition in animals and humans. Nonetheless, important compounds have emerged from these efforts and promising preclinical and variable clinical validation has been achieved.

  5. Calculated pKa Variations Expose Dynamic Allosteric Communication Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Eric J M; Heyes, Logan C; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Parker, Emily J

    2016-02-17

    Allosteric regulation of protein function, the process by which binding of an effector molecule provokes a functional response from a distal site, is critical for metabolic pathways. Yet, the way the allosteric signal is communicated remains elusive, especially in dynamic, entropically driven regulation mechanisms for which no major conformational changes are observed. To identify these dynamic allosteric communication networks, we have developed an approach that monitors the pKa variations of ionizable residues over the course of molecular dynamics simulations performed in the presence and absence of an allosteric regulator. As the pKa of ionizable residues depends on their environment, it represents a simple metric to monitor changes in several complex factors induced by binding an allosteric effector. These factors include Coulombic interactions, hydrogen bonding, and solvation, as well as backbone motions and side chain fluctuations. The predictions that can be made with this method concerning the roles of ionizable residues for allosteric communication can then be easily tested experimentally by changing the working pH of the protein or performing single point mutations. To demonstrate the method's validity, we have applied this approach to the subtle dynamic regulation mechanism observed for Neisseria meningitidis 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase, the first enzyme of aromatic biosynthesis. We were able to identify key communication pathways linking the allosteric binding site to the active site of the enzyme and to validate these findings experimentally by reestablishing the catalytic activity of allosterically inhibited enzyme via modulation of the working pH, without compromising the binding affinity of the allosteric regulator.

  6. Perspective: network-guided pattern formation of neural dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Kaiser, Marcus; Claus C Hilgetag

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of neural activity patterns is fundamentally linked to an understanding of how the brain's network architecture shapes dynamical processes. Established approaches rely mostly on deviations of a given network from certain classes of random graphs. Hypotheses about the supposed role of prominent topological features (for instance, the roles of modularity, network motifs or hierarchical network organization) are derived from these deviations. An alternative strategy could be to...

  7. Model reduction and parameter estimation of non-linear dynamical biochemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaodian; Medvedovic, Mario

    2016-02-01

    Parameter estimation for high dimension complex dynamic system is a hot topic. However, the current statistical model and inference approach is known as a large p small n problem. How to reduce the dimension of the dynamic model and improve the accuracy of estimation is more important. To address this question, the authors take some known parameters and structure of system as priori knowledge and incorporate it into dynamic model. At the same time, they decompose the whole dynamic model into subset network modules, based on different modules, and then they apply different estimation approaches. This technique is called Rao-Blackwellised particle filters decomposition methods. To evaluate the performance of this method, the authors apply it to synthetic data generated from repressilator model and experimental data of the JAK-STAT pathway, but this method can be easily extended to large-scale cases.

  8. Adaptive financial networks with static and dynamic thresholds

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Tian; Chen, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Based on the daily data of American and Chinese stock markets, the dynamic behavior of a financial network with static and dynamic thresholds is investigated. Compared with the static threshold, the dynamic threshold suppresses the large fluctuation induced by the cross-correlation of individual stock prices, and leads to a stable topological structure in the dynamic evolution. Long-range time-correlations are revealed for the average clustering coefficient, average degree and cross-correlation of degrees. The dynamic network shows a two-peak behavior in the degree distribution.

  9. Local community detection as pattern restoration by attractor dynamics of recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Densely connected parts in networks are referred to as "communities". Community structure is a hallmark of a variety of real-world networks. Individual communities in networks form functional modules of complex systems described by networks. Therefore, finding communities in networks is essential to approaching and understanding complex systems described by networks. In fact, network science has made a great deal of effort to develop effective and efficient methods for detecting communities in networks. Here we put forward a type of community detection, which has been little examined so far but will be practically useful. Suppose that we are given a set of source nodes that includes some (but not all) of "true" members of a particular community; suppose also that the set includes some nodes that are not the members of this community (i.e., "false" members of the community). We propose to detect the community from this "imperfect" and "inaccurate" set of source nodes using attractor dynamics of recurrent neural networks. Community detection by the proposed method can be viewed as restoration of the original pattern from a deteriorated pattern, which is analogous to cue-triggered recall of short-term memory in the brain. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method using synthetic networks and real social networks for which correct communities are known.

  10. Rhythm dynamics of complex neuronal networks with mixed bursting neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Yong-Bing; Shi Xia; Zheng Yan-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The spatiotemporal order and rhythm dynamics of a complex neuronal network with mixed bursting neurons are studied in this paper.A quantitative characteristic,the width factor,is introduced to describe the rhythm dynamics of an individual neuron,and the average width factor is used to characterize the rhythm dynamics of a neuronal network.An r parameter is introduced to denote the ratio of the short bursting neurons in the network.Then we investigate the effect of the ratio on the rhythm dynamics of the neuronal network.The critical value of r is derived,and the neurons in the network always remain short bursting when the r ratio is larger than the critical value.

  11. Synthesis of recurrent neural networks for dynamical system simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trischler, Adam P; D'Eleuterio, Gabriele M T

    2016-08-01

    We review several of the most widely used techniques for training recurrent neural networks to approximate dynamical systems, then describe a novel algorithm for this task. The algorithm is based on an earlier theoretical result that guarantees the quality of the network approximation. We show that a feedforward neural network can be trained on the vector-field representation of a given dynamical system using backpropagation, then recast it as a recurrent network that replicates the original system's dynamics. After detailing this algorithm and its relation to earlier approaches, we present numerical examples that demonstrate its capabilities. One of the distinguishing features of our approach is that both the original dynamical systems and the recurrent networks that simulate them operate in continuous time.

  12. Dale's Principle is necessary for an optimal neuronal network's dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Catsigeras, Eleonora

    2013-01-01

    We study a mathematical model of biological neuronal networks composed by any finite number $N \\geq 2$ of non necessarily identical cells. The model is a deterministic dynamical system governed by finite-dimensional impulsive differential equations. The statical structure of the network is described by a directed and weighted graph whose nodes are certain subsets of neurons, and whose edges are the groups of synaptical connections among those subsets. First, we prove that among all the possible networks such that their respective graphs are mutually isomorphic, there exists a dynamical optimum. This optimal network exhibits the richest dynamics: namely, it is capable to show the most diverse set of responses (i.e. orbits in the future) under external stimulus or signals. Second, we prove that all the neurons of a dynamically optimal neuronal network necessarily satisfy Dale's Principle, i.e. each neuron must be either excitatory or inhibitory, but not mixed. So, Dale's Principle is a mathematical necessary co...

  13. Orientation selectivity in inhibition-dominated networks of spiking neurons: effect of single neuron properties and network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Sadra; Rotter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying the emergence of orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex of mammals are still elusive. In rodents, visual neurons show highly selective responses to oriented stimuli, but neighboring neurons do not necessarily have similar preferences. Instead of a smooth map, one observes a salt-and-pepper organization of orientation selectivity. Modeling studies have recently confirmed that balanced random networks are indeed capable of amplifying weakly tuned inputs and generating highly selective output responses, even in absence of feature-selective recurrent connectivity. Here we seek to elucidate the neuronal mechanisms underlying this phenomenon by resorting to networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are amenable to analytic treatment. Specifically, in networks of perfect integrate-and-fire neurons, we observe that highly selective and contrast invariant output responses emerge, very similar to networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We then demonstrate that a theory based on mean firing rates and the detailed network topology predicts the output responses, and explains the mechanisms underlying the suppression of the common-mode, amplification of modulation, and contrast invariance. Increasing inhibition dominance in our networks makes the rectifying nonlinearity more prominent, which in turn adds some distortions to the otherwise essentially linear prediction. An extension of the linear theory can account for all the distortions, enabling us to compute the exact shape of every individual tuning curve in our networks. We show that this simple form of nonlinearity adds two important properties to orientation selectivity in the network, namely sharpening of tuning curves and extra suppression of the modulation. The theory can be further extended to account for the nonlinearity of the leaky model by replacing the rectifier by the appropriate smooth input-output transfer function. These results are robust and do not

  14. Orientation selectivity in inhibition-dominated networks of spiking neurons: effect of single neuron properties and network dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadra Sadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neuronal mechanisms underlying the emergence of orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex of mammals are still elusive. In rodents, visual neurons show highly selective responses to oriented stimuli, but neighboring neurons do not necessarily have similar preferences. Instead of a smooth map, one observes a salt-and-pepper organization of orientation selectivity. Modeling studies have recently confirmed that balanced random networks are indeed capable of amplifying weakly tuned inputs and generating highly selective output responses, even in absence of feature-selective recurrent connectivity. Here we seek to elucidate the neuronal mechanisms underlying this phenomenon by resorting to networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are amenable to analytic treatment. Specifically, in networks of perfect integrate-and-fire neurons, we observe that highly selective and contrast invariant output responses emerge, very similar to networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We then demonstrate that a theory based on mean firing rates and the detailed network topology predicts the output responses, and explains the mechanisms underlying the suppression of the common-mode, amplification of modulation, and contrast invariance. Increasing inhibition dominance in our networks makes the rectifying nonlinearity more prominent, which in turn adds some distortions to the otherwise essentially linear prediction. An extension of the linear theory can account for all the distortions, enabling us to compute the exact shape of every individual tuning curve in our networks. We show that this simple form of nonlinearity adds two important properties to orientation selectivity in the network, namely sharpening of tuning curves and extra suppression of the modulation. The theory can be further extended to account for the nonlinearity of the leaky model by replacing the rectifier by the appropriate smooth input-output transfer function. These results are

  15. Synchronization criteria based on a general complex dynamical network model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-lin; WANG Chang-jian; XU Cong-fu

    2008-01-01

    Many complex dynamical networks display synchronization phenomena. We introduce a general complex dynamical network model. The model is equivalent to a simple vector model of adopting the Kronecker product. Some synchronization criteria, including time-variant networks and time-varying networks, are deduced based on Lyapunov's stability theory, and they are proven on the condition of obtaining a certain synchronous solution of an isolated cell. In particular, the inner-coupling matrix directly determines the synchronization of the time-invariant network; while for a time-varying periodic dynamical network, the asymptotic stability of a synchronous solution is determined by a constant matrix which is related to the fundamental solution matrices of the linearization system. Finally, illustrative examples are given to validate the results.

  16. Complex systems and networks dynamics, controls and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Xinghuo; Chen, Guanrong; Yu, Wenwu

    2016-01-01

    This elementary book provides some state-of-the-art research results on broad disciplinary sciences on complex networks. It presents an in-depth study with detailed description of dynamics, controls and applications of complex networks. The contents of this book can be summarized as follows. First, the dynamics of complex networks, for example, the cluster dynamic analysis by using kernel spectral methods, community detection algorithms in bipartite networks, epidemiological modeling with demographics and epidemic spreading on multi-layer networks, are studied. Second, the controls of complex networks are investigated including topics like distributed finite-time cooperative control of multi-agent systems by applying homogenous-degree and Lyapunov methods, composite finite-time containment control for disturbed second-order multi-agent systems, fractional-order observer design of multi-agent systems, chaos control and anticontrol of complex systems via Parrondos game and many more. Third, the applications of ...

  17. Identifying communities by influence dynamics in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Stanoev, Angel; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2011-01-01

    Communities are not static; they evolve, split and merge, appear and disappear, i.e. they are product of dynamical processes that govern the evolution of the network. A good algorithm for community detection should not only quantify the topology of the network, but incorporate the dynamical processes that take place on the network. We present a novel algorithm for community detection that combines network structure with processes that support creation and/or evolution of communities. The algorithm does not embrace the universal approach but instead tries to focus on social networks and model dynamic social interactions that occur on those networks. It identifies leaders, and communities that form around those leaders. It naturally supports overlapping communities by associating each node with a membership vector that describes node's involvement in each community. This way, in addition to overlapping communities, we can identify nodes that are good followers to their leader, and also nodes with no clear commu...

  18. How memory generates heterogeneous dynamics in temporal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Vestergaard, Christian L; Barrat, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Empirical temporal networks display strong heterogeneities in their dynamics, which profoundly affect processes taking place on these networks, such as rumor and epidemic spreading. Despite the recent wealth of data on temporal networks, little work has been devoted to the understanding of how such heterogeneities can emerge from microscopic mechanisms at the level of nodes and links. Here we show that long-term memory effects are present in the creation and disappearance of links in empirical networks. We thus consider a simple generative modeling framework for temporal networks able to incorporate these memory mechanisms. This allows us to study separately the role of each of these mechanisms in the emergence of heterogeneous network dynamics. In particular, we show analytically and numerically how heterogeneous distributions of contact durations, of inter-contact durations and of numbers of contacts per link emerge. We also study the individual effect of heterogeneities on dynamical processes, such as the ...

  19. Predicting the evolution of complex networks via similarity dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Chen, Leiting; Zhong, Linfeng; Xian, Xingping

    2017-01-01

    Almost all real-world networks are subject to constant evolution, and plenty of them have been investigated empirically to uncover the underlying evolution mechanism. However, the evolution prediction of dynamic networks still remains a challenging problem. The crux of this matter is to estimate the future network links of dynamic networks. This paper studies the evolution prediction of dynamic networks with link prediction paradigm. To estimate the likelihood of the existence of links more accurate, an effective and robust similarity index is presented by exploiting network structure adaptively. Moreover, most of the existing link prediction methods do not make a clear distinction between future links and missing links. In order to predict the future links, the networks are regarded as dynamic systems in this paper, and a similarity updating method, spatial-temporal position drift model, is developed to simulate the evolutionary dynamics of node similarity. Then the updated similarities are used as input information for the future links' likelihood estimation. Extensive experiments on real-world networks suggest that the proposed similarity index performs better than baseline methods and the position drift model performs well for evolution prediction in real-world evolving networks.

