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Sample records for dynamic multileaf-collimator target

  1. Dynamic and quasi-dynamic multileaf collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortfeld, T.

    1995-01-01

    Several recent investigations deal with the problem of how to produce arbitrary two-dimensional x-ray fluence distributions by means of a multileaf collimator (MLC), an approach, which could be called multileaf modulation. The goal of this approach is to facilitate the delivery of compensated or intensity-modulated fields. The present work gives an overview of these developments. The hardware requirements on MLCs for this special application are specified. Most commercially available MLCs fulfill these requirement sufficiently, however, the MLC control software is generally not capable of controlling an MLC dynamically. There is also the question of how to verify the dynamic movement of the leaves. Some minimum requirements on a control software suitable for application in clinical practice are therefore specified. An alternative, the stepwise or 'quasi-dynamic' movement of the MLC-leaves, is also discussed with respect to practicality. In this case the control is easier, but the demands on the stability of the accelerator for small dose deliveries are higher. Nevertheless, it can be expected that, for reasons of ease of control and verification, the quasi-dynamic technique will become the method of choice in the near future, while the slightly more effective fully dynamic technique will become available later in the future. In any case, multileaf modulation is an interesting and important alternative to the tomotherapy-concept

  2. First Demonstration of Combined kV/MV Image-Guided Real-Time Dynamic Multileaf-Collimator Target Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Byungchul; Poulsen, Per R.; Sloutsky, Alex; Sawant, Amit; Keall, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For intrafraction motion management, a real-time tracking system was developed by combining fiducial marker-based tracking via simultaneous kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imaging and a dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) beam-tracking system. Methods and Materials: The integrated tracking system employed a Varian Trilogy system equipped with kV/MV imaging systems and a Millennium 120-leaf MLC. A gold marker in elliptical motion (2-cm superior-inferior, 1-cm left-right, 10 cycles/min) was simultaneously imaged by the kV and MV imagers at 6.7 Hz and segmented in real time. With these two-dimensional projections, the tracking software triangulated the three-dimensional marker position and repositioned the MLC leaves to follow the motion. Phantom studies were performed to evaluate time delay from image acquisition to MLC adjustment, tracking error, and dosimetric impact of target motion with and without tracking. Results: The time delay of the integrated tracking system was ∼450 ms. The tracking error using a prediction algorithm was 0.9 ± 0.5 mm for the elliptical motion. The dose distribution with tracking showed better target coverage and less dose to surrounding region over no tracking. The failure rate of the gamma test (3%/3-mm criteria) was 22.5% without tracking but was reduced to 0.2% with tracking. Conclusion: For the first time, a complete tracking system combining kV/MV image-guided target tracking and DMLC beam tracking was demonstrated. The average geometric error was less than 1 mm, and the dosimetric error was negligible. This system is a promising method for intrafraction motion management.

  3. Implementation of intensity modulation with dynamic multileaf collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J W; Yu, C; Jaffray, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The computer-controlled multileaf collimator (MLC) marks one of the most important advances in radiation therapy. The device efficiently replaces manual blocking to shape fields and can be used to modulate beam intensity. The results of a research programme at William Beaumont Hospital, aimed at bringing dynamic intensity modulation into clinical use, are discussed.

  4. Algorithms for optimal sequencing of dynamic multileaf collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, Srijit; Sahni, Sartaj; Palta, Jatinder; Ranka, Sanjay

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used to deliver intensity modulated beams using a multileaf collimator (MLC), with the leaves in motion. DMLC-IMRT requires the conversion of a radiation intensity map into a leaf sequence file that controls the movement of the MLC while the beam is on. It is imperative that the intensity map delivered using the leaf sequence file be as close as possible to the intensity map generated by the dose optimization algorithm, while satisfying hardware constraints of the delivery system. Optimization of the leaf-sequencing algorithm has been the subject of several recent investigations. In this work, we present a systematic study of the optimization of leaf-sequencing algorithms for dynamic multileaf collimator beam delivery and provide rigorous mathematical proofs of optimized leaf sequence settings in terms of monitor unit (MU) efficiency under the most common leaf movement constraints that include leaf interdigitation constraint. Our analytical analysis shows that leaf sequencing based on unidirectional movement of the MLC leaves is as MU efficient as bi-directional movement of the MLC leaves

  5. Algorithms for optimal sequencing of dynamic multileaf collimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, Srijit [Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sahni, Sartaj [Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Palta, Jatinder [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ranka, Sanjay [Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2004-01-07

    Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used to deliver intensity modulated beams using a multileaf collimator (MLC), with the leaves in motion. DMLC-IMRT requires the conversion of a radiation intensity map into a leaf sequence file that controls the movement of the MLC while the beam is on. It is imperative that the intensity map delivered using the leaf sequence file be as close as possible to the intensity map generated by the dose optimization algorithm, while satisfying hardware constraints of the delivery system. Optimization of the leaf-sequencing algorithm has been the subject of several recent investigations. In this work, we present a systematic study of the optimization of leaf-sequencing algorithms for dynamic multileaf collimator beam delivery and provide rigorous mathematical proofs of optimized leaf sequence settings in terms of monitor unit (MU) efficiency under the most common leaf movement constraints that include leaf interdigitation constraint. Our analytical analysis shows that leaf sequencing based on unidirectional movement of the MLC leaves is as MU efficient as bi-directional movement of the MLC leaves.

  6. Multileaf collimator in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeraj, M.; Robar, V.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Basic goal of radiotherapy treatment is the irradiation of a target volume while minimizing the amount of radiation absorbed in healthy tissue. Shaping the beam is an important way of minimizing the absorbed dose in healthy tissue and critical structures. Conventional collimator jaws are used for shaping a rectangular treatment field; but, as usually treatment volume is not rectangular, additional shaping is required. On a linear accelerator, lead blocks or individually made Cerroben TM blocks are attached onto the treatment head under standard collimating system. Another option is the use of multileaf collimator (MLC). Conclusions. Multileaf collimator is becoming the main tool for beam shaping on the linear accelerator. It is a simple and useful system in the preparation and performance of radiotherapy treatment. Multileaf collimators are reliable, as their manufacturers developed various mechanisms for their precision, control and reliability, together with reduction of leakage and transmission of radiation between and through the leaves. Multileaf collimator is known today as a very useful clinical system for simple field shaping, but its use is getting even more important in dynamic radiotherapy, with the leaves moving during irradiation. This enables a precise dose delivery on any part of a treated volume. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the therapy of the future, is based on the dynamic use of MLC. (author)

  7. Testing of dynamic multileaf collimator by dynamic log file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kaoru; Nakamura, Tetsuji; Yamato, Shinichirou; Miyazawa, Masanori

    2007-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) represents one of the most significant technical advances in radiation therapy. In the dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) method of IMRT delivery, because of the relatively small gaps between opposed leaves and because most regions are shielded by leaves most of the time, the delivered dose is very sensitive to MLC leaf positional accuracy. A variation of ±0.2 mm in the gap width can result in a dose variation of ±3% for each clinical dynamic MLC field. Most often the effects of leaf motion are inferred from dose deviations on film or from variations in ionization measurements. These techniques provide dosimetric information but do not provide detailed information for diagnosing delivery problems. Therefore, a dynamic log file (Dynalog file) was used to verify dynamic MLC leaf positional accuracy. Measuring for narrow gaps using the thickness gauge could detect a log file accuracy of approximately 0.1 mm. The accuracy of dynamic MLC delivery depends on the accuracy with which the velocity of each leaf is controlled. We studied the relationship between leaf positional accuracy and leaf velocity. Leaf velocity of 0.7 cm/sec caused approximately 0.2 mm leaf positional variation. We then analyzed leaf positional accuracy for the clinical dynamic MLC field using Dynalog File Viewer (Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, California (CA)), and developed a new program that can analyze more detailed leaf motions. Using this program, we can obtain more detailed information, and therefore can determine the source of dose uncertainties for the dynamic MLC field. (author)

  8. Intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery using dynamic micro-multileaf collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, Stanley H.; Cardinale, Robert M.; Wu Qiuwen; Zwicker, Robert D.; Broaddus, William C.; Mohan, Radhe

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The implementation of dynamic leaf motion on a micro-multileaf collimator system provides the capability for intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IMSRS), and the consequent potential for improved dose distributions for irregularly shaped tumor volumes adjacent to critical organs. This study explores the use of IMSRS to provide improved tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing for small cranial tumors relative to plans based on multiple fixed uniform-intensity beams or traditional circular collimator arc-based stereotactic techniques. Methods and Materials: Four patient cases involving small brain lesions are presented and analyzed. The cases were chosen to include a representative selection of target shapes, number of targets, and adjacent critical areas. Patient plans generated for these comparisons include standard arcs with multiple circular collimators, and fixed noncoplanar static fields with uniform-intensity beams and IMSRS. Parameters used for evaluation of the plans include the percentage of irradiated volume to tumor volume (PITV), normal tissue dose-volume histograms, and dose-homogeneity ratios. All IMSRS plans were computed using previously established IMRT techniques adapted for use with the BrainLAB M3 micro-multileaf collimator. The algorithms comprising the IMRT system for optimization of intensity distributions and conversion into leaf trajectories of the BrainLab M3 were developed at our institution. The ADAC Pinnacle 3 radiation treatment-planning system was used for dose calculations and for input of contours for target volumes and normal critical structures. Results: For all cases, the IMSRS plans showed a high degree of conformity of the dose distribution with the target shape. The IMSRS plans provided either (1) a smaller volume of normal tissue irradiated to significant dose levels, generally taken as doses greater than 50% of the prescription, or (2) a lower dose to an important adjacent critical organ. The reduction in

  9. Segmental and dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivery techniques for micro-multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agazaryan, Nzhde; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2003-01-01

    A leaf sequencing algorithm has been implemented to deliver segmental and dynamic multileaf collimated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SMLC-IMRT and DMLC-IMRT, respectively) using a linear accelerator equipped with a micro-multileaf collimator (mMLC). The implementation extends a previously published algorithm for the SMLC-IMRT to include the dynamic MLC-IMRT method and several dosimetric considerations. The algorithm has been extended to account for the transmitted radiation and minimize the leakage between opposing and neighboring leaves. The underdosage problem associated with the tongue-and-groove design of the MLC is significantly reduced by synchronizing the MLC leaf movements. The workings of the leaf sequencing parameters have been investigated and the results of the planar dosimetric investigations show that the sequencing parameters affect the measured dose distributions as intended. Investigations of clinical cases suggest that SMLC and DMLC delivery methods produce comparable results with leaf sequences obtained by root-mean-square (RMS) errors specification of 1.5% and lower, approximately corresponding to 20 or more segments. For SMLC-IMRT, there is little to be gained by using an RMS error specification smaller than 2%, approximately corresponding to 15 segments; however, more segments directly translate to longer treatment time and more strain on the MLC. The implemented leaf synchronization method does not increase the required monitor units while it reduces the measured TG underdoses from a maximum of 12% to a maximum of 3% observed with single field measurements of representative clinical cases studied

  10. [A review of progress of real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy technology based on dynamic multi-leaf collimator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fubo; Li, Guangjun; Shen, Jiuling; Li, Ligin; Bai, Sen

    2017-02-01

    While radiation treatment to patients with tumors in thorax and abdomen is being performed, further improvement of radiation accuracy is restricted by the tumor intra-fractional motion due to respiration. Real-time tumor tracking radiation is an optimal solution to tumor intra-fractional motion. A review of the progress of real-time dynamic multi-leaf collimator(DMLC) tracking is provided in the present review, including DMLC tracking method, time lag of DMLC tracking system, and dosimetric verification.

  11. Toward the development of intrafraction tumor deformation tracking using a dynamic multi-leaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Yuanyuan; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Booth, Jeremy T. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intrafraction deformation limits targeting accuracy in radiotherapy. Studies show tumor deformation of over 10 mm for both single tumor deformation and system deformation (due to differential motion between primary tumors and involved lymph nodes). Such deformation cannot be adapted to with current radiotherapy methods. The objective of this study was to develop and experimentally investigate the ability of a dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) tracking system to account for tumor deformation. Methods: To compensate for tumor deformation, the DMLC tracking strategy is to warp the planned beam aperture directly to conform to the new tumor shape based on real time tumor deformation input. Two deformable phantoms that correspond to a single tumor and a tumor system were developed. The planar deformations derived from the phantom images in beam's eye view were used to guide the aperture warping. An in-house deformable image registration software was developed to automatically trigger the registration once new target image was acquired and send the computed deformation to the DMLC tracking software. Because the registration speed is not fast enough to implement the experiment in real-time manner, the phantom deformation only proceeded to the next position until registration of the current deformation position was completed. The deformation tracking accuracy was evaluated by a geometric target coverage metric defined as the sum of the area incorrectly outside and inside the ideal aperture. The individual contributions from the deformable registration algorithm and the finite leaf width to the tracking uncertainty were analyzed. Clinical proof-of-principle experiment of deformation tracking using previously acquired MR images of a lung cancer patient was implemented to represent the MRI-Linac environment. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment delivered with enabled deformation tracking was simulated and demonstrated. Results: The first

  12. Dosimetric and qualitative analysis of kinetic properties of millennium 80 multileaf collimator system for dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj Anup

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the positional accuracy, kinetic properties of the dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC and dosimetric evaluation of fractional dose delivery for the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for step and shoot and sliding window (dynamic techniques of Varian multileaf collimator millennium 80. Various quality assurance tests such as accuracy in leaf positioning and speed, stability of dynamic MLC output, inter and intra leaf transmission, dosimetric leaf separation and multiple carriage field verification were performed. Evaluation of standard field patterns as pyramid, peaks, wedge, chair, garden fence test, picket fence test and sweeping gap output was done. Patient dose quality assurance procedure consists of an absolute dose measurement for all fields at 5 cm depth on solid water phantom using 0.6cc water proof ion chamber and relative dose verification using Kodak EDR-2 films for all treatment fields along transverse and coronal direction using IMRT phantom. The relative dose verification was performed using Omni Pro IMRT film verification software. The tests performed showed acceptable results for commissioning the millennium 80 MLC and Clinac DHX for dynamic and step and shoot IMRT treatments.

  13. SU-F-T-527: A Novel Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Leaf-Sequencing Algorithm in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, J; Lin, H [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui (China); Chow, J [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A novel leaf-sequencing algorithm is developed for generating arbitrary beam intensity profiles in discrete levels using dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC). The efficiency of this dynamic MLC leaf-sequencing method was evaluated using external beam treatment plans delivered by intensity modulated radiation therapy technique. Methods: To qualify and validate this algorithm, integral test for the beam segment of MLC generated by the CORVUS treatment planning system was performed with clinical intensity map experiments. The treatment plans were optimized and the fluence maps for all photon beams were determined. This algorithm started with the algebraic expression for the area under the beam profile. The coefficients in the expression can be transformed into the specifications for the leaf-setting sequence. The leaf optimization procedure was then applied and analyzed for clinical relevant intensity profiles in cancer treatment. Results: The macrophysical effect of this method can be described by volumetric plan evaluation tools such as dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The DVH results are in good agreement compared to those from the CORVUS treatment planning system. Conclusion: We developed a dynamic MLC method to examine the stability of leaf speed including effects of acceleration and deceleration of leaf motion in order to make sure the stability of leaf speed did not affect the intensity profile generated. It was found that the mechanical requirements were better satisfied using this method. The Project is sponsored by the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry.

  14. SU-F-T-527: A Novel Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Leaf-Sequencing Algorithm in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, J; Lin, H; Chow, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A novel leaf-sequencing algorithm is developed for generating arbitrary beam intensity profiles in discrete levels using dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC). The efficiency of this dynamic MLC leaf-sequencing method was evaluated using external beam treatment plans delivered by intensity modulated radiation therapy technique. Methods: To qualify and validate this algorithm, integral test for the beam segment of MLC generated by the CORVUS treatment planning system was performed with clinical intensity map experiments. The treatment plans were optimized and the fluence maps for all photon beams were determined. This algorithm started with the algebraic expression for the area under the beam profile. The coefficients in the expression can be transformed into the specifications for the leaf-setting sequence. The leaf optimization procedure was then applied and analyzed for clinical relevant intensity profiles in cancer treatment. Results: The macrophysical effect of this method can be described by volumetric plan evaluation tools such as dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The DVH results are in good agreement compared to those from the CORVUS treatment planning system. Conclusion: We developed a dynamic MLC method to examine the stability of leaf speed including effects of acceleration and deceleration of leaf motion in order to make sure the stability of leaf speed did not affect the intensity profile generated. It was found that the mechanical requirements were better satisfied using this method. The Project is sponsored by the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry.

  15. The application in detection the position accuracy of the multi-leaf collimator of Varian linear accelerator with dynamic therapy log files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Changhu; Xu Liming; Teng Jianjian; Ge Wei; Zhang Jun; Ma Guangdong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explorer the application in detection the position accuracy of the multileaf collimator of Varian accelerator with dynamic therapy log files. Methods: A pre-designed MLC format files named PMLC for two Varian accelerators, the dynamic treatment log files were recorded 10 times on a different date, and be converted into the MLC format files named DMLC, compared with the original plan PMLC, so we can analysis two files for each leaf position deviation. In addition, we analysis the repeatability of MLC leaves position accuracy between 10 dynalog files of two accelerators. Results: No statistically significant difference between the average position of the 10 times leaf position of the two accelerators,their were 0.29 -0.29 and 0.29 -0.30 (z = -0.77, P=0.442). About 40%, 30%, 20% and 10% of the leaf position deviation was at ≤0.2 mm, 0.3 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.4 mm, respectively. the maximum value was 0.5 mm. More than 86% of the leaf position are completely coincident between 10 dynamic treatment files of two accelerators. The rate of position deviation no more 0. 05 mm was 96. 6% and 97.3%, respectively. And the maximum value was 0.09 mm. Conclusions: Dynamic treatment log file is a splendid tool in testing the actual position of multi-leaf collimator. The multi-leaf collimator of two accelerators be detected are precise and stabilized. (authors)

  16. Planning, delivery, and quality assurance of treatment with dynamic multileaf collimator for prostate: a strategy for large scale implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burman, Chandra; Chen, Chui; Kutcher, Gerald; Leibel, Steven; Zelefsky, Michael; LoSasso, Thomas; Spirou, Spiridon; Wu Qiuwen; Stein, Jorge; Mohan, Radhe; Ling, C. Clifton; Fuks, Zvi

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In an attempt to improve tumor control of patients treated for the adenocarcinoma of the prostate, we have implemented a technique to deliver a prescribed dose of 81 Gy. At such high doses, the surrounding normal organs such as the rectum, bladder, and femur impose challenging constraints. We present a method to plan and deliver intensity modulated fields with dynamic multileaf collimators (DMLCs) in an effort to meet the difficult constraints. While the planning technique which uses inverse planning has been described in the literature, safe delivery with DMLC is a new and challenging problem. We will describe in detail our procedures with the emphasis on the delivery problems and chosen solutions. Procedures for the quality assurance of DMLC will be described. Methods and Materials: Using a recently developed and modified inverse planning algorithm, we have developed a 5-field intensity modulated plan that is delivered using DMLC. The planner specifies the target, normal organs, and the desired doses for these tissues and for the overlap regions. The planning system designs the desired intensity profiles to meet the specified criteria. To deliver the dose DMLCs provide a practical and convenient method. A procedure has been developed for the dose delivery. A scheme has been designed to determine the leaf motion to produce the required intensity pattern based on the prescribed dose and the dose rate. In order to ensure that the dose is delivered as planned, we have instituted the following procedures: (1) verification of the aperture shape on a localization port film, (2) an additional dose calculation, which uses the delivered leaf motion, and compares the difference between the planned and delivered doses, (3) comparison of the machine log files, generated during the actual dose delivery, with the planned leaf motions, (4) comparison of the measured dose profile in a flat phantom with the calculated dose distribution using the prescribed treatment

  17. Independent checks of linear accelerators equipped with multileaf collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlikova, I.; Ekendahl, D.; Horakova, I.

    2005-01-01

    National Radiation Protection Institute (NRPI) provides independent checks of therapeutic equipment as a part of state supervision. In the end of 2003, the audit was broaden for linear accelerators equipped with multileaf collimators (MLC). NRPI provides TLD postal audits and on-site independent checks. This contribution describes tests for multileaf collimators and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique that are accomplished within the independent on-site check of linear accelerators. The character and type of tests that are necessary to pursue for multileaf collimator depends on application technique. There are three basic application of the MLC. The first we call 'static MLC' and it serves for replacing conventional blocking or for adjusting the field shape to match the beam's-eye view projection of a planning target volume during an arc rotation of the x-ray beam. This procedure is called conformal radiotherapy. The most advanced technique with MLC is intensity modulated radiation therapy. The dose can be delivered to the patient with IMRT in various different ways: dynamic MLC, segmented MLC and IMRT arc therapy. Independent audits represent an important instrument of quality assurance. Methodology for independent check of static MLC was successfully verified on two types of accelerators: Varian and Elekta. Results from pilot measurements with dynamic MLC imply that the methodology is applicable for Varian accelerators. In the future, the experience with other types of linear accelerators will contribute to renovation, modification, and broaden independent checks methodology. (authors)

  18. Conformity of LINAC-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using Dynamic Conformal Arcs and Micro-Multileaf Collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazard, Lisa J.; Wang, Brian; Skidmore, Thomas B.; Chern, Shyh-Shi; Salter, Bill J.; Jensen, Randy L.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the conformity of dynamic conformal arc linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery and to describe a standardized method of isodose surface (IDS) selection. Methods and Materials: In 174 targets, the conformity index (CI) at the prescription IDS used for treatment was calculated as CI = (PIV/PVTV)/(PVTV/TV), where TV is the target volume, PIV (prescription isodose volume) is the total volume encompassed by the prescription IDS, and PVTV is the TV encompassed by the IDS. In addition, a 'standardized' prescription IDS (sIDS) was chosen according to the following criteria: 95% of the TV was encompassed by the PIV and 99% of TV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose. The CIs at the sIDS were also calculated. Results: The median CI at the prescription IDS and sIDS was 1.63 and 1.47, respectively (p < 0.001). In 132 of 174 cases, the volume of normal tissue in the PIV was reduced by the prescription to the sIDS compared with the prescription IDS, in 20 cases it remained unchanged, and in 22 cases it was increased. Conclusion: The CIs obtained with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery are comparable to those previously reported for gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery. Using a uniform method to select the sIDS, adequate target coverage was usually achievable with prescription to an IDS greater than that chosen by the treating physician (prescription IDS), providing sparing of normal tissue. Thus, the sIDS might aid physicians in identifying a prescription IDS that balances coverage and conformity

  19. A modified method of planning and delivery for dynamic multileaf collimator intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, Nesrin; Leybovich, Leonid B.; Sethi, Anil; Krasin, Matthew; Emami, Bahman

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a modified planning and delivery technique that reduces dose nonuniformity for tomographic delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The NOMOS-CORVUS system delivers IMRT in a tomographic paradigm. This type of delivery is prone to create multiple dose nonuniformity regions at the arc abutment regions. The modified technique was based on the cyclical behavior of arc positions as a function of a target length. With the modified technique, two plans are developed for the same patient, one with the original target and the second with a slightly increased target length and the abutment regions shifted by ∼5 mm compared to the first plan. Each plan is designed to deliver half of the target prescription dose delivered on alternate days, resulting in periodic shifts of abutment regions. This method was experimentally tested in phantoms with and without intentionally introduced errors in couch indexing. Results: With the modified technique, the degree of dose nonuniformity was reduced. For example, with 1 mm error in couch indexing, the degree of dose nonuniformity changed from ∼25% to ∼12%. Conclusion: Use of the modified technique reduces dose nonuniformity due to periodic shifts of abutment regions during treatment delivery

  20. The effect on IMRT conformality of elastic tissue movement and a practical suggestion for movement compensation via the modified dynamic multileaf collimator (dMLC) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S

    2005-01-01

    A major remaining problem in delivering radiotherapy, specifically intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), is the need to accommodate and correct for intrafraction movement. The developing availability of 4D computed tomographic images can potentially form the basis of the new field of image-guided IMRT. It is important to understand the effects on delivered dose of the patient breathing during IMRT and this paper models the effect which applies whether there is or is not a time component to the IMRT delivery method. It then goes on to suggest a practical correction strategy. The 'stretch-and-shift-the-planned-modulations' strategy is proposed and a practical method to deliver this is explained. This practical strategy is based on a modification of the dynamic multileaf collimator IMRT method whereby the leaves are arranged to 'breath' in tandem with the breathing of the patient. Some examples are also given from a study of mismatching the patient and leaf-correction motions

  1. Multileaf collimator and related apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    In radiotherapy apparatus using a multileaf collimator, the adjustment positions of the individual leaves can be determined optically by means of a video camera which observes the leaves via a radiation transparent mirror in the beam path. In order to overcome problems of low contrast and varying object brightness, the improvement comprises adding retroreflectors to the collimator leaves whose positions are known relative to the inner edge of the respective leaf. The retroreflectors can extend along the length of the leaf or they can be small. For setting up, corresponding manually adjustable optical diaphragm leaves can be used to project an optical simulation of the treatment area onto the patient, retroreflectors being similarly located relative to the shadow-casting edge of the leaves. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the penumbras of a Philips multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafay, F.; Malet, C.; Mombard, C.; Ginestet, C.; Blondel, E.; Desfarges, Y.; Dupin, G.

    1995-01-01

    Since January 1995, a Philips SL20 linear accelerator which is connected to a multileaf collimator has been used. Computer-controlled multileaf collimators open up the opportunity to practice conformal radiotherapy. Its aim is to adjust as well as possible the Planning Target Volume (PTV) to the effective treated volume with an homogeneous dose distribution in the PTV, and to protect healthy tissues and delicate organs. This is possible by means of a multileaf collimator by increasing the number of complex fields with different incidences during a same session. Moreover, the Beam's Eye View function of the three-dimensional treatment planning system allows to define the shape of complex fields. For rectangular fields, the penumbra is defined by the distance between the 80% and 20% isodoses relative to the beam axis. In addition, the distances between, respectively, the 95% and 50% isodoses, the 90% and 50% isodoses, the 50% and 20% isodoses relative to the beam axis have been analysed. Different penumbras were evaluated. The result of this work will enable to adjust the reference isodose to the PTV either by integrating this result into dosimetry software, or by taking it into account for drawing the PTV

  3. Evaluation of the penumbras of a Philips multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafay, F; Malet, C; Mombard, C; Ginestet, C [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Blondel, E [Isotec, Saint-Quentin (France); Desfarges, Y; Dupin, G [Philips Medical System, Lyon (France)

    1995-12-01

    Since January 1995, a Philips SL20 linear accelerator which is connected to a multileaf collimator has been used. Computer-controlled multileaf collimators open up the opportunity to practice conformal radiotherapy. Its aim is to adjust as well as possible the Planning Target Volume (PTV) to the effective treated volume with an homogeneous dose distribution in the PTV, and to protect healthy tissues and delicate organs. This is possible by means of a multileaf collimator by increasing the number of complex fields with different incidences during a same session. Moreover, the Beam`s Eye View function of the three-dimensional treatment planning system allows to define the shape of complex fields. For rectangular fields, the penumbra is defined by the distance between the 80% and 20% isodoses relative to the beam axis. In addition, the distances between, respectively, the 95% and 50% isodoses, the 90% and 50% isodoses, the 50% and 20% isodoses relative to the beam axis have been analysed. Different penumbras were evaluated. The result of this work will enable to adjust the reference isodose to the PTV either by integrating this result into dosimetry software, or by taking it into account for drawing the PTV.

  4. Segmented abutting fields irradiation using multileaf collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo

    1998-01-01

    The object of this study is to evaluate the clinical feasibility of segmented abutting fields irradiation (SAFI) using multileaf collimators (MLCs), in which the target volume is divided into several segments to create complex irregular field without use of alloy blocks. A linear accelerator with 26 pairs of roundly ended MLCs of 1 cm in width was tested in this study. In SAFI, radiation leakage occurs at the abutment sites with these MLCs. Film dosimetry was used to determine the optimal length of the MLC overlap to minimize dose profile variation in abutting fields. A mantle field was investigated as a clinical application. Without overlapping the MLCs, radiation leakage at the abutments appeared as a peak of the dose profile. With more overlapping, the profile exhibited a minimized variation with a two-peak pattern. With excessive overlapping, the peak was reversed due to decreased dose. Variation of the profile was minimized with an overlap of 2.0-2.2 mm. The level of variation and the optimal length of overlap were found to be independent of the sites of measurement. Reproducibility was confirmed by repeated measurements. With the mantle field, SAFI using MLCs revealed an profile equivalent to use of alloy blocking fields in all respects other than the variations at the abutting sites. If the length of the MLC abutment overlap differs by site, clinical application of SAFI using MLCs would be quite complicated. The optimal length of the overlap was found to be 2.0 mm and to be independent of the sites of abutment. Therefore, we conclude that SAFI using MLCs of 1 cm in width is feasible for clinical use. (author)

  5. Multileaf collimator for radiotherapy machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunan, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for radiotherapy treatment of a patient. It comprises: an electron linear accelerator means for generating x-rays at an x-ray source target; a set of four moveable jaws mounted on a jaw frame between the x-ray source target and the patient. The set of jaws defining a rectangular x-ray field; mounting means for mounting a leaf means on the jaw frame; the mounting means including a main leaf support frame; a pair of subframes, each of which is linearly movable mounted from the frame. The subframes being coplanar; a multiplicity of leaves of material substantially opaque to x-rays. The leaves provided with means to make them linearly movable relative to each subframe, each leaf being capable of extension beyond a field mid-line, the length of each leaf being shorter than half of a maximum field length capability of the jaws measured in the direction and plane of the leaves; leaf drive means; and computer control means for controlling the subframe drive means and the leaf drive means to provide a dynamically changing radiation field shape during the course of radiation treatment of the patient

  6. Electronic tissue compensation achieved with both dynamic and static multileaf collimator in eclipse treatment planning system for Clinac 6 EX and 2100 CD Varian linear accelerators: Feasibility and dosimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinhikar Rajesh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC and static multileaf collimator (SMLC, along with three-dimensional treatment planning system (3-D TPS, open the possibility of tissue compensation. A method using electronic tissue compensator (ETC has been implemented in Eclipse 3-D TPS (V 7.3, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA at our center. The ETC was tested for head and neck conformal radiotherapy planning. The purpose of this study was to verify the feasibility of DMLC and SMLC in head and neck field irradiation for delivering homogeneous dose in the midplane at a pre-defined depth. In addition, emphasis was given to the dosimetric aspects in commissioning ETC in Eclipse. A Head and Neck Phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, USA was used for the dosimetric verification. Planning was carried out for both DMLC and SMLC ETC plans. The dose calculated at central axis by eclipse with DMLC and SMLC was noted. This was compared with the doses measured on machine with ion chamber and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD. The calculated isodose curves and profiles were compared with the measured ones. The dose profiles along the two major axes from Eclipse were also compared with the profiles obtained from Amorphous Silicon (AS500 Electronic portal imaging device (EPID on Clinac 6 EX machine. In uniform dose regions, measured dose values agreed with the calculated doses within 3%. Agreement between calculated and measured isodoses in the dose gradient zone was within 3 mm. The isodose curves and the profiles were found to be in good agreement with the measured curves and profiles. The measured and the calculated dose profiles along the two major axes were flat for both DMLC and SMLC. The dosimetric verification of ETC for both the linacs demonstrated the feasibility and the accuracy of the ETC treatment modality for achieving uniform dose distributions. Therefore, ETC can be used as a tool in head and neck treatment planning optimization for improved dose uniformity.

  7. Characterization of a multileaf collimator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvin, J.M.; Smith, A.R.; Lally, B.

    1993-01-01

    Commissioning measurements for a multileaf collimator installed on a dual energy accelerator with 6 and 15 MV photons are described. Detailed dosimetric characterization of the multileaf collimator is a requirement for modeling the collimator with treatment planning software. Measurements include a determination of the penumbra width, leaf transmission, between-leaf leakage, and localization of the leaf ends and sides. Standard radiographic film was used for the penumbra measurements, and separate experiments using radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeters were performed to verify that distortions of the dose distribution at an edge due to changing energy sensitivity of silver bromide film are negligible. Films were analyzed with a scanning laser densitometer with a 210 micron spot. Little change in the penumbra edge distribution was noted for different positions of a leaf in the field. Experiments localizing the physical end of the leaves showed less than 1 mm deviation from the 50% decrement line. This small difference is attributed to the shaped end on the leaves. One side of a single leaf corresponded to the 50% decrement line, but the opposite face was aligned with a lower value. This difference is due to the tongue and groove used to decrease between-leaf leakage. For both energies, approximately 2% of photons incident on the multileaf collimator are transmitted and an additional 0.5% leakage occurs between the leaves. Alignment of the leaves to form a straight edge results in a penumbra profile which compares favorably with the standard technique of using alloy blocks. When the edge is stepped, the isodose lines follow the leaf pattern and the boundary is poorly defined compared to divergent blocks. 19 refs., 13 figs

  8. Leaf sequencing algorithms for segmented multileaf collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, Srijit; Sahni, Sartaj; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder; Ranka, Sanjay

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multileaf collimator (MLC) requires the conversion of a radiation fluence map into a leaf sequence file that controls the movement of the MLC during radiation delivery. It is imperative that the fluence map delivered using the leaf sequence file is as close as possible to the fluence map generated by the dose optimization algorithm, while satisfying hardware constraints of the delivery system. Optimization of the leaf sequencing algorithm has been the subject of several recent investigations. In this work, we present a systematic study of the optimization of leaf sequencing algorithms for segmental multileaf collimator beam delivery and provide rigorous mathematical proofs of optimized leaf sequence settings in terms of monitor unit (MU) efficiency under most common leaf movement constraints that include minimum leaf separation constraint and leaf interdigitation constraint. Our analytical analysis shows that leaf sequencing based on unidirectional movement of the MLC leaves is as MU efficient as bidirectional movement of the MLC leaves

  9. Leaf sequencing algorithms for segmented multileaf collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, Srijit [Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sahni, Sartaj [Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Li, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Palta, Jatinder [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ranka, Sanjay [Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2003-02-07

    The delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multileaf collimator (MLC) requires the conversion of a radiation fluence map into a leaf sequence file that controls the movement of the MLC during radiation delivery. It is imperative that the fluence map delivered using the leaf sequence file is as close as possible to the fluence map generated by the dose optimization algorithm, while satisfying hardware constraints of the delivery system. Optimization of the leaf sequencing algorithm has been the subject of several recent investigations. In this work, we present a systematic study of the optimization of leaf sequencing algorithms for segmental multileaf collimator beam delivery and provide rigorous mathematical proofs of optimized leaf sequence settings in terms of monitor unit (MU) efficiency under most common leaf movement constraints that include minimum leaf separation constraint and leaf interdigitation constraint. Our analytical analysis shows that leaf sequencing based on unidirectional movement of the MLC leaves is as MU efficient as bidirectional movement of the MLC leaves.

  10. Clinical significance of multi-leaf collimator calibration errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norvill, Craig; Jenetsky, Guy

    2016-01-01

    This planning study investigates the clinical impact of multi-leaf collimator (MLC) calibration errors on three common treatment sites; head and neck (H&N), prostate and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung. All plans used using either volumetric modulated adaptive therapy or dynamic MLC techniques. Five patient plans were retrospectively selected from each treatment site, and MLC errors intentionally introduced. MLC errors of 0.7, 0.4 and 0.2 mm were sufficient to cause major violations in the PTV planning criteria for the H&N, prostate and SBRT lung plans. Mean PTV dose followed a linear trend with MLC error, increasing at rates of 3.2–5.9 % per millimeter depending on treatment site. The results indicate that an MLC quality assurance program that provides sub-millimeter accuracy is an important component of intensity modulated radiotherapy delivery techniques.

  11. Planning and delivering high doses to targets surrounding the spinal cord at the lower neck and upper mediastinal levels: static beam-segmentation technique executed with a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neve, W. de; Wagter, C. de; Jaeger, K. de; Thienpont, M.; Colle, C.; Derycke, S.; Schelfhout, J.

    1996-01-01

    Background and purpose. It remains a technical challenge to limit the dose to the spinal cord below tolerance if, in head and neck or thyroid cancer, the planning target volume reaches to a level below the shoulders. In order to avoid these dose limitations, we developed a standard plan involving Beam Intensity Modulation (BIM) executed by a static technique of beam segmentation. In this standard plan, many machine parameters (gantry angles, couch position, relative beam and segment weights) as well as the beam segmentation rules were identical for all patients. Materials and methods. The standard plan involved: the use of static beams with a single isocenter; BIM by field segmentation executable with a standard Philips multileaf collimator; virtual simulation and dose computation on a general 3D-planning system (Sherouse's GRATIS[reg]); heuristic computation of segment intensities and optimization (improving the dose distribution and reducing the execution time) by human intelligence. The standard plan used 20 segments spread over 8 gantry angles plus 2 non-segmented wedged beams (2 gantry angles). Results. The dose that could be achieved at the lowest target voxel, without exceeding tolerance of the spinal cord (50 Gy at highest voxel) was 70-80 Gy. The in-target 3D dose-inhomogeneity was ∼25%. The shortest time of execution of a treatment (22 segments) on a patient (unpublished) was 25 min. Conclusions. A heuristic model has been developed and investigated to obtain a 3D concave dose distribution applicable to irradiate targets in the lower neck and upper mediastinal regions. The technique spares efficiently the spinal cord and allows the delivery of higher target doses than with conventional techniques. It can be planned as a standard plan using conventional 3D-planning technology. The routine clinical implementation is performed with commercially available equipment, however, at the expense of extended execution times

  12. Planning and delivering high doses to targets surrounding the spinal cord at the lower neck and upper mediastinal levels: static beam-segmentation technique executed by a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelfhout, J.; Derycke, S.; Fortan, L.; Van Duyse, B.; Colle, C.; De Wagter, C.; De Neve, W.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility to plan and deliver beam intensity modulated radiotherapy using a general purpose 3D-planning system (Sherouse's GRATISTM) and a linear accelerator equipped with a standard multileaf collimator (MLC) was investigated in view of limiting the dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. During the planning process, dose homogenization at the target is obtained by the calculation of the weights, given to beam segments of a specific predetermined geometry. This specific geometry maximizes the area of each segment and thus reduces the number of segments. With a virtual patient in supine position, a first planning using a single isocenter, with gantry positions of -60, -30, 0, 30 and 60 degrees was performed. Medial edges of all segments were located tangential to the spinal cord. The resulting dose distribution allowed to encompass the target by an isodose surface of 66-70 Gy without exceeding spinal cord tolerance but required 42 segments distributed over 5 gantry angles. Therefore, dose-volume histogram analysis were performed for those cases where: 1) for some gantry positions, all beam segments could be omitted; 2) at the remaining gantry angles, segments could be omitted; 3) at least 2 segments could be traded off against 1 additional gantry angle. This procedure resulted in a final plan containing 22 segments spread over 8 gantry angles. Preliminary dosimetric results on a RANDO phantom support the robustness of the method. The first clinical applications have been planned. Although up to 99 beam segments can be programmed on the Philips SL25 linear accelerator, it remained impossible to use these segments synchronized with the MLC. From a clinical viewpoint, the proposed treatment for irradiating lower neck and upper mediastinal targets could be used as a standard against which other solutions might be tested

  13. Planning and delivering high doses to targets surrounding the spinal cord at the lower neck and upper mediastinal levels: static beam-segmentation technique executed by a multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelfhout, J; Derycke, S; Fortan, L; Van Duyse, B; Colle, C; De Wagter, C; De Neve, W [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde

    1995-12-01

    The possibility to plan and deliver beam intensity modulated radiotherapy using a general purpose 3D-planning system (Sherouse`s GRATISTM) and a linear accelerator equipped with a standard multileaf collimator (MLC) was investigated in view of limiting the dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. During the planning process, dose homogenization at the target is obtained by the calculation of the weights, given to beam segments of a specific predetermined geometry. This specific geometry maximizes the area of each segment and thus reduces the number of segments. With a virtual patient in supine position, a first planning using a single isocenter, with gantry positions of -60, -30, 0, 30 and 60 degrees was performed. Medial edges of all segments were located tangential to the spinal cord. The resulting dose distribution allowed to encompass the target by an isodose surface of 66-70 Gy without exceeding spinal cord tolerance but required 42 segments distributed over 5 gantry angles. Therefore, dose-volume histogram analysis were performed for those cases where: (1) for some gantry positions, all beam segments could be omitted; (2) at the remaining gantry angles, segments could be omitted; (3) at least 2 segments could be traded off against 1 additional gantry angle. This procedure resulted in a final plan containing 22 segments spread over 8 gantry angles. Preliminary dosimetric results on a RANDO phantom support the robustness of the method. The first clinical applications have been planned. Although up to 99 beam segments can be programmed on the Philips SL25 linear accelerator, it remained impossible to use these segments synchronized with the MLC. From a clinical viewpoint, the proposed treatment for irradiating lower neck and upper mediastinal targets could be used as a standard against which other solutions might be tested.

  14. A multileaf collimator field prescription preparation system for conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, M.N.; Yu, C. X.; Symons, M.; Yan, D.; Taylor, R.; Matter, R.C.; Gustafson, G.; Martinez, A.; Wong, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a prescription preparation system for efficient field shaping using a multileaf collimator that can be used in community settings as well as research institutions. The efficiency advantage of the computer-controlled multileaf collimator, over cerrobend blocks, to shape radiation fields has been shown in conformal treatments, which typically require complete volumetric computerized tomographic data for three-dimensional radiation treatment planning--a utility not readily available to the general community. As a result, most patients today are treated with conventional radiation therapy. Therefore, we believe that it is very important to fully use the same efficiency advantage of multileaf collimator as a block replacement in conventional practice. Methods and Material: The multileaf collimator prescription preparation system developed by us acquires prescription images from different sources, including film scanner and radiation treatment planning systems. The multileaf collimator angle and leaf positions are set from the desired field contour defined on the prescription image, by minimizing the area discrepancies. Interactive graphical tools include manual adjustment of collimator angle and leaf positions, and definition of portions of the field edges that require maximal conformation. Data files of the final leaf positions are transferred to the multileaf collimator controller via a dedicated communication link. Results: We have implemented the field prescription preparation system and a network model for integrating the multileaf collimator and other radiotherapy modalities for routine treatments. For routine plan evaluation, isodose contours measured with film in solid water phantom at prescription depth are overlaid on the prescription image. Preliminary study indicates that the efficiency advantage of the MLC over cerrobend blocks in conformal therapy also holds true for conventional treatments. Conclusion: Our

  15. Delivery of modulated electron beams with conventional photon multi-leaf collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Eric E; Mamalui-Hunter, Maria; Low, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    Electron beam radiotherapy is an accepted method to treat shallow tumors. However, modulation of electrons to customize dose distributions has not readily been achieved. Studies of bolus and tertiary collimation systems have been met with limitations. We pursue the use of photon multi-leaf collimators (MLC) for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) to achieve customized distributions for potential clinical use. As commercial planning systems do not support the use of MLC with electrons, planning was conducted using Monte Carlo calculations. Segmented and dynamic modulated delivery of multiple electron segments was configured, calculated and delivered for validation. Delivery of electrons with segmented or dynamic leaf motion was conducted. A phantom possessing an idealized stepped target was planned and optimized with subsequent validation by measurements. Finally, clinical treatment plans were conducted for post-mastectomy and cutaneous lymphoma of the scalp using forward optimization techniques. Comparison of calculations and measurements was successful with agreement of ±2%/2 mm for the energies, segment sizes, depths tested for delivered segments for the dynamic and segmented delivery. Clinical treatment plans performed provided optimal dose coverage of the target while sparing distal organs at risk. Execution of plans using an anthropomorphic phantom to ensure safe and efficient delivery was conducted. Our study validates that MERT is not only possible using the photon MLC, but the efficient and safe delivery inherent with the dynamic delivery provides an ideal technique for shallow tumor treatment.

  16. A study of inverse planning by simulated annealing for photon beams modulated by a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Walter; Carol, Mark; Geis, Paul; Boyer, Arthur L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To demonstrate the feasibility of inverse planning for multiple fixed-field conformal therapy with a prototype simulated annealing technique and to deliver the treatment plan with an engineering prototype dynamic multileaf collimator. Methods and Materials: A version of the NOMOS inverse-planning algorithm was used to compute weighting distributions over the areas of multiple fixed-gantry fields. The algorithm uses simulated annealing and a cost function based on physical dose. The algorithm is a modification of a NOMOS Peacock planning implementation being used clinically. The computed weighting distributions represented the relative intensities over small 0.5 cm x 1.0 cm areas of the fields. The inverse planning was carried out using a Sun Model 20 computer using four processors. Between five and nine fixed-gantry beams were used in the plans. The weighting distributions were rendered into leaf-setting sequences using an algorithm developed for use with a Varian experimental dynamic-multileaf collimator. The sequences were saved as computer files in a format that was used to drive the Varian control system. X-ray fields having 6-MV and 18-MV energies were planned and delivered using tumor target and sensitive structure volumes segmented from clinical CT scans. Results: The resulting beam-modulation sequences could be loaded into the accelerator control systems and initiated. Each fixed-gantry angle beam was delivered in 30 s to 50 s. The resulting dose distributions were measured in quasi-anatomical phantoms using film. Dose distributions that could achieve significant tissue-sparing were demonstrated. There was good agreement between the delivered dose distributions and the planned distributions. Conclusion: The prototype inverse-planning system under development by NOMOS can be integrated with the prototype dynamic-delivery system being developed by Varian Associates. Should these commercial entities chose to offer compatible FDA

  17. Clinical use of a simulation-multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, M.; Vacha, P.; Riis, B.; Feyerabend, T.; Richter, E.

    1998-01-01

    Background: At the University of Luebeck, radiotherapy is delivered by a 6/18-MV linear accelerator. Using the integrated multileaf collimator, irradiation of individually shaped treatment fields is possible in place of alloy blocks. Due to unsatisfactory pretherapeutic review of the radiation-field-specific multileaf collimator (MLC) configuration, we developed a simulation-multileaf collimator (SMLC) and assessed its feasibility at different tumor sites. Material and Methods: The SMLC is made of a perspex carrier with 52 horizontal sliding leaves. The position of each leaf is calculated by a 3D treatment-planning computer. The technician manually adjusts the leaves according to the beams-eye-view plot of the planning computer. Consequently, the SMLC is mounted on the therapy simulator at a distance of 64.8 cm from the focus. The treatment fields and the position of the leaves are documented by X-ray films. Results: Using the SMLC, radiation oncologists are able to review exactly the leaf configuration of each MLC-shaped radiation field and to correlate the MLC-shaped radiation field with the treated volume, the organs at risk and the port films acquired by the Portal Vision trademark system. Conclusion: The SMLC is a new tool to review radiation planning that uses an MLC in daily routine. The use of the SMLC improves the documentation and the quality assurance. It accelerates the treatment field review at the linear accelerator by comparing the SMLC simulator films with the portal images. (orig.) [de

  18. Execution of mantle field with multileaf collimator: A simple approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Ramachandran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until very recently mantle field radiotherapy remained the gold standard for the treatment of favorable early-stage Hodgkin′s lymphoma. The classic mantle includes all the major lymph nodes above the diaphragm and extends from the inferior portion of the mandible to the level of the insertion of the diaphragm. Aims: To describe a simple technique that has been devised to treat the mantle field with the help of multileaf collimator and using computed tomography (CT-based treatment planning. Materials and Methods: CT scan was performed with the patient in the supine position and the datasets were transferred to the Eclipse™ treatment planning system. Elekta Precise™ linear accelerator equipped with 40 pairs of multileaf collimator (MLC was used for the execution of the mantle field. The MLC′s shapes were designed to take the shape of the conventional customized blocks used for treatment of mantle field. The anterior mantle field was divided into three separate MLC segments with the collimator kept at 0°. The first MLC segment was shaped to cover the neck, clavicular regions, and mediastinum. The second and the third MLC segments covered the right and left axilla, respectively. The posterior fields were opposed to the anterior subfields in a similar fashion. The dose was prescribed at the midplane, using reference points. Results and Conclusion: The technique described in this study is very simple, easy to implement, and avoids unnecessary delay in the execution of the mantle field. The mantle field can be easily shaped with the multileaf collimators, without any collimator rotation.

  19. Sensitivity of 3D Dose Verification to Multileaf Collimator Misalignments in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Spinal Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin-Ye, Ni; Ren, Lei; Yan, Hui; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to detect the sensitivity of Delt 4 on ordinary field multileaf collimator misalignments, system misalignments, random misalignments, and misalignments caused by gravity of the multileaf collimator in stereotactic body radiation therapy. (1) Two field sizes, including 2.00 cm (X) × 6.00 cm (Y) and 7.00 cm (X) × 6.00 cm (Y), were set. The leaves of X1 and X2 in the multileaf collimator were simultaneously opened. (2) Three cases of stereotactic body radiation therapy of spinal tumor were used. The dose of the planning target volume was 1800 cGy with 3 fractions. The 4 types to be simulated included (1) the leaves of X1 and X2 in the multileaf collimator were simultaneously opened, (2) only X1 of the multileaf collimator and the unilateral leaf were opened, (3) the leaves of X1 and X2 in the multileaf collimator were randomly opened, and (4) gravity effect was simulated. The leaves of X1 and X2 in the multileaf collimator shifted to the same direction. The difference between the corresponding 3-dimensional dose distribution measured by Delt 4 and the dose distribution in the original plan made in the treatment planning system was analyzed with γ index criteria of 3.0 mm/3.0%, 2.5 mm/2.5%, 2.0 mm/2.0%, 2.5 mm/1.5%, and 1.0 mm/1.0%. (1) In the field size of 2.00 cm (X) × 6.00 cm (Y), the γ pass rate of the original was 100% with 2.5 mm/2.5% as the statistical standard. The pass rate decreased to 95.9% and 89.4% when the X1 and X2 directions of the multileaf collimator were opened within 0.3 and 0.5 mm, respectively. In the field size of 7.00 (X) cm × 6.00 (Y) cm with 1.5 mm/1.5% as the statistical standard, the pass rate of the original was 96.5%. After X1 and X2 of the multileaf collimator were opened within 0.3 mm, the pass rate decreased to lower than 95%. The pass rate was higher than 90% within the 3 mm opening. (2) For spinal tumor, the change in the planning target volume V 18 under various modes calculated using treatment planning system

  20. Multileaf collimator intercomparison for intensity modulated radiation therapy implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viteri, Juan Fernando Delgado

    2006-01-01

    In this work a dosimetric comparison between three multileaf collimator systems is presented: a Varian Millennium with 120 leaves, Brainlab mMLC m3 and Varian Mark II both with 52 leaves. The width projection at isocenter level in field's central region are: 0,5 cm; 0,35 cm and 1,0 cm respectively. Common dosimetric characteristics for the three systems in static mode and dynamic capabilities for the two first were compared. In dynamic mode, tests validating proper MLC function through film irradiation were done, such MLC stability, MU linearity, treatment interruptions sensitivity, stability of MLC in dynamic mode, leaf speed stability, were found within ±3% deviation in all cases. Dose rate linearity showed differences when this parameter decreases in dynamic mode. Average dose errors for fixed width gaps moving at constant speed were found to be proportional to gap errors and inversely proportional to the gap width. Output factors differences delivered through a sweeping gap were found less than ±1% when the gantry was in a lateral position. For the three MLC systems, when comparing beam profiles for the same field was observed that for mMLC presents the sharpest dose gradient region. In the output factors small differences where observed in every MLC system. Dosimetric leaf gap was determined for MLC 120, mMLC and MLC 52, obtained values for a 6 MV beam are: (0,202 ± 0,054) cm; (0,157 ± 0,070) cm and (0,189 ± 0,081) cm respectively. The transmission showed an increase with depth and field width for 6 MV in all the three systems. Average values obtained with ionization chamber for this energy were: (1,630 ± 0,018)% for MLC 120; (1,291 ± 0,029)% for mMLC and (1,638 ± 0,010)% for MLC 52. When obtained through film irradiation, inter and intra leaf transmission showed an off axis dependent behavior for MLC 120 and mMLC. Scatter produced by MLC as a 6 MV open reference field ratio was: (0,297 ± 0,024)% for MLC 120; (0,239 ± 0,052)% for mMLC and (0,202 ± 0

  1. Dosimetric performance of the new high-definition multileaf collimator for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabaan, Anees; Elder, Eric; Schreibmann, Eduard; Crocker, Ian; Curran, Walter J; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Fox, Tim

    2010-06-21

    The objective was to evaluate the performance of a high-definition multileaf collimator (MLC) of 2.5 mm leaf width (MLC2.5) and compare to standard 5 mm leaf width MLC (MLC5) for the treatment of intracranial lesions using dynamic conformal arcs (DCA) technique with a dedicated radiosurgery linear accelerator. Simulated cases of spherical targets were created to study solely the effect of target volume size on the performance of the two MLC systems independent of target shape complexity. In addition, 43 patients previously treated for intracranial lesions in our institution were retrospectively planned using DCA technique with MLC2.5 and MLC5 systems. The gross tumor volume ranged from 0.07 to 40.57 cm3 with an average volume of 5.9 cm3. All treatment parameters were kept the same for both MLC-based plans. The plan evaluation was performed using figures of merits (FOM) for a rapid and objective assessment on the quality of the two treatment plans for MLC2.5 and MLC5. The prescription isodose surface was selected as the greatest isodose surface covering >or= 95% of the target volume and delivering 95% of the prescription dose to 99% of target volume. A Conformity Index (CI) and conformity distance index (CDI) were used to quantifying the dose conformity to a target volume. To assess normal tissue sparing, a normal tissue difference (NTD) was defined as the difference between the volume of normal tissue receiving a certain dose utilizing MLC5 and the volume receiving the same dose using MLC2.5. The CI and normal tissue sparing for the simulated spherical targets were better with the MLC2.5 as compared to MLC5. For the clinical patients, the CI and CDI results indicated that the MLC2.5 provides better treatment conformity than MLC5 even at large target volumes. The CI's range was 1.15 to 2.44 with a median of 1.59 for MLC2.5 compared to 1.60-2.85 with a median of 1.71 for MLC5. Improved normal tissue sparing was also observed for MLC2.5 over MLC5, with the NTD always

  2. A proposal for quality assurance of multi-leaf collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hounsell, A R; Jordan, T J; Williams, P C

    1995-01-01

    Multi-leaf collimators (MLC's) are rapidly entering clinical service in many Institutes through-out the World. Commercial MLC's are reliable but highly complex devices that have new and sometimes complex maintenance and quality assurance (QA) requirements. The experience gained from installing the prototype Philips MLC and from using and maintaining two production model Philips MLC's - one four years old, one six months old - will be used to define the requirements of a QA schedule for MLC's. Problems specific to MLC's such as leaf positioning and radiation leakage between the leaves will be discussed and methods for measuring these problems presented. Recommendations for the frequency for performing these checks based on our experiences will be made. Preventative maintenance times, machine down times due to the MLC and planned Quality Control down times will be reported

  3. Independent monitor unit calculation for intensity modulated radiotherapy using the MIMiC multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhe; Xing Lei; Nath, Ravinder

    2002-01-01

    A self-consistent monitor unit (MU) and isocenter point-dose calculation method has been developed that provides an independent verification of the MU for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using the MIMiC (Nomos Corporation) multileaf collimator. The method takes into account two unique features of IMRT using the MIMiC: namely the gantry-dynamic arc delivery of intensity modulated photon beams and the slice-by-slice dose delivery for large tumor volumes. The method converts the nonuniform beam intensity planned at discrete gantry angles of 5 deg. or 10 deg. into conventional nonmodulated beam intensity apertures of elemental arc segments of 1 deg. This approach more closely simulates the actual gantry-dynamic arc delivery by MIMiC. Because each elemental arc segment is of uniform intensity, the MU calculation for an IMRT arc is made equivalent to a conventional arc with gantry-angle dependent beam apertures. The dose to the isocenter from each 1 deg. elemental arc segment is calculated by using the Clarkson scatter summation technique based on measured tissue-maximum-ratio and output factors, independent of the dose calculation model used in the IMRT planning system. For treatments requiring multiple treatment slices, the MU for the arc at each treatment slice takes into account the MU, leakage and scatter doses from other slices. This is achieved by solving a set of coupled linear equations for the MUs of all involved treatment slices. All input dosimetry data for the independent MU/isocenter point-dose calculation are measured directly. Comparison of the MU and isocenter point dose calculated by the independent program to those calculated by the Corvus planning system and to direct measurements has shown good agreement with relative difference less than ±3%. The program can be used as an independent initial MU verification for IMRT plans using the MIMiC multileaf collimators

  4. Clinical use of a simulation-multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, M; Vacha, P; Riis, B; Feyerabend, T; Richter, E [Medizinische Univ., Luebeck (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin

    1998-07-01

    Background: At the University of Luebeck, radiotherapy is delivered by a 6/18-MV linear accelerator. Using the integrated multileaf collimator, irradiation of individually shaped treatment fields is possible in place of alloy blocks. Due to unsatisfactory pretherapeutic review of the radiation-field-specific multileaf collimator (MLC) configuration, we developed a simulation-multileaf collimator (SMLC) and assessed its feasibility at different tumor sites. Material and Methods: The SMLC is made of a perspex carrier with 52 horizontal sliding leaves. The position of each leaf is calculated by a 3D treatment-planning computer. The technician manually adjusts the leaves according to the beams-eye-view plot of the planning computer. Consequently, the SMLC is mounted on the therapy simulator at a distance of 64.8 cm from the focus. The treatment fields and the position of the leaves are documented by X-ray films. Results: Using the SMLC, radiation oncologists are able to review exactly the leaf configuration of each MLC-shaped radiation field and to correlate the MLC-shaped radiation field with the treated volume, the organs at risk and the port films acquired by the Portal Vision {sup trademark} system. Conclusion: The SMLC is a new tool to review radiation planning that uses an MLC in daily routine. The use of the SMLC improves the documentation and the quality assurance. It accelerates the treatment field review at the linear accelerator by comparing the SMLC simulator films with the portal images. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Seit 1994 werden Patienten an der Luebecker Universitaetsklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin an einem Linearbeschleuniger bestrahlt, der mit einem Multileaf-Kollimator ausgeruestet ist. Dieser ermoeglicht die Bestrahlung individuell geformter Zielvolumina ohne gegossene Individualsatelliten. Wegen der unzureichenden praetherapeutischen Kontrolle der Lamellenkonfiguration des Multileaf-Kollimators wurde ein Simulations

  5. Multileaf Collimator Characteristics and Reliability Requirements for IMRT Elekta System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chihray; Simon, Thomas A.; Fox, Christopher; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder R.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics of a multileaf collimator (MLC) system, modeling MLC in a treatment planning system, and maintaining the mechanical accuracy of the linear accelerator gantry head system are important factors in the safe implementation of an intensity-modulated radiotherapy program. We review the characteristics of an Elekta MLC system, discuss the necessary MLC modeling parameters for a treatment planning system, and provide a novel method to establish an MLC leaf position quality assurance program. To perform quality assurance on 40 pairs of individual MLC leaves is a time-consuming and difficult task. In this report, an effective routine MLC quality assurance method based on the field edge of a backup jaw as referenced in conjunction with a diode array as a radiation detector system is discussed. The sensitivity of this test for determining the relative leaf positions was observed to be better than 0.1 mm. The Elekta MLC leaf position accuracy measured with this system has been better than 0.3 mm

  6. Multileaf collimator characteristics and reliability requirements for IMRT Elekta system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chihray; Simon, Thomas A; Fox, Christopher; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder R

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics of a multileaf collimator (MLC) system, modeling MLC in a treatment planning system, and maintaining the mechanical accuracy of the linear accelerator gantry head system are important factors in the safe implementation of an intensity-modulated radiotherapy program. We review the characteristics of an Elekta MLC system, discuss the necessary MLC modeling parameters for a treatment planning system, and provide a novel method to establish an MLC leaf position quality assurance program. To perform quality assurance on 40 pairs of individual MLC leaves is a time-consuming and difficult task. In this report, an effective routine MLC quality assurance method based on the field edge of a backup jaw as referenced in conjunction with a diode array as a radiation detector system is discussed. The sensitivity of this test for determining the relative leaf positions was observed to be better than 0.1 mm. The Elekta MLC leaf position accuracy measured with this system has been better than 0.3 mm.

  7. Methodology for Multileaf Collimator Quality Assurance in clinical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz M, R. M.; Rodriguez Z, M.; Juarez D, A.; Romero R, R.

    2013-01-01

    Multileaf Collimators (MLCs) have become an important technological advance as part of clinical linear accelerators (linacs) for radiotherapy. Treatment planning and delivery were substantially modified after these devices. However, it was needed to develop Quality Assurance (QA) methodologies related to the performance of these developments. The most common methods for QA of MLC are made in basic conditions that hardly cover all possible difficulties in clinical practice. Diaz et. el. developed a methodology based upon volumetric detectors bidimensional arrays that can be extended to more demanding situations. In this work, the Auril methodology of Diaz et. al. was implemented to the irradiation with the linac gantry in horizontal position. A mathematical procedure was developed to ease the dosimetric centering of the device with the Auril centering tool. System calibration was made as in the typical Auril methodology. Patterns with leaf misplacements in known positions were irradiated. the method allowed the detection of leafs' misplacements with a minimum number of false positives. We concluded that Auril methodology can be applied in clinical conditions. (Author)

  8. Characterization of a commercial multileaf collimator used for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Daniel A.; Sohn, Jason W.; Klein, Eric E.; Markman, Jerry; Mutic, Sasa; Dempsey, James F.