  20. Random and systematic beam modulator errors in dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsai, Homayon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cho, Paul S [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Phillips, Mark H [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Giansiracusa, Robert S [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Axen, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2003-05-07

    This paper reports on the dosimetric effects of random and systematic modulator errors in delivery of dynamic intensity modulated beams. A sliding-widow type delivery that utilizes a combination of multileaf collimators (MLCs) and backup diaphragms was examined. Gaussian functions with standard deviations ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 mm were used to simulate random positioning errors. A clinical example involving a clival meningioma was chosen with optic chiasm and brain stem as limiting critical structures in the vicinity of the tumour. Dose calculations for different modulator fluctuations were performed, and a quantitative analysis was carried out based on cumulative and differential dose volume histograms for the gross target volume and surrounding critical structures. The study indicated that random modulator errors have a strong tendency to reduce minimum target dose and homogeneity. Furthermore, it was shown that random perturbation of both MLCs and backup diaphragms in the order of {sigma} = 1 mm can lead to 5% errors in prescribed dose. In comparison, when MLCs or backup diaphragms alone was perturbed, the system was more robust and modulator errors of at least {sigma} = 1.5 mm were required to cause dose discrepancies greater than 5%. For systematic perturbation, even errors in the order of {+-}0.5 mm were shown to result in significant dosimetric deviations.

  1. Correlated dynamics in egocentric communication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Karsai, Márton; Kertész, János

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the communication sequences of millions of people through two different channels and analyze the fine grained temporal structure of correlated event trains induced by single individuals. By focusing on correlations between the heterogeneous dynamics and the topology of egocentric networks we find that the bursty trains usually evolve for pairs of individuals rather than for the ego and his/her several neighbors thus burstiness is a property of the links rather than of the nodes. We compare the directional balance of calls and short messages within bursty trains to the average on the actual link and show that for the trains of voice calls the imbalance is significantly enhanced, while for short messages the balance within the trains increases. These effects can be partly traced back to the technological constrains (for short messages) and partly to the human behavioral features (voice calls). We define a model that is able to reproduce the empirical results and may help us to understand better t...

  2. Dynamical Networks for Smog Pattern Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zong, Linqi; Zhu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Smog, as a form of air pollution, poses as a serious problem to the environment, health, and economy of the world[1-4] . Previous studies on smog mostly focused on the components and the effects of smog [5-10]. However, as the smog happens with increased frequency and duration, the smog pattern which is critical for smog forecast and control, is rarely investigated, mainly due to the complexity of the components, the causes, and the spreading processes of smog. Here we report the first analysis on smog pattern applying the model of dynamical networks with spontaneous recovery. We show that many phenomena such as the sudden outbreak and dissipation of smog and the long duration smog can be revealed with the mathematical mechanism under a random walk simulation. We present real-world air quality index data in accord with the predictions of the model. Also we found that compared to external causes such as pollution spreading from nearby, internal causes such as industrial pollution and vehicle emission generated...

  3. Application of dynamic recurrent neural networks in nonlinear system identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yun; Wu, Xueli; Sun, Huiqin; Zhang, Suying; Tian, Qiang

    2006-11-01

    An adaptive identification method of simple dynamic recurrent neural network (SRNN) for nonlinear dynamic systems is presented in this paper. This method based on the theory that by using the inner-states feed-back of dynamic network to describe the nonlinear kinetic characteristics of system can reflect the dynamic characteristics more directly, deduces the recursive prediction error (RPE) learning algorithm of SRNN, and improves the algorithm by studying topological structure on recursion layer without the weight values. The simulation results indicate that this kind of neural network can be used in real-time control, due to its less weight values, simpler learning algorithm, higher identification speed, and higher precision of model. It solves the problems of intricate in training algorithm and slow rate in convergence caused by the complicate topological structure in usual dynamic recurrent neural network.

  4. Prediction of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules using Bayesian networks and regression trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaoyu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vertebrates, a large part of gene transcriptional regulation is operated by cis-regulatory modules. These modules are believed to be regulating much of the tissue-specificity of gene expression. Results We develop a Bayesian network approach for identifying cis-regulatory modules likely to regulate tissue-specific expression. The network integrates predicted transcription factor binding site information, transcription factor expression data, and target gene expression data. At its core is a regression tree modeling the effect of combinations of transcription factors bound to a module. A new unsupervised EM-like algorithm is developed to learn the parameters of the network, including the regression tree structure. Conclusion Our approach is shown to accurately identify known human liver and erythroid-specific modules. When applied to the prediction of tissue-specific modules in 10 different tissues, the network predicts a number of important transcription factor combinations whose concerted binding is associated to specific expression.

  5. Dynamic spreading behavior of homogeneous and heterogeneous networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Chengyi; LIU Zhongxin; CHEN Zengqiang; YUAN Zhuzhi

    2007-01-01

    The detailed investigation of the dynamic epidemic spreading on homogeneous and heterogeneous networks was carried out. After the analysis of the basic epidemic models, the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model on homogenous and heterogeneous networks is established, and the dynamical evolution of the density of the infected individuals in these two different kinds of networks is analyzed theoretically. It indicates that heterogeneous networks are easier to propagate for the epidemics and the leading spreading behavior is dictated by the exponential increasing in the initial outbreaks. Large-scale simulations display that the infection is much faster on heterogeneous networks than that on homogeneous ones. It means that the network topology can have a significant effect on the epidemics taking place on complex networks. Some containment strategies of epidemic outbreaks are presented according to the theoretical analyses and numerical simulations.

  6. Complex brain networks: From topological communities to clustered dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lucia Zemanová; Gorka Zamora-López; Changsong Zhou; Jürgen Kurths

    2008-06-01

    Recent research has revealed a rich and complicated network topology in the cortical connectivity of mammalian brains. A challenging task is to understand the implications of such network structures on the functional organisation of the brain activities. We investigate synchronisation dynamics on the corticocortical network of the cat by modelling each node of the network (cortical area) with a subnetwork of interacting excitable neurons. We find that this network of networks displays clustered synchronisation behaviour and the dynamical clusters closely coincide with the topological community structures observed in the anatomical network. The correlation between the firing rate of the areas and the areal intensity is additionally examined. Our results provide insights into the relationship between the global organisation and the functional specialisation of the brain cortex.

  7. Dynamics of epidemic diseases on a growing adaptive network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Güven; Barter, Edmund; Gross, Thilo

    2017-02-01

    The study of epidemics on static networks has revealed important effects on disease prevalence of network topological features such as the variance of the degree distribution, i.e. the distribution of the number of neighbors of nodes, and the maximum degree. Here, we analyze an adaptive network where the degree distribution is not independent of epidemics but is shaped through disease-induced dynamics and mortality in a complex interplay. We study the dynamics of a network that grows according to a preferential attachment rule, while nodes are simultaneously removed from the network due to disease-induced mortality. We investigate the prevalence of the disease using individual-based simulations and a heterogeneous node approximation. Our results suggest that in this system in the thermodynamic limit no epidemic thresholds exist, while the interplay between network growth and epidemic spreading leads to exponential networks for any finite rate of infectiousness when the disease persists.

  8. Pinning impulsive directed coupled delayed dynamical network and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chunnan; Wu, Quanjun; Xiang, Lan; Zhou, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the present paper is to further investigate pinning synchronisation of a complex delayed dynamical network with directionally coupling by a single impulsive controller. By developing the analysis procedure of pinning impulsive stability for undirected coupled dynamical network previously, some simple yet general criteria of pinning impulsive synchronisation for such directed coupled network are derived analytically. It is shown that a single impulsive controller can always pin a given directed coupled network to a desired homogenous solution, including an equilibrium point, a periodic orbit, or a chaotic orbit. Subsequently, the theoretical results are illustrated by a directed small-world complex network which is a cellular neural network (CNN) and a directed scale-free complex network with the well-known Hodgkin-Huxley neuron oscillators. Numerical simulations are finally given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control methodology.

  9. Anomalous Contagion and Renormalization in Dynamical Networks with Nodal Mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Manrique, Pedro D; Zheng, Minzhang; Xu, Chen; Hui, Pak Ming; Johnson, Neil F

    2015-01-01

    The common real-world feature of individuals migrating through a network -- either in real space or online -- significantly complicates understanding of network processes. Here we show that even though a network may appear static on average, underlying nodal mobility can dramatically distort outbreak profiles. Highly nonlinear dynamical regimes emerge in which increasing mobility either amplifies or suppresses outbreak severity. Predicted profiles mimic recent outbreaks of real-space contagion (social unrest) and online contagion (pro-ISIS support). We show that this nodal mobility can be renormalized in a precise way for a particular class of dynamical networks.

  10. Stochastic synchronization for time-varying complex dynamical networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Xiao-Yong; Li Jun-Min

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the stochastic synchronization problem for time-varying complex dynamical networks. This model is totally different from some existing network models. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, inequality techniques, and the properties of the Weiner process, some controllers and adaptive laws are designed to ensure achieving stochastic synchronization of a complex dynamical network model. A sufficient synchronization condition is given to ensure that the proposed network model is mean-square stable. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation fully verify the main results.

  11. Extinction dynamics of Lotka-Volterra ecosystems on evolving networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppex, F; Droz, M; Lipowski, A

    2004-06-01

    We study a model of a multispecies ecosystem described by Lotka-Volterra-like equations. Interactions among species form a network whose evolution is determined by the dynamics of the model. Numerical simulations show power-law distribution of intervals between extinctions, but only for ecosystems with sufficient variability of species and with networks of connectivity above certain threshold that is very close to the percolation threshold of the network. The effect of slow environmental changes on extinction dynamics, degree distribution of the network of interspecies interactions, and some emergent properties of our model are also examined.

  12. Synchronization in a Novel Local-World Dynamical Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianeng Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in complex network research have recently stimulated increasing interests in understanding the relationship between the topology and dynamics of complex networks. In the paper, we study the synchronizability of a class of local-world dynamical networks. Then, we have proposed a local-world synchronization-optimal growth topology model. Compared with the local-world evolving network model, it exhibits a stronger synchronizability. We also investigate the robustness of the synchronizability with respect to random failures and the fragility of the synchronizability with specific removal of nodes.

  13. A User Driven Dynamic Circuit Network Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guok, Chin; Robertson, David; Chaniotakis, Evangelos; Thompson, Mary; Johnston, William; Tierney, Brian

    2008-10-01

    The requirements for network predictability are becoming increasingly critical to the DoE science community where resources are widely distributed and collaborations are world-wide. To accommodate these emerging requirements, the Energy Sciences Network has established a Science Data Network to provide user driven guaranteed bandwidth allocations. In this paper we outline the design, implementation, and secure coordinated use of such a network, as well as some lessons learned.

  14. DAWN: Dynamic Ad-hoc Wireless Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-19

    Wireless Networks, , ( ): . doi: Ning Li, Jennifer C. Hou. Localized Topology Control Algorithms for Heterogeneous Wireless Networks, IEEE ...Multi-User Diversity in Single-Radio OFDMA AdHoc Networks Based on Gibbs Sampling, IEEE Milcom . 03-NOV-10, . : , TOTAL: 1 Number of Peer-Reviewed...Networks, ( ) Hui Xu, , Xianren Wu, , Hamid R. Sadjadpour, , J.J. Garcia-Luna-Aceves, . A Unified Analysis of Routing Protocols inMANETs, IEEE

  15. Evolving networks:from topology to dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengping FAN; Guanrong CHEN; King Tim KO

    2004-01-01

    A multi-local-world model is introduced to describe the evolving networks that have a localization property such as the Intemet. Based on this model, we show that the traffic load defined by "betweenness centrality" on the multi-local-world scale-free networks' model also follows a power law form. In this kind of network, a few vertices have heavier loads and so play more important roles than the others in the network.

  16. Structure Properties of Koch Networks Based on Networks Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhai, Yinhu; Wang, Shaohui

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an informative labeling algorithm for the vertices of a family of Koch networks. Each of the labels is consisted of two parts, the precise position and the time adding to Koch networks. The shortest path routing between any two vertices is determined only on the basis of their labels, and the routing is calculated only by few computations. The rigorous solutions of betweenness centrality for every node and edge are also derived by the help of their labels. Furthermore, the community structure in Koch networks is studied by the current and voltage characteristics of its resistor networks.

  17. Dynamics and control of diseases in networks with community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Salathé

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of infectious diseases spread via direct person-to-person transmission (such as influenza, smallpox, HIV/AIDS, etc. depends on the underlying host contact network. Human contact networks exhibit strong community structure. Understanding how such community structure affects epidemics may provide insights for preventing the spread of disease between communities by changing the structure of the contact network through pharmaceutical or non-pharmaceutical interventions. We use empirical and simulated networks to investigate the spread of disease in networks with community structure. We find that community structure has a major impact on disease dynamics, and we show that in networks with strong community structure, immunization interventions targeted at individuals bridging communities are more effective than those simply targeting highly connected individuals. Because the structure of relevant contact networks is generally not known, and vaccine supply is often limited, there is great need for efficient vaccination algorithms that do not require full knowledge of the network. We developed an algorithm that acts only on locally available network information and is able to quickly identify targets for successful immunization intervention. The algorithm generally outperforms existing algorithms when vaccine supply is limited, particularly in networks with strong community structure. Understanding the spread of infectious diseases and designing optimal control strategies is a major goal of public health. Social networks show marked patterns of community structure, and our results, based on empirical and simulated data, demonstrate that community structure strongly affects disease dynamics. These results have implications for the design of control strategies.

  18. Minimal model for dynamic bonding in colloidal transient networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinninger, Philip; Fortini, Andrea; Schmidt, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a model for colloidal network formation using Brownian dynamics computer simulations. Hysteretic springs establish transient bonds between particles with repulsive cores. If a bonded pair of particles is separated by a cutoff distance, the spring vanishes and reappears only if the two particles contact each other. We present results for the bond lifetime distribution and investigate the properties of the van Hove dynamical two-body correlation function. The model displays crossover from fluidlike dynamics, via transient network formation, to arrested quasistatic network behavior.

  19. Hierarchical Routing over Dynamic Wireless Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Tschopp, Dominique; Grossglauser, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Wireless network topologies change over time and maintaining routes requires frequent updates. Updates are costly in terms of consuming throughput available for data transmission, which is precious in wireless networks. In this paper, we ask whether there exist low-overhead schemes that produce low-stretch routes. This is studied by using the underlying geometric properties of the connectivity graph in wireless networks.

  20. Reconstructing network topology and coupling strengths in directed networks of discrete-time dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Pik-Yin

    2017-02-01

    Reconstructing network connection topology and interaction strengths solely from measurement of the dynamics of the nodes is a challenging inverse problem of broad applicability in various areas of science and engineering. For a discrete-time step network under noises whose noise-free dynamics is stationary, we derive general analytic results relating the weighted connection matrix of the network to the correlation functions obtained from time-series measurements of the nodes for networks with one-dimensional intrinsic node dynamics. Information about the intrinsic node dynamics and the noise strengths acting on the nodes can also be obtained. Based on these results, we develop a scheme that can reconstruct the above information of the network using only the time-series measurements of node dynamics as input. Reconstruction formulas for higher-dimensional node dynamics are also derived and illustrated with a two-dimensional node dynamics network system. Furthermore, we extend our results and obtain a reconstruction scheme even for the cases when the noise-free dynamics is periodic. We demonstrate that our method can give accurate reconstruction results for weighted directed networks with linear or nonlinear node dynamics of various connection topologies, and with linear or nonlinear couplings.

  1. Modeling of carrier dynamics in quantum-well electroabsorption modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højfeldt, Sune; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    We present a comprehensive drift-diffusion-type electroabsorption modulator (EAM) model. The model allows us to investigate both steady-state properties and to follow the sweep-out of carriers after pulsed optical excitation. Furthermore, it allows for the investigation of the influence that vari......We present a comprehensive drift-diffusion-type electroabsorption modulator (EAM) model. The model allows us to investigate both steady-state properties and to follow the sweep-out of carriers after pulsed optical excitation. Furthermore, it allows for the investigation of the influence...... that various design parameters have on the device properties, in particular how they affect the carrier dynamics and the corresponding field dynamics. A number of different types of results are presented. We calculate absorption spectra and steady-state field screening due to carrier pile-up at the separate......-confinement heterobarriers. We then move on to look at carrier sweep-out upon short-pulse optical excitation. For a structure with one well, we analyze how the well position affects the carrier sweep-out and the absorption recovery. We calculate the field dynamics in a multiquantum-well structure and discuss how the changes...

  2. Ponderomotive dynamics of waves in quasiperiodically modulated media

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, D E

    2016-01-01

    Similarly to how charged particles experience time-averaged ponderomotive forces in high-frequency fields, linear waves also experience time-averaged refraction in modulated media. Here we propose a covariant variational theory of this "ponderomotive effect on waves" for a general nondissipative linear medium. Using the Weyl calculus, our formulation accommodates waves with temporal and spatial period comparable to that of the modulation (provided that parametric resonances are avoided). Our theory also shows that any wave is, in fact, a polarizable object that contributes to the linear dielectric tensor of the ambient medium. The dynamics of quantum particles is subsumed as a special case. As an illustration, ponderomotive potentials of quantum particles and photons are calculated within a number of models. We also explain a fundamental connection between these results and the commonly known expression for the electrostatic dielectric tensor of quantum plasmas.

  3. The Structure and Dynamics of Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, Mark; Watts, Duncan J

    2011-01-01

    From the Internet to networks of friendship, disease transmission, and even terrorism, the concept--and the reality--of networks has come to pervade modern society. But what exactly is a network? What different types of networks are there? Why are they interesting, and what can they tell us? In recent years, scientists from a range of fields--including mathematics, physics, computer science, sociology, and biology--have been pursuing these questions and building a new "science of networks." This book brings together for the first time a set of seminal articles representing research from across

  4. The classification and analysis of dynamic networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Jin-Li

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we, firstly, classify the complex networks in which the nodes are of the lifetime distribution. Secondly, in order to study complex networks in terms of queuing system and homogeneous Markov chain, we establish the relation between the complex networks and queuing system, providing a new way of studying complex networks. Thirdly, we prove that there exist stationary degree distributions of M-G-P network, and obtain the analytic expression of the distribution by means of Markov chain theory. We also obtain the average path length and clustering coefficient of the network. The results show that M-G-P network is not only scale-free but also of a small-world feature in proper conditions.

  5. Modeling reveals bistability and low-pass filtering in the network module determining blood stem cell fate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin Narula

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Combinatorial regulation of gene expression is ubiquitous in eukaryotes with multiple inputs converging on regulatory control elements. The dynamic properties of these elements determine the functionality of genetic networks regulating differentiation and development. Here we propose a method to quantitatively characterize the regulatory output of distant enhancers with a biophysical approach that recursively determines free energies of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions from experimental analysis of transcriptional reporter libraries. We apply this method to model the Scl-Gata2-Fli1 triad-a network module important for cell fate specification of hematopoietic stem cells. We show that this triad module is inherently bistable with irreversible transitions in response to physiologically relevant signals such as Notch, Bmp4 and Gata1 and we use the model to predict the sensitivity of the network to mutations. We also show that the triad acts as a low-pass filter by switching between steady states only in response to signals that persist for longer than a minimum duration threshold. We have found that the auto-regulation loops connecting the slow-degrading Scl to Gata2 and Fli1 are crucial for this low-pass filtering property. Taken together our analysis not only reveals new insights into hematopoietic stem cell regulatory network functionality but also provides a novel and widely applicable strategy to incorporate experimental measurements into dynamical network models.

  6. Individuality manifests in the dynamic reconfiguration of large-scale brain networks during movie viewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Changwon; Knight, Elizabeth Quattrocki; Pae, Chongwon; Park, Bumhee; Yoon, Shin-Ae; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Individuality, the uniqueness that distinguishes one person from another, may manifest as diverse rearrangements of functional connectivity during heterogeneous cognitive demands; yet, the neurobiological substrates of individuality, reflected in inter-individual variations of large-scale functional connectivity, have not been fully evidenced. Accordingly, we explored inter-individual variations of functional connectivity dynamics, subnetwork patterns and modular architecture while subjects watched identical video clips designed to induce different arousal levels. How inter-individual variations are manifested in the functional brain networks was examined with respect to four contrasting divisions: edges within the anterior versus posterior part of the brain, edges with versus without corresponding anatomically-defined structural pathways, inter- versus intra-module connections, and rich club edge types. Inter-subject variation in dynamic functional connectivity occurred to a greater degree within edges localized to anterior rather than posterior brain regions, without adhering to structural connectivity, between modules as opposed to within modules, and in weak-tie local edges rather than strong-tie rich-club edges. Arousal level significantly modulates inter-subject variability in functional connectivity, edge patterns, and modularity, and particularly enhances the synchrony of rich-club edges. These results imply that individuality resides in the dynamic reconfiguration of large-scale brain networks in response to a stream of cognitive demands. PMID:28112247

  7. Dynamic structure evolution of time-dependent network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beibei; Zhou, Yadong; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dai; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we research the long-voided problem of formulating the time-dependent network structure evolution scheme, it focus not only on finding new emerging vertices in evolving communities and new emerging communities over the specified time range but also formulating the complex network structure evolution schematic. Previous approaches basically applied to community detection on time static networks and thus failed to consider the potentially crucial and useful information latently embedded in the dynamic structure evolution process of time-dependent network. To address these problems and to tackle the network non-scalability dilemma, we propose the dynamic hierarchical method for detecting and revealing structure evolution schematic of the time-dependent network. In practice and specificity, we propose an explicit hierarchical network evolution uncovering algorithm framework originated from and widely expanded from time-dependent and dynamic spectral optimization theory. Our method yields preferable results compared with previous approaches on a vast variety of test network data, including both real on-line networks and computer generated complex networks.

  8. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2011-10-11

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals that propagate through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programmes in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. Cellular response dynamics are ultimately determined by interactions between transcriptional and non-transcriptional networks, with dramatic implications for physiology and evolution. Here, we provide an overview of non-transcriptional interactions that can affect the performance of natural and synthetic bacterial regulatory networks.

  9. The Graph Laplacian and the Dynamics of Complex Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thulasidasan, Sunil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-11

    In this talk, we explore the structure of networks from a spectral graph-theoretic perspective by analyzing the properties of the Laplacian matrix associated with the graph induced by a network. We will see how the eigenvalues of the graph Laplacian relate to the underlying network structure and dynamics and provides insight into a phenomenon frequently observed in real world networks - the emergence of collective behavior from purely local interactions seen in the coordinated motion of animals and phase transitions in biological networks, to name a few.

  10. A core eating network and its modulations underlie diverse eating phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Jing; Papies, Esther K.; Barsalou, Lawrence W.

    2016-01-01

    We propose that a core eating network and its modulations account for much of what is currently known about the neural activity underlying a wide range of eating phenomena in humans (excluding homeostasis and related phenomena). The core eating network is closely adapted from a network that Kaye, Fu

  11. Collective Relaxation Dynamics of Small-World Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Grabow, Carsten; Kurths, Jürgen; Timme, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks exhibit a wide range of collective dynamic phenomena, including synchronization, diffusion, relaxation, and coordination processes. Their asymptotic dynamics is generically characterized by the local Jacobian, graph Laplacian or a similar linear operator. The structure of networks with regular, small-world and random connectivities are reasonably well understood, but their collective dynamical properties remain largely unknown. Here we present a two-stage mean-field theory to derive analytic expressions for network spectra. A single formula covers the spectrum from regular via small-world to strongly randomized topologies in Watts-Strogatz networks, explaining the simultaneous dependencies on network size N, average degree k and topological randomness q. We present simplified analytic predictions for the second largest and smallest eigenvalue, and numerical checks confirm our theoretical predictions for zero, small and moderate topological randomness q, including the entire small-world regime...

  12. Dynamics of brain networks in the aesthetic appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela-Conde, Camilo J.; García-Prieto, Juan; Ramasco, José J.; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Bajo, Ricardo; Munar, Enric; Flexas, Albert; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimage experiments have been essential for identifying active brain networks. During cognitive tasks as in, e.g., aesthetic appreciation, such networks include regions that belong to the default mode network (DMN). Theoretically, DMN activity should be interrupted during cognitive tasks demanding attention, as is the case for aesthetic appreciation. Analyzing the functional connectivity dynamics along three temporal windows and two conditions, beautiful and not beautiful stimuli, here we report experimental support for the hypothesis that aesthetic appreciation relies on the activation of two different networks, an initial aesthetic network and a delayed aesthetic network, engaged within distinct time frames. Activation of the DMN might correspond mainly to the delayed aesthetic network. We discuss adaptive and evolutionary explanations for the relationships existing between the DMN and aesthetic networks and offer unique inputs to debates on the mind/brain interaction. PMID:23754437

  13. Dynamics of brain networks in the aesthetic appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela-Conde, Camilo J; García-Prieto, Juan; Ramasco, José J; Mirasso, Claudio R; Bajo, Ricardo; Munar, Enric; Flexas, Albert; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestú, Fernando

    2013-06-18

    Neuroimage experiments have been essential for identifying active brain networks. During cognitive tasks as in, e.g., aesthetic appreciation, such networks include regions that belong to the default mode network (DMN). Theoretically, DMN activity should be interrupted during cognitive tasks demanding attention, as is the case for aesthetic appreciation. Analyzing the functional connectivity dynamics along three temporal windows and two conditions, beautiful and not beautiful stimuli, here we report experimental support for the hypothesis that aesthetic appreciation relies on the activation of two different networks, an initial aesthetic network and a delayed aesthetic network, engaged within distinct time frames. Activation of the DMN might correspond mainly to the delayed aesthetic network. We discuss adaptive and evolutionary explanations for the relationships existing between the DMN and aesthetic networks and offer unique inputs to debates on the mind/brain interaction.

  14. Interplay between Network Topology and Dynamics in Neural Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is a compendium of research which brings together ideas from the fields of Complex Networks and Computational Neuroscience to address two questions regarding neural systems: 1) How the activity of neurons, via synaptic changes, can shape the topology of the network they form part of, and 2) How the resulting network structure, in its turn, might condition aspects of brain behaviour. Although the emphasis is on neural networks, several theoretical findings which are relevant for complex networks in general are presented -- such as a method for studying network evolution as a stochastic process, or a theory that allows for ensembles of correlated networks, and sets of dynamical elements thereon, to be treated mathematically and computationally in a model-independent manner. Some of the results are used to explain experimental data -- certain properties of brain tissue, the spontaneous emergence of correlations in all kinds of networks... -- and predictions regarding statistical aspects of the centra...