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of a commercial multileaf collimator (MLC) to deliver static and dynamic multileaf collimation (SMLC and DMLC, respectively) were investigated to determine their influence on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning and quality assurance. The influence of MLC leaf positioning accuracy on sequentially abutted SMLC fields was measured by creating abutting fields with selected gaps and overlaps. These data were also used to measure static leaf positioning precision. The characteristics of high leaf-velocity DMLC delivery were measured with constant velocity leaf sequences starting with an open field and closing a single leaf bank. A range of 1-72 monitor units (MU) was used providing a range of leaf velocities. The field abutment measurements yielded dose errors (as a percentage of the open field max dose) of 16.7±0.7% mm-1 and 12.8±0.7% mm-1 for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams, respectively. The MLC leaf positioning precision was 0.080±0.018 mm (single standard deviation) highlighting the excellent delivery hardware tolerances for the tested beam delivery geometry. The high leaf-velocity DMLC measurements showed delivery artifacts when the leaf sequence and selected monitor units caused the linear accelerator to move the leaves at their maximum velocity while modulating the accelerator dose rate to deliver the desired leaf and MU sequence (termed leaf-velocity limited delivery). According to the vendor, a unique feature to their linear accelerator and MLC is that the dose rate is reduced to provide the correct cm MU-1 leaf velocity when the delivery is leaf-velocity limited. However, it was found that the system delivered roughly 1 MU per pulse when the delivery was leaf-velocity limited causing dose profiles to exhibit discrete steps rather than a smooth dose gradient. The root mean square difference between the steps and desired linear gradient was less than 3% when more than 4 MU were used. The average dose per MU was

  9. High-resolution field shaping utilizing a masked multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P C; Cooper, P

    2000-08-01

    Multileaf collimators (MLCs) have become an important tool in the modern radiotherapy department. However, the current limit of resolution (1 cm at isocentre) can be too coarse for acceptable shielding of all fields. A number of mini- and micro-MLCs have been developed, with thinner leaves to achieve approved resolution. Currently however, such devices are limited to modest field sizes and stereotactic applications. This paper proposes a new method of high-resolution beam collimation by use of a tertiary grid collimator situated below the conventional MLC. The width of each slit in the grid is a submultiple of the MLC width. A composite shaped field is thus built up from a series of subfields, with the main MLC defining the length of each strip within each subfield. Presented here are initial findings using a prototype device. The beam uniformity achievable with such a device was examined by measuring transmission profiles through the grid using a diode. Profiles thus measured were then copied and superposed to generate composite beams, from which the uniformity achievable could be assessed. With the average dose across the profile normalized to 100%, hot spots up to 5.0% and troughs of 3% were identified for a composite beam of 2 x 5.0 mm grids, as measured at Dmax for a 6 MV beam. For a beam composed from 4 x 2.5 mm grids, the maximum across the profile was 3.0% above the average, and the minimum 2.5% below. Actual composite profiles were also formed using the integrating properties of film, with the subfield indexing performed using an engineering positioning stage. The beam uniformity for these fields compared well with that achieved in theory using the diode measurements. Finally sine wave patterns were generated to demonstrate the potential improvements in field shaping and conformity using this device as opposed to the conventional MLC alone. The scalloping effect on the field edge commonly seen on MLC fields was appreciably reduced by use of 2 x 5.0 mm

  10. Technology assessment of multileaf collimation: a North American users survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Eric E.; Tepper, Joel; Sontag, Mark; Franklin, Michael; Ling, Clifton; Kubo, Dale

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) initiated an Assessment of Technology Subcommittee (ATS) to help the radiotherapy community evaluate emerging technologies. The ATS decided to first address multileaf collimation (MLC) by means of a North American users survey. The survey attempted to address issues such as MLC utility, efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and customer satisfaction. Methods and Materials: The survey was designed with 38 questions, with cross-tabulation set up to decipher a particular clinic's perception of MLC. The surveys were coded according to MLC types, which were narrowed to four: Elekta, Siemens, Varian 52-leaf, and Varian 80-leaf. A 40% return rate was desired. Results: A 44% (108 of 250) return was achieved. On an MLC machine, 76.5% of photon patients are being treated with MLC. The main reasons for not using MLC were stair stepping, field size limitation, and physician objection. The most common sites in which MLC is being used are lung, pelvis, and prostate. The least used sites are head and neck and mantle fields. Of the facilities, 31% claimed an increase in number of patients being treated since MLC was installed, and 44% claimed an increase in the number of fields. Though the staffing for block cutting has decreased, therapist staffing has not. However, 91% of the facilities claimed a decreased workload for the therapists, despite the increase in daily treated patients and fields. Of the facilities that justified MLC purchase for more daily patients, 63% are actually treating more patients. Only 26% of the facilities that justified an MLC purchase for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are currently using it for that purpose. The satisfaction rating (1 = low to 5 = high) for department groups averaged 4.0. Therapists ranked MLC as 4.6. Conclusions: Our survey shows that most users have successfully introduced MLC into the clinic as a block replacement. Most have found MLC to be cost-effective and

  11. Optimized dose conformation of multi-leaf collimator fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serago, Christopher F.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Foo, May L.; McLaughlin, Mark P.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Current commercially available multi-leaf collimators (MLC) have leaf widths of about 1 cm. These leaf widths may produce stepped dose gradients at the fields edges at the 50% dose level. Small local perturbations of the dose distribution from the prescribed/expected dose distribution may not be acceptable for some clinical applications. Improvements to the conformation of the MLC dose distribution may be achieved using multiple exposures per MLC field, with either shifting the table/patient position, or rotating the orientation of the MLC jaws between exposures. Material and Methods: Dose distributions for MLC, primary jaws only, and lead alloy block fields were measured with film dosimetry for 6 and 20 MV photon beams in a solid water phantom. Square, circular, and typical clinical prostate, brain, lung, esophagus, and head and neck fields were measured. MLC field shapes were produced using a commercial MLC with a leaf width of 1 cm at the treatment isocenter. The dose per MLC field was delivered in either single (conventional) or multiple exposures. The table(patient) position or the collimator rotation was shifted between exposures when multiple exposure MLC fields were used. Differences in the dose distribution were evaluated at the 90% and 50% isodose level. Displacements of the measured 50% isodose from the prescribed/expected 50% isodose were measured at 5 degree intervals. Results: Measurements of the penumbra at a 10 cm depth for square fields show that using double exposure MLC fields with .5 cm table index decreases the effective penumbra by 1 mm. For clinical shaped fields, displacements between the prescribed/expected 50% isodose and the measured 50% isodose for conventional single exposure MLC fields are measured to be as great as 9 mm, and discrepancies on the order of 5 to 6 mm are common. In contrast, the maximum displacement errors measured with multiple exposure MLC fields are less than 5 mm and rarely more than 4 mm. In some cases, the measured displacement errors of the multiple exposure MLC field are less than those for the comparable lead alloy blocked field. Conclusions: Use of table indexing, or use of collimator rotations for 2 or more exposures per MLC field increases the dose conformation and decreases the effective penumbra compared to single exposure MLC fields. The multiple exposure MLC fields have smoother edges. Improved dose conformation may be clinically significant when jagged, stepped dose distributions produced by conventional MLC fields are near critical normal structures. Use of automatic settings of treatment parameters (collimator angle, table position) together with a record-and-verify system render such treatment fields a practical option

  12. Intensity modulation of therapeutic photon beams using a rotating multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, Karl

    2004-01-01

    The thesis describes the development and implementation of a novel method of delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) that provides greater accuracy and spatial resolution than currently available methods. Through improvements in multileaf collimator (MLC) based fluence generation, a dose distribution may be generated that conforms more closely to the tumour target volume. Healthy tissue surrounding the target volume will therefore receive less dose, reducing the probability of side effects and allowing the physician to increase the prescribed tumor dose (dose escalation). As a preamble to the description of the IMRT delivery method a new model for evaluating the spatial resolution capabilities of dose delivery techniques is presented. Flexibility and complexity in patient treatment due to advances in radiotherapy techniques necessitates a simple method for evaluating spatial resolution capabilities of the dose delivery device. The model is based on linear systems theory and is analogous to methods used to describe resolution degradation in imaging systems. The spatial resolution capabilities of different delivery components can be quantified separately, providing a simple method for comparing different treatment machine characteristics. Also, the model provides the ability to evaluate spatial resolution changes independent of the tumor that is being treated, providing a means of comparing delivery techniques that is not biased by the characteristics of any particular treatment volume. MLC based IMRT techniques are well established but suffer several physical limitations. Dosimetric spatial resolution is limited by the MLC leaf width, interleaf leakage and tongue-and-groove effects degrade dosimetric accuracy and the range of leaf motion limits the maximum deliverable field size. Based on observations from the linear systems model it is hypothesized that, by rotating the entire MLC between each sub-field, improvements will be obtained in spatial

  13. Postoperative modified stereotactic radiotherapy using a micro-multileaf collimator in patients with malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaka, Toshihiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Nakagawa, Hidemitsu; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Kouichi

    2002-06-01

    To achieve local control of malignant glioma, we designed a postoperative stereotactic radiotherapy using a micro-multileaf collimator (micro-MLC). The purpose of this study was to clarify the feasibility of this treatment. The treatment was performed in six patients who met the following eligibility criteria: (1) supratentorial tumor, (2) residual tumor volume or = 70. The three planning target volumes (PTVs), which consisted of restricted PTV (RPTV), intermediate PTV (IPTV), and extended PTV (EPTV), defined as the residual tumor plus a 1 cm, 2 cm, and 3 cm margins, respectively, and total dose delivery of 60-68 Gy, 52-60 Gy, and 44-52 Gy to the isocenters of RPTV, IPTV, and EPTV, respectively, in 4 Gy per fraction at five fractions per week, were established. The beam arrangement and the conformal blockade with a micro-MLC for the optimal treatment plan were designed. The treatment plans showed the high dose conformation to EPTV, the appropriate dose gradients in the three PTVs with the high dose homogeneity to RPTV, and the tolerated dose to critical structures. Following the plans, treatment was performed. The clinical findings more than 12 months after the treatment supported its possible use. We conclude that this treatment is feasible at least in selected patients.

  14. Modification of a 3D-planning system for use with a multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Duyse, B [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Colle, C; De Wagter, C; De Neve, W

    1995-12-01

    Recently, the Philips SL25 linear accelerator of the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital of Gent was retro-fitted with a multileaf collimator (MLC). To allow treatment planning with the MLC, the currently use GRATISTM 3D-planning system (developed by G. Sherouse) needed some adaptations, using the C source code. The virtual Simulator section was extended so that the leaves are graphically set in the Beams Eye View. The leaves can be set manually or automatically, based on a previously defined margin around the target. Once the leaves are set, a data file is created for each beam, containing the leaf settings. This file is finally transferred to the MLC computer over the network or by disk. The entire process does not require any manual transfer of leaf settings, not only adding a time-saving but also an error preventing factor to the GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Measurements to verify the accuracy of the adaptations to the planning system are addressed.

  15. Modification of a 3D-planning system for use with a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Duyse, B.; Colle, C.; De Wagter, C.; De Neve, W.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, the Philips SL25 linear accelerator of the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital of Gent was retro-fitted with a multileaf collimator (MLC). To allow treatment planning with the MLC, the currently use GRATISTM 3D-planning system (developed by G. Sherouse) needed some adaptations, using the C source code. The virtual Simulator section was extended so that the leaves are graphically set in the Beams Eye View. The leaves can be set manually or automatically, based on a previously defined margin around the target. Once the leaves are set, a data file is created for each beam, containing the leaf settings. This file is finally transferred to the MLC computer over the network or by disk. The entire process does not require any manual transfer of leaf settings, not only adding a time-saving but also an error preventing factor to the GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Measurements to verify the accuracy of the adaptations to the planning system are addressed

  16. Pitfalls of tungsten multileaf collimator in proton beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States) and Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center (Formerly Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Particle beam therapy is associated with significant startup and operational cost. Multileaf collimator (MLC) provides an attractive option to improve the efficiency and reduce the treatment cost. A direct transfer of the MLC technology from external beam radiation therapy is intuitively straightforward to proton therapy. However, activation, neutron production, and the associated secondary cancer risk in proton beam should be an important consideration which is evaluated. Methods: Monte Carlo simulation with FLUKA particle transport code was applied in this study for a number of treatment models. The authors have performed a detailed study of the neutron generation, ambient dose equivalent [H*(10)], and activation of a typical tungsten MLC and compared with those obtained from a brass aperture used in a typical proton therapy system. Brass aperture and tungsten MLC were modeled by absorber blocks in this study, representing worst-case scenario of a fully closed collimator. Results: With a tungsten MLC, the secondary neutron dose to the patient is at least 1.5 times higher than that from a brass aperture. The H*(10) from a tungsten MLC at 10 cm downstream is about 22.3 mSv/Gy delivered to water phantom by noncollimated 200 MeV beam of 20 cm diameter compared to 14 mSv/Gy for the brass aperture. For a 30-fraction treatment course, the activity per unit volume in brass aperture reaches 5.3 x 10{sup 4} Bq cm{sup -3} at the end of the last treatment. The activity in brass decreases by a factor of 380 after 24 h, additional 6.2 times after 40 days of cooling, and is reduced to background level after 1 yr. Initial activity in tungsten after 30 days of treating 30 patients per day is about 3.4 times higher than in brass that decreases only by a factor of 2 after 40 days and accumulates to 1.2 x 10{sup 6} Bq cm{sup -3} after a full year of operation. The daily utilization of the MLC leads to buildup of activity with time. The overall activity continues to increase

  17. Dose distributions of x-ray fields as shaped with multileaf collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.; Boyer, A.L.; Desobry, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Multileaf collimators (MLC) with various blade widths were simulated using standard cerrobend blocks, and three-dimensional dose computations were carried out to study the resultant radiation field edges. The study suggests that multileaf collimation to the outside of the desired field edge will lead to overdose outside the field, whereas multileaf collimation to the inside of the desired field edge will lead to underdose inside the field. When the direction of travel of the leaves with respect to the field edge is near 45 o , the 50% isodose of a multileaf-collimated beam will fall close to the desired edge with no underdose when the leaf corners are allowed to insert into the desired field edge by 1.2 mm for 6 MV x-rays and 1.4 mm for 18 MV x-rays using a 1 cm wide leaf. These blade offsets account for the scattering of photons and electrons in the medium within the penumbral region. (author)

  18. Optimized procedure for calibration and verification multileaf collimator from Elekta Synergy accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castel Millan, A.; Perellezo Mazon, A.; Fernandez Ibiza, J.; Arnalte Olloquequi, M.; Armengol Martinez, S.; Rodriguez Rey, A.; Guedea Edo, F.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to design an optimized procedure for calibration and verification of a multileaf collimator used so as to allow the EPID and the image plate in a complementary way, using different processing systems. With this procedure we have two equivalent alternative as the same parameters obtained for the calibration of multileaf Elekta Synergy accelerator.

  19. A strategy to minimize errors from differential intrafraction organ motion using a single configuration for a 'breathing' multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S; Binnie, D M

    2006-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be delivered by the 'sliding-leaves' dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) technique. Intrafraction organ motion can be accommodated by arranging an identical tracking motion for 'breathing leaves'. However, this is only possible for very specific circumstances such as regular, mathematically parameterizable, rigid-body, density-conserving, one-dimensional translations. In this paper, we investigate what happens when planes of tissue in the line of sight of the MLC have differential motion with respect to the moving leaves. In this situation, there is no solution to the problem and a perfect tracking motion cannot be arranged. However, an iterative minimization-of-errors 'solution' (or strategy) can be found and the technique is presented for this. From this, under certain mathematically simple differential motions it is possible to obtain some elegant algebraic solutions which are presented. In general, however, a lengthy computational minimization is required and results of examples of these are presented

  20. A comparison of arc-based and static mini-multileaf collimator-based radiosurgery treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Hideo Dale; Pappas, Conrad T.E.; Wilder, Richard B.

    1997-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to compare arc-based and mini-multileaf collimator (mMLC)-based radiosurgery treatment plans using isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Methods: Of 11 patients who underwent conventional arc-based radiosurgery for intracranial malignancies, four were treated with one isocenter, four were treated with two isocenters and three were treated with three isocenters. The same cases were re-planned using a test version of mMLC-based radiosurgery software for multiple static non-coplanar fields. Results and conclusion: For non-spherical targets, treatment planning is relatively intuitive with mMLC-based radiosurgery, reducing the amount of time required for planning. Moreover, a lower dose of radiation is delivered to normal tissue with mMLC-based radiosurgery than with arc-based radiosurgery, which theoretically should lead to a reduced risk of complications

  1. ‘Inverted Y’ field radiotherapy planning with multi-leaf collimator: A single isocentric technique using multiple fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Sahai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study is to describe a planning technique using multi-leaf collimator and asymmetric fields for irradiating an ‘inverted Y’ shaped geometry in a patient with testicular seminoma. The entire target area covering the para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal nodal regions was split into three fields. Single isocenter half-beam block technique was employed. The fields were planned with antero-posterior and postero-anterior portals with a differential weightage. The dose was prescribed at the respective reference points of the fields. A uniform dose distribution for the entire portal was achieved without any under- or over-dosing at the field junctions.  

  2. Modification of a three-dimensional treatment planning system for the use of multi-leaf collimators in conformation radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesecke, R.; Becker, G.; Alandt, K.; Pastyr, O.; Doll, J.; Schlegel, W.; Lorenz, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The multi-leaf collimator of the DKFZ is designed as a low cost add-on device for conventional linear accelerators for radiotherapy. The technical specification of the computer controlled collimator is briefly described . A major limitation in the use of the wide capabilities of multi-leaf collimators in the clinic is still an appropriate treatment planning system. This paper describes treatment planning and dose calculation techniques for multi-leaf collimators and shows examples where the capabilities of the collimators are used extensively. (author). 18 refs.; 8 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. Incorporating multi-leaf collimator leaf sequencing into iterative IMRT optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Lauterbach, Marc; Keall, Paul J.; Mohan, Radhe

    2002-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning typically considers beam optimization and beam delivery as separate tasks. Following optimization, a multi-leaf collimator (MLC) or other beam delivery device is used to generate fluence patterns for patient treatment delivery. Due to limitations and characteristics of the MLC, the deliverable intensity distributions often differ from those produced by the optimizer, leading to differences between the delivered and the optimized doses. Objective function parameters are then adjusted empirically, and the plan is reoptimized to achieve a desired deliverable dose distribution. The resulting plan, though usually acceptable, may not be the best achievable. A method has been developed to incorporate the MLC restrictions into the optimization process. Our in-house IMRT system has been modified to include the calculation of the deliverable intensity into the optimizer. In this process, prior to dose calculation, the MLC leaf sequencer is used to convert intensities to dynamic MLC sequences, from which the deliverable intensities are then determined. All other optimization steps remain the same. To evaluate the effectiveness of deliverable-based optimization, 17 patient cases have been studied. Compared with standard optimization plus conversion to deliverable beams, deliverable-based optimization results show improved isodose coverage and a reduced dose to critical structures. Deliverable-based optimization results are close to the original nondeliverable optimization results, suggesting that IMRT can overcome the MLC limitations by adjusting individual beamlets. The use of deliverable-based optimization may reduce the need for empirical adjustment of objective function parameters and reoptimization of a plan to achieve desired results

  4. Multileaf collimator-based linear accelerator radiosurgery: five-year efficiency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Joshua D; Fox, Tim; Waller, Anthony F; Davis, Lawrence; Crocker, Ian

    2009-03-01

    In 1989, Emory University initiated a linear accelerator (linac) radiosurgery program using circular collimators. In 2001, the program converted to a multileaf collimator. Since then, the treatment parameters of each patient have been stored in the record-and-verify system. Three major changes have occurred in the radiosurgery program in the past 6 years: in 2002, treatment was changed from static conformal beams to dynamic conformal arc (DCA) therapy, and all patients were imaged before treatment. Beginning in 2005, a linac was used, with the opportunity to treat at higher dose rates (600-1,000 monitor units/min). The aim of this study was to analyze the time required to deliver radiosurgery and the factors affecting treatment delivery. Benchmark data are provided for centers contemplating initiating linac radiosurgery programs. Custom software was developed to mine the record-and-verify system database and automatically perform a chart review on patients who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery from March 2001 to October 2006. The software extracted 510 patients who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery, and the following information was recorded for each patient: treatment technique, treatment time (from initiation of imaging, if done, to completion of therapy), number of isocenters, number of fields, total monitor units, and dose rate. Of the 510 patients, 395 were treated with DCA therapy and 115 with static conformal beams. The average number of isocenters treated was 1.06 (range, 1-4). The average times to deliver treatment were 24.1 minutes for patients who underwent DCA therapy and 19.3 minutes for those treated with static conformal beams, reflecting the lack of imaging in the latter patients. Eighty percent of patients were treated in question the need for a dedicated radiosurgery unit for even busy treatment centers.

  5. A machine learning approach to the accurate prediction of multi-leaf collimator positional errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joel N. K.; Park, Jong Min; Park, So-Yeon; In Park, Jong; Choi, Yunseok; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2016-03-01

    Discrepancies between planned and delivered movements of multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) are an important source of errors in dose distributions during radiotherapy. In this work we used machine learning techniques to train models to predict these discrepancies, assessed the accuracy of the model predictions, and examined the impact these errors have on quality assurance (QA) procedures and dosimetry. Predictive leaf motion parameters for the models were calculated from the plan files, such as leaf position and velocity, whether the leaf was moving towards or away from the isocenter of the MLC, and many others. Differences in positions between synchronized DICOM-RT planning files and DynaLog files reported during QA delivery were used as a target response for training of the models. The final model is capable of predicting MLC positions during delivery to a high degree of accuracy. For moving MLC leaves, predicted positions were shown to be significantly closer to delivered positions than were planned positions. By incorporating predicted positions into dose calculations in the TPS, increases were shown in gamma passing rates against measured dose distributions recorded during QA delivery. For instance, head and neck plans with 1%/2 mm gamma criteria had an average increase in passing rate of 4.17% (SD  =  1.54%). This indicates that the inclusion of predictions during dose calculation leads to a more realistic representation of plan delivery. To assess impact on the patient, dose volumetric histograms (DVH) using delivered positions were calculated for comparison with planned and predicted DVHs. In all cases, predicted dose volumetric parameters were in closer agreement to the delivered parameters than were the planned parameters, particularly for organs at risk on the periphery of the treatment area. By incorporating the predicted positions into the TPS, the treatment planner is given a more realistic view of the dose distribution as it will truly be

  6. Initiation of conformal radiotherapy with a multileaf-collimator - An approach to clinical routine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannach, B.; Doll, Th.; Pape, H.; Schmitt, G.

    1995-01-01

    The implementation of a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy facility in the radiotherapy department of the Heinrich Heine University is described. Complex radiotherapy techniques with commercially available networked systems are introduced to improve clinical work. Over 18 month we have gained clinical experience with a PHILIPS Multileaf Collimator (MLC) mounted on a SL 25 linear accelerator. For a limited period the MLC was used as a conventional blocking device. The standard MLC-shapes are controlled with a stand-alone computer system. In addition, a three-dimensional treatment planning system (3-D-TPS / TMS-Radix, Helax AB) based on convolution/superposition algorithms was recently installed. Treatment optimization is achieved using static field arrangements with complete volumetric computerized tomographic patient data for 3-D-TPS. Conformal adaptation of the 95%-isodose to the Planning Target Volume (PTV, ICRU 50) results in MLC-field-shaping concerning size, position and contour to PTV-projection in beams-eye-view (BEV). Field prescription with defined leaf positions of the MLC-setting for geometrical beam shaping is transferred from TPS via TCP/IP. Patient treatment with complex coplanar and non-coplanar field arrangements is performed with an automatic set-up for gantry and collimator angle position contolled by a verification system. Quality assurance for treatment set-up is gained with a mega-voltage imaging device (MVI / PHILIPS SRI 100). Actual treatment outcome and accurate dose delivery for conformal therapy is verified by intercomparison of geometrical field matching of MVI and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) for each delivered beam in BEV

  7. Lateral Penumbra Modelling Based Leaf End Shape Optimization for Multileaf Collimator in Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral penumbra of multileaf collimator plays an important role in radiotherapy treatment planning. Growing evidence has revealed that, for a single-focused multileaf collimator, lateral penumbra width is leaf position dependent and largely attributed to the leaf end shape. In our study, an analytical method for leaf end induced lateral penumbra modelling is formulated using Tangent Secant Theory. Compared with Monte Carlo simulation and ray tracing algorithm, our model serves well the purpose of cost-efficient penumbra evaluation. Leaf ends represented in parametric forms of circular arc, elliptical arc, Bézier curve, and B-spline are implemented. With biobjective function of penumbra mean and variance introduced, genetic algorithm is carried out for approximating the Pareto frontier. Results show that for circular arc leaf end objective function is convex and convergence to optimal solution is guaranteed using gradient based iterative method. It is found that optimal leaf end in the shape of Bézier curve achieves minimal standard deviation, while using B-spline minimum of penumbra mean is obtained. For treatment modalities in clinical application, optimized leaf ends are in close agreement with actual shapes. Taken together, the method that we propose can provide insight into leaf end shape design of multileaf collimator.

  8. Development and validation of a BEAMnrc component module for a miniature multileaf collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, E.; Hartmann, G. H.

    2012-05-01

    A new component module (CM) named mini multileaf collimator (mMLC) was developed for the Monte Carlo code BEAMnrc. It models the geometry of the add-on miniature multileaf collimator ModuLeaf (MRC Systems GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany, now part of Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The new CM is partly based on the existing CM called DYNVMLC. The development was performed using a modified EGSnrc platform which enables us to work in the Microsoft Visual Studio environment. In order to validate the new CM, the PRIMUS linac with 6 MV x-rays (Siemens OCS, Concord, CA, USA) equipped with the ModuLeaf mMLC was modelled. Validation was performed by two methods: (a) a ray-tracing method to check the correct geometry of the multileaf collimator (MLC) and (b) a comparison of calculated and measured results of the following dosimetrical parameters: output factors, dose profiles, field edge position penumbra, MLC interleaf leakage and transmission values. Excellent agreement was found for all parameters. It was, in particular, found that the relationship between leaf position and field edge depending on the shape of the leaf ends can be investigated with a higher accuracy by this new CM than by measurements demonstrating the usefulness of the new CM.

  9. Lateral Penumbra Modelling Based Leaf End Shape Optimization for Multileaf Collimator in Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Peiqing

    2016-01-01

    Lateral penumbra of multileaf collimator plays an important role in radiotherapy treatment planning. Growing evidence has revealed that, for a single-focused multileaf collimator, lateral penumbra width is leaf position dependent and largely attributed to the leaf end shape. In our study, an analytical method for leaf end induced lateral penumbra modelling is formulated using Tangent Secant Theory. Compared with Monte Carlo simulation and ray tracing algorithm, our model serves well the purpose of cost-efficient penumbra evaluation. Leaf ends represented in parametric forms of circular arc, elliptical arc, Bézier curve, and B-spline are implemented. With biobjective function of penumbra mean and variance introduced, genetic algorithm is carried out for approximating the Pareto frontier. Results show that for circular arc leaf end objective function is convex and convergence to optimal solution is guaranteed using gradient based iterative method. It is found that optimal leaf end in the shape of Bézier curve achieves minimal standard deviation, while using B-spline minimum of penumbra mean is obtained. For treatment modalities in clinical application, optimized leaf ends are in close agreement with actual shapes. Taken together, the method that we propose can provide insight into leaf end shape design of multileaf collimator.

  10. Lateral Penumbra Modelling Based Leaf End Shape Optimization for Multileaf Collimator in Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Peiqing

    2016-01-01

    Lateral penumbra of multileaf collimator plays an important role in radiotherapy treatment planning. Growing evidence has revealed that, for a single-focused multileaf collimator, lateral penumbra width is leaf position dependent and largely attributed to the leaf end shape. In our study, an analytical method for leaf end induced lateral penumbra modelling is formulated using Tangent Secant Theory. Compared with Monte Carlo simulation and ray tracing algorithm, our model serves well the purpose of cost-efficient penumbra evaluation. Leaf ends represented in parametric forms of circular arc, elliptical arc, Bézier curve, and B-spline are implemented. With biobjective function of penumbra mean and variance introduced, genetic algorithm is carried out for approximating the Pareto frontier. Results show that for circular arc leaf end objective function is convex and convergence to optimal solution is guaranteed using gradient based iterative method. It is found that optimal leaf end in the shape of Bézier curve achieves minimal standard deviation, while using B-spline minimum of penumbra mean is obtained. For treatment modalities in clinical application, optimized leaf ends are in close agreement with actual shapes. Taken together, the method that we propose can provide insight into leaf end shape design of multileaf collimator. PMID:27110274

  11. Development and validation of a BEAMnrc component module for a miniature multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerner, E; Hartmann, G H

    2012-01-01

    A new component module (CM) named mini multileaf collimator (mMLC) was developed for the Monte Carlo code BEAMnrc. It models the geometry of the add-on miniature multileaf collimator ModuLeaf (MRC Systems GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany, now part of Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The new CM is partly based on the existing CM called DYNVMLC. The development was performed using a modified EGSnrc platform which enables us to work in the Microsoft Visual Studio environment. In order to validate the new CM, the PRIMUS linac with 6 MV x-rays (Siemens OCS, Concord, CA, USA) equipped with the ModuLeaf mMLC was modelled. Validation was performed by two methods: (a) a ray-tracing method to check the correct geometry of the multileaf collimator (MLC) and (b) a comparison of calculated and measured results of the following dosimetrical parameters: output factors, dose profiles, field edge position penumbra, MLC interleaf leakage and transmission values. Excellent agreement was found for all parameters. It was, in particular, found that the relationship between leaf position and field edge depending on the shape of the leaf ends can be investigated with a higher accuracy by this new CM than by measurements demonstrating the usefulness of the new CM. (paper)

  12. A method for photon beam Monte Carlo multileaf collimator particle transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Keall, Paul J.; Kim, Jong Oh; Mohan, Radhe

    2002-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms are recognized as the most accurate methodology for patient dose assessment. For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivered with dynamic multileaf collimators (DMLCs), accurate dose calculation, even with MC, is challenging. Accurate IMRT MC dose calculations require inclusion of the moving MLC in the MC simulation. Due to its complex geometry, full transport through the MLC can be time consuming. The aim of this work was to develop an MLC model for photon beam MC IMRT dose computations. The basis of the MC MLC model is that the complex MLC geometry can be separated into simple geometric regions, each of which readily lends itself to simplified radiation transport. For photons, only attenuation and first Compton scatter interactions are considered. The amount of attenuation material an individual particle encounters while traversing the entire MLC is determined by adding the individual amounts from each of the simplified geometric regions. Compton scatter is sampled based upon the total thickness traversed. Pair production and electron interactions (scattering and bremsstrahlung) within the MLC are ignored. The MLC model was tested for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams by comparing it with measurements and MC simulations that incorporate the full physics and geometry for fields blocked by the MLC and with measurements for fields with the maximum possible tongue-and-groove and tongue-or-groove effects, for static test cases and for sliding windows of various widths. The MLC model predicts the field size dependence of the MLC leakage radiation within 0.1% of the open-field dose. The entrance dose and beam hardening behind a closed MLC are predicted within +/-1% or 1 mm. Dose undulations due to differences in inter- and intra-leaf leakage are also correctly predicted. The MC MLC model predicts leaf-edge tongue-and-groove dose effect within +/-1% or 1 mm for 95% of the points compared at 6 MV and 88% of the points compared at 18 MV

  13. A method for photon beam Monte Carlo multileaf collimator particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)]. E-mail: jsiebers@vcu.edu; Keall, Paul J.; Kim, Jong Oh; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2002-09-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms are recognized as the most accurate methodology for patient dose assessment. For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivered with dynamic multileaf collimators (DMLCs), accurate dose calculation, even with MC, is challenging. Accurate IMRT MC dose calculations require inclusion of the moving MLC in the MC simulation. Due to its complex geometry, full transport through the MLC can be time consuming. The aim of this work was to develop an MLC model for photon beam MC IMRT dose computations. The basis of the MC MLC model is that the complex MLC geometry can be separated into simple geometric regions, each of which readily lends itself to simplified radiation transport. For photons, only attenuation and first Compton scatter interactions are considered. The amount of attenuation material an individual particle encounters while traversing the entire MLC is determined by adding the individual amounts from each of the simplified geometric regions. Compton scatter is sampled based upon the total thickness traversed. Pair production and electron interactions (scattering and bremsstrahlung) within the MLC are ignored. The MLC model was tested for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams by comparing it with measurements and MC simulations that incorporate the full physics and geometry for fields blocked by the MLC and with measurements for fields with the maximum possible tongue-and-groove and tongue-or-groove effects, for static test cases and for sliding windows of various widths. The MLC model predicts the field size dependence of the MLC leakage radiation within 0.1% of the open-field dose. The entrance dose and beam hardening behind a closed MLC are predicted within {+-}1% or 1 mm. Dose undulations due to differences in inter- and intra-leaf leakage are also correctly predicted. The MC MLC model predicts leaf-edge tongue-and-groove dose effect within {+-}1% or 1 mm for 95% of the points compared at 6 MV and 88% of the points compared at 18 MV

  14. Characterization of an extendable multi-leaf collimator for clinical electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Tuathan P.; Ge, Yuanyuan; Foley, Mark J.; Faddegon, Bruce A.

    2011-12-01

    An extendable x-ray multi-leaf collimator (eMLC) is investigated for collimation of electron beams on a linear accelerator. The conventional method of collimation using an electron applicator is impractical for conformal, modulated and mixed beam therapy techniques. An eMLC would allow faster, more complex treatments with potential for reduction in dose to organs-at-risk and critical structures. The add-on eMLC was modelled using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and validated against dose measurements at 6-21 MeV with the eMLC mounted on a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator at 71.6 and 81.6 cm source-to-collimator distances. Measurements and simulations at 8.4-18.4 cm airgaps showed agreement of 2%/2 mm. The eMLC dose profiles and percentage depth dose curves were compared with standard electron applicator parameters. The primary differences were a wider penumbra and up to 4.2% reduction in the build-up dose at 0.5 cm depth, with dose normalized on the central axis. At 90 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD)--relevant to isocentric delivery--the applicator and eMLC penumbrae agreed to 0.3 cm. The eMLC leaves, which were 7 cm thick, contributed up to 6.3% scattered electron dose at the depth of maximum dose for a 10 × 10 cm2 field, with the thick leaves effectively eliminating bremsstrahlung leakage. A Monte Carlo calculated wedge shaped dose distribution generated with all six beam energies matched across the maximum available eMLC field width demonstrated a therapeutic (80% of maximum dose) depth range of 2.1-6.8 cm. Field matching was particularly challenging at lower beam energies (6-12 MeV) due to the wider penumbrae and angular distribution of electron scattering. An eMLC isocentric electron breast boost was planned and compared with the conventional applicator fixed SSD plan, showing similar target coverage and dose to critical structures. The mean dose to the target differed by less than 2%. The low bremsstrahlung dose from the 7 cm thick MLC leaves had the added

  15. Characterization of megavoltage electron beams delivered through a photon multi-leaf collimator (pMLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plessis, F C P du; Leal, A; Stathakis, S; Xiong, W; Ma, C-M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States)

    2006-04-21

    A study is presented that characterizes megavoltage electron beams delivered through an existing double-focused photon multi-leaf collimator (pMLC) using film measurements in a solid water phantom. Machine output stability and linearity were evaluated as well as the effect of source-to-surface distance (SSD) and field size on the penumbra for electron energies between 6 and 18 MeV over an SSD range of 60-100 cm. Penumbra variations as a function of field size, depth of measurement and the influence of the jaws were also studied. Field abutment, field flatness and target coverage for segmented beams were also addressed. The measured field size for electrons transported through the pMLC was the same as that for an x-ray beam up to SSDs of 70 cm. At larger SSD, the lower energy electron fields deviated from the projected field. Penumbra data indicated that 60 cm SSD was the most favourable treatment distance. Backprojection of P{sub 20-80} penumbra data yielded a virtual source position located at 98.9 cm from the surface for 18 MeV electrons. For 6 MeV electrons, the virtual source position was at a distance of 82.6 cm. Penumbra values were smaller for small beam slits and reached a near-constant value for field widths larger than 5 cm. The influence of the jaws had a small effect on the penumbra. The R{sub 90} values ranged from 1.4 to 4.8 cm between 6 and 21 MeV as measured at 60 cm SSD for a 9 x 9 cm{sup 2} field. Uniformity and penumbra improvement could be demonstrated using weighted abutted fields especially useful for small segments. No detectable electron leakage through the pMLC was observed. Bremsstrahlung measurements taken at 60 cm SSD for a 9 x 9 cm{sup 2} field as shaped by the pMLC compared within 1% to bremsstrahlung measurements taken at 100 cm SSD for a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} electron applicator field at 100 cm SSD.

  16. Peripheral dose in photon beams from a linear accelerator with a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lope Lope, R.; Lozano Flores, F.; Gracia Sorrosal, J.; Font Gomez, J.A.; Hernandez Vitoria, A.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation doses outside the radiotherapy treatment field are of radiation protection interest when anatomical structures with very low dose tolerances might be involved. One of the major sources of peripheral dose, scatter from secondary collimators, depends on the configuration of the collimator. In this study, peripheral dose was measured at two depths for 6 and 18 MV photons from a linac Primus (Siemens) with a multileaf collimator (MLC). Comparative measurements were made both with leaves and with the upper jaw positioned at the field edge near to the detector. Configuring the MLC leaves at the field edge yielded a reduction in peripheral dose. (author)

  17. Dose Distribution and Characterization for Radiation Fields of Multileaf Collimator System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Sung Sil; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1996-01-01

    Purpose : Multileaf collimator(MLC) is very suitable tool for conformal radiotherapy and commissioning measurements for a multileaf collimator installed on a dual energy accelerator with 6 and 10MV photons are required. For modeling the collimator with treatment planning software, detailed dosimetric characterization of the multileaf collimator including the penumbra width, leaf transmission between leaf leakage and localization of the leaf ends and sides is an essential requirement. Measurement of characteristic data of the MLC with 26 pair block leaves installed on CLINAC 2100C linear accelerator was performed. Low sensitive radiographic film(X-omatV) was used for the penumbra measurement and separate experiments using radiographic film and thermoluminescent dosimeters were performed to verify the dose distribution, Measured films were analyzed with a photo densitometer of WP700i scanner. For 6 and 10 MV x-ray energies, approximately 2.0% of photons incident on the multileaf collimator were transmitted and an additional 0.5% leakage occurs between the leaves. Localizing the physical end of the leaves showed less than 1mm deviation from the 50% decrement line and this difference is attributed to the curved shaped end on the leaves. One side of a single leaf corresponded to the 50% decrement line, but the opposite face was aligned with a lower value. this difference is due to the tongue and groove used to decrease between leaf leakage. Alignment of the leaves to form a straight edge resulted larger penumbra at far position from isocenter as compare with divergent alloy blocks. When the MLC edge is stepped by sloping field, the isodose lines follow the leaf pattern and produce scalloping isodose curves in tissue. The effective penumbra by 45 degree stepped MLC is about 10mm at 10cm depth for 6MV x-ray. The difference of effective penumbra in deep tissue between MLC and divergent alloy blocks is small (5mm). Using the characteristic data of MLC, the MLC has the

  18. Dosimetric Comparison Between 3DCRT and IMRT Using Different Multileaf Collimators in the Treatment of Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Meisong; Newman, Francis M.S.; Chen Changhu; Stuhr, Kelly; Gaspar, Laurie E.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the differences between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and the impact of collimator leaf-width on IMRT plans for the treatment of nonspherical brain tumors. Eight patients treated by 3DCRT with Novalis were selected. We developed 3 IMRT plans with different multileaf collimators (Novalis m3, Varian MLC-120, and Varian MLC-80) with the same treatment margins, number of beams, and gantry positions as in the 3DCRT treatment plans. Treatment planning utilized the BrainLAB treatment planning system. For each patient, the dose constraints and optimization parameters remained identical for all plans. The heterogeneity index, the percentage target coverage, critical structures, and normal tissue volumes receiving 50% of the prescription dose were calculated to compare the dosimetric difference. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) were also introduced to evaluate the radiobiological effect for different plans. We found that IMRT significantly improved the target dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT. However, IMRT showed the same radiobiological effect as 3DCRT. For the brain tumors adjacent to (or partially overlapping with) critical structures, IMRT dramatically spared the volume of the critical structures to be irradiated. In IMRT plans, the smaller collimator leaf width could reduce the volume of critical structures irradiated to the 50% level for those partially overlapping with the brain tumors. For relatively large and spherical brain tumors, the smaller collimator leaf widths give no significant benefit

  19. Technical Note: Modeling a complex micro-multileaf collimator using the standard BEAMnrc distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairn, T.; Kenny, J.; Crowe, S. B.; Fielding, A. L.; Franich, R. D.; Johnston, P. N.; Knight, R. T.; Langton, C. M.; Schlect, D.; Trapp, J. V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The component modules in the standard BEAMnrc distribution may appear to be insufficient to model micro-multileaf collimators that have trifaceted leaf ends and complex leaf profiles. This note indicates, however, that accurate Monte Carlo simulations of radiotherapy beams defined by a complex collimation device can be completed using BEAMnrc's standard VARMLC component module. Methods: That this simple collimator model can produce spatially and dosimetrically accurate microcollimated fields is illustrated using comparisons with ion chamber and film measurements of the dose deposited by square and irregular fields incident on planar, homogeneous water phantoms. Results: Monte Carlo dose calculations for on-axis and off-axis fields are shown to produce good agreement with experimental values, even on close examination of the penumbrae. Conclusions: The use of a VARMLC model of the micro-multileaf collimator, along with a commissioned model of the associated linear accelerator, is therefore recommended as an alternative to the development or use of in-house or third-party component modules for simulating stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments. Simulation parameters for the VARMLC model are provided which should allow other researchers to adapt and use this model to study clinical stereotactic radiotherapy treatments.

  20. An alternative effective method for verifying the multileaf collimator leaves speed by using a digital-video imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Ing-Ming; Wu, Jay; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Ding, Hueisch-Jy

    2010-01-01

    We present an alternative effective method for verifying the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves speed using a digital-video imaging system in daily dynamic conformal radiation therapy (DCRT) and intensity-modulation radiation therapy (IMRT) in achieving increased convenience and shorter treatment times. The horizontal leaves speed measured was within 1.76-2.08 cm/s. The mean full range of traveling time was 20 s. The initial speed-up time was within 1.5-2.0 s, and the slowing-down time was within 2.0-2.5 s. Due to gravity the maximum speed-up effect in the X1 bank was +0.10 cm/s, but the lagging effect in the X2 bank was -0.20 cm/s. This technique offered an alternative method with electronic portal imaging device (EPID), charged coupled device (CCD) or a light field for the measurement of MLC leaves speed. When time taken on the linac was kept to a minimum, the image could be processed off-line.

  1. Rounded leaf end effect of multileaf collimator on penumbra width and radiation field offset: an analytical and numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Ye, Peiqing

    2015-01-01

    Penumbra characteristics play a significant role in dose delivery accuracy for radiation therapy. For treatment planning, penumbra width and radiation field offset strongly influence target dose conformity and organ at risk sparing. In this study, we present an analytical and numerical approach for evaluation of the rounded leaf end effect on penumbra characteristics. Based on the rule of half-value layer, algorithms for leaf position calculation and radiation field offset correction were developed, which were advantageous particularly in dealing with large radius leaf end. Computer simulation was performed based on the Monte Carlo codes of EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, with groups of leaf end radii and source sizes. Data processing technique of curve fitting was employed for deriving penumbra width and radiation field offset. Results showed that penumbra width increased with source size. Penumbra width curves for large radius leaf end were U-shaped. This observation was probably related to the fact that radiation beams penetrated through the proximal and distal leaf sides. In contrast, source size had negligible impact on radiation field offset. Radiation field offsets were found to be constant both for analytical method and numerical simulation. However, the overall resulting values of radiation field offset obtained by analytical method were slightly smaller compared with Monte Carlo simulation. The method we proposed could provide insight into the investigation of rounded leaf end effects on penumbra characteristics. Penumbra width and radiation field offset calibration should be carefully performed to commission multileaf collimator for intensity modulated radiotherapy

  2. Feasibility of replacing patient specific cutouts with a computer-controlled electron multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldib, Ahmed; Jin Lihui; Li Jinsheng; Ma, C-M Charlie

    2013-01-01

    A motorized electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) was developed as an add-on device to the Varian linac for delivery of advanced electron beam therapy. It has previously been shown that electron beams collimated by an eMLC have very similar penumbra to those collimated by applicators and cutouts. Thus, manufacturing patient specific cutouts would no longer be necessary, resulting in the reduction of time taken in the cutout fabrication process. Moreover, cutout construction involves handling of toxic materials and exposure to toxic fumes that are usually generated during the process, while the eMLC will be a pollution-free device. However, undulation of the isodose lines is expected due to the finite size of the eMLC. Hence, the provided planned target volume (PTV) shape will not exactly follow the beam's-eye-view of the PTV, but instead will make a stepped approximation to the PTV shape. This may be a problem when the field edge is close to a critical structure. Therefore, in this study the capability of the eMLC to achieve the same clinical outcome as an applicator/cutout combination was investigated based on real patient computed tomographies (CTs). An in-house Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was used for dose calculation using ten patient CTs. For each patient, two plans were generated; one with electron beams collimated using the applicator/cutout combination; and the other plan with beams collimated by the eMLC. Treatment plan quality was compared for each patient based on dose distribution and dose–volume histogram. In order to determine the optimal position of the leaves, the impact of the different leaf positioning strategies was investigated. All plans with both eMLC and cutouts were generated such that 100% of the target volume receives at least 90% of the prescribed dose. Then the percentage difference in dose between both delivery techniques was calculated for all the cases. The difference in the dose received by 10% of the volume of the

  3. Feasibility of replacing patient specific cutouts with a computer-controlled electron multileaf collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldib, Ahmed; Jin, Lihui; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, C.-M. Charlie

    2013-08-01

    A motorized electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) was developed as an add-on device to the Varian linac for delivery of advanced electron beam therapy. It has previously been shown that electron beams collimated by an eMLC have very similar penumbra to those collimated by applicators and cutouts. Thus, manufacturing patient specific cutouts would no longer be necessary, resulting in the reduction of time taken in the cutout fabrication process. Moreover, cutout construction involves handling of toxic materials and exposure to toxic fumes that are usually generated during the process, while the eMLC will be a pollution-free device. However, undulation of the isodose lines is expected due to the finite size of the eMLC. Hence, the provided planned target volume (PTV) shape will not exactly follow the beam's-eye-view of the PTV, but instead will make a stepped approximation to the PTV shape. This may be a problem when the field edge is close to a critical structure. Therefore, in this study the capability of the eMLC to achieve the same clinical outcome as an applicator/cutout combination was investigated based on real patient computed tomographies (CTs). An in-house Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was used for dose calculation using ten patient CTs. For each patient, two plans were generated; one with electron beams collimated using the applicator/cutout combination; and the other plan with beams collimated by the eMLC. Treatment plan quality was compared for each patient based on dose distribution and dose-volume histogram. In order to determine the optimal position of the leaves, the impact of the different leaf positioning strategies was investigated. All plans with both eMLC and cutouts were generated such that 100% of the target volume receives at least 90% of the prescribed dose. Then the percentage difference in dose between both delivery techniques was calculated for all the cases. The difference in the dose received by 10% of the volume of the

  4. Characterization of an extendable multi-leaf collimator for clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, Tuathan P; Foley, Mark J; Ge Yuanyuan; Faddegon, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    An extendable x-ray multi-leaf collimator (eMLC) is investigated for collimation of electron beams on a linear accelerator. The conventional method of collimation using an electron applicator is impractical for conformal, modulated and mixed beam therapy techniques. An eMLC would allow faster, more complex treatments with potential for reduction in dose to organs-at-risk and critical structures. The add-on eMLC was modelled using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and validated against dose measurements at 6–21 MeV with the eMLC mounted on a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator at 71.6 and 81.6 cm source-to-collimator distances. Measurements and simulations at 8.4–18.4 cm airgaps showed agreement of 2%/2 mm. The eMLC dose profiles and percentage depth dose curves were compared with standard electron applicator parameters. The primary differences were a wider penumbra and up to 4.2% reduction in the build-up dose at 0.5 cm depth, with dose normalized on the central axis. At 90 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD)-–relevant to isocentric delivery-–the applicator and eMLC penumbrae agreed to 0.3 cm. The eMLC leaves, which were 7 cm thick, contributed up to 6.3% scattered electron dose at the depth of maximum dose for a 10 × 10 cm 2 field, with the thick leaves effectively eliminating bremsstrahlung leakage. A Monte Carlo calculated wedge shaped dose distribution generated with all six beam energies matched across the maximum available eMLC field width demonstrated a therapeutic (80% of maximum dose) depth range of 2.1–6.8 cm. Field matching was particularly challenging at lower beam energies (6–12 MeV) due to the wider penumbrae and angular distribution of electron scattering. An eMLC isocentric electron breast boost was planned and compared with the conventional applicator fixed SSD plan, showing similar target coverage and dose to critical structures. The mean dose to the target differed by less than 2%. The low bremsstrahlung dose from the 7 cm thick MLC leaves

  5. Multibeam tomotherapy: A new treatment unit devised for multileaf collimation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achterberg, Nils; Mueller, Reinhold G.

    2007-01-01

    A fully integrated system for treatment planning, application, and verification for automated multileaf collimator (MLC) based, intensity-modulated, image-guided, and adaptive radiation therapy (IMRT, IGRT and ART, respectively) is proposed. Patient comfort, which was the major development goal, will be achieved through a new unit design and short treatment times. Our device for photon beam therapy will consist of a new dual energy linac with five fixed treatment heads positioned evenly along one plane but one electron beam generator only. A minimum of moving parts increases technical reliability and reduces motion times to a minimum. Motion is allowed solely for the MLCs, the robotic patient table, and the small angle gantry rotation of ±36 deg. . Besides sophisticated electron beam guidance, this compact setup can be built using existing modules. The flattening-filter-free treatment heads are characterized by reduced beam-on time and contain apertures restricted in one dimension to the area of maximum primary fluence output. In the case of longer targets, this leads to a topographic intensity modulation, thanks to the combination of ''step and shoot'' MLC delivery and discrete patient couch motion. Owing to the limited number of beam directions, this multislice cone beam serial tomotherapy is referred to as ''multibeam tomotherapy.'' Every patient slice is irradiated by one treatment head at any given moment but for one subfield only. The electron beam is then guided to the next head ready for delivery, while the other heads are preparing their leaves for the next segment. The ''Multifocal MLC-positioning'' algorithm was programmed to enable treatment planning and optimize treatment time. We developed an overlap strategy for the longitudinally adjacent fields of every beam direction, in doing so minimizing the field match problem and the effects of possible table step errors. Clinical case studies show for the same or better planning target volume coverage

  6. Dosimetric effect of multileaf collimator leaf width on volumetric modulated arc stereotactic radiotherapy for spine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoush, Ahmad, E-mail: aamoush@augusta.edu [Augusta University, 1120 15th St, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States); Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Long, Huang [University of Utah, 1950 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Subedi, Laxmi [Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44115 (United States); Qi, Peng; Djemil, Toufik; Xia, Ping [Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This work aimed to study the dosimetric effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths in treatment plans for patients receiving volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Thirteen patients treated with spine SBRT were retrospectively selected for this study. The patients were treated following the protocol of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0631 (RTOG 0631) for spine metastasis. The prescription dose was 16 Gy in 1 fraction to 90% of the target volume (V16 > 90%). The maximum spinal cord dose of 14 Gy and 10% of the spinal cord receiving < 10 Gy (V10) were the acceptable tolerance doses. For the purpose of this study, 2 dual-arc VMAT plans were created for each patient using 3 different MLC leaf widths: 2.5 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm. The compliance with the RTOG 0631 protocol, conformity index (CI), dose gradient index (DGI), and number of monitor units (MUs) were compared. The average V16Gy of the targets was 91.8 ± 1.2%, 92.2 ± 2.1%, and 91.7 ± 2.3% for 2.5-mm, 4-mm, and 5-mm leaf widths, respectively (p = 0.78). Accordingly, the average CI was 1.45 ± 0.4, 1.47 ± 0.29, and 1.47 ± 0.31 (p = 0.98), respectively. The average DGI was 0.22 ± 0.04, 0.20 ± 0.06, and 0.22 ± 0.05, respectively (p = 0.77). The average maximum dose to the spinal cord was 12.45 ± 1.0 Gy, 12.80 ± 1.0 Gy, and 12.48 ± 1.1 (p = 0.62) and V10% of the spinal cord was 3.6 ± 2.1%, 5.6 ± 2.8%, and 5.5 ± 3.0% (p = 0.11) for 2.5-mm, 4-mm, and 5-mm leaf widths, respectively. Accordingly, the average number of MUs was 4341 ± 500 MU, 5019 ± 834 MU, and 4606 ± 691 MU, respectively (p = 0.053). The use of 2.5-mm, 4-mm, and 5-mm MLCs achieved similar VMAT plan quality as recommended by the RTOG 0631. The dosimetric parameters were also comparable for the 3 MLCs. In general, any of these leaf widths can be used for spine

  7. Evaluation of the vidar`s VXR-12 digitizer performances for film dosimetry of beams delimited by multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julia, F [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Briot, E

    1995-12-01

    The development of new irradiation techniques such as conformal radiotherapy increasingly implies the use of a multileaf collimator. The measurement of dose gradients in the penumbra region, and of dose distributions at the edge of complex shaped fields defined by multileaf collimators requires a high definition dosimetric method. Nowadays film digitizers have been notably improved and allow the film dosimetry to be faster, more accurate, presenting a sensitivity and high spatial resolution. To be able to perform the study of physical and dosimetric specifications of a multileaf collimator, we have evaluated the performances of the Vidar VCR-12 digitizer, with respect to its sensitivity, linearity, optical density range and the resolution. These performances were compared with the performances of different systems already in use in our department, either manual or automatic, using specific patterns. The main limitation for dosimetric use is the detection threshold that can introduce errors in isodose calculation, especially for the lowest values. The result of the intercomparisons have allowed corrections to be added, taking into account this Vidar problem. The results obtained after correction for the dose profiles of squared fields are in good agreement with ionization chamber measurements in a water phantom. It is concluded that Vidar digitizer is suitable for the use of film dosimetry for the dose distributions in fields defined by multileaf collimator.

  8. Study on the tongue and groove effect of the elekta multileaf collimator using Monte Carlo simulation and film dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haryanto, F.; Fippel, M.; Bakai, A.; Nuesslin, F. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Radiooncologic Univ. Clinic, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2004-01-01

    Background: nowadays, multileaf collimation of the treatment fields from medical linear accelerators is a common option. Due to the design of the leaf sides, the tongue and groove effect occurs for certain multileaf collimator applications such as the abutment of fields where the beam edges are defined by the sides of the leaves. Material and methods: in this study, the tongue and groove effect was measured for two pairs of irregular multileaf collimator fields that were matched along leaf sides in two steps. Measurements were made at 10 cm depth in a polystyrene phantom using Kodak EDR2 films for a photon beam energy of 6 MV on an elekta sli-plus accelerator. To verify the measurements, full Monte Carlo simulations were done. In the simulations, the design of the leaf sides was taken into account and one component module of BEAM code was modified to correctly simulate the elekta multileaf collimator. Results and conclusion: the results of measurements and simulations are in good agreement and within the tolerance of film dosimetry. (orig.)

  9. Multileaf collimator leaf position verification and analysis for adaptive radiation therapy using a video-optical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethna, Sohrab B.

    External beam radiation therapy is commonly used to eliminate and control cancerous tumors. High-energy beams are shaped to match the patient's specific tumor volume, whereby maximizing radiation dose to malignant cells and limiting dose to normal tissue. A multileaf collimator (MLC) consisting of multiple pairs of tungsten leaves is used to conform the radiation beam to the desired treatment field. Advanced treatment methods utilize dynamic MLC settings to conform to multiple treatment fields and provide intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Future methods would further increase conformity by actively tracking tumor motion caused by patient cardiac and respiratory motion. Leaf position quality assurance for a dynamic MLC is critical as variation between the planned and actual leaf positions could induce significant errors in radiation dose. The goal of this research project is to prototype a video-optical quality assurance system for MLC leaf positions. The system captures light-field images of MLC leaf sequences during dynamic therapy. Image acquisition and analysis software was developed to determine leaf edge positions. The mean absolute difference between QA prototype predicted and caliper measured leaf positions was found to be 0.6 mm with an uncertainty of +/- 0.3 mm. Maximum errors in predicted positions were below 1.0 mm for static fields. The prototype served as a proof of concept for quality assurance of future tumor tracking methods. Specifically, a lung tumor phantom was created to mimic a lung tumor's motion from respiration. The lung tumor video images were superimposed on MLC field video images for visualization and analysis. The toolbox is capable of displaying leaf position, leaf velocity, tumor position, and determining errors between planned and actual treatment fields for dynamic radiation therapy.

  10. Dosimetric verification and evaluation of segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC)-IMRT for quality assurance. The second report. Absolute dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateoka, Kunihiko; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atsushi; Nakata, Kensei; Nagase, Daiki; Saikawa, Tsunehiko; Shimizume, Kazunari; Sugimoto, Harumi; Waka, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was developed to irradiate the target are more conformally, sparing organs at risk (OARs). Since the beams are sequentially delivered by many, small, irregular, and off-center fields in IMRT, dosimetric quality assurance (QA) is an extremely important issue. QA is performed by verifying both the dose distribution and doses at arbitrary points. In this work, we describe the verification of doses at arbitrary points in our hospital for Segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC)-IMRT. In general, verification of the absolute doses for IMRT is performed by comparison between the calculated doses using Radiation Treatment Planning Systems (RTP) and the measured doses using an ionization chamber with a small volume at arbitrary points in relatively flat regions of the dose gradients. However, no clear definitions of the dose gradients and the flat regions have yet been reported. We carried out verification by comparison of the measured doses with the average dose and the central point dose in a virtual Farmer type ionization chamber (V-F) and a virtual PinPoint ionization chamber (V-P) equal to the Farmer-type ionization chamber volume and PinPoint ionization chamber volumes using the RTP. Furthermore, we defined the dose gradients as the deviation of the maximum dose from the minimum dose in the virtual ionization chamber volume. In IMRT, the dose gradients may be as high as 80% or more in the virtual ionization chamber volume. Therefore, it is thought that the effective center of the ionization chamber varies by segment for IMRT fields (i.e., the variation of the ionization chamber replacement effect). Additionally, in regions with a higher dose gradient, uncertainty in the measured doses is influenced by the variations in the ionization chamber replacement effect and the ionization chamber positioning error. We more objectively examined the verification method for the absolute dose in IMRT using the virtual ionization chamber

  11. An effective method for smoothing the staggered dose distribution of multi-leaf collimator field edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I.-M.; Lin, S.-Y.; Lee, M.-S.; Wang, C.-J.; Chuang, K.-S.; Ding, H.-J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To smooth the staggered dose distribution that occurs in stepped leaves defined by a multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Materials and methods: The MLC Shaper program controlled the stepped leaves, which were shifted in a traveling range, the pattern of shift was from the position of out-bound to in-bound with a one-segment (cross-bound), three-segment, and five-segment shifts. Film was placed at a depth of 1.5 cm and irradiated with the same irradiation dose used for the cerrobend block experiment. Four field edges with the MLC defining at 15 deg., 30 deg., 45 deg., 60 deg. angels relative to the jaw edge were performed, respectively, in this study. For the field edge defined by the multi-segment technique, the amplitude of the isodose lines for 50% isodose line and both the 80% and 20% isodose lines were measured. The effective penumbra widths with 90-10% and 80-20% distances for different irradiations were determined at four field edges with the MLC defining at 15 deg., 30 deg., 45 deg., 60 deg. angels relative to the jaw edge. Results: Use of the five-segment technique for multi-leaf collimation at the 60 deg. angle field edge smoothes each isodose line into an effectively straight line, similar to the pattern achieved using a cerrobend block. The separation of these lines is also important. The 80-20% effective penumbra width with five-segment techniques (8.23 mm) at 60 deg. angle relative to the jaw edge is little wider (1.9 times) than the penumbra of cerrobend block field edge (4.23 mm). We also found that the 90-10% effective penumbra width with five-segment techniques (12.68 mm) at 60 deg. angle relative to the jaw edge is little wider (1.28 times) than the penumbra of cerrobend block field edge (9.89 mm). Conclusion: The multi-segment technique is effective in smoothing the MLC staggered field edge. The effective penumbra width with more segment techniques at larger degree angles relative to the field edge is little wider than the penumbra for a cerrobend block

  12. Lens sparing technique using multi-leaf collimators in irradiation of the unilateral retro-orbital space for benign disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, Mark; Medwell, Stephen; Bennie, David; Fogarty, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    The authors present a case of a 30-year-old woman with pseudolymphoma of the left medial rectus muscle. A multi-field technique was planned for irradiating the unilateral retro-orbital space to 20 Gray (GY) in 15 fractions while keeping the average dose to the lens of 8 Gy and the peak dose to the lens of 11 Gy using multi-leaf collimators is described. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Radiography

  13. Implementation of multileaf collimator in a LINAC MCNP5 simulation coupled with the radiation treatment planing system PLUNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abella, Vicente; Miro, Rafael; Juste, Belen; Verdu, Gumersindo

    2010-01-01

    Multileaf collimators are used on linear accelerators to provide conformal shaping of radiotherapy treatment beams, being an important tool for radiation therapy dose delivery. In this work, a multileaf collimator has been designed and implemented in the MCNP model of an Elekta Precise Linear Accelerator and introduced in PLUNC, a set of software tools for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) which was coupled in previous works with MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code), with the purpose of comparing its effect on deterministic and Monte Carlo dose calculations. A 3D Shepp-Logan phantom was utilized as the patient model for validation purposes. Once the multileaf collimator model is implemented in the PLUNC LINAC model, a series of Matlab interfaces extract phantom and beam information created with PLUNC during the treatment plan and write it in MCNP5 input deck format. After the Monte Carlo simulation is performed, results are input back again in PLUNC in order to continue with the plan evaluation. The comparison is made via mapping of dose distribution inside the phantom with different field sizes, utilizing the MCNP5 tool EMESH, superimposed mesh tally, which allows registering the results over the problem geometry. This work follows a valid methodology for multileaf LINAC MC calculations during radiation treatment plans. (author)

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of a multi-leaf collimator design for telecobalt machine using BEAMnrc code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyangar Komanduri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation aims to design a practical multi-leaf collimator (MLC system for the cobalt teletherapy machine and check its radiation properties using the Monte Carlo (MC method. The cobalt machine was modeled using the BEAMnrc Omega-Beam MC system, which could be freely downloaded from the website of the National Research Council (NRC, Canada. Comparison with standard depth dose data tables and the theoretically modeled beam showed good agreement within 2%. An MLC design with low melting point alloy (LMPA was tested for leakage properties of leaves. The LMPA leaves with a width of 7 mm and height of 6 cm, with tongue and groove of size 2 mm wide by 4 cm height, produced only 4% extra leakage compared to 10 cm height tungsten leaves. With finite 60 Co source size, the interleaf leakage was insignificant. This analysis helped to design a prototype MLC as an accessory mount on a cobalt machine. The complete details of the simulation process and analysis of results are discussed.

  15. Analytical model of the binary multileaf collimator of tomotherapy for Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, E; Vynckier, S; Salvat, F; Olivera, G H

    2008-01-01

    Helical Tomotherapy (HT) delivers intensity-modulated radiotherapy by the means of many configurations of the binary multi-leaf collimator (MLC). The aim of the present study was to devise a method, which we call the 'transfer function' (TF) method, to perform the transport of particles through the MLC much faster than the time consuming Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and with no significant loss of accuracy. The TF method consists of calculating, for each photon in the phase-space file, the attenuation factor for each leaf (up to three) that the photon passes, assuming straight propagation through closed leaves, and storing these factors in a modified phase-space file. To account for the transport through the MLC in a given configuration, the weight of a photon is simply multiplied by the attenuation factors of the leaves that are intersected by the photon ray and are closed. The TF method was combined with the PENELOPE MC code, and validated with measurements for the three static field sizes available (40x5, 40x2.5 and 40x1 cm 2 ) and for some MLC patterns. The TF method allows a large reduction in computation time, without introducing appreciable deviations from the result of full MC simulations

  16. Modeling Monte Carlo of multileaf collimators using the code GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Alex C.H.; Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: oliveira.ach@yahoo.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Luciano S.; Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: lusoulima@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Radiotherapy uses various techniques and equipment for local treatment of cancer. The equipment most often used in radiotherapy to the patient irradiation is linear accelerator (Linac). Among the many algorithms developed for evaluation of dose distributions in radiotherapy planning, the algorithms based on Monte Carlo (MC) methods have proven to be very promising in terms of accuracy by providing more realistic results. The MC simulations for applications in radiotherapy are divided into two parts. In the first, the simulation of the production of the radiation beam by the Linac is performed and then the phase space is generated. The phase space contains information such as energy, position, direction, etc. of millions of particles (photons, electrons, positrons). In the second part the simulation of the transport of particles (sampled phase space) in certain configurations of irradiation field is performed to assess the dose distribution in the patient (or phantom). Accurate modeling of the Linac head is of particular interest in the calculation of dose distributions for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), where complex intensity distributions are delivered using a multileaf collimator (MLC). The objective of this work is to describe a methodology for modeling MC of MLCs using code Geant4. To exemplify this methodology, the Varian Millennium 120-leaf MLC was modeled, whose physical description is available in BEAMnrc Users Manual (20 11). The dosimetric characteristics (i.e., penumbra, leakage, and tongue-and-groove effect) of this MLC were evaluated. The results agreed with data published in the literature concerning the same MLC. (author)

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of a multi-leaf collimator design for telecobalt machine using BEAMnrc code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Narayan, Pradush; Jesuraj, Fenedit; Raju, M.R.; Dinesh Kumar, M.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation aims to design a practical multi-leaf collimator (MLC) system for the cobalt teletherapy machine and check its radiation properties using the Monte Carlo (MC) method. The cobalt machine was modeled using the BEAMnrc Omega-Beam MC system, which could be freely downloaded from the website of the National Research Council (NRC), Canada. Comparison with standard depth dose data tables and the theoretically modeled beam showed good agreement within 2%. An MLC design with low melting point alloy (LMPA) was tested for leakage properties of leaves. The LMPA leaves with a width of 7 mm and height of 6 cm, with tongue and groove of size 2 mm wide by 4 cm height, produced only 4% extra leakage compared to 10 cm height tungsten leaves. With finite 60 Co source size, the interleaf leakage was insignificant. This analysis helped to design a prototype MLC as an accessory mount on a cobalt machine. The complete details of the simulation process and analysis of results are discussed. (author)

  18. Manual multi-leaf collimator for electron beam shaping - a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindran, B Paul; Singh, I Rabi Raja; Brindha, S; Sathyan, S

    2002-01-01

    In electron beam therapy, lead or low melting point alloy (LMA) sheet cutouts of sufficient thickness are commonly used to shape the beam. In order to avoid making cutouts for each patient, an attempt has been made to develop a manual multi-leaf collimator for electron beams (eMLC). The eMLC has been developed using LMA for a 15x15 cm 2 applicator. Electron beam characteristics such as depth dose, beam profiles, surface dose, output factors and virtual source position with the eMLC have been studied and compared with those of an applicator electron beam. The interleaf leakage radiation has also been measured with film dosimetry. Depth dose values obtained using the eMLC were found to be identical to those with the applicator for depths larger than D max . However, a decrease in the size of the beam penumbra with the eMLC and increase in the values of surface dose, output factors and virtual source position with eMLC were observed. The leakage between the leaves was less than 5% and the leakage between the opposing leaves was 15%, which could be minimized further by careful positioning of the leaves. It is observed that it is feasible to use such a manual eMLC for patients and eliminate the fabrication of cutouts for each patient

  19. Penumbra characteristics of square photon beams delimited by a GEMS multi-leaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briot, E; Julia, F [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1995-12-01

    A multi-leaf collimator (MLC) has been designed to replace directly the standard collimator of a SATURNE IV Series linac. It consists of 2 x 32 tungsten leaves and one set of upper block jaws. Isodose curves and dose profiles were measured for symmetric fields at the depth of the maximum and the reference depths for 6 MV, 10 MV, 18 MV photon beams. The penumbra (80%-20%) corresponding to the face and the side of the leaves have been compared with the standard collimators. Along with the X direction, the field delimitation is performed primarily with the leaves which are continuously variable in position. Along the Y direction, the field is initially approximated by the closure of opposite leaf pairs; then the Y upper jaws produce the exact size of the required field. As the leaves move linearly the penumbra (80%-20%) corresponding to the leaf ends is minimized and held constant at all positions by curvature of their faces. Penumbra obtained with the superposition of leaves and Y jaws depend on their relative position. The penumbra is minimum when the leaf side and the Y jaw edge coincide and the comparison of the measurement values with the conventional collimator shows that the differences are within 1 mm. When the leaves delineating the field are not entirely covered by the Y block upper jaws, the penumbra increases, and the junction of the opposing leaves, a width increase up to 3.5 mm has been measured.