  15. Dynamics of Complex Interconnected Systems: Networks and Bioprocesses

    CERN Document Server

    Skjeltorp, Arne T

    2006-01-01

    The book reviews the synergism between various fields of research that are confronted with networks, such as genetic and metabolic networks, social networks, the Internet and ecological systems. In many cases, the interacting networks manifest so-called emergent properties that are not possessed by any of the individual components. This means that the detailed knowledge of the components is insufficient to describe the whole system. Recent work has indicated that networks in nature have so-called scale-free characteristics, and the associated dynamic network modelling shows unexpected results such as an amazing robustness against accidental failures. Modelling the signal transduction networks in bioprocesses as in living cells is a challenging interdisciplinary research area. It is now realized that the many features of molecular interaction networks within a cell are shared to a large degree by the other complex systems mentioned above, such as the Internet, computer chips and society. Thus knowledge gained ...

  16. Global network reorganization during dynamic adaptations of Bacillus subtilis metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buescher, Joerg Martin; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Jules, Matthieu

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation of cells to environmental changes requires dynamic interactions between metabolic and regulatory networks, but studies typically address only one or a few layers of regulation. For nutritional shifts between two preferred carbon sources of Bacillus subtilis, we combined statistical...

  17. Modeling the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks

    CERN Document Server

    Marceau, Vincent; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Allard, Antoine; Dubé, Louis J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemics seldom occur as isolated phenomena. Typically, two or more viral agents spread within the same host population and may interact dynamically with each other. We present a general model where two viral agents interact via an immunity mechanism as they propagate simultaneously on two networks connecting the same set of nodes. Exploiting a correspondence between the propagation dynamics and a dynamical process performing progressive network generation, we develop an analytic approach that accurately captures the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks. The formalism allows for overlay networks with arbitrary joint degree distribution and overlap. To illustrate the versatility of our approach, we consider a hypothetical delayed intervention scenario in which an immunizing agent is disseminated in a host population to hinder the propagation of an undesirable agent (e.g. the spread of preventive information in the context of an emerging infectious disease).

  18. Wavelength converter placement in optical networks with dynamic traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jakob Due; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Wessing, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    We evaluate the connection provisioning performance of GMPLS-controlled wavelength routed networks under dynamic traffic load and using three different wavelength converter placement heuristics. Results show that a simple uniform placement heuristic matches the performance of complex heuristics u...

  19. Node Sensing & Dynamic Discovering Routes for Wireless Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Nanda, Arabinda; Rout, Saroj Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The applications of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) contain a wide variety of scenarios. In most of them, the network is composed of a significant number of nodes deployed in an extensive area in which not all nodes are directly connected. Then, the data exchange is supported by multihop communications. Routing protocols are in charge of discovering and maintaining the routes in the network. However, the correctness of a particular routing protocol mainly depends on the capabilities of the nodes and on the application requirements. This paper presents a dynamic discover routing method for communication between sensor nodes and a base station in WSN. This method tolerates failures of arbitrary individual nodes in the network (node failure) or a small part of the network (area failure). Each node in the network does only local routing preservation, needs to record only its neighbor nodes' information, and incurs no extra routing overhead during failure free periods. It dynamically discovers new routes when an in...

  20. Reconstructing complex networks with binary-state dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingwen; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2015-01-01

    The prerequisite for our understanding of many complex networked systems lies in the reconstruction of network structure from measurable data. Although binary-state dynamics occurring in a broad class of complex networked systems in nature and society and has been intensively investigated, a general framework for reconstructing complex networks from binary states, the inverse problem, is lacking. Here we offer a general solution to the reconstruction problem by developing a data-based linearization approach for binary-state dynamics with linear, nonlinear, discrete and stochastic switching functions. The linearization allows us to convert the network reconstruction problem into a sparse signal reconstruction problem that can be resolved efficiently and credibly by convex optimization based on compressed sensing. The completely data-based linearization method and the sparse signal reconstruction constitutes a general framework for reconstructing complex networks without any knowledge of the binary-state dynami...

  1. A Supervised Approach to Windowing Detection on Dynamic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    A supervised approach to windowing detection on dynamic networks Benjamin Fish University of Illinois at Chicago 1200 W. Harrison St. Chicago...For any stream of time-stamped edges that form a dynamic network, a necessary and important choice is the aggregation granularity that an analyst uses...to bin the data at. While this choice is often picked by hand, or left up to the tech- nology that is collecting the data, the choice can make a big

  2. A Dynamic Algebraic Specification for Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ksystra, Katerina; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos; Stefaneas, Petros

    2011-01-01

    With the help of the Internet, social networks have grown rapidly. This has increased security requirements. We present a formalization of social networks as composite behavioral objects, defined using the Observational Transition System (OTS) approach. Our definition is then translated to the OTS/CafeOBJ algebraic specification methodology. This translation allows the formal verification of safety properties for social networks via the Proof Score method. Finally, using this methodology we formally verify some security properties.

  3. Emergent Opinion Dynamics on Endogenous Networks

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    In recent years networks have gained unprecedented attention in studying a broad range of topics, among them in complex systems research. In particular, multi-agent systems have seen an increased recognition of the importance of the interaction topology. It is now widely recognized that emergent phenomena can be highly sensitive to the structure of the interaction network connecting the system's components, and there is a growing body of abstract network classes, whose contributions to emerge...

  4. Information Dynamics as Foundation for Network Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-04

    built several efficient implementations of network coding libraries on android , both in Java and one in C++. In addition, and perhaps even more...probes. IMPLEMENTATION OF NETWORK CODING ON ANDROID PHONES As part of this MURI, we started a thread on implementation of network coding on Android ...specifically for Android phones. This work led to a spin-off from UC Irvine and EPFL, www.shoelacewireless.com, see Commercialization section later

  5. Network-state modulation of power-law frequency-scaling in visual cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Boustani, Sami; Marre, Olivier; Béhuret, Sébastien; Baudot, Pierre; Yger, Pierre; Bal, Thierry; Destexhe, Alain; Frégnac, Yves

    2009-09-01

    Various types of neural-based signals, such as EEG, local field potentials and intracellular synaptic potentials, integrate multiple sources of activity distributed across large assemblies. They have in common a power-law frequency-scaling structure at high frequencies, but it is still unclear whether this scaling property is dominated by intrinsic neuronal properties or by network activity. The latter case is particularly interesting because if frequency-scaling reflects the network state it could be used to characterize the functional impact of the connectivity. In intracellularly recorded neurons of cat primary visual cortex in vivo, the power spectral density of V(m) activity displays a power-law structure at high frequencies with a fractional scaling exponent. We show that this exponent is not constant, but depends on the visual statistics used to drive the network. To investigate the determinants of this frequency-scaling, we considered a generic recurrent model of cortex receiving a retinotopically organized external input. Similarly to the in vivo case, our in computo simulations show that the scaling exponent reflects the correlation level imposed in the input. This systematic dependence was also replicated at the single cell level, by controlling independently, in a parametric way, the strength and the temporal decay of the pairwise correlation between presynaptic inputs. This last model was implemented in vitro by imposing the correlation control in artificial presynaptic spike trains through dynamic-clamp techniques. These in vitro manipulations induced a modulation of the scaling exponent, similar to that observed in vivo and predicted in computo. We conclude that the frequency-scaling exponent of the V(m) reflects stimulus-driven correlations in the cortical network activity. Therefore, we propose that the scaling exponent could be used to read-out the "effective" connectivity responsible for the dynamical signature of the population signals measured

  6. Network-state modulation of power-law frequency-scaling in visual cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami El Boustani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Various types of neural-based signals, such as EEG, local field potentials and intracellular synaptic potentials, integrate multiple sources of activity distributed across large assemblies. They have in common a power-law frequency-scaling structure at high frequencies, but it is still unclear whether this scaling property is dominated by intrinsic neuronal properties or by network activity. The latter case is particularly interesting because if frequency-scaling reflects the network state it could be used to characterize the functional impact of the connectivity. In intracellularly recorded neurons of cat primary visual cortex in vivo, the power spectral density of V(m activity displays a power-law structure at high frequencies with a fractional scaling exponent. We show that this exponent is not constant, but depends on the visual statistics used to drive the network. To investigate the determinants of this frequency-scaling, we considered a generic recurrent model of cortex receiving a retinotopically organized external input. Similarly to the in vivo case, our in computo simulations show that the scaling exponent reflects the correlation level imposed in the input. This systematic dependence was also replicated at the single cell level, by controlling independently, in a parametric way, the strength and the temporal decay of the pairwise correlation between presynaptic inputs. This last model was implemented in vitro by imposing the correlation control in artificial presynaptic spike trains through dynamic-clamp techniques. These in vitro manipulations induced a modulation of the scaling exponent, similar to that observed in vivo and predicted in computo. We conclude that the frequency-scaling exponent of the V(m reflects stimulus-driven correlations in the cortical network activity. Therefore, we propose that the scaling exponent could be used to read-out the "effective" connectivity responsible for the dynamical signature of the population

  7. Neural network based dynamic controllers for industrial robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S Y; Shin, W C; Kim, H G

    1995-09-01

    The industrial robot's dynamic performance is frequently measured by positioning accuracy at high speeds and a good dynamic controller is essential that can accurately compute robot dynamics at a servo rate high enough to ensure system stability. A real-time dynamic controller for an industrial robot is developed here using neural networks. First, an efficient time-selectable hidden layer architecture has been developed based on system dynamics localized in time, which lends itself to real-time learning and control along with enhanced mapping accuracy. Second, the neural network architecture has also been specially tuned to accommodate servo dynamics. This not only facilitates the system design through reduced sensing requirements for the controller but also enhances the control performance over the control architecture neglecting servo dynamics. Experimental results demonstrate the controller's excellent learning and control performances compared with a conventional controller and thus has good potential for practical use in industrial robots.

  8. GFAP isoforms control intermediate filament network dynamics, cell morphology, and focal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeton, Martina; Stassen, Oscar M J A; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; van der Meer, Vincent W N; Kluivers, Liselot J; van Hoorn, Hedde; Schmidt, Thomas; Reits, Eric A J; van Strien, Miriam E; Hol, Elly M

    2016-11-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the characteristic intermediate filament (IF) protein in astrocytes. Expression of its main isoforms, GFAPα and GFAPδ, varies in astrocytes and astrocytoma implying a potential regulatory role in astrocyte physiology and pathology. An IF-network is a dynamic structure and has been functionally linked to cell motility, proliferation, and morphology. There is a constant exchange of IF-proteins with the network. To study differences in the dynamic properties of GFAPα and GFAPδ, we performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments on astrocytoma cells with fluorescently tagged GFAPs. Here, we show for the first time that the exchange of GFP-GFAPδ was significantly slower than the exchange of GFP-GFAPα with the IF-network. Furthermore, a collapsed IF-network, induced by GFAPδ expression, led to a further decrease in fluorescence recovery of both GFP-GFAPα and GFP-GFAPδ. This altered IF-network also changed cell morphology and the focal adhesion size, but did not alter cell migration or proliferation. Our study provides further insight into the modulation of the dynamic properties and functional consequences of the IF-network composition.

  9. Dynamic Network Drivers of Seizure Generation, Propagation and Termination in Human Neocortical Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambhati, Ankit N.; Davis, Kathryn A.; Oommen, Brian S.; Chen, Stephanie H.; Lucas, Timothy H.; Litt, Brian; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2015-01-01

    The epileptic network is characterized by pathologic, seizure-generating ‘foci’ embedded in a web of structural and functional connections. Clinically, seizure foci are considered optimal targets for surgery. However, poor surgical outcome suggests a complex relationship between foci and the surrounding network that drives seizure dynamics. We developed a novel technique to objectively track seizure states from dynamic functional networks constructed from intracranial recordings. Each dynamical state captures unique patterns of network connections that indicate synchronized and desynchronized hubs of neural populations. Our approach suggests that seizures are generated when synchronous relationships near foci work in tandem with rapidly changing desynchronous relationships from the surrounding epileptic network. As seizures progress, topographical and geometrical changes in network connectivity strengthen and tighten synchronous connectivity near foci—a mechanism that may aid seizure termination. Collectively, our observations implicate distributed cortical structures in seizure generation, propagation and termination, and may have practical significance in determining which circuits to modulate with implantable devices. PMID:26680762

  10. Dynamic Relaying in 3GPP LTE-Advanced Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teyeb, Oumer Mohammed; Van Phan, Vinh; Redana, Simone

    2009-01-01

    Relaying is one of the proposed technologies for LTE-Advanced networks. In order to enable a flexible and reliable relaying support, the currently adopted architectural structure of LTE networks has to be modified. In this paper, we extend the LTE architecture to enable dynamic relaying, while ma...

  11. Consensus in Directed Networks of Agents With Nonlinear Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Wenwu; Chen, Guanrong; Cao, Ming; Qu, Z.

    2011-01-01

    This technical note studies the consensus problem for cooperative agents with nonlinear dynamics in a directed network. Both local and global consensus are defined and investigated. Techniques for studying the synchronization in such complex networks are exploited to establish various sufficient con

  12. Non-homogeneous dynamic Bayesian networks for continuous data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grzegorczyk, Marco; Husmeier, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Classical dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs) are based on the homogeneous Markov assumption and cannot deal with non-homogeneous temporal processes. Various approaches to relax the homogeneity assumption have recently been proposed. The present paper presents a combination of a Bayesian network with c

  13. Popularity and Adolescent Friendship Networks : Selection and Influence Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Borch, Casey

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the dynamics of popularity in adolescent friendship networks across 3 years in middle school. Longitudinal social network modeling was used to identify selection and influence in the similarity of popularity among friends. It was argued that lower status adolescents strive to enh

  14. Popularity and Adolescent Friendship Networks: Selection and Influence Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Borch, Casey

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the dynamics of popularity in adolescent friendship networks across 3 years in middle school. Longitudinal social network modeling was used to identify selection and influence in the similarity of popularity among friends. It was argued that lower status adolescents strive to enhance their status through befriending higher…

  15. Modeling community structure and topics in dynamic text networks

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, Teague; Chai, Christine; Owens-Oas, Derek

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen great progress in both dynamic network modeling and topic modeling. This paper draws upon both areas to create a Bayesian method that allows topic discovery to inform the latent network model and the network structure to facilitate topic identification. We apply this method to the 467 top political blogs of 2012. Our results find complex community structure within this set of blogs, where community membership depends strongly upon the set of topics in which the blogger is interested.

  16. A dynamic epidemic control model on uncorrelated complex networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Wei-Dong; Chen Zeng-Qiang; Yuan Zhu-Zhi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,a dynamic epidemic control model on the uncorrelated complex networks is proposed.By means of theoretical analysis,we found that the new model has a similar epidemic threshold as that of the susceptible-infectedrecovered (SIR) model on the above networks,but it can reduce the prevalence of the infected individuals remarkably.This result may help us understand epidemic spreading phenomena on real networks and design appropriate strategies to control infections.

  17. Network evolution driven by dynamics applied to graph coloring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jian-She; Li Li-Guang; Wang Xiao-Hua; Yu Xin; Jiao Li-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    An evolutionary network driven by dynamics is studied and applied to the graph coloring problem.From an initial structure,both the topology and the coupling weights evolve according to the dynamics.On the other hand,the dynamics of the network are determined by the topology and the coupling weights,so an interesting structure-dynamics co-evolutionary scheme appears.By providing two evolutionary strategies,a network described by the complement of a graph will evolve into several clusters of nodes according to their dynamics.The nodes in each cluster can be assigned the same color and nodes in different clusters assigned different colors.In this way,a co-evolution phenomenon is applied to the graph coloring problem.The proposed scheme is tested on several benchmark graphs for graph coloring.

  18. Structure-based control of complex networks with nonlinear dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zañudo, Jorge G T; Albert, Réka

    2016-01-01

    Given the network of interactions underlying a complex system, what can we learn about controlling such a system solely from its structure? Over a century of research in control theory has given us tools to answer this question, which were widely applied in science and engineering. Yet the current tools do not always consider the inherently nonlinear dynamics of real systems and the naturally occurring system states in their definition of "control", a term whose interpretation varies across disciplines. Here we use a new mathematical framework for structure-based control of networks governed by a broad class of nonlinear dynamics that includes the major dynamic models of biological, technological, and social processes. This framework provides realizable node overrides that steer a system towards any of its natural long term dynamic behaviors and which are guaranteed to be effective regardless of the dynamic details and parameters of the underlying system. We use this framework on several real networks, compar...

  19. Simulating market dynamics: interactions between consumer psychology and social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Marco A; Jager, Wander

    2003-01-01

    Markets can show different types of dynamics, from quiet markets dominated by one or a few products, to markets with continual penetration of new and reintroduced products. In a previous article we explored the dynamics of markets from a psychological perspective using a multi-agent simulation model. The main results indicated that the behavioral rules dominating the artificial consumer's decision making determine the resulting market dynamics, such as fashions, lock-in, and unstable renewal. Results also show the importance of psychological variables like social networks, preferences, and the need for identity to explain the dynamics of markets. In this article we extend this work in two directions. First, we will focus on a more systematic investigation of the effects of different network structures. The previous article was based on Watts and Strogatz's approach, which describes the small-world and clustering characteristics in networks. More recent research demonstrated that many large networks display a scale-free power-law distribution for node connectivity. In terms of market dynamics this may imply that a small proportion of consumers may have an exceptional influence on the consumptive behavior of others (hubs, or early adapters). We show that market dynamics is a self-organized property depending on the interaction between the agents' decision-making process (heuristics), the product characteristics (degree of satisfaction of unit of consumption, visibility), and the structure of interactions between agents (size of network and hubs in a social network).

  20. Improving functional modules discovery by enriching interaction networks with gene profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Saeed

    2013-05-01

    Recent advances in proteomic and transcriptomic technologies resulted in the accumulation of vast amount of high-throughput data that span multiple biological processes and characteristics in different organisms. Much of the data come in the form of interaction networks and mRNA expression arrays. An important task in systems biology is functional modules discovery where the goal is to uncover well-connected sub-networks (modules). These discovered modules help to unravel the underlying mechanisms of the observed biological processes. While most of the existing module discovery methods use only the interaction data, in this work we propose, CLARM, which discovers biological modules by incorporating gene profiles data with protein-protein interaction networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of CLARM on Yeast and Human interaction datasets, and gene expression and molecular function profiles. Experiments on these real datasets show that the CLARM approach is competitive to well established functional module discovery methods.

  1. Electrically modulated dynamic spreading of drops on soft surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ranabir; Daga, Ashish; DasGupta, Sunando; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-07-01

    The intricate interaction between the deformability of a substrate and the dynamic spreading of a liquid drop on the same, under the application of an electrical voltage, has remained far from being well understood. Here, we demonstrate that electrospreading dynamics on soft substrates is dictated by the combined interplay of electrocapillarity, the wetting line friction, and the viscoelastic energy dissipation at the contact line. Our results reveal that during such electro-elastocapillarity mediated spreading of a sessile drop, the contact radius evolution exhibits a universal power-law in a substrate elasticity based non-dimensional time, with an electrical voltage dependent spreading exponent. Simultaneously, the macroscopic dynamic contact angle variation follows a general power-law in the contact line velocity, normalized by elasticity dependent characteristic velocity scale. These findings will be beneficial for comprehending droplet spreading dynamics stemming from the combination of electrically modulated spreading and "soft wetting." Hence, our results are likely to provide the foundation for the development of a plethora of applications involving droplet manipulations by exploiting the interplay between electrically triggered spreading and substrate-compliance over interfacial scales.

  2. Dynamics of fermions in an amplitude-modulated lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Tomotake; Watanabe, Shinichi; Ohgoda, Shun; Itin, Alexander P.

    2016-06-01

    We study the dynamics of fermions loaded in an optical lattice with a superimposed parabolic trap potential. In the recent Hamburg experiments [J. Heinze et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 085302 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.085302] on quantum simulation of photoconductivity, a modulation pulse on the optical lattice transferred part of the population of the lowest band to an excited band, leaving a hole in the particle distribution of the lowest band. The subsequent intricate dynamics of both excited particles and holes can be explained by a semiclassical approach based on the evolution of the Wigner function. Here we provide a more detailed analysis of the dynamics, taking into account the dimensionality of the system and finite-temperature effects, aiming at reproducing experimental results on longer time scales. A semiclassical wave packet is constructed more accurately than in the previous theory. As a result, semiclassical dynamics indeed reproduces experimental data and full quantum numerical calculations with a much better accuracy. In particular, the fascinating phenomenon of collapse and revival of holes is investigated in more detail. We presume that the experimental setup can be used for deeper exploration of nonlinear waves in fermionic gases.

  3. Network statistics of genetically-driven gene co-expression modules in mouse crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pier eScott-Boyer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In biology, networks are used in different contexts as ways to represent relationships between entities, such as for instance interactions between genes, proteins or metabolites. Despite progress in the analysis of such networks and their potential to better understand the collective impact of genes on complex traits, one remaining challenge is to establish the biologic validity of gene co-expression networks and to determine what governs their organization. We used WGCNA to construct and analyze seven gene expression datasets from several tissues of mouse recombinant inbred strains (RIS. For six out of the 7 networks, we found that linkage to module QTLs (mQTLs could be established for 29.3% of gene co-expression modules detected in the several mouse RIS. For about 74.6% of such genetically-linked modules, the mQTL was on the same chromosome as the one contributing most genes to the module, with genes originating from that chromosome showing higher connectivity than other genes in the modules. Such modules (that we considered as genetically-driven had network statistic properties (density, centralization and heterogeneity that set them apart from other modules in the network. Altogether, a sizeable portion of gene co-expression modules detected in mouse RIS panels had genetic determinants as their main organizing principle. In addition to providing a biologic interpretation validation for these modules, these genetic determinants imparted on them particular properties that set them apart from other modules in the network, to the point that they can be predicted to a large extent on the basis of their network statistics.

  4. Optimizing controllability of edge dynamics in complex networks by perturbing network structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shaopeng; Hao, Fei

    2017-03-01

    Using the minimum input signals to drive the dynamics in complex networks toward some desired state is a fundamental issue in the field of network controllability. For a complex network with the dynamical process defined on its edges, the controllability of this network is optimal if it can be fully controlled by applying one input signal to an arbitrary non-isolated vertex of it. In this paper, the adding-edge strategy and turning-edge strategy are proposed to optimize the controllability by minimum structural perturbations. Simulations and analyses indicate that the minimum number of adding-edges required for the optimal controllability is equal to the minimum number of turning-edges, and networks with positively correlated in- and out-degrees are easier to achieve optimal controllability. Furthermore, both the strategies have the capacity to reveal the relationship between certain structural properties of a complex network and its controllability of edge dynamics.

  5. Recovery processes and dynamics in single and interdependent networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdandzic, Antonio

    Systems composed of dynamical networks --- such as the human body with its biological networks or the global economic network consisting of regional clusters --- often exhibit complicated collective dynamics. Three fundamental processes that are typically present are failure, damage spread, and recovery. Here we develop a model for such systems and find phase diagrams for single and interacting networks. By investigating networks with a small number of nodes, where finite-size effects are pronounced, we describe the spontaneous recovery phenomenon present in these systems. In the case of interacting networks the phase diagram is very rich and becomes increasingly more complex as the number of interacting networks increases. In the simplest example of two interacting networks we find two critical points, four triple points, ten allowed transitions, and two forbidden transitions, as well as complex hysteresis loops. Remarkably, we find that triple points play the dominant role in constructing the optimal repairing strategy in damaged interacting systems. To test our model, we analyze an example of real interacting financial networks and find evidence of rapid dynamical transitions between well-defined states, in agreement with the predictions of our model.

  6. Discriminating lysosomal membrane protein types using dynamic neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vijay; Gupta, Dwijendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a dynamic artificial neural network methodology, which classifies the proteins into their classes from their sequences alone: the lysosomal membrane protein classes and the various other membranes protein classes. In this paper, neural networks-based lysosomal-associated membrane protein type prediction system is proposed. Different protein sequence representations are fused to extract the features of a protein sequence, which includes seven feature sets; amino acid (AA) composition, sequence length, hydrophobic group, electronic group, sum of hydrophobicity, R-group, and dipeptide composition. To reduce the dimensionality of the large feature vector, we applied the principal component analysis. The probabilistic neural network, generalized regression neural network, and Elman regression neural network (RNN) are used as classifiers and compared with layer recurrent network (LRN), a dynamic network. The dynamic networks have memory, i.e. its output depends not only on the input but the previous outputs also. Thus, the accuracy of LRN classifier among all other artificial neural networks comes out to be the highest. The overall accuracy of jackknife cross-validation is 93.2% for the data-set. These predicted results suggest that the method can be effectively applied to discriminate lysosomal associated membrane proteins from other membrane proteins (Type-I, Outer membrane proteins, GPI-Anchored) and Globular proteins, and it also indicates that the protein sequence representation can better reflect the core feature of membrane proteins than the classical AA composition.

  7. Understanding migraine using dynamic network biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlem, M.A.; Kurths, J.; Ferrari, M.D.; Aihara, K.; Scheffer, M.; May, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mathematical modeling approaches are becoming ever more established in clinical neuroscience. They provide insight that is key to understanding complex interactions of network phenomena, in general, and interactions within the migraine-generator network, in particular. Purpose: In this s

  8. Information processing by biochemical networks: a dynamic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowsher, Clive G

    2011-02-06

    Understanding how information is encoded and transferred by biochemical networks is of fundamental importance in cellular and systems biology. This requires analysis of the relationships between the stochastic trajectories of the constituent molecular (or submolecular) species that comprise the network. We describe how to identify conditional independences between the trajectories or time courses of groups of species. These are robust network properties that provide important insight into how information is processed. An entire network can then be decomposed exactly into modules on informational grounds. In the context of signalling networks with multiple inputs, the approach identifies the routes and species involved in sequential information processing between input and output modules. An algorithm is developed which allows automated identification of decompositions for large networks and visualization using a tree that encodes the conditional independences. Only stoichiometric information is used and neither simulations nor knowledge of rate parameters are required. A bespoke version of the algorithm for signalling networks identifies the routes of sequential encoding between inputs and outputs, visualized as paths in the tree. Application to the toll-like receptor signalling network reveals that inputs can be informative in ways unanticipated by steady-state analyses, that the information processing structure is not well described as a bow tie, and that encoding for the interferon response is unusually sparse compared with other outputs of this innate immune system.

  9. Cytoskeletal network morphology regulates intracellular transport dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, David; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable time scales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that r...

  10. Vaccination intervention on epidemic dynamics in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Xiao-Long; Fu, Xinchu; Zhou, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is an important measure available for preventing or reducing the spread of infectious diseases. In this paper, an epidemic model including susceptible, infected, and imperfectly vaccinated compartments is studied on Watts-Strogatz small-world, Barab\\'asi-Albert scale-free, and random scale-free networks. The epidemic threshold and prevalence are analyzed. For small-world networks, the effective vaccination intervention is suggested and its influence on the threshold and prevalence is analyzed. For scale-free networks, the threshold is found to be strongly dependent both on the effective vaccination rate and on the connectivity distribution. Moreover, so long as vaccination is effective, it can linearly decrease the epidemic prevalence in small-world networks, whereas for scale-free networks it acts exponentially. These results can help in adopting pragmatic treatment upon diseases in structured populations.