  20. A multileaf collimator phantom for the quality assurance of radiation therapy planning systems and CT simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNiven, Andrea; Kron, Tomas; Van Dyk, Jake

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The evolution of three-dimensional conformal radiation treatment has led to the use of multileaf collimators (MLCs) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and other treatment techniques to increase the conformity of the dose distribution. A new quality assurance (QA) phantom has been designed to check the handling of MLC settings in treatment planning and delivery. Methods and materials: The phantom consists of a Perspex block with stepped edges that can be rotated in all planes. The design allows for the assessment of several MLC and micro-MLC types from various manufacturers, and is therefore applicable to most radiation therapy institutions employing MLCs. The phantom is computed tomography (CT) scanned as is a patient, and QA assessments can be made of field edge display for a variety of shapes and orientations on both radiation treatment planning systems (RTPS) and computed tomography simulators. Results: The dimensions of the phantom were verified to be physically correct within an uncertainty range of 0-0.7 mm. Errors in leaf position larger than 1 mm were easily identified by multiple observers. Conclusions: The MLC geometry phantom is a useful tool in the QA of radiation therapy with application to RTPS, CT simulators, and virtual simulation packages with MLC display capabilities

  1. Leakage of the Siemens 160 MLC multileaf collimator on a dual energy linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueter, Sebastian; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Schubert, Kai; Debus, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    Multileaf collimators (MLCs) have been in clinical use for many years and meanwhile are commonly used to deliver intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beams. For this purpose it is important to know their dosimetric properties precisely, one of them being inter- and intraleaf leakage. The Siemens 160 MLC features a single focus design with flat-sided and tilted leaves instead of tongue-and-groove. The leakage performance of the 160 MLC was investigated on a dual energy linear accelerator Siemens ARTISTE with 6 MV and 18 MV photon energies. While the intraleaf leakage amounted to nearly the same dose for 6 and for 18 MV, a much higher interleaf leakage for 6 MV was measured. It could be reduced by simply rotating the collimator, and also by changing the voltage applied to the beam steering coils. The leakage of the 160 MLC is shown to be sensitive to beam alignment. This is of special interest for dual energy accelerators, as the two focal spots of both energies, neither in position nor in shape, do not necessarily always coincide. As a consequence of that, a higher leakage can be expected for one out of two energies for the 160 MLC. (note)

  2. Assessment of diagnostic multileaf collimator for cephalometric exposure reduction using optically stimulated luminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Su Chul; Kim, Kum Bae; Jung, Haijo; Ji, YoungHoon; Park, Seungwoo

    2017-01-01

    A diagnostic multileaf collimator (MLC) was developed for diagnostic radiography dose reduction. Optically stimulated luminescent dosemeters (OSLDs) were used to evaluate the efficacy of this device for dental radiography cephalometric exposure reduction. The OSLD dosimetric characteristics for 80 kVp cephalometric exposure were first obtained. The batch homogeneity and reproducibility were 1.67 % and 0.18-1.58, respectively. Good linearity was obtained between the OSLD dose and response, and the angular dependence was within ±4 %. The equivalent organ doses for the left eye, right eye and thyroid were 41.20±6.58, 178.86±1.71 and 171.12±8.78 mSv and 36.80±0.33, 156.63±0.22 and 22.04±0.13 mSv for the open and MLC fields, respectively. The MLC-induced dose reductions for the left and right eyes of in field were 10.67±16.78 and 12.42±8.84 %, respectively, and that of the thyroid gland of out of field was 87±8.82 %, considering combined uncertainty. Therefore, use of diagnostic MLC for dose reduction during dental radiography cephalometric exposure is both feasible and effective. (authors)

  3. Variable Circular Collimator in Robotic Radiosurgery: A Time-Efficient Alternative to a Mini-Multileaf Collimator?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water, Steven van de; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Nuyttens, Joost J.M.E.; Schaart, Dennis R.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Compared with many small circular beams used in CyberKnife treatments, beam's eye view-shaped fields are generally more time-efficient for dose delivery. However, beam's eye view-shaping devices, such as a mini-multileaf collimator (mMLC), are not presently available for CyberKnife, although a variable-aperture collimator (Iris, 12 field diameters; 5-60 mm) is available. We investigated whether the Iris can mimic noncoplanar mMLC treatments using a limited set of principal beam orientations (nodes) to produce time-efficient treatment plans. Methods and Materials: The data from 10 lung cancer patients and the beam-orientation optimization algorithm 'Cycle' were used to generate stereotactic treatment plans (3 x 20 Gy) for a CyberKnife virtually equipped with a mMLC. Typically, 10-16 favorable beam orientations were selected from 117 available robot node positions using beam's eye view-shaped fields with uniform fluence. Second, intensity-modulated Iris plans were generated by inverse optimization of nonisocentric circular candidate beams targeted from the same nodes selected in the mMLC plans. The plans were evaluated using the mean lung dose, lung volume receiving ≥20 Gy, conformality index, number of nodes, beams, and monitor units, and estimated treatment time. Results: The mMLC plans contained an average of 12 nodes and 11,690 monitor units. For a comparable mean lung dose, the Iris plans contained 12 nodes, 64 beams, and 21,990 monitor units. The estimated fraction duration was 12.2 min (range, 10.8-13.5) for the mMLC plans and 18.4 min (range, 12.9-28.5) for the Iris plans. In contrast to the mMLC plans, the treatment time for the Iris plans increased with an increasing target volume. The Iris plans were, on average, 40% longer than the corresponding mMLC plans for small targets ( 3 ) and ≤121% longer for larger targets. For a comparable conformality index, similar results were obtained. Conclusion: For stereotactic lung irradiation, time

  4. Verification of multileaf collimator leaf positions using an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Zheng Wei; Parra, Nestor Andres; Chandler, Jason; Gopal, Arun; Wu Jian; Jain Jinesh; Zhu Yunping; Sontag, Marc

    2002-01-01

    An automated method is presented for determining individual leaf positions of the Siemens dual focus multileaf collimator (MLC) using the Siemens BEAMVIEW(PLUS) electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Leaf positions are computed with an error of 0.6 mm at one standard deviation (σ) using separate computations of pixel dimensions, image distortion, and radiation center. The pixel dimensions are calculated by superimposing the film image of a graticule with the corresponding EPID image. A spatial correction is used to compensate for the optical distortions of the EPID, reducing the mean distortion from 3.5 pixels (uncorrected) per localized x-ray marker to 2 pixels (1 mm) for a rigid rotation and 1 pixel for a third degree polynomial warp. A correction for a nonuniform dosimetric response across the field of view of the EPID images is not necessary due to the sharp intensity gradients across leaf edges. The radiation center, calculated from the average of the geometric centers of a square field at 0 deg. and 180 deg. collimator angles, is independent of graticule placement error. Its measured location on the EPID image was stable to within 1 pixel based on 3 weeks of repeated extensions/retractions of the EPID. The MLC leaf positions determined from the EPID images agreed to within a pixel of the corresponding values measured using film and ionization chamber. Several edge detection algorithms were tested: contour, Sobel, Roberts, Prewitt, Laplace, morphological, and Canny. These agreed with each other to within ≤1.2 pixels for the in-air EPID images. Using a test pattern, individual MLC leaves were found to be typically within 1 mm of the corresponding record-and-verify values, with a maximum difference of 1.8 mm, and standard deviations of <0.3 mm in the daily reproducibility. This method presents a fast, automatic, and accurate alternative to using film or a light field for the verification and calibration of the MLC

  5. Analysis of Radiation Field and Block Pattern for Optimal Size in Multileaf Collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seoung Do; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yi, Byong Yong; Choi, Eun Kyong; Chang, Hye Sook

    1994-01-01

    The patterns of the conventional radiation treatment fields and their shielding blocks are analysed to determine the optimal dimension of the MultiLeaf Collimator (MLC) which is considered as an essential tool for conformal therapy. Total 1169 radiation fields from 303 patients (203 from Asan Medical center, 50 from Baek Hosp and 50 from Hanyang Univ. Hosp.) were analysed for this study. Weighted case selection treatment site (from The Korean Society of Therapeutic Radiology 1003). Ninety one percent of total fields have shielding blocks. Y axis is defined as leaf movement direction and it is assumed that MLC is installed on the cranial-caudal direction. The length of X axis were distributed from 4cm to 40cm (less than 21cm for 95% of cases), and Y axis from 5cm to 38cm (less than 22cm for 95% of cases). The shielding blocks extended to less than 6cm from center of the filed for 95% of the cases. Start length for ninety five percent of block is less than 10cm for X axis and 11cm for Y axis. Seventy six percent of shielding blocks could be placed by either X or Y axis direction, 7.9% only by Y axis, 5.1% only by X axis and it is reasonable to install MLC for Y direction. Ninety five percent of patients can be treated with coplanar rotation therapy without changing the collimator angle. Eleven percent of cases of cases were impossible to replace with MLC. Futher study of shielding should be larger than 21cm X 22cm. The MLC should be designed as a pair of 21 leaves with 1cm wide for an acceptable resolution and 17cm long to enable the leaf to overtravel at least 6cm from the treatment field center

  6. SU-F-T-540: Comprehensive Fluence Delivery Optimization with Multileaf Collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weppler, S; Villarreal-Barajas, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); McGeachy, P [Department of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Khan, R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf sequencing is performed via commercial black-box implementations, on which a user has limited to no access. We have developed an explicit, generic MLC sequencing model to serve as a tool for future investigations of fluence map optimization, fluence delivery optimization, and rotational collimator delivery methods. Methods: We have developed a novel, comprehensive model to effectively account for a variety of transmission and penumbra effects previously treated on an ad hoc basis in the literature. As the model is capable of quantifying a variety of effects, we utilize the asymmetric leakage intensity across each leaf to deliver fluence maps with pixel size smaller than the narrowest leaf width. Developed using linear programming and mixed integer programming formulations, the model is implemented using state of the art open-source solvers. To demonstrate the versatility of the algorithm, a graphical user interface (GUI) was developed in MATLAB capable of accepting custom leaf specifications and transmission parameters. As a preliminary proof-ofconcept, we have sequenced the leaves of a Varian 120 Leaf Millennium MLC for five prostate cancer patient fields and one head and neck field. Predetermined fluence maps have been processed by data smoothing methods to obtain pixel sizes of 2.5 cm{sup 2}. The quality of output was analyzed using computer simulations. Results: For the prostate fields, an average root mean squared error (RMSE) of 0.82 and gamma (0.5mm/0.5%) of 91.4% were observed compared to RMSE and gamma (0.5mm/0.5%) values of 7.04 and 34.0% when the leakage considerations were omitted. Similar results were observed for the head and neck case. Conclusion: A model to sequence MLC leaves to optimality has been proposed. Future work will involve extensive testing and evaluation of the method on clinical MLCs and comparison with black-box leaf sequencing algorithms currently used by commercial treatment planning systems.

  7. SU-E-T-646: Quality Assurance of Truebeam Multi-Leaf Collimator Using a MLC QA Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Lu, J; Hong, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a routine quality assurance procedure for Truebeam multi-leaf collimator (MLC) using MLC QA phantom, verify the stability and reliability of MLC during the treatment. Methods: MLC QA phantom is a specialized phantom for MLC quality assurance (QA), and contains five radio-opaque spheres that are embedded in an “L” shape. The phantom was placed isocentrically on the Truebeam treatment couch for the tests. A quality assurance plan was setted up in the Eclipse v10.0, the fields that need to be delivered in order to acquire the necessary images, the MLC shapes can then be obtained by the images. The images acquired by the electronic portal imaging device (EPID), and imported into the PIPSpro software for the analysis. The tests were delivered twelve weeks (once a week) to verify consistency of the delivery, and the images are acquired in the same manner each time. Results: For the Leaf position test, the average position error was 0.23mm±0.02mm (range: 0.18mm∼0.25mm). The Leaf width was measured at the isocenter, the average error was 0.06mm±0.02mm (range: 0.02mm∼0.08mm) for the Leaf width test. Multi-Port test showed the dynamic leaf shift error, the average error was 0.28mm±0.03mm (range: 0.2mm∼0.35mm). For the leaf transmission test, the average inter-leaf leakage value was 1.0%±0.17% (range: 0.8%∼1.3%) and the average inter-bank leakage value was 32.6%±2.1% (range: 30.2%∼36.1%). Conclusion: By the test of 12 weeks, the MLC system of the Truebeam is running in a good condition and the MLC system can be steadily and reliably carried out during the treatment. The MLC QA phantom is a useful test tool for the MLC QA

  8. Dosimetric comparison of different multileaf collimator leaves in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shichao; Ai, Ping; Xie, Li; Xu, Qingfeng; Bai, Sen; Lu, You; Li, Ping; Chen, Nianyong

    2013-01-01

    To study the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths (standard MLC [sMLC] width of 10 mm and micro-MLC [mMLC] width of 4 mm) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer. Between January 2010 and August 2010, a retrospective analysis was conducted on 12 patients with cervical cancer. The treatment plans for all patients were generated with the same machine setup parameters and optimization methods in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on 2 commercial Elekta MLC devices. The dose distribution for the planning tumor volume (PTV), the dose sparing for organs at risk (OARs), the monitor units (MUs), and the number of IMRT segments were evaluated. For the delivery efficiency, the MUs were significantly higher in the sMLC-IMRT plan than in the mMLC-IMRT plan (802 ± 56.9 vs 702 ± 56.7; p 0.05). For the planning quality, the conformity index (CI) between the 2 paired IMRT plans with the mMLC and the sMLC did not differ significantly (average: 0.817 ± 0.024 vs 0.810 ± 0.028; p > 0.05). The differences of the homogeneity index (HI) between the 2 paired plans were statistically significant (average: 1.122 ± 0.010 vs 1.132 ± 0.014; p 10 , V 20 , V 30 , and V 40 , percentage of contoured OAR volumes receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, and the mean dose (D mean ) received. The IMRT plans with the mMLC protected the OARs better than the plans with the sMLC. There were significant differences (p 30 and V 40 of the rectum and V 10 , V 20 , V 40 , and D mean of the bladder. IMRT plans with the mMLC showed advantages over the plans with the sMLC in dose homogeneity for targets, dose sparing of OARs, and fewer MUs in cervical cancer

  9. Results of daily monitoring of positioning MLC multileaf collimator for Siemens 160 with an array of cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Fernandez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Martin Martin, G.; Saez Beltran, M.

    2011-01-01

    Modern techniques of radiotherapy, and in particular the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), require sub-millimeter accuracy in the positioning of multileaf collimators to ensure that patients receive the prescribed dose. It is difficult to include checks of positioning accuracy as high on the agendas of regular monitoring of the accelerators of a hospital. This paper presents the results of a method that enables rapid verification of the position of the sheets with an accuracy of tenths of a millimeter by using an ionization chamber array. The procedure has been applied to the daily control of the two accelerators of our service for 12 months.

  10. 6 MV dosimetric characterization of the 160 MLC, the new Siemens multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, Martin B.; Nill, Simeon; Haering, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    New technical developments constantly aim at improving the outcome of radiation therapy. With the use of a computer-controlled multileaf collimator (MLC), the quality of the treatment and the efficiency in patient throughput is significantly increased. New MLC designs aim to further enhance the advantages. In this article, we present the first detailed experimental investigation of the new 160 MLC TM , Siemens Medical Solutions. The assessment included the experimental investigation of typical MLC characteristics such as leakage, tongue-and-groove effect, penumbra, leaf speed, and leaf positioning accuracy with a 6 MV treatment beam. The leakage is remarkably low with an average of 0.37% due to a new design principle of slightly tilted leaves instead of the common tongue-and-groove design. But due to the tilt, the triangular tongue-and-groove effect occurs. Its magnitude of approximately 19% is similar to the dose defect measured for MLCs with the common tongue-and-groove design. The average longitudinal penumbra measured at depth d max =15 mm with standard 100x100 mm 2 fields is 4.1±0.5 mm for the central range and increases to 4.9±1.3 mm for the entire field range of 400x400 mm 2 . The increase is partly due to the single-focusing design and the large distance between the MLC and the isocenter enabling a large patient clearance. Regarding the leaf speed, different velocity tests were performed. The positions of the moving leaves were continuously recorded with the kilovoltage-imaging panel. The maximum leaf velocities measured were 42.9±0.6 mm/s. In addition, several typical intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments were performed and the delivery times compared to the Siemens OPTIFOCUS MLC. An average decrease of 11% in delivery time was observed. The experimental results presented in this article indicate that the dosimetric characteristics of the 160 MLC are capable of improving the quality of dose delivery with respect to precision and dose

  11. Monte Carlo simulation based study of a proposed multileaf collimator for a telecobalt machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahani, G.; Dash Sharma, P. K.; Hussain, S. A.; Dutt Sharma, Sunil; Sharma, D. N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the present work was to propose a design of a secondary multileaf collimator (MLC) for a telecobalt machine and optimize its design features through Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: The proposed MLC design consists of 72 leaves (36 leaf pairs) with additional jaws perpendicular to leaf motion having the capability of shaping a maximum square field size of 35 × 35 cm 2 . The projected widths at isocenter of each of the central 34 leaf pairs and 2 peripheral leaf pairs are 10 and 5 mm, respectively. The ends of the leaves and the x-jaws were optimized to obtain acceptable values of dosimetric and leakage parameters. Monte Carlo N-Particle code was used for generating beam profiles and depth dose curves and estimating the leakage radiation through the MLC. A water phantom of dimension 50 × 50 × 40 cm 3 with an array of voxels (4 × 0.3 × 0.6 cm 3 = 0.72 cm 3 ) was used for the study of dosimetric and leakage characteristics of the MLC. Output files generated for beam profiles were exported to the PTW radiation field analyzer software through locally developed software for analysis of beam profiles in order to evaluate radiation field width, beam flatness, symmetry, and beam penumbra. Results: The optimized version of the MLC can define radiation fields of up to 35 × 35 cm 2 within the prescribed tolerance values of 2 mm. The flatness and symmetry were found to be well within the acceptable tolerance value of 3%. The penumbra for a 10 × 10 cm 2 field size is 10.7 mm which is less than the generally acceptable value of 12 mm for a telecobalt machine. The maximum and average radiation leakage through the MLC were found to be 0.74% and 0.41% which are well below the International Electrotechnical Commission recommended tolerance values of 2% and 0.75%, respectively. The maximum leakage through the leaf ends in closed condition was observed to be 8.6% which is less than the values reported for other MLCs designed for medical linear

  12. Quality assurance for multileaf collimator with radiographic film exposed by slit beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jinli; Jiang Guoliang; Fu Xiaolong; Liao Yuan; Wu Kailiang; Zhou Lijun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of Kodak X-OMAT-V film exposed by slit beam in the check of various leaf positions of multileaf collimator(MLC), and to check the status of Varian 26 leaf pairs MLC in the Department of Radiation Oncology in Shanghai Cancer Hospital affiliated to Fudan University. Methods: At first, some position errors of different sizes were produced for different leaves so as to determine the minimal leaf position error that could be seen on film. Then, exposure conditions including the exposure dose and source to film distance were changed to find the optimal one. Finally, a Kodak X-OMAT-V film was exposed with a leaf sequence file which was designated randomly by a physicist with leaf position errors of different sizes. After the film was developed, two doctors and two physicists were invited to observe, on blind basis, in order to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the film in the check of leaf positions. Ultimately, leaf positions of the Varian 26 leaf pairs MLC were checked, in which way, the leaf motor status and the carriage stability were checked indirectly. Results: Leaf position errors no less than 0.2 mm could be found using Kodak X-OMAT-V film under the following conditions: source to film distance 100 cm, exposure dose 25 MU, which had been considered as the optimal exposure conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of this method were 73.4% and 96.4%. Any MLC leaf position errors more than 0.2 mm could not be detected. Thus, it was deemed that all leaf motors of the Varian 26 leaf pairs MLC were well in gear and the carriages were stable. Conclusions: MLC leaf position errors can be detected by Kodak X-OMAT-V film exposed by slit beam with high accuracy, but the ability to find leaf position errors with the naked eye may vary from person to person. It is proposed that the Kodak X-OMAT-V film exposed by slit beam be used to check the MLC leaf positions, i. e. the leaf motor status and carriage stability, at regular

  13. Dose deviations caused by positional inaccuracy of multileaf collimator in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.C.; Chui, C.S.; Tsai, H.Y.; Chen, C.H.; Tsai, L.F.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Multileaf collimator (MLC) is currently a widely used system in the delivery of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The accuracy of the multileaf position plays an important role in the final outcome of the radiation treatment. According to ICRU recommendation, a dose inaccuracy over than 5% of prescribed dose affects treatment results. In order to quantify the influence of leaf positional errors on dose distribution, we set different MLC positional inaccuracy from 0 to 6 mm for step-and-shoot IMRT in clinical cases. Two-dimensional dose distributions of radiotherapy plans with different leaf displacements generated with a commercial treatment planning system. And verification films were used to measure two-dimensional dose distributions. Then a computerized dose comparison system will be introduced to analyze the dose deviations. Materials/methods: We assumed MLC positional inaccuracy from 0 to 6 mm for step-and-shoot IMRT in clinical cases by simulating the different leaf displacements with a commercial treatment planning system. Then we transferred the treatment plans with different leaf offset that may be happened in clinical situation to linear accelerator. Verification films (Kodat EDR2) were well positioned within solid water phantoms to be irradiated by the simulated plans. The films were scanned to display two-dimensional dose distributions. Finally, we compared with the dose distributions with MLC positional inaccuracy by a two-dimensional dose comparison software to analyze the deviations in Gamma indexes and normalized agreement test (NAT) values. Results: In general, the data show that larger leaf positional error induces larger dose error. More fields used for treatment generate lesser errors. Besides, leaf position relative to a field influences the degree of dose error. A leaf lying close to the border of a field leads to a more significant dose deviation than a leaf in the center. Algorithms for intensity modulation also affect

  14. Characteristics and performance of the first commercial multileaf collimator for a robotic radiosurgery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fürweger, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.fuerweger@cyber-knife.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam 3075 EA, The Netherlands and European CyberKnife Center Munich, Munich 81377 (Germany); Prins, Paulette; Coskan, Harun; Heijmen, Ben J. M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam 3075 EA (Netherlands)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The “InCise™ multileaf-collimator (MLC)” is the first commercial MLC to be mounted on a robotic SRS/SBRT platform (CyberKnife). The authors assessed characteristics and performance of this novel device in a preclinical five months test period. Methods: Commissioning beam data were acquired with unshielded diodes. EBT3 radiochromic films were employed for measurement of transmission, leaf/bank position accuracy (garden fence) before and after exercising the MLC, for end-to-end testing and further characterization of the beam. The robot workspace with MLC was assessed analytically by transformation to an Euler geometry (“plane,” “gantry,” and “collimator” angles) and by measuring pointing accuracy at each node. Stability over time was evaluated in picket fence and adapted Winston–Lutz tests (AQA). Results: Beam penumbrae (80%–20%, with 100% = 2 × dose at inflection point for field sizes ≥ 50 × 50 mm{sup 2}) were 2.2–3.7 mm for square fields in reference condition (source-axis-distance 800 mm, depth 15 mm) and depended on field size and off-axis position. Transmission and leakage did not exceed 0.5%. Accessible clinical workspace with MLC covered non-coplanar gantry angles of [−113°; +112°] and collimator angles of [−100°; +107°], with an average robot pointing accuracy of 0.12 ± 0.09 mm. For vertical beams, garden fence tests exhibited an average leaf positioning error of ≤0.2 mm, which increased by 0.25 and 0.30 mm (banks X1 and X2) with leaves traveling parallel to gravity. After execution of a leaf motion stress routine, garden fence tests showed slightly increased jaggedness and allowed to identify one malfunctioning leaf motor. Total system accuracy with MLC was 0.38 ± 0.05 mm in nine end-to-end tests. Picket fence and AQA tests displayed stable results over the test period. Conclusions: The InCise™ MLC for CyberKnife showed high accuracy and adequate characteristics for SRS/SBRT applications. MLC performance

  15. Dosimetric assessment of the field abutment region in head and neck treatments using a multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Hakim, K.; Nishimura, T.; Sakahara, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan); Takaih, M.; Suzuki, S. [Dept. of Informatics, Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Background and Purpose: The use of conventional asymmetric collimators for junctioning of abutted fields can lead to significant dose inhomogeneity, due to jaw misalignment. However, recent technologic advances enable us to fabricate much finer leaf-positioning accuracy. Consequently, it is anticipated that the use of multileaf collimator (MLC) will potentially improve dose homogeneity at the junction of abutted fields. In this work, we evaluated the dose inhomogeneities at the match-plane in monoisocentric three-field head and neck setups, using MLC for field abutment. Material and Methods: To define either the anterior or the lateral fields, the MLC was used with either the longitudinal (0 angle) or the transverse (90 angle) settings. For 0 setting, each leaf moves in a direction perpendicular to the gantry rotation axis, hence the ''tongue and groove'' (T and G) design can effect matching-area dose at the side of the leaf (Figure 1a). For 90 setting, the rounded shape of the leaf produces its effect at the leaf end. Four combinations of abutted anterior field and abutted lateral field defined by MLC, i.e., abutted using MLC side-by-side, side-by-end, end-by-side and end-by-end, were compared. Dose inhomogeneity was measured at the junction of the two abutted fields with films in a solid water phantom. The effect of jaw settings as a backup diaphragm on the dose distribution was also studied. Reproducibility of the results was confirmed by repeated measurements over a 1-year period. Results: Abutted fields using MLC side-by-side caused underdose of approximately 15%. Abutted fields using MLC side-by-end produced > 10% overdose that could be improved to {+-} 1% for 0.5 mm overlap of the leaf end from the lateral portals. When using end-by-side, an overdose of approximately 15% was observed. However, the dose improved to a homogeneous dose for 0.8 mm overlap of leaf end from the anterior portal. End-by-end showed an overdose of > 20%. This

  16. Dosimetric assessment of the field abutment region in head and neck treatments using a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Hakim, K.; Nishimura, T.; Sakahara, H.; Takaih, M.; Suzuki, S.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The use of conventional asymmetric collimators for junctioning of abutted fields can lead to significant dose inhomogeneity, due to jaw misalignment. However, recent technologic advances enable us to fabricate much finer leaf-positioning accuracy. Consequently, it is anticipated that the use of multileaf collimator (MLC) will potentially improve dose homogeneity at the junction of abutted fields. In this work, we evaluated the dose inhomogeneities at the match-plane in monoisocentric three-field head and neck setups, using MLC for field abutment. Material and Methods: To define either the anterior or the lateral fields, the MLC was used with either the longitudinal (0 angle) or the transverse (90 angle) settings. For 0 setting, each leaf moves in a direction perpendicular to the gantry rotation axis, hence the ''tongue and groove'' (T and G) design can effect matching-area dose at the side of the leaf (Figure 1a). For 90 setting, the rounded shape of the leaf produces its effect at the leaf end. Four combinations of abutted anterior field and abutted lateral field defined by MLC, i.e., abutted using MLC side-by-side, side-by-end, end-by-side and end-by-end, were compared. Dose inhomogeneity was measured at the junction of the two abutted fields with films in a solid water phantom. The effect of jaw settings as a backup diaphragm on the dose distribution was also studied. Reproducibility of the results was confirmed by repeated measurements over a 1-year period. Results: Abutted fields using MLC side-by-side caused underdose of approximately 15%. Abutted fields using MLC side-by-end produced > 10% overdose that could be improved to ± 1% for 0.5 mm overlap of the leaf end from the lateral portals. When using end-by-side, an overdose of approximately 15% was observed. However, the dose improved to a homogeneous dose for 0.8 mm overlap of leaf end from the anterior portal. End-by-end showed an overdose of > 20%. This overdose could be smoothed

  17. Use of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device for multileaf collimator quality control and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S J K; Budgell, G J; MacKay, R I

    2005-01-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and quality control is a time-consuming procedure typically involving the processing, scanning and analysis of films to measure leaf and collimator positions. Faster and more reliable calibration procedures are required for these tasks, especially with the introduction of intensity modulated radiotherapy which requires more frequent checking and finer positional leaf tolerances than previously. A routine quality control (QC) technique to measure MLC leaf bank gain and offset, as well as minor offsets (individual leaf position relative to a reference leaf), using an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been developed. The technique also tests the calibration of the primary and back-up collimators. A detailed comparison between film and EPID measurements has been performed for six linear accelerators (linacs) equipped with MLC and amorphous silicon EPIDs. Measurements of field size from 4 to 24 cm with the EPID were systematically smaller than film measurements over all field sizes by 0.4 mm for leaves/back-up collimators and by 0.2 mm for conventional collimators. This effect is due to the gain calibration correction applied by the EPID, resulting in a 'flattening' of primary beam profiles. Linac dependent systematic differences of up to 0.5 mm in individual leaf/collimator positions were also found between EPID and film measurements due to the difference between the mechanical and radiation axes of rotation. When corrections for these systematic differences were applied, the residual random differences between EPID and film were 0.23 mm and 0.26 mm (1 standard deviation) for field size and individual leaf/back-up collimator position, respectively. Measured gains (over a distance of 220 mm) always agreed within 0.4 mm with a standard deviation of 0.17 mm. Minor offset measurements gave a mean agreement between EPID and film of 0.01 ± 0.10 mm (1 standard deviation) after correction for the tilt of the

  18. Characteristics and performance of the first commercial multileaf collimator for a robotic radiosurgery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fürweger, Christoph; Prins, Paulette; Coskan, Harun; Heijmen, Ben J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The “InCise™ multileaf-collimator (MLC)” is the first commercial MLC to be mounted on a robotic SRS/SBRT platform (CyberKnife). The authors assessed characteristics and performance of this novel device in a preclinical five months test period. Methods: Commissioning beam data were acquired with unshielded diodes. EBT3 radiochromic films were employed for measurement of transmission, leaf/bank position accuracy (garden fence) before and after exercising the MLC, for end-to-end testing and further characterization of the beam. The robot workspace with MLC was assessed analytically by transformation to an Euler geometry (“plane,” “gantry,” and “collimator” angles) and by measuring pointing accuracy at each node. Stability over time was evaluated in picket fence and adapted Winston–Lutz tests (AQA). Results: Beam penumbrae (80%–20%, with 100% = 2 × dose at inflection point for field sizes ≥ 50 × 50 mm"2) were 2.2–3.7 mm for square fields in reference condition (source-axis-distance 800 mm, depth 15 mm) and depended on field size and off-axis position. Transmission and leakage did not exceed 0.5%. Accessible clinical workspace with MLC covered non-coplanar gantry angles of [−113°; +112°] and collimator angles of [−100°; +107°], with an average robot pointing accuracy of 0.12 ± 0.09 mm. For vertical beams, garden fence tests exhibited an average leaf positioning error of ≤0.2 mm, which increased by 0.25 and 0.30 mm (banks X1 and X2) with leaves traveling parallel to gravity. After execution of a leaf motion stress routine, garden fence tests showed slightly increased jaggedness and allowed to identify one malfunctioning leaf motor. Total system accuracy with MLC was 0.38 ± 0.05 mm in nine end-to-end tests. Picket fence and AQA tests displayed stable results over the test period. Conclusions: The InCise™ MLC for CyberKnife showed high accuracy and adequate characteristics for SRS/SBRT applications. MLC performance after

  19. Cost-minimization analysis: radiation treatment with and without a multi-leaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Lapsley, Helen; Manderson, Christine; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, Roland

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the costs of radiation treatment on a linear accelerator with a multileaf collimator (MLC) versus treatment on a linear accelerator without an MLC. The study was designed to determine whether the increased throughput of fields and decreased block cutting made the MLC cost effective from an institutional perspective. Methods and Materials: The number of fields, basic treatment equivalent, equivalent simple treatment visits, and blocks were prospectively collected for the four linear accelerators. Building, equipment, staffing, and service costs were all obtained in 1999 Australian dollars from the manufacturers and hospital department heads. The Joint Radiation Oncology Centre at Westmead and Nepean Hospitals, which are Australian public hospitals, runs as one unit, with the same staff, and currently operates five linear accelerators. Currently, four of the linear accelerators are used for general radiotherapy, operating for exactly the same hours; the final machine operates more limited hours and is used for specialized radiotherapy techniques and emergency cases. Results: The two machines with MLCs, on average, treated 5,169 fields each, while the two machines without MLCs treated 4,543 fields in a 3-month period, a 12% increase in throughput. The two non-MLC machines required 155 premounted trays (PMTs) in total, while the MLC machines required 17 PMTs. Linear accelerators with MLCs were demonstrably more efficient, and while their capital costs were higher, the reduction in labor costs associated with block cutting and, particularly the increased throughput, more than offset these initial costs. The total cost of a radiation field with an MLC was found to be $A101.69 compared to $A106.98 without an MLC. A multiway sensitivity analysis showed the results to be robust. The worst-case scenario was a departmental savings of $A168,000 per year; the best-case scenario was a savings of $A680,000 per year. Conclusion: Under the conditions pertaining

  20. Electronic compensation using multileaf collimation for involved field radiation to the neck and mediastinum in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Shelly; Bernard, Shelley; Balogh, Alex; Spencer, David; Sawchuk, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    An efficient procedure is required for the preparation, planning, and delivery of radiation therapy for involved field radiation to the neck and mediastinum. This technique must reduce tissue complications while maintaining dose uniformity. An elegant intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment that is forward planned has been developed. Both static fields and static subfields shaped by multileaf collimators (MLCs) and asymmetric jaws are used. Patients receiving involved field radiation to the neck and mediastinum are planned in 3 dimensions (3D), where 3D dose compensation is provided using subfields consisting of MLC or asymmetric jaws instead of physical compensators or wedges. Forward planning is performed, usually generating 2 pairs of parallel-opposed fields, with at least 1 of them consisting of subfields to eliminate elevated dose regions. Efficiency in the preparation, planning, and delivery of treatment has been achieved for more than 10 patients. Verification of treatment setup, target anatomy, and MLC configuration is quick when using an electronic portal imaging device. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) have verified point-dose uniformity noticeably to ± 5%. An efficient technique using forward planning for simple IMRT consisting of static MLC and asymmetric jaws has been developed

  1. Can cost make a difference dosimetrically? Volumetric modulated arc therapy study for multileaf collimators of various widths for head and neck and prostate cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Jong-Han, E-mail: jonghanho@gmail.com; Hagler, Shane; Lujano, Carrie; Seng, Sopaul; Starks, Christine; Perrin, Kelly; Turner, Lehendrick; Court, Laurence

    2017-04-01

    Cancer is a global health issue that disproportionately kills based on stage of disease, cellular pathology, and genetics, to name a few. Another variable to consider in this ongoing fight is treatment machine complexity that leads to elevated development and purchasing cost, leading to a reduced use. Reducing the complexity (in hopes of lowering costs) would benefit underdeveloped, low- and middle-income countries by introducing newer treatment technology, as their currently accepted standards do not meet standards of more advanced, developed countries. In this study, unilateral head and neck (H&N), and prostate cases using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were tested with multiple segment widths of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mm to create treatable plans. Pinnacle 9.10v was used for planning purposes. A total of 12 cases were planned with varying multileaf collimator (MLC) widths. Treatment plans were evaluated retrospectively. Results show that altering the MLC widths from 5 through 20 mm produces both comparable and treatable plans up to 99% and 98% target coverage for H&N and prostate, respectively, albeit clinically significant hot spots were shown to increase with increasing segment width. Furthermore, the results show that increasing widths can produce comparable treatment plans as measured against our current Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved treatment devices—leading to an increase in treatment efficacy in economically underdeveloped countries.

  2. An automatic CT-guided adaptive radiation therapy technique by online modification of multileaf collimator leaf positions for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, Laurence E.; Dong Lei; Lee, Andrew K.; Cheung, Rex; Bonnen, Mark D.; O'Daniel, Jennifer; Wang He; Mohan, Radhe; Kuban, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To propose and evaluate online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) using in-room computed tomography (CT) imaging that detects changes in the target position and shape of the prostate and seminal vesicles (SVs) and then automatically modifies the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf pairs in a slice-by-slice fashion. Methods and materials: For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using a coplanar beam arrangement, each MLC leaf pair projects onto a specific anatomic slice. The proposed strategy assumes that shape deformation is a function of only the superior-inferior (SI) position. That is, there is no shape change within a CT slice, but each slice can be displaced in the anteroposterior (AP) or right-left (RL) direction relative to adjacent slices. First, global shifts (in SI, AP, and RL directions) were calculated by three-dimensional (3D) registration of the bulk of the prostate in the treatment planning CT images with the daily CT images taken immediately before treatment. Local shifts in the AP direction were then found using slice-by-slice registration, in which the CT slices were individually registered. The translational shift within a slice could then be projected to a translational shift in the position of the corresponding MLC leaf pair for each treatment segment for each gantry angle. Global shifts in the SI direction were accounted for by moving the open portal superiorly or inferiorly by an integral number of leaf pairs. The proposed slice-by-slice registration technique was tested by using daily CT images from 46 CT image sets (23 each from 2 patients) taken before the standard delivery of IMRT for prostate cancer. A dosimetric evaluation was carried out by using an 8-field IMRT plan. Results: The shifts and shape change of the prostate and SVs could be separated into 3D global shifts in the RL, AP, and SI directions, plus local shifts in the AP direction, which were different for each CT slice. The MLC leaf positions were successfully

  3. Characterization of an add-on multileaf collimator for electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauer, T; Sokoll, J; Cremers, F; Schmidt, R; Harmansa, R; Luzzara, M

    2008-01-01

    An add-on multileaf collimator for electrons (eMLC) has been developed that provides computer-controlled beam collimation and isocentric dose delivery. The design parameters result from the design study by Gauer et al (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5987-6003) and were configured such that a compact and light-weight eMLC with motorized leaves can be industrially manufactured and stably mounted on a conventional linear accelerator. In the present study, the efficiency of an initial computer-controlled prototype was examined according to the design goals and the performance of energy- and intensity-modulated treatment techniques. This study concentrates on the attachment and gantry stability as well as the dosimetric characteristics of central-axis and off-axis dose, field size dependence, collimator scatter, field abutment, radiation leakage and the setting of the accelerator jaws. To provide isocentric irradiation, the eMLC can be placed either 16 or 28 cm above the isocentre through interchangeable holders. The mechanical implementation of this feature results in a maximum field displacement of less than 0.6 mm at 90 0 and 270 0 gantry angles. Compared to a 10 x 10 cm applicator at 6-14 MeV, the beam penumbra of the eMLC at a 16 cm collimator-to-isocentre distance is 0.8-0.4 cm greater and the depth-dose curves show a larger build-up effect. Due to the loss in energy dependence of the therapeutic range and the much lower dose output at small beam sizes, a minimum beam size of 3 x 3 cm is necessary to avoid suboptimal dose delivery. Dose output and beam symmetry are not affected by collimator scatter when the central axis is blocked. As a consequence of the broader beam penumbra, uniform dose distributions were measured in the junction region of adjacent beams at perpendicular and oblique beam incidence. However, adjacent beams with a high difference in a beam energy of 6 to 14 MeV generate cold and hot spots of approximately 15% in the abutting region. In order to

  4. Multileaf collimator performance monitoring and improvement using semiautomated quality control testing and statistical process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Létourneau, Daniel; McNiven, Andrea; Keller, Harald; Wang, An; Amin, Md Nurul; Pearce, Jim; Norrlinger, Bernhard; Jaffray, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: High-quality radiation therapy using highly conformal dose distributions and image-guided techniques requires optimum machine delivery performance. In this work, a monitoring system for multileaf collimator (MLC) performance, integrating semiautomated MLC quality control (QC) tests and statistical process control tools, was developed. The MLC performance monitoring system was used for almost a year on two commercially available MLC models. Control charts were used to establish MLC performance and assess test frequency required to achieve a given level of performance. MLC-related interlocks and servicing events were recorded during the monitoring period and were investigated as indicators of MLC performance variations. Methods: The QC test developed as part of the MLC performance monitoring system uses 2D megavoltage images (acquired using an electronic portal imaging device) of 23 fields to determine the location of the leaves with respect to the radiation isocenter. The precision of the MLC performance monitoring QC test and the MLC itself was assessed by detecting the MLC leaf positions on 127 megavoltage images of a static field. After initial calibration, the MLC performance monitoring QC test was performed 3–4 times/week over a period of 10–11 months to monitor positional accuracy of individual leaves for two different MLC models. Analysis of test results was performed using individuals control charts per leaf with control limits computed based on the measurements as well as two sets of specifications of ±0.5 and ±1 mm. Out-of-specification and out-of-control leaves were automatically flagged by the monitoring system and reviewed monthly by physicists. MLC-related interlocks reported by the linear accelerator and servicing events were recorded to help identify potential causes of nonrandom MLC leaf positioning variations. Results: The precision of the MLC performance monitoring QC test and the MLC itself was within ±0.22 mm for most MLC leaves

  5. Multileaf collimator performance monitoring and improvement using semiautomated quality control testing and statistical process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Daniel; Wang, An; Amin, Md Nurul; Pearce, Jim; McNiven, Andrea; Keller, Harald; Norrlinger, Bernhard; Jaffray, David A

    2014-12-01

    High-quality radiation therapy using highly conformal dose distributions and image-guided techniques requires optimum machine delivery performance. In this work, a monitoring system for multileaf collimator (MLC) performance, integrating semiautomated MLC quality control (QC) tests and statistical process control tools, was developed. The MLC performance monitoring system was used for almost a year on two commercially available MLC models. Control charts were used to establish MLC performance and assess test frequency required to achieve a given level of performance. MLC-related interlocks and servicing events were recorded during the monitoring period and were investigated as indicators of MLC performance variations. The QC test developed as part of the MLC performance monitoring system uses 2D megavoltage images (acquired using an electronic portal imaging device) of 23 fields to determine the location of the leaves with respect to the radiation isocenter. The precision of the MLC performance monitoring QC test and the MLC itself was assessed by detecting the MLC leaf positions on 127 megavoltage images of a static field. After initial calibration, the MLC performance monitoring QC test was performed 3-4 times/week over a period of 10-11 months to monitor positional accuracy of individual leaves for two different MLC models. Analysis of test results was performed using individuals control charts per leaf with control limits computed based on the measurements as well as two sets of specifications of ± 0.5 and ± 1 mm. Out-of-specification and out-of-control leaves were automatically flagged by the monitoring system and reviewed monthly by physicists. MLC-related interlocks reported by the linear accelerator and servicing events were recorded to help identify potential causes of nonrandom MLC leaf positioning variations. The precision of the MLC performance monitoring QC test and the MLC itself was within ± 0.22 mm for most MLC leaves and the majority of the

  6. Characterization of an add-on multileaf collimator for electron beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauer, T; Sokoll, J; Cremers, F; Schmidt, R [Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Harmansa, R [3D Line, Schwarzenbruck (Germany); Luzzara, M [3D Line, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: t.gauer@uke.uni-hamburg.de

    2008-02-21

    An add-on multileaf collimator for electrons (eMLC) has been developed that provides computer-controlled beam collimation and isocentric dose delivery. The design parameters result from the design study by Gauer et al (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5987-6003) and were configured such that a compact and light-weight eMLC with motorized leaves can be industrially manufactured and stably mounted on a conventional linear accelerator. In the present study, the efficiency of an initial computer-controlled prototype was examined according to the design goals and the performance of energy- and intensity-modulated treatment techniques. This study concentrates on the attachment and gantry stability as well as the dosimetric characteristics of central-axis and off-axis dose, field size dependence, collimator scatter, field abutment, radiation leakage and the setting of the accelerator jaws. To provide isocentric irradiation, the eMLC can be placed either 16 or 28 cm above the isocentre through interchangeable holders. The mechanical implementation of this feature results in a maximum field displacement of less than 0.6 mm at 90{sup 0} and 270{sup 0} gantry angles. Compared to a 10 x 10 cm applicator at 6-14 MeV, the beam penumbra of the eMLC at a 16 cm collimator-to-isocentre distance is 0.8-0.4 cm greater and the depth-dose curves show a larger build-up effect. Due to the loss in energy dependence of the therapeutic range and the much lower dose output at small beam sizes, a minimum beam size of 3 x 3 cm is necessary to avoid suboptimal dose delivery. Dose output and beam symmetry are not affected by collimator scatter when the central axis is blocked. As a consequence of the broader beam penumbra, uniform dose distributions were measured in the junction region of adjacent beams at perpendicular and oblique beam incidence. However, adjacent beams with a high difference in a beam energy of 6 to 14 MeV generate cold and hot spots of approximately 15% in the abutting region. In

  7. Sensitivity of volumetric modulated arc therapy patient specific QA results to multileaf collimator errors and correlation to dose volume histogram based metrics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coleman, Linda

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the impact of systematic multileaf collimator (MLC) positional errors on gamma analysis results used for quality assurance (QA) of Rapidarc treatments. In addition, this study evaluates the relationship of these gamma analysis results and clinical dose volume histogram metrics (DVH) for Rapidarc treatment plans.

  8. Geometrical and dosimetrical characterization of the photon source using a micro-multileaf collimator for stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treuer, H; Hoevels, M; Luyken, K; Hunsche, S; Kocher, M; Mueller, R-P; Sturm, V

    2003-01-01

    A micro-multileaf collimator (μMLC) for stereotactic radiosurgery is used for determination of the spatial intensity distribution of the photon source of a linear accelerator. The method is based on grid field dose measurements using film dosimetry and is easy to perform. Since the μMLC does not allow 'direct' imaging of the photon source, special software has been developed to analyse grid field measurements. Besides the source-density function, grid field analysis yields the position of the focal spot in the room laser coordinate system of the linear accelerator and the position of the treatment head rotation axis and the inclination angle of the leaf bank. Thus the method can be used for base dosimetry and for quality assurance in radiosurgery using a μMLC

  9. Determination of Tongue and Groove parameters for multileaf collimators; Determinaco de parametros de Tongue and Groove de colimadores de multilaminas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Aluisio; Almeida, Carlos E. de, E-mail: alu_neto@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas; Nguyen, Bihn [Prowess Inc., Concord, CA (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The Tongue and Groove effect (TandG) is characterized by an additional attenuation between adjacent and opposing leaves on multileaf collimators (MLCs) in adjacent or complementary fields. This is a typical situation in of intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatments. The aim of this study was to measure the width and transmission of TandG effect for two commercial MLCs: Varian Millennium 120 (6 MV and 16 MV beams) and BrainLab m3 (only for 6 MV). The methodology used was based on the creation of MLC shapes that emphasizes TandG effect, the irradiation of these fields on radiochromic film and the sensitometric evaluation of the films in order to determine the TandG width and transmission. The results for TandG width for studied MLCs were 2.5, 1.8 and 2 mm, respectively, whit transmission TandG values of 87, 90 and 85%. (author)

  10. Geometrical and dosimetrical characterization of the photon source using a micro-multileaf collimator for stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treuer, H [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Hoevels, M [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Luyken, K [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Hunsche, S [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Kocher, M [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Mueller, R-P [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Sturm, V [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2003-08-07

    A micro-multileaf collimator ({mu}MLC) for stereotactic radiosurgery is used for determination of the spatial intensity distribution of the photon source of a linear accelerator. The method is based on grid field dose measurements using film dosimetry and is easy to perform. Since the {mu}MLC does not allow 'direct' imaging of the photon source, special software has been developed to analyse grid field measurements. Besides the source-density function, grid field analysis yields the position of the focal spot in the room laser coordinate system of the linear accelerator and the position of the treatment head rotation axis and the inclination angle of the leaf bank. Thus the method can be used for base dosimetry and for quality assurance in radiosurgery using a {mu}MLC.

  11. SU-E-T-214: Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Based On Passively Scattered Protons and Multi-Leaf Collimation: Prototype TPS and Dosimetry Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D; Carabe-Fernandez, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Intensity-modulated proton therapy is usually implemented with multi-field optimization of pencil-beam scanning (PBS) proton fields. However, at the view of the experience with photon-IMRT, proton facilities equipped with double-scattering (DS) delivery and multi-leaf collimation (MLC) could produce highly conformal dose distributions (and possibly eliminate the need for patient-specific compensators) with a clever use of their MLC field shaping, provided that an optimal inverse TPS is developed. Methods. A prototype TPS was developed in MATLAB. The dose calculation process was based on a fluence-dose algorithm on an adaptive divergent grid. A database of dose kernels was precalculated in order to allow for fast variations of the field range and modulation during optimization. The inverse planning process was based on the adaptive simulated annealing approach, with direct aperture optimization of the MLC leaves. A dosimetry study was performed on a phantom formed by three concentrical semicylinders separated by 5 mm, of which the inner-most and outer-most were regarded as organs at risk (OARs), and the middle one as the PTV. We chose a concave target (which is not treatable with conventional DS fields) to show the potential of our technique. The optimizer was configured to minimize the mean dose to the OARs while keeping a good coverage of the target. Results. The plan produced by the prototype TPS achieved a conformity index of 1.34, with the mean doses to the OARs below 78% of the prescribed dose. This Result is hardly achievable with traditional conformal DS technique with compensators, and it compares to what can be obtained with PBS. Conclusion. It is certainly feasible to produce IMPT fields with MLC passive scattering fields. With a fully developed treatment planning system, the produced plans can be superior to traditional DS plans in terms of plan conformity and dose to organs at risk

  12. Adverse impact of multileaf collimator field shaping on lens dose in children with acute leukemia receiving cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Sathiaseelan, Vythialingam; Bista, Tomasz C.; Marymont, Maryanne H.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the impact of multileaf collimator (MLC) on lens dose in children with leukemia undergoing cranial irradiation. Methods and Materials: This is a prospective study utilizing three common cranial irradiation techniques. Technique A uses a half-beam, nondivergent radiation field. Technique B has the anterior divergent field edge at the lateral bony canthus. Technique C is similar to B, but with a field collimator angle. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) lens dose measurements were obtained in children and phantom with all three techniques. Results: Seventeen children were studied. Lens dose measurements were obtained in 14 children with technique A using MLC and blocks. In 7 of 14 children, dose measurements were obtained with MLC only. One child was treated with technique B and 2 children were treated with C, with MLC ± blocks. In all 3 techniques, with MLC alone, the lens dose increased by 64%, 119%, and 72%, respectively. Similar results were obtained in phantom. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that independent of irradiation technique, additional custom blocking is required to maximally protect the lens with MLC shaped fields. This is due to the lack of conformity between MLC and the desired field edge at the lateral bony canthus

  13. Dosimetric advantage and clinical implication of a micro-multileaf collimator in the treatment of prostate with intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lu; Hoban, Peter; Paskalev, Kamen; Yang Jie; Li Jinsheng; Chen Lili; Xiong Weijun; Ma, Charlie

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the dosimetric benefits of a micro-multileaf (4-mm leaf width) collimator (mMLC) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning of the prostate cancer and its potential application for dose escalation and hypofractionation. We compared treatment plans for IMRT delivery using 2 different multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths (4 vs. 10 mm) for 10 patients with prostate cancer. Treatment planning was performed on the XknifeRT2 treatment planning system. All beams and optimization parameters were identical for the mMLC and MLC plans. All of the plans were normalized to ensure that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received 100% of the prescribed dose (74 Gy). The differences in dose distribution between the 2 groups of plans using the mMLC and the MLC were assessed by dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis of the target and critical organs. Significant reductions in the volume of rectum receiving medium to higher doses were achieved using the mMLC. The average decrease in the volume of the rectum receiving 40, 50, and 60 Gy using the mMLC plans was 40.2%, 33.4%, and 17.7%, respectively, with p-values less than 0.0001 for V 40 and V 50 and 0.012 for V 60 . The mean dose reductions for D 17 and D 35 for the rectum were 20.0% (p 0.78). Because of the reduction of rectal volume receiving medium to higher doses, dose to the prostate target can be escalated by about 20 Gy to over 74 Gy, while keeping the rectal dose (either denoted by D 17 or D 35 ) the same as those with the use of the MLC. The maximum achievable dose, derived when the rectum is allowed to reach the tolerance level, was found to be in the range of 113-172 Gy (using the tolerance value of D 17 ). We conclude that the use of the mMLC for IMRT of the prostate may facilitate dose hypofractionation due to its dosimetric advantage in significantly improving the DVH parameters of the prostate and critical organs. When used for conventional fractionation scheme, m

  14. SU-E-T-428: Dosimetric Impact of Multileaf Collimator Leaf Width On Single and multiple Isocenter Stereotactic IMRT Treatment Plans for multiple Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giem, J; Algan, O; Ahmad, S; Ali, I; Young, J; Hossain, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impacts that multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf width has on the dose conformity and normal brain tissue doses of single and multiple isocenter stereotactic IMRT (SRT) plans for multiple intracranial tumors. Methods: Fourteen patients with 2–3 targets were studied retrospectively. Patients treated with multiple isocenter treatment plans using 9 to 12 non-coplanar beams per lesion underwent repeat planning using single isocenter and 10 to 12 non-coplanar beams with 2.5mm, 3mm and 5mm MLC leaf widths. Brainlab iPlan treatment planning system for delivery with the 2.5mm MLC served as reference. Identical contour sets and dose-volume constraints were applied. The prescribed dose to each target was 25 Gy to be delivered over 5 fractions with a minimum of 99% dose to cover ≥ 95% of the target volume. Results: The lesions and normal brains ranged in size from 0.11 to 51.67cc (median, 2.75cc) and 1090 to 1641cc (median, 1401cc), respectively. The Paddick conformity index for single and multiple isocenter (2.5mm vs. 3mm and 5mm MLCs) was (0.79±0.08 vs. 0.79±0.07 and 0.77±0.08) and (0.79±0.09 vs. 0.77±0.09 and 0.76±0.08), respectively. The average normal brain volumes receiving 15 Gy for single and multiple isocenter (2.5mm vs. 3mm and 5mm MLCs) were (3.65% vs. 3.95% and 4.09%) and (2.89% vs. 2.91% and 2.92%), respectively. Conclusion: The average dose conformity observed for the different leaf width for single and multiple isocenter plans were similar, throughout. However, the average normal brain volumes receiving 2.5 to 15 Gy were consistently lower for the 2.5mm MLC leaf width, especially for single isocenter plans. The clinical consequences of these integral normal brain tissue doses are still unknown, but employing the use of the 2.5mm MLC option is desirable at sparing normal brain tissue for both single and multiple isocenter cases

  15. SU-E-T-467: Implementation of Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for a Multileaf Collimator Equipped Robotic Radiotherapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, JS; Fan, J; Ma, C-M [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the treatment efficiency and capabilities for full-body treatment, a robotic radiosurgery system has equipped with a multileaf collimator (MLC) to extend its accuracy and precision to radiation therapy. To model the MLC and include it in the Monte Carlo patient dose calculation is the goal of this work. Methods: The radiation source and the MLC were carefully modeled to consider the effects of the source size, collimator scattering, leaf transmission and leaf end shape. A source model was built based on the output factors, percentage depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles measured in a water phantom. MLC leaf shape, leaf end design and leaf tilt for minimizing the interleaf leakage and their effects on beam fluence and energy spectrum were all considered in the calculation. Transmission/leakage was added to the fluence based on the transmission factors of the leaf and the leaf end. The transmitted photon energy was tuned to consider the beam hardening effects. The calculated results with the Monte Carlo implementation was compared with measurements in homogeneous water phantom and inhomogeneous phantoms with slab lung or bone material for 4 square fields and 9 irregularly shaped fields. Results: The calculated output factors are compared with the measured ones and the difference is within 1% for different field sizes. The calculated dose distributions in the phantoms show good agreement with measurements using diode detector and films. The dose difference is within 2% inside the field and the distance to agreement is within 2mm in the penumbra region. The gamma passing rate is more than 95% with 2%/2mm criteria for all the test cases. Conclusion: Implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation for a MLC equipped robotic radiosurgery system is completed successfully. The accuracy of Monte Carlo dose calculation with MLC is clinically acceptable. This work was supported by Accuray Inc.

  16. Impact of Multileaf Collimator Configuration Parameters on the Dosimetric Accuracy of 6-MV Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Nick; Perrin, David; Newhauser, Wayne; Zhang, Rui

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected configuration parameters that govern multileaf collimator (MLC) transmission and rounded leaf offset in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (Pinnacle 3 , Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA, USA) on the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose calculation. The MLC leaf transmission factor was modified based on measurements made with ionization chambers. The table of parameters containing rounded-leaf-end offset values was modified by measuring the radiation field edge as a function of leaf bank position with an ionization chamber in a scanning water-tank dosimetry system and comparing the locations to those predicted by the TPS. The modified parameter values were validated by performing IMRT quality assurance (QA) measurements on 19 gantry-static IMRT plans. Planar dose measurements were performed with radiographic film and a diode array (MapCHECK2) and compared to TPS calculated dose distributions using default and modified configuration parameters. Based on measurements, the leaf transmission factor was changed from a default value of 0.001 to 0.005. Surprisingly, this modification resulted in a small but statistically significant worsening of IMRT QA gamma-index passing rate, which revealed that the overall dosimetric accuracy of the TPS depends on multiple configuration parameters in a manner that is coupled and not intuitive because of the commissioning protocol used in our clinic. The rounded leaf offset table had little room for improvement, with the average difference between the default and modified offset values being -0.2 ± 0.7 mm. While our results depend on the current clinical protocols, treatment unit and TPS used, the methodology used in this study is generally applicable. Different clinics could potentially obtain different results and improve their dosimetric accuracy using our approach.

  17. Impact of multileaf collimator configuration parameters on the dosimetric accuracy of 6-MV Intensity-Modulated radiation therapy treatment plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Petersen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected configuration parameters that govern multileaf collimator (MLC transmission and rounded leaf offset in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA, USA on the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT dose calculation. The MLC leaf transmission factor was modified based on measurements made with ionization chambers. The table of parameters containing rounded-leaf-end offset values was modified by measuring the radiation field edge as a function of leaf bank position with an ionization chamber in a scanning water-tank dosimetry system and comparing the locations to those predicted by the TPS. The modified parameter values were validated by performing IMRT quality assurance (QA measurements on 19 gantry-static IMRT plans. Planar dose measurements were performed with radiographic film and a diode array (MapCHECK2 and compared to TPS calculated dose distributions using default and modified configuration parameters. Based on measurements, the leaf transmission factor was changed from a default value of 0.001 to 0.005. Surprisingly, this modification resulted in a small but statistically significant worsening of IMRT QA gamma-index passing rate, which revealed that the overall dosimetric accuracy of the TPS depends on multiple configuration parameters in a manner that is coupled and not intuitive because of the commissioning protocol used in our clinic. The rounded leaf offset table had little room for improvement, with the average difference between the default and modified offset values being −0.2 ± 0.7 mm. While our results depend on the current clinical protocols, treatment unit and TPS used, the methodology used in this study is generally applicable. Different clinics could potentially obtain different results and improve their dosimetric accuracy using our approach.

  18. Evaluation of Kodak EDR2 film for dose verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered by a static multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X R; Jursinic, P A; Grimm, D F; Lopez, F; Rownd, J J; Gillin, M T

    2002-08-01

    A new type of radiographic film, Kodak EDR2 film, was evaluated for dose verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivered by a static multileaf collimator (SMLC). A sensitometric curve of EDR2 film irradiated by a 6 MV x-ray beam was compared with that of Kodak X-OMAT V (XV) film. The effects of field size, depth and dose rate on the sensitometric curve were also studied. It is found that EDR2 film is much less sensitive than XV film. In high-energy x-ray beams, the double hit process is the dominant mechanism that renders the grains on EDR2 films developable. As a result, in the dose range that is commonly used for film dosimetry for IMRT and conventional external beam therapy, the sensitometric curves of EDR2 films cannot be approximated as a linear function, OD = c * D. Within experimental uncertainty, the film sensitivity does not depend on the dose rate (50 vs 300 MU/min) or dose per pulse (from 1.0 x 10(-4) to 4.21 x 10(-4) Gy/pulse). Field sizes and depths (up to field size of 10 x 10 cm2 and depth = 10 cm) have little effect on the sensitometric curves. Percent depth doses (PDDs) for both 6 and 23 MV x rays were measured with both EDR2 and XV films and compared with ion chamber data. Film data are within 2.5% of the ion chamber results. Dose profiles measured with EDR2 film are consistent with those measured with an ion chamber. Examples of measured IMRT isodose distributions versus calculated isodoses are presented. We have used EDR2 films for verification of all IMRT patients treated by SMLC in our clinic. In most cases, with EDR2 film, actual clinical daily fraction doses can be used for verification of composite isodose distributions of SMLC-based IMRT.

  19. TH-AB-BRA-01: A Novel Doubly-Focused Multileaf Collimator Design for MR-Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H; Mutic, S; Green, O [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Fought, G; Kawrakow, I; Sharma, A; Shvartsman, S; Dempsey, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the physical and dosimetric properties of a novel double-stack multileaf collimator (MLC). Methods: One of the compromises made in the MLC design has been to employ linear-motion singly-divergent shapes. Because the MLC leading edge moves linearly, it is rounded to provide a consistent, albeit compromised penumbra. The MLC employed in the new linac-based MR-IGRT unit is designed to be doubly focused in that each leaf moves in an arc centered at the source, and the sides of the leaves are machined such that they lie parallel to a line between the leaf edge and the source. The curvature of the MLC keeps motors and encoders in lower magnetic field. However, high spatial-resolution leaves are difficult to manufacture to sufficiently tight tolerances and difficult to move due to restricted space on the gantry. Wider leaves alleviate this problem with less moving parts but the coarse resolution disallows treating very small lesions. This compromise has been overcome by splitting the MLC leaf bank into two sets, stacked one upon the other and offset half of a leaf width. The dosimetry has been simulated using Monte-Carlo and a 6 MV linac in a 0.35 T magnetic field. Results: The combined MLC leaf set has a spatial resolution of effectively half of the leaf width, 4mm here. The dosimetry resolution and conformality are consistent with 4mm wide MLC assisted by inverse fluence modulation. Also, because each leaf junction is backed up by the stacked leaf that lies over the junction, the problem of tongue-and-groove dosimetry has been greatly reduced. The novel MLC design allows the use of more powerful leaf motors than would be otherwise possible if a single MLC bank is employed. Conclusions: The stacked MLC will provide highly conformal dose distributions suitable for stereotactic radiation therapy of small lesions. The research was funded by ViewRay, Inc.

  20. An analytical approach for optimizing the leaf design of a multi-leaf collimator in a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topolnjak, R; Heide, U A van der

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we present an analytical approach for optimizing the leaf design of a multi-leaf collimator (MLC) in a linear accelerator. Because leaf designs vary between vendors, our goal is to characterize and quantify the effects of different compromises which have to be made between performance parameters. Subsequently, an optimal leaf design for an earlier proposed six-bank MLC which combines a high-resolution field-shaping ability with a large field size is determined. To this end a model of the linac is created that includes the following parameters: the source size, the maximum field size, the distance between source and isocenter, and the leaf's design parameters. First, the optimal radius of the leaf tip was found. This optimum was defined by the requirement that the fluence intensity should fall from 80% of the maximum value to 20% in a minimal distance, defining the width of the fluence penumbra. A second requirement was that this penumbra width should be constant when a leaf moves from one side of the field to the other. The geometric, transmission and total penumbra width (80-20%) were calculated depending on the design parameters. The analytical model is in agreement with Elekta, Varian and Siemens collimator designs. For leaves thinner than 4 cm, the transmission penumbra becomes dominant, and for leaves close to the source the geometric penumbra plays a role. Finally, by choosing the leaf thickness of 3.5 cm, 4 cm and 5 cm from the lowest to the highest bank, respectively, an optimal leaf design for a six-bank MLC is achieved

  1. TH-AB-BRA-01: A Novel Doubly-Focused Multileaf Collimator Design for MR-Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H; Mutic, S; Green, O; Low, D; Fought, G; Kawrakow, I; Sharma, A; Shvartsman, S; Dempsey, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the physical and dosimetric properties of a novel double-stack multileaf collimator (MLC). Methods: One of the compromises made in the MLC design has been to employ linear-motion singly-divergent shapes. Because the MLC leading edge moves linearly, it is rounded to provide a consistent, albeit compromised penumbra. The MLC employed in the new linac-based MR-IGRT unit is designed to be doubly focused in that each leaf moves in an arc centered at the source, and the sides of the leaves are machined such that they lie parallel to a line between the leaf edge and the source. The curvature of the MLC keeps motors and encoders in lower magnetic field. However, high spatial-resolution leaves are difficult to manufacture to sufficiently tight tolerances and difficult to move due to restricted space on the gantry. Wider leaves alleviate this problem with less moving parts but the coarse resolution disallows treating very small lesions. This compromise has been overcome by splitting the MLC leaf bank into two sets, stacked one upon the other and offset half of a leaf width. The dosimetry has been simulated using Monte-Carlo and a 6 MV linac in a 0.35 T magnetic field. Results: The combined MLC leaf set has a spatial resolution of effectively half of the leaf width, 4mm here. The dosimetry resolution and conformality are consistent with 4mm wide MLC assisted by inverse fluence modulation. Also, because each leaf junction is backed up by the stacked leaf that lies over the junction, the problem of tongue-and-groove dosimetry has been greatly reduced. The novel MLC design allows the use of more powerful leaf motors than would be otherwise possible if a single MLC bank is employed. Conclusions: The stacked MLC will provide highly conformal dose distributions suitable for stereotactic radiation therapy of small lesions. The research was funded by ViewRay, Inc.

  2. SU-E-T-247: Multi-Leaf Collimator Model Adjustments Improve Small Field Dosimetry in VMAT Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, L; Yang, F [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The Elekta beam modulator linac employs a 4-mm micro multileaf collimator (MLC) backed by a fixed jaw. Out-of-field dose discrepancies between treatment planning system (TPS) calculations and output water phantom measurements are caused by the 1-mm leaf gap required for all moving MLCs in a VMAT arc. In this study, MLC parameters are optimized to improve TPS out-of-field dose approximations. Methods: Static 2.4 cm square fields were created with a 1-mm leaf gap for MLCs that would normally park behind the jaw. Doses in the open field and leaf gap were measured with an A16 micro ion chamber and EDR2 film for comparison with corresponding point doses in the Pinnacle TPS. The MLC offset table and tip radius were adjusted until TPS point doses agreed with photon measurements. Improvements to the beam models were tested using static arcs consisting of square fields ranging from 1.6 to 14.0 cm, with 45° collimator rotation, and 1-mm leaf gap to replicate VMAT conditions. Gamma values for the 3-mm distance, 3% dose difference criteria were evaluated using standard QA procedures with a cylindrical detector array. Results: The best agreement in point doses within the leaf gap and open field was achieved by offsetting the default rounded leaf end table by 0.1 cm and adjusting the leaf tip radius to 13 cm. Improvements in TPS models for 6 and 10 MV photon beams were more significant for smaller field sizes 3.6 cm or less where the initial gamma factors progressively increased as field size decreased, i.e. for a 1.6cm field size, the Gamma increased from 56.1% to 98.8%. Conclusion: The MLC optimization techniques developed will achieve greater dosimetric accuracy in small field VMAT treatment plans for fixed jaw linear accelerators. Accurate predictions of dose to organs at risk may reduce adverse effects of radiotherapy.

  3. Minimizing the number of segments in a delivery sequence for intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Jianrong; Zhu Yunping

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes a sequencing algorithm for intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a multileaf collimator in the static mode. The algorithm aims to minimize the number of segments in a delivery sequence. For a machine with a long verification and recording overhead time (e.g., 15 s per segment), minimizing the number of segments is equivalent to minimizing the delivery time. The proposed new algorithm is based on checking numerous candidates for a segment and selecting the candidate that results in a residual intensity matrix with the least complexity. When there is more than one candidate resulting in the same complexity, the candidate with the largest size is selected. The complexity of an intensity matrix is measured in the new algorithm in terms of the number of segments in the delivery sequence obtained by using a published algorithm. The beam delivery efficiency of the proposed algorithm and the influence of different published algorithms used to calculate the complexity of an intensity matrix were tested with clinical intensity-modulated beams. The results show that no matter which published algorithm is used to calculate the complexity of an intensity matrix, the sequence generated by the algorithm proposed here is always more efficient than that generated by the published algorithm itself. The results also show that the algorithm used to calculate the complexity of an intensity matrix affects the efficiency of beam delivery. The delivery sequences are frequently most efficient when the algorithm of Bortfeld et al. is used to calculate the complexity of an intensity matrix. Because no single variation is most efficient for all beams tested, we suggest implementing multiple variations of our algorithm

  4. SU-E-T-467: Implementation of Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for a Multileaf Collimator Equipped Robotic Radiotherapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, JS; Fan, J; Ma, C-M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the treatment efficiency and capabilities for full-body treatment, a robotic radiosurgery system has equipped with a multileaf collimator (MLC) to extend its accuracy and precision to radiation therapy. To model the MLC and include it in the Monte Carlo patient dose calculation is the goal of this work. Methods: The radiation source and the MLC were carefully modeled to consider the effects of the source size, collimator scattering, leaf transmission and leaf end shape. A source model was built based on the output factors, percentage depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles measured in a water phantom. MLC leaf shape, leaf end design and leaf tilt for minimizing the interleaf leakage and their effects on beam fluence and energy spectrum were all considered in the calculation. Transmission/leakage was added to the fluence based on the transmission factors of the leaf and the leaf end. The transmitted photon energy was tuned to consider the beam hardening effects. The calculated results with the Monte Carlo implementation was compared with measurements in homogeneous water phantom and inhomogeneous phantoms with slab lung or bone material for 4 square fields and 9 irregularly shaped fields. Results: The calculated output factors are compared with the measured ones and the difference is within 1% for different field sizes. The calculated dose distributions in the phantoms show good agreement with measurements using diode detector and films. The dose difference is within 2% inside the field and the distance to agreement is within 2mm in the penumbra region. The gamma passing rate is more than 95% with 2%/2mm criteria for all the test cases. Conclusion: Implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation for a MLC equipped robotic radiosurgery system is completed successfully. The accuracy of Monte Carlo dose calculation with MLC is clinically acceptable. This work was supported by Accuray Inc

  5. SU-F-T-481: Physics Evaluation of a Newly Released InCise™ Multileaf Collimator for CyberKnife M6™ System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L; Chin, E; Lo, A [Stanford University Cancer Center, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This work reports the results of the physics evaluation of a newly released InCise™2 Multileaf Collimator (MLC) installed in our institution. Methods: Beam property data was measured with unshielded diode and EBT2 films. The measurements included MLC leaf transmission, beam profiles, output factors and tissue-phantom ratios. MLC performance was evaluated for one month after commissioning. Weekly Garden Fence tests were performed for leaf / bank positioning in standard (A/P) and clinically relevant non-standard positions, before and after MLC driving exercises of 10+ minutes. Daily Picket Fence test and AQA test, End-to-End tests and dosimetric quality assurance were performed to evaluate the overall system performance. Results: All measurements including beam energy, flatness and symmetry, were within manufacture specifications. Leaf transmission was 0.4% <0.5% specification. The values of output factors ranged from 0.825 (7.6 mm × 7.5 mm) to 1.026 (115.0 mm × 100.1 mm). Average beam penumbra at 10 cm depth ranged from 2.7mm/2.7mm(7.6 mm × 7.5 mm) to 6.0 mm/6.2mm(84.6 mm × 84.7 mm). Slight penumbra difference (<10% from average penumbra for fields >20 mm) was observed in the direction perpendicular to leaf motion due to the tilting of the leaf housing. Mean leaf position offsets was −0.08±0.07mm and −0.13 ± 0.08 for X1 and X2 leaf banks in 13 Garden Fence tests. No significant difference on average leaf positioning offsets was observed between different leaf orientations and before/after MLC driving exercises. Six End-to-End tests showed 0.43±0.23mm overall targeting accuracy. Picket-Fence and AQA showed stable performance of MLC during the test period. Dosimetric point dose measurements for test cases agreed with calculation within 3%. All film measurements on relative dose had Gamma (2%, 2mm) passing rate of >95%. Conclusion: The Incise™2 MLC for CyberKnife M6™ was proven to be accurate and reliable, and it is currently in clinical use

  6. Treatment planning for conformation therapy using a multi-leaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesecke, R.; Doll, J.; Bauer, B.; Schlegel, W.; Pastyr, O.; Lorenz, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    In high energy photon therapy an optimum dose distribution is achieved with an irradiation from several directions, thus adapting the field shape to the target volume. Some methods of irradiation planning using these techniques are presented. The result of such a treatment planning is demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  7. Linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery with micro multi-leaf collimator : technological advancement in precision radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayananda, S.; Kinhikar, R.A.; Saju, Sherley; Deshpande, D.D.; Jalali, R.; Sarin, R.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Dinshaw, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) is an advancement on precision radiotherapy, in which stereo tactically guided localized high dose is delivered to the lesion (target) in a single fraction, while sparing the surrounding normal tissue. Radiosurgery has been used to treat variety of benign and malignant lesions as well as functional disorders in brain such as arteriovenous malformation (AVM), acoustic neuroma, solitary primary brain tumor, single metastasis, pituitary adenoma etc

  8. Electromagnetic guided couch and multileaf collimator tracking on a TrueBeam accelerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rune; Ravkilde, Thomas; Worm, Esben Schjødt

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Couch and MLC tracking are two promising methods for real-time motion compensation during radiation therapy. So far, couch and MLC tracking experiments have mainly been performed by different research groups, and no direct comparison of couch and MLC tracking of volumetric modulated arc...... to characterize the geometric and dosimetric performance of electromagnetic guided couch and MLC tracking on a TrueBeam accelerator equipped with a Millennium MLC. The tracking system latency was determined without motion prediction as the time lag between sinusoidal target motion and the compensating motion...

  9. Using the volumetric effect of a finite-sized detector for routine quality assurance of multileaf collimator leaf positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yong; Xing Lei

    2003-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced form of radiation therapy and promises to improve dose conformation while reducing the irradiation to the sensitive structures. The modality is, however, more complicated than conventional treatment and requires much more stringent quality assurance (QA) to ensure what has been planned can be achieved accurately. One of the main QA tasks is the assurance of positioning accuracy of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves during IMRT delivery. Currently, the routine quality assurance of MLC in most clinics is being done using radiographic films with specially designed MLC leaf sequences. Besides being time consuming, the results of film measurements are difficult to quantify and interpret. In this work, we propose a new and effective technique for routine MLC leaf positioning QA. The technique utilizes the fact that, when a finite-sized detector is placed under a leaf, the relative output of the detector will depend on the relative fractional volume irradiated. A small error in leaf positioning would change the fractional volume irradiated and lead to a deviation of the relative output from the normal reading. For a given MLC and detector system, the relation between the relative output and the leaf displacement can be easily established through experimental measurements and used subsequently as a quantitative means for detecting possible leaf positional errors. The method was tested using a linear accelerator with an 80-leaf MLC. Three different locations, including two locations on central plane (X1=X2=0) and one point on an off-central plane location (X1=-7.5, X=7.5), were studied. Our results indicated that the method could accurately detect a leaf positional change of ∼0.1 mm. The method was also used to monitor the stability of MLC leaf positioning for five consecutive weeks. In this test, we intentionally introduced two positional errors in the testing MLC leaf sequences: -0.2 mm and 1.2 mm. The technique

  10. SU-E-T-766: Treatment Planning Comparison Study On Two Different Multileaf Collimators Delivered with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R; Xiaomei, F; Bai, W; Zhang, X; Gao, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the performance of two different multileaf collimators(MLCi2 and Agility) delivery with volumetric modulated arc therapy techniques. Methods: Treatment plans were graded four (Low, Moderate, Moderate-High and High complexity) accorrding to the complexity. This includes 1 Low complexity(brain metastasis), 2 Moderate complexity(Lung and Liver), 1 Moderate-High complexity(prostate) and 1 High complexity ( head and neck) cases. Total dose of 60 Gy was given for all the plans. All cases were desigined two VMAT plans, one with MLCi2(group A) and the other with Agility(group B). All plans were done on Elekta VMAT with Monaco treatment planning system. All plans were generated with 6 MV X-rays for both Plan A and Plan B. Plans were evaluated based on the ability to meet the dose volume histogram, radiation conformity index, estimated radiation delivery time, dose homogeneity index(HI) and monitor units(MU) needed to deliver the prescribed dose. Results: Plans of group B achieved the best HI (HI = 1.05 Vs. 1.06) at the Low complexity cases while plans of group A were slightly better at the high complexity cases (HI = 1.12 Vs. 1.14). Faster VMAT plan delivery with Agility than with MLCi2 as plan complexity increased (Low complexity:52s Vs.52s, Moderate complexity:58s Vs. 55s, Moderate-High complexity: 171s Vs.152s, High complexity : 326s Vs. 202s ), especially for the most complex paradigms delivered time can be decresed 38%. No Significant changes were observed between the group B and group A plans in terms of the healthy tissue mean dose and MU. Both plans respected the planning objective for all organs at risk. Conclusion: The study concludes that VMAT plans with the novel Agility MLC can significant decrease the delivering time at the high complexity cases, while a slight compromise in the dose homogeneity index should be noted. This work was supported by The Medical Science Foundation of The health department of Hebei Province (No

  11. SU-E-T-766: Treatment Planning Comparison Study On Two Different Multileaf Collimators Delivered with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Xiaomei, F; Bai, W [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China); Zhang, X [The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China); Gao, Y [Hebei General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the performance of two different multileaf collimators(MLCi2 and Agility) delivery with volumetric modulated arc therapy techniques. Methods: Treatment plans were graded four (Low, Moderate, Moderate-High and High complexity) accorrding to the complexity. This includes 1 Low complexity(brain metastasis), 2 Moderate complexity(Lung and Liver), 1 Moderate-High complexity(prostate) and 1 High complexity ( head and neck) cases. Total dose of 60 Gy was given for all the plans. All cases were desigined two VMAT plans, one with MLCi2(group A) and the other with Agility(group B). All plans were done on Elekta VMAT with Monaco treatment planning system. All plans were generated with 6 MV X-rays for both Plan A and Plan B. Plans were evaluated based on the ability to meet the dose volume histogram, radiation conformity index, estimated radiation delivery time, dose homogeneity index(HI) and monitor units(MU) needed to deliver the prescribed dose. Results: Plans of group B achieved the best HI (HI = 1.05 Vs. 1.06) at the Low complexity cases while plans of group A were slightly better at the high complexity cases (HI = 1.12 Vs. 1.14). Faster VMAT plan delivery with Agility than with MLCi2 as plan complexity increased (Low complexity:52s Vs.52s, Moderate complexity:58s Vs. 55s, Moderate-High complexity: 171s Vs.152s, High complexity : 326s Vs. 202s ), especially for the most complex paradigms delivered time can be decresed 38%. No Significant changes were observed between the group B and group A plans in terms of the healthy tissue mean dose and MU. Both plans respected the planning objective for all organs at risk. Conclusion: The study concludes that VMAT plans with the novel Agility MLC can significant decrease the delivering time at the high complexity cases, while a slight compromise in the dose homogeneity index should be noted. This work was supported by The Medical Science Foundation of The health department of Hebei Province (No

  12. Measurement of back-scattered radiation from micro multileaf collimator into the beam monitor chamber from a dual energy linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements designed to find the collimator backscatter into the beam monitor chamber from Micro Multileaf collimator of 6 MV photon beams of the Siemens Primus linear accelerator were made with the help of dose rate feedback control. The photons and electrons backscattered from the upper and lower secondary collimator jaws give rise to a significant increase in the ion charge measured by monitor chamber. This increase varies between the different accelerators. The output measurements were carried out in air at the isocenter. The effect of collimator backscatter was investigated by measuring the pulse width, number of beam pulses per monitor unit, monitor unit rate and dose for different mMLC openings. These measurements were made with and without dose rate feedback control, i.e., with constant electron beam current in the accelerator. Monitor unit rate (MU/min was almost constant for all field sizes. The maximum variation between the open and the closed feedback control circuits was 2.5%. There was no difference in pulse width and negligible difference in pulse frequency. Maximum value of backscattered radiation from the micro Multileaf collimator into the beam monitor chamber was found to be 0.5%.

  13. Multileaf collimator intercomparison for intensity modulated radiation therapy implementation; Intercomparacao de colimadores de multiplas laminas para implementacao de terapia de feixes de intensidade modulada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viteri, Juan Fernando Delgado

    2006-07-01

    In this work a dosimetric comparison between three multileaf collimator systems is presented: a Varian Millennium with 120 leaves, Brainlab mMLC m3 and Varian Mark II both with 52 leaves. The width projection at isocenter level in field's central region are: 0,5 cm; 0,35 cm and 1,0 cm respectively. Common dosimetric characteristics for the three systems in static mode and dynamic capabilities for the two first were compared. In dynamic mode, tests validating proper MLC function through film irradiation were done, such MLC stability, MU linearity, treatment interruptions sensitivity, stability of MLC in dynamic mode, leaf speed stability, were found within {+-}3% deviation in all cases. Dose rate linearity showed differences when this parameter decreases in dynamic mode. Average dose errors for fixed width gaps moving at constant speed were found to be proportional to gap errors and inversely proportional to the gap width. Output factors differences delivered through a sweeping gap were found less than {+-}1% when the gantry was in a lateral position. For the three MLC systems, when comparing beam profiles for the same field was observed that for mMLC presents the sharpest dose gradient region. In the output factors small differences where observed in every MLC system. Dosimetric leaf gap was determined for MLC 120, mMLC and MLC 52, obtained values for a 6 MV beam are: (0,202 {+-} 0,054) cm; (0,157 {+-} 0,070) cm and (0,189 {+-} 0,081) cm respectively. The transmission showed an increase with depth and field width for 6 MV in all the three systems. Average values obtained with ionization chamber for this energy were: (1,630 {+-} 0,018)% for MLC 120; (1,291 {+-} 0,029)% for mMLC and (1,638 {+-} 0,010)% for MLC 52. When obtained through film irradiation, inter and intra leaf transmission showed an off axis dependent behavior for MLC 120 and mMLC. Scatter produced by MLC as a 6 MV open reference field ratio was: (0,297 {+-} 0,024)% for MLC 120; (0,239 {+-} 0

  14. Multileaf collimator intercomparison for intensity modulated radiation therapy implementation; Intercomparacao de colimadores de multiplas laminas para implementacao de terapia de feixes de intensidade modulada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viteri, Juan Fernando Delgado

    2006-07-01

    In this work a dosimetric comparison between three multileaf collimator systems is presented: a Varian Millennium with 120 leaves, Brainlab mMLC m3 and Varian Mark II both with 52 leaves. The width projection at isocenter level in field's central region are: 0,5 cm; 0,35 cm and 1,0 cm respectively. Common dosimetric characteristics for the three systems in static mode and dynamic capabilities for the two first were compared. In dynamic mode, tests validating proper MLC function through film irradiation were done, such MLC stability, MU linearity, treatment interruptions sensitivity, stability of MLC in dynamic mode, leaf speed stability, were found within {+-}3% deviation in all cases. Dose rate linearity showed differences when this parameter decreases in dynamic mode. Average dose errors for fixed width gaps moving at constant speed were found to be proportional to gap errors and inversely proportional to the gap width. Output factors differences delivered through a sweeping gap were found less than {+-}1% when the gantry was in a lateral position. For the three MLC systems, when comparing beam profiles for the same field was observed that for mMLC presents the sharpest dose gradient region. In the output factors small differences where observed in every MLC system. Dosimetric leaf gap was determined for MLC 120, mMLC and MLC 52, obtained values for a 6 MV beam are: (0,202 {+-} 0,054) cm; (0,157 {+-} 0,070) cm and (0,189 {+-} 0,081) cm respectively. The transmission showed an increase with depth and field width for 6 MV in all the three systems. Average values obtained with ionization chamber for this energy were: (1,630 {+-} 0,018)% for MLC 120; (1,291 {+-} 0,029)% for mMLC and (1,638 {+-} 0,010)% for MLC 52. When obtained through film irradiation, inter and intra leaf transmission showed an off axis dependent behavior for MLC 120 and mMLC. Scatter produced by MLC as a 6 MV open reference field ratio was: (0,297 {+-} 0,024)% for MLC 120; (0,239 {+-} 0,052)% for

  15. Neutron dosimetry in organs of an adult human phantom using linacs with multileaf collimator in radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ovalle, S. A.; Barquero, R.; Gomez-Ros, J. M.; Lallena, A. M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada y Simulacion, Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Tunja 15001000 (Colombia); Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Clinico Universitario, E-47012 Valladolid (Spain) and Departamento de Radiologia, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid E-47071 (Spain); CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid, E-28040 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, Granada E-18071 (Spain)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To calculate absorbed doses due to neutrons in 87 organs/tissues for anthropomorphic phantoms, irradiated in position supine (head first into the gantry) with orientations anteroposterior (AP) and right-left (RLAT) with a 18 MV accelerator. Conversion factors from monitor units to {mu}Gy per neutron in organs, equivalent doses in organs/tissues, and effective doses, which permit to quantify stochastic risks, are estimated. Methods: MAX06 and FAX06 phantoms were modeled with MCNPX and irradiated with a 18 MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D accelerator whose geometry included a multileaf collimator. Two actual fields of a pelvic treatment were simulated using electron-photon-neutron coupled transport. Absorbed doses due to neutrons were estimated from kerma. Equivalent doses were estimated using the radiation weighting factor corresponding to an average incident neutron energy 0.47 MeV. Statistical uncertainties associated to absorbed doses, as calculated by MCNPX, were also obtained. Results: Largest doses were absorbed in shallowest (with respect to the neutron pathway) organs. In {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, values of 2.66 (for penis) and 2.33 (for testes) were found in MAX06, and 1.68 (for breasts), 1.05 (for lenses of eyes), and 0.94 (for sublingual salivary glands) in FAX06, in AP orientation. In RLAT, the largest doses were found for bone tissues (leg) just at the entrance of the beam in the body (right side in our case). Values, in {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, of 1.09 in upper leg bone right spongiosa, for MAX06, and 0.63 in mandible spongiosa, for FAX06, were found. Except for gonads, liver, and stomach wall, equivalent doses found for FAX06 were, in both orientations, higher than for MAX06. Equivalent doses in AP are higher than in RLAT for all organs/tissues other than brain and liver. Effective doses of 12.6 and 4.1 {mu}SvMU{sup -1} were found for AP and RLAT, respectively. The organs/tissues with larger relative contributions to the effective dose were testes and breasts, in

  16. Matching extended-SSD electron beams to multileaf collimated photon beams in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steel, Jared; Stewart, Allan; Satory, Philip [Auckland Regional Blood and Cancer Service, Auckland City Hospital, 2 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 1023 (New Zealand)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: Matching the penumbra of a 6 MeV electron beam to the penumbra of a 6 MV photon beam is a dose optimization challenge, especially when the electron beam is applied from an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD), as in the case of some head and neck treatments. Traditionally low melting point alloy blocks have been used to define the photon beam shielding over the spinal cord region. However, these are inherently time consuming to construct and employ in the clinical situation. Multileaf collimators (MLCs) provide a fast and reproducible shielding option but generate geometrically nonconformal approximations to the desired beam edge definition. The effects of substituting Cerrobend for the MLC shielding mode in the context of beam matching with extended-SSD electron beams are the subject of this investigation. Methods: Relative dose beam data from a Varian EX 2100 linear accelerator were acquired in a water tank under the 6 MeV electron beam at both standard and extended-SSD and under the 6 MV photon beam defined by Cerrobend and a number of MLC stepping regimes. The effect of increasing the electron beam SSD on the beam penumbra was assessed. MLC stepping was also assessed in terms of the effects on both the mean photon beam penumbra and the intraleaf dose-profile nonuniformity relative to the MLC midleaf. Computational techniques were used to combine the beam data so as to simulate composite relative dosimetry in the water tank, allowing fine control of beam abutment gap variation. Idealized volumetric dosimetry was generated based on the percentage depth-dose data for the beam modes and the abutment geometries involved. Comparison was made between each composite dosimetry dataset and the relevant ideal dosimetry dataset by way of subtraction. Results: Weighted dose-difference volume histograms (DDVHs) were produced, and these, in turn, summed to provide an overall dosimetry score for each abutment and shielding type/angle combination. Increasing the

  17. Matching extended-SSD electron beams to multileaf collimated photon beams in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, Jared; Stewart, Allan; Satory, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Matching the penumbra of a 6 MeV electron beam to the penumbra of a 6 MV photon beam is a dose optimization challenge, especially when the electron beam is applied from an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD), as in the case of some head and neck treatments. Traditionally low melting point alloy blocks have been used to define the photon beam shielding over the spinal cord region. However, these are inherently time consuming to construct and employ in the clinical situation. Multileaf collimators (MLCs) provide a fast and reproducible shielding option but generate geometrically nonconformal approximations to the desired beam edge definition. The effects of substituting Cerrobend for the MLC shielding mode in the context of beam matching with extended-SSD electron beams are the subject of this investigation. Methods: Relative dose beam data from a Varian EX 2100 linear accelerator were acquired in a water tank under the 6 MeV electron beam at both standard and extended-SSD and under the 6 MV photon beam defined by Cerrobend and a number of MLC stepping regimes. The effect of increasing the electron beam SSD on the beam penumbra was assessed. MLC stepping was also assessed in terms of the effects on both the mean photon beam penumbra and the intraleaf dose-profile nonuniformity relative to the MLC midleaf. Computational techniques were used to combine the beam data so as to simulate composite relative dosimetry in the water tank, allowing fine control of beam abutment gap variation. Idealized volumetric dosimetry was generated based on the percentage depth-dose data for the beam modes and the abutment geometries involved. Comparison was made between each composite dosimetry dataset and the relevant ideal dosimetry dataset by way of subtraction. Results: Weighted dose-difference volume histograms (DDVHs) were produced, and these, in turn, summed to provide an overall dosimetry score for each abutment and shielding type/angle combination. Increasing the

  18. Matching extended-SSD electron beams to multileaf collimated photon beams in the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Jared; Stewart, Allan; Satory, Philip

    2009-09-01

    Matching the penumbra of a 6 MeV electron beam to the penumbra of a 6 MV photon beam is a dose optimization challenge, especially when the electron beam is applied from an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD), as in the case of some head and neck treatments. Traditionally low melting point alloy blocks have been used to define the photon beam shielding over the spinal cord region. However, these are inherently time consuming to construct and employ in the clinical situation. Multileaf collimators (MLCs) provide a fast and reproducible shielding option but generate geometrically nonconformal approximations to the desired beam edge definition. The effects of substituting Cerrobend for the MLC shielding mode in the context of beam matching with extended-SSD electron beams are the subject of this investigation. Relative dose beam data from a Varian EX 2100 linear accelerator were acquired in a water tank under the 6 MeV electron beam at both standard and extended-SSD and under the 6 MV photon beam defined by Cerrobend and a number of MLC stepping regimes. The effect of increasing the electron beam SSD on the beam penumbra was assessed. MLC stepping was also assessed in terms of the effects on both the mean photon beam penumbra and the intraleaf dose-profile nonuniformity relative to the MLC midleaf. Computational techniques were used to combine the beam data so as to simulate composite relative dosimetry in the water tank, allowing fine control of beam abutment gap variation. Idealized volumetric dosimetry was generated based on the percentage depth-dose data for the beam modes and the abutment geometries involved. Comparison was made between each composite dosimetry dataset and the relevant ideal dosimetry dataset by way of subtraction. Weighted dose-difference volume histograms (DDVHs) were produced, and these, in turn, summed to provide an overall dosimetry score for each abutment and shielding type/angle combination. Increasing the electron beam SSD increased

  19. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced......-to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system. The dosimetric results were evaluated using gamma index evaluation with static target measurements as reference. Results: The plan quality...

  20. SU-G-JeP1-12: Head-To-Head Performance Characterization of Two Multileaf Collimator Tracking Algorithms for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillet, V; Colvill, E; O’Brien, R; Keall, P; Poulsen, P; Moore, D; Booth, J; Sawant, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multi-leaf collimator (MLC) tracking is being clinically pioneered to continuously compensate for thoracic and abdominal motion during radiotherapy. The purpose of this work is to characterize the performance of two MLC tracking algorithms for cancer radiotherapy, based on a direct optimization and a piecewise leaf fitting approach respectively. Methods: To test the algorithms, both physical and in silico experiments were performed. Previously published high and low modulation VMAT plans for lung and prostate cancer cases were used along with eight patient-measured organ-specific trajectories. For both MLC tracking algorithm, the plans were run with their corresponding patient trajectories. The physical experiments were performed on a Trilogy Varian linac and a programmable phantom (HexaMotion platform). For each MLC tracking algorithm, plan and patient trajectory, the tracking accuracy was quantified as the difference in aperture area between ideal and fitted MLC. To compare algorithms, the average cumulative tracking error area for each experiment was calculated. The two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test was used to evaluate the cumulative tracking errors between algorithms. Results: Comparison of tracking errors for the physical and in silico experiments showed minor differences between the two algorithms. The KS D-statistics for the physical experiments were below 0.05 denoting no significant differences between the two distributions pattern and the average error area (direct optimization/piecewise leaf-fitting) were comparable (66.64 cm2/65.65 cm2). For the in silico experiments, the KS D-statistics were below 0.05 and the average errors area were also equivalent (49.38 cm2/48.98 cm2). Conclusion: The comparison between the two leaf fittings algorithms demonstrated no significant differences in tracking errors, neither in a clinically realistic environment nor in silico. The similarities in the two independent algorithms give confidence in the use of either algorithm for clinical implementation.

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of multi-pattern spatially fractionated radiation therapy using a multi-leaf collimator and collapsed cone convolution superposition dose calculation algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stathakis, Sotirios [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, 7979 Wurzbach Rd, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)], E-mail: stathakis@uthscsa.edu; Esquivel, Carlos; Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Shi, ChengYu; Papanikolaou, Niko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, 7979 Wurzbach Rd, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: In this paper, we present an alternative to the originally proposed technique for the delivery of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (GRID) using multi-leaf collimator (MLC) shaped fields. We employ the MLC to deliver various pattern GRID treatments to large solid tumors and dosimetrically characterize the GRID fields. Methods and materials: The GRID fields were created with different open to blocked area ratios and with variable separation between the openings using a MLC. GRID designs were introduced into the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system, and the dose was calculated in a water phantom. Ionization chamber and film measurements using both Kodak EDR2 and Gafchromic EBT film were performed in a SolidWater phantom to determine the relative output of each GRID design as well as its spatial dosimetric characteristics. Results: Agreement within 5.0% was observed between the Pinnacle{sup 3} predicted dose distributions and the measurements for the majority of experiments performed. A higher magnitude of discrepancy (15%) was observed using a high photon beam energy (18 MV) and small GRID opening. Skin dose at the GRID openings was higher than the corresponding open field by a factor as high as three for both photon energies and was found to be independent of the open-to-blocked area ratio. Conclusion: In summary, we reaffirm that the MLC can be used to deliver spatially fractionated GRID therapy and show that various GRID patterns may be generated. The Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS can accurately calculate the dose of the different GRID patterns in our study to within 5% for the majority of the cases based on film and ion chamber measurements. Disadvantages of MLC-based GRID therapy are longer treatment times and higher surface doses.

  2. SU-G-JeP1-12: Head-To-Head Performance Characterization of Two Multileaf Collimator Tracking Algorithms for Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillet, V; Colvill, E [School of Medecine, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney (Australia); O’Brien, R; Keall, P [School of Medecine, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Poulsen, P [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Moore, D [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Booth, J [Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Sawant, A [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Multi-leaf collimator (MLC) tracking is being clinically pioneered to continuously compensate for thoracic and abdominal motion during radiotherapy. The purpose of this work is to characterize the performance of two MLC tracking algorithms for cancer radiotherapy, based on a direct optimization and a piecewise leaf fitting approach respectively. Methods: To test the algorithms, both physical and in silico experiments were performed. Previously published high and low modulation VMAT plans for lung and prostate cancer cases were used along with eight patient-measured organ-specific trajectories. For both MLC tracking algorithm, the plans were run with their corresponding patient trajectories. The physical experiments were performed on a Trilogy Varian linac and a programmable phantom (HexaMotion platform). For each MLC tracking algorithm, plan and patient trajectory, the tracking accuracy was quantified as the difference in aperture area between ideal and fitted MLC. To compare algorithms, the average cumulative tracking error area for each experiment was calculated. The two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test was used to evaluate the cumulative tracking errors between algorithms. Results: Comparison of tracking errors for the physical and in silico experiments showed minor differences between the two algorithms. The KS D-statistics for the physical experiments were below 0.05 denoting no significant differences between the two distributions pattern and the average error area (direct optimization/piecewise leaf-fitting) were comparable (66.64 cm2/65.65 cm2). For the in silico experiments, the KS D-statistics were below 0.05 and the average errors area were also equivalent (49.38 cm2/48.98 cm2). Conclusion: The comparison between the two leaf fittings algorithms demonstrated no significant differences in tracking errors, neither in a clinically realistic environment nor in silico. The similarities in the two independent algorithms give confidence in the use of either algorithm for clinical implementation.

  3. SU-E-T-515: Field-In-Field Compensation Technique Using Multi-Leaf Collimator to Deliver Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakeman, T [The State University of New York at Buffalo (United States); Wang, IZ [The State University of New York at Buffalo (United States); Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) uses large parallel-opposed radiation fields to suppress the patient's immune system and eradicate the residual cancer cells in preparation of recipient for bone marrow transplant. The manual placement of lead compensators has been used conventionally to compensate for the varying thickness through the entire body in large-field TBI. The goal of this study is to pursue utilizing the modern field-in-field (FIF) technique with the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) to more accurately and efficiently deliver dose to patients in need of TBI. Method: Treatment plans utilizing the FIF technique to deliver a total body dose were created retrospectively for patients for whom CT data had been previously acquired. Treatment fields include one pair of opposed open large fields (collimator=45°) with a specific weighting and a succession of smaller fields (collimator=90°) each with their own weighting. The smaller fields are shaped by moving MLC to block the sections of the patient which have already received close to 100% of the prescribed dose. The weighting factors for each of these fields were calculated using the attenuation coefficient of the initial lead compensators and the separation of the patient in different positions in the axial plane. Results: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were calculated for evaluating the FIF compensation technique. The maximum body doses calculated from the DVH were reduced from the non-compensated 179.3% to 148.2% in the FIF plans, indicating a more uniform dose with the FIF compensation. All calculated monitor units were well within clinically acceptable limits and exceeded those of the original lead compensation plan by less than 50 MU (only ~1.1% increase). Conclusion: MLC FIF technique for TBI will not significantly increase the beam on time while it can substantially reduce the compensator setup time and the potential risk of errors in manually placing lead compensators.

  4. Dose linearity and uniformity of a linear accelerator designed for implementation of multileaf collimation system-based intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Li Sicong; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Yoe-Sein, Maung; Pillai, Susha; Enke, Charles A.; Celi, Juan C.

    2003-01-01

    The dose linearity and uniformity of a linear accelerator designed for multileaf collimation system- (MLC) based IMRT was studied as a part of commissioning and also in response to recently published data. The linear accelerator is equipped with a PRIMEVIEW, a graphical interface and a SIMTEC IM-MAXX, which is an enhanced autofield sequencer. The SIMTEC IM-MAXX sequencer permits the radiation beam to be 'ON' continuously while delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy subfields at a defined gantry angle. The dose delivery is inhibited when the electron beam in the linear accelerator is forced out of phase with the microwave power while the MLC configures the field shape of a subfield. This beam switching mechanism reduces the overhead time and hence shortens the patient treatment time. The dose linearity, reproducibility, and uniformity were assessed for this type of dose delivery mechanism. The subfields with monitor units ranged from 1 MU to 100 MU were delivered using 6 MV and 23 MV photon beams. The doses were computed and converted to dose per monitor unit. The dose linearity was found to vary within 2% for both 6 MV and 23 MV photon beam using high dose rate setting (300 MU/min) except below 2 MU. The dose uniformity was assessed by delivering 4 subfields to a Kodak X-OMAT TL film using identical low monitor units. The optical density was converted to dose and found to show small variation within 3%. Our results indicate that this linear accelerator with SIMTEC IM-MAXX sequencer has better dose linearity, reproducibility, and uniformity than had been reported

  5. Serial tomotherapy vs. MLC-IMRT (Multileaf Collimator Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy) for simultaneous boost treatment large intracerebral lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Dirk; Lohr, Frank; Mai, Sabine; Polednik, Martin; Wenz, Frederik; Dobler, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Recent data suggest that a radiosurgery boost treatment for up to three brain metastases in addition to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is beneficial. Sequential treatment of multiple metastatic lesions is time-consuming and optimal normal tissue sparing is not trivial for larger metastases when separate plans are created and are only superimposed afterwards. Sequential Tomotherapy with noncoplanar arcs and Multi-field IMRT may streamline the process and enable easy simultaneous treatment. We compared plans for 2-3 intracerebral targets calculated with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) based on treatment with MLC or sequential Tomotherapy using the Peacock-System. Treatment time was not to exceed 90 min on a linac with standart dose rate. MIMiC plans without treatment-time restrictions were created as a benchmark. Materials and methods: Calculations are based on a Siemens KD2 linac with a dose rate of 200 MU/min. Step-and-Shoot IMRT is performed with a standard MLC (2 x 29 leaves, 1 cm), serial Tomotherapy with the Multivane-Collimator MIMiC (NOMOS Inc. USA). Treatment plans are created with Corvus 5.0. To create plans with good conformity we chose a noncoplanar beam- and arc geometry for each approach (IMRT 4-, MIMiC 5-couch angles). The benchmark MIMiC plans with maximally steep dose gradients had 9 couch angles. For plan comparison reasons, 10Gy were prescribed to 90% of the PTV. Steepness of dose gradients, homogeneity and conformity were assessed by the following parameters: Volume encompassed by certain isodoses outside the target as well as homogeneity and conformity as indicated by Homogeneity- and Conformity-Index. Results: Plans without treatment-time restrictions had slightest dose to organ at risk (OAR), normal tissue and least Conformity-index. MIMiC- and MLC-IMRT based plans can be treated within the intended period of 90 min, all plans met the required dose. MLC based plans resulted in higher dose to organs at risk (OAR) and dose

  6. SU-G-TeP4-03: A Multileaf Collimator Calibration and Quality Assurance Technique Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebron, S; Yan, G; Li, J; Lu, B; Liu, C [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an accurate and quick multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and quality assurance technique using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) Methods: The MLC models used include the MLCi and Agility (Elekta Ltd). This technique consists of two 22(L)x10(W) cm{sup 2} fields with 0{sup 0} and 180{sup 0} collimator angles centered to an offset EPID. The MLC opening is estimated by calculating the profile at the image’s center in the image’s horizontal direction. Scans in the image’s vertical direction were calculated every 20 pixels in the inner 70% of estimated MLC opening. The profiles’ edges were fitted with linear equations to determine the image’s rotation angle. Then, crossline profiles were scanned at the center of each leaf taking into account the leaf’s width at isocenter and the rotation angle. The profiles’ edges determine the location of the leaves’ edges and these were subtracted from the reference leaf’s position in order to determine the relative leaf offsets. The edge location of all profiles was determined by using the parameterized gradient of the penumbra region. The technique was tested against an established diode array-based method, and for different MLC systems, patterns, gantry angles, days, energies, beam modalities and MLC openings. Results: The differences between the proposed and established methods were 0.26±0.19mm. The leaf offsets’ deviation was <0.3mm (5 months period). For pattern fields, the differences between predetermined and calculated offsets were 0.18±0.18mm. The leaf offset deviation of measurements with different energies and MLC openings were <0.1mm and <0.3mm, respectively. The differences between offsets of FF and FFF beams were 0.01±0.02mm (<0.07mm). The differences between the offsets at different gantry angles were 0.08±0.15mm. Conclusion: The proposed method proved to be accurate and efficient in calculating the relative leaf offsets. Parameterized field edge is essential to

  7. Non-dosimetric quality assurance for the three-dimensional radiation treatment planning systems using a multi-leaf collimator phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateoka, Kunihiko; Nagase, Daiki; Sato, Takahito; Shimizume, Kazunari; Ouchi, Atsushi; Nakata, Kensei; Hareyama, Masato

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of errors and limitations in simulation software for three-dimensional radiation treatment systems (3D-RTPS) is an important issue. Non-dosimetric quality assurance (QA) of the simulation software of 3D-RTPS was evaluated by graphical displays of JAW and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) settings in a 3D-RTPS. The influence of observations made using the phantom depends on human errors and several parameters of the CT scan set, such as slice thickness and spacing, pixel size, partial volume effects and the reconstructed image orientation. We explored the methods that were minimally influenced by these errors and parameters. The QA phantom (MLC phantom) has been designed for checking a JAW and MLC settings in a 3D-RTPS is used for non-dosimetric QA. We analyzed the CT value of the boundary the structures of the MLC phantom. The relative CT value for thickness 1 mm slice in border of each structure body of MLC phantom respectively shows a decrease of about 2%, 4%, 10% by 2 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm. In case of thickness 5 mm slice, the mean deference of border of virtual radiation beams and phantom was 0.8 mm, and standard deviation of them was 0.6 mm. And the mean difference of border of a DRR image and phantom was 0.08 mm and the standard deviation of them 0.6 mm. In case of thickness 2 mm slice, the mean deference of border of virtual radiation beams and phantom was -0.18 mm, and standard deviation of them was 0.32 mm. And the mean difference of border of a DRR image and phantom was 0.87 mm and the standard deviation of them 0.54 mm. The result of the study is useful for improvement in a precision of non-dosimetric QA. Our method of non-dosimetric QA can minimize human error and influence of several parameters of the CT scan set. The MLC phantom is a useful tool in the QA of radiation therapy with application to 3D-RTPS, CT simulators, and virtual simulation packages with MLC display capabilities. (author)

  8. Real-Time Dynamic MLC Tracking for Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne

    Motion management of intra-fraction tumour motion during radiotherapy treatment can be a challenging task in order to achieve tumour control as well as minimizing the dose to the surrounding healthy tissue. Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking is a novel method for intra-fraction...

  9. SU-E-T-604: Penumbra Characteristics of a New InCiseâ„¢ Multileaf Collimator of CyberKnife M6â„¢ System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, M; Jang, S; Ozhasoglu, C; Lalonde, R; Heron, D; Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The InCise™ Multileaf Collimator (MLC) of CyberKnife M6™ System has been released recently. The purpose of this study was to explore the dosimetric characteristics of the new MLC. In particular, the penumbra characteristics of MLC fields at varying locations are evaluated. Methods: EBT3-based film measurements were performed with varying MLC fields ranging from 7.5 mm to 27.5 mm. Seventeen regions of interests (ROIs) were identified for irradiation. These are regions located at the central area (denoted as reference field), at the left/right edge areas of reference open field, at an intermediate location between central and edge area. Single beam treatment plans were designed by using the MultiPlan and was delivered using the Blue Phantom. Gafchromic films were irradiated at 1.5 cm depth in the Blue Phantom and analyzed using the Film Pro software. Variation of maximum dose, penumbra of MLC-defined fields, and symmetry/flatness were calculated as a function of locations of MLC fields. Results: The InCise™ MLC System showed relatively consistent dose distribution and penumbra size with varying locations of MLC fields. The measured maximum dose varied within 5 % at different locations compared to that at the central location and agreed with the calculated data well within 2%. The measured penumbrae were in the range of 2.9 mm and 3.7 mm and were relatively consistent regardless of locations. However, dose profiles in the out-of-field and in-field regions varied with locations and field sizes. Strong variation was seen for all fields located at 55 mm away from the central field. The MLC leakage map showed that the leakage is dependent on position. Conclusion: The size of penumbra and normalized maximum dose for MLC-defined fields were consistent in different regions of MLC. However, dose profiles in the out-field region varied with locations and field sizes.

  10. SU-E-T-604: Penumbra Characteristics of a New InCiseâ„¢ Multileaf Collimator of CyberKnife M6â„¢ System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, M; Jang, S; Ozhasoglu, C; Lalonde, R; Heron, D; Huq, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The InCise™ Multileaf Collimator (MLC) of CyberKnife M6™ System has been released recently. The purpose of this study was to explore the dosimetric characteristics of the new MLC. In particular, the penumbra characteristics of MLC fields at varying locations are evaluated. Methods: EBT3-based film measurements were performed with varying MLC fields ranging from 7.5 mm to 27.5 mm. Seventeen regions of interests (ROIs) were identified for irradiation. These are regions located at the central area (denoted as reference field), at the left/right edge areas of reference open field, at an intermediate location between central and edge area. Single beam treatment plans were designed by using the MultiPlan and was delivered using the Blue Phantom. Gafchromic films were irradiated at 1.5 cm depth in the Blue Phantom and analyzed using the Film Pro software. Variation of maximum dose, penumbra of MLC-defined fields, and symmetry/flatness were calculated as a function of locations of MLC fields. Results: The InCise™ MLC System showed relatively consistent dose distribution and penumbra size with varying locations of MLC fields. The measured maximum dose varied within 5 % at different locations compared to that at the central location and agreed with the calculated data well within 2%. The measured penumbrae were in the range of 2.9 mm and 3.7 mm and were relatively consistent regardless of locations. However, dose profiles in the out-of-field and in-field regions varied with locations and field sizes. Strong variation was seen for all fields located at 55 mm away from the central field. The MLC leakage map showed that the leakage is dependent on position. Conclusion: The size of penumbra and normalized maximum dose for MLC-defined fields were consistent in different regions of MLC. However, dose profiles in the out-field region varied with locations and field sizes

  11. Interplay effect on a 6-MV flattening-filter-free linear accelerator with high dose rate and fast multi-leaf collimator motion treating breast and lung phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netherton, Tucker; Li, Yuting; Nitsch, Paige; Shaitelman, Simona; Balter, Peter; Gao, Song; Klopp, Ann; Muruganandham, Manickam; Court, Laurence

    2018-06-01

    with maximum dose deviations greater than 3.7%, dose deviation as a function of fraction number was protracted. For treatments on the Halcyon 1.0 linear accelerator, the convergence of dose deviation with fraction number happened more slowly than reported for conventional linear accelerators. However, if plan complexity is reduced for IMRT and if tumor motion is less than ~10-mm, interplay is greatly reduced. To minimize dose deviations across multiple fractions for dynamic targets, we recommend limiting treatment plan complexity and avoiding one-arc VMAT on the Halcyon 1.0 linear accelerator when interplay is a concern. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Technical Note: Motion-perturbation method applied to dosimetry of dynamic MLC target tracking—A proof-of-concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feygelman, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.feygelman@moffitt.org; Tonner, Brian; Hunt, Dylan; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Stambaugh, Cassandra [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Previous studies show that dose to a moving target can be estimated using 4D measurement-guided dose reconstruction based on a process called virtual motion simulation, or VMS. A potential extension of VMS is to estimate dose during dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC)-tracking treatments. The authors introduce a modified VMS method and quantify its performance as proof-of-concept for tracking applications. Methods: Direct measurements with a moving biplanar diode array were used to verify accuracy of the VMS dose estimates. A tracking environment for variably sized circular MLC apertures was simulated by sending preprogrammed control points to the MLC while simultaneously moving the accelerator treatment table. Sensitivity of the method to simulated tracking latency (0–700 ms) was also studied. Potential applicability of VMS to fast changing beam apertures was evaluated by modeling, based on the demonstrated dependence of the cumulative dose on the temporal dose gradient. Results: When physical and virtual latencies were matched, the agreement rates (2% global/2 mm gamma) between the VMS and the biplanar dosimeter were above 96%. When compared to their own reference dose (0 induced latency), the agreement rates for VMS and biplanar array track closely up to 200 ms of induced latency with 10% low-dose cutoff threshold and 300 ms with 50% cutoff. Time-resolved measurements suggest that even in the modulated beams, the error in the cumulative dose introduced by the 200 ms VMS time resolution is not likely to exceed 0.5%. Conclusions: Based on current results and prior benchmarks of VMS accuracy, the authors postulate that this approach should be applicable to any MLC-tracking treatments where leaf speeds do not exceed those of the current Varian accelerators.

  13. Technical Note: Motion-perturbation method applied to dosimetry of dynamic MLC target tracking—A proof-of-concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feygelman, Vladimir; Tonner, Brian; Hunt, Dylan; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies show that dose to a moving target can be estimated using 4D measurement-guided dose reconstruction based on a process called virtual motion simulation, or VMS. A potential extension of VMS is to estimate dose during dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC)-tracking treatments. The authors introduce a modified VMS method and quantify its performance as proof-of-concept for tracking applications. Methods: Direct measurements with a moving biplanar diode array were used to verify accuracy of the VMS dose estimates. A tracking environment for variably sized circular MLC apertures was simulated by sending preprogrammed control points to the MLC while simultaneously moving the accelerator treatment table. Sensitivity of the method to simulated tracking latency (0–700 ms) was also studied. Potential applicability of VMS to fast changing beam apertures was evaluated by modeling, based on the demonstrated dependence of the cumulative dose on the temporal dose gradient. Results: When physical and virtual latencies were matched, the agreement rates (2% global/2 mm gamma) between the VMS and the biplanar dosimeter were above 96%. When compared to their own reference dose (0 induced latency), the agreement rates for VMS and biplanar array track closely up to 200 ms of induced latency with 10% low-dose cutoff threshold and 300 ms with 50% cutoff. Time-resolved measurements suggest that even in the modulated beams, the error in the cumulative dose introduced by the 200 ms VMS time resolution is not likely to exceed 0.5%. Conclusions: Based on current results and prior benchmarks of VMS accuracy, the authors postulate that this approach should be applicable to any MLC-tracking treatments where leaf speeds do not exceed those of the current Varian accelerators

  14. SU-F-T-629: Effect of Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) Width On Plan Quality of Single-Isocenter VMAT Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Multiple Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, J; Thomas, E; Wu, X; Fiveash, J; Popple, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Single-isocenter VMAT has been shown able to create high quality plans for complex intracranial multiple metastasis SRS cases. Linacs capable of the technique are typically outfitted with an MLC that consists of a combination of 5 mm and 10 mm leaves (standard) or 2.5 mm and 5 mm leaves (high-definition). In this study, we test the hypothesis that thinner collimator leaves are associated with improved plan quality. Methods: Ten multiple metastasis cases were identified and planned for VMAT SRS using a 10 MV flattening filter free beam. Plans were created for a standard (std) and a high-definition (HD) MLC. Published values for leaf transmission factor and dosimetric leaf gap were utilized. All other parameters were invariant. Conformity (plan and individual target), moderate isodose spill (V50%), and low isodose spill (mean brain dose) were selected for analysis. Results: Compared to standard MLC, HD-MLC improved overall plan conformity (median: Paddick CI-HD = 0.83, Paddick CI-std = 0.79; p = 0.004 and median: RTOG CI-HD =1.18, RTOG CI-std =1.24; p = 0.01 ), improved individual lesion conformity (median: Paddick CI-HD,i =0.77, Paddick CI-std,i =0.72; p < 0.001 and median: RTOG CI-HD,i = 1.28, RTOG CI-std,i =1.35; p < 0.001), improved moderate isodose spill (median: V50%-HD = 37.0 cc, V50%-std = 45.7 cc; p = 0.002), and improved low dose spill (median: dmean-HD = 2.90 Gy, dmean-std = 3.19 Gy; p = 0.002). Conclusion: For the single-isocenter VMAT SRS of multiple metastasis plans examined, use of HD-MLC modestly improved conformity, moderate isodose, and low isodose spill compared to standard MLC. However, in all cases we were able to generate clinically acceptable plans with the standard MLC. More work is need to further quantify the difference in cases with higher numbers of small targets and to better understand any potential clinical significance. This research was supported in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  15. SU-F-T-629: Effect of Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) Width On Plan Quality of Single-Isocenter VMAT Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Multiple Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, J; Thomas, E; Wu, X; Fiveash, J; Popple, R [University Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Single-isocenter VMAT has been shown able to create high quality plans for complex intracranial multiple metastasis SRS cases. Linacs capable of the technique are typically outfitted with an MLC that consists of a combination of 5 mm and 10 mm leaves (standard) or 2.5 mm and 5 mm leaves (high-definition). In this study, we test the hypothesis that thinner collimator leaves are associated with improved plan quality. Methods: Ten multiple metastasis cases were identified and planned for VMAT SRS using a 10 MV flattening filter free beam. Plans were created for a standard (std) and a high-definition (HD) MLC. Published values for leaf transmission factor and dosimetric leaf gap were utilized. All other parameters were invariant. Conformity (plan and individual target), moderate isodose spill (V50%), and low isodose spill (mean brain dose) were selected for analysis. Results: Compared to standard MLC, HD-MLC improved overall plan conformity (median: Paddick CI-HD = 0.83, Paddick CI-std = 0.79; p = 0.004 and median: RTOG CI-HD =1.18, RTOG CI-std =1.24; p = 0.01 ), improved individual lesion conformity (median: Paddick CI-HD,i =0.77, Paddick CI-std,i =0.72; p < 0.001 and median: RTOG CI-HD,i = 1.28, RTOG CI-std,i =1.35; p < 0.001), improved moderate isodose spill (median: V50%-HD = 37.0 cc, V50%-std = 45.7 cc; p = 0.002), and improved low dose spill (median: dmean-HD = 2.90 Gy, dmean-std = 3.19 Gy; p = 0.002). Conclusion: For the single-isocenter VMAT SRS of multiple metastasis plans examined, use of HD-MLC modestly improved conformity, moderate isodose, and low isodose spill compared to standard MLC. However, in all cases we were able to generate clinically acceptable plans with the standard MLC. More work is need to further quantify the difference in cases with higher numbers of small targets and to better understand any potential clinical significance. This research was supported in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  16. SU-E-T-225: Correction Matrix for PinPoint Ionization Chamber for Dosimetric Measurements in the Newly Released Incise™ Multileaf Collimator Shaped Small Field for CyberKnife M6™ Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Li, T; Heron, D; Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC CancerCenter, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For small field dosimetry, such as measurements of output factors for cones or MLC-shaped irregular small fields, ion chambers often Result in an underestimation of the dose, due to both the volume averaging effect and the lack of lateral charged particle equilibrium. This work presents a mathematical model for correction matrix for a PTW PinPoint ionization chamber for dosimetric measurements made in the newly released Incise™ Multileaf collimator fields of the CyberKnife M6™ machine. Methods: A correction matrix for a PTW 0.015cc PinPoint ionization chamber was developed by modeling its 3D dose response in twelve cone-shaped circular fields created using the 5mm, 7.5mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 15mm, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm cones in a CyberKnife M6™ machine. For each field size, hundreds of readings were recorded for every 2mm chamber shift in the horizontal plane. The contribution of each dose pixel to a measurement point depended on the radial distance and the angle to the chamber axis. These readings were then compared with the theoretical dose as obtained with Monte Carlo calculation. A penalized least-square optimization algorithm was developed to generate the correction matrix. After the parameter fitting, the mathematical model was validated for MLC-shaped irregular fields. Results: The optimization algorithm used for parameter fitting was stable and the resulted response factors were smooth in spatial domain. After correction with the mathematical model, the chamber reading matched with the calculation for all the tested fields to within 2%. Conclusion: A novel mathematical model has been developed for PinPoint chamber for dosimetric measurements in small MLC-shaped irregular fields. The correction matrix is dependent on detector, treatment unit and the geometry of setup. The model can be applied to non-standard composite fields and provides an access to IMRT point dose validation.

  17. SU-E-T-225: Correction Matrix for PinPoint Ionization Chamber for Dosimetric Measurements in the Newly Released Incise™ Multileaf Collimator Shaped Small Field for CyberKnife M6™ Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Li, T; Heron, D; Huq, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: For small field dosimetry, such as measurements of output factors for cones or MLC-shaped irregular small fields, ion chambers often Result in an underestimation of the dose, due to both the volume averaging effect and the lack of lateral charged particle equilibrium. This work presents a mathematical model for correction matrix for a PTW PinPoint ionization chamber for dosimetric measurements made in the newly released Incise™ Multileaf collimator fields of the CyberKnife M6™ machine. Methods: A correction matrix for a PTW 0.015cc PinPoint ionization chamber was developed by modeling its 3D dose response in twelve cone-shaped circular fields created using the 5mm, 7.5mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 15mm, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm cones in a CyberKnife M6™ machine. For each field size, hundreds of readings were recorded for every 2mm chamber shift in the horizontal plane. The contribution of each dose pixel to a measurement point depended on the radial distance and the angle to the chamber axis. These readings were then compared with the theoretical dose as obtained with Monte Carlo calculation. A penalized least-square optimization algorithm was developed to generate the correction matrix. After the parameter fitting, the mathematical model was validated for MLC-shaped irregular fields. Results: The optimization algorithm used for parameter fitting was stable and the resulted response factors were smooth in spatial domain. After correction with the mathematical model, the chamber reading matched with the calculation for all the tested fields to within 2%. Conclusion: A novel mathematical model has been developed for PinPoint chamber for dosimetric measurements in small MLC-shaped irregular fields. The correction matrix is dependent on detector, treatment unit and the geometry of setup. The model can be applied to non-standard composite fields and provides an access to IMRT point dose validation

  18. SU-E-T-88: Acceptance Testing and Commissioning Measurements of a Newly Released InCiseâ„¢ Multileaf Collimator for CyberKnife M6â„¢ System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huq, M Saiful; Ozhasoglu, C; Jang, S; Hwang, M; Heron, D; Lalonde, R [UPMC CancerCenter, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accuray recently released a new collimator, the InCise™ Multileaf Collimator (MLC), for clinical use with the CyberKnife M6™ System. This work reports the results of acceptance testing and commissioning measurements for this collimator. Methods: The MLC consists of 41 pairs of 2.5 mm wide leaves projecting a clinical maximum field size of 110 mm x 97.5 mm at 800 mm SAD. The leaves are made of tungsten, 90 mm in height and tilted by 0.5 degree. The manufacturer stated leaf positioning accuracy and reproducibility are 0.5 mm and 0.4 mm respectively at 800 mm SAD. The leaf over-travel is 100% with full interdigitation capability. Acceptance testing included, but are not limited to, the verification of the specifications of various parameters described above, leakage measurements and end-to-end tests. Dosimetric measurements included, but not limited to, measurements of output factors, open beam profiles, tissue-phantom ratios, beam flatness and symmetry, and patient specific QA. Results: All measurements were well within the manufacturer specifications. The values of output factors ranged from 0.804 (smallest field size of 7.6 mm x 7.5 mm) to 1.018 (largest field size of 110.0 mm x 97.5 mm). End-to-end test results for the various tracking modes are: Skull (0.27mm), fiducial (0.16mm), Xsight Spine (0.4mm), Xsight Lung (0.93 mm) and Synchrony (0.43mm). Measured maximum and average leakage was 0.37% and 0.3%, respectively. Patient-specific QA measurements with chamber were all within 5% absolute dose agreement, and film measurements all passed 2%/2mm gamma evaluation for more than 95% of measurement points. Conclusion: The presented results are the first set of data reported on the InCise™ MLC. The MLC proved to be very reliable and is currently in clinical use.

  19. IMRT delivery to a moving target by dynamic MLC tracking: delivery for targets moving in two dimensions in the beam's eye view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQuaid, D; Webb, S

    2006-01-01

    A new modification of the dynamic multileaf collimator (dMLC) delivery technique for intensity-modulated therapy (IMRT) is outlined. This technique enables the tracking of a target moving through rigid-body translations in a 2D trajectory in the beam's eye view. The accuracy of the delivery versus that of deliveries with no tracking and of 1D tracking techniques is quantified with clinically derived intensity-modulated beams (IMBs). Leaf trajectories calculated in the target-reference frame were iteratively synchronized assuming regular target motion. This allowed the leaves defined in the lab-reference frame to simultaneously follow the target motion and to deliver the required IMB without violation of the leaf maximum-velocity constraint. The leaves are synchronized until the gradient of the leaf position at every instant is less than a calculated maximum. The delivered fluence in the target-reference frame was calculated with a simple primary-fluence model. The new 2D tracking technique was compared with the delivered fluence produced by no-tracking deliveries and by 1D tracking deliveries for 33 clinical IMBs. For the clinical IMBs normalized to a maximum fluence of 200 MUs, the rms difference between the desired and the delivered IMB was 15.6 ± 3.3 MU for the case of a no-tracking delivery, 7.9 ± 1.6 MU for the case where only the primary component of motion was corrected and 5.1 ± 1.1 MU for the 2D tracking delivery. The residual error is due to interpolation and sampling effects. The 2D tracking delivery technique requires an increase in the delivery time evaluated as between 0 and 50% of the unsynchronized delivery time for each beam with a mean increase of 13% for the IMBs tested. The 2D tracking dMLC delivery technique allows an optimized IMB to be delivered to moving targets with increased accuracy and with acceptable increases in delivery time. When combined with real-time knowledge of the target motion at delivery time, this technique facilitates

  20. Sci-Fri PM: Radiation Therapy, Planning, Imaging, and Special Techniques - 02: Feasibility of using multileaf collimation for stereotactic radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young; Ruschin, Mark; Tsao, May; Schwartz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    SRS using linac and cones offers steep dose fall-off but a tradeoff exists between conformality and treatment time, which depends on the number of isocentres. Purpose of this study is to quantify planning metrics between cones- and MLC-based SRS for arteriovenous malformation(AVM). Seven AVM cases treated with cones were re-planned with MLC on Pinnacle treatment planning system. Planning target volume(PTV) was created with 1mm uniform margin to the AVM to account for MLC positional variation. Clinically-planned prescription dose(15–25Gy) was used. Four plans were generated per case:non-coplanar VMAT(ncV), single-arc VMAT(saV), non-coplanar IMRT(ncI), non-coplanar conformal(ncC). Plans were compared for conformity(CI), heterogeneity(HI) and gradient(GI) indices and brain doses. Estimated treatment times and monitor units(MU) were compared. Cone-based plans required 2–6 isocentres. Though CI-RTOG was similar for plans(median=0.98), CI-Paddick was most favourable for ncV(median=0.86) and worst for cones(0.54). HI for MLC plans(median=1.19–1.27) were lower than cone-based plans(1.43). GI was similar for all plans. For 2/7 ncC had brainstem maximum dose>16.7Gy and therefore were clinically unacceptable. Brain V12Gy,V10Gy,V2Gy were lowest in the cones plan. ncV brain V12Gy,V10Gy,V2Gy were lowest of all MLC-based plans studied. Treatment MUs were similar for MLC-based plans and up to 70% lower than clinically delivered plans. ncV showed best conformality in this study. Of the MLC-based plans, ncV also showed lowest normal tissue dose with reasonable treatment time.

  1. Sci-Fri PM: Radiation Therapy, Planning, Imaging, and Special Techniques - 02: Feasibility of using multileaf collimation for stereotactic radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young; Ruschin, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto (Canada); Tsao, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto (Canada); Schwartz, Michael [Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery), Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    SRS using linac and cones offers steep dose fall-off but a tradeoff exists between conformality and treatment time, which depends on the number of isocentres. Purpose of this study is to quantify planning metrics between cones- and MLC-based SRS for arteriovenous malformation(AVM). Seven AVM cases treated with cones were re-planned with MLC on Pinnacle treatment planning system. Planning target volume(PTV) was created with 1mm uniform margin to the AVM to account for MLC positional variation. Clinically-planned prescription dose(15–25Gy) was used. Four plans were generated per case:non-coplanar VMAT(ncV), single-arc VMAT(saV), non-coplanar IMRT(ncI), non-coplanar conformal(ncC). Plans were compared for conformity(CI), heterogeneity(HI) and gradient(GI) indices and brain doses. Estimated treatment times and monitor units(MU) were compared. Cone-based plans required 2–6 isocentres. Though CI-RTOG was similar for plans(median=0.98), CI-Paddick was most favourable for ncV(median=0.86) and worst for cones(0.54). HI for MLC plans(median=1.19–1.27) were lower than cone-based plans(1.43). GI was similar for all plans. For 2/7 ncC had brainstem maximum dose>16.7Gy and therefore were clinically unacceptable. Brain V12Gy,V10Gy,V2Gy were lowest in the cones plan. ncV brain V12Gy,V10Gy,V2Gy were lowest of all MLC-based plans studied. Treatment MUs were similar for MLC-based plans and up to 70% lower than clinically delivered plans. ncV showed best conformality in this study. Of the MLC-based plans, ncV also showed lowest normal tissue dose with reasonable treatment time.