  11. Monitoring the Topology of Growing Dynamical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhaoyan; Fu, Xinchu; Chen, Guanrong

    In this paper, topology monitoring of growing networks is studied. When some new nodes are added into a network, the topology of the network is changed, which needs to be monitored in many applications. Some auxiliary systems (network monitors) are designed to achieve this goal. Both linear feedback control and adaptive strategy are applied to designing such network monitors. Based on the Lyapunov function method via constructing a potential or energy function decreasing along any solution of the system, and the LaSalle's invariance principle, which is a generalization of the Lyapunov function method, some sufficient conditions for achieving topology monitoring are obtained. Illustrative examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new method.

  12. Multinephron dynamics on the renal vascular network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Donald J; Wexler, Anthony S; Brazhe, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    ensemble. Ensembles may synchronize. Smooth muscle cells in the ensemble depolarize periodically, generating electrical signals that propagate along the vascular network. We developed a mathematical model of a nephron-vascular network, with 16 versions of a single nephron model containing representations...... of both mechanisms in the regulatory ensemble, to examine the effects of network structure on nephron synchronization. Symmetry, as a property of a network, facilitates synchronization. Nephrons received blood from a symmetric electrically conductive vascular tree. Symmetry was created by using identical...... nephron models at each of the 16 sites, and symmetry breaking by varying nephron length. The symmetric model achieved synchronization of all elements in the network. As little as 1% variation in nephron length caused extensive desynchronization, although synchronization was maintained in small nephron...

  13. Dynamic Packet Scheduling in Wireless Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kesselheim, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We consider protocols that serve communication requests arising over time in a wireless network that is subject to interference. Unlike previous approaches, we take the geometry of the network and power control into account, both allowing to increase the network's performance significantly. We introduce a stochastic and an adversarial model to bound the packet injection. Although taken as the primary motivation, this approach is not only suitable for models based on the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR). It also covers virtually all other common interference models, for example the multiple-access channel, the radio-network model, the protocol model, and distance-2 matching. Packet-routing networks allowing each edge or each node to transmit or receive one packet at a time can be modeled as well. Starting from algorithms for the respective scheduling problem with static transmission requests, we build distributed stable protocols. This is more involved than in previous, similar approaches because...

  14. Fractional Hopfield Neural Networks: Fractional Dynamic Associative Recurrent Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yi-Fei; Yi, Zhang; Zhou, Ji-Liu

    2016-07-14

    This paper mainly discusses a novel conceptual framework: fractional Hopfield neural networks (FHNN). As is commonly known, fractional calculus has been incorporated into artificial neural networks, mainly because of its long-term memory and nonlocality. Some researchers have made interesting attempts at fractional neural networks and gained competitive advantages over integer-order neural networks. Therefore, it is naturally makes one ponder how to generalize the first-order Hopfield neural networks to the fractional-order ones, and how to implement FHNN by means of fractional calculus. We propose to introduce a novel mathematical method: fractional calculus to implement FHNN. First, we implement fractor in the form of an analog circuit. Second, we implement FHNN by utilizing fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, and further analyze its attractors. Third, we perform experiments to analyze the stability and convergence of FHNN, and further discuss its applications to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. The main contribution of our work is to propose FHNN in the form of an analog circuit by utilizing a fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, prove its Lyapunov stability, analyze its attractors, and apply FHNN to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. A significant advantage of FHNN is that its attractors essentially relate to the neuron's fractional order. FHNN possesses the fractional-order-stability and fractional-order-sensitivity characteristics.

  15. Identifying the interactions in a colored dynamical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴召艳; 弓晓利

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of a colored dynamical network play a great role in its dynamical behaviour and are denoted by outer and inner coupling matrices. In this paper, the outer and inner coupling matrices are assumed to be unknown and need to be identified. A corresponding network estimator is designed for identifying the unknown interactions by adopting proper adaptive laws. Based on the Lyapunov function method and Barbalat’s lemma, the obtained result is analytically proved. A colored network coupled with chaotic Lorenz, Chen, and L ¨u systems is considered as a numerical example to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Dynamic baseline detection method for power data network service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes a dynamic baseline Traffic detection Method which is based on the historical traffic data for the Power data network. The method uses Cisco's NetFlow acquisition tool to collect the original historical traffic data from network element at fixed intervals. This method uses three dimensions information including the communication port, time, traffic (number of bytes or number of packets) t. By filtering, removing the deviation value, calculating the dynamic baseline value, comparing the actual value with the baseline value, the method can detect whether the current network traffic is abnormal.

  17. Dynamics of networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in response to time-dependent inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Erwan; Brunel, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of recurrent networks of excitatory (E) and inhibitory (I) neurons in the presence of time-dependent inputs. The dynamics is characterized by the network dynamical transfer function, i.e., how the population firing rate is modulated by sinusoidal inputs at arbitrary frequencies. Two types of networks are studied and compared: (i) a Wilson-Cowan type firing rate model; and (ii) a fully connected network of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons, in a strong noise regime. We first characterize the region of stability of the "asynchronous state" (a state in which population activity is constant in time when external inputs are constant) in the space of parameters characterizing the connectivity of the network. We then systematically characterize the qualitative behaviors of the dynamical transfer function, as a function of the connectivity. We find that the transfer function can be either low-pass, or with a single or double resonance, depending on the connection strengths and synaptic time constants. Resonances appear when the system is close to Hopf bifurcations, that can be induced by two separate mechanisms: the I-I connectivity and the E-I connectivity. Double resonances can appear when excitatory delays are larger than inhibitory delays, due to the fact that two distinct instabilities exist with a finite gap between the corresponding frequencies. In networks of LIF neurons, changes in external inputs and external noise are shown to be able to change qualitatively the network transfer function. Firing rate models are shown to exhibit the same diversity of transfer functions as the LIF network, provided delays are present. They can also exhibit input-dependent changes of the transfer function, provided a suitable static non-linearity is incorporated.

  18. On the Modular Dynamics of Financial Market Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Filipi N; Peron, Thomas K DM; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Ye, Cheng; Wilson, Richard C; Costa, Edwin Hancockm Luciano da F

    2015-01-01

    The financial market is a complex dynamical system composed of a large variety of intricate relationships between several entities, such as banks, corporations and institutions. At the heart of the system lies the stock exchange mechanism, which establishes a time-evolving network of transactions among companies and individuals. Such network can be inferred through correlations between time series of companies stock prices, allowing the overall system to be characterized by techniques borrowed from network science. Here we study the presence of communities in the inferred stock market network, and show that the knowledge about the communities alone can provide a nearly complete representation of the system topology. This is done by defining a simple random model sharing only the sizes and interconnectivity between communities observed in the time-evolving stock market network. We show that many topological characteristics of the inferred networks are preserved in the modeled networks. In particular, we find t...

  19. Dynamics and processing in finite self-similar networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeDeo, Simon; Krakauer, David C

    2012-09-07

    A common feature of biological networks is the geometrical property of self-similarity. Molecular regulatory networks through to circulatory systems, nervous systems, social systems and ecological trophic networks show self-similar connectivity at multiple scales. We analyse the relationship between topology and signalling in contrasting classes of such topologies. We find that networks differ in their ability to contain or propagate signals between arbitrary nodes in a network depending on whether they possess branching or loop-like features. Networks also differ in how they respond to noise, such that one allows for greater integration at high noise, and this performance is reversed at low noise. Surprisingly, small-world topologies, with diameters logarithmic in system size, have slower dynamical time scales, and may be less integrated (more modular) than networks with longer path lengths. All of these phenomena are essentially mesoscopic, vanishing in the infinite limit but producing strong effects at sizes and time scales relevant to biology.

  20. Maritime piracy situation modelling with dynamic Bayesian networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dabrowski, James M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A generative model for modelling maritime vessel behaviour is proposed. The model is a novel variant of the dynamic Bayesian network (DBN). The proposed DBN is in the form of a switching linear dynamic system (SLDS) that has been extended into a...

  1. Scalable Approaches to Control Network Dynamics: Prospects for City Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Adilson E.; Gray, Kimberly A.

    2014-07-01

    A city is a complex, emergent system and as such can be conveniently represented as a network of interacting components. A fundamental aspect of networks is that the systemic properties can depend as much on the interactions as they depend on the properties of the individual components themselves. Another fundamental aspect is that changes to one component can affect other components, in a process that may cause the entire or a substantial part of the system to change behavior. Over the past 2 decades, much research has been done on the modeling of large and complex networks involved in communication and transportation, disease propagation, and supply chains, as well as emergent phenomena, robustness and optimization in such systems...

  2. Protein dynamics modulated electron transfer kinetics in early stage photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prasanta; Dua, Arti

    2013-01-28

    A recent experiment has probed the electron transfer kinetics in the early stage of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides for the reaction center of wild type and different mutants [Science 316, 747 (2007)]. By monitoring the changes in the transient absorption of the donor-acceptor pair at 280 and 930 nm, both of which show non-exponential temporal decay, the experiment has provided a strong evidence that the initial electron transfer kinetics is modulated by the dynamics of protein backbone. In this work, we present a model where the electron transfer kinetics of the donor-acceptor pair is described along the reaction coordinate associated with the distance fluctuations in a protein backbone. The stochastic evolution of the reaction coordinate is described in terms of a non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with a memory kernel and Gaussian colored noise, both of which are completely described in terms of the microscopics of the protein normal modes. This model provides excellent fits to the transient absorption signals at 280 and 930 nm associated with protein distance fluctuations and protein dynamics modulated electron transfer reaction, respectively. In contrast to previous models, the present work explains the microscopic origins of the non-exponential decay of the transient absorption curve at 280 nm in terms of multiple time scales of relaxation of the protein normal modes. Dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway due to protein conformational fluctuations which occur on time scales slower than or comparable to the electron transfer kinetics explains the microscopic origin of the non-exponential nature of the transient absorption decay at 930 nm. The theoretical estimates for the relative driving force for five different mutants are in close agreement with the experimental estimates obtained using electrochemical measurements.

  3. Topology identification of complex dynamical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junchan; Li, Qin; Lu, Jun-An; Jiang, Zhong-Ping

    2010-06-01

    Recently, some researchers investigated the topology identification for complex networks via LaSalle's invariance principle. The principle cannot be directly applied to time-varying systems since the positive limit sets are generally not invariant. In this paper, we study the topology identification problem for a class of weighted complex networks with time-varying node systems. Adaptive identification laws are proposed to estimate the coupling parameters of the networks with and without communication delays. We prove that the asymptotic identification is ensured by a persistently exciting condition. Numerical simulations are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  4. Spatial price dynamics: From complex network perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. L.; Bi, J. T.; Sun, H. J.

    2008-10-01

    The spatial price problem means that if the supply price plus the transportation cost is less than the demand price, there exists a trade. Thus, after an amount of exchange, the demand price will decrease. This process is continuous until an equilibrium state is obtained. However, how the trade network structure affects this process has received little attention. In this paper, we give a evolving model to describe the levels of spatial price on different complex network structures. The simulation results show that the network with shorter path length is sensitive to the variation of prices.

  5. Out of control: Fluctuation of cascading dynamics in networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianwei; Cai, Lin; Xu, Bo; Li, Peng; Sun, Enhui; Zhu, Zhiguo

    2016-11-01

    Applying two preferential selection mechanisms of flow destination, we develop two new methods to quantify the initial load of a node, where the flow is transported along the shortest path between two nodes. We propose a simple cascading model and study cascading dynamics induced by attacking the node with the highest load in some synthetic and actual networks. Surprisingly, we observe the abnormal fluctuation of cascading dynamics, i.e., more damage can be triggered if we spend significantly higher cost to protect a network. In particular, this phenomenon is independent of the initial flow distribution and the preferential selection mechanisms of flow destination. However, it remains unclear which specific structural patterns may affect the fluctuation of cascading dynamics. In this paper, we examine the local evolution of the cascading propagation by constructing some special networks. We show that revivals of some nodes in the double ring structure facilitate the transportation of the flow between two unconnected sub-networks, cause more damage and subsequently lead to the abnormal fluctuation of cascading dynamics. Compared with the traditional definition of the betweenness, we adopt two new proposed methods to further evaluate the resilience of several actual networks. We find that some real world networks reach the strongest resilience level against cascading failures in our preferential selection mechanisms of flow destination. Moreover, we explore how to use the minimum cost to maximize the resilience of the studied networks.

  6. Dynamic Routing in Translucent WDM Optical Networks: The Intradomain Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Ramamurthy, Byrav

    2005-03-01

    Translucent wavelength-division multiplexing optical networks use sparse placement of regenerators to overcome physical impairments and wavelength contention introduced by fully transparent networks, and achieve a performance close to fully opaque networks at a much less cost. In previous studies, we addressed the placement of regenerators based on static schemes,allowing for only a limited number of regenerators at fixed locations. This paper furthers those studies by proposing a dynamic resource allocation and dynamic routing scheme to operate translucent networks. This scheme is realized through dynamically sharing regeneration resources, including transmitters,receivers, and electronic interfaces, between regeneration and access functions under a multidomain hierarchical translucent network model. An intradomain routing algorithm, which takes into consideration optical-layer constraints as well as dynamic allocation of regeneration resources, is developed to address the problem of translucent dynamic routing in a single routing domain. Network performance in terms of blocking probability, resource utilization, and running times under different resource allocation and routing schemes is measured through simulation experiments.