  2. Experimental investigation of a moving averaging algorithm for motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction in dynamic MLC target tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jai-Woong; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Cho, Byung-Chul; Suh, Tae-Suk; Keall, Paul [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea 131-700 and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, 131-700 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, 131-700 and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, 131-700 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, 2006 (Australia)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: In dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion tracking with complex intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields, target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction can cause beam holds, which increase beam delivery time by up to a factor of 4. As a means to balance delivery efficiency and accuracy, a moving average algorithm was incorporated into a dynamic MLC motion tracking system (i.e., moving average tracking) to account for target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction. The experimental investigation of the moving average algorithm compared with real-time tracking and no compensation beam delivery is described. Methods: The properties of the moving average algorithm were measured and compared with those of real-time tracking (dynamic MLC motion tracking accounting for both target motion parallel and perpendicular to the leaf travel direction) and no compensation beam delivery. The algorithm was investigated using a synthetic motion trace with a baseline drift and four patient-measured 3D tumor motion traces representing regular and irregular motions with varying baseline drifts. Each motion trace was reproduced by a moving platform. The delivery efficiency, geometric accuracy, and dosimetric accuracy were evaluated for conformal, step-and-shoot IMRT, and dynamic sliding window IMRT treatment plans using the synthetic and patient motion traces. The dosimetric accuracy was quantified via a {gamma}-test with a 3%/3 mm criterion. Results: The delivery efficiency ranged from 89 to 100% for moving average tracking, 26%-100% for real-time tracking, and 100% (by definition) for no compensation. The root-mean-square geometric error ranged from 3.2 to 4.0 mm for moving average tracking, 0.7-1.1 mm for real-time tracking, and 3.7-7.2 mm for no compensation. The percentage of dosimetric points failing the {gamma}-test ranged from 4 to 30% for moving average tracking, 0%-23% for real-time tracking, and 10%-47% for no compensation

  3. Experimental investigation of a moving averaging algorithm for motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction in dynamic MLC target tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jai-Woong; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Cho, Byung-Chul; Suh, Tae-Suk; Keall, Paul

    2011-07-01

    In dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion tracking with complex intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields, target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction can cause beam holds, which increase beam delivery time by up to a factor of 4. As a means to balance delivery efficiency and accuracy, a moving average algorithm was incorporated into a dynamic MLC motion tracking system (i.e., moving average tracking) to account for target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction. The experimental investigation of the moving average algorithm compared with real-time tracking and no compensation beam delivery is described. The properties of the moving average algorithm were measured and compared with those of real-time tracking (dynamic MLC motion tracking accounting for both target motion parallel and perpendicular to the leaf travel direction) and no compensation beam delivery. The algorithm was investigated using a synthetic motion trace with a baseline drift and four patient-measured 3D tumor motion traces representing regular and irregular motions with varying baseline drifts. Each motion trace was reproduced by a moving platform. The delivery efficiency, geometric accuracy, and dosimetric accuracy were evaluated for conformal, step-and-shoot IMRT, and dynamic sliding window IMRT treatment plans using the synthetic and patient motion traces. The dosimetric accuracy was quantified via a tgamma-test with a 3%/3 mm criterion. The delivery efficiency ranged from 89 to 100% for moving average tracking, 26%-100% for real-time tracking, and 100% (by definition) for no compensation. The root-mean-square geometric error ranged from 3.2 to 4.0 mm for moving average tracking, 0.7-1.1 mm for real-time tracking, and 3.7-7.2 mm for no compensation. The percentage of dosimetric points failing the gamma-test ranged from 4 to 30% for moving average tracking, 0%-23% for real-time tracking, and 10%-47% for no compensation. The delivery efficiency of

  4. Synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litzenberg, Dale W.; Hadley, Scott W.; Tyagi, Neelam; Balter, James M.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2007-01-01

    Variations in target volume position between and during treatment fractions can lead to measurable differences in the dose distribution delivered to each patient. Current methods to estimate the ongoing cumulative delivered dose distribution make idealized assumptions about individual patient motion based on average motions observed in a population of patients. In the delivery of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multi-leaf collimator (MLC), errors are introduced in both the implementation and delivery processes. In addition, target motion and MLC motion can lead to dosimetric errors from interplay effects. All of these effects may be of clinical importance. Here we present a method to compute delivered dose distributions for each treatment beam and fraction, which explicitly incorporates synchronized real-time patient motion data and real-time fluence and machine configuration data. This synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction method properly accounts for the two primary classes of errors that arise from delivering IMRT with an MLC: (a) Interplay errors between target volume motion and MLC motion, and (b) Implementation errors, such as dropped segments, dose over/under shoot, faulty leaf motors, tongue-and-groove effect, rounded leaf ends, and communications delays. These reconstructed dose fractions can then be combined to produce high-quality determinations of the dose distribution actually received to date, from which individualized adaptive treatment strategies can be determined

  5. Dynamic-MLC leaf control utilizing on-flight intensity calculations: A robust method for real-time IMRT delivery over moving rigid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Ryan; Papiez, Lech; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy

    2007-01-01

    An algorithm is presented that allows for the control of multileaf collimation (MLC) leaves based entirely on real-time calculations of the intensity delivered over the target. The algorithm is capable of efficiently correcting generalized delivery errors without requiring the interruption of delivery (self-correcting trajectories), where a generalized delivery error represents anything that causes a discrepancy between the delivered and intended intensity profiles. The intensity actually delivered over the target is continually compared to its intended value. For each pair of leaves, these comparisons are used to guide the control of the following leaf and keep this discrepancy below a user-specified value. To demonstrate the basic principles of the algorithm, results of corrected delivery are shown for a leading leaf positional error during dynamic-MLC (DMLC) IMRT delivery over a rigid moving target. It is then shown that, with slight modifications, the algorithm can be used to track moving targets in real time. The primary results of this article indicate that the algorithm is capable of accurately delivering DMLC IMRT over a rigid moving target whose motion is (1) completely unknown prior to delivery and (2) not faster than the maximum MLC leaf velocity over extended periods of time. These capabilities are demonstrated for clinically derived intensity profiles and actual tumor motion data, including situations when the target moves in some instances faster than the maximum admissible MLC leaf velocity. The results show that using the algorithm while calculating the delivered intensity every 50 ms will provide a good level of accuracy when delivering IMRT over a rigid moving target translating along the direction of MLC leaf travel. When the maximum velocities of the MLC leaves and target were 4 and 4.2 cm/s, respectively, the resulting error in the two intensity profiles used was 0.1±3.1% and -0.5±2.8% relative to the maximum of the intensity profiles. For

  6. SU-G-BRA-16: Target Dose Comparison for Dynamic MLC Tracking and Mid- Ventilation Planning in Lung Radiotherapy Subject to Intrafractional Baseline Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menten, MJ; Fast, MF; Nill, S; Oelfke, U [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Lung tumor motion during radiotherapy can be accounted for by expanded treatment margins, for example using a mid-ventilation planning approach, or by localizing the tumor in real-time and adapting the treatment beam with multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking. This study evaluates the effect of intrafractional changes in the average tumor position (baseline drifts) on these two treatment techniques. Methods: Lung stereotactic treatment plans (9-beam IMRT, 54Gy/3 fractions, mean treatment time: 9.63min) were generated for three patients: either for delivery with MLC tracking (isotropic GTV-to-PTV margin: 2.6mm) or planned with a mid-ventilation approach and delivered without online motion compensation (GTV-to-PTV margin: 4.4-6.3mm). Delivery to a breathing patient was simulated using DynaTrack, our in-house tracking and delivery software. Baseline drifts in cranial and posterior direction were simulated at a rate of 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5mm/min. For dose reconstruction, the corresponding 4DCT phase was selected for each time point of the delivery. Baseline drifts were accounted for by rigidly shifting the CT to ensure correct relative beam-to-target positioning. Afterwards, the doses delivered to each 4DCT phase were accumulated deformably on the mid-ventilation phase using research RayStation v4.6 and dose coverage of the GTV was evaluated. Results: When using the mid-ventilation planning approach, dose coverage of the tumor deteriorated substantially in the presence of baseline drifts. The reduction in D98% coverage of the GTV in a single fraction ranged from 0.4-1.2, 0.6-3.3 and 4.5-6.2Gy, respectively, for the different drift rates. With MLC tracking the GTV D98% coverage remained unchanged (+/− 0.1Gy) regardless of drift. Conclusion: Intrafractional baseline drifts reduce the tumor dose in treatments based on mid-ventilation planning. In rare, large target baseline drifts tumor dose coverage may drop below the prescription, potentially affecting clinical

  7. Random and systematic beam modulator errors in dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsai, Homayon; Cho, Paul S; Phillips, Mark H; Giansiracusa, Robert S; Axen, David

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on the dosimetric effects of random and systematic modulator errors in delivery of dynamic intensity modulated beams. A sliding-widow type delivery that utilizes a combination of multileaf collimators (MLCs) and backup diaphragms was examined. Gaussian functions with standard deviations ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 mm were used to simulate random positioning errors. A clinical example involving a clival meningioma was chosen with optic chiasm and brain stem as limiting critical structures in the vicinity of the tumour. Dose calculations for different modulator fluctuations were performed, and a quantitative analysis was carried out based on cumulative and differential dose volume histograms for the gross target volume and surrounding critical structures. The study indicated that random modulator errors have a strong tendency to reduce minimum target dose and homogeneity. Furthermore, it was shown that random perturbation of both MLCs and backup diaphragms in the order of σ = 1 mm can lead to 5% errors in prescribed dose. In comparison, when MLCs or backup diaphragms alone was perturbed, the system was more robust and modulator errors of at least σ = 1.5 mm were required to cause dose discrepancies greater than 5%. For systematic perturbation, even errors in the order of ±0.5 mm were shown to result in significant dosimetric deviations

  8. Dose distribution assessment (comparison) in the target volume treated with VMAT given by the planning system and evaluated by TL dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravim, A.; Sakuraba, R.K.; Campos, L.L., E-mail: ambravim@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes

    2015-07-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a relatively new therapy technique in which treatment is delivered using a cone beam that rotates around the patient. The radiation is delivered in a continuous gantry rotation while the cone beam is modulated by the intertwining of dynamic multileaf collimators (MLCs). Studies of VMAT plans have shown reduction in the treatment delivery time and monitor units (MU) comparable to IMRT plans improving major comfort to the patient and reducing uncertainties associated with patient movement during treatment. The treatment using VMAT minimizes the biological effects of radiation to critical structures near to the target volumes and produces excellent dose distributions. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation is essential for the radiological protection programs for quality assurance and licensing of equipment. For radiation oncology a quality assurance program is essentially to maintain the quality of patient care. As the VMAT is a new technique of radiation therapy it is important to optimize quality assurance mechanisms to ensure that tests are performed in order to preserve the patient and the equipment. This paper aims to determinate the dose distribution in the target volume (tumor to be treated) and the scattered dose distribution in the risk organs for VMAT technique comparing data given by the planning system and thermoluminescent (TL) response. (author)

  9. An open source solution for an in-house built dynamic platform for the validation of stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy for VMAT and IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Luis; Ziebell, Amy; Morton, Jason; Bhat, Madhava

    2016-12-01

    An in-house solution for the verification of dose delivered to a moving phantom as required for the clinical implementation of lung stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy was developed. The superior-inferior movement required to simulate tumour motion during a normal breathing cycle was achieved via the novel use of an Arduino Uno™, a low-cost open-source microcontroller board connected to a high torque servo motor. Slow CT imaging was used to acquire the image set and a 4D cone beam CT (4D-CBCT) verified the efficacy of contoured margins before treatment on the moving phantom. Treatment fields were delivered to a section of a CIRS™ anthropomorphic phantom. Dose verification to the dynamic phantom with Gafchromic EBT3 film using 3 %-1 mm gamma analysis acceptance criteria registered an absolute dose pass rate for IMRT and VMAT of 98 and 96.6 %, respectively. It was verified that 100 % of the PTV received the prescribed dose of 12 Gy per fraction using the dynamic phantom, and no major discrepancy between planned and measured results due to interplay between multileaf collimator sequences and target motion was observed. This study confirmed that the use of an in-house solution using open source hardware and software with existing quality assurance equipment was appropriate in validating a new treatment technique.

  10. Target tracking using DMLC for volumetric modulated arc therapy: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Baozhou; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Papiez, Lech; Oddiraju, Swetha; Yang Deshan; Li, H. Harold [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Target tracking using dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) is a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in radiation therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a DMLC tracking algorithm capable of delivering volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the targets that experience two-dimensional (2D) rigid motion in the beam's eye view. Methods: The problem of VMAT delivery to moving targets is formulated as a control problem with constraints. The relationships between gantry speed, gantry acceleration, MLC leaf-velocity, dose rate, and target motion are derived. An iterative search algorithm is developed to find numerical solutions for efficient delivery of a specific VMAT plan to the moving target using 2D DMLC tracking. The delivery of five VMAT lung plans is simulated. The planned and delivered fluence maps in the target-reference frame are calculated and compared. Results: The simulation demonstrates that the 2D tracking algorithm is capable of delivering the VMAT plan to a moving target fast and accurately without violating the machine constraints and the integrity of the treatment plan. The average delivery time is only 29 s longer than that of no-tracking delivery, 101 versus 72 s, respectively. The fluence maps are normalized to 200 MU and the average root-mean-square error between the desired and the delivered fluence is 2.1 MU, compared to 14.8 MU for no-tracking and 3.6 MU for one-dimensional tracking. Conclusions: A locally optimal MLC tracking algorithm for VMAT delivery is proposed, aiming at shortest delivery time while maintaining treatment plan invariant. The inconsequential increase of treatment time due to DMLC tracking is clinically desirable, which makes VMAT with DMLC tracking attractive in treating moving tumors.

  11. Development of a Multileaf Collimator for Proton Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    the oxygen fraction would be underestimated by the MGH calibration, and the carbon fraction would be overestimated. The differences are likely due...the Roberts Proton Therapy Center. Our long term goal is to simulate and measure proton-induced positron isotope distributions at different time...Dr. Mayer has considerable experience extending from medical physics to image-processing. Ms. Kathleen Noel and Ms. Jean Petrov, both research nurses

  12. Development of a Multileaf Collimator for Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    in 3.3 mm thick waterproof PMMA sleeves within a 30_30_30 cm water phantom with 0.5 cm thick PMMA walls at an SSD of 100 cm, with the xray beam...machines located at WRAMC connected to Internet2 were isolated from those on the WRAMC LAN, with the ‘‘tennis shoe network’’ (thumb drives) used to

  13. Real-time tracking of tumor motions and deformations along the leaf travel direction with the aid of a synchronized dynamic MLC leaf sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, Martin; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Advanced radiotherapeutical techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) are based on an accurate knowledge of the location of the radiation target. An accurate dose delivery, therefore, requires a method to account for the inter- and intrafractional target motion and the target deformation occurring during the course of treatment. A method to compensate in real time for changes in the position and shape of the target is the use of a dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) technique which can be devised to automatically arrange the treatment field according to real-time image information. So far, various approaches proposed for leaf sequencers have had to rely on a priori known target motion data and have aimed to optimize the overall treatment time. Since for a real-time dose delivery the target motion is not known a priori, the velocity range of the leading leaves is restricted by a safety margin to c x v max while the following leaves can travel with an additional maximum speed to compensate for the respective target movements. Another aspect to be considered is the tongue and groove effect. A uniform radiation field can only be achieved if the leaf movements are synchronized. The method presented in this note is the first to combine a synchronizing sequencer and real-time tracking with a dynamic MLC. The newly developed algorithm is capable of online optimizing the leaf velocities by minimizing the overall treatment time while at the same time it synchronizes the leaf trajectories in order to avoid the tongue and groove effect. The simultaneous synchronization is performed with the help of an online-calculated mid-time leaf trajectory which is common for all leaf pairs and which takes into account the real-time target motion and deformation information. (note)

  14. Real-time tracking of tumor motions and deformations along the leaf travel direction with the aid of a synchronized dynamic MLC leaf sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacke, Martin; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2007-11-21

    Advanced radiotherapeutical techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) are based on an accurate knowledge of the location of the radiation target. An accurate dose delivery, therefore, requires a method to account for the inter- and intrafractional target motion and the target deformation occurring during the course of treatment. A method to compensate in real time for changes in the position and shape of the target is the use of a dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) technique which can be devised to automatically arrange the treatment field according to real-time image information. So far, various approaches proposed for leaf sequencers have had to rely on a priori known target motion data and have aimed to optimize the overall treatment time. Since for a real-time dose delivery the target motion is not known a priori, the velocity range of the leading leaves is restricted by a safety margin to c x v(max) while the following leaves can travel with an additional maximum speed to compensate for the respective target movements. Another aspect to be considered is the tongue and groove effect. A uniform radiation field can only be achieved if the leaf movements are synchronized. The method presented in this note is the first to combine a synchronizing sequencer and real-time tracking with a dynamic MLC. The newly developed algorithm is capable of online optimizing the leaf velocities by minimizing the overall treatment time while at the same time it synchronizes the leaf trajectories in order to avoid the tongue and groove effect. The simultaneous synchronization is performed with the help of an online-calculated mid-time leaf trajectory which is common for all leaf pairs and which takes into account the real-time target motion and deformation information.

  15. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: dynamic MLC (DMLC) therapy, multisegment therapy and tomotherapy. An example of QA in DMLC therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.

    1998-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy will make a quantum leap in tumor control. It is the new radiation therapy for the new millennium. The major methods to achieve IMRT are: 1. Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) therapy, 2. multisegment therapy, and 3. tomotherapy. The principles of these 3 techniques are briefly reviewed. Each technique presents unique QA issues which are outlined. As an example this paper will present the results of a recent new study of an important QA concern in DMLC therapy. (orig.) [de

  16. Tolerances on MLC leaf position accuracy for IMRT delivery with a dynamic MLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel, Alejandra; Dunscombe, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The objective determination of performance standards for radiation therapy equipment requires, ideally, establishing the quantitative relationship between performance deviations and clinical outcome or some acceptable surrogate. In this simulation study the authors analyzed the dosimetric impact of random (leaf by leaf) and systematic (entire leaf bank) errors in the position of the MLC leaves on seven clinical prostate and seven clinical head and neck IMRT plans delivered using a dynamic MLC. In-house software was developed to incorporate normally distributed errors of up to ±2 mm in individual leaf position or systematic errors (±1 and ±0.5 mm in all leaves of both leaf banks or +1 mm in one bank only) into the 14 plans, thus simulating treatment delivery using a suboptimally performing MLC. The dosimetric consequences of suboptimal MLC performance were quantified using the equivalent uniform doses (EUDs) of the clinical target volumes and important organs at risk (OARs). The deviation of the EUDs of the selected structures as the performance of the MLC deteriorated was used as the objective surrogate of clinical outcome. Random errors of 2 mm resulted in negligible changes for all structures of interest in both sites. In contrast, systematic errors can lead to potentially significant dosimetric changes that may compromise clinical outcome. If a 2% change in EUD of the target and 2 Gy for the OARs were adopted as acceptable levels of deviation in dose due to MLC effects alone, then systematic errors in leaf position will need to be limited to 0.3 mm. This study provides guidance, based on a dosimetric surrogate of clinical outcome, for the development of one component, leaf position accuracy of performance standards for multileaf collimators.

  17. Optimization of radiotherapy to target volumes with concave outlines: target-dose homogenization and selective sparing of critical structures by constrained matrix inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colle, C; Van den Berge, D; De Wagter, C; Fortan, L; Van Duyse, B; De Neve, W

    1995-12-01

    The design of 3D-conformal dose distributions for targets with concave outlines is a technical challenge in conformal radiotherapy. For these targets, it is impossible to find beam incidences for which the target volume can be isolated from the tissues at risk. Commonly occurring examples are most thyroid cancers and the targets located at the lower neck and upper mediastinal levels related to some head and neck. A solution to this problem was developed, using beam intensity modulation executed with a multileaf collimator by applying a static beam-segmentation technique. The method includes the definition of beam incidences and beam segments of specific shape as well as the calculation of segment weights. Tests on Sherouse`s GRATISTM planning system allowed to escalate the dose to these targets to 65-70 Gy without exceeding spinal cord tolerance. Further optimization by constrained matrix inversion was investigated to explore the possibility of further dose escalation.

  18. Effective source size, yield and beam profile from multi-layered bremsstrahlung targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, R.; Brahme, A.

    1996-01-01

    Modern conformal radiotherapy benefits from heterogeneous dose delivery using scanned narrow bremsstrahlung beams of high energy in combination with dynamic double focused multi-leaf collimation and purging magnets. When using a purging magnet to remove electrons and positrons the target space is limited and unorthodox thin multi-layered targets are needed. A computational technique has therefore been developed to determine the forward yield and the angular distributions of the bremsstrahlung beam as well as the size and location of the effective and the virtual photon point source for arbitrary multi-layer bremsstrahlung targets. The Gaussian approximation of the diffusion equation for the electrons has been used and convolved with the bremsstrahlung production process. For electrons with arbitrary emittance impinging on targets of any multi-layer and atomic number combination, the model is well applicable, at least for energies in the range 1-100 MeV. The intrinsic bremsstrahlung photon profile has been determined accurately by deconvolving the electron multiple scattering process from thin experimental beryllium target profiles. For electron pencil beams incident on a target of high density and atomic number such as tungsten, the size of the effective photon source stays at around a tenth of a millimetre. The effective photon source for low-Z materials such as Be, C and Al is located at depths from 3-7 mm in the target, decreasing with increasing atomic number. The effective photon source at off-axis positions then moves out considerably from the central axis, which should be considered when aligning collimators. For high-Z materials such as tungsten, the location of the effective photon source is at a few tenths of a millimetre deep. The virtual photon point source is located only a few tenths of a millimetre upstream of the effective photon source both for high- and low-Z materials. For 50 MeV electrons incident on multi-layered full range targets the radial

  19. Dynamic simulation of motion effects in IMAT lung SBRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Yin, Lingshu; Shen, Jiajian; Corradetti, Michael N; Kirk, Maura; Munbodh, Reshma; Fang, Penny; Jabbour, Salma K; Simone, Charles B; Yue, Ning J; Rengan, Ramesh; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) has been widely adopted for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. While treatment dose is optimized and calculated on a static Computed Tomography (CT) image, the effect of the interplay between the target and linac multi-leaf collimator (MLC) motion is not well described and may result in deviations between delivered and planned dose. In this study, we investigated the dosimetric consequences of the inter-play effect on target and organs at risk (OAR) by simulating dynamic dose delivery using dynamic CT datasets. Fifteen stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with greater than 10 mm tumor motion treated with SBRT in 4 fractions to a dose of 50 Gy were retrospectively analyzed for this study. Each IMAT plan was initially optimized using two arcs. Simulated dynamic delivery was performed by associating the MLC leaf position, gantry angle and delivered beam monitor units (MUs) for each control point with different respiratory phases of the 4D-CT using machine delivery log files containing time stamps of the control points. Dose maps associated with each phase of the 4D-CT dose were calculated in the treatment planning system and accumulated using deformable image registration onto the exhale phase of the 4D-CT. The original IMAT plans were recalculated on the exhale phase of the CT for comparison with the dynamic simulation. The dose coverage of the PTV showed negligible variation between the static and dynamic simulation. There was less than 1.5% difference in PTV V95% and V90%. The average inter-fraction and cumulative dosimetric effects among all the patients were less than 0.5% for PTV V95% and V90% coverage and 0.8 Gy for the OARs. However, in patients where target is close to the organs, large variations were observed on great vessels and bronchus for as much as 4.9 Gy and 7.8 Gy. Limited variation in target dose coverage and OAR constraints were seen for each SBRT fraction as well as over all

  20. VMAT optimization with dynamic collimator rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Qihui; O'Connor, Daniel; Ruan, Dan; Yu, Victoria; Nguyen, Dan; Sheng, Ke

    2018-04-16

    Although collimator rotation is an optimization variable that can be exploited for dosimetric advantages, existing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) optimization uses a fixed collimator angle in each arc and only rotates the collimator between arcs. In this study, we develop a novel integrated optimization method for VMAT, accounting for dynamic collimator angles during the arc motion. Direct Aperture Optimization (DAO) for Dynamic Collimator in VMAT (DC-VMAT) was achieved by adding to the existing dose fidelity objective an anisotropic total variation term for regulating the fluence smoothness, a binary variable for forming simple apertures, and a group sparsity term for controlling collimator rotation. The optimal collimator angle for each beam angle was selected using the Dijkstra's algorithm, where the node costs depend on the estimated fluence map at the current iteration and the edge costs account for the mechanical constraints of multi-leaf collimator (MLC). An alternating optimization strategy was implemented to solve the DAO and collimator angle selection (CAS). Feasibility of DC-VMAT using one full-arc with dynamic collimator rotation was tested on a phantom with two small spherical targets, a brain, a lung and a prostate cancer patient. The plan was compared against a static collimator VMAT (SC-VMAT) plan using three full arcs with 60 degrees of collimator angle separation in patient studies. With the same target coverage, DC-VMAT achieved 20.3% reduction of R50 in the phantom study, and reduced the average max and mean OAR dose by 4.49% and 2.53% of the prescription dose in patient studies, as compared with SC-VMAT. The collimator rotation co-ordinated with the gantry rotation in DC-VMAT plans for deliverability. There were 13 beam angles in the single-arc DC-VMAT plan in patient studies that requires slower gantry rotation to accommodate multiple collimator angles. The novel DC-VMAT approach utilizes the dynamic collimator rotation during arc

  1. Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    ARL-TR-8234 ● DEC 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations by DeCarlos E...return it to the originator. ARL-TR-8234● DEC 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics...REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 October 2015–30 September 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Visualizing Energy on Target

  2. Dynamic nuclear polarization of irradiated target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polarized nucleon targets used in high energy physics experiments usually employ the method of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to polarize the protons or deuterons in an alcohol. DNP requires the presence of paramagnetic centers, which are customarily provided by a chemical dopant. These chemically doped targets have a relatively low polarizable nucleon content and suffer from loss of polarization when subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation. If the paramagnetic centers formed when the target is irradiated can be used in the DNP process, it becomes possible to produce targets using materials which have a relatively high polarizable nucleon content, but which are not easily doped by chemical means. Furthermore, the polarization of such targets may be much more radiation resistant. Dynamic nuclear polarization in ammonia, deuterated ammonia, ammonium hydroxide, methylamine, borane ammonia, butonal, ethane and lithium borohydride has been studied. These studies were conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center using the Yale-SLAC polarized target system. Results indicate that the use of ammonia and deuterated ammonia as polarized target materials would make significant increases in polarized target performance possible

  3. The effect of respiratory cycle and radiation beam-on timing on the dose distribution of free-breathing breast treatment using dynamic IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chuxiong; Li Xiang; Huq, M. Saiful; Saw, Cheng B.; Heron, Dwight E.; Yue, Ning J.

    2007-01-01

    In breast cancer treatment, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be utilized to deliver more homogeneous dose to target tissues to minimize the cosmetic impact. We have investigated the effect of the respiratory cycle and radiation beam-on timing on the dose distribution in free-breathing dynamic breast IMRT treatment. Six patients with early stage cancer of the left breast were included in this study. A helical computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for treatment planning. A four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scan was obtained right after the helical CT scan with little or no setup uncertainty to simulate patient respiratory motion. After optimizing based on the helical CT scan, the sliding-window dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) leaf sequence was segmented into multiple sections that corresponded to various respiratory phases per respiratory cycle and radiation beam-on timing. The segmented DMLC leaf sections were grouped according to respiratory phases and superimposed over the radiation fields of corresponding 4D CT image set. Dose calculation was then performed for each phase of the 4D CT scan. The total dose distribution was computed by accumulating the contribution of dose from each phase to every voxel in the region of interest. This was tracked by a deformable registration program throughout all of the respiratory phases of the 4D CT scan. A dose heterogeneity index, defined as the ratio between (D 20 -D 80 ) and the prescription dose, was introduced to numerically illustrate the impact of respiratory motion on the dose distribution of treatment volume. A respiratory cycle range of 4-8 s and randomly distributed beam-on timing were assigned to simulate the patient respiratory motion during the free-breathing treatment. The results showed that the respiratory cycle period and radiation beam-on timing presented limited impact on the target dose coverage and slightly increased the target dose heterogeneity. This motion impact

  4. Leaf transmission reduction using moving jaws for dynamic MLC IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidhalter, D.; Fix, M. K.; Niederer, P.; Mini, R.; Manser, P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate to what extent it is possible to use the secondary collimator jaws to reduce the transmitted radiation through the multileaf collimator (MLC) during an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A method is developed and introduced where the jaws follow the open window of the MLC dynamically (dJAW method). With the aid of three academic cases (Closed MLC, Sliding-gap, and Chair) and two clinical cases (prostate and head and neck) the feasibility of the dJAW method and the influence of this method on the applied dose distributions are investigated. For this purpose the treatment planning system Eclipse and the Research-Toolbox were used as well as measurements within a solid water phantom were performed. The transmitted radiation through the closed MLC leads to an inhomogeneous dose distribution. In this case, the measured dose within a plane perpendicular to the central axis differs up to 40% (referring to the maximum dose within this plane) for 6 and 15 MV. The calculated dose with Eclipse is clearly more homogeneous. For the Sliding-gap case this difference is still up to 9%. Among other things, these differences depend on the depth of the measurement within the solid water phantom and on the application method. In the Chair case, the dose in regions where no dose is desired is locally reduced by up to 50% using the dJAW method instead of the conventional method. The dose inside the chair-shaped region decreased up to 4% if the same number of monitor units (MU) as for the conventional method was applied. The undesired dose in the volume body minus the planning target volume in the clinical cases prostate and head and neck decreased up to 1.8% and 1.5%, while the number of the applied MU increased up to 3.1% and 2.8%, respectively. The new dJAW method has the potential to enhance the optimization of the conventional IMRT to a further step

  5. Predicting the effects of organ motion on the dose delivered by dynamic intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.X.; Jaffray, David; Martinez, A.A.; Wong, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Computer-optimized treatment plans, aimed to enhance tumor control and reduce normal tissue complication, generally require non-uniform beam intensities. One of the techniques for delivering intensity-modulated beams is the use of dynamic multileaf collimation, where the beam aperture and field shape change during irradiation. When intensity-modulated beams are delivered with dynamic collimation, intra-treatment organ motion may not only cause geometric misses at the field boundaries but also create hot and cold spots in the target. The mechanism for producing such effects has not been well understood. This study analyzes the dosimetric effects of intra-treatment organ motion on dynamic intensity modulation. A numerical method is developed for predicting the intensity distributions in a moving target before dose is delivered with dynamic intensity modulation. Material and Methods: In the numerical algorithm, the change in position and shape of the beam aperture with time were modeled as a three-dimensional 'tunnel', with the shape of the field aperture described in the x-y plane and its temporal position shown in the z-dimension. A point in the target had to be in the tunnel in order to receive irradiation and the dose to the point was proportional to the amount of time that this point stayed in the tunnel. Since each point in the target were analyzed separately, non-rigid body variations could easily be handled. The dependency of the dose variations on all parameters involved, including the speed of collimator motion, the frequency and amplitude of the target motion, and the size of the field segments, was analyzed. The algorithm was verified by irradiating moving phantoms with beams of dynamically modulated intensities. Predictions were also made for a treatment of a thoracic tumor using a dynamic wedge. The changes of target position with time were based on the MRI images of the chest region acquired using fast MRI scans in a cine fashion for a duration

  6. A method for estimation of accuracy of dose delivery with dynamic slit windows in medical linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravichandran, R.; Binukumar, J.P.; Sivakumar, S.S.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Davis, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) clinical dose delivery is based on computer-controlled multileaf movements at different velocities. To test the accuracy of modulation of the beam periodically, quality assurance (QA) methods are necessary. Using a cylindrical phantom, dose delivery was checked at a constant geometry for sweeping fields. Repeated measurements with an in-house designed methodology over a period of 1 year indicate that the method is very sensitive to check the proper functioning of such dose delivery in medical linacs. A cylindrical perspex phantom with facility to accurately position a 0.6- cc (FC 65) ion chamber at constant depth at isocenter, (SA 24 constancy check tool phantom for MU check, Scanditronix Wellhofer) was used. Dosimeter readings were integrated for 4-mm, 10-mm, 20-mm sweeping fields and for 3 angular positions of the gantry periodically. Consistency of standard sweeping field output (10-mm slit width) and the ratios of outputs against other slit widths over a long period were reported. A 10-mm sweeping field output was found reproducible within an accuracy of 0.03% (n = 25) over 1 year. Four-millimeter, 20-mm outputs expressed as ratio with respect to 10- mm sweep output remained within a mean deviation of 0.2% and 0.03% respectively. Outputs at 3 gantry angles remained within 0.5%, showing that the effect of dynamic movements of multileaf collimator (MLC) on the output is minimal for angular positions of gantry. This method of QA is very simple and is recommended in addition to individual patient QA measurements, which reflect the accuracy of dose planning system. In addition to standard output and energy checks of linacs, the above measurements can be complemented so as to check proper functioning of multileaf collimator for dynamic field dose delivery. (author)

  7. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul; Chul Cho, Byung; Aznar, Marianne; Korreman, Stine; Poulsen, Per; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced by using a leaf position constraint (LPC) that reduces the difference in the position of adjacent MLC leaves in the plan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the LPC on the quality of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans and the effect of the MLC motion pattern on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans with a single 358 deg. arc were generated with LPC priorities of 0 (no LPC), 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 (highest possible LPC), respectively. All the plans had a prescribed dose of 2 Gy x 30, used 6 MV, a maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a collimator angle of 45 deg. or 315 deg. To quantify the plan modulation, an average adjacent leaf distance (ALD) was calculated by averaging the mean adjacent leaf distance for each control point. The linear relationship between the plan quality [i.e., the calculated dose distributions and the number of monitor units (MU)] and the LPC was investigated, and the linear regression coefficient as well as a two tailed confidence level of 95% was used in the evaluation. The effect of the plan modulation on the performance of MLC tracking was tested by delivering the plans to a cylindrical diode array phantom moving with sinusoidal motion in the superior-inferior direction with a peak-to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system

  8. Satellite recovery - Attitude dynamics of the targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Lahr, B. S.

    1986-01-01

    The problems of categorizing and modeling the attitude dynamics of uncontrolled artificial earth satellites which may be targets in recovery attempts are addressed. Methods of classification presented are based on satellite rotational kinetic energy, rotational angular momentum and orbit and on the type of control present prior to the benign failure of the control system. The use of approximate analytical solutions and 'exact' numerical solutions to the equations governing satellite attitude motions to predict uncontrolled attitude motion is considered. Analytical and numerical results are presented for the evolution of satellite attitude motions after active control termination.

  9. TH-AB-202-03: A Novel Tool for Computing Deliverable Doses in Dynamic MLC Tracking Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, M; Kamerling, C; Menten, M; Nill, S; Oelfke, U [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Crijns, S; Raaymakers, B [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In tracked dynamic multi-leaf collimator (MLC) treatments, segments are continuously adapted to the target centroid motion in beams-eye-view. On-the-fly segment adaptation, however, potentially induces dosimetric errors due to the finite MLC leaf width and non-rigid target motion. In this study, we outline a novel tool for computing the 4d dose of lung SBRT plans delivered with MLC tracking. Methods: The following automated workflow was developed: A) centroid tracking, where the initial segments are morphed to each 4dCT phase based on the beams-eye-view GTV shift (followed by a dose calculation on each phase); B) re-optimized tracking, in which all morphed initial plans from (A) are further optimised (“warm-started”) in each 4dCT phase using the initial optimisation parameters but phase-specific volume definitions. Finally, both dose sets are accumulated to the reference phase using deformable image registration. Initial plans were generated according to the RTOG-1021 guideline (54Gy, 3-Fx, equidistant 9-beam IMRT) on the peak-exhale (reference) phase of a phase-binned 4dCT. Treatment planning and delivery simulations were performed in RayStation (research v4.6) using our in-house segment-morphing algorithm, which directly links to RayStation through a native C++ interface. Results: Computing the tracking plans and 4d dose distributions via the in-house interface takes 5 and 8 minutes respectively for centroid and re-optimized tracking. For a sample lung SBRT patient with 14mm peak-to-peak motion in sup-inf direction, mainly perpendicular leaf motion (0-collimator) resulted in small dose changes for PTV-D95 (−13cGy) and GTV-D98 (+18cGy) for the centroid tracking case compared to the initial plan. Modest reductions of OAR doses (e.g. spinal cord D2: −11cGy) were achieved in the idealized tracking case. Conclusion: This study presents an automated “1-click” workflow for computing deliverable MLC tracking doses in RayStation. Adding a non

  10. TH-AB-202-03: A Novel Tool for Computing Deliverable Doses in Dynamic MLC Tracking Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, M; Kamerling, C; Menten, M; Nill, S; Oelfke, U; Crijns, S; Raaymakers, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In tracked dynamic multi-leaf collimator (MLC) treatments, segments are continuously adapted to the target centroid motion in beams-eye-view. On-the-fly segment adaptation, however, potentially induces dosimetric errors due to the finite MLC leaf width and non-rigid target motion. In this study, we outline a novel tool for computing the 4d dose of lung SBRT plans delivered with MLC tracking. Methods: The following automated workflow was developed: A) centroid tracking, where the initial segments are morphed to each 4dCT phase based on the beams-eye-view GTV shift (followed by a dose calculation on each phase); B) re-optimized tracking, in which all morphed initial plans from (A) are further optimised (“warm-started”) in each 4dCT phase using the initial optimisation parameters but phase-specific volume definitions. Finally, both dose sets are accumulated to the reference phase using deformable image registration. Initial plans were generated according to the RTOG-1021 guideline (54Gy, 3-Fx, equidistant 9-beam IMRT) on the peak-exhale (reference) phase of a phase-binned 4dCT. Treatment planning and delivery simulations were performed in RayStation (research v4.6) using our in-house segment-morphing algorithm, which directly links to RayStation through a native C++ interface. Results: Computing the tracking plans and 4d dose distributions via the in-house interface takes 5 and 8 minutes respectively for centroid and re-optimized tracking. For a sample lung SBRT patient with 14mm peak-to-peak motion in sup-inf direction, mainly perpendicular leaf motion (0-collimator) resulted in small dose changes for PTV-D95 (−13cGy) and GTV-D98 (+18cGy) for the centroid tracking case compared to the initial plan. Modest reductions of OAR doses (e.g. spinal cord D2: −11cGy) were achieved in the idealized tracking case. Conclusion: This study presents an automated “1-click” workflow for computing deliverable MLC tracking doses in RayStation. Adding a non

  11. Megavoltage CT imaging as a by-product of multileaf collimator leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchala, K.J.; Kapatoes, J.M.; Olivera, G.H.; Schloesser, E.A.; Reckwerdt, P.J.; Mackie, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    In addition to their potential for the delivery of highly conformal radiation therapy treatments, tomotherapeutic treatments also feature increased potential for verification. For example, megavoltage CT allows one to use the megavoltage linac to generate tomographic images of the patient in the treatment position. This is typically done before or after radiation therapy treatments. However, it is also possible to collect MVCT images entirely during the treatment itself. This process utilizes the leakage radiation through the closed leaves of the Nomos MIMiC MLC, along with slight inefficiencies in treatment delivery, to generate MVCT images during treatment that require neither additional time nor dose. The image quality is limited, yet sufficient to see a patient's external boundary, density differences over 8% for 25.0 mm objects and resolutions of 3.0 mm for high-contrast objects. Such images can potentially be viewed during treatment, used to flag additional CT immediately after the treatment and provide a representation of the patient's exact position during treatment for use with dose reconstruction. (author)

  12. SU-E-T-610: Comparison of Treatment Times Between the MLCi and Agility Multileaf Collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, C; Bowling, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Agility is a new 160-leaf MLC developed by Elekta for use in their Infinity and Versa HD linacs. As compared to the MLCi, the Agility increased the maximum leaf speed from 2 cm/s to 3.5 cm/s, and the maximum primary collimator speed from 1.5 cm/s to 9.0 cm/s. The purpose of this study was to determine if the Agility MLC resulted in improved plan quality and/or shorter treatment times. Methods: An Elekta Infinity that was originally equipped with a 80 leaf MLCi was upgraded to an 160 leaf Agility. Treatment plan quality was evaluated using the Pinnacle planning system with SmartArc. Optimization was performed once for the MLCi and once for the Agility beam models using the same optimization parameters and the same number of iterations. Patient treatment times were measured for all IMRT, VMAT, and SBRT patients treated on the Infinity with the MLCi and Agility MLCs. Treatment times were extracted from the EMR and measured from when the patient first walked into the treatment room until exiting the treatment room. Results: 11,380 delivery times were measured for patients treated with the MLCi, and 1,827 measurements have been made for the Agility MLC. The average treatment times were 19.1 minutes for the MLCi and 20.8 minutes for the Agility. Using a t-test analysis, there was no difference between the two groups (t = 0.22). The dose differences between patients planned with the MLCi and the Agility MLC were minimal. For example, the dose difference for the PTV, GTV, and cord for a head and neck patient planned using Pinnacle were effectively equivalent. However, the dose to the parotid glands was slightly worse with the Agility MLC. Conclusion: There was no statistical difference in treatment time, or any significant dosimetric difference between the Agility MLC and the MLCi

  13. Conformal radiotherapy using multileaf collimation: quality assurance and in vivo dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aletti, P [Centre A. Vautrin, Nancy (France)

    1995-12-01

    The application of quality assurance principles in three dimensional conformal therapy is discussed.Critical requirements in three dimensional radiotherapy are the patient immobilization, the location, and the delivered dose. General recommendations with respect to the equipment for conformal radiotherapy and personnel are made.

  14. An accurate calibration method of the multileaf collimator valid for conformal and intensity modulated radiation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastre-Padro, Maria; Heide, Uulke A van der; Welleweerd, Hans [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2004-06-21

    Because for IMRT treatments the required accuracy on leaf positioning is high, conventional calibration methods may not be appropriate. The aim of this study was to develop the tools for an accurate MLC calibration valid for conventional and IMRT treatments and to investigate the stability of the MLC. A strip test consisting of nine adjacent segments 2 cm wide, separated by 1 mm and exposed on Kodak X-Omat V films at D{sub max} depth, was used for detecting leaf-positioning errors. Dose profiles along the leaf-axis were taken for each leaf-pair. We measured the dose variation on each abutment to quantify the relative positioning error (RPE) and the absolute position of the abutment to quantify the absolute positioning error (APE). The accuracy of determining the APE and RPE was 0.15 and 0.04 mm, respectively. Using the RPE and the APE the MLC calibration parameters were calculated in order to obtain a flat profile on the abutment at the correct position. A conventionally calibrated Elekta MLC was re-calibrated using the strip test. The stability of the MLC and leaf-positioning reproducibility was investigated exposing films with 25 adjacent segments 1 cm wide during three months and measuring the standard deviation of the RPE values. A maximum shift over the three months of 0.27 mm was observed and the standard deviation of the RPE values was 0.11 mm.

  15. An accurate calibration method of the multileaf collimator valid for conformal and intensity modulated radiation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastre-Padro, Maria; Heide, Uulke A van der; Welleweerd, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Because for IMRT treatments the required accuracy on leaf positioning is high, conventional calibration methods may not be appropriate. The aim of this study was to develop the tools for an accurate MLC calibration valid for conventional and IMRT treatments and to investigate the stability of the MLC. A strip test consisting of nine adjacent segments 2 cm wide, separated by 1 mm and exposed on Kodak X-Omat V films at D max depth, was used for detecting leaf-positioning errors. Dose profiles along the leaf-axis were taken for each leaf-pair. We measured the dose variation on each abutment to quantify the relative positioning error (RPE) and the absolute position of the abutment to quantify the absolute positioning error (APE). The accuracy of determining the APE and RPE was 0.15 and 0.04 mm, respectively. Using the RPE and the APE the MLC calibration parameters were calculated in order to obtain a flat profile on the abutment at the correct position. A conventionally calibrated Elekta MLC was re-calibrated using the strip test. The stability of the MLC and leaf-positioning reproducibility was investigated exposing films with 25 adjacent segments 1 cm wide during three months and measuring the standard deviation of the RPE values. A maximum shift over the three months of 0.27 mm was observed and the standard deviation of the RPE values was 0.11 mm

  16. Quality control program of multi-leaf collimation based EPID for teams with Rapidarc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.; Gimeno Olmos, J.; Lliso Valverde, F.; Carmona Mesenguer, V.; Garcia Martinez, M. T.; Palomo Llinares, R.; Ballester Pallares, F.; Perez Calatayud, J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to show a collection of different recommendations on the control of quality of collimation multi-leaf system and present the selection of tests based on the electronic imaging device (EPID) portal that have decided to establish in our Center, where in addition to the requirements of quality assurance generic for collimation multi-leaf system quality control methods have been included for RapidArc. (Author)

  17. 'Tongue-and-groove' effect in intensity modulated radiotherapy with static multileaf collimator fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Que, W; Kung, J; Dai, J

    2004-01-01

    The 'tongue-and-groove problem' in step-and-shoot delivery of intensity modulated radiotherapy is investigated. A 'tongue-and-groove' index (TGI) is introduced to quantify the 'tongue-and-groove' effect in step-and-shoot delivery. Four different types of leaf sequencing methods are compared. The sliding window method and the reducing level method use the same number of field segments to deliver the same intensity map, but the TGI is much less for the reducing level method. The leaf synchronization method of Van Santvoort and Heijmen fails in step-and-shoot delivery, but a new method inspired by the method of Van Santvoort and Heijmen is shown to eliminate 'tongue-and-groove' underdosage completely

  18. Modulated electron radiotherapy treatment planning using a photon multileaf collimator for post-mastectomized chest walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salguero, Francisco Javier; Palma, Bianey; Arrans, Rafael; Rosello, Joan; Leal, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using a photon MLC (xMLC) for modulated electron radiotherapy treatment (MERT) as an alternative to conventional post-mastectomy chest wall (CW) irradiation. A Monte Carlo (MC) based planning system was developed to overcome the inaccuracy of the 'pencil beam' algorithm. MC techniques are known to accurately calculate the dose distributions of electron beams, allowing the explicit simulation of electron interactions within the MLC. Materials and methods: Four real clinical CW cases were planned using MERT which were compared with the conventional electron treatments based on blocks and by a straightforward approach using the MLC, and not the blocks (as an intermediate step to MERT) to shape the same segments with SSD between 60 and 70 cm depending on PTV size. MC calculations were verified with an array of ionization chambers and radiochromic films in a solid water phantom. Results: Tests based on gamma analysis between MC dose distributions and radiochromic film measurements showed an excellent agreement. Differences in the absolute dose measured with a plane-parallel chamber at a reference point were below 3% for all cases. MERT solution showed a better PTV coverage and a significant reduction of the doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Conclusion: MERT can effectively improve the current electron treatments by obtaining a better PTV coverage and sparing healthy tissues. More directly, block-shaped treatments could be replaced by MLC-shaped non-modulated segments providing similar results.

  19. Conformal radiotherapy using multileaf collimation: quality assurance and in vivo dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aletti, P.

    1995-01-01

    The application of quality assurance principles in three dimensional conformal therapy is discussed.Critical requirements in three dimensional radiotherapy are the patient immobilization, the location, and the delivered dose. General recommendations with respect to the equipment for conformal radiotherapy and personnel are made

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of the conformation of the multileaf collimator to irregularly shaped fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, Arthur; Du, Maria; Wong, John; Vicini, Frank; Taylor, Roy; Yu, Cedric; Matter, Richard; Martinez, Alvaro; Yan Di

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of geometric MLC prescription strategies and compare them to those of conventional shielding block. Methods and Materials: Circular fields, square fields, and 12 irregular fields for patients with cancer of the head and neck, lung, and pelvis were included in this study. All fields were shaped using the MLC and conventional blocks. A geometric criterion was defined as the amount of area discrepancy between the MLC and the prescription outline. The 'least area discrepancy' (LAD) of the MLC conformation was searched by selecting the collimator angle, meanwhile keeping a preselected position along the width of the leaf into the prescribed field. Five LAD conventions were studied. These included the LAD-0, LAD-(1(3)), LAD-(1(2)), and LAD-(2(3)) that inserted the leaves at the 0, (1(3)), (1(2)), and (2(3)) of the leaf end into the prescription field, respectively. In addition, the LAD optimization was applied to the transecting (TRN) approach for leaf conformation that prescribed an equal area of overblocking and underblocking under each leaf. Film dosimetry was performed in a 20 cm polystyrene phantom at 10 cm depth 100 cm from source to axis distance (SAD) for both 6 and 18 MV photons with each of the above MLC conformations and conventional blocks. The field penumbra width, defined as the mean of the separation between the 20% and 80% isodose lines along the normal of the prescription field edge, was calculated using both the MLC and conventional block film dosimetry and compared. In a similar way, the d20 is defined as the mean separation between the 20% isodose line and the prescription field edge, and the d80 is defined as the mean separation between the 80% isodose line and the prescription field edge. Results: The field penumbra width for all MLC conventions was approximately 2 mm larger than that of the conventional block. However, there was a larger variation of the separation distribution in the penumbra region of the irregular fields for the MLC, which had a standard deviation of 1 mm (a factor of 5 larger than the conventional block). The dosimetry for the circular fields showed that the LAD-TRN, LAD-(1(2)), and LAD-(1(3)) approximated the conventional blocking well in terms of d20 and d80; however, no single convention produced the best conformation for both measures. The dosimetric result of the patient treatment fields was similar for all sites. The LAD-(1(3)), LAD-(1(2)), and LAD-TRN strategies conformed to within 1 to 1.5 mm of the d80 of the conventional block for both 6 MV and 18 MV, respectively. The LAD-(1(2)) and LAD-TRN conformations were virtually identical, although it is proven analytically that the LAD-(1(2)) convention has the least overall area discrepancy of all conventions. Conclusions: The five MLC conformation conventions resulted in similar dosimetric penumbrae for all field shapes studied. The LAD-(1(3)), LAD-TRN, and LAD-(1(2)) produced the more favorable approximation to conventional block. The field penumbra width, although useful for evaluating irregular field shapes, could not describe the large local variations in the penumbra along the field edge for the MLC. These local variations could be of clinical concern when they appear near vital organs. However, the variation in a local region can potentially be reduced by minimizing the jaggedness of the leaf steps in that local region. The dosimetric results were useful as guidelines for the clinicians in the evaluation and adjustment of MLC leaf positions

  1. A strategy to correct for intrafraction target translation in conformal prostate radiotherapy: Simulation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, P. J.; Lauve, A. D.; Hagan, M. P.; Siebers, J. V.

    2007-01-01

    A strategy is proposed in which intrafraction internal target translation is corrected for by repositioning the multileaf collimator position aperture to conform to the new target pose in the beam projection, and the beam monitor units are adjusted to account for the change in the geometric relationship between the target and the beam. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric stability of the prostate and critical structures in the presence of internal target translation using the dynamic compensation strategy. Twenty-five previously treated prostate cancer patients were replanned using a four-field conformal technique to deliver 72 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Internal translation was introduced by displacing the prostate PTV (no rotation or deformation was considered). Thirty-six randomly selected isotropic displacements of magnitude 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 cm were sampled for each patient, for a total of 3600 errors. Due to their anatomic relation to the prostate, the rectum and bladder contours were also moved with the same magnitude and direction as the prostate. The dynamic compensation strategy was used to correct each of these errors by conforming the beam apertures to the new target pose and adjusting the monitor units using inverse-square and off-axis factor corrections. The dynamic compensation strategy plans were then compared to the original treatment plans via dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Changes of more than 5% of the prescription dose (3.6 Gy) were deemed clinically significant. Compared to the original treatment plans, the dynamic compensation strategy produced small discrepancies in isodose distributions and DVH analyses for all structures considered apart from the femoral heads. These differences increased with the magnitude of the internal motion. Coverage of the PTV was excellent: D 5 , D 95 , and D mean were not increased or decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose for any of the 3600

  2. Experimental targeting of chaos via controlled symbolic dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corron, Ned J.; Pethel, Shawn D.

    2003-01-01

    In this Letter, we report experimental targeting in a chaotic system by controlling symbolic dynamics. We acquire and control an electronic circuit using small perturbations to elicit a desired objective state starting from an arbitrary, uncontrolled state. The control perturbations are calculated using a symbolic targeting sequence and applied using dynamic limiting control

  3. Visualizing Energy on Target: Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents. Citation of manufacturer’s or...all atoms to the interior of the cell. After equilibration, N2 was driven into the target at multiple impact velocities, vimp. Momentum of N2 toward

  4. Dynamics of interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cang Yu; Wang Wei; Zhang Jie

    2001-01-01

    Using Saha equation, a simple model is proposed for the dynamics of interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and solid targets. An adiabatic expansion model is adopted to study the expansion phase after the heating phase. Temporal evolvement of the dynamics of the interaction is obtained, from which the electron temperature, density, ionization balances can be determined

  5. Moving Target Techniques: Cyber Resilience throught Randomization, Diversity, and Dynamism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-03

    attacks. Simply put, these techniques turn systems into moving targets that will be hard for cyber attackers to compromise. MT techniques leverage...been diversified, they can attack it as if it was not diversified at all. Dynamic Data: Techniques in the dynamic data domain change the format

  6. Dynamic response of the target container under pulsed heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liping Ni [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The structural mechanics of a liquid target container for pulsed spallation sources have been simulated using both a commercial code and a PSI-developed program. Results from the transient thermal-structural analysis showed that, due to inertia effects, the dynamic stress in the target container is contributed mainly from direct heating in the initial time stage, and later from the pressure wave in the target liquid once it reaches the wall. (author) figs., tab., refs.

  7. Detailed analysis of latencies in image-based dynamic MLC tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Cho, Byungchul; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Previous measurements of the accuracy of image-based real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking show that the major contributor to errors is latency, i.e., the delay between target motion and MLC response. Therefore the purpose of this work was to develop a method for detailed analysis of latency contributions during image-based DMLC tracking. Methods: A prototype DMLC tracking system integrated with a linear accelerator was used for tracking a phantom with an embedded fiducial marker during treatment delivery. The phantom performed a sinusoidal motion. Real-time target localization was based on x-ray images acquired either with a portal imager or a kV imager mounted orthogonal to the treatment beam. Each image was stored in a file on the imaging workstation. A marker segmentation program opened the image file, determined the marker position in the image, and transferred it to the DMLC tracking program. This program estimated the three-dimensional target position by a single-imager method and adjusted the MLC aperture to the target position. Imaging intervals ΔT image from 150 to 1000 ms were investigated for both kV and MV imaging. After the experiments, the recorded images were synchronized with MLC log files generated by the MLC controller and tracking log files generated by the tracking program. This synchronization allowed temporal analysis of the information flow for each individual image from acquisition to completed MLC adjustment. The synchronization also allowed investigation of the MLC adjustment dynamics on a considerably finer time scale than the 50 ms time resolution of the MLC log files. Results: For ΔT image =150 ms, the total time from image acquisition to completed MLC adjustment was 380±9 ms for MV and 420±12 ms for kV images. The main part of this time was from image acquisition to completed image file writing (272 ms for MV and 309 ms for kV). Image file opening (38 ms), marker segmentation (4 ms), MLC position

  8. Detailed analysis of latencies in image-based dynamic MLC tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Cho, Byungchul; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Oncology and Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Previous measurements of the accuracy of image-based real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking show that the major contributor to errors is latency, i.e., the delay between target motion and MLC response. Therefore the purpose of this work was to develop a method for detailed analysis of latency contributions during image-based DMLC tracking. Methods: A prototype DMLC tracking system integrated with a linear accelerator was used for tracking a phantom with an embedded fiducial marker during treatment delivery. The phantom performed a sinusoidal motion. Real-time target localization was based on x-ray images acquired either with a portal imager or a kV imager mounted orthogonal to the treatment beam. Each image was stored in a file on the imaging workstation. A marker segmentation program opened the image file, determined the marker position in the image, and transferred it to the DMLC tracking program. This program estimated the three-dimensional target position by a single-imager method and adjusted the MLC aperture to the target position. Imaging intervals {Delta}T{sub image} from 150 to 1000 ms were investigated for both kV and MV imaging. After the experiments, the recorded images were synchronized with MLC log files generated by the MLC controller and tracking log files generated by the tracking program. This synchronization allowed temporal analysis of the information flow for each individual image from acquisition to completed MLC adjustment. The synchronization also allowed investigation of the MLC adjustment dynamics on a considerably finer time scale than the 50 ms time resolution of the MLC log files. Results: For {Delta}T{sub image}=150 ms, the total time from image acquisition to completed MLC adjustment was 380{+-}9 ms for MV and 420{+-}12 ms for kV images. The main part of this time was from image acquisition to completed image file writing (272 ms for MV and 309 ms for kV). Image file opening (38 ms), marker segmentation (4 ms

  9. Dependence of ICF reaction dynamics on target structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Kamal; Dutt, Sunil; GulI, Muntazir; Ahmad, Tauseef; Rizvi, I.A.; Ali, Sabir; Agarwal, Avinash; Kumar, R.; Chaubey, A.K.

    2016-01-01

    The projectile structure is also found responsible for the ICF reaction processes. It is found that projectile having bigger alpha cluster is more unstable towards break up. In this context, a comparative study of 12 C and 16 O ion-beams induced reactions with different targets has been done. The deduced ICF contributions for different systems have been plotted against the target charge of different targets. It is observed that target properties may also be responsible for the interplay between CF and ICF reaction dynamics

  10. Fast regional readout CMOS Image Sensor for dynamic MLC tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, H.; Harris, E.; Osmond, J.; Evans, P.

    2014-03-01

    Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) require verification of the complex beam delivery including tracking of multileaf collimators (MLC) and monitoring the dose rate. This work explores the feasibility of a prototype Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor Image Sensor (CIS) for tracking these complex treatments by utilising fast, region of interest (ROI) read out functionality. An automatic edge tracking algorithm was used to locate the MLC leaves edges moving at various speeds (from a moving triangle field shape) and imaged with various sensor frame rates. The CIS demonstrates successful edge detection of the dynamic MLC motion within accuracy of 1.0 mm. This demonstrates the feasibility of the sensor to verify treatment delivery involving dynamic MLC up to ~400 frames per second (equivalent to the linac pulse rate), which is superior to any current techniques such as using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). CIS provides the basis to an essential real-time verification tool, useful in accessing accurate delivery of complex high energy radiation to the tumour and ultimately to achieve better cure rates for cancer patients.

  11. Fast regional readout CMOS image sensor for dynamic MLC tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zin, H; Harris, E; Osmond, J; Evans, P

    2014-01-01

    Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) require verification of the complex beam delivery including tracking of multileaf collimators (MLC) and monitoring the dose rate. This work explores the feasibility of a prototype Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor Image Sensor (CIS) for tracking these complex treatments by utilising fast, region of interest (ROI) read out functionality. An automatic edge tracking algorithm was used to locate the MLC leaves edges moving at various speeds (from a moving triangle field shape) and imaged with various sensor frame rates. The CIS demonstrates successful edge detection of the dynamic MLC motion within accuracy of 1.0 mm. This demonstrates the feasibility of the sensor to verify treatment delivery involving dynamic MLC up to ∼400 frames per second (equivalent to the linac pulse rate), which is superior to any current techniques such as using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). CIS provides the basis to an essential real-time verification tool, useful in accessing accurate delivery of complex high energy radiation to the tumour and ultimately to achieve better cure rates for cancer patients.

  12. Dynamic effects of interaction of composite projectiles with targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharov, V. M. [Scientific Research Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics of Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Avenue, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The process of high-speed impact of projectiles against targets of finite thickness is experimentally investigated. Medium-hard steel plates are used as targets. The objective of this research is to carry out a comparative analysis of dynamic effects of interaction of various types of projectiles with targets, such as characteristics of destruction of the target, the state of the projectile behind the target, and particularities of the after-penetration stream of fragments after the target has been pierced. The projectiles are made of composites on the basis of tungsten carbide obtained by caking and the SHS-technology. To compare effectiveness of composite projectiles steel projectiles are used. Their effectiveness was estimated in terms of the ballistic limit. High density projectiles obtained by means of the SHS-technology are shown to produce results comparable in terms of the ballistic limit with high-strength projectiles that contain tungsten received by caking.

  13. Qweak Data Analysis for Target Modeling Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Covrig, Silviu

    2015-04-01

    The 2.5 kW liquid hydrogen (LH2) target used in the Qweak parity violation experiment is the highest power LH2 target in the world and the first to be designed with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at Jefferson Lab. The Qweak experiment determined the weak charge of the proton by measuring the parity-violating elastic scattering asymmetry of longitudinally polarized electrons from unpolarized liquid hydrogen at small momentum transfer (Q2 = 0 . 025 GeV2). This target met the design goals of bench-marked with the Qweak target data. This work is an essential ingredient in future designs of very high power low noise targets like MOLLER (5 kW, target noise asymmetry contribution < 25 ppm) and MESA (4.5 kW).

  14. Eye tracking a self-moved target with complex hand-target dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landelle, Caroline; Montagnini, Anna; Madelain, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the ability to track with the eye a moving target is substantially improved when the target is self-moved by the subject's hand compared with when being externally moved. Here, we explored a situation in which the mapping between hand movement and target motion was perturbed by simulating an elastic relationship between the hand and target. Our objective was to determine whether the predictive mechanisms driving eye-hand coordination could be updated to accommodate this complex hand-target dynamics. To fully appreciate the behavioral effects of this perturbation, we compared eye tracking performance when self-moving a target with a rigid mapping (simple) and a spring mapping as well as when the subject tracked target trajectories that he/she had previously generated when using the rigid or spring mapping. Concerning the rigid mapping, our results confirmed that smooth pursuit was more accurate when the target was self-moved than externally moved. In contrast, with the spring mapping, eye tracking had initially similar low spatial accuracy (though shorter temporal lag) in the self versus externally moved conditions. However, within ∼5 min of practice, smooth pursuit improved in the self-moved spring condition, up to a level similar to the self-moved rigid condition. Subsequently, when the mapping unexpectedly switched from spring to rigid, the eye initially followed the expected target trajectory and not the real one, thereby suggesting that subjects used an internal representation of the new hand-target dynamics. Overall, these results emphasize the stunning adaptability of smooth pursuit when self-maneuvering objects with complex dynamics. PMID:27466129

  15. Target acquisition performance : Effects of target aspect angle, dynamic imaging and signal processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, J.A.; Bijl, P.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Dijk, J.

    2008-01-01

    In an extensive Target Acquisition (TA) performance study, we recorded static and dynamic imagery of a set of military and civilian two-handheld objects at a range of distances and aspect angles with an under-sampled uncooled thermal imager. Next, we applied signal processing techniques including

  16. The Quadrotor Dynamic Modeling and Indoor Target Tracking Control Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A reliable nonlinear dynamic model of the quadrotor is presented. The nonlinear dynamic model includes actuator dynamic and aerodynamic effect. Since the rotors run near a constant hovering speed, the dynamic model is simplified at hovering operating point. Based on the simplified nonlinear dynamic model, the PID controllers with feedback linearization and feedforward control are proposed using the backstepping method. These controllers are used to control both the attitude and position of the quadrotor. A fully custom quadrotor is developed to verify the correctness of the dynamic model and control algorithms. The attitude of the quadrotor is measured by inertia measurement unit (IMU. The position of the quadrotor in a GPS-denied environment, especially indoor environment, is estimated from the downward camera and ultrasonic sensor measurements. The validity and effectiveness of the proposed dynamic model and control algorithms are demonstrated by experimental results. It is shown that the vehicle achieves robust vision-based hovering and moving target tracking control.

  17. An experimental comparison of conventional two-bank and novel four-bank dynamic MLC tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, G A; Clowes, P; McQuaid, D; Evans, P M; Webb, S; Poludniowski, G

    2013-01-01

    The AccuLeaf mMLC featuring four multileaf-collimator (MLC) banks has been used for the first time for an experimental comparison of conventional two-bank with novel four-bank dynamic MLC tracking of a two-dimensional sinusoidal respiratory motion. This comparison was performed for a square aperture, and for three conformal treatment apertures from clinical radiotherapy lung cancer patients. The system latency of this prototype tracking system was evaluated and found to be 1.0 s and the frequency at which MLC positions could be updated, 1 Hz, and therefore accurate MLC tracking of irregular patient motion would be difficult with the system in its current form. The MLC leaf velocity required for two-bank-MLC and four-bank-MLC tracking was evaluated for the apertures studied and a substantial decrease was found in the maximum MLC velocity required when four-banks were used for tracking rather than two. A dosimetric comparison of the two techniques was also performed and minimal difference was found between two-bank-MLC and four-bank-MLC tracking. The use of four MLC banks for dynamic MLC tracking is shown to be potentially advantageous for increasing the delivery efficiency compared with two-bank-MLC tracking where difficulties are encountered if large leaf shifts are required to track motion perpendicular to the direction of leaf travel. (paper)

  18. A Monte Carlo dosimetric quality assurance system for dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takegawa, Hideki; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Teshima, Teruki; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Yano, Shinsuke; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation system, which can resolve dosimetric issues derived from multileaf collimator (MLC) design for routine dosimetric quality assurance (QA) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The treatment head of the medical linear accelerator equipped with MLC was modeled using the EGS4 MC code. A graphical user interface (GUI) application was developed to implement MC dose computation in the CT-based patient model and compare the MC calculated results with those of a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) system, Varian Eclipse. To reduce computation time, the EGS4 MC code has been parallelized on massive parallel processing (MPP) system using the message passing interface (MPI). The MC treatment head model and MLC model were validated by the measurement data sets of percentage depth dose (PDD) and off-center ratio (OCR) in the water phantom and the film measurements for the static and dynamic test patterns, respectively. In the treatment head model, the MC calculated results agreed with those of measurements for both of PDD and OCR. The MC could reproduce all of the MLC dosimetric effects. A quantitative comparison between the results of MC and Eclipse was successfully performed with the GUI application. Parallel speed-up became almost linear. An MC dosimetric QA system for dynamic IMRT has been developed, however there were large dose discrepancies between the MC and the measurement in the MLC model simulation, which are now being investigated. (author)

  19. Multileaf Collimator Tracking Improves Dose Delivery for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy: Results of the First Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy T; O'Brien, Ricky T

    2015-01-01

    was tested for each dose-volume value via analysis of variance using the F test. RESULTS: Of the 513 fractions delivered, 475 (93%) were suitable for analysis. The mean difference and standard deviation between the planned and treated MLC tracking doses and the planned and without-MLC tracking doses for all...... 475 fractions were, respectively, PTV D99% -0.8% ± 1.1% versus -2.1% ± 2.7%; CTV D99% -0.6% ± 0.8% versus -0.6% ± 1.1%; rectum V65% 1.6% ± 7.9% versus -1.2% ± 18%; and bladder V65% 0.5% ± 4.4% versus -0.0% ± 9.2% (P

  20. Dynamic interactions between visual working memory and saccade target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneegans, Sebastian; Spencer, John P.; Schöner, Gregor; Hwang, Seongmin; Hollingworth, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recent psychophysical experiments have shown that working memory for visual surface features interacts with saccadic motor planning, even in tasks where the saccade target is unambiguously specified by spatial cues. Specifically, a match between a memorized color and the color of either the designated target or a distractor stimulus influences saccade target selection, saccade amplitudes, and latencies in a systematic fashion. To elucidate these effects, we present a dynamic neural field model in combination with new experimental data. The model captures the neural processes underlying visual perception, working memory, and saccade planning relevant to the psychophysical experiment. It consists of a low-level visual sensory representation that interacts with two separate pathways: a spatial pathway implementing spatial attention and saccade generation, and a surface feature pathway implementing color working memory and feature attention. Due to bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and feature attention in the model, the working memory content can indirectly exert an effect on perceptual processing in the low-level sensory representation. This in turn biases saccadic movement planning in the spatial pathway, allowing the model to quantitatively reproduce the observed interaction effects. The continuous coupling between representations in the model also implies that modulation should be bidirectional, and model simulations provide specific predictions for complementary effects of saccade target selection on visual working memory. These predictions were empirically confirmed in a new experiment: Memory for a sample color was biased toward the color of a task-irrelevant saccade target object, demonstrating the bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and perceptual processing. PMID:25228628

  1. Dynamic interactions between visual working memory and saccade target selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneegans, Sebastian; Spencer, John P; Schöner, Gregor; Hwang, Seongmin; Hollingworth, Andrew

    2014-09-16

    Recent psychophysical experiments have shown that working memory for visual surface features interacts with saccadic motor planning, even in tasks where the saccade target is unambiguously specified by spatial cues. Specifically, a match between a memorized color and the color of either the designated target or a distractor stimulus influences saccade target selection, saccade amplitudes, and latencies in a systematic fashion. To elucidate these effects, we present a dynamic neural field model in combination with new experimental data. The model captures the neural processes underlying visual perception, working memory, and saccade planning relevant to the psychophysical experiment. It consists of a low-level visual sensory representation that interacts with two separate pathways: a spatial pathway implementing spatial attention and saccade generation, and a surface feature pathway implementing color working memory and feature attention. Due to bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and feature attention in the model, the working memory content can indirectly exert an effect on perceptual processing in the low-level sensory representation. This in turn biases saccadic movement planning in the spatial pathway, allowing the model to quantitatively reproduce the observed interaction effects. The continuous coupling between representations in the model also implies that modulation should be bidirectional, and model simulations provide specific predictions for complementary effects of saccade target selection on visual working memory. These predictions were empirically confirmed in a new experiment: Memory for a sample color was biased toward the color of a task-irrelevant saccade target object, demonstrating the bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and perceptual processing. © 2014 ARVO.

  2. Kinetic studies of ICF target dynamics with ePLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. J.

    2016-10-01

    The ePLAS code was recently used1 to show that a modeling change from artificial to real viscosity can result in a decrease of the predicted performance of ICF targets. This code typically follows either fluid or PIC electrons with fluid ions in self-consistent E - and B - fields computed by the Implicit Moment Method2. For the present study the ions have instead been run as PIC particles undergoing Krook-like self-collisions. The ePLAS collision model continually redistributes the ion particle properties toward a local Maxwellian, while conserving the mean density, momentum and energy. Whereas the use of real viscosity captures large Knudsen Number effects as the active target dimensions shrink below the ion mean-free-path, the new kinetic modeling can manifest additional effects such as collisional shock precursors3 from the escape and streaming of the fastest particle ions. In 2D cylindrical geometry we will explore how such kinetic shock extensions might affect shell and core compression dynamics in ICF target implosions.

  3. Dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device for verification of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, Peter B.; Popescu, Carmen C.

    2003-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for verification of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery were investigated. The EPID was utilized with continuous frame-averaging during the beam delivery. Properties studied included effect of buildup, dose linearity, field size response, sampling of rapid multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf speeds, response to dose-rate fluctuations, memory effect, and reproducibility. The dependence of response on EPID calibration and a dead time in image frame acquisition occurring every 64 frames were measured. EPID measurements were also compared to ion chamber and film for open and wedged static fields and IMRT fields. The EPID was linear with dose and dose rate, and response to MLC leaf speeds up to 2.5 cm s-1 was found to be linear. A field size dependent response of up to 5% relative to d max ion-chamber measurement was found. Reproducibility was within 0.8% (1 standard deviation) for an IMRT delivery recorded at intervals over a period of one month. The dead time in frame acquisition resulted in errors in the EPID that increased with leaf speed and were over 20% for a 1 cm leaf gap moving at 1.0 cm s-1. The EPID measurements were also found to depend on the input beam profile utilized for EPID flood-field calibration. The EPID shows promise as a device for verification of IMRT, the major limitation currently being due to dead-time in frame acquisition

  4. Implementation and acceptance of dynamic MLC for IMRT and VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, B.; Marquina, J.; Ramirez, J.; Gonzales, A.

    2014-08-01

    The use of Multi-leaf Collimator (MLC) in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for dynamic treatment techniques as Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) makes that the movement controls as the speed of the MLC are quantified by means of an acceptance test. The objective determination of the operation regulations of the radiotherapy equipment requires ideally the establishment of the quantitative relationship among the performance deviations and clinical results or some acceptable substitute. Different protocols exist detailed with parameters and acceptance ranges according to the MLC thickness. In our case the acceptance test was carried out for 120-MLC of Trilogy equipment brand Varian. For all the test were used 300-200 Um for each formed beam lets; source-surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm. 9 acceptance tests were used each one with different purposes like to quantify, synchronization, stability, complexity, precision, positioning, conformity, dynamic movements for the case of dynamic wedges, consecutive moves, among others, for the measurements were used film badges dosimetry (Gafchromic Ebt-3 scanner Epson expression 10000 XL); additionally the results were compared with a diodes arrangement Map-Check 2 brand Sun Nuclear; that consists of 1527 diodes prepared in a field of 32 x 26 cm located at a distance of 1 cm parallel, 0.5 cm diagonally. All the developed tests were inside the acceptance tolerance parameters when comparing the obtained result regarding the badges and the Map-Check was found a discrepancy of 0.01%, what gives a treatment certainty to the moment to impart volumetric dose in dynamic fields to the patients. (Author)

  5. Efforts towards a dynamically polarised HD-target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, E.; Goertz, St.; Harmsen, J.; Heckmann, J.; Meier, A.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G.

    2004-01-01

    The molecular hydrogen isotopes contain no unpolarisable background. From this point of view they appear to be the material of choice for a polarised bulk target in scattering experiments. The fast nuclear relaxation of H 2 and D 2 is one reason that these substances are not highly polarisable. This fact brings hydrogendeuteride (HD) into focus. In Bochum a device to freeze out gases into the consisting 4 He-cryostat has been built up. The principle of the Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation requires a sufficient amount of paramagnetic electrons. These have been produced by cracking HD molecules at 1 K using a 90 Sr β-source with an activity of 3.7 GBq. Six days of effective irradiation resulted in a density of paramagnetic centres in the order of 10 18 spins/cm 3 . This could be estimated from bolometric electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. Dynamic polarisation could not be achieved. This is accounted to isotopic impurities in the used HD, which accelerate the nuclear relaxation. The constant of ortho-para conversion in H 2 could be confirmed to be 1.9%/h

  6. Melatonin: A Mitochondrial Targeting Molecule Involving Mitochondrial Protection and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Qin, Lilan; Reiter, Russel J.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has been speculated to be mainly synthesized by mitochondria. This speculation is supported by the recent discovery that aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase/serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT/SNAT) is localized in mitochondria of oocytes and the isolated mitochondria generate melatonin. We have also speculated that melatonin is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. It accumulates in mitochondria with high concentration against a concentration gradient. This is probably achieved by an active transportation via mitochondrial melatonin transporter(s). Melatonin protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), and activating uncoupling proteins (UCPs). Thus, melatonin maintains the optimal mitochondrial membrane potential and preserves mitochondrial functions. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is also regulated by melatonin. In most cases, melatonin reduces mitochondrial fission and elevates their fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics exhibit an oscillatory pattern which matches the melatonin circadian secretory rhythm in pinealeocytes and probably in other cells. Recently, melatonin has been found to promote mitophagy and improve homeostasis of mitochondria. PMID:27999288

  7. Dynamics of Laser-Driven Shock Waves in Solid Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Grun, J.; Metzler, N.; Zalesak, S. T.; Gardner, J. H.; Oh, J.; Harding, E. C.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate shock timing is a key issue of both indirect- and direct-drive laser fusions. The experiments on the Nike laser at NRL presented here were made possible by improvements in the imaging capability of our monochromatic x-ray diagnostics based on Bragg reflection from spherically curved crystals. Side-on imaging implemented on Nike makes it possible to observe dynamics of the shock wave and ablation front in laser-driven solid targets. We can choose to observe a sequence of 2D images or a continuous time evolution of an image resolved in one spatial dimension. A sequence of 300 ps snapshots taken using vanadium backlighter at 5.2 keV reveals propagation of a shock wave in a solid plastic target. The shape of the shock wave reflects the intensity distribution in the Nike beam. The streak records with continuous time resolution show the x-t trajectory of a laser-driven shock wave in a 10% solid density DVB foam.

  8. Terrestrial carbon storage dynamics: Chasing a moving target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Shi, Z.; Jiang, L.; Xia, J.; Wang, Y.; Kc, M.; Liang, J.; Lu, X.; Niu, S.; Ahlström, A.; Hararuk, O.; Hastings, A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Medlyn, B. E.; Rasmussen, M.; Smith, M. J.; Todd-Brown, K. E.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems have been estimated to absorb roughly 30% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Past studies have identified myriad drivers of terrestrial carbon storage changes, such as fire, climate change, and land use changes. Those drivers influence the carbon storage change via diverse mechanisms, which have not been unified into a general theory so as to identify what control the direction and rate of terrestrial carbon storage dynamics. Here we propose a theoretical framework to quantitatively determine the response of terrestrial carbon storage to different exogenous drivers. With a combination of conceptual reasoning, mathematical analysis, and numeric experiments, we demonstrated that the maximal capacity of an ecosystem to store carbon is time-dependent and equals carbon input (i.e., net primary production, NPP) multiplying by residence time. The capacity is a moving target toward which carbon storage approaches (i.e., the direction of carbon storage change) but usually does not attain. The difference between the capacity and the carbon storage at a given time t is the unrealized carbon storage potential. The rate of the storage change is proportional to the magnitude of the unrealized potential. We also demonstrated that a parameter space of NPP, residence time, and carbon storage potential can well characterize carbon storage dynamics quantified at six sites ranging from tropical forests to tundra and simulated by two versions (carbon-only and coupled carbon-nitrogen) of the Australian Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Land Ecosystem (CABLE) Model under three climate change scenarios (CO2 rising only, climate warming only, and RCP8.5). Overall this study reveals the unified mechanism unerlying terrestrial carbon storage dynamics to guide transient traceability analysis of global land models and synthesis of empirical studies.

  9. Designing high power targets with computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covrig, S. D.

    2013-01-01

    High power liquid hydrogen (LH2) targets, up to 850 W, have been widely used at Jefferson Lab for the 6 GeV physics program. The typical luminosity loss of a 20 cm long LH2 target was 20% for a beam current of 100 μA rastered on a square of side 2 mm on the target. The 35 cm long, 2500 W LH2 target for the Qweak experiment had a luminosity loss of 0.8% at 180 μA beam rastered on a square of side 4 mm at the target. The Qweak target was the highest power liquid hydrogen target in the world and with the lowest noise figure. The Qweak target was the first one designed with CFD at Jefferson Lab. A CFD facility is being established at Jefferson Lab to design, build and test a new generation of low noise high power targets

  10. Designing high power targets with computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covrig, S. D. [Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    High power liquid hydrogen (LH2) targets, up to 850 W, have been widely used at Jefferson Lab for the 6 GeV physics program. The typical luminosity loss of a 20 cm long LH2 target was 20% for a beam current of 100 μA rastered on a square of side 2 mm on the target. The 35 cm long, 2500 W LH2 target for the Qweak experiment had a luminosity loss of 0.8% at 180 μA beam rastered on a square of side 4 mm at the target. The Qweak target was the highest power liquid hydrogen target in the world and with the lowest noise figure. The Qweak target was the first one designed with CFD at Jefferson Lab. A CFD facility is being established at Jefferson Lab to design, build and test a new generation of low noise high power targets.

  11. Targeted Molecular Dynamics to determine Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain Folding Intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Mohanty

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Focal adhesion kinase (FAT domain of Focal Adhesion Kinase is a four helical bundle known for conformational plasticity. FAT adopts two distinctly different conformations i.e., close (cFAT and arm-exchanged (aeFAT states under native conditions [1]. The slow transition from cFAT to aeFAT is likely to proceed through an open intermediate state that allows YENV motif to attain β-turn conformation and phosphorylation of Y925 by Src kinases [2]. The two end states of FAT are known to interact with Paxillin and are responsible for maintaining steady state in Heart while intermediate conformation interacts with Grb2-SH2 leading to Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy (PAH [2]. 10ns Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD was done between c- and aeFAT in order to explore the conformational transition and to capture pathologically relevant oFAT. Cluster and dynamic cross correlation analysis (DCCA of TMD generated trajectory was done and the selected FAT intermediate was docked with Grb2-SH2 using HADDOCK v2.2 docking followed by molecular dynamics. Conservation analysis of FAT-Grb2 binding site was done using CONSURF [3]. A Pharmacophore FAT-Grb2 complex was generated using SPARKv1.2 and submitted for Virtual screening using BLAZE v4. Drug likeliness and ADMET properties were calculated using MOLINSPIRATION tool. TMD reveals six clusters and DCCA showed positively and negatively correlated region along the transition pathway. Intermediates with competence for Grb2 interaction were docked with Grb2 and best binding complex was further refined. MMPBSA binding energy calculations revealed the best binding pose where the phosphorylated YENV motif of Human FAT interacted with a charged and hydrophobic pocket of Grb2. The conservation analysis showed that the charged pocket was more conserved in comparison with the hydrophobic pocket, hence providing useful insights on binding and specificity determining residues in Grb2. Virtual screening using the pharmacophore

  12. Target-directed Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: A Study on Potentials and Pitfalls as Exemplified on a Bacterial Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Priska; Pang, Lijuan; Silbermann, Marleen; Eriş, Deniz; Mühlethaler, Tobias; Schwardt, Oliver; Ernst, Beat

    2017-08-25

    Target-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is an emerging technique for the efficient identification of inhibitors of pharmacologically relevant targets. In this contribution, we present an application for a bacterial target, the lectin FimH, a crucial virulence factor of uropathogenic E. coli being the main cause of urinary tract infections. A small dynamic library of acylhydrazones was formed from aldehydes and hydrazides and equilibrated at neutral pH in presence of aniline as nucleophilic catalyst. The major success factors turned out to be an accordingly adjusted ratio of scaffolds and fragments, an adequate sample preparation prior to HPLC analysis, and the data processing. Only then did the ranking of the dynamic library constituents correlate well with affinity data. Furthermore, as a support of DCC applications especially to larger libraries, a new protocol for improved hit identification was established. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Implementation of random set-up errors in Monte Carlo calculated dynamic IMRT treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapleton, S; Zavgorodni, S; Popescu, I A; Beckham, W A

    2005-01-01

    The fluence-convolution method for incorporating random set-up errors (RSE) into the Monte Carlo treatment planning dose calculations was previously proposed by Beckham et al, and it was validated for open field radiotherapy treatments. This study confirms the applicability of the fluence-convolution method for dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose calculations and evaluates the impact of set-up uncertainties on a clinical IMRT dose distribution. BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes were used for Monte Carlo calculations. A sliding window IMRT delivery was simulated using a dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) transport model developed by Keall et al. The dose distributions were benchmarked for dynamic IMRT fields using extended dose range (EDR) film, accumulating the dose from 16 subsequent fractions shifted randomly. Agreement of calculated and measured relative dose values was well within statistical uncertainty. A clinical seven field sliding window IMRT head and neck treatment was then simulated and the effects of random set-up errors (standard deviation of 2 mm) were evaluated. The dose-volume histograms calculated in the PTV with and without corrections for RSE showed only small differences indicating a reduction of the volume of high dose region due to set-up errors. As well, it showed that adequate coverage of the PTV was maintained when RSE was incorporated. Slice-by-slice comparison of the dose distributions revealed differences of up to 5.6%. The incorporation of set-up errors altered the position of the hot spot in the plan. This work demonstrated validity of implementation of the fluence-convolution method to dynamic IMRT Monte Carlo dose calculations. It also showed that accounting for the set-up errors could be essential for correct identification of the value and position of the hot spot

  14. Implementation of random set-up errors in Monte Carlo calculated dynamic IMRT treatment plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, S.; Zavgorodni, S.; Popescu, I. A.; Beckham, W. A.

    2005-02-01

    The fluence-convolution method for incorporating random set-up errors (RSE) into the Monte Carlo treatment planning dose calculations was previously proposed by Beckham et al, and it was validated for open field radiotherapy treatments. This study confirms the applicability of the fluence-convolution method for dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose calculations and evaluates the impact of set-up uncertainties on a clinical IMRT dose distribution. BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes were used for Monte Carlo calculations. A sliding window IMRT delivery was simulated using a dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) transport model developed by Keall et al. The dose distributions were benchmarked for dynamic IMRT fields using extended dose range (EDR) film, accumulating the dose from 16 subsequent fractions shifted randomly. Agreement of calculated and measured relative dose values was well within statistical uncertainty. A clinical seven field sliding window IMRT head and neck treatment was then simulated and the effects of random set-up errors (standard deviation of 2 mm) were evaluated. The dose-volume histograms calculated in the PTV with and without corrections for RSE showed only small differences indicating a reduction of the volume of high dose region due to set-up errors. As well, it showed that adequate coverage of the PTV was maintained when RSE was incorporated. Slice-by-slice comparison of the dose distributions revealed differences of up to 5.6%. The incorporation of set-up errors altered the position of the hot spot in the plan. This work demonstrated validity of implementation of the fluence-convolution method to dynamic IMRT Monte Carlo dose calculations. It also showed that accounting for the set-up errors could be essential for correct identification of the value and position of the hot spot.

  15. Structural dynamic response of target container against proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Ishikura, Syuichi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Hino, Ryutaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Stress waves were analyzed for a target container of neutron science research project using a high-intensity proton accelerator that generates high energy and high current proton beam. In the mercury target, the pulsed proton beam generates intense power density in the course of spallation reaction and causes pressure wave in the mercury and stress wave in the target container due to a sudden temperature change. Structural integrity of the target container depends on the power intensity at a maximum energy deposit. A broad proton profile is favorable to the structural assessment of the container rather than narrow one. Stress wave have propagated in the target container at a speed of sound. It only takes 0.1 ms for the size of 40 cm length stainless steel container. Further assessment is necessary to optimize a geometry of the container and establish a method to evaluate a life time. (author)

  16. Structural dynamic response of target container against proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Ishikura, Syuichi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Hino, Ryutaro

    1997-01-01

    Stress waves were analyzed for a target container of neutron science research project using a high-intensity proton accelerator that generates high energy and high current proton beam. In the mercury target, the pulsed proton beam generates intense power density in the course of spallation reaction and causes pressure wave in the mercury and stress wave in the target container due to a sudden temperature change. Structural integrity of the target container depends on the power intensity at a maximum energy deposit. A broad proton profile is favorable to the structural assessment of the container rather than narrow one. Stress wave have propagated in the target container at a speed of sound. It only takes 0.1 ms for the size of 40 cm length stainless steel container. Further assessment is necessary to optimize a geometry of the container and establish a method to evaluate a life time. (author)

  17. COMPARISON OF THE PERIPHERAL DOSES FROM DIFFERENT IMRT TECHNIQUES FOR PEDIATRIC HEAD AND NECK RADIATION THERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Masahiko; Saigo, Yasumasa; Higuchi, Kenta; Fujimura, Takuya; Koriyama, Chihaya; Yoshiura, Takashi; Akiba, Suminori

    2017-11-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver high and homogeneous doses to the target area while limiting doses to organs at risk. We used a pediatric phantom to simulate the treatment of a head and neck tumor in a child. The peripheral doses were examined for three different IMRT techniques [dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC), segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)]. Peripheral doses were evaluated taking thyroid, breast, ovary and testis as the points of interest. Doses were determined using a radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeter, and the COMPASS system was used for three-dimensional dose evaluation. VMAT achieved the lowest peripheral doses because it had the highest monitor unit efficiency. However, doses in the vicinity of the irradiated field, i.e. the thyroid, could be relatively high, depending on the VMAT collimator angle. DMLC and SMLC had a large area of relatively high peripheral doses in the breast region. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Implementation and acceptance of dynamic MLC for IMRT and VMAT; Implementacion y aceptacion de MLC dinamicos para IMRT y VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, B.; Marquina, J.; Ramirez, J.; Gonzales, A., E-mail: bertha.garcia@aliada.com.pe [ALIADA, Oncologia Integral, Av. Jose Galvez Barrenechea 1044, San Isidro, Lima 27 (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    The use of Multi-leaf Collimator (MLC) in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for dynamic treatment techniques as Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) makes that the movement controls as the speed of the MLC are quantified by means of an acceptance test. The objective determination of the operation regulations of the radiotherapy equipment requires ideally the establishment of the quantitative relationship among the performance deviations and clinical results or some acceptable substitute. Different protocols exist detailed with parameters and acceptance ranges according to the MLC thickness. In our case the acceptance test was carried out for 120-MLC of Trilogy equipment brand Varian. For all the test were used 300-200 Um for each formed beam lets; source-surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm. 9 acceptance tests were used each one with different purposes like to quantify, synchronization, stability, complexity, precision, positioning, conformity, dynamic movements for the case of dynamic wedges, consecutive moves, among others, for the measurements were used film badges dosimetry (Gafchromic Ebt-3 scanner Epson expression 10000 XL); additionally the results were compared with a diodes arrangement Map-Check 2 brand Sun Nuclear; that consists of 1527 diodes prepared in a field of 32 x 26 cm located at a distance of 1 cm parallel, 0.5 cm diagonally. All the developed tests were inside the acceptance tolerance parameters when comparing the obtained result regarding the badges and the Map-Check was found a discrepancy of 0.01%, what gives a treatment certainty to the moment to impart volumetric dose in dynamic fields to the patients. (Author)

  19. Impact of collimator leaf width on stereotactic radiosurgery and 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, H. Dale; Wilder, Richard B.; Pappas, Conrad T.E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The authors undertook a study to analyze the impact of collimator leaf width on stereotactic radiosurgery and 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Twelve cases involving primary brain tumors, metastases, or arteriovenous malformations that had been planned with BrainLAB's conventional circular collimator-based radiosurgery system were re-planned using a β-version of BrainLAB's treatment planning software that is compatible with MRC Systems' and BrainLAB's micro-multileaf collimators. These collimators have a minimum leaf width of 1.7 mm and 3.0 mm, respectively, at isocenter. The clinical target volumes ranged from 2.7-26.1 cc and the number of static fields ranged from 3-5. In addition, for 4 prostate cancer cases, 2 separate clinical target volumes were planned using MRC Systems' and BrainLAB's micro-multileaf collimators and Varian's multileaf collimator: the smaller clinical target volume consisted of the prostate gland and the larger clinical target volume consisted of the prostate and seminal vesicles. For the prostate cancer cases, treatment plans were generated using either 6 or 7 static fields. A 'PITV ratio', which the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group defines as the volume encompassed by the prescription isodose surface divided by the clinical target volume, was used as a measure of the quality of treatment plans (a PITV ratio of 1.0-2.0 is desirable). Bladder and rectal volumes encompassed by the prescription isodose surface, isodose distributions and dose volume histograms were also analyzed for the prostate cancer patients. Results: In 75% of the cases treated with radiosurgery, a PITV ratio between 1.0-2.0 could be achieved using a micro-multileaf collimator with a leaf width of 1.7-3.0 mm at isocenter and 3-5 static fields. When the clinical target volume consisted of the prostate gland, the micro-multileaf collimator with a minimum leaf width of 3.0 mm allowed one to decrease the median volume of bladder and

  20. Dynamic modelling of heavy metals - time scales and target loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posch, M.; Vries, de W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade steady-state methods have been developed to assess critical loads of metals avoiding long-term risks in view of food quality and eco-toxicological effects on organisms in soils and surface waters. However, dynamic models are needed to estimate the times involved in attaining a

  1. Dynamic nuclear polarization tests in some polymers for polarized targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, B. van den; Hautle, P.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.; Bunyatova, E.I.

    1998-01-01

    The results of dynamic polarization tests in polyethylene (PE) and ethylene propylene copolymer (EPC), doped with the stable free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO), are presented. Sizable proton polarizations have been achieved in a magnetic field of 2.5 T at a temperature below 0.3 K and 5T at 1 K

  2. Farm Target Capital Structure: Dynamics, Determinants and Speed of Adjustment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamirat, A.S.; Trujillo Barrera, A.A.; Pennings, J.M.E.

    2017-01-01

    The corporate finance literature has focused on explaining the determinants of firms target capital structure and speed of adjustment using the well-established theories such as pecking order, signaling and trade-off theories. However, less attention has been paid to understanding the financing

  3. Application of a Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Weapon Target Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    evaluation and weapon assignment in maritime combat scenarios. Lloyd also acts as a liaison for the Weapons and Combat Systems Division with the ANZAC...positively identified a number of targets as threats, whether they are an enemy ship (i.e., specifically, its weapon launcher systems) or a directed

  4. Step-and-Shoot versus Compensator-based IMRT: Calculation and Comparison of Integral Dose in Non-tumoral and Target Organs in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Shirani Tak Abi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT is becoming an increasingly routine treatment method. IMRT can be delivered by use of conventional Multileaf Collimators (MLCs and/or physical compensators. One of the most important factors in selecting an appropriate IMRT technique is integral dose. Integral dose is equal to the mean energy deposited in the total irradiated volume of the patient. The aim of the present study was to calculate and compare the integral dose in normal and target organs in two different procedures of IMRT: Step-and-Shoot (SAS and compensator-based IMRT. Materials and Methods In this comparative study, five patients with prostate cancer were selected. Module Integrated Radiotherapy System was applied, using three energy ranges. In both treatment planning methods, the integral dose dramatically decreased by increasing energy. Results Comparison of two treatment methods showed that on average, the integral dose of body in SAS radiation therapy was about 1.62% lower than that reported in compensator-based IMRT. In planning target volume, rectum, bladder, and left and right femoral heads, the integral doses for SAS method were 1.01%, 1.02%, 1.11%, 1.47%, and 1.40% lower than compensator-based IMRT, respectively. Conclusion Considering the treatment conditions, the definition of dose volume constraints for healthy tissues, and the equal volume of organs in both treatment methods, SAS radiation therapy by providing a lower integral dose seems to be more advantageous and efficient for prostate cancer treatment, compared to compensator-based IMRT.

  5. Present and Future Developments in Radiotherapy Treatment Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer

    1995-04-01

    Technical advances in the design of medical accelerators are making possible the exploration of new treatment techniques. Technology currently available to the radiation oncologist allows the use of internal and dynamic wedges. Multileaf collimators can be used for static treatment ports, and dynamic field shaping and beam modulation using multileaf collimators has been shown to be feasible. Computer interfaces are necessary to transfer the complex treatment sequences that are possible with these devices. Such network interfaces also provide for more efficient conventional treatments. New machines such as X-band linear accelerators and advanced proton accelerators are being developed for applications such as boron neutron capture therapy and proton conformal therapy.

  6. Targeted quantification of functional enzyme dynamics in environmental samples for microbially mediated biogeochemical processes: Targeted quantification of functional enzyme dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minjing [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 People' s Republic of China; Gao, Yuqian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Qian, Wei-Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Liu, Yuanyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Nelson, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Nicora, Carrie D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Resch, Charles T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Thompson, Christopher [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Yan, Sen [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 People' s Republic of China; Fredrickson, James K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen 518055 People' s Republic of China

    2017-07-13

    Microbially mediated biogeochemical processes are catalyzed by enzymes that control the transformation of carbon, nitrogen, and other elements in environment. The dynamic linkage between enzymes and biogeochemical species transformation has, however, rarely been investigated because of the lack of analytical approaches to efficiently and reliably quantify enzymes and their dynamics in soils and sediments. Herein, we developed a signature peptide-based technique for sensitively quantifying dissimilatory and assimilatory enzymes using nitrate-reducing enzymes in a hyporheic zone sediment as an example. Moreover, the measured changes in enzyme concentration were found to correlate with the nitrate reduction rate in a way different from that inferred from biogeochemical models based on biomass or functional genes as surrogates for functional enzymes. This phenomenon has important implications for understanding and modeling the dynamics of microbial community functions and biogeochemical processes in environments. Our results also demonstrate the importance of enzyme quantification for the identification and interrogation of those biogeochemical processes with low metabolite concentrations as a result of faster enzyme-catalyzed consumption of metabolites than their production. The dynamic enzyme behaviors provide a basis for the development of enzyme-based models to describe the relationship between the microbial community and biogeochemical processes.

  7. The dynamics of target ionization by fast higly charged projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Unverzagt, M.; Olsen, R.E.; Doerner, R.; Mergel, V.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.

    1995-12-01

    We report on the first kinematically complete investigation of single target ionization by fast heavy ions, on the measurement of all low energy electrons down to zero emission velocities and on the determination of the projectile energy loss on the level of ΔE p /E p ∼10 -7 . This has been achieved by combining a high-resolution recoil-ion momentum spectrometer with a novel 4π electron analyzer. The complete momentum balance between electron, recoil-ion and projectile for single ionization of helium by 3.6 MeV/u Ni 24+ was explored. Low energy electrons are found to be ejected mainly into the forward direction with a most likely longitudinal energy of only 2 eV. The electron momentum is not balanced, as might be expected, by the projectile momentum but is nearly completely compensated by the recoil ion. Surprisingly, the momenta of the helium-atom ''fragments'', the electron and the He 1+ recoil ion, are considerably larger than the total momentum loss of the projectile: the target atom seems to dissociate in the strong, longranging projectile potential. The collision has to be considered as a real three body interaction. (orig.)

  8. Dosimetric commissioning and system for stereotactic radiation treatments based on linear accelerators with dynamic micromultilaminas collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascension, Yudy; Alfonso, Rodolfo; Silvestre, Ileana

    2009-01-01

    Once installed and accepted, a system for stereotactic radiosurgery / stereotactic radiotherapy (CERs / RTE) requires, before starting to be used clinically in patients undergoing a process of commissioning dosimetry, which evaluates all geometric parameters, physical, Dosimetric and technical impact on the precision and accuracy of treatment to administer, and therefore its effectiveness. This process includes training and familiarization of the multidisciplinary team (medical physicists, radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons, dosimetrists, biomedical engineers) with the equipment and techniques used, the quality assurance program and special radiation protection standards for this technology. The aim of this work is to prepare the pre-clinical dosimetric conditions to ensure the quality and radiation safety of treatment with CER RTE. Treatment with CER RTE INOR has a linear accelerator equipped with a micro-multileaf collimator dynamic tertiary (dMLC 3Dline). The system aceleradordMLC geometric and dosimetric was calibrated, using ionization chambers miniature, diode and film dosimetry. The immobilization of the patient and location of the lesion is made by both invasive stereotactic frames and relocatable. The computerized planning of the CER / TEN is done with the ERGO system, for which commissioning is designed test cases of increasing complexity, using planes and anthropomorphic dummies, which help assess the accuracy of the dosimetric calculations and accuracy of the system as a whole. We compared the results of the planning system with measurements, showing that the discrepancies are within tolerances, so it is concluded that from the standpoint of physical dosimetry, the system-under-ERGO accelerator MLC is eligible for clinical use. (author)

  9. Validation of dynamic MLC-controller log files using a two-dimensional diode array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jonathan G.; Dempsey, James F.; Ding Li; Liu, Chihray; Palta, Jatinder R.

    2003-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivered with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) in the step-and-shoot mode uses multiple static MLC segments to achieve intensity modulation. For typical IMRT treatment plans, significant numbers of segments are delivered with monitor units (MUs) of much less than 10. Verification of the ability of the linear accelerator (linac) to deliver small MU segments accurately is an important step in the IMRT commissioning and quality assurance (QA) process. Recent studies have reported large discrepancies between the intended and delivered segment MUs. These discrepancies could potentially cause large errors in the delivered patient dose. We have undertaken a systematic study to evaluate the accuracy of the dynamic MLC log files, which are created automatically by our commercial MLC workstation after each delivery, in recording the fractional MU delivered in the step-and-shoot mode. Two linac models were evaluated with simple-geometry leaf sequences and delivered with different total MUs and different nominal dose rates. A commercial two-dimensional diode array was used for the measurement. Large discrepancies between the intended and delivered segment MUs were found. The discrepancies were larger for small MU segments at higher dose rate, with some small MU segments completely undelivered. The recorded fractional MUs in the log files were found to agree with what was delivered within the limits of our experimental uncertainty. Our results indicate that it is important to verify the delivery accuracy of small MU segments that could potentially occur in a patient treatment and that the log files are useful in checking the integrity of the linac delivery once validated. Thus validated log files can be used as a QA tool for general IMRT delivery and patient-specific plan verification

  10. Dynamic RCS Simulation of a Missile Target Group Based on the High-frequency Asymptotic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Tao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To simulate dynamic Radar Cross Section (RCS of missile target group, an efficient RCS prediction approach is proposed based on the high-frequency asymptotic theory. The minimal energy trajectory and coordinate transformation is used to get trajectories of the missile, decoys and roll booster, and establish the dynamic scene for the separate procedure of the target group, and the dynamic RCS including specular reflection, edge diffraction and multi-reflection from the target group are obtained by Physical Optics (PO, Equivalent Edge Currents (EEC and Shooting-and-Bouncing Ray (SBR methods. Compared with the dynamic RCS result with the common interpolation method, the proposed method is consistent with the common method when the targets in the scene are far away from each other and each target is not sheltered by others in the incident direction. When the target group is densely distributed and the shelter effect can not be neglected, the interpolation method is extremely difficult to realize, whereas the proposed method is successful.

  11. SU-E-J-57: First Development of Adapting to Intrafraction Relative Motion Between Prostate and Pelvic Lymph Nodes Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Y; Colvill, E; O’Brien, R; Keall, P [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Booth, J [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Large intrafraction relative motion of multiple targets is common in advanced head and neck, lung, abdominal, gynaecological and urological cancer, jeopardizing the treatment outcomes. The objective of this study is to develop a real-time adaptation strategy, for the first time, to accurately correct for the relative motion of multiple targets by reshaping the treatment field using the multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Methods The principle of tracking the simultaneously treated but differentially moving tumor targets is to determine the new aperture shape that conforms to the shifted targets. Three dimensional volumes representing the individual targets are projected to the beam’s eye view. The leaf openings falling inside each 2D projection will be shifted according to the measured motion of each target to form the new aperture shape. Based on the updated beam shape, new leaf positions will be determined with optimized trade-off between the target underdose and healthy tissue overdose, and considerations of the physical constraints of the MLC. Taking a prostate cancer patient with pelvic lymph node involvement as an example, a preliminary dosimetric study was conducted to demonstrate the potential treatment improvement compared to the state-of- art adaptation technique which shifts the whole beam to track only one target. Results The world-first intrafraction adaptation system capable of reshaping the beam to correct for the relative motion of multiple targets has been developed. The dose in the static nodes and small bowel are closer to the planned distribution and the V45 of small bowel is decreased from 110cc to 75cc, corresponding to a 30% reduction by this technique compared to the state-of-art adaptation technique. Conclusion The developed adaptation system to correct for intrafraction relative motion of multiple targets will guarantee the tumour coverage and thus enable PTV margin reduction to minimize the high target dose to the adjacent organs

  12. A simple analytical model for dynamics of time-varying target leverage ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. F.; Hui, C. H.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we have formulated a simple theoretical model for the dynamics of the time-varying target leverage ratio of a firm under some assumptions based upon empirical observations. In our theoretical model the time evolution of the target leverage ratio of a firm can be derived self-consistently from a set of coupled Ito's stochastic differential equations governing the leverage ratios of an ensemble of firms by the nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation approach. The theoretically derived time paths of the target leverage ratio bear great resemblance to those used in the time-dependent stationary-leverage (TDSL) model [Hui et al., Int. Rev. Financ. Analy. 15, 220 (2006)]. Thus, our simple model is able to provide a theoretical foundation for the selected time paths of the target leverage ratio in the TDSL model. We also examine how the pace of the adjustment of a firm's target ratio, the volatility of the leverage ratio and the current leverage ratio affect the dynamics of the time-varying target leverage ratio. Hence, with the proposed dynamics of the time-dependent target leverage ratio, the TDSL model can be readily applied to generate the default probabilities of individual firms and to assess the default risk of the firms.

  13. Individual Differences in Search and Monitoring for Color Targets in Dynamic Visual Displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhl-Richardson, Alex; Godwin, Hayward J; Garner, Matthew; Hadwin, Julie A; Liversedge, Simon P; Donnelly, Nick

    2018-02-01

    Many real-world tasks now involve monitoring visual representations of data that change dynamically over time. Monitoring dynamically changing displays for the onset of targets can be done in two ways: detecting targets directly, post-onset, or predicting their onset from the prior state of distractors. In the present study, participants' eye movements were measured as they monitored arrays of 108 colored squares whose colors changed systematically over time. Across three experiments, the data show that participants detected the onset of targets both directly and predictively. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that predictive detection was only possible when supported by sequential color changes that followed a scale ordered in color space. Experiment 3 included measures of individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) and anxious affect and a manipulation of target prevalence in the search task. It found that predictive monitoring for targets, and decisions about target onsets, were influenced by interactions between individual differences in verbal and spatial WMC and intolerance of uncertainty, a characteristic that reflects worry about uncertain future events. The results have implications for the selection of individuals tasked with monitoring dynamic visual displays for target onsets. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Penalty dynamic programming algorithm for dim targets detection in sensor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dayu; Xue, Anke; Guo, Yunfei

    2012-01-01

    In order to detect and track multiple maneuvering dim targets in sensor systems, an improved dynamic programming track-before-detect algorithm (DP-TBD) called penalty DP-TBD (PDP-TBD) is proposed. The performances of tracking techniques are used as a feedback to the detection part. The feedback is constructed by a penalty term in the merit function, and the penalty term is a function of the possible target state estimation, which can be obtained by the tracking methods. With this feedback, the algorithm combines traditional tracking techniques with DP-TBD and it can be applied to simultaneously detect and track maneuvering dim targets. Meanwhile, a reasonable constraint that a sensor measurement can originate from one target or clutter is proposed to minimize track separation. Thus, the algorithm can be used in the multi-target situation with unknown target numbers. The efficiency and advantages of PDP-TBD compared with two existing methods are demonstrated by several simulations.

  15. Synthesis of Fe–Ni bimetallic nanoparticles from pixel target ablation: plume dynamics and surface characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Xiaoxu; Murray, Paul T.; Sarangan, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    A novel Fe–Ni bimetallic nanoparticle synthesis technique, denoted pixel target ablation, is reported. The technique entails ablating a thin film target consisting of patterned Fe and Ni pixels with a selected ratio using a KrF excimer laser. The laser energy breaks a known amount of target materials into metal atoms, which then form nanoparticles by recombination in the gas phase. Due to the nature of thin-film ablation, splashing of large particles was eliminated with the added benefit of minimizing nanoparticle agglomeration. Plume dynamics and surface characterizations were carried out to exploit the formation of Fe–Ni nanoparticles more fully. The composition was readily controlled by varying the initial relative amount of Fe and Ni target pixels. Synthesis of multi-element nanoparticles by pixel target ablation should be possible with any element combination that can be prepared as a thin-film target.

  16. Predicting the Noise of High Power Fluid Targets Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Covrig Dusa, Silviu

    The 2.5 kW liquid hydrogen (LH2) target used in the Qweak parity violation experiment is the highest power LH2 target in the world and the first to be designed with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at Jefferson Lab. The Qweak experiment determined the weak charge of the proton by measuring the parity-violating elastic scattering asymmetry of longitudinally polarized electrons from unpolarized liquid hydrogen at small momentum transfer (Q2 = 0 . 025 GeV2). This target satisfied the design goals of bench-marked with the Qweak target data. This work is an essential component in future designs of very high power low noise targets like MOLLER (5 kW, target noise asymmetry contribution < 25 ppm) and MESA (4.5 kW).

  17. Dynamic studies of multiple configurations of CERN's Antiproton Decelerator Target core under proton beam impact

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2248381

    Antiprotons, like many other exotic particles, are produced by impacting high energy proton beams onto fixed targets. At the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), this is done in the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) Facility. The engineering challenges related to the design of an optimal configuration of the AD-Target system derive from the extremely high energy depositions reached in the very thin target core as a consequence of each proton beam impact. A new target design is foreseen for operation after 2021, triggering multiple R&D activities since 2013 for this purpose. The goal of the present Master Thesis is to complement these activities with analytical and numerical calculations, delving into the phenomena associated to the dynamic response of the target core. In this context, two main studies have been carried out. First, the experimental data observed in targets subjected to low intensity proton pulses was cross-checked with analytical and computational methods for modal analysis, applie...

  18. TH-AB-BRB-05: Using a Research Real-Time Control Interface to Go Beyond Dynamic MLC Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nill, S. [The Institute of Cancer Research (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Current state-of-the art digital C-arm medical linear accelerators are capable of delivering radiation treatments with high level of automation, which affords coordinated motions of gantry, couch, and multileaf collimator (MLC) with dose rate modulations. The new machine capacity has shown the potential to bring substantially improved radiation dosimetry and/or delivery efficiency to many challenging diseases. Combining an integrated beam orientation optimization algorithm with automated machine navigation, markedly improved dose conformity has been achieved using 4ρ therapy. Trajectory modulated radiation therapy (TMAT) can be used to deliver highly conformal dose to partial breast or to carve complex dose distribution for therapy involving extended volumes such as total marrow and total lymph node treatment. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) not only overcomes the deficiencies of conventional electron therapy in dose conformity and homogeneity but also achieves so without patient-specific shields. The combination of MLC and couch tracking provides improved motion management of thoracic and abdominal tumors. A substantial body of work has been done in these technological advances for clinical translation. The proposed symposium will provide a timely review of these exciting opportunities. Learning Objectives: Recognize the potential of using digitally controlled linacs for clinically significant improvements in delivered dose distributions for various treatment sites. Identify existing approaches to treatment planning, optimization and delivery for treatment techniques utilizing the advanced functions of digital linacs and venues for further development and improvement. Understand methods for testing and validating delivery system performance. Identify tools available on current delivery systems for implementation and control for such treatments. Obtain the update in clinical applications, trials and regulatory approval. K. Sheng, NIH U19AI067769, NIH R43

  19. TH-AB-BRB-05: Using a Research Real-Time Control Interface to Go Beyond Dynamic MLC Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nill, S.

    2016-01-01

    Current state-of-the art digital C-arm medical linear accelerators are capable of delivering radiation treatments with high level of automation, which affords coordinated motions of gantry, couch, and multileaf collimator (MLC) with dose rate modulations. The new machine capacity has shown the potential to bring substantially improved radiation dosimetry and/or delivery efficiency to many challenging diseases. Combining an integrated beam orientation optimization algorithm with automated machine navigation, markedly improved dose conformity has been achieved using 4ρ therapy. Trajectory modulated radiation therapy (TMAT) can be used to deliver highly conformal dose to partial breast or to carve complex dose distribution for therapy involving extended volumes such as total marrow and total lymph node treatment. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) not only overcomes the deficiencies of conventional electron therapy in dose conformity and homogeneity but also achieves so without patient-specific shields. The combination of MLC and couch tracking provides improved motion management of thoracic and abdominal tumors. A substantial body of work has been done in these technological advances for clinical translation. The proposed symposium will provide a timely review of these exciting opportunities. Learning Objectives: Recognize the potential of using digitally controlled linacs for clinically significant improvements in delivered dose distributions for various treatment sites. Identify existing approaches to treatment planning, optimization and delivery for treatment techniques utilizing the advanced functions of digital linacs and venues for further development and improvement. Understand methods for testing and validating delivery system performance. Identify tools available on current delivery systems for implementation and control for such treatments. Obtain the update in clinical applications, trials and regulatory approval. K. Sheng, NIH U19AI067769, NIH R43

  20. Dynamic energy spectrum and energy deposition in solid target by intense pulsed ion beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Yu; Xiao-Yun Le; Zheng Liu; Jie Shen; Yu I.Isakova; Hao-Wen Zhong; Jie Zhang; Sha Yan; Gao-Long Zhang; Xiao-Fu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    A method for analyzing the dynamic energy spectrum of intense pulsed ion beam (IPIB) was proposed.Its influence on beam energy deposition in metal target was studied with IPIB produced by two types of magnetically insulated diodes (MID).The emission of IPIB was described with space charge limitation model,and the dynamic energy spectrum was further analyzed with time-of-flight method.IPIBs generated by pulsed accelerators of BIPPAB-450 (active MID) and TEMP-4M (passive MID) were studied.The dynamic energy spectrum was used to deduce the power density distribution of IPIB in the target with Monte Carlo simulation and infrared imaging diagnostics.The effect on the distribution and evolution of thermal field induced by the characteristics of IPIB dynamic energy spectrum was discussed.

  1. Dosimetric verification of the dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMR) of 21 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, J.-S.; Engler, Mark J.; Ling, Marilyn N.; Wu, Julian; Kramer, Bradley; Fagundes, Marcio; Dipetrillo, Thomas; Wazer, David E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To verify the accuracy of conformal isodose distributions and absolute doses delivered with a dynamic IMR system. Methods and materials: 21 patients treated with advanced or recurrent disease with a dynamic IMR system, of which 13 were immobilized with head screws, and 8, with non-invasive plastic masks. The system included immobilization techniques, computerized tomography (CT), a dynamic pencil beam multileaf collimator (MLC), a collimator controller computer, collimator safety interlocks, a simulated annealing optimization implemented on a dedicated quad processing computer system, phantoms embedded with dosemeters, patient setup and dose delivery techniques, in vivo dose verification, and a comprehensive quality assurance program. The collimator consisted of a 2 x 20 array of Tungsten leaves, each programmable to be either fully open or shut, thus offering 2 40 beam patterns with cross sectional areas of up to 4 x 20 cm at the linear accelerator (linac) gantry rotational axis. Any of these patterns were dynamically changeable per degree sign of gantry rotation. An anthropomorphic phantom composed of transverse anatomic slabs helped simulate patient geometry relative to immobilization devices, fiducial markers, CT and treatment room lasers, and linac rotational axis. Before each treatment regimen, the compliance of measured to planned doses was tested in phantom irradiations using each patient's fiducial markers, immobilization system, anatomic positioning, and collimator sequencing. Films and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) were embedded in the phantom to measure absolute doses and dose distributions. Because the planner didn't account for variable electron density distributions in head and neck targets, the air cavities of the anthropomorphic phantom were filled with tissue equivalent bolus. Optical density distributions of films exposed to the dynamic IMR of each patient were obtained with a Hurter-Driffield calibration curved based on films

  2. Cluster-based Dynamic Energy Management for Collaborative Target Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao-Wei Bi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A primary criterion of wireless sensor network is energy efficiency. Focused onthe energy problem of target tracking in wireless sensor networks, this paper proposes acluster-based dynamic energy management mechanism. Target tracking problem isformulated by the multi-sensor detection model as well as energy consumption model. Adistributed adaptive clustering approach is investigated to form a reasonable routingframework which has uniform cluster head distribution. Dijkstra’s algorithm is utilized toobtain optimal intra-cluster routing. Target position is predicted by particle filter. Thepredicted target position is adopted to estimate the idle interval of sensor nodes. Hence,dynamic awakening approach is exploited to prolong sleep time of sensor nodes so that theoperation energy consumption of wireless sensor network can be reduced. The sensornodes around the target wake up on time and act as sensing candidates. With the candidatesensor nodes and predicted target position, the optimal sensor node selection is considered.Binary particle swarm optimization is proposed to minimize the total energy consumptionduring collaborative sensing and data reporting. Experimental results verify that theproposed clustering approach establishes a low-energy communication structure while theenergy efficiency of wireless sensor networks is enhanced by cluster-based dynamic energymanagement.

  3. Dynamic Nucleolar Targeting of Dengue Virus Polymerase NS5 in Response to Extracellular pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Johanna E.; Rawlinson, Stephen M.; Heaton, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nucleolar subcompartment of the nucleus is increasingly recognized as an important target of RNA viruses. Here we document for the first time the ability of dengue virus (DENV) polymerase, nonstructural protein 5 (NS5), to accumulate within the nucleolus of infected cells and to target green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the nucleolus of live transfected cells. Intriguingly, NS5 exchange between the nucleus and nucleolus is dynamically modulated by extracellular pH, responding rapidly and reversibly to pH change, in contrast to GFP alone or other nucleolar and non-nucleolar targeted protein controls. The minimal pH-sensitive nucleolar targeting region (pHNTR), sufficient to target GFP to the nucleolus in a pH-sensitive fashion, was mapped to NS5 residues 1 to 244, with mutation of key hydrophobic residues, Leu-165, Leu-167, and Val-168, abolishing pHNTR function in NS5-transfected cells, and severely attenuating DENV growth in infected cells. This is the first report of a viral protein whose nucleolar targeting ability is rapidly modulated by extracellular stimuli, suggesting that DENV has the ability to detect and respond dynamically to the extracellular environment. IMPORTANCE Infections by dengue virus (DENV) threaten 40% of the world's population yet there is no approved vaccine or antiviral therapeutic to treat infections. Understanding the molecular details that govern effective viral replication is key for the development of novel antiviral strategies. Here, we describe for the first time dynamic trafficking of DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) to the subnuclear compartment, the nucleolus. We demonstrate that NS5's targeting to the nucleolus occurs in response to acidic pH, identify the key amino acid residues within NS5 that are responsible, and demonstrate that their mutation severely impairs production of infectious DENV. Overall, this study identifies a unique subcellular trafficking event and suggests that DENV is able to detect and respond

  4. Fast IMRT with narrow high energy scanned photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, Bjoern; Straaring t, Sara Janek; Holmberg, Rickard; Naefstadius, Peder; Brahme, Anders [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, P.O. Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Hospital Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, P.O. Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden and Department of Hospital Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Since the first publications on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the early 1980s almost all efforts have been focused on fairly time consuming dynamic or segmental multileaf collimation. With narrow fast scanned photon beams, the flexibility and accuracy in beam shaping increases, not least in combination with fast penumbra trimming multileaf collimators. Previously, experiments have been performed with full range targets, generating a broad bremsstrahlung beam, in combination with multileaf collimators or material compensators. In the present publication, the first measurements with fast narrow high energy (50 MV) scanned photon beams are presented indicating an interesting performance increase even though some of the hardware used were suboptimal. Methods: Inverse therapy planning was used to calculate optimal scanning patterns to generate dose distributions with interesting properties for fast IMRT. To fully utilize the dose distributional advantages with scanned beams, it is necessary to use narrow high energy beams from a thin bremsstrahlung target and a powerful purging magnet capable of deflecting the transmitted electron beam away from the generated photons onto a dedicated electron collector. During the present measurements the scanning system, purging magnet, and electron collimator in the treatment head of the MM50 racetrack accelerator was used with 3-6 mm thick bremsstrahlung targets of beryllium. The dose distributions were measured with diodes in water and with EDR2 film in PMMA. Monte Carlo simulations with geant4 were used to study the influence of the electrons transmitted through the target on the photon pencil beam kernel. Results: The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the scanned photon beam was 34 mm measured at isocenter, below 9.5 cm of water, 1 m from the 3 mm Be bremsstrahlung target. To generate a homogeneous dose distribution in a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field, the authors used a spot matrix of 100 equal intensity

  5. Exogenous Social Identity Cues Differentially Affect the Dynamic Tracking of Individual Target Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Roy; Gabbert, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    We report on an experiment to investigate the top-down effect of exogenous social identity cues on a multiple-identity tracking task, a paradigm well suited to investigate the processes of binding identity to spatial locations. Here we simulated an eyewitness event in which dynamic targets, all to be tracked with equal effort, were identified from…

  6. Changes in Inflation Dynamics under Inflation Targeting? Evidence from Central European Countries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baxa, Jaromír; Plašil, M.; Vašíček, B.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2013), s. 2-5 ISSN 1803-7089 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Inflation Dynamics * Inflation Targeting? Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/E/baxa-0395372.pdf

  7. A dosimetric comparison of real-time adaptive and non-adaptive radiotherapy: A multi-institutional study encompassing robotic, gimbaled, multileaf collimator and couch tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy; Nill, Simeon

    2016-01-01

    AND MATERIALS: Ten institutions with robotic(2), gimbaled(2), MLC(4) or couch tracking(2) used common materials including CT and structure sets, motion traces and planning protocols to create a lung and a prostate plan. For each motion trace, the plan was delivered twice to a moving dosimeter; with and without...

  8. SU-F-T-506: Development and Commissioning of the Effective and Efficient Grid Therapy Using High Dose Rate Flattening Filter Free Beam and Multileaf Collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M; Wen, N; Beyer, C; Siddiqui, F; Chetty, I; Zhao, B [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treating bulky tumors with grid therapy (GT) has demonstrated high response rates. Long delivery time (∼15min), with consequent increased risk of intrafraction motion, is a major disadvantage of conventional MLC-based GT (MLC-GT). The goal of this study was to develop and commission a MLC-GT technique with similar dosimetric characteristics, but more efficient delivery. Methods: Grid plan was designed with 10X-FFF (2400MU/min) beam and MLC in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Grid size was 1cm by 1cm and grid-to-grid distance was 2cm. Field-in-field technique was used to flatten the dose profile at depth of 10cm. Prescription was 15Gy at 1.5cm depth. Doses were verified at depths of 1.5cm, 5cm and 10cm. Point dose was measured with a plastic scintillator detector (PSD) while the planar dose was measured with calibrated Gafchromic EBT3 films in a 20cm think, 30cmx30cm solid water phantom. The measured doses were compared to the doses calculated in the treatment planning system. Percent depth dose (PDD) within the grid was also measured using EBT3 film. Five clinical cases were planned to compare beam-on time. Results: The valley-to-peak dose ratio at the 3 depths was approximately 10–15%, which is very similar to published result. The average point dose difference between the PSD measurements and TPS calculation is 2.1±0.6%. Film dosimetry revealed good agreement between the delivered and calculated dose. The average gamma passing rates at the 3 depths were 95% (3%, 1mm). The average percent difference between the measured PDD and calculated PDD was 2.1% within the depth of 20cm. The phantom plan delivery time was 3.6 min. Average beam-on time was reduced by 66.1±5.6% for the 5 clinical cases. Conclusion: An effective and efficient GT technique was developed and commissioned for the treatment of bulky tumors using FFF beam combined with MLC and automation. The Department of Radiation Oncology at Henry Ford Health System receives research support from Varian Medical Systems and Philips Health Care.

  9. Internal models of target motion: expected dynamics overrides measured kinematics in timing manual interceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Myrka; Bosco, Gianfranco; Maffei, Vincenzo; Iosa, Marco; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2004-04-01

    Prevailing views on how we time the interception of a moving object assume that the visual inputs are informationally sufficient to estimate the time-to-contact from the object's kinematics. Here we present evidence in favor of a different view: the brain makes the best estimate about target motion based on measured kinematics and an a priori guess about the causes of motion. According to this theory, a predictive model is used to extrapolate time-to-contact from expected dynamics (kinetics). We projected a virtual target moving vertically downward on a wide screen with different randomized laws of motion. In the first series of experiments, subjects were asked to intercept this target by punching a real ball that fell hidden behind the screen and arrived in synchrony with the visual target. Subjects systematically timed their motor responses consistent with the assumption of gravity effects on an object's mass, even when the visual target did not accelerate. With training, the gravity model was not switched off but adapted to nonaccelerating targets by shifting the time of motor activation. In the second series of experiments, there was no real ball falling behind the screen. Instead the subjects were required to intercept the visual target by clicking a mousebutton. In this case, subjects timed their responses consistent with the assumption of uniform motion in the absence of forces, even when the target actually accelerated. Overall, the results are in accord with the theory that motor responses evoked by visual kinematics are modulated by a prior of the target dynamics. The prior appears surprisingly resistant to modifications based on performance errors.

  10. Effect of Target Location on Dynamic Visual Acuity During Passive Horizontal Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Meghan; DeDios, Yiri; Kulecz, Walter; Peters, Brian; Wood, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) generates eye rotation to compensate for potential retinal slip in the specific plane of head movement. Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) has been utilized as a functional measure of the VOR. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in accuracy and reaction time when performing a DVA task with targets offset from the plane of rotation, e.g. offset vertically during horizontal rotation. Visual acuity was measured in 12 healthy subjects as they moved a hand-held joystick to indicate the orientation of a computer-generated Landolt C "as quickly and accurately as possible." Acuity thresholds were established with optotypes presented centrally on a wall-mounted LCD screen at 1.3 m distance, first without motion (static condition) and then while oscillating at 0.8 Hz (DVA, peak velocity 60 deg/s). The effect of target location was then measured during horizontal rotation with the optotypes randomly presented in one of nine different locations on the screen (offset up to 10 deg). The optotype size (logMar 0, 0.2 or 0.4, corresponding to Snellen range 20/20 to 20/50) and presentation duration (150, 300 and 450 ms) were counter-balanced across five trials, each utilizing horizontal rotation at 0.8 Hz. Dynamic acuity was reduced relative to static acuity in 7 of 12 subjects by one step size. During the random target trials, both accuracy and reaction time improved proportional to optotype size. Accuracy and reaction time also improved between 150 ms and 300 ms presentation durations. The main finding was that both accuracy and reaction time varied as a function of target location, with greater performance decrements when acquiring vertical targets. We conclude that dynamic visual acuity varies with target location, with acuity optimized for targets in the plane of motion. Both reaction time and accuracy are functionally relevant DVA parameters of VOR function.

  11. Motion management during IMAT treatment of mobile lung tumors-A comparison of MLC tracking and gated delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne; Pommer, Tobias; Keall, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:To compare real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking, respiratory amplitude and phase gating, and no compensation for intrafraction motion management during intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods: Motion management with MLC tracking and gating was evaluated for four...... tracking reduced the effects of the target movements, although the gated delivery showed a better dosimetric accuracy and enabled a larger reduction of the margins in some cases. MLC tracking did not prolong the treatment time compared to delivery with no motion compensation while gating had a considerably...... of the dosimetric error contributions showed that the gated delivery mainly had errors in target localization, while MLC tracking also had contributions from MLC leaf fitting and leaf adjustment. The average treatment time was about three times longer with gating compared to delivery with MLC tracking (that did...

  12. Variable beam dose rate and DMLC IMRT to moving body anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papiez, Lech; Abolfath, Ramin M.

    2008-01-01

    Derivation of formulas relating leaf speeds and beam dose rates for delivering planned intensity profiles to static and moving targets in dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is presented. The analysis of equations determining algorithms for DMLC IMRT delivery under a variable beam dose rate reveals a multitude of possible delivery strategies for a given intensity map and for any given target motion patterns. From among all equivalent delivery strategies for DMLC IMRT treatments specific subclasses of strategies can be selected to provide deliveries that are particularly suitable for clinical applications providing existing delivery devices are used. Special attention is devoted to the subclass of beam dose rate variable DMLC delivery strategies to moving body anatomy that generalize existing techniques of such deliveries in Varian DMLC irradiation methodology to static body anatomy. Few examples of deliveries from this subclass of DMLC IMRT irradiations are investigated to illustrate the principle and show practical benefits of proposed techniques.

  13. Variable beam dose rate and DMLC IMRT to moving body anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papiez, Lech; Abolfath, Ramin M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UTSouthwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Derivation of formulas relating leaf speeds and beam dose rates for delivering planned intensity profiles to static and moving targets in dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is presented. The analysis of equations determining algorithms for DMLC IMRT delivery under a variable beam dose rate reveals a multitude of possible delivery strategies for a given intensity map and for any given target motion patterns. From among all equivalent delivery strategies for DMLC IMRT treatments specific subclasses of strategies can be selected to provide deliveries that are particularly suitable for clinical applications providing existing delivery devices are used. Special attention is devoted to the subclass of beam dose rate variable DMLC delivery strategies to moving body anatomy that generalize existing techniques of such deliveries in Varian DMLC irradiation methodology to static body anatomy. Few examples of deliveries from this subclass of DMLC IMRT irradiations are investigated to illustrate the principle and show practical benefits of proposed techniques.

  14. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  15. Real-Time Motion Management of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Tobias

    of this thesis is to manage prostate motion in real-time by aligning the radiation beam to the prostate using the novel dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking method. Specifically, the delivered dose with tracking was compared to the planned dose, and the impact of treatment plan complexity and limitations...

  16. Approach the National Quality Audit System for Radiotherapy in Latvia

    OpenAIRE

    Dehtjars, J; Popovs, S; Plaude, S

    2008-01-01

    It is very important to make National Quality Audit to ensure accurate conformal RT delivery. It is necessary to develop an Audit system to inspect all Conformal RT and IMRT delivery chain including the Quality checks of linear accelerator, Multileaf Collimator (MLC), Computer Tomography (CT) scanner or simulator, target and tissue delineation, plan evaluation, and delivery.

  17. The CERN antiproton target: hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 {\\deg}C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of...

  18. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Torregrosa Martin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26  GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa’s. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  19. Step and shoot IMRT to mobile targets and techniques to mitigate the interplay effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, Eric D; Tome, Wolfgang A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate a method to mitigate temporal dose variation due to the interplay effect as well as investigate the effect of randomly varying motion patterns. The multi-leaf collimator (MLC) settings from 5, 9 and 11 field step and shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment plans with tumor motion of 1.53, 1.03 and 1.95 cm, respectively, were used. Static planar dose distributions were determined for each treatment field using the Planar Dose Module in the Pinnacle 3 treatment planning system. The MotionSIM XY/4D robotic diode array was used to recreate the tumor motion orthogonal to each treatment beam. Dose rate modulation was investigated as a method to mitigate temporal dose variation due to the interplay effect. Computer simulation was able to identify individual fields where interplay effects are greatest. Computer simulation and physical measurement have shown that temporal dose variation can be mitigated by the selection of the dose rate or by selective dose rate modulation within a given IMRT treatment field. Selective dose rate modulation within a given IMRT treatment field reduced temporal dose variation to levels comparable to whole field dose rate reduction, while also producing shorter radiation delivery times in six of the seven cases investigated. For the cases considered, the interplay effect did not appear to have a greater effect on hypofractionation compared to traditional fractionation even though fewer fractions were delivered. Randomized motion kernel variation was also considered. For this portion of the study, a nine field step and shoot IMRT configuration was considered with a 1.03 cm tumor motion rather than the five field case. In general, if the extent of the variant motion pattern was mostly contained within the target volume, limited impact on the temporal dose variation was observed. In cases where the variant motion kernels increasingly exceeded the

  20. Target Surface Area Effects on Hot Electron Dynamics from High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-19

    Science, University ofMichigan, AnnArbor,MI 48109-2099, USA E-mail: czulick@umich.edu Keywords: laser- plasma ,mass-limited, fast electrons , sheath...New J. Phys. 18 (2016) 063020 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/18/6/063020 PAPER Target surface area effects on hot electron dynamics from high intensity laser... plasma interactions CZulick, ARaymond,AMcKelvey, VChvykov, AMaksimchuk, AGRThomas, LWillingale, VYanovsky andKKrushelnick Center forUltrafast Optical

  1. Study of the dynamic fragmentation of laser shock-loaded metallic target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescoute, E.

    2010-01-01

    The irradiation of a metallic target by a high power laser pulse induces a shock wave in the material. Under some conditions, it leads to the production of high velocity ejecta which can damage the optical environment (lenses, mirrors, windows, etc.). With the ongoing development of high energy laser facilities designed to achieve inertial confinement fusion, such as the Laser MegaJoule in France or the National Ignition Facility in the USA, the question of debris ejection from metallic samples subjected to intense laser irradiation has become a key issue. It is necessary to understand fragmentation processes induced by laser shock, and to anticipate and quantify generated fragments, in order to design suitable protections and experiments, and to preserve laser facilities. The main fragmentation processes which can occur in a laser-shock-loaded metallic target and generate high velocity ejecta are: (i) micro-jetting, which occurs upon reflection of the incident compressive front from the free surface, (ii) spallation, which is due to the later interaction of the release wave reflected from that surface with the incident unloading wave and (iii) dynamic punching of thin targets. Experimental campaigns have been performed on high energy laser facilities in the Centre d'Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d'Aquitaine (CESTA, CEA, Alise facility) and in the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, LULI 2000 facility). Gold and aluminium have been mainly studied because they are the two main metallic components of the target which will be used to achieved the inertial confinement fusion. Specific diagnostics have been developed and used during these experiments to study the dynamic fragmentation: transverse shadowgraphy, free surface velocity measurement and recovery of generated fragments. Experimental results have been compared with numerical predictions obtained with a bi-dimensional hydrodynamic code, where a specific numerical

  2. Penalty Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Dim Targets Detection in Sensor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Guo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to detect and track multiple maneuvering dim targets in sensor systems, an improved dynamic programming track-before-detect algorithm (DP-TBD called penalty DP-TBD (PDP-TBD is proposed. The performances of tracking techniques are used as a feedback to the detection part. The feedback is constructed by a penalty term in the merit function, and the penalty term is a function of the possible target state estimation, which can be obtained by the tracking methods. With this feedback, the algorithm combines traditional tracking techniques with DP-TBD and it can be applied to simultaneously detect and track maneuvering dim targets. Meanwhile, a reasonable constraint that a sensor measurement can originate from one target or clutter is proposed to minimize track separation. Thus, the algorithm can be used in the multi-target situation with unknown target numbers. The efficiency and advantages of PDP-TBD compared with two existing methods are demonstrated by several simulations.

  3. Some safety studies of the MEGAPIE spallation source target performed using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.L.

    2011-01-01

    Such a target forms part of the evolutionary Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) concept in which neutrons are generated in an otherwise sub-critical core by spallation reactions resulting from bombardment by a proton beam. The international project MEGAPIE had the objective of demonstrating the feasibility of the spallation process for a particular target design under strict test conditions. The test was carried over a period of four months at the end of 2006 at the SINQ facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The design studies carried out for the MEGAPIE target prior to irradiation using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) resulted in an optimum flow configuration being defined for the coolant circulation. Simultaneously, stresses in the structural components were examined using Finite Element Method (FEM) techniques. To this purpose, an interface program was written which enabled different specialist groups to carry out the thermal hydraulics and structural mechanics analyses within the project with fully consistent model data. Results for steady-state operation of the target show that the critical lower target components are adequately cooled, and that stresses and displacements are well within tolerances. Transient analyses were also performed to demonstrate the robustness of the design in the event of abnormal operation, including pump failure and burn-through of the target casing by the proton beam. In the latter case, the CFD analyses complemented and extended full-scale tests. (author)

  4. Some safety studies of the MEGAPIE spallation source target performed using computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.L., E-mail: brian.smith@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, OHSA/C08, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    Such a target forms part of the evolutionary Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) concept in which neutrons are generated in an otherwise sub-critical core by spallation reactions resulting from bombardment by a proton beam. The international project MEGAPIE had the objective of demonstrating the feasibility of the spallation process for a particular target design under strict test conditions. The test was carried over a period of four months at the end of 2006 at the SINQ facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The design studies carried out for the MEGAPIE target prior to irradiation using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) resulted in an optimum flow configuration being defined for the coolant circulation. Simultaneously, stresses in the structural components were examined using Finite Element Method (FEM) techniques. To this purpose, an interface program was written which enabled different specialist groups to carry out the thermal hydraulics and structural mechanics analyses within the project with fully consistent model data. Results for steady-state operation of the target show that the critical lower target components are adequately cooled, and that stresses and displacements are well within tolerances. Transient analyses were also performed to demonstrate the robustness of the design in the event of abnormal operation, including pump failure and burn-through of the target casing by the proton beam. In the latter case, the CFD analyses complemented and extended full-scale tests. (author)

  5. Dynamic analysis of the Nova Target Chamber to assess alignment errors due to ambient noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCallen, D.B.; Murray, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    We performed a study to determine the dynamic behavior of the Nova Target Chamber. We conducted a free vibration analysis to determine the natural frequencies of vibration and the corresponding modeshapes of the target chamber. Utilizing the free vibration results, we performed forced vibration analysis to predict the displacements of the chamber due to ambient vibration. The input support motion for the forced vibration analysis was defined by a white noise acceleration spectrum which was based on previous measurements of ground noise near the Nova site. A special purpose computer program was prepared to process the results of the forced vibration analysis. The program yields distances by which the lines of sight of the various laser beams miss the target as a result of ambient vibrations. We also performed additional estimates of miss distance to provide bounds on the results. A description of the finite element model of the chamber, the input spectrum, and the results of the analyses are included

  6. The impact of leaf width and plan complexity on DMLC tracking of prostate intensity modulated arc therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Tobias; Falk, Marianne; Poulsen, Per Rugaard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of leaf width and plan complexity on dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking for prostate motion management during IMAT treatments.Methods: Prostate...... IMAT plans were delivered with either a high-definition MLC (HDMLC) or a Millennium MLC (M-MLC) (0.25 and 0.50 cm central leaf width, respectively), with and without DMLC tracking, to a dosimetric phantom that reproduced four prostate motion traces. The plan complexity was varied by applying leaf....... The corresponding pass rates without tracking were 87.6% (range 76.2%-94.7%) and 91.1% (range 81.4%-97.6%), respectively. Decreased plan complexity improved the pass rate when static target measurements were used as reference, but not with the planned dose as reference. The main cause of tracking errors was leaf...