  7. Intrinsic dynamics induce global symmetry in network controllability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Wang, Wen-Xu; Liu, Yang-Yu; Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2015-02-12

    Controlling complex networked systems to desired states is a key research goal in contemporary science. Despite recent advances in studying the impact of network topology on controllability, a comprehensive understanding of the synergistic effect of network topology and individual dynamics on controllability is still lacking. Here we offer a theoretical study with particular interest in the diversity of dynamic units characterized by different types of individual dynamics. Interestingly, we find a global symmetry accounting for the invariance of controllability with respect to exchanging the densities of any two different types of dynamic units, irrespective of the network topology. The highest controllability arises at the global symmetry point, at which different types of dynamic units are of the same density. The lowest controllability occurs when all self-loops are either completely absent or present with identical weights. These findings further improve our understanding of network controllability and have implications for devising the optimal control of complex networked systems in a wide range of fields.

  8. Dynamical complexity in the perception-based network formation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Moon, Eunyoung

    2016-12-01

    Many link formation mechanisms for the evolution of social networks have been successful to reproduce various empirical findings in social networks. However, they have largely ignored the fact that individuals make decisions on whether to create links to other individuals based on cost and benefit of linking, and the fact that individuals may use perception of the network in their decision making. In this paper, we study the evolution of social networks in terms of perception-based strategic link formation. Here each individual has her own perception of the actual network, and uses it to decide whether to create a link to another individual. An individual with the least perception accuracy can benefit from updating her perception using that of the most accurate individual via a new link. This benefit is compared to the cost of linking in decision making. Once a new link is created, it affects the accuracies of other individuals' perceptions, leading to a further evolution of the actual network. As for initial actual networks, we consider both homogeneous and heterogeneous cases. The homogeneous initial actual network is modeled by Erdős-Rényi (ER) random networks, while we take a star network for the heterogeneous case. In any cases, individual perceptions of the actual network are modeled by ER random networks with controllable linking probability. Then the stable link density of the actual network is found to show discontinuous transitions or jumps according to the cost of linking. As the number of jumps is the consequence of the dynamical complexity, we discuss the effect of initial conditions on the number of jumps to find that the dynamical complexity strongly depends on how much individuals initially overestimate or underestimate the link density of the actual network. For the heterogeneous case, the role of the highly connected individual as an information spreader is also discussed.

  9. Temporal dynamics of connectivity and epidemic properties of growing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Babak; Shirkoohi, Mehrdad Khani

    2016-01-01

    Traditional mathematical models of epidemic disease had for decades conventionally considered static structure for contacts. Recently, an upsurge of theoretical inquiry has strived towards rendering the models more realistic by incorporating the temporal aspects of networks of contacts, societal and online, that are of interest in the study of epidemics (and other similar diffusion processes). However, temporal dynamics have predominantly focused on link fluctuations and nodal activities, and less attention has been paid to the growth of the underlying network. Many real networks grow: Online networks are evidently in constant growth, and societal networks can grow due to migration flux and reproduction. The effect of network growth on the epidemic properties of networks is hitherto unknown, mainly due to the predominant focus of the network growth literature on the so-called steady state. This paper takes a step towards alleviating this gap. We analytically study the degree dynamics of a given arbitrary network that is subject to growth. We use the theoretical findings to predict the epidemic properties of the network as a function of time. We observe that the introduction of new individuals into the network can enhance or diminish its resilience against endemic outbreaks and investigate how this regime shift depends upon the connectivity of newcomers and on how they establish connections to existing nodes. Throughout, theoretical findings are corroborated with Monte Carlo simulations over synthetic and real networks. The results shed light on the effects of network growth on the future epidemic properties of networks and offers insights for devising a priori immunization strategies.

  10. Scale-Free Networks Hidden in Chaotic Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Iba, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show our discovery that state-transition networks in several chaotic dynamical systems are "scale-free networks," with a technique to understand a dynamical system as a whole, which we call the analysis for "Discretized-State Transition" (DST) networks; This scale-free nature is found universally in the logistic map, the sine map, the cubic map, the general symmetric map, the sine-circle map, the Gaussian map, and the delayed logistic map. Our findings prove that there is a hidden order in chaos, which has not detected yet. Furthermore, we anticipate that our study opens up a new way to a "network analysis approach to dynamical systems" for understanding complex phenomena.

  11. Congested Link Inference Algorithms in Dynamic Routing IP Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance descending of current congested link inference algorithms is obviously in dynamic routing IP network, such as the most classical algorithm CLINK. To overcome this problem, based on the assumptions of Markov property and time homogeneity, we build a kind of Variable Structure Discrete Dynamic Bayesian (VSDDB network simplified model of dynamic routing IP network. Under the simplified VSDDB model, based on the Bayesian Maximum A Posteriori (BMAP and Rest Bayesian Network Model (RBNM, we proposed an Improved CLINK (ICLINK algorithm. Considering the concurrent phenomenon of multiple link congestion usually happens, we also proposed algorithm CLILRS (Congested Link Inference algorithm based on Lagrangian Relaxation Subgradient to infer the set of congested links. We validated our results by the experiments of analogy, simulation, and actual Internet.

  12. Actin dynamics and the elasticity of cytoskeletal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The structural integrity of a cell depends on its cytoskeleton, which includes an actin network. This network is transient and depends upon the continual polymerization and depolymerization of actin. The degradation of an actin network, and a corresponding reduction in cell stiffness, can indicate the presence of disease. Numerical simulations will be invaluable for understanding the physics of these systems and the correlation between actin dynamics and elasticity. Here we develop a model that is capable of generating actin network structures. In particular, we develop a model of actin dynamics which considers the polymerization, depolymerization, nucleation, severing, and capping of actin filaments. The structures obtained are then fed directly into a mechanical model. This allows us to qualitatively assess the effects of changing various parameters associated with actin dynamics on the elasticity of the material.

  13. Agent Based Modeling on Organizational Dynamics of Terrorist Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling organizational dynamics of terrorist network is a critical issue in computational analysis of terrorism research. The first step for effective counterterrorism and strategic intervention is to investigate how the terrorists operate with the relational network and what affects the performance. In this paper, we investigate the organizational dynamics by employing a computational experimentation methodology. The hierarchical cellular network model and the organizational dynamics model are developed for modeling the hybrid relational structure and complex operational processes, respectively. To intuitively elucidate this method, the agent based modeling is used to simulate the terrorist network and test the performance in diverse scenarios. Based on the experimental results, we show how the changes of operational environments affect the development of terrorist organization in terms of its recovery and capacity to perform future tasks. The potential strategies are also discussed, which can be used to restrain the activities of terrorists.

  14. Dynamic properties of epidemic spreading on finite size complex networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ying; Liu Yang; Shan Xiu-Ming; Ren Yong; Jiao Jian; Qiu Ben

    2005-01-01

    The Internet presents a complex topological structure, on which computer viruses can easily spread. By using theoretical analysis and computer simulation methods, the dynamic process of disease spreading on finite size networks with complex topological structure is investigated. On the finite size networks, the spreading process of SIS (susceptibleinfected-susceptible) model is a finite Markov chain with an absorbing state. Two parameters, the survival probability and the conditional infecting probability, are introduced to describe the dynamic properties of disease spreading on finite size networks. Our results can help understanding computer virus epidemics and other spreading phenomena on communication and social networks. Also, knowledge about the dynamic character of virus spreading is helpful for adopting immunity policy.

  15. Decentralized adaptive synchronization of an uncertain complex delayed dynamical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weisong ZHONG; Jun ZHAO; Georgi M.DIMIROVSKI

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,we investigate the locally and globally adaptive synchronization problem for an uncertain complex dynamical network with time-varying coupling delays based on the decentralized control.The coupling terms here are bounded by high-order polynomials with known gains that are ubiquitous in a large class of complex dynamical networks.We generalize the usual technology of searching for an appropriate coordinates transformation to change the network dynamics into a series of decoupled lower-dimensional systems.Several adaptive synchronization criteria are derived by constructing the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and Barbalat lemma,and the proposed criteria are simple in form and convenient for the practical engineering design.Numerical simulations illustrated by a nearest-neighbor coupling network verify the effectiveness of the proposed synchronization scheme.

  16. Virtual mutagenesis of the yeast cyclins genetic network reveals complex dynamics of transcriptional control networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliska Vohradska

    Full Text Available Study of genetic networks has moved from qualitative description of interactions between regulators and regulated genes to the analysis of the interaction dynamics. This paper focuses on the analysis of dynamics of one particular network--the yeast cyclins network. Using a dedicated mathematical model of gene expression and a procedure for computation of the parameters of the model from experimental data, a complete numerical model of the dynamics of the cyclins genetic network was attained. The model allowed for performing virtual experiments on the network and observing their influence on the expression dynamics of the genes downstream in the regulatory cascade. Results show that when the network structure is more complicated, and the regulatory interactions are indirect, results of gene deletion are highly unpredictable. As a consequence of quantitative behavior of the genes and their connections within the network, causal relationship between a regulator and target gene may not be discovered by gene deletion. Without including the dynamics of the system into the network, its functional properties cannot be studied and interpreted correctly.

  17. Dynamic Routing Protocol for Computer Networks with Clustering Topology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a hierarchical dynamic routing protocol (HDRP) based on the discrete dynamic programming principle. The proposed protocol can adapt to the dynamic and large computer networks (DLCN) with clustering topology. The procedures for realizing routing update and decision are presented in this paper. The proof of correctness and complexity analysis of the protocol are also made. The performance measures of the HDRP including throughput and average message delay are evaluated by using of simulation. The study shows that the HDRP provides a new available approach to the routing decision for DLCN or high speed networks with clustering topology.

  18. Global behavior of dynamical agents in directed network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwang YU; Yufan ZHENG

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the global behavior of controlled dynamical agents in directed networks.The agents are Lyapunov stable,are distributed in a line,and communicate through a directed network.The communication topology of the network is characterized by a directed graph and the control protocol is designed in simple linear decentralized feedback law.We study the different conditions under which agents will achieve aggregation,and critical and divergent trajectories,respectively.Our investigation on the dynamical agent system under network is extended to the time-delay network case.Furthermore,we study the case with two pre-specified virtual leaders in the system.Numerical simulations are given and demonstrate that our theoretical results are effective.

  19. Slow dynamics of the contact process on complex networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ódor Géza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Contact Process has been studied on complex networks exhibiting different kinds of quenched disorder. Numerical evidence is found for Griffiths phases and other rare region effects, in Erdős Rényi networks, leading rather generically to anomalously slow (algebraic, logarithmic,… relaxation. More surprisingly, it turns out that Griffiths phases can also emerge in the absence of quenched disorder, as a consequence of sole topological heterogeneity in networks with finite topological dimension. In case of scalefree networks, exhibiting infinite topological dimension, slow dynamics can be observed on tree-like structures and a superimposed weight pattern. In the infinite size limit the correlated subspaces of vertices seem to cause a smeared phase transition. These results have a broad spectrum of implications for propagation phenomena and other dynamical process on networks and are relevant for the analysis of both models and empirical data.

  20. Opinion dynamics on a group structured adaptive network

    CERN Document Server

    Gargiulo, F

    2009-01-01

    Many models have been proposed to analyze the evolution of opinion structure due to the interaction of individuals in their social environment. Such models analyze the spreading of ideas both in completely interacting backgrounds and on social networks, where each person has a finite set of interlocutors.Moreover also the investigation on the topological structure of social networks has been object of several analysis, both from the theoretical and the empirical point of view. In this framework a particularly important area of study regards the community structure inside social networks.In this paper we analyze the reciprocal feedback between the opinions of the individuals and the structure of the interpersonal relationships at the level of community structures. For this purpose we define a group based random network and we study how this structure co-evolve with opinion dynamics processes. We observe that the adaptive network structure affects the opinion dynamics process helping the consensus formation. Th...

  1. Dynamics of TCP traffic over ATM networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floyd, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Information and Computing Sciences Div.; Romanow, A. [Sun Microsystems Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The authors investigate the performance of TCP (Transport Control Protocol) connections over ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) networks without ATM-level congestion control, and compare it to the performance of TCP over packet-based networks. For simulations of congested networks, the effective throughput of TCP over ATM can be quite low when cells are dropped at the congested ATM switch. The low throughput is due to wasted bandwidth as the congested link transmits cells from ``corrupted`` packets, i.e., packets in which at least one cell is dropped by the switch. This fragmentation effect can be corrected and high throughput can be achieved if the switch drops whole packets prior to buffer overflow; they call this strategy Early Packet Discard. They also discuss general issues of congestion avoidance for best-effort traffic in ATM networks.

  2. Personality traits and ego-network dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simone Centellegher; Eduardo López; Jari Saramäki; Bruno Lepri

    2017-01-01

    .... Furthermore, some individuals maintain more stable networks than others. Here, we focus on how personality traits of individuals affect this picture, using mobile phone calls records and survey data from the Mobile Territorial Lab (MTL) study...

  3. Fundamental structures of dynamic social networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekara, Vedran; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

    2016-01-01

    and their interactions in the network of real-world person-to-person proximity measured via Bluetooth, as well as their telecommunication networks, online social media contacts, geolocation, and demographic data. These high-resolution data allow us to observe social groups directly, rendering community detection...... a pattern of recurring meetings across weeks and months, each with varying degrees of regularity. Taken together, these findings provide a powerful simplification of the social network, where cores represent fundamental structures expressed with strong temporal and spatial regularity. Using this framework......, we explore the complex interplay between social and geospatial behavior, documenting how the formation of cores is preceded by coordination behavior in the communication networks and demonstrating that social behavior can be predicted with high precision....