  7. Conformation radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo

    1999-01-01

    In order to coincide the high dose region to the target volume, the 'Conformation Radiotherapy Technique' using the multileaf collimator and the device for 'hollow-out technique' was developed by Prof. S. Takahashi in 1960. This technique can be classified a type of 2D-dynamic conformal RT techniques. By the clinical application of this technique, the late complications of the lens, the intestine and the urinary bladder after radiotherapy for the maxillary cancer and the cervical cancer decreased. Since 1980's the exact position and shape of the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues can be easily obtained by the tremendous development of the CT/MRI imaging technique. As a result, various kinds of new conformal techniques such as the 3D-CRT, the dose intensity modulation, the tomotherapy have been developed since the beginning of 1990'. Several 'dose escalation study with 2D-/3D conformal RT' is now under way to improve the treatment results. (author)

  8. Dynamics of target recognition by interstitial axon branching along developing cortical axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastmeyer, M; O'Leary, D D

    1996-02-15

    Corticospinal axons innervate their midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal targets by extending collateral branches interstitially along their length. To establish that the axon shaft rather than the axonal growth cone is responsible for target recognition in this system, and to characterize the dynamics of interstitial branch formation, we have studied this process in an in vivo-like setting using slice cultures from neonatal mice containing the entire pathway of corticospinal axons. Corticospinal axons labeled with the dye 1,1'-dioctodecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (or Dil) were imaged using time-lapse video microscopy of their pathway overlying the basilar pons, their major hindbrain target. The axon shaft millimeters behind the growth cone exhibits several dynamic behaviors, including the de novo formation of varicosities and filopodia-like extensions, and a behavior that we term "pulsation," which is characterized by a variable thickening and thining of short segments of the axon. An individual axon can have multiple sites of branching activity, with many of the branches being transient. These dynamic behaviors occur along the portion of the axon shaft overlying the basilar pons, but not just caudal to it. Once the collaterals extend into the pontine neuropil, they branch further in the neuropil, while the parent axon becomes quiescent. Thus, the branching activity is spatially restricted to specific portions of the axon, as well as temporally restricted to a relatively brief time window. These findings provide definitive evidence that collateral branches form de novo along corticospinal axons and establish that the process of target recognition in this system is a property of the axon shaft rather than the leading growth cone.

  9. SU-E-T-533: Evaluation of Dose Calculation Accuracy for Small Elongated Targets On the Edge Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Y; Wen, N; Snyder, K; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Bellon, M; Li, H; Song, K; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate output factors and dose calculation accuracy on a novel SRS linear accelerator, the Edge (Varian), for treatments of small, elongated targets using flattening filter free (FFF) beam. Methods: Total scatter/output factors (OF’s) for 24 elongated, small, high definition multi-leaf collimator (HDMLC)-defined fields were measured on the Edge machine using 6X FFF beam. 3 detectors were used in water tank: CC01 ion chamber (active volume 10cc), stereotactic photon diode (SFD) (active diameter 0.6mm, active thickness 0.06mm), Edge detector (active volume 0.0019cc). The 24 MLC apertures have widths ranging from 5 to 20mm and length/width ratio from 0.25 to 5. Readings were cross calibrated with CC04 at field size 3×3 cm. A beam model was developed using commissioning measurements for treatment planning in Eclipse (AAA, version 11). One representative patient case (IMRT, target volume 0.2cc, 4×4×14mm) was calculated using AAA 11 and delivered on the Edge. Results: Due to volume averaging effects, CC01 readings were 11.2±0.9% lower than SFD readings for 5mm field sizes. The Edge diode showed a uniform over-response of 2.6±0.7% compared to SFD. Calculation using AAA v11 showed the best agreement with SFD measurements (2.4±1.7% lower than SFD). The largest difference between AAA v11 and SFD occurs at 5mm field sizes. For the patient plan, dose delivered on Edge was measured to be 2.2% higher than AAA v11 calculation. Conclusion: Cross-calibrated SFD output measurements presented the best agreement with commissioned AAA v11 beam model. Field sizes smaller than 1cm posed challenges to both the detectors and the calculation algorithm. For the representative patient with small elongated target, AAA v11 and measurements agreed within ~2% on the Edge linac. Although encouraging, a more comprehensive study is required to validate the overall algorithmic accuracy

  10. Exploratory investigation of the HIPPO gas-jet target fluid dynamic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisel, Zach, E-mail: zmeisel@nd.edu [Department of Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Shi, Ke; Jemcov, Aleksandar [Hessert Laboratory for Aerospace Research, Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Couder, Manoel [Department of Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2016-08-21

    In order to optimize the performance of gas-jet targets for future nuclear reaction measurements, a detailed understanding of the dependence of the gas-jet properties on experiment design parameters is required. Common methods of gas-jet characterization rely on measuring the effective thickness using nuclear elastic scattering and energy loss techniques; however, these tests are time intensive and limit the range of design modifications which can be explored to improve the properties of the jet as a nuclear reaction target. Thus, a more rapid jet-characterization method is desired. We performed the first steps towards characterizing the gas-jet density distribution of the HIPPO gas-jet target at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Laboratory by reproducing results from {sup 20}Ne(α,α){sup 20}Ne elastic scattering measurements with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations performed with the state-of-the-art CFD software ANSYS Fluent. We find a strong sensitivity to experimental design parameters of the gas-jet target, such as the jet nozzle geometry and ambient pressure of the target chamber. We argue that improved predictive power will require moving to three-dimensional simulations and additional benchmarking with experimental data.

  11. Sampling Enrichment toward Target Structures Using Hybrid Molecular Dynamics-Monte Carlo Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kecheng Yang

    Full Text Available Sampling enrichment toward a target state, an analogue of the improvement of sampling efficiency (SE, is critical in both the refinement of protein structures and the generation of near-native structure ensembles for the exploration of structure-function relationships. We developed a hybrid molecular dynamics (MD-Monte Carlo (MC approach to enrich the sampling toward the target structures. In this approach, the higher SE is achieved by perturbing the conventional MD simulations with a MC structure-acceptance judgment, which is based on the coincidence degree of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS intensity profiles between the simulation structures and the target structure. We found that the hybrid simulations could significantly improve SE by making the top-ranked models much closer to the target structures both in the secondary and tertiary structures. Specifically, for the 20 mono-residue peptides, when the initial structures had the root-mean-squared deviation (RMSD from the target structure smaller than 7 Å, the hybrid MD-MC simulations afforded, on average, 0.83 Å and 1.73 Å in RMSD closer to the target than the parallel MD simulations at 310K and 370K, respectively. Meanwhile, the average SE values are also increased by 13.2% and 15.7%. The enrichment of sampling becomes more significant when the target states are gradually detectable in the MD-MC simulations in comparison with the parallel MD simulations, and provide >200% improvement in SE. We also performed a test of the hybrid MD-MC approach in the real protein system, the results showed that the SE for 3 out of 5 real proteins are improved. Overall, this work presents an efficient way of utilizing solution SAXS to improve protein structure prediction and refinement, as well as the generation of near native structures for function annotation.

  12. Whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastases: The technique of irradiation influences the dose to parotid glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos, G.; Paulon, R.; Verrelle, P.; Lapeyre, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of brain metastases, whole brain radiotherapy can be carried out according two distinct methods: one using multi-leaf collimator for field shaping and protection of organs at risk, and a second one is to make a rotation of the field to avoid the eyes. The aim of the study was to compare for 10 patients the dose distributions at organs at risk for each method. Patients received 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Except for parotid glands, the dose received by organs at risk and the planning target volume was the same with each method. For whole brain radiotherapy, excluding the cisterna cerebellomedullaris, the mean parotid dose was 9.63 Gy using the multi-leaf collimator versus 12.32 Gy using the field rotation (P = 0.04). For whole brain radiotherapy including the cisterna cerebellomedullaris, the mean parotid dose was 11.12 Gy using the multi-leaf collimator versus 20.06 Gy using field rotation (P < 0.001). Using the multi-leaf collimator seems recommended for whole brain radiotherapy, to reduce the dose to the parotids. (authors)

  13. Mathematical modeling of antibody drug conjugates with the target and tubulin dynamics to predict AUC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jong Hyuk; Jung, Il Hyo

    2018-04-14

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs)are one of the most recently developed chemotherapeutics to treat some types of tumor cells. They consist of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), linkers, and potent cytotoxic drugs. Unlike common chemotherapies, ADCs combine selectively with a target at the surface of the tumor cell, and a potent cytotoxic drug (payload) effectively prevents microtubule polymerization. In this work, we construct an ADC model that considers both the target of antibodies and the receptor (tubulin) of the cytotoxic payloads. The model is simulated with brentuximab vedotin, one of ADCs, and used to investigate the pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics of ADCs in vivo. It also predicts area under the curve (AUC) of ADCs and the payloads by identifying the half-life. The results show that dynamical behaviors fairly coincide with the observed data and half-life and capture AUC. Thus, the model can be used for estimating some parameters, fitting experimental observations, predicting AUC, and exploring various dynamical behaviors of the target and the receptor. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamically polarized hydrogen target as a broadband, wavelength-independent thermal neutron spin polarizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jinkui; Garamus, Vasil M.; Mueller, Wilhelm; Willumeit, Regine

    2005-01-01

    A hydrogen-rich sample with dynamically polarized hydrogen nuclei was tested as a wavelength-independent neutron transmission spin polarizer. The experiment used a modified setup of the dynamic nuclear polarization target station at the GKSS research center. The standard solvent sample at the GKSS DNP station was used. It is 2.8mm thick and consists of 43.4wt% water, 54.6wt% glycerol, and 2wt% of EHBA-Cr(v) complex. The wavelength of the incident neutrons for the transmission experiment was λ=8.1A with Δλ/λ=10%. The polarization of neutron beam after the target sample was analyzed with a supermirror analyzer. A neutron polarization of -52% was achieved at the hydrogen polarization of -69%. Further experiments will test the feasibility of other hydrogen-rich materials, such as methane, as the polarizer. A theoretical calculation shows that a polarized methane target would allow over 95% neutron polarizations with more than 30% transmission

  15. HOW BOXERS DECIDE TO PUNCH A TARGET: EMERGENT BEHAVIOUR IN NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL MOVEMENT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hristovski

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown how dynamical systems theory provides a relevant framework for investigating decision-making behavior in sport. The aim of this study was to adopt concepts and tools from nonlinear dynamics in examining effects of boxer-target distance and perceived punching efficiency on emergent decision-making during a typical practice task in boxing. Results revealed the existence of critical values of scaled distances between boxers and targets for first time appearance and disappearance of a diverse range of boxing actions including jabs, hooks and uppercuts. Reasons for the diversity of actions were twofold: i abrupt (qualitative changes in the number of the possible punches, i.e. motor solutions to the hitting task; and ii, fine modification of the probabilities of selecting specific striking patterns. Boxers were able to exploit the emerging perception of strikeability, leading to a changing diversity of selected actions and a cascade of abrupt changes in the perceptual-motor work space of the task. Perceived efficiency of a punching action by the participants also changed as a function of the scaled distance to a target and was correlated with the probability of occurrence of specific boxing actions. Accordingly, scaled distance-dependent perceived efficiency seems an important perceptual constraint in the training task of punching a heavy bag in boxers

  16. High-speed photographic methods for compression dynamics investigation of laser irradiated shell target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Kologrivov, A.A.; Krokhin, O.N.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    Three methods are described for a high-speed diagnostics of compression dynamics of shell targets being spherically laser-heated on the installation ''Kal'mar''. The first method is based on the direct investigation of the space-time evolution of the critical-density region for Nd-laser emission (N sub(e) asymptotically equals 10 21 I/cm 3 ) by means of the streak photography of plasma image in the second-harmonic light. The second method involves investigation of time evolution of the second-harmonic spectral distribution by means of a spectrograph coupled with a streak camera. The use of a special laser pulse with two time-distributed intensity maxima for the irradiation of shell targets, and the analysis of the obtained X-ray pin-hole pictures constitute the basis of the third method. (author)

  17. Simulation and Automation of Microwave Frequency Control in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for Solid Polarized Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Gonaduwage; Johnson, Ian; Keller, Dustin

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is used in most of the solid polarized target scattering experiments. Those target materials must be irradiated using microwaves at a frequency determined by the difference in the nuclear Larmor and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) frequencies. But the resonance frequency changes with time as a result of radiation damage. Hence the microwave frequency should be adjusted accordingly. Manually adjusting the frequency can be difficult, and improper adjustments negatively impact the polarization. In order to overcome these difficulties, two controllers were developed which automate the process of seeking and maintaining the optimal frequency: one being a standalone controller for a traditional DC motor and the other a LabVIEW VI for a stepper motor configuration. Further a Monte-Carlo simulation was developed which can accurately model the polarization over time as a function of microwave frequency. In this talk, analysis of the simulated data and recent improvements to the automated system will be presented. DOE.

  18. Comprehensive Identification of SUMO2/3 Targets and Their Dynamics during Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Julie; Kelstrup, Christian D; Hayward, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    During mitosis large alterations in cellular structures occur rapidly, which to a large extent is regulated by post-translational modification of proteins. Modification of proteins with the small ubiquitin-related protein SUMO2/3 regulates mitotic progression, but few mitotic targets have been...... identified so far. To deepen our understanding of SUMO2/3 during this window of the cell cycle, we undertook a comprehensive proteomic characterization of SUMO2/3 modified proteins in mitosis and upon mitotic exit. We developed an efficient tandem affinity purification strategy of SUMO2/3 modified proteins...... from mitotic cells. Combining this purification strategy with cell synchronization procedures and quantitative mass spectrometry allowed for the mapping of numerous novel targets and their dynamics as cells progressed out of mitosis. This identified RhoGDIα as a major SUMO2/3 modified protein...

  19. Utilisation of computational fluid dynamics techniques for design of molybdenum target specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeoh, G.H.; Wassink, D.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to investigate the hydraulic behaviour within a model of the liner and irradiation rig, located in the central portion of the HIFAR fuel element is described. Flow visualisation and LDV measurements are performed to better understand the fluid flow around the narrow spaces within the irradiation rig, annular target cans and liner. Based on the unstructured meshing consisted of triangular elements and tetrahedrons within the flow space generated for the geometrical structure, the CFD model was able to predict complex flow structures inside the liner containing the irradiation rig and target cans. The reliability of the model was validated against experiments. The predicted flow behaviour was comparable to the experimental observations. Predicted velocities were also found to be in good agreement with LDV measurements. (author)

  20. Management of the interplay effect when using dynamic MLC sequences to treat moving targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, Laurence E.; Wagar, Matthew; Ionascu, Dan; Berbeco, Ross; Chin, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Interplay between organ motion and leaf motion has been shown to generally have a small dosimetric impact for most clinical intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments. However, it has also been shown that for some MLC sequences there can be large daily variations in the delivered dose, depending on details of patient motion or the number of fractions. This study investigates guidelines for dynamic MLC sequences that will keep daily dose variations due to the interplay between organ motion and leaf motion within 10%. Dose distributions for a range of MLC separations (0.2-5.0 cm) and displacements between adjacent MLCs (0-1.5 cm) were exported from ECLIPSE to purpose-written software, which simulated the dose distribution delivered to a moving target. Target motion parallel and perpendicular to the MLC motion was investigated for a range of amplitudes (0.5-4.0 cm), periods (1.5-10 s), and MLC speeds (0.1-3.0 cm/s) with target motions modeled as sin 6 . Results were confirmed experimentally by measuring the dose delivered to an ion chamber array in a moving phantom for different MLC sequences. The simulation results were used to identify MLC sequences that kept dose variations within 10% compared to the dose delivered with no motion. The maximum allowable MLC speed, when target motion is parallel to the MLC motion, was found to be a simple function of target period and MLC separation. When the target motion is perpendicular to MLC motion, the maximum allowable MLC speed can be described as a function of MLC separation and the displacement of adjacent MLCs. These guidelines were successfully applied to two-dimensional motion, and a simple program was written to import MLC sequence files and evaluate whether the maximum daily dose discrepancy caused by the interplay effect will be larger than 10%. This software was experimentally evaluated, and found to conservatively predict whether a given MLC sequence could give large daily dose discrepancies

  1. Targeted microbubbles for imaging tumor angiogenesis: assessment of whole-body biodistribution with dynamic micro-PET in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Cheng, Zhen; Davis, Corrine

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice.......To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice....

  2. A universal molecular translator for non-nucleic acid targets that enables dynamic DNA assemblies and logic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Hu, Shichao; Wang, Huaming; Zhao, Yan; Li, Na; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-28

    A universal molecular translator based on the target-triggered DNA strand displacement was developed, which was able to convert various kinds of non-nucleic acid targets into a unique output DNA. This translation strategy was successfully applied in directing dynamic DNA assemblies and in realizing three-input logic gate operations.

  3. Actin dynamics at focal adhesions: a common endpoint and putative therapeutic target for proteinuric kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Sanja; Schiffer, Mario

    2018-06-01

    Proteinuria encompasses diverse causes including both genetic diseases and acquired forms such as diabetic and hypertensive nephropathy. The basis of proteinuria is a disturbance in size selectivity of the glomerular filtration barrier, which largely depends on the podocyte: a terminally differentiated epithelial cell type covering the outer surface of the glomerulus. Compromised podocyte structure is one of the earliest signs of glomerular injury. The phenotype of diverse animal models and podocyte cell culture firmly established the essential role of the actin cytoskeleton in maintaining functional podocyte structure. Podocyte foot processes, actin-based membrane extensions, contain 2 molecularly distinct "hubs" that control actin dynamics: a slit diaphragm and focal adhesions. Although loss of foot processes encompasses disassembly of slit diaphragm multiprotein complexes, as long as cells are attached to the glomerular basement membrane, focal adhesions will be the sites in which stress due to filtration flow is counteracted by forces generated by the actin network in foot processes. Numerous studies within last 20 years have identified actin binding and regulatory proteins as well as integrins as essential components of signaling and actin dynamics at focal adhesions in podocytes, suggesting that some of them may become novel, druggable targets for proteinuric kidney diseases. Here we review evidence supporting the idea that current treatments for chronic kidney diseases beneficially and directly target the podocyte actin cytoskeleton associated with focal adhesions and suggest that therapeutic reagents that target the focal adhesion-regulated actin cytoskeleton in foot processes have potential to modernize treatments for chronic kidney diseases. Copyright © 2018 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanism of microRNA-target interaction: molecular dynamics simulations and thermodynamics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Wang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenously produced approximately 21-nt riboregulators that associate with Argonaute (Ago proteins to direct mRNA cleavage or repress the translation of complementary RNAs. Capturing the molecular mechanisms of miRNA interacting with its target will not only reinforce the understanding of underlying RNA interference but also fuel the design of more effective small-interfering RNA strands. To address this, in the present work the RNA-bound (Ago-miRNA, Ago-miRNA-target and RNA-free Ago forms were analyzed by performing both molecular dynamics simulations and thermodynamic analysis. Based on the principal component analysis results of the simulation trajectories as well as the correlation analysis in fluctuations of residues, we discover that: 1 three important (PAZ, Mid and PIWI domains exist in Argonaute which define the global dynamics of the protein; 2 the interdomain correlated movements are so crucial for the interaction of Ago-RNAs that they not only facilitate the relaxation of the interactions between residues surrounding the RNA binding channel but also induce certain conformational changes; and 3 it is just these conformational changes that expand the cavity of the active site and open putative pathways for both the substrate uptake and product release. In addition, by thermodynamic analysis we also discover that for both the guide RNA 5'-end recognition and the facilitated site-specific cleavage of the target, the presence of two metal ions (of Mg(2+ plays a predominant role, and this conclusion is consistent with the observed enzyme catalytic cleavage activity in the ternary complex (Ago-miRNA-mRNA. Our results find that it is the set of arginine amino acids concentrated in the nucleotide-binding channel in Ago, instead of the conventionally-deemed seed base-paring, that makes greater contributions in stabilizing the binding of the nucleic acids to Ago.

  5. Mechanism of microRNA-target interaction: molecular dynamics simulations and thermodynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonghua; Li, Yan; Ma, Zhi; Yang, Wei; Ai, Chunzhi

    2010-07-29

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously produced approximately 21-nt riboregulators that associate with Argonaute (Ago) proteins to direct mRNA cleavage or repress the translation of complementary RNAs. Capturing the molecular mechanisms of miRNA interacting with its target will not only reinforce the understanding of underlying RNA interference but also fuel the design of more effective small-interfering RNA strands. To address this, in the present work the RNA-bound (Ago-miRNA, Ago-miRNA-target) and RNA-free Ago forms were analyzed by performing both molecular dynamics simulations and thermodynamic analysis. Based on the principal component analysis results of the simulation trajectories as well as the correlation analysis in fluctuations of residues, we discover that: 1) three important (PAZ, Mid and PIWI) domains exist in Argonaute which define the global dynamics of the protein; 2) the interdomain correlated movements are so crucial for the interaction of Ago-RNAs that they not only facilitate the relaxation of the interactions between residues surrounding the RNA binding channel but also induce certain conformational changes; and 3) it is just these conformational changes that expand the cavity of the active site and open putative pathways for both the substrate uptake and product release. In addition, by thermodynamic analysis we also discover that for both the guide RNA 5'-end recognition and the facilitated site-specific cleavage of the target, the presence of two metal ions (of Mg(2+)) plays a predominant role, and this conclusion is consistent with the observed enzyme catalytic cleavage activity in the ternary complex (Ago-miRNA-mRNA). Our results find that it is the set of arginine amino acids concentrated in the nucleotide-binding channel in Ago, instead of the conventionally-deemed seed base-paring, that makes greater contributions in stabilizing the binding of the nucleic acids to Ago.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100871 (China); Xue, J.M. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100871 (China); Zhang, Y., E-mail: Zhangy1@ornl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Morris, J.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zhu, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Gao, Y.; Wang, Y.G.; Yan, S. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100871 (China); Weber, W.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The determination of stopping powers for slow heavy ions in targets containing light elements is important to accurately describe ion-solid interactions, evaluate ion irradiation effects and predict ion ranges for device fabrication and nuclear applications. Recently, discrepancies of up to 40% between the experimental results and SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) predictions of ion ranges for heavy ions with medium and low energies (<{approx}25 keV/nucleon) in light elemental targets have been reported. The longer experimental ion ranges indicate that the stopping powers used in the SRIM code are overestimated. Here, a molecular dynamics simulation scheme is developed to calculate the ion ranges of heavy ions in light elemental targets. Electronic stopping powers generated from both a reciprocity approach and the SRIM code are used to investigate the influence of electronic stopping on ion range profiles. The ion range profiles for Au and Pb ions in SiC and Er ions in Si, with energies between 20 and 5250 keV, are simulated. The simulation results show that the depth profiles of implanted ions are deeper and in better agreement with the experiments when using the electronic stopping power values derived from the reciprocity approach. These results indicate that the origin of the discrepancy in ion ranges between experimental results and SRIM predictions in the low energy region may be an overestimation of the electronic stopping powers used in SRIM.

  7. Biologic targets identified from dynamic 18FDG-PET and implications for image-guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusten, Espen; Malinen, Eirik; Roedal, Jan; Bruland, Oeyvind S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The outcome of biologic image-guided radiotherapy depends on the definition of the biologic target. The purpose of the current work was to extract hyper perfused and hypermetabolic regions from dynamic positron emission tomography (D-PET) images, to dose escalate either region and to discuss implications of such image guided strategies. Methods: Eleven patients with soft tissue sarcomas were investigated with D-PET. The images were analyzed using a two-compartment model producing parametric maps of perfusion and metabolic rate. The two image series were segmented and exported to a treatment planning system, and biological target volumes BTV per and BTV met (perfusion and metabolism, respectively) were generated. Dice's similarity coefficient was used to compare the two biologic targets. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were generated for a dose painting by contours regime, where planning target volume (PTV) was planned to 60 Gy and BTV to 70 Gy. Thus, two separate plans were created for each patient with dose escalation of either BTV per or BTV met . Results: BTV per was somewhat smaller than BTV met (209 ±170 cm 3 against 243 ±143 cm 3 , respectively; population-based mean and s.d.). Dice's coefficient depended on the applied margin, and was 0.72 ±0.10 for a margin of 10 mm. Boosting BTV per resulted in mean dose of 69 ±1.0 Gy to this region, while BTV met received 67 ±3.2 Gy. Boosting BTV met gave smaller dose differences between the respective non-boost DVHs (such as D 98 ). Conclusions: Dose escalation of one of the BTVs results in a partial dose escalation of the other BTV as well. If tumor aggressiveness is equally pronounced in hyper perfused and hypermetabolic regions, this should be taken into account in the treatment planning

  8. Toward improved target conformity for two spot scanning proton therapy delivery systems using dynamic collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moignier, Alexandra; Gelover, Edgar; Smith, Blake R.; Wang, Dongxu; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kirk, Maura L.; Lin, Liyong; Solberg, Timothy D.; Lin, Alexander; Hyer, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify improvement in target conformity in brain and head and neck tumor treatments resulting from the use of a dynamic collimation system (DCS) with two spot scanning proton therapy delivery systems (universal nozzle, UN, and dedicated nozzle, DN) with median spot sizes of 5.2 and 3.2 mm over a range of energies from 100 to 230 MeV. Methods: Uncollimated and collimated plans were calculated with both UN and DN beam models implemented within our in-house treatment planning system for five brain and ten head and neck datasets in patients previously treated with spot scanning proton therapy. The prescription dose and beam angles from the clinical plans were used for both the UN and DN plans. The average reduction of the mean dose to the 10-mm ring surrounding the target between the uncollimated and collimated plans was calculated for the UN and the DN. Target conformity was analyzed using the mean dose to 1-mm thickness rings surrounding the target at increasing distances ranging from 1 to 10 mm. Results: The average reductions of the 10-mm ring mean dose for the UN and DN plans were 13.7% (95% CI: 11.6%–15.7%; p < 0.0001) and 11.5% (95% CI: 9.5%–13.5%; p < 0.0001) across all brain cases and 7.1% (95% CI: 4.4%–9.8%; p < 0.001) and 6.3% (95% CI: 3.7%–9.0%; p < 0.001), respectively, across all head and neck cases. The collimated UN plans were either more conformal (all brain cases and 60% of the head and neck cases) than or equivalent (40% of the head and neck cases) to the uncollimated DN plans. The collimated DN plans offered the highest conformity. Conclusions: The DCS added either to the UN or DN improved the target conformity. The DCS may be of particular interest for sites with UN systems looking for a more economical solution than upgrading the nozzle to improve the target conformity of their spot scanning proton therapy system. PMID:26936726

  9. Studying the potential of point detectors in time-resolved dose verification of dynamic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beierholm, A.R.; Behrens, C.F.; Andersen, C.E.

    2015-01-01

    Modern megavoltage x-ray radiotherapy with high spatial and temporal dose gradients puts high demands on the entire delivery system, including not just the linear accelerator and the multi-leaf collimator, but also algorithms used for optimization and dose calculations, and detectors used for quality assurance and dose verification. In this context, traceable in-phantom dosimetry using a well-characterized point detector is often an important supplement to 2D-based quality assurance methods based on radiochromic film or detector arrays. In this study, an in-house developed dosimetry system based on fiber-coupled plastic scintillator detectors was evaluated and compared with a Farmer-type ionization chamber and a small-volume ionization chamber. An important feature of scintillator detectors is that the sensitive volume of the detector can easily be scaled, and five scintillator detectors of different scintillator length were thus employed to quantify volume averaging effects by direct measurement. The dosimetric evaluation comprised several complex-shape static fields as well as simplified dynamic deliveries using RapidArc, a volumetric-modulated arc therapy modality often used at the participating clinic. The static field experiments showed that the smallest scintillator detectors were in the best agreement with dose calculations, while needing the smallest volume averaging corrections. Concerning total dose measured during RapidArc, all detectors agreed with dose calculations within 1.1 ± 0.7% when positioned in regions of high homogenous dose. Larger differences were observed for high dose gradient and organ at risk locations, were differences between measured and calculated dose were as large as 8.0 ± 5.5%. The smallest differences were generally seen for the small-volume ionization chamber and the smallest scintillators. The time-resolved RapidArc dose profiles revealed volume-dependent discrepancies between scintillator and ionization chamber response

  10. Spin filtering neutrons with a proton target dynamically polarized using photo-excited triplet states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haag, M.; Brandt, B. van den; Eichhorn, T.R.; Hautle, P.; Wenckebach, W.Th.

    2012-01-01

    In a test of principle a neutron spin filter has been built, which is based on dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) using photo-excited triplet states. This DNP method has advantages over classical concepts as the requirements for cryogenic equipment and magnets are much relaxed: the spin filter is operated in a field of 0.3 T at a temperature of about 100 K and has performed reliably over periods of several weeks. The neutron beam was also used to analyze the polarization of the target employed as a spin filter. We obtained an independent measurement of the proton spin polarization of ∼0.13 in good agreement with the value determined with NMR. Moreover, the neutron beam was used to measure the proton spin polarization as a function of position in the naphthalene sample. The polarization was found to be homogeneous, even at low laser power, in contradiction to existing models describing the photo-excitation process.

  11. Development and performance evaluation of a dynamic phantom for biological dosimetry of moving targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmel, A.; Bert, C.; Saito, N.; von Neubeck, C.; Iancu, G.; K-Weyrather, W.; Durante, M.; Rietzel, E.

    2010-06-01

    A dynamic phantom has been developed to allow for measurement of 3D cell survival distributions and the corresponding distributions of the RBE-weighted dose (RBED) in the presence of motion. The phantom consists of two 96-microwell plates holding Chinese hamster ovary cells inside a container filled with culture medium and is placed on a movable stage. Basic biological properties of the phantom were investigated without irradiation and after irradiation with a carbon ion beam, using both a stationary (reference) exposure and exposure during motion of the phantom perpendicular to the beam with beam tracking. There was no statistically significant difference between plating efficiency measured in the microwells with and without motion (0.75) and values reported in the literature. Mean differences between measured and calculated cell survival for these two irradiation modes were within ±5% of the target dose of 6 Gy (RBE).

  12. Development and performance evaluation of a dynamic phantom for biological dosimetry of moving targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmel, A; Bert, C; Saito, N; Von Neubeck, C; Iancu, G; K-Weyrather, W; Durante, M; Rietzel, E, E-mail: alexander.ag.gemmel@siemens.co [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-06-07

    A dynamic phantom has been developed to allow for measurement of 3D cell survival distributions and the corresponding distributions of the RBE-weighted dose (RBED) in the presence of motion. The phantom consists of two 96-microwell plates holding Chinese hamster ovary cells inside a container filled with culture medium and is placed on a movable stage. Basic biological properties of the phantom were investigated without irradiation and after irradiation with a carbon ion beam, using both a stationary (reference) exposure and exposure during motion of the phantom perpendicular to the beam with beam tracking. There was no statistically significant difference between plating efficiency measured in the microwells with and without motion (0.75) and values reported in the literature. Mean differences between measured and calculated cell survival for these two irradiation modes were within {+-}5% of the target dose of 6 Gy (RBE).

  13. A system dynamics optimization framework to achieve population desired of average weight target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Norhaslinda Zainal; Zulkepli, Jafri Haji; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

    2017-11-01

    Obesity is becoming a serious problem in Malaysia as it has been rated as the highest among Asian countries. The aim of the paper is to propose a system dynamics (SD) optimization framework to achieve population desired weight target based on the changes in physical activity behavior and its association to weight and obesity. The system dynamics approach of stocks and flows diagram was used to quantitatively model the impact of both behavior on the population's weight and obesity trends. This work seems to bring this idea together and highlighting the interdependence of the various aspects of eating and physical activity behavior on the complex of human weight regulation system. The model was used as an experimentation vehicle to investigate the impacts of changes in physical activity on weight and prevalence of obesity implications. This framework paper provides evidence on the usefulness of SD optimization as a strategic decision making approach to assist in decision making related to obesity prevention. SD applied in this research is relatively new in Malaysia and has a high potential to apply to any feedback models that address the behavior cause to obesity.

  14. Migraine generator network and spreading depression dynamics as neuromodulation targets in episodic migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlem, Markus A.

    2013-12-01

    Migraine is a common disabling headache disorder characterized by recurrent episodes sometimes preceded or accompanied by focal neurological symptoms called aura. The relation between two subtypes, migraine without aura (MWoA) and migraine with aura (MWA), is explored with the aim to identify targets for neuromodulation techniques. To this end, a dynamically regulated control system is schematically reduced to a network of the trigeminal nerve, which innervates the cranial circulation, an associated descending modulatory network of brainstem nuclei, and parasympathetic vasomotor efferents. This extends the idea of a migraine generator region in the brainstem to a larger network and is still simple and explicit enough to open up possibilities for mathematical modeling in the future. In this study, it is suggested that the migraine generator network (MGN) is driven and may therefore respond differently to different spatio-temporal noxious input in the migraine subtypes MWA and MWoA. The noxious input is caused by a cortical perturbation of homeostasis, known as spreading depression (SD). The MGN might even trigger SD in the first place by a failure in vasomotor control. As a consequence, migraine is considered as an inherently dynamical disease to which a linear course from upstream to downstream events would not do justice. Minimally invasive and noninvasive neuromodulation techniques are briefly reviewed and their rational is discussed in the context of the proposed mechanism.

  15. Modulation of actin dynamics as potential macrophage subtype-targeting anti-tumour strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergola, Carlo; Schubert, Katrin; Pace, Simona; Ziereisen, Jana; Nikels, Felix; Scherer, Olga; Hüttel, Stephan; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Weinigel, Christina; Rummler, Silke; Müller, Rolf; Raasch, Martin; Mosig, Alexander; Koeberle, Andreas; Werz, Oliver

    2017-01-30

    Tumour-associated macrophages mainly comprise immunosuppressive M2 phenotypes that promote tumour progression besides anti-tumoural M1 subsets. Selective depletion or reprogramming of M2 may represent an innovative anti-cancer strategy. The actin cytoskeleton is central for cellular homeostasis and is targeted for anti-cancer chemotherapy. Here, we show that targeting G-actin nucleation using chondramide A (ChA) predominantly depletes human M2 while promoting the tumour-suppressive M1 phenotype. ChA reduced the viability of M2, with minor effects on M1, but increased tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α release from M1. Interestingly, ChA caused rapid disruption of dynamic F-actin filaments and polymerization of G-actin, followed by reduction of cell size, binucleation and cell division, without cellular collapse. In M1, but not in M2, ChA caused marked activation of SAPK/JNK and NFκB, with slight or no effects on Akt, STAT-1/-3, ERK-1/2, and p38 MAPK, seemingly accounting for the better survival of M1 and TNFα secretion. In a microfluidically-supported human tumour biochip model, circulating ChA-treated M1 markedly reduced tumour cell viability through enhanced release of TNFα. Together, ChA may cause an anti-tumoural microenvironment by depletion of M2 and activation of M1, suggesting induction of G-actin nucleation as potential strategy to target tumour-associated macrophages in addition to neoplastic cells.

  16. Dynamic target high pressure control of a VRF system for heating energy savings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Geun Young; Lee, Je Hyeon; Kim, Inhan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed the dynamic target high pressure control of a VRF system. • We created the VRF control model using the EnergyPlus runtime language. • Multicalorimeter experimental results indicate that the energy efficiency improved by 21%. • EnergyPlus simulations demonstrate that the annual heating energy consumption was lowered by 22%. - Abstract: Variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems are widely used because of their ability to provide individualized comfort control with energy-saving potential. This study develops load responsive high pressure control of a VRF system with the aim of reducing the heating energy consumption of a VRF system under part load conditions. The developed control consists of two parts: one part that determines the level of heating load, and the other that assigns a target high pressure based on the level of heating load. In this way, the compressor speed can be accurately matched to heating load, which improves the energy performance of the VRF system. A series of multicalorimeter experiments revealed that the heating capacity of the VRF system varied by 45% by modulating the target high pressure and that its efficiency was enhanced by 21% by changing the high pressure from 30 kgf/cm"2 to 25 kgf/cm"2. To evaluate the annual heating energy performance of the VRF system with the developed control, a custom computer code was developed to implement the developed control using a programming language called EnergyPlus Runtime Language. Simulation outcomes showed that the annual heating energy consumption of a medium-size office building was reduced by 22% when the developed control was applied.

  17. Failure mode and effect analysis-based quality assurance for dynamic MLC tracking systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawant, Amit; Dieterich, Sonja; Svatos, Michelle; Keall, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA)-based commissioning and quality assurance framework for dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tumor tracking systems. Methods: A systematic failure mode and effect analysis was performed for a prototype real-time tumor tracking system that uses implanted electromagnetic transponders for tumor position monitoring and a DMLC for real-time beam adaptation. A detailed process tree of DMLC tracking delivery was created and potential tracking-specific failure modes were identified. For each failure mode, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of the probability of occurrence, the severity of effect, and the detectibility of the failure. Based on the insights obtained from the FMEA, commissioning and QA procedures were developed to check (i) the accuracy of coordinate system transformation, (ii) system latency, (iii) spatial and dosimetric delivery accuracy, (iv) delivery efficiency, and (v) accuracy and consistency of system response to error conditions. The frequency of testing for each failure mode was determined from the RPN value. Results: Failures modes with RPN≥125 were recommended to be tested monthly. Failure modes with RPN<125 were assigned to be tested during comprehensive evaluations, e.g., during commissioning, annual quality assurance, and after major software/hardware upgrades. System latency was determined to be ∼193 ms. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Tracking accuracy was within 3%-3 mm gamma (100% pass rate) for sinusoidal as well as a wide variety of patient-derived respiratory motions. The total time taken for monthly QA was ∼35 min, while that taken for comprehensive testing was ∼3.5 h. Conclusions: FMEA proved to be a powerful and flexible tool to develop and implement a quality management (QM) framework for DMLC tracking. The authors conclude that the use of FMEA-based QM ensures efficient allocation

  18. Failure mode and effect analysis-based quality assurance for dynamic MLC tracking systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, Amit; Dieterich, Sonja; Svatos, Michelle; Keall, Paul [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94394 (United States); Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, California 94394 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA)-based commissioning and quality assurance framework for dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tumor tracking systems. Methods: A systematic failure mode and effect analysis was performed for a prototype real-time tumor tracking system that uses implanted electromagnetic transponders for tumor position monitoring and a DMLC for real-time beam adaptation. A detailed process tree of DMLC tracking delivery was created and potential tracking-specific failure modes were identified. For each failure mode, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of the probability of occurrence, the severity of effect, and the detectibility of the failure. Based on the insights obtained from the FMEA, commissioning and QA procedures were developed to check (i) the accuracy of coordinate system transformation, (ii) system latency, (iii) spatial and dosimetric delivery accuracy, (iv) delivery efficiency, and (v) accuracy and consistency of system response to error conditions. The frequency of testing for each failure mode was determined from the RPN value. Results: Failures modes with RPN{>=}125 were recommended to be tested monthly. Failure modes with RPN<125 were assigned to be tested during comprehensive evaluations, e.g., during commissioning, annual quality assurance, and after major software/hardware upgrades. System latency was determined to be {approx}193 ms. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Tracking accuracy was within 3%-3 mm gamma (100% pass rate) for sinusoidal as well as a wide variety of patient-derived respiratory motions. The total time taken for monthly QA was {approx}35 min, while that taken for comprehensive testing was {approx}3.5 h. Conclusions: FMEA proved to be a powerful and flexible tool to develop and implement a quality management (QM) framework for DMLC tracking. The authors conclude that the use of FMEA-based QM ensures

  19. Failure mode and effect analysis-based quality assurance for dynamic MLC tracking systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Amit; Dieterich, Sonja; Svatos, Michelle; Keall, Paul

    2010-12-01

    To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA)-based commissioning and quality assurance framework for dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tumor tracking systems. A systematic failure mode and effect analysis was performed for a prototype real-time tumor tracking system that uses implanted electromagnetic transponders for tumor position monitoring and a DMLC for real-time beam adaptation. A detailed process tree of DMLC tracking delivery was created and potential tracking-specific failure modes were identified. For each failure mode, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of the probability of occurrence, the severity of effect, and the detectibility of the failure. Based on the insights obtained from the FMEA, commissioning and QA procedures were developed to check (i) the accuracy of coordinate system transformation, (ii) system latency, (iii) spatial and dosimetric delivery accuracy, (iv) delivery efficiency, and (v) accuracy and consistency of system response to error conditions. The frequency of testing for each failure mode was determined from the RPN value. Failures modes with RPN > or = 125 were recommended to be tested monthly. Failure modes with RPN < 125 were assigned to be tested during comprehensive evaluations, e.g., during commissioning, annual quality assurance, and after major software/hardware upgrades. System latency was determined to be approximately 193 ms. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Tracking accuracy was within 3%-3 mm gamma (100% pass rate) for sinusoidal as well as a wide variety of patient-derived respiratory motions. The total time taken for monthly QA was approximately 35 min, while that taken for comprehensive testing was approximately 3.5 h. FMEA proved to be a powerful and flexible tool to develop and implement a quality management (QM) framework for DMLC tracking. The authors conclude that the use of FMEA-based QM ensures efficient allocation

  20. EPID-based verification of the MLC performance for dynamic IMRT and VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; Barnes, Michael P.; O’Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In advanced radiotherapy treatments such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), verification of the performance of the multileaf collimator (MLC) is an essential part of the linac QA program. The purpose of this study is to use the existing measurement methods for geometric QA of the MLCs and extend them to more comprehensive evaluation techniques, and to develop dedicated robust algorithms to quantitatively investigate the MLC performance in a fast, accurate, and efficient manner. Methods: The behavior of leaves was investigated in the step-and-shoot mode by the analysis of integrated electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images acquired during picket fence tests at fixed gantry angles and arc delivery. The MLC was also studied in dynamic mode by the analysis of cine EPID images of a sliding gap pattern delivered in a variety of conditions including different leaf speeds, deliveries at fixed gantry angles or in arc mode, and changing the direction of leaf motion. The accuracy of the method was tested by detection of the intentionally inserted errors in the delivery patterns. Results: The algorithm developed for the picket fence analysis was able to find each individual leaf position, gap width, and leaf bank skewness in addition to the deviations from expected leaf positions with respect to the beam central axis with sub-pixel accuracy. For the three tested linacs over a period of 5 months, the maximum change in the gap width was 0.5 mm, the maximum deviation from the expected leaf positions was 0.1 mm and the MLC skewness was up to 0.2°. The algorithm developed for the sliding gap analysis could determine the velocity and acceleration/deceleration of each individual leaf as well as the gap width. There was a slight decrease in the accuracy of leaf performance with increasing leaf speeds. The analysis results were presented through several graphs. The accuracy of the method was assessed as 0.01 mm

  1. Successful application of virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulations against antimalarial molecular targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Rachide Nunes

    Full Text Available The main challenge in the control of malaria has been the emergence of drug-resistant parasites. The presence of drug-resistant Plasmodium sp. has raised the need for new antimalarial drugs. Molecular modelling techniques have been used as tools to develop new drugs. In this study, we employed virtual screening of a pyrazol derivative (Tx001 against four malaria targets: plasmepsin-IV, plasmepsin-II, falcipain-II, and PfATP6. The receiver operating characteristic curves and area under the curve (AUC were established for each molecular target. The AUC values obtained for plasmepsin-IV, plasmepsin-II, and falcipain-II were 0.64, 0.92, and 0.94, respectively. All docking simulations were carried out using AutoDock Vina software. The ligand Tx001 exhibited a better interaction with PfATP6 than with the reference compound (-12.2 versus -6.8 Kcal/mol. The Tx001-PfATP6 complex was submitted to molecular dynamics simulations in vacuum implemented on an NAMD program. The ligand Tx001 docked at the same binding site as thapsigargin, which is a natural inhibitor of PfATP6. Compound TX001 was evaluated in vitro with a P. falciparum strain (W2 and a human cell line (WI-26VA4. Tx001 was discovered to be active against P. falciparum (IC50 = 8.2 µM and inactive against WI-26VA4 (IC50 > 200 µM. Further ligand optimisation cycles generated new prospects for docking and biological assays.

  2. Pilots' Visual Scan Patterns and Attention Distribution During the Pursuit of a Dynamic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chung-San; Wang, Eric Min-Yang; Li, Wen-Chin; Braithwaite, Graham; Greaves, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The current research was to investigate pilots' visual scan patterns in order to assess attention distribution during air-to-air maneuvers. A total of 30 qualified mission-ready fighter pilots participated in this research. Eye movement data were collected by a portable head-mounted eye-tracking device, combined with a jet fighter simulator. To complete the task, pilots had to search for, pursue, and lock on a moving target while performing air-to-air tasks. There were significant differences in pilots' saccade duration (ms) in three operating phases, including searching (M = 241, SD = 332), pursuing (M = 311, SD = 392), and lock-on (M = 191, SD = 226). Also, there were significant differences in pilots' pupil sizes (pixel(2)), of which the lock-on phase was the largest (M = 27,237, SD = 6457), followed by pursuit (M = 26,232, SD = 6070), then searching (M = 25,858, SD = 6137). Furthermore, there were significant differences between expert and novice pilots in the percentage of fixation on the head-up display (HUD), time spent looking outside the cockpit, and the performance of situational awareness (SA). Experienced pilots have better SA performance and paid more attention to the HUD, but focused less outside the cockpit when compared with novice pilots. Furthermore, pilots with better SA performance exhibited a smaller pupil size during the operational phase of lock on while pursuing a dynamic target. Understanding pilots' visual scan patterns and attention distribution are beneficial to the design of interface displays in the cockpit and in developing human factors training syllabi to improve the safety of flight operations.

  3. Rosé Wine Fining Using Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone: Colorimetry, Targeted Polyphenomics, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Mélodie; Avila-Salas, Fabian; Santos, Leonardo S; Iturmendi, Nerea; Moine, Virginie; Cheynier, Véronique; Saucier, Cédric

    2017-12-06

    Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) is a fining agent polymer used in winemaking to adjust rosé wine color and to prevent organoleptic degradations by reducing polyphenol content. The impact of this polymer on color parameters and polyphenols of rosé wines was investigated, and the binding specificity of polyphenols toward PVPP was determined. Color measured by colorimetry decreased after treatment, thus confirming the adsorption of anthocyanins and other pigments. Phenolic composition was determined before and after fining by targeted polyphenomics (Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC)-Electrospray Ionization(ESI)-Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS)). MS analysis showed adsorption differences among polyphenol families. Flavonols (42%) and flavanols (64%) were the most affected. Anthocyanins were not strongly adsorbed on average (12%), but a specific adsorption of coumaroylated anthocyanins was observed (37%). Intermolecular interactions were also studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Relative adsorptions of flavanols were correlated with the calculated interaction energies. The specific affinity of coumaroylated anthocyanins toward PVPP was also well explained by the molecular modeling.

  4. Predicting the dynamics of bacterial growth inhibition by ribosome-targeting antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Philip; Doležal, Jakub; Scott, Matthew; Evans, Martin R.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding how antibiotics inhibit bacteria can help to reduce antibiotic use and hence avoid antimicrobial resistance—yet few theoretical models exist for bacterial growth inhibition by a clinically relevant antibiotic treatment regimen. In particular, in the clinic, antibiotic treatment is time-dependent. Here, we use a theoretical model, previously applied to steady-state bacterial growth, to predict the dynamical response of a bacterial cell to a time-dependent dose of ribosome-targeting antibiotic. Our results depend strongly on whether the antibiotic shows reversible transport and/or low-affinity ribosome binding (‘low-affinity antibiotic’) or, in contrast, irreversible transport and/or high affinity ribosome binding (‘high-affinity antibiotic’). For low-affinity antibiotics, our model predicts that growth inhibition depends on the duration of the antibiotic pulse, and can show a transient period of very fast growth following removal of the antibiotic. For high-affinity antibiotics, growth inhibition depends on peak dosage rather than dose duration, and the model predicts a pronounced post-antibiotic effect, due to hysteresis, in which growth can be suppressed for long times after the antibiotic dose has ended. These predictions are experimentally testable and may be of clinical significance.

  5. Dynamic substrate enhancement for the identification of specific, second-site-binding fragments targeting a set of protein tyrosine phosphatases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Marco F; Groves, Matthew R; Rademann, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulators in living systems and thus are attractive drug targets. The development of potent, selective PTP inhibitors has been a difficult challenge mainly due to the high homology of the phosphotyrosine substrate pockets. Here, a strategy of dynamic

  6. Windowless gas target with gas-dynamical focussing of an ultrasonic neutral gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietsch, W.; Bethge, K.; Feist, H.; Schopper, E.

    1975-11-01

    The construction of a gas jet target for heavy ion reaction is reported on. The spatial compression strockwaves in a supersonic flow behind a laval nozzle are used as a target. The target thickness can be varied by the choice of the nozzle pressure and the static pressure in the expansion room. All gases can be used. (WL) [de

  7. Shock dynamics induced by double-spot laser irradiation of layered targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliverdiev Abutrab A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the interaction of a double-spot laser beam with targets using the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS iodine laser working at 0.44 μm wavelength and intensity of about 1015 W/cm2. Shock breakout signals were recorder using time-resolved self-emission from target rear side of irradiated targets. We compared the behavior of pure Al targets and of targets with a foam layer on the laser side. Results have been simulated using hydrodynamic numerical codes.

  8. Dynamics of positron beam from a convertor target while beam additional accelerating in a travelling wave electron linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhilavyan, L.Z.; Karev, A.I.

    1981-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the dynamics of a positron beam produced in a tantalum converter of the 6 mm thickness in the process of beam reacceleration in an electron linac (ELA) are presented. The mean finite positron currents and their dependences on the accelerating electric field are measured. The energy spectra of accelerated positrons are given. A good agreement between the calculated and experimental data is shown. As a result of investigations some peculiarities of positron production on the ELA intersection targets, which are defined by both the initial positron beam parameters from the converter and the dynamics of positron reacceleration in the ELA [ru

  9. Linear accelerator quality assurance using EPIQA software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozhikov, S.; Sokerov, H.; Tonev, A.; Ivanova, K.

    2012-01-01

    Unlike treatment with static fields, using a dynamic multileaf collimator (dMLC), there are significant dosimetric issues which must be assessed before dynamic therapy can be implemented. The advanced techniques require some additional commissioning and quality assurance tests. The results of standard quality assurance (QA) machine tests and commissioning tests for volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using electronic portal image device (EPID) and 'EPIQA' software are presented. (authors)

  10. Present and future prospects of external radiation cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valuckas, K. P.; Aleknavicius, E.; Grybauskas, M.

    2004-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the most applicable method in the treatment of cancer patients. Rapid advances in radiotherapy and imaging techniques allow improvement in definition of target margins, volumes, and organs at risk. Conformal radiotherapy using multileaf collimator was introduced towards the end of the 1980s. Further improvements in dose distribution were possible through intensity modulation radiation therapy based on the use of computer-controlled multileaf collimators for creating the desired dose variation inside a radiation field. The dose of definite radiotherapy is limited by dose tolerance of organs or tissues at risk near the target. In the last 50 years radiotherapy modalities achieved rapid developments, particularly in field of treatment planning and dose distribution. The main goal of that development is to apply definite radiotherapy dose to target and minimize normal tissue irradiation, leaving the patient free of treatment related morbidity. (author)

  11. Trial-to-trial dynamics of selective long-term-memory retrieval with continuously changing retrieval targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilirmak, Jasmin M; Rösler, Frank; Khader, Patrick H

    2014-10-01

    How do we control the successive retrieval of behaviorally relevant information from long-term memory (LTM) without being distracted by other potential retrieval targets associated to the same retrieval cues? Here, we approach this question by investigating the nature of trial-by-trial dynamics of selective LTM retrieval, i.e., in how far retrieval in one trial has detrimental or facilitatory effects on selective retrieval in the following trial. Participants first learned associations between retrieval cues and targets, with one cue always being linked to three targets, forming small associative networks. In successive trials, participants had to access either the same or a different target belonging to either the same or a different cue. We found that retrieval times were faster for targets that had already been relevant in the previous trial, with this facilitatory effect being substantially weaker when the associative network changed in which the targets were embedded. Moreover, staying within the same network still had a facilitatory effect even if the target changed, which became evident in a relatively higher memory performance in comparison to a network change. Furthermore, event-related brain potentials (ERPs) showed topographically and temporally dissociable correlates of these effects, suggesting that they result from combined influences of distinct processes that aid memory retrieval when relevant and irrelevant targets change their status from trial to trial. Taken together, the present study provides insight into the different processing stages of memory retrieval when fast switches between retrieval targets are required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. DMPD: Fifty years of interferon research: aiming at a moving target. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mmunity. 2006 Sep;25(3):343-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Fifty years of interferon research: aiming at a moving target. Pubm...edID 16979566 Title Fifty years of interferon research: aiming at a moving target.

  13. DMPD: Targeting bacterial endotoxin: two sides of a coin. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n M. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2007 Jan;1096:1-17. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Targeting bacterial endotoxin: two sides of a coin. Pub...medID 17405910 Title Targeting bacterial endotoxin: two sides of a coin. Authors Bo

  14. Applications of Dynamic Clamp to Cardiac Arrhythmia Research: Role in Drug Target Discovery and Safety Pharmacology Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis A. Ortega

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic clamp, a hybrid-computational-experimental technique that has been used to elucidate ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac electrophysiology, is emerging as a promising tool in the discovery of potential anti-arrhythmic targets and in pharmacological safety testing. Through the injection of computationally simulated conductances into isolated cardiomyocytes in a real-time continuous loop, dynamic clamp has greatly expanded the capabilities of patch clamp outside traditional static voltage and current protocols. Recent applications include fine manipulation of injected artificial conductances to identify promising drug targets in the prevention of arrhythmia and the direct testing of model-based hypotheses. Furthermore, dynamic clamp has been used to enhance existing experimental models by addressing their intrinsic limitations, which increased predictive power in identifying pro-arrhythmic pharmacological compounds. Here, we review the recent advances of the dynamic clamp technique in cardiac electrophysiology with a focus on its future role in the development of safety testing and discovery of anti-arrhythmic drugs.

  15. Investigations of ultrafast charge dynamics in laser-irradiated targets by a self probing technique employing laser driven protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, H. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Kar, S., E-mail: s.kar@qub.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Cantono, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Research Unit Adriano Gozzini, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Nersisyan, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Brauckmann, S. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany); Doria, D.; Gwynne, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Macchi, A. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Research Unit Adriano Gozzini, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Naughton, K. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Willi, O. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany); Lewis, C.L.S.; Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    The divergent and broadband proton beams produced by the target normal sheath acceleration mechanism provide the unique opportunity to probe, in a point-projection imaging scheme, the dynamics of the transient electric and magnetic fields produced during laser-plasma interactions. Commonly such experimental setup entails two intense laser beams, where the interaction produced by one beam is probed with the protons produced by the second. We present here experimental studies of the ultra-fast charge dynamics along a wire connected to laser irradiated target carried out by employing a ‘self’ proton probing arrangement – i.e. by connecting the wire to the target generating the probe protons. The experimental data shows that an electromagnetic pulse carrying a significant amount of charge is launched along the wire, which travels as a unified pulse of 10s of ps duration with a velocity close to speed of light. The experimental capabilities and the analysis procedure of this specific type of proton probing technique are discussed. - Highlights: • Prompt charging of laser irradiated target generates ultra-short EM pulses. • Its ultrafast propagation along a wire was studied by self-proton probing technique. • Self-proton probing technique is the proton probing with one laser pulse. • Pulse temporal profile and speed along the wire were measured with high resolution.

  16. Quality assurance of geometric accuracy based on an electronic portal imaging device and log data analysis for Dynamic WaveArc irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Hideaki; Miyabe, Yuki; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2018-04-06

    The purpose of this study was to develop a simple verification method for the routine quality assurance (QA) of Dynamic WaveArc (DWA) irradiation using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images and log data analysis. First, an automatic calibration method utilizing the outermost multileaf collimator (MLC) slits was developed to correct the misalignment between the center of the EPID and the beam axis. Moreover, to verify the detection accuracy of the MLC position according to the EPID images, various positions of the MLC with intentional errors in the range 0.1-1 mm were assessed. Second, to validate the geometric accuracy during DWA irradiation, tests were designed in consideration of three indices. Test 1 evaluated the accuracy of the MLC position. Test 2 assessed dose output consistency with variable dose rate (160-400 MU/min), gantry speed (2.2-6°/s), and ring speed (0.5-2.7°/s). Test 3 validated dose output consistency with variable values of the above parameters plus MLC speed (1.6-4.2 cm/s). All tests were delivered to the EPID and compared with those obtained using a stationary radiation beam with a 0° gantry angle. Irradiation log data were recorded simultaneously. The 0.1-mm intentional error on the MLC position could be detected by the EPID, which is smaller than the EPID pixel size. In Test 1, the MLC slit widths agreed within 0.20 mm of their exposed values. The averaged root-mean-square error (RMSE) of the dose outputs was less than 0.8% in Test 2 and Test 3. Using log data analysis in Test 3, the RMSE between the planned and recorded data was 0.1 mm, 0.12°, and 0.07° for the MLC position, gantry angle, and ring angle, respectively. The proposed method is useful for routine QA of the accuracy of DWA. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Studies of implosion dynamics of D{sup 3}He gas-filled plastic targets using nuclear diagnostics at OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, Magnus

    2004-09-01

    Information about target-implosion dynamics is essential for understanding how assembly occurs. Without carefully tailored assembly of the fuel, hot-spot ignition on National Ignition Facility (NIF) will fail. Hot spot ignition relies on shock convergence to 'ignite' the hot spot (shock burn), followed by propagation of the burn into the compressed shell material (compressive burn). The relationship between these events must be understood to ensure the success of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. To further improve our knowledge about the timing of these events, temporal evolution of areal density (density times radius, normally referred to as {rho}R) and burn of direct-drive, D{sup 3}He gas-filled plastic target implosions have been studied using dd neutrons and d{sup 3}He protons. The proton temporal diagnostic (PTD) code was developed for this purpose. {rho}R asymmetries were observed at shock-bang time (time of peak burn during shock phase) and grew approximately twice as fast as the average {rho}R, without any phase changes. Furthermore, it was observed that the shock-bang and compression-bang time occur earlier, and that the time difference between these events decreases for higher laser energy on target, which indicates that the compression-bang time is more sensitive to the variation of laser energy on target. It was also observed that the duration of shock and compression phase might decrease for higher laser energy on target.

  18. Studies of implosion dynamics of D3He gas-filled plastic targets using nuclear diagnostics at OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Magnus

    2004-09-01

    Information about target-implosion dynamics is essential for understanding how assembly occurs. Without carefully tailored assembly of the fuel, hot-spot ignition on National Ignition Facility (NIF) will fail. Hot spot ignition relies on shock convergence to 'ignite' the hot spot (shock burn), followed by propagation of the burn into the compressed shell material (compressive burn). The relationship between these events must be understood to ensure the success of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. To further improve our knowledge about the timing of these events, temporal evolution of areal density (density times radius, normally referred to as ρR) and burn of direct-drive, D 3 He gas-filled plastic target implosions have been studied using dd neutrons and d 3 He protons. The proton temporal diagnostic (PTD) code was developed for this purpose. ρR asymmetries were observed at shock-bang time (time of peak burn during shock phase) and grew approximately twice as fast as the average ρR, without any phase changes. Furthermore, it was observed that the shock-bang and compression-bang time occur earlier, and that the time difference between these events decreases for higher laser energy on target, which indicates that the compression-bang time is more sensitive to the variation of laser energy on target. It was also observed that the duration of shock and compression phase might decrease for higher laser energy on target

  19. Improved Deep Belief Networks (IDBN Dynamic Model-Based Detection and Mitigation for Targeted Attacks on Heavy-Duty Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianpeng Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the robots, especially heavy-duty robots, have become the hardest-hit areas for targeted attacks. These attacks come from both the cyber-domain and the physical-domain. In order to improve the security of heavy-duty robots, this paper proposes a detection and mitigation mechanism which based on improved deep belief networks (IDBN and dynamic model. The detection mechanism consists of two parts: (1 IDBN security checks, which can detect targeted attacks from the cyber-domain; (2 Dynamic model and security detection, used to detect the targeted attacks which can possibly lead to a physical-domain damage. The mitigation mechanism was established on the base of the detection mechanism and could mitigate transient and discontinuous attacks. Moreover, a test platform was established to carry out the performance evaluation test for the proposed mechanism. The results show that, the detection accuracy for the attack of the cyber-domain of IDBN reaches 96.2%, and the detection accuracy for the attack of physical-domain control commands reaches 94%. The performance evaluation test has verified the reliability and high efficiency of the proposed detection and mitigation mechanism for heavy-duty robots.

  20. Finite-horizon differential games for missile-target interception system using adaptive dynamic programming with input constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingliang; Liu, Chunsheng

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of intercepting a manoeuvring target within a fixed final time is posed in a non-linear constrained zero-sum differential game framework. The Nash equilibrium solution is found by solving the finite-horizon constrained differential game problem via adaptive dynamic programming technique. Besides, a suitable non-quadratic functional is utilised to encode the control constraints into a differential game problem. The single critic network with constant weights and time-varying activation functions is constructed to approximate the solution of associated time-varying Hamilton-Jacobi-Isaacs equation online. To properly satisfy the terminal constraint, an additional error term is incorporated in a novel weight-updating law such that the terminal constraint error is also minimised over time. By utilising Lyapunov's direct method, the closed-loop differential game system and the estimation weight error of the critic network are proved to be uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by using a simple non-linear system and a non-linear missile-target interception system, assuming first-order dynamics for the interceptor and target.

  1. Reaction dynamics of {sup 34-38}Mg projectile with carbon target using Glauber model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shama, Mahesh K., E-mail: maheshphy82@gmail.com [School of Physics and Material Sciences, Thapar University Patiala-147004 (India); Department of Applied Sciences, Chandigarh Engineering College, Landran Mohali-140307 (India); Panda, R. N. [Department of Physics, ITER, Shiksha O Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar-751030 (India); Sharma, Manoj K. [School of Physics and Material Sciences, Thapar University Patiala-147004 (India); Patra, S. K. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya marg Bhubneswar-751005 (India)

    2015-08-28

    We have studied nuclear reaction cross-sections for {sup 34-38}Mg isotopes as projectile with {sup 12}C target at projectile energy 240AMeV using Glauber model with the conjunction of densities from relativistic mean filed formalism. We found good agreement with the available experimental data. The halo status of {sup 37}Mg is also investigated.

  2. Standardizing commercial CPUE data in monitoring stock dynamics: Accounting for targeting behaviour in mixed fisheries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quirijns, F.J.; Poos, J.J.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Catch per unit effort (CPUE) is commonly used as an indicator for monitoring developments in stock size. To ensure proportionality between average CPUE and total stock size, two processes that should be accounted for are the degree of targeting behaviour of the fleet and the management-induced

  3. A Theory of Interest Rate Stepping : Inflation Targeting in a Dynamic Menu Cost Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijffinger, S.C.W.; Schaling, E.; Verhagen, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract: A stylised fact of monetary policy making is that central banks do not immediately respond to new information but rather seem to prefer to wait until sufficient ‘evidence’ to warrant a change has accumulated. However, theoretical models of inflation targeting imply that an optimising

  4. Employee Anonymous Online Dissent: Dynamics and Ethical Challenges for Employees, Targeted Organisations, Online Outlets and Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzani, Silvia; Mazzei, Alessandra

    2018-01-01

    administrators, audiences and targeted organisations. This multi-actor, dialectical process encompasses actor-related tensions that may generate unethical consequences if single voices are not brought out and confronted. Appropriating a Habermasian ethical and discursive lens, we examine and disentangle three...

  5. Flat ended steel wires, backscattering targets for calibrating over a large dynamic range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, Jaap; Graaff, Reindert

    2006-01-01

    A series of flat ended stainless steel wires was constructed and experimentally evaluated as point targets giving a calibrated backscattering over a large range (up to 72 dB) for ultrasound frequencies in the range 2 to 10 MHz. Over a range of 36 dB, theory was strictly followed (within 1 dB),

  6. Spectroscopic investigation of the charge dynamics of heavy ions penetrating solid and gaseous targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korostiy, S.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents the study of the slowing down process of fast heavy ions inside matter. In the framework of this research, the influence of the target density on the stopping process is investigated. Experiments on the interaction of 48 Ca 6+ - 48 Ca 10+ and 26 Mg 5+ ion beams with initial energies of 11.4 MeV/u and 5.9 MeV/u with solid and gaseous targets have been carried out. A novel diagnostic method, X-ray spectroscopy of K-shell projectile radiation, is used to determine the ion charge state in relation to its velocity during the penetration of fast heavy ions inside the stopping material. A spatially resolved analysis of the projectile and target radiation in solids is achieved for the first time. The application of low-density silica aerogels as stopping media provided a stretching of the ion stopping length by 20 - 100 times in comparison with solid quartz. The Doppler Effect observed on the projectile K-shell spectra is used to calculate the ion velocity in dependence on the ion penetration depth in the target material. A comparative analysis of K α spectra of fast heavy ions is performed in solid (silica aerogels) and gaseous targets (Ar and Ne gases) at the same ion energy. It is shown that the dominant role of collisions in dense matter leads to an increase of the effective ionization cross section at high ion velocity and suppression of the electron capture to the projectile ion excited states at low ion velocity. As a result, an increase of the ion charge state in dense matter is observed. The experimentally detected effects are interpreted with numerical calculations of the projectile population kinetics, which are in good agreement with measurements. (orig.)