  4. Railway Network Timetabling and Dynamic Traffic Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, I.A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses the current state of research concerning railway network timetabling and traffic management. Timetable effectiveness is governed by frequency, regularity, accurate running, recovery and layover times, as well as minimal headway, buffer times and waiting times. Analytic (queuing)

  5. Dynamics of TCP traffic over ATM networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floyd, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Information and Computing Sciences Div.; Romanow, A. [Sun Microsystems Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The authors investigate the performance of TCP (Transport Control Protocol) connections over ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) networks without ATM-level congestion control, and compare it to the performance of TCP over packet-based networks. For simulations of congested networks, the effective throughput of TCP over ATM can be quite low when cells are dropped at the congested ATM switch. The low throughput is due to wasted bandwidth as the congested link transmits cells from ``corrupted`` packets, i.e., packets in which at least one cell is dropped by the switch. This fragmentation effect can be corrected and high throughput can be achieved if the switch drops whole packets prior to buffer overflow; they call this strategy Early Packet Discard. They also discuss general issues of congestion avoidance for best-effort traffic in ATM networks.

  6. Designing a simple dynamic Digital Signage Network

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Andreas Ødegård

    2006-01-01

    Digital Signage Networks (DSN) is a continious emerging digital advertisment medium. Display devices, typically large format plasma or LCD screens, are used to provide rich multimedia advertisments in shops, buses, at airports and other public premises. Such networks have turned out to gain significant cost-effective advantages over traditional printed signage by eliminating the need for manual distribution. Animated graphics, audio and video effects makes a DSN highly suitable to attract the...

  7. Synchronization and Bifurcation of General Complex Dynamical Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Wei-Gang; XU Cong-Xiang; LI Chang-Pin; FANG Jin-Qing

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper, synchronization and bifurcation of general complex dynamical networks are investigated. We mainly focus on networks with a somewhat general coupling matrix, i.e., the sum of each row equals a nonzero constant u. We derive a result that the networks can reach a new synchronous state, which is not the asymptotic limit set determined by the node equation. At the synchronous state, the networks appear bifurcation if we regard the constant u as a bifurcation parameter. Numerical examples are given to illustrate our derived conclusions.

  8. Tourist activated networks: Implications for dynamic packaging systems in tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zach, Florian; Fesenmaier, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses tourist activated networks as a concept to inform technological applications supporting dynamic bundling and en-route recommendations. Empirical data was collected from travellers who visited a regional destination in the US and then analyzed with respect to its network...... structure. The results indicate that the tourist activated network for the destination is rather sparse and that there are clearly differences in core and peripheral nodes. The findings illustrate the structure of a tourist activated network and provide implications for technology design and tourism...

  9. Socio-semantic dynamics in a blog network

    CERN Document Server

    Cointet, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The blogosphere can be construed as a knowledge network made of bloggers who are interacting through a social network to share, exchange or produce information. We claim that the social and semantic dimensions are essentially co-determined and propose to investigate the co-evolutionary dynamics of the blogosphere by examining two intertwined issues: ?rst, how does knowledge distribution drive new interactions and thus in?uence the social network topology? Second, which role structural network properties play in the information circulation in the system? We adopt an empirical standpoint by analyzing the semantic and social activity of a portion of the US political blogosphere, monitored on a period of four months.

  10. Using neural networks for dynamic light scattering time series processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicea, Dan

    2017-04-01

    A basic experiment to record dynamic light scattering (DLS) time series was assembled using basic components. The DLS time series processing using the Lorentzian function fit was considered as reference. A Neural Network was designed and trained using simulated frequency spectra for spherical particles in the range 0–350 nm, assumed to be scattering centers, and the neural network design and training procedure are described in detail. The neural network output accuracy was tested both on simulated and on experimental time series. The match with the DLS results, considered as reference, was good serving as a proof of concept for using neural networks in fast DLS time series processing.

  11. Silicon photonic Mach Zehnder modulators for next-generation short-reach optical communication networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacava, C.; Liu, Z.; Thomson, D.; Ke, Li; Fedeli, J. M.; Richardson, D. J.; Reed, G. T.; Petropoulos, P.

    2016-02-01

    Communication traffic grows relentlessly in today's networks, and with ever more machines connected to the network, this trend is set to continue for the foreseeable future. It is widely accepted that increasingly faster communications are required at the point of the end users, and consequently optical transmission plays a progressively greater role even in short- and medium-reach networks. Silicon photonic technologies are becoming increasingly attractive for such networks, due to their potential for low cost, energetically efficient, high-speed optical components. A representative example is the silicon-based optical modulator, which has been actively studied. Researchers have demonstrated silicon modulators in different types of structures, such as ring resonators or slow light based devices. These approaches have shown remarkably good performance in terms of modulation efficiency, however their operation could be severely affected by temperature drifts or fabrication errors. Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZM), on the other hand, show good performance and resilience to different environmental conditions. In this paper we present a CMOS-compatible compact silicon MZM. We study the application of the modulator to short-reach interconnects by realizing data modulation using some relevant advanced modulation formats, such as 4-level Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM-4) and Discrete Multi-Tone (DMT) modulation and compare the performance of the different systems in transmission.

  12. Inhibition causes ceaseless dynamics in networks of excitable nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larremore, Daniel B.; Shew, Woodrow L.; Ott, Edward; Sorrentino, Francesco; Restrepo, Juan G.

    2014-01-01

    The collective dynamics of a network of excitable nodes changes dramatically when inhibitory nodes are introduced. We consider inhibitory nodes which may be activated just like excitatory nodes but, upon activating, decrease the probability of activation of network neighbors. We show that, although the direct effect of inhibitory nodes is to decrease activity, the collective dynamics becomes self-sustaining. We explain this counterintuitive result by defining and analyzing a “branching function” which may be thought of as an activity-dependent branching ratio. The shape of the branching function implies that for a range of global coupling parameters dynamics are self-sustaining. Within the self-sustaining region of parameter space lies a critical line along which dynamics take the form of avalanches with universal scaling of size and duration, embedded in ceaseless timeseries of activity. Our analyses, confirmed by numerical simulation, suggest that inhibition may play a counterintuitive role in excitable networks. PMID:24745460

  13. Relaxation Dynamics in Condensation on Weighted Scale-Free Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xin-He; TANG Ming; WANG Peng; LIU Zong-Hua

    2008-01-01

    Most of the realistic networks are weighted scale-free networks. How this structure influences the conden-sation on it is a challenging problem. Recently, we make a first step to discuss its condensation [Phys. Rev. E 74 (2006) 036101] and here we focus on its evolutionary process of phase transition. In order to show how the weighted transport influences the dynamical properties, we study the relaxation dynamics in a zero range process on weighted scale-free networks. We find that there is a hierarchical relaxation dynamics in the evolution and there is a scaling relation between the relaxation time and the jumping exponent. The relaxation dynamics can be illustrated by a mean-field equation. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by our numerical simulations.

  14. A scalable distribution network risk evaluation framework via symbolic dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yuan

    Full Text Available Evaluations of electric power distribution network risks must address the problems of incomplete information and changing dynamics. A risk evaluation framework should be adaptable to a specific situation and an evolving understanding of risk.This study investigates the use of symbolic dynamics to abstract raw data. After introducing symbolic dynamics operators, Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy and Kullback-Leibler relative entropy are used to quantitatively evaluate relationships between risk sub-factors and main factors. For layered risk indicators, where the factors are categorized into four main factors - device, structure, load and special operation - a merging algorithm using operators to calculate the risk factors is discussed. Finally, an example from the Sanya Power Company is given to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.Distribution networks are exposed and can be affected by many things. The topology and the operating mode of a distribution network are dynamic, so the faults and their consequences are probabilistic.

  15. Revealing physical interaction networks from statistics of collective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Mor; Casadiego, Jose; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Revealing physical interactions in complex systems from observed collective dynamics constitutes a fundamental inverse problem in science. Current reconstruction methods require access to a system’s model or dynamical data at a level of detail often not available. We exploit changes in invariant measures, in particular distributions of sampled states of the system in response to driving signals, and use compressed sensing to reveal physical interaction networks. Dynamical observations following driving suffice to infer physical connectivity even if they are temporally disordered, are acquired at large sampling intervals, and stem from different experiments. Testing various nonlinear dynamic processes emerging on artificial and real network topologies indicates high reconstruction quality for existence as well as type of interactions. These results advance our ability to reveal physical interaction networks in complex synthetic and natural systems. PMID:28246630

  16. A Scalable Distribution Network Risk Evaluation Framework via Symbolic Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai; Liu, Jian; Liu, Kaipei; Tan, Tianyuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Evaluations of electric power distribution network risks must address the problems of incomplete information and changing dynamics. A risk evaluation framework should be adaptable to a specific situation and an evolving understanding of risk. Methods This study investigates the use of symbolic dynamics to abstract raw data. After introducing symbolic dynamics operators, Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy and Kullback-Leibler relative entropy are used to quantitatively evaluate relationships between risk sub-factors and main factors. For layered risk indicators, where the factors are categorized into four main factors – device, structure, load and special operation – a merging algorithm using operators to calculate the risk factors is discussed. Finally, an example from the Sanya Power Company is given to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method. Conclusion Distribution networks are exposed and can be affected by many things. The topology and the operating mode of a distribution network are dynamic, so the faults and their consequences are probabilistic. PMID:25789859

  17. Adaptive Network Dynamics and Evolution of Leadership in Collective Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Pais, Darren

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of leadership in migratory populations depends not only on costs and benefits of leadership investments but also on the opportunities for individuals to rely on cues from others through social interactions. We derive an analytically tractable adaptive dynamic network model of collective migration with fast timescale migration dynamics and slow timescale adaptive dynamics of individual leadership investment and social interaction. For large populations, our analysis of bifurcations with respect to investment cost explains the observed hysteretic effect associated with recovery of migration in fragmented environments. Further, we show a minimum connectivity threshold above which there is evolutionary branching into leader and follower populations. For small populations, we show how the topology of the underlying social interaction network influences the emergence and location of leaders in the adaptive system. Our model and analysis can describe other adaptive network dynamics involving collective...

  18. The relevance of network micro-structure for neural dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernice, Volker; Deger, Moritz; Cardanobile, Stefano; Rotter, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The activity of cortical neurons is determined by the input they receive from presynaptic neurons. Many previous studies have investigated how specific aspects of the statistics of the input affect the spike trains of single neurons and neurons in recurrent networks. However, typically very simple random network models are considered in such studies. Here we use a recently developed algorithm to construct networks based on a quasi-fractal probability measure which are much more variable than commonly used network models, and which therefore promise to sample the space of recurrent networks in a more exhaustive fashion than previously possible. We use the generated graphs as the underlying network topology in simulations of networks of integrate-and-fire neurons in an asynchronous and irregular state. Based on an extensive dataset of networks and neuronal simulations we assess statistical relations between features of the network structure and the spiking activity. Our results highlight the strong influence that some details of the network structure have on the activity dynamics of both single neurons and populations, even if some global network parameters are kept fixed. We observe specific and consistent relations between activity characteristics like spike-train irregularity or correlations and network properties, for example the distributions of the numbers of in- and outgoing connections or clustering. Exploiting these relations, we demonstrate that it is possible to estimate structural characteristics of the network from activity data. We also assess higher order correlations of spiking activity in the various networks considered here, and find that their occurrence strongly depends on the network structure. These results provide directions for further theoretical studies on recurrent networks, as well as new ways to interpret spike train recordings from neural circuits. PMID:23761758

  19. Integrating multiple sensory systems to modulate neural networks controlling posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, I; Gerasimenko, Y; Burdick, J; Zhong, H; Roy, R R; Edgerton, V R

    2015-12-01

    In this study we investigated the ability of sensory input to produce tonic responses in hindlimb muscles to facilitate standing in adult spinal rats and tested two hypotheses: 1) whether the spinal neural networks below a complete spinal cord transection can produce tonic reactions by activating different sensory inputs and 2) whether facilitation of tonic and rhythmic responses via activation of afferents and with spinal cord stimulation could engage similar neuronal mechanisms. We used a dynamically controlled platform to generate vibration during weight bearing, epidural stimulation (at spinal cord level S1), and/or tail pinching to determine the postural control responses that can be generated by the lumbosacral spinal cord. We observed that a combination of platform displacement, epidural stimulation, and tail pinching produces a cumulative effect that progressively enhances tonic responses in the hindlimbs. Tonic responses produced by epidural stimulation alone during standing were represented mainly by monosynaptic responses, whereas the combination of epidural stimulation and tail pinching during standing or epidural stimulation during stepping on a treadmill facilitated bilaterally both monosynaptic and polysynaptic responses. The results demonstrate that tonic muscle activity after complete spinal cord injury can be facilitated by activation of specific combinations of afferent inputs associated with load-bearing proprioception and cutaneous input in the presence of epidural stimulation and indicate that whether activation of tonic or rhythmic responses is generated depends on the specific combinations of sources and types of afferents activated in the hindlimb muscles.

  20. Matrix expression and vaccination control for epidemic dynamics over dynamic networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peilian GUO; Yuzhen WANG

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates epidemic dynamics over dynamic networks via the approach of semi-tensor product of matrices. First, a formal susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic dynamic model over dynamic networks (SISED-DN) is given. Second, based on a class of determinate co-evolutionary rule, the matrix expressions are established for the dynamics of individual states and network topologies, respectively. Then, all possible final spreading equilibria are obtained for any given initial epidemic state and network topology by the matrix expression. Third, a sufficient and necessary condition of the existence of state feedback vaccination control is presented to make every individual susceptible. The study of illustrative examples shows the effectiveness of our new results.