  7. Spectroscopic investigation of the charge dynamics of heavy ions penetrating solid and gaseous targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korostiy, S

    2007-01-15

    This thesis presents the study of the slowing down process of fast heavy ions inside matter. In the framework of this research, the influence of the target density on the stopping process is investigated. Experiments on the interaction of {sup 48}Ca{sup 6+}-{sup 48}Ca{sup 10+} and {sup 26}Mg{sup 5+} ion beams with initial energies of 11.4 MeV/u and 5.9 MeV/u with solid and gaseous targets have been carried out. A novel diagnostic method, X-ray spectroscopy of K-shell projectile radiation, is used to determine the ion charge state in relation to its velocity during the penetration of fast heavy ions inside the stopping material. A spatially resolved analysis of the projectile and target radiation in solids is achieved for the first time. The application of low-density silica aerogels as stopping media provided a stretching of the ion stopping length by 20 - 100 times in comparison with solid quartz. The Doppler Effect observed on the projectile K-shell spectra is used to calculate the ion velocity in dependence on the ion penetration depth in the target material. A comparative analysis of K{sub {alpha}} spectra of fast heavy ions is performed in solid (silica aerogels) and gaseous targets (Ar and Ne gases) at the same ion energy. It is shown that the dominant role of collisions in dense matter leads to an increase of the effective ionization cross section at high ion velocity and suppression of the electron capture to the projectile ion excited states at low ion velocity. As a result, an increase of the ion charge state in dense matter is observed. The experimentally detected effects are interpreted with numerical calculations of the projectile population kinetics, which are in good agreement with measurements. (orig.)

  8. Three-Dimensional Dynamics of Breakout Afterburner Ion Acceleration Using High-Contrast Short-Pulse Laser and Nanoscale Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Fernandez, J. C.; Jung, D.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Breakout afterburner (BOA) laser-ion acceleration has been demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory. In the BOA, an initially solid-density target undergoes relativistically induced transparency, initiating a period of enhanced ion acceleration. First-ever kinetic simulations of the BOA in three dimensions show that the ion beam forms lobes in the direction orthogonal to laser polarization and propagation. Analytic theory presented for the electron dynamics in the laser ponderomotive field explains how azimuthal symmetry breaks even for a symmetric laser intensity profile; these results are consistent with recent experiments at the Trident laser facility.

  9. Cratering efficiency on coarse-grain targets: Implications for the dynamical evolution of asteroid 25143 Itokawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Eri; Sugita, Seiji

    2018-01-01

    Remote sensing observations made by the spacecraft Hayabusa provided the first direct evidence of a rubble-pile asteroid: 25143 Itokawa. Itokawa was found to have a surface structure very different from other explored asteroids; covered with coarse pebbles and boulders ranging at least from cm to meter size. The cumulative size distribution of small circular depressions on Itokawa, most of which may be of impact origin, has a significantly shallower slope than that on the Moon; small craters are highly depleted on Itokawa compared to the Moon. This deficiency of small circular depressions and other features, such as clustered fragments and pits on boulders, suggest that the boulders on Itokawa might behave like armor, preventing crater formation: the ;armoring effect;. This might contribute to the low number density of small crater candidates. In this study, the cratering efficiency reduction due to coarse-grained targets was investigated based on impact experiments at velocities ranging from ∼ 70 m/s to ∼ 6 km/s using two vertical gas gun ranges. We propose a scaling law extended for cratering on coarse-grained targets (i.e., target grain size ≳ projectile size). We have found that the crater efficiency reduction is caused by energy dissipation at the collision site where momentum is transferred from the impactor to the first-contact target grain, and that the armoring effect can be classified into three regimes: (1) gravity scaled regime, (2) reduced size crater regime, or (3) no apparent crater regime, depending on the ratio of the impactor size to the target grain size and the ratio of the impactor kinetic energy to the disruption energy of a target grain. We found that the shallow slope of the circular depressions on Itokawa cannot be accounted for by this new scaling law, suggesting that obliteration processes, such as regolith convection and migration, play a greater role in the depletion of circular depressions on Itokawa. Based on the new extended

  10. Changes in Inflation Dynamics under Inflation Targeting? Evidence from Central European Countries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baxa, Jaromír; Plašil, M.; Vašíček, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2015), s. 116-130 ISSN 0264-9993 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Bayesian model averaging * Central European countries * Inflation Dynamics Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.997, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/E/baxa-0449816.pdf

  11. System dynamic analyses on the JKJ mercury target and cold moderator systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshio; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Aso, Tomokazu; Haga, Katsuhiro; Hino, Ryutaro

    2001-01-01

    The temperature responses of major points in a mercury target cooling system and in a cold moderator system of JKJ (JAERI/KEK Joint Project) were simulated by the analytical code MATLAB (SIMULINK). As a result, it was made clear that non-control of mercury temperature is the best way to control the mercury target cooling system. If the mercury temperature of the system is controlled by the PID control system using an outlet temperature of heat exchanger, the PID control system shows the characteristics of an on-off control system, and the temperature cannot be controlled. Analytical results also showed that mercury temperature remained below the boiling point of 356degC under 0.1 MPa during a transient at one cooling pump trip. Analytical results for the cold moderator system showed that the outlet temperature of cold moderator vessels could be kept within a temperature range of 1 k during steady-state conditions. (author)

  12. TH-CD-207A-09: Stay On Target: Dynamic, Patient-Specific Templates of Fiducial Marker Clusters for IGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, W; Miften, M; Jones, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic SBRT relies on extremely accurate delivery of ablative radiation doses to the target, and intra-fractional tracking of fiducial markers can facilitate improvements in dose delivery. However, this requires algorithms that are able to find fiducial markers with high speed and accuracy. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel marker tracking algorithm that is robust against many of the common errors seen with traditional template matching techniques. Methods: Using CBCT projection images, a method was developed to create detailed template images of fiducial marker clusters without prior knowledge of the number of markers, their positions, or their orientations. Briefly, the method (i) enhances markers in projection images, (ii) stabilizes the cluster’s position, (iii) reconstructs the cluster in 3D, and (iv) precomputes a set of static template images dependent on gantry angle. Furthermore, breathing data were used to produce 4D reconstructions of clusters, yielding dynamic template images dependent on gantry angle and breathing amplitude. To test these two approaches, static and dynamic templates were used to track the motion of marker clusters in more than 66,000 projection images from 75 CBCT scans of 15 pancreatic SBRT patients. Results: For both static and dynamic templates, the new technique was able to locate marker clusters present in projection images 100% of the time. The algorithm was also able to correctly locate markers in several instances where only some of the markers were visible due to insufficient field-of-view. In cases where clusters exhibited deformation and/or rotation during breathing, dynamic templates resulted in cross-correlation scores up to 70% higher than static templates. Conclusion: Patient-specific templates provided complete tracking of fiducial marker clusters in CBCT scans, and dynamic templates helped to provide higher cross-correlation scores for deforming/rotating clusters. This novel algorithm

  13. TH-CD-207A-09: Stay On Target: Dynamic, Patient-Specific Templates of Fiducial Marker Clusters for IGRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, W; Miften, M; Jones, B [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic SBRT relies on extremely accurate delivery of ablative radiation doses to the target, and intra-fractional tracking of fiducial markers can facilitate improvements in dose delivery. However, this requires algorithms that are able to find fiducial markers with high speed and accuracy. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel marker tracking algorithm that is robust against many of the common errors seen with traditional template matching techniques. Methods: Using CBCT projection images, a method was developed to create detailed template images of fiducial marker clusters without prior knowledge of the number of markers, their positions, or their orientations. Briefly, the method (i) enhances markers in projection images, (ii) stabilizes the cluster’s position, (iii) reconstructs the cluster in 3D, and (iv) precomputes a set of static template images dependent on gantry angle. Furthermore, breathing data were used to produce 4D reconstructions of clusters, yielding dynamic template images dependent on gantry angle and breathing amplitude. To test these two approaches, static and dynamic templates were used to track the motion of marker clusters in more than 66,000 projection images from 75 CBCT scans of 15 pancreatic SBRT patients. Results: For both static and dynamic templates, the new technique was able to locate marker clusters present in projection images 100% of the time. The algorithm was also able to correctly locate markers in several instances where only some of the markers were visible due to insufficient field-of-view. In cases where clusters exhibited deformation and/or rotation during breathing, dynamic templates resulted in cross-correlation scores up to 70% higher than static templates. Conclusion: Patient-specific templates provided complete tracking of fiducial marker clusters in CBCT scans, and dynamic templates helped to provide higher cross-correlation scores for deforming/rotating clusters. This novel algorithm

  14. Automatic online adaptive radiation therapy techniques for targets with significant shape change: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, Laurence E; Tishler, Roy B; Petit, Joshua; Cormack, Robert; Chin Lee

    2006-01-01

    This work looks at the feasibility of an online adaptive radiation therapy concept that would detect the daily position and shape of the patient, and would then correct the daily treatment to account for any changes compared with planning position. In particular, it looks at the possibility of developing algorithms to correct for large complicated shape change. For co-planar beams, the dose in an axial plane is approximately associated with the positions of a single multi-leaf collimator (MLC) pair. We start with a primary plan, and automatically generate several secondary plans with gantry angles offset by regular increments. MLC sequences for each plan are calculated keeping monitor units (MUs) and number of segments constant for a given beam (fluences are different). Bulk registration (3D) of planning and daily CT images gives global shifts. Slice-by-slice (2D) registration gives local shifts and rotations about the longitudinal axis for each axial slice. The daily MLC sequence is then created for each axial slice/MLC leaf pair combination, by taking the MLC positions from the pre-calculated plan with the nearest rotation, and shifting using a beam's-eye-view calculation to account for local linear shifts. A planning study was carried out using two head and neck region MR images of a healthy volunteer which were contoured to simulate a base-of-tongue treatment: one with the head straight (used to simulate the planning image) and the other with the head tilted to the left (the daily image). Head and neck treatment was chosen to evaluate this technique because of its challenging nature, with varying internal and external contours, and multiple degrees of freedom. Shape change was significant: on a slice-by-slice basis, local rotations in the daily image varied from 2 to 31 deg, and local shifts ranged from -0.2 to 0.5 cm and -0.4 to 0.0 cm in right-left and posterior-anterior directions, respectively. The adapted treatment gave reasonable target coverage (100%, 90

  15. Identification of novel targets for HIV-1: Molecular dynamics simulation and binding energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vishnudatt; Tiwari, Gargi; Mall, Vijaya Shri; Tiwari, Rakesh Kumar; Ojha, R. P.

    2018-05-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion is managed by the concerted coalescence of the HIV-1 gp41 N- and C- helical regions, which is a product in the formation of 6-helix bundles. These two regions are considered prime targets for peptides and antibodies that inhibit HIV-1 entry. There are so many rational method aimed to attach a rationally designed artificial tail to the C-terminus of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors to increase their antiviral potency. Here M. D. simulation was performed to go insight for study of C-terminal tail of Ile-Asp-Leu (IDL).

  16. Dynamics of magnetic particles in cylindrical Halbach array: implications for magnetic cell separation and drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babinec, Peter; Krafcík, Andrej; Babincová, Melánia; Rosenecker, Joseph

    2010-08-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for therapy and diagnosis are at the leading edge of the rapidly developing field of bionanotechnology. In this study, we have theoretically studied motion of magnetic nano- as well as micro-particles in the field of cylindrical Halbach array of permanent magnets. Magnetic flux density was modeled as magnetostatic problem by finite element method and particle motion was described using system of ordinary differential equations--Newton law. Computations were done for nanoparticles Nanomag-D with radius 65 nm, which are often used in magnetic drug targeting, as well as microparticles DynaBeads-M280 with radius 1.4 microm, which can be used for magnetic separation. Analyzing snapshots of trajectories of hundred magnetite particles of each size in the water as well as in the air, we have found that optimally designed magnetic circuits of permanent magnets in quadrupolar Halbach array have substantially shorter capture time than simple blocks of permanent magnets commonly used in experiments, therefore, such a Halbach array may be useful as a potential source of magnetic field for magnetic separation and targeting of magnetic nanoparticles as well as microparticles for delivery of drugs, genes, and cells in various biomedical applications.

  17. Action Potential Dynamics in Fine Axons Probed with an Axonally Targeted Optical Voltage Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yihe; Bayguinov, Peter O; Jackson, Meyer B

    2017-01-01

    The complex and malleable conduction properties of axons determine how action potentials propagate through extensive axonal arbors to reach synaptic terminals. The excitability of axonal membranes plays a major role in neural circuit function, but because most axons are too thin for conventional electrical recording, their properties remain largely unexplored. To overcome this obstacle, we used a genetically encoded hybrid voltage sensor (hVOS) harboring an axonal targeting motif. Expressing this probe in transgenic mice enabled us to monitor voltage changes optically in two populations of axons in hippocampal slices, the large axons of dentate granule cells (mossy fibers) in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region and the much finer axons of hilar mossy cells in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Action potentials propagated with distinct velocities in each type of axon. Repetitive firing broadened action potentials in both populations, but at an intermediate frequency the degree of broadening differed. Repetitive firing also attenuated action potential amplitudes in both mossy cell and granule cell axons. These results indicate that the features of use-dependent action potential broadening, and possible failure, observed previously in large nerve terminals also appear in much finer unmyelinated axons. Subtle differences in the frequency dependences could influence the propagation of activity through different pathways to excite different populations of neurons. The axonally targeted hVOS probe used here opens up the diverse repertoire of neuronal processes to detailed biophysical study.

  18. Spatiotemporal dynamics of HIV-1 transmission in France (1999-2014) and impact of targeted prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillon, Antoine; Essat, Asma; Frange, Pierre; Smith, Davey M; Delaugerre, Constance; Barin, Francis; Ghosn, Jade; Pialoux, Gilles; Robineau, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Goujard, Cécile; Meyer, Laurence; Chaix, Marie-Laure

    2017-02-21

    Characterizing HIV-1 transmission networks can be important in understanding the evolutionary patterns and geospatial spread of the epidemic. We reconstructed the broad molecular epidemiology of HIV from individuals with primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) enrolled in France in the ANRS PRIMO C06 cohort over 15 years. Sociodemographic, geographic, clinical, biological and pol sequence data from 1356 patients were collected between 1999 and 2014. Network analysis was performed to infer genetic relationships, i.e. clusters of transmission, between HIV-1 sequences. Bayesian coalescent-based methods were used to examine the temporal and spatial dynamics of identified clusters from different regions in France. We also evaluated the use of network information to target prevention efforts. Participants were mostly Caucasian (85.9%) and men (86.7%) who reported sex with men (MSM, 71.4%). Overall, 387 individuals (28.5%) were involved in clusters: 156 patients (11.5%) in 78 dyads and 231 participants (17%) in 42 larger clusters (median size: 4, range 3-41). Compared to individuals with single PHI (n = 969), those in clusters were more frequently men (95.9 vs 83%, p turnaround time for sample processing, targeting prevention efforts based on phylogenetic monitoring may be an efficient way to deliver prevention interventions but would require near real time targeted interventions on the identified index cases and their partners.

  19. Magnetic drug targeting through a realistic model of human tracheobronchial airways using computational fluid and particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmehran, Oveis; Gorji, Tahereh B; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic drug targeting (MDT) is a local drug delivery system which aims to concentrate a pharmacological agent at its site of action in order to minimize undesired side effects due to systemic distribution in the organism. Using magnetic drug particles under the influence of an external magnetic field, the drug particles are navigated toward the target region. Herein, computational fluid dynamics was used to simulate the air flow and magnetic particle deposition in a realistic human airway geometry obtained by CT scan images. Using discrete phase modeling and one-way coupling of particle-fluid phases, a Lagrangian approach for particle tracking in the presence of an external non-uniform magnetic field was applied. Polystyrene (PMS40) particles were utilized as the magnetic drug carrier. A parametric study was conducted, and the influence of particle diameter, magnetic source position, magnetic field strength and inhalation condition on the particle transport pattern and deposition efficiency (DE) was reported. Overall, the results show considerable promise of MDT in deposition enhancement at the target region (i.e., left lung). However, the positive effect of increasing particle size on DE enhancement was evident at smaller magnetic field strengths (Mn [Formula: see text] 1.5 T), whereas, at higher applied magnetic field strengths, increasing particle size has a inverse effect on DE. This implies that for efficient MTD in the human respiratory system, an optimal combination of magnetic drug career characteristics and magnetic field strength has to be achieved.

  20. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E; Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments. VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤ 8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D99%), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found. For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from the 4DCT, the interplay effect

  1. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D 99% ), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from the

  2. Engineering design and molecular dynamics of mucoadhesive drug delivery systems as targeting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Laura; Doménech, Josep; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2009-03-01

    The goal of this critical review is to provide a critical analysis of the chain dynamics responsible for the action of micro- and nanoparticles of mucoadhesive biomaterials. The objective of using bioadhesive controlled drug delivery devices is to prolong their residence at a specific site of delivery, thus enhancing the drug absorption process. These mucoadhesive devices can protect the drug during the absorption process in addition to protecting it on its route to the delivery site. The major emphasis of recent research on mucoadhesive biomaterials has been on the use of adhesion promoters, which would enhance the adhesion between synthetic polymers and mucus. The use of adhesion promoters such as linear or tethered polymer chains is a natural result of the diffusional characteristics of adhesion. Mucoadhesion depends largely on the structure of the synthetic polymer gels used in controlled release applications.

  3. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D{sub 99%}), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from

  4. Drug addiction: targeting dynamic neuroimmune receptor interactions as a potential therapeutic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jonathan Henry W; Hutchinson, Mark R; Mustafa, Sanam

    2016-02-01

    Drug addiction and dependence have proven to be difficult psychiatric disorders to treat. The limited efficacy of neuronally acting medications, such as acamprosate and naltrexone, highlights the need to identify novel targets. Recent research has underscored the importance of the neuroimmune system in many behavioural manifestations of drug addiction. In this review, we propose that our appreciation for complex phenotypes such as drug addiction and dependence will come with a greater understanding that these disorders are the result of intricate, interconnected signalling pathways that are, if only partially, determined at the receptor level. The idea of receptor heteromerisation and receptor mosaics will be introduced to explain cross talk between the receptors and signalling molecules implicated in neuroimmune signalling pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dengue vector dynamics (Aedes aegypti influenced by climate and social factors in Ecuador: implications for targeted control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Stewart Ibarra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is now the fastest spreading tropical disease globally. Previous studies indicate that climate and human behavior interact to influence dengue virus and vector (Aedes aegypti population dynamics; however, the relative effects of these variables depends on local ecology and social context. We investigated the roles of climate and socio-ecological factors on Ae. aegypti population dynamics in Machala, a city in southern coastal Ecuador where dengue is hyper-endemic. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied two proximate urban localities where we monitored weekly Ae. aegypti oviposition activity (Nov. 2010-June 2011, conducted seasonal pupal surveys, and surveyed household to identify dengue risk factors. The results of this study provide evidence that Ae. aegypti population dynamics are influenced by social risk factors that vary by season and lagged climate variables that vary by locality. Best-fit models to predict the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae included parameters for household water storage practices, access to piped water, the number of households per property, condition of the house and patio, and knowledge and perceptions of dengue. Rainfall and minimum temperature were significant predictors of oviposition activity, although the effect of rainfall varied by locality due to differences in types of water storage containers. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate the potential to reduce the burden of dengue in this region by conducting focused vector control interventions that target high-risk households and containers in each season and by developing predictive models using climate and non-climate information. These findings provide the region's public health sector with key information for conducting time and location-specific vector control campaigns, and highlight the importance of local socio-ecological studies to understand dengue dynamics. See Text S1 for an executive summary in

  6. A dynamic supraclavicular field-matching technique for head-and-neck cancer patients treated with IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Jun; Shen Sui; Spencer, Sharon A.; Ahmed, Raef S.; Popple, Richard A.; Ye, Sung-Joon; Brezovich, Ivan A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The conventional single-isocenter and half-beam (SIHB) technique for matching supraclavicular fields with head-and-neck (HN) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) fields is subject to substantial dose inhomogeneities from imperfect accelerator jaw/MLC calibration. It also limits the isocenter location and restricts the useful field size for IMRT. We propose a dynamic field-matching technique to overcome these limitations. Methods and materials: The proposed dynamic field-matching technique makes use of wedge junctions for the abutment of supraclavicular and HN IMRT fields. The supraclavicular field was shaped with a multileaf collimator (MLC), which was orientated such that the leaves traveled along the superoinferior direction. The leaves that defined the superior field border moved continuously during treatment from 1.5 cm below to 1.5 cm above the conventional match line to generate a 3-cm-wide wedge-shaped junction. The HN IMRT fields were optimized by taking into account the dose contribution from the supraclavicular field to the junction area, which generates a complementary wedge to produce a smooth junction in the abutment region. This technique was evaluated on a polystyrene phantom and 10 HN cancer patients. Treatment plans were generated for the phantom and the 10 patients. Dose profiles across the abutment region were measured in the phantom on films. For patient plans, dose profiles that passed through the center of the neck lymph nodes were calculated using the proposed technique and the SIHB technique, and dose uniformity in the abutment region was compared. Field mismatches of ± 1 mm and ± 2 mm because of imperfect jaw/MLC calibration were simulated, and the resulting dose inhomogeneities were studied for the two techniques with film measurements and patient plans. Three-dimensional volumetric doses were analyzed, and equivalent uniform doses (EUD) were computed. The effect of field mismatches on EUD was compared for the two match

  7. Dynamic Pressure of Liquid Mercury Target During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, S.W.; Andriulli, J.B.; Cates, M.R.; Earl, D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Morrissey, F.X.; Tsai, C.C.; Wender, S.

    2000-01-01

    Described here are efforts to diagnose transient pressures generated by a short-pulse (about 0.5 microseconds) high intensity proton (∼ 2 * 10 14 per pulse) beam. Proton energy is 800-MeV. The tests were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE-WNR). Such capability is required for understanding target interaction for the Spallation Neutron Source project as described previously at this conference.1-4 The main approach to effect the pressure measurements utilized the deflection of a diaphragm in intimate contact with the mercury. There are a wide variety of diaphragm-deflection methods used in scientific and industrial applications. Many deflection-sensing approaches are typically used, including, for instance, capacitive and optical fiber techniques. It was found, however, that conventional pressure measurement using commercial pressure gages with electrical leads was not possible due to the intense nuclear radiation environment. Earlier work with a fiber optic strain gauge demonstrated the viability of using fiber optics for this environment

  8. Dynamic Target Definition: A novel approach for PTV definition in ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabal, Gonzalo A.; Jäkel, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present a beam arrangement specific approach for PTV definition in ion beam therapy. Materials and methods: By means of a Monte Carlo error propagation analysis a criteria is formulated to assess whether a voxel is safely treated. Based on this a non-isotropical expansion rule is proposed aiming to minimize the impact of uncertainties on the dose delivered. Results: The method is exemplified in two cases: a Head and Neck case and a Prostate case. In both cases the modality used is proton beam irradiation and the sources of uncertainties taken into account are positioning (set up) errors and range uncertainties. It is shown how different beam arrangements have an impact on plan robustness which leads to different target expansions necessary to assure a predefined level of plan robustness. The relevance of appropriate beam angle arrangements as a way to minimize uncertainties is demonstrated. Conclusions: A novel method for PTV definition in on beam therapy is presented. The method show promising results by improving the probability of correct dose CTV coverage while reducing the size of the PTV volume. In a clinical scenario this translates into an enhanced tumor control probability while reducing the volume of healthy tissue being irradiated

  9. Uncovering SUMOylation Dynamics during Cell-Cycle Progression Reveals FoxM1 as a Key Mitotic SUMO Target Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schimmel, Joost; Eifler, Karolin; Sigurdsson, Jón Otti

    2014-01-01

    Loss of small ubiquitin-like modification (SUMOylation) in mice causes genomic instability due to the missegregation of chromosomes. Currently, little is known about the identity of relevant SUMO target proteins that are involved in this process and about global SUMOylation dynamics during cell......-cycle progression. We performed a large-scale quantitative proteomics screen to address this and identified 593 proteins to be SUMO-2 modified, including the Forkhead box transcription factor M1 (FoxM1), a key regulator of cell-cycle progression and chromosome segregation. SUMOylation of FoxM1 peaks during G2 and M...... relieving FoxM1 autorepression. Cells deficient for FoxM1 SUMOylation showed increased levels of polyploidy. Our findings contribute to understanding the role of SUMOylation during cell-cycle progression....

  10. Implosion scaling and hydro dynamically equivalent target design - Strategy for proof of principle of high gain inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Nishihara, K.; Azechi, H.; Nakatsuka, M.; Kanabe, T.; Miyanaga, N.

    2003-01-01

    Scaling laws for hydro dynamically similar implosions are derived by applying Lie group analysis to the set of partial differential equations for the hydrodynamic system. Physically this implies that any fluid system belonging to a common similarity group evolves quite in the same manner including hydrodynamic instabilities. The scalings strongly depend on the description of the energy transport, i.e., whether the fluid system is heat conductive or adiabatic. Under a fully specified group transformation including prescriptions on the laser wavelength and the ionization state, the hydrodynamic similarity can still be preserved even when the system is cooperated with such other energy sources as classical laser absorption, hot electrons, local alpha heating, and bremsstrahlung loss. The results are expected to give the basis of target design and diagnostics for scaled high gain experiments in future. (author)

  11. A molecular dynamics computer simulation of the time dependence of surface damage production in ion irradiated metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, R.P.; Harrison, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations have been used to study the development of ion-induced cascades in the surface region of an initially perfect single crystal metal target. A 16 mm movie has been produced to show the temporal progress of individual cascades. The cascades can then be seen to be formed from a few high energy primary knock-on initiated replacement collision sequences which overlap to form the more usual interpretation of a mature collision cascade. However, it is before the collision cascade has matured, and while the replacement sequences are spreading, that the majority of atoms (> 80%) are ejected. These qualitative observations are also upheld more quantatively in a global average, over many cascades, of the ejection time of each atom. This gives rise to the appearance of a statistical ejection front which propagates radially outwards, from the impact point on the crystal surface, with a well defined velocity. (author)

  12. Genome-wide dynamics of a bacterial response to antibiotics that target the cell envelope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Ngat

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A decline in the discovery of new antibacterial drugs, coupled with a persistent rise in the occurrence of drug-resistant bacteria, has highlighted antibiotics as a diminishing resource. The future development of new drugs with novel antibacterial activities requires a detailed understanding of adaptive responses to existing compounds. This study uses Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2 as a model system to determine the genome-wide transcriptional response following exposure to three antibiotics (vancomycin, moenomycin A and bacitracin that target distinct stages of cell wall biosynthesis. Results A generalised response to all three antibiotics was identified which involves activation of transcription of the cell envelope stress sigma factor σE, together with elements of the stringent response, and of the heat, osmotic and oxidative stress regulons. Attenuation of this system by deletion of genes encoding the osmotic stress sigma factor σB or the ppGpp synthetase RelA reduced resistance to both vancomycin and bacitracin. Many antibiotic-specific transcriptional changes were identified, representing cellular processes potentially important for tolerance to each antibiotic. Sensitivity studies using mutants constructed on the basis of the transcriptome profiling confirmed a role for several such genes in antibiotic resistance, validating the usefulness of the approach. Conclusions Antibiotic inhibition of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis induces both common and compound-specific transcriptional responses. Both can be exploited to increase antibiotic susceptibility. Regulatory networks known to govern responses to environmental and nutritional stresses are also at the core of the common antibiotic response, and likely help cells survive until any specific resistance mechanisms are fully functional.

  13. Radiation assisted thermonuclear burn wave dynamics in heavy ion fast ignition of cylindrical deuterium-tritium fuel target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, S.; Kouser, R.; Nazir, R.; Manzoor, Z.; Tasneem, G.; Jehan, N.; Nasim, M.H.; Salahuddin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of thermonuclear burn wave propagation assisted by thermal radiation precursor in a heavy ion fast ignition of cylindrical deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel target are studied by two dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations using Multi-2D code. Thermal radiations, as they propagate ahead of the burn wave, suffer multiple reflections and preheat the fuel, are found to play a vital role in burn wave dynamics. After fuel ignition, the burn wave propagates in a steady state manner for some time. Multiple reflection and absorption of radiation at the fuel-tamper interface, fuel ablation and radial implosion driven by ablative shock and fast fusion rates on the fuel axis, at relatively later times, result into filamentary wave front. Strong pressure gradients are developed and sausage like structures behind the front are appeared. The situation leads to relatively reduced and non-uniform radial fuel burning and burn wave propagation. The fuel burning due to DD reaction is also taken into account and overall fusion energy and fusion power density, due to DT and DD reactions, during the burn wave propagation are determined as a function of time. (authors)

  14. Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Flight Dynamics Test-1 Flight Design and Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Mark

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) program was established to identify, develop, and eventually qualify to Test [i.e. Technology] Readiness Level (TRL) - 6 aerodynamic decelerators for eventual use on Mars. Through comprehensive Mars application studies, two distinct Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) designs were chosen that afforded the optimum balance of benefit, cost, and development risk. In addition, a Supersonic Disk Sail (SSDS) parachute design was chosen that satisfied the same criteria. The final phase of the multi-tiered qualification process involves Earth Supersonic Flight Dynamics Tests (SFDTs) within environmental conditions similar to those that would be experienced during a Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) mission. The first of these flight tests (i.e. SFDT-1) was completed on June 28, 2014 with two more tests scheduled for the summer of 2015 and 2016, respectively. The basic flight design for all the SFDT flights is for the SFDT test vehicle to be ferried to a float altitude of 120 kilo-feet by a 34 thousand cubic feet (Mcf) heavy lift helium balloon. Once float altitude is reached, the test vehicle is released from the balloon, spun-up for stability, and accelerated to supersonic speeds using a Star48 solid rocket motor. After burnout of the Star48 motor the vehicle decelerates to pre-flight selected test conditions for the deployment of the SIAD system. After further deceleration with the SIAD deployed, the SSDS parachute is then deployed stressing the performance of the parachute in the wake of the SIAD augmented blunt body. The test vehicle/SIAD/parachute system then descends to splashdown in the Pacific Ocean for eventual recovery. This paper will discuss the development of both the test vehicle and the trajectory sequence including design trade-offs resulting from the interaction of both engineering efforts. In addition, the SFDT-1 nominal trajectory design and associated sensitivities will be discussed

  15. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes: altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werken, C; Avo Santos, M; Laven, J S E; Eleveld, C; Fauser, B C J M; Lens, S M A; Baart, E B

    2015-10-01

    Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal phosphorylation dynamics of histone H2A at T120 (H2ApT120) by Bub1 kinase and subsequent recruitment of Shugoshin, but phosphorylation of histone H3 at threonine 3 (H3pT3) by Haspin failed to show the expected centromeric enrichment on metaphase chromosomes in the zygote. Human cleavage stage embryos show high levels of chromosomal instability. What causes this high error rate is unknown, as mechanisms used to ensure proper chromosome segregation in mammalian embryos are poorly described. In this study, we investigated the pathways regulating CPC targeting to the inner centromere in human embryos. We characterized the distribution of the CPC in relation to activity of its two main centromeric targeting pathways: the Bub1-H2ApT120-Sgo-CPC and Haspin-H3pT3-CPC pathways. The study was conducted between May 2012 and March 2014 on human surplus embryos resulting from in vitro fertilization treatment and donated for research. In zygotes, nuclear envelope breakdown was monitored by time-lapse imaging to allow timed incubations with specific inhibitors to arrest at prometaphase and metaphase, and to interfere with Haspin and Aurora B/C kinase activity. Functionality of the targeting pathways was assessed through characterization of histone phosphorylation dynamics by immunofluorescent analysis, combined with gene expression by RT-qPCR and immunofluorescent localization of key pathway proteins. Immunofluorescent analysis of the CPC subunit Inner Centromere Protein revealed the pool of stably bound CPC proteins was not strictly confined to the inner centromere of prometaphase chromosomes in human zygotes, as observed in later stages of preimplantation development and somatic cells. Investigation of the

  16. Conformational Dynamics of the Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain Control Specific Functions of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kadaré, Gress

    2015-01-02

    Focal adhesion (FA) kinase (FAK) regulates cell survival and motility by transducing signals from membrane receptors. The C-terminal FA targeting (FAT) domain of FAK fulfils multiple functions, including recruitment to FAs through paxillin binding. Phosphorylation of FAT on Tyr925 facilitates FA disassembly and connects to the MAPK pathway through Grb2 association, but requires dissociation of the first helix (H1) of the four-helix bundle of FAT. We investigated the importance of H1 opening in cells by comparing the properties of FAK molecules containing wild-type or mutated FAT with impaired or facilitated H1 openings. These mutations did not alter the activation of FAK, but selectively affected its cellular functions, including self-association, Tyr925 phosphorylation, paxillin binding, and FA targeting and turnover. Phosphorylation of Tyr861, located between the kinase and FAT domains, was also enhanced by the mutation that opened the FAT bundle. Similarly phosphorylation of Ser910 by ERK in response to bombesin was increased by FAT opening. Although FAK molecules with the mutation favoring FAT opening were poorly recruited at FAs, they efficiently restored FA turnover and cell shape in FAK-deficient cells. In contrast, the mutation preventing H1 opening markedly impaired FAK function. Our data support the biological importance of conformational dynamics of the FAT domain and its functional interactions with other parts of the molecule.

  17. Optimal sensitometric curves of Kodak EDR2 film for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyapee, S; Pitaxtarnin, N; Oonsiri, S; Jumpangern, C; Israngkul Na Ayuthaya, I

    2008-01-01

    measured with EDR2 film were consistent with those measured with an ion chamber. The optimal sensitometric curve was acquired by irradiating film at a depth of 5 cm with doses ranging from 20 to 450 cGy with a 3×3 cm(2) multileaf collimator. The optimal sensitometric curve allowed accurate determination of the absolute dose distribution. In almost 200 cases of dynamic IMRT plan verification with EDR2 film, the difference between measured and calculated dose was generally less than 3% and with 3 mm distance to agreement when using gamma value verification. EDR2 film can be used for accurate verification of composite isodose distributions of dynamic IMRT when the optimal sensitometric curve has been established.

  18. An evaluation of gating window size, delivery method, and composite field dosimetry of respiratory-gated IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2002-01-01

    A respiratory gating system has been developed based on a commercial patient positioning system. The purpose of this study is to investigate the ability of the gating system to reproduce normal, nongated IMRT operation and to quantify the errors produced by delivering a nongated IMRT treatment onto a moving target. A moving phantom capable of simultaneous two-dimensional motion was built, and an analytical liver motion function was used to drive the phantom. Studies were performed to assess the effect of gating window size and choice of delivery method (segmented and dynamic multileaf collimation). Additionally, two multiple field IMRT cases were delivered to quantify the error in gated and nongated IMRT with motion. Dosimetric error between nonmoving and moving deliveries is related to gating window size. By reducing the window size, the error can be reduced. Delivery error can be reduced for both dynamic and segmented delivery with gating. For the implementation of dynamic IMRT delivery in this study, dynamic delivery was found to generate larger delivery errors than segmented delivery in most cases studied. For multiple field IMRT delivery, the largest errors were generated in regions where high field modulation was present parallel to the axis of motion. Gating was found to reduce these large errors to clinically acceptable levels

  19. Identification of Phytochemicals Targeting c-Met Kinase Domain using Consensus Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliebrahimi, Shima; Montasser Kouhsari, Shideh; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Arab, Seyed Shahriar; Karami, Leila

    2018-06-01

    c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase is a proto-oncogene whose aberrant activation is attributed to a lower rate of survival in most cancers. Natural product-derived inhibitors known as "fourth generation inhibitors" constitute more than 60% of anticancer drugs. Furthermore, consensus docking approach has recently been introduced to augment docking accuracy and reduce false positives during a virtual screening. In order to obtain novel small-molecule Met inhibitors, consensus docking approach was performed using Autodock Vina and Autodock 4.2 to virtual screen Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anti-cancer Compound-Activity-Target database against active and inactive conformation of c-Met kinase domain structure. Two hit molecules that were in line with drug-likeness criteria, desired docking score, and binding pose were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate intermolecular contacts in protein-ligand complexes. Analysis of molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area studies showed that ZINC08234189 is a plausible inhibitor for the active state of c-Met, whereas ZINC03871891 may be more effective toward active c-Met kinase domain compared to the inactive form due to higher binding energy. Our analysis showed that both the hit molecules formed hydrogen bonds with key residues of the hinge region (P1158, M1160) in the active form, which is a hallmark of kinase domain inhibitors. Considering the pivotal role of HGF/c-Met signaling in carcinogenesis, our results propose ZINC08234189 and ZINC03871891 as the therapeutic options to surmount Met-dependent cancers.

  20. Dynamic sequence analysis of a decision making task of multielement target tracking and its usage as a learning method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ziho

    This dissertation is divided into four parts: 1) Development of effective methods for comparing visual scanning paths (or scanpaths) for a dynamic task of multiple moving targets, 2) application of the methods to compare the scanpaths of experts and novices for a conflict detection task of multiple aircraft on radar screen, 3) a post-hoc analysis of other eye movement characteristics of experts and novices, and 4) finding out whether the scanpaths of experts can be used to teach the novices. In order to compare experts' and novices' scanpaths, two methods are developed. The first proposed method is the matrix comparisons using the Mantel test. The second proposed method is the maximum transition-based agglomerative hierarchical clustering (MTAHC) where comparisons of multi-level visual groupings are held out. The matrix comparison method was useful for a small number of targets during the preliminary experiment, but turned out to be inapplicable to a realistic case when tens of aircraft were presented on screen; however, MTAHC was effective with large number of aircraft on screen. The experiments with experts and novices on the aircraft conflict detection task showed that their scanpaths are different. The MTAHC result was able to explicitly show how experts visually grouped multiple aircraft based on similar altitudes while novices tended to group them based on convergence. Also, the MTAHC results showed that novices paid much attention to the converging aircraft groups even if they are safely separated by altitude; therefore, less attention was given to the actual conflicting pairs resulting in low correct conflict detection rates. Since the analysis showed the scanpath differences, experts' scanpaths were shown to novices in order to find out its effectiveness. The scanpath treatment group showed indications that they changed their visual movements from trajectory-based to altitude-based movements. Between the treatment and the non-treatment group, there were no

  1. MO-AB-BRA-06: Dynamic FLT PET for Investigating Potential Synergistic Therapeutic Targets During Anti-Angiogenic Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpelli, M; Perlman, S; Liu, G [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Simoncic, U [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeraj, R [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Novel treatment strategies for metastatic cancer patients involve synergistically combining treatments with the hope of improving outcomes. This study investigated changes in tumor proliferative and vascular characteristics derived from dynamic [F-18]FLT PET during antiangiogenic treatment with the goal of identifying synergistic treatment opportunities. Methods: Patients with various solid cancers underwent continuous three-week cycles of anti-angiogenic treatment with intermittent dosing (two-weeks-on/one-week-off). Patients received up to six dynamic FLT PET/CT scans (days 0, 14, and 21 of cycle 1 (C1) and cycle 3 (C3)). Tumor proliferative (Kflt, net uptake rate) and vascular parameters (K1 blood-to-tissue transfer; Vb, vascular fraction) were calculated using a two-tissue compartment four-rate parameter kinetic model. Relative changes in these parameters, from day 0 to 14 (TxResp) and day 14 to 21 (offTxResp), were calculated. Significant differences were tested using Wilcoxon signed-rank test and significant correlations were tested using Spearman correlation. Results: Thirty patients were evaluable for C1 offTxResp with median values for Kflt, K1, and Vb of +30%, +35% and +30%, respectively. The fractions of patients with positive C1 offTxResp were: 21/30 for Ki, 24/30 for K1, 21/30 for Vb, and 12/30 had positive offTxResp for all three kinetic parameters. The offTxResp in C3 was not significantly different from C1 for any of the kinetic parameters. Significant correlations were found between TxResp and offTxResp in C1 for Kflt (ρ=-0.52, p=0.014), K1 (ρ=−0.61, p=0.003) and Vb (ρ=−0.80, p<0.001). Similar correlations were found for Kflt (ρ=-1, p=0.017) and K1 (ρ=−1, p=0.017) for the five patients evaluable in C3. Conclusion: Dynamic FLT PET showed evidence of distinct vascular and proliferative increases during off treatment weeks that could potentially be targeted with synergistic therapy. Early changes in kinetic parameters were

  2. Effects of seed mixture sowing with resistant and susceptible rice on population dynamics of target planthoppers and non-target stemborers and leaffolders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Wan, Guijun; Wang, Long; Parajulee, Megha N; Zhao, Zihua; Chen, Fajun

    2018-07-01

    The widespread planting of insect-resistant crops has caused a dramatic shift in agricultural landscapes, thus raising concerns about the potential impact on both target and non-target pests worldwide. In this study, we examined the potential effects of six seed mixture ratios of insect-resistance dominance [100% (R100), 95% (S05R95), 90% (S10R90), 80% (S20R80), 60% (S40R60), and 0% (S100)] on target and non-target pests in a 2-year field trial in southern China. The occurrence of the target pests Nilaparvata lugens and Sogatella furcifera decreased with an increase in the ratio of resistant rice, and mixture ratios with ≥90% resistant rice significantly increased the pest suppression efficiency, with the lowest occurrences of the non-target pests Sesamia inferens, Chilo suppressalis and Cnaphalocrocis medinalis for S100 and S10R90 seed mixture ratios. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in the 1000-grain dry weight and grain yield between R100 and other treatments with ≥80% resistant seeds in the mixture (S20R80, S10R90 and S05R95). S10R90 produced a good yield and provided the most effective control of both target and non-target pests, with the potential to significantly reduce the application of chemical pesticides for integrated pest management in paddy fields. It is further presumed that the strategy of seed mixture with resistant and susceptible rice would be advantageous for rice yield stability. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Effects of seed mixture sowing with transgenic Bt rice and its parental line on the population dynamics of target stemborers and leafrollers, and non-target planthoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Li, Li-Kun; Liu, Bin; Wang, Long; Parajulee, Megha N; Chen, Fa-Jun

    2018-01-24

    The widespread planting of insect-resistant crops has caused a dramatic shift in agricultural landscapes, thus raising concerns about the potential impacts on both target and non-target pests. In this study, we examined the potential effects of intra-specific seed mixture sowing with transgenic Bt rice (Bt) and its parental non-transgenic line (Nt) (100% Bt rice [Bt 100 ], 5% Nt+95% Bt [Nt 05 Bt 95 ], 10% Nt+90% Bt [Nt 10 Bt 90 ], 20% Nt+80% Bt [Nt 20 Bt 80 ], 40% Nt+60% Bt [Nt 40 Bt 60 ] and 100% Nt rice [Nt 100 ]) on target and non-target pests in a 2-year field trial in southern China. The occurrence of target pests, Sesamia inferens, Chilo suppressalis and Cnaphalocrocis medinalis, decreased with the increased ratio of Bt rice, and the mixture ratios with more than 90% Bt rice (Bt 100 and Nt 05 Bt 95 ) significantly increased the pest suppression efficiency, with the lowest occurrences of non-target planthoppers, Nilaparvata lugens and Sogatella furcifera in Nt 100 and Nt 05 Bt 95 . Furthermore, there were no significant differences in 1000-grain dry weight and grain dry weight per 100 plants between Bt 100 and Nt 05 Bt 95 . Seed mixture sowing of Bt rice with ≤10% (especially 5%) of its parent line was sufficient to overcome potential compliance issues that exist with the use of block or structured refuge to provide most effective control of both target and non-target pests without compromising the grain yield. It is also expected that the strategy of seed mixture sowing with transgenic Bt rice and the non-transgenic parental line would provide rice yield stability while decreasing the insecticide use frequency in rice production. © 2018 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. KSHV Entry and Trafficking in Target Cells—Hijacking of Cell Signal Pathways, Actin and Membrane Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV is etiologically associated with human endothelial cell hyperplastic Kaposi’s sarcoma and B-cell primary effusion lymphoma. KSHV infection of adherent endothelial and fibroblast cells are used as in vitro models for infection and KSHV enters these cells by host membrane bleb and actin mediated macropinocytosis or clathrin endocytosis pathways, respectively. Infection in endothelial and fibroblast cells is initiated by the interactions between multiple viral envelope glycoproteins and cell surface associated heparan sulfate (HS, integrins (α3β1, αVβ3 and αVβ5, and EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase (EphA2R. This review summarizes the accumulated studies demonstrating that KSHV manipulates the host signal pathways to enter and traffic in the cytoplasm of the target cells, to deliver the viral genome into the nucleus, and initiate viral gene expression. KSHV interactions with the cell surface receptors is the key platform for the manipulations of host signal pathways which results in the simultaneous induction of FAK, Src, PI3-K, Rho-GTPase, ROS, Dia-2, PKC ζ, c-Cbl, CIB1, Crk, p130Cas and GEF-C3G signal and adaptor molecules that play critical roles in the modulation of membrane and actin dynamics, and in the various steps of the early stages of infection such as entry and trafficking towards the nucleus. The Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT proteins are also recruited to assist in viral entry and trafficking. In addition, KSHV interactions with the cell surface receptors also induces the host transcription factors NF-κB, ERK1/2, and Nrf2 early during infection to initiate and modulate viral and host gene expression. Nuclear delivery of the viral dsDNA genome is immediately followed by the host innate responses such as the DNA damage response (DDR, inflammasome and interferon responses. Overall, these studies form the initial framework for further studies of

  5. Dosimetric comparative study of two methods of intensity modulation performed on the same accelerator; Etude comparative dosimetrique de deux methodes de modulation d'intensite realisees sur le meme accelerateur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, V.; Aletti, P.; Madelis, G. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Unite de Radiophysique, CRLCC, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Marchal, C.; Bey, P. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Service de Radiotherapie, CRLCC, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Wolf, D. [Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine, UPRES-A 7039, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2000-12-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced method of conformal radiotherapy. It permits optimal dose distribution to the target volume while preserving surrounding normal tissues. IMRT, with a multi-leaf collimator, can be realised in two different ways: either the segmented mode, which consists of combining small elementary static field, or the dynamic mode, which consists of moving the leaves while irradiating. The purpose of this work was to study these two methods of modulation on a Varian linear accelerator equipped with a collimator consisting of 40 pairs of one centimeter-wide leaves. The measurements, obtained by using a diode array, showed that the quality of the irradiation in the dynamic mode does not depend on either the dose rate or the duration of the irradiation. In the segmented mode, weak magnitude segments are preferable, but increase the errors in the delivered dose. Comparisons of various profiles showed that the measured profiles are consistent with those programmed. Both modes seem to be equivalent for step shaped profiles. In the case of profiles with constant slope, the segmentation generated by the segmented method deteriorates the profile. Even though the choice of technique is strongly dependent on the material available, the dynamic mode presents greater flexibility of use and has been chosen in our institution for IMRT. (authors)

  6. A dimensionless dynamic contrast enhanced MRI parameter for intra-prostatic tumour target volume delineation: initial comparison with histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Gibson, Eli; Gaed, Mena; Gomez, Jose A.; Moussa, Madeleine; McKenzie, Charles A.; Bauman, Glenn S.; Ward, Aaron D.; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: T2 weighted and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show promise in isolating prostate tumours. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has also been employed as a component in multi-parametric tumour detection schemes. Model-based parameters such as Ktrans are conventionally used to characterize DCE images and require arterial contrast agent (CR) concentration. A robust parameter map that does not depend on arterial input may be more useful for target volume delineation. We present a dimensionless parameter (Wio) that characterizes CR wash-in and washout rates without requiring arterial CR concentration. Wio is compared to Ktrans in terms of ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate, as demonstrated via comparison with histology. Methods: Three subjects underwent DCE-MRI using gadolinium contrast and 7 s imaging temporal resolution. A pathologist identified cancer on whole-mount histology specimens, and slides were deformably registered to MR images. The ability of Wio maps to discriminate cancer was determined through receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Results: There is a trend that Wio shows greater area under the ROC curve (AUC) than Ktrans with median AUC values of 0.74 and 0.69 respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant based on a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p = 0.13). Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that Wio shows potential as a tool for Ktrans QA, showing similar ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate as Ktrans without requiring arterial CR concentration.

  7. Influence of the distance between target surface and focal point on the expansion dynamics of a laser-induced silicon plasma with spatial confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Chen, Anmin; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Ying; Sui, Laizhi; Ke, Da; Li, Suyu; Jiang, Yuanfei; Jin, Mingxing

    2018-05-01

    Expansion dynamics of a laser-induced plasma plume, with spatial confinement, for various distances between the target surface and focal point were studied by the fast photography technique. A silicon wafer was ablated to induce the plasma with a Nd:YAG laser in an atmospheric environment. The expansion dynamics of the plasma plume depended on the distance between the target surface and focal point. In addition, spatially confined time-resolved images showed the different structures of the plasma plumes at different distances between the target surface and focal point. By analyzing the plume images, the optimal distance for emission enhancement was found to be approximately 6 mm away from the geometrical focus using a 10 cm focal length lens. This optimized distance resulted in the strongest compression ratio of the plasma plume by the reflected shock wave. Furthermore, the duration of the interaction between the reflected shock wave and the plasma plume was also prolonged.

  8. Fluid dynamic calculations for the cooling of the European Spallation Source (ESS) target; Calculos fluidodinamicos para la refrigeracion del target de la Fuente Europea de Espalacin (ESS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magan Romero, M.; Sordo Balbin, F.; Domingo, S.; Bermejo, J.; Perlado, J. M.

    2010-07-01

    In this document is simulated the tantalum water cooling, that is going to be used in the ESS-Bilbao, using fluent. The target mesh, the models used and the options choices are displayed. At the end, the results and design recommendations are analyzed.

  9. The influence of plan modulation on the interplay effect in VMAT liver SBRT treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubley, Emily; Pierce, Greg

    2017-08-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) uses multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves, gantry speed, and dose rate to modulate beam fluence, producing the highly conformal doses required for liver radiotherapy. When targets that move with respiration are treated with a dynamic fluence, there exists the possibility for interplay between the target and leaf motions. This study employs a novel motion simulation technique to determine if VMAT liver SBRT plans with an increase in MLC leaf modulation are more susceptible to dosimetric differences in the GTV due to interplay effects. For ten liver SBRT patients, two VMAT plans with different amounts of MLC leaf modulation were created. Motion was simulated using a random starting point in the respiratory cycle for each fraction. To isolate the interplay effect, motion was also simulated using four specific starting points in the respiratory cycle. The dosimetric differences caused by different starting points were examined by subtracting resultant dose distributions from each other. When motion was simulated using random starting points for each fraction, or with specific starting points, there were significantly more dose differences in the GTV (maximum 100cGy) for more highly modulated plans, but the overall plan quality was not adversely affected. Plans with more MLC leaf modulation are more susceptible to interplay effects, but dose differences in the GTV are clinically negligible in magnitude. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  11. DMPD: Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16982211 Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. Wullaer...vg) (.html) (.csml) Show Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. PubmedID 1698221...1 Title Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. Author

  12. DMPD: Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to control inflammation andimmune-mediated disorders. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14643884 Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to control inflammation andimmune-m...g) (.html) (.csml) Show Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to control inflammation andimmune-mediated di...sorders. PubmedID 14643884 Title Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to contro

  13. DMPD: Toll-like receptors: novel pharmacological targets for the treatment ofneurological diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17974478 Toll-like receptors: novel pharmacological targets for the treatment ofneu...png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors: novel pharmacological targets for the treatment ofneur...ological diseases. PubmedID 17974478 Title Toll-like receptors: novel pharmacological target

  14. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hak, Sjoerd; Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only...... because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution...... kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging...

  15. Hot Spot Temperature and Grey Target Theory-Based Dynamic Modelling for Reliability Assessment of Transformer Oil-Paper Insulation Systems: A Practical Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefeng Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a novel dynamic correction method for the reliability assessment of large oil-immersed power transformers. First, with the transformer oil-paper insulation system (TOPIS as the target of evaluation and the winding hot spot temperature (HST as the core point, an HST-based static ageing failure model is built according to the Weibull distribution and Arrhenius reaction law, in order to describe the transformer ageing process and calculate the winding HST for obtaining the failure rate and life expectancy of TOPIS. A grey target theory based dynamic correction model is then developed, combined with the data of Dissolved Gas Analysis (DGA in power transformer oil, in order to dynamically modify the life expectancy calculated by the built static model, such that the corresponding relationship between the state grade and life expectancy correction coefficient of TOPIS can be built. Furthermore, the life expectancy loss recovery factor is introduced to correct the life expectancy of TOPIS again. Lastly, a practical case study of an operating transformer has been undertaken, in which the failure rate curve after introducing dynamic corrections can be obtained for the reliability assessment of this transformer. The curve shows a better ability of tracking the actual reliability level of transformer, thus verifying the validity of the proposed method and providing a new way for transformer reliability assessment. This contribution presents a novel model for the reliability assessment of TOPIS, in which the DGA data, as a source of information for the dynamic correction, is processed based on the grey target theory, thus the internal faults of power transformer can be diagnosed accurately as well as its life expectancy updated in time, ensuring that the dynamic assessment values can commendably track and reflect the actual operation state of the power transformers.

  16. Intensity-modulated arc therapy simplified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Eugene; Chen, Jeff Z.; Greenland, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We present a treatment planning strategy for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using gantry arcs with dynamic multileaf collimator, previously termed intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: The planning strategy is an extension of the photon bar arc and asymmetric arc techniques and is classified into three levels of complexity, with increasing number of gantry arcs. This principle allows us to generalize the analysis of the number of arcs required for intensity modulation for a given treatment site. Using a phantom, we illustrate how the current technique is more flexible than the photon bar arc technique. We then compare plans from our strategy with conventional three-dimensional conformal treatment plans for three sites: prostate (prostate plus seminal vesicles), posterior pharyngeal wall, and chest wall. Results: Our strategy generates superior IMAT treatment plans compared to conventional three-dimensional conformal plans. The IMAT plans spare critical organs well, and the trade-off for simplicity is that the dose uniformity in the target volume may not rival that of true inverse treatment plans. Conclusions: The analyses presented in this paper give a better understanding of IMAT plans. Our strategy is easier to understand and more efficient in generating plans than inverse planning systems; our plans are also simpler to modify, and quality assurance is more intuitive

  17. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Treatment Planning for Superficial Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacarias, Albert S.; Brown, Mellonie F.; Mills, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    The physician's planning objective is often a uniform dose distribution throughout the planning target volume (PTV), including superficial PTVs on or near the surface of a patient's body. Varian's Eclipse treatment planning system uses a progressive resolution optimizer (PRO), version 8.2.23, for RapidArc dynamic multileaf collimator volumetric modulated arc therapy planning. Because the PRO is a fast optimizer, optimization convergence errors (OCEs) produce dose nonuniformity in the superficial area of the PTV. We present a postsurgical cranial case demonstrating the recursive method our clinic uses to produce RapidArc treatment plans. The initial RapidArc treatment plan generated using one 360 o arc resulted in substantial dose nonuniformity in the superficial section of the PTV. We demonstrate the use of multiple arcs to produce improved dose uniformity in this region. We also compare the results of this superficial dose compensation method to the results of a recursive method of dose correction that we developed in-house to correct optimization convergence errors in static intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans. The results show that up to 4 arcs may be necessary to provide uniform dose to the surface of the PTV with the current version of the PRO.

  18. 3-D dosimetric evaluation of 2.5 mm HD120 multileaf system for intensity modulated stereotactic radiosurgery using optical CT based polymer gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuu, C-S; Kessel, Jack; Xu, Y

    2009-01-01

    A Trilogy TX equipped with a 2.5 mm HD120 multileaf collimator system is available for the treatment of radiosurgery and IMRT. In this study, we evaluated the 3-D dosimetric impact of leaf width on an IMRT radiosurgery plan by comparing the target coverage and the dose gradient around the target, produced from both a 2.5 mm HD120 high-definition MLC system and a 5mm-leaf-width millennium 120 MLC system, using an optical CT based polymer gel dosimetry system. The 2.5 mm MLC improves target conformity and surrounding tissue sparing when compared to that of 5 mm MLC.

  19. No association between the use of Bti for mosquito control and the dynamics of non-target aquatic invertebrates in French coastal and continental wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagadic, Laurent; Schäfer, Ralf B; Roucaute, Marc; Szöcs, Eduard; Chouin, Sébastien; de Maupeou, Jérôme; Duchet, Claire; Franquet, Evelyne; Le Hunsec, Benoit; Bertrand, Céline; Fayolle, Stéphanie; Francés, Benoît; Rozier, Yves; Foussadier, Rémi; Santoni, Jean-Baptiste; Lagneau, Christophe

    2016-05-15

    The environmental safety of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is still controversial, mainly because most of the previous field studies on its undesired effects were spatially limited and did not address the relationship between community similarity and application time and frequency. No general statement can therefore be drawn on the usage conditions of Bti that insure protection of non-target organisms. The present study was conducted in eight sites distributed over the main geographical sectors where mosquito control is implemented in mainland France and Corsica. Changes in non-target aquatic invertebrates were followed at elapsed time after repeated applications of two Bti formulations (VectoBac® WDG or 12AS) up to four consecutive years. We examined the influence of both larvicide treatments and environmental variables on community dynamics and dissimilarity between treated and control areas. As it can be argued that chironomids are the most vulnerable group of non-target invertebrates, we scrutinised potential Bti-related effects on the dynamics of their community. The use of VectoBac® WDG and 12AS in coastal and continental wetlands had no immediate or long-term detectable effect on the taxonomic structure and taxa abundance of non-target aquatic invertebrate communities, including chironomids. This applied to the main habitats where mosquito larvae occur, regardless of their geographic location. Flooding, whose frequency and duration depend on local meteorological and hydrological conditions, was identified as the main environmental driver of invertebrate community dynamics. Our findings add support to the environmental safety of currently available Bti formulations when following recommended application rates and best mosquito control practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigation on effect of image lag in fluoroscopic images obtained with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) on accuracy of target tracking in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Sanada, Sigeru; Mori, Shinichiro; Dobashi, Suguru; Kumagai, Motoki; Minohara, Shinichi; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Real-time tumor tracking in external radiotherapy can be achieved by diagnostic (kV) X-ray imaging with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD). The purpose of this study was to address image lag in target tracking and its influence on the accuracy of tumor tracking. Fluoroscopic images were obtained using a direct type of dynamic FPD. Image lag properties were measured without test devices according to IEC 62220-1. Modulation transfer function (MTF) and profile curves were measured on the edges of a moving tungsten plate at movement rate of 10 and 20 mm/s, covering lung tumor movement of normal breathing. A lung tumor and metal sphere with blurred edge due to image lag was simulated using the results and then superimposed on breathing chest radiographs of a patient. The moving target with and without image lag was traced using a template-matching technique. In the results, the image lag for the first frame after X-ray cutoff was 2.0% and decreased to less than 0.1% in the fifth frame. In the measurement of profile curves on the edges of static and moving tungsten material plates, the effect of image lag was seen as blurred edges of the plate. The blurred edges of a moving target were indicated as reduction of MTF. However, the target could be traced within an error of ±5 mm. The results indicated that there was no effect of image lag on target tracking in usual breathing speed in a radiotherapy situation. (author)

  1. No association between the use of Bti for mosquito control and the dynamics of non-target aquatic invertebrates in French coastal and continental wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagadic, Laurent; Schäfer, Ralf B.; Roucaute, Marc; Szöcs, Eduard; Chouin, Sébastien; Maupeou, Jérôme de; Duchet, Claire

    2016-01-01

    The environmental safety of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is still controversial, mainly because most of the previous field studies on its undesired effects were spatially limited and did not address the relationship between community similarity and application time and frequency. No general statement can therefore be drawn on the usage conditions of Bti that insure protection of non-target organisms. The present study was conducted in eight sites distributed over the main geographical sectors where mosquito control is implemented in mainland France and Corsica. Changes in non-target aquatic invertebrates were followed at elapsed time after repeated applications of two Bti formulations (VectoBac® WDG or 12AS) up to four consecutive years. We examined the influence of both larvicide treatments and environmental variables on community dynamics and dissimilarity between treated and control areas. As it can be argued that chironomids are the most vulnerable group of non-target invertebrates, we scrutinised potential Bti-related effects on the dynamics of their community. The use of VectoBac® WDG and 12AS in coastal and continental wetlands had no immediate or long-term detectable effect on the taxonomic structure and taxa abundance of non-target aquatic invertebrate communities, including chironomids. This applied to the main habitats where mosquito larvae occur, regardless of their geographic location. Flooding, whose frequency and duration depend on local meteorological and hydrological conditions, was identified as the main environmental driver of invertebrate community dynamics. Our findings add support to the environmental safety of currently available Bti formulations when following recommended application rates and best mosquito control practices. - Highlights: • Bti is used in a variety of continental and coastal wetlands against mosquito larvae. • Bti dosages recommended for mosquito control do not affect non-target invertebrates.

  2. No association between the use of Bti for mosquito control and the dynamics of non-target aquatic invertebrates in French coastal and continental wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagadic, Laurent, E-mail: Laurent.Lagadic@rennes.inra.fr [INRA, UMR985 Écologie et Santé des Écosystèmes, Agrocampus Ouest, 65 rue de Saint Brieuc, F-35042 Rennes (France); Schäfer, Ralf B. [Quantitative Landscape Ecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Fortstraße 7, D-76829 Landau (Germany); Roucaute, Marc [INRA, UMR985 Écologie et Santé des Écosystèmes, Agrocampus Ouest, 65 rue de Saint Brieuc, F-35042 Rennes (France); Szöcs, Eduard [Quantitative Landscape Ecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Fortstraße 7, D-76829 Landau (Germany); Chouin, Sébastien; Maupeou, Jérôme de [Etablissement Interdépartemental pour la Démoustication du Littoral Atlantique, 1 rue Toufaire, F-17300 Rochefort-sur-Mer (France); Duchet, Claire [Entente Interdépartementale pour la Démoustication du Littoral Méditerranéen, 165 avenue Paul-Rimbaud, F-34184 Montpellier (France); and others

    2016-05-15

    The environmental safety of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is still controversial, mainly because most of the previous field studies on its undesired effects were spatially limited and did not address the relationship between community similarity and application time and frequency. No general statement can therefore be drawn on the usage conditions of Bti that insure protection of non-target organisms. The present study was conducted in eight sites distributed over the main geographical sectors where mosquito control is implemented in mainland France and Corsica. Changes in non-target aquatic invertebrates were followed at elapsed time after repeated applications of two Bti formulations (VectoBac® WDG or 12AS) up to four consecutive years. We examined the influence of both larvicide treatments and environmental variables on community dynamics and dissimilarity between treated and control areas. As it can be argued that chironomids are the most vulnerable group of non-target invertebrates, we scrutinised potential Bti-related effects on the dynamics of their community. The use of VectoBac® WDG and 12AS in coastal and continental wetlands had no immediate or long-term detectable effect on the taxonomic structure and taxa abundance of non-target aquatic invertebrate communities, including chironomids. This applied to the main habitats where mosquito larvae occur, regardless of their geographic location. Flooding, whose frequency and duration depend on local meteorological and hydrological conditions, was identified as the main environmental driver of invertebrate community dynamics. Our findings add support to the environmental safety of currently available Bti formulations when following recommended application rates and best mosquito control practices. - Highlights: • Bti is used in a variety of continental and coastal wetlands against mosquito larvae. • Bti dosages recommended for mosquito control do not affect non-target invertebrates.

  3. Measurement of 3-D Vibrational Motion by Dynamic Photogrammetry Using Least-Square Image Matching for Sub-Pixel Targeting to Improve Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoseong; Rhee, Huinam; Oh, Jae Hong; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an improved methodology to measure three-dimensional dynamic displacements of a structure by digital close-range photogrammetry. A series of stereo images of a vibrating structure installed with targets are taken at specified intervals by using two daily-use cameras. A new methodology is proposed to accurately trace the spatial displacement of each target in three-dimensional space. This method combines the correlation and the least-square image matching so that the sub-pixel targeting can be obtained to increase the measurement accuracy. Collinearity and space resection theory are used to determine the interior and exterior orientation parameters. To verify the proposed method, experiments have been performed to measure displacements of a cantilevered beam excited by an electrodynamic shaker, which is vibrating in a complex configuration with mixed bending and torsional motions simultaneously with multiple frequencies. The results by the present method showed good agreement with the measurement by two laser displacement sensors. The proposed methodology only requires inexpensive daily-use cameras, and can remotely detect the dynamic displacement of a structure vibrating in a complex three-dimensional defection shape up to sub-pixel accuracy. It has abundant potential applications to various fields, e.g., remote vibration monitoring of an inaccessible or dangerous facility. PMID:26978366

  4. H(infinity)/H(2)/Kalman filtering of linear dynamical systems via variational techniques with applications to target tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawicz, Paul Lawrence

    In this thesis, the similarities between the structure of the H infinity, H2, and Kalman filters are examined. The filters used in this examination have been derived through duality to the full information controller. In addition, a direct variation of parameters derivation of the Hinfinity filter is presented for both continuous and discrete time (staler case). Direct and controller dual derivations using differential games exist in the literature and also employ variational techniques. Using a variational, rather than a differential games, viewpoint has resulted in a simple relationship between the Riccati equations that arise from the derivation and the results of the Bounded Real Lemma. This same relation has previously been found in the literature and used to relate the Riccati inequality for linear systems to the Hamilton Jacobi inequality for nonlinear systems when implementing the Hinfinity controller. The Hinfinity, H2, and Kalman filters are applied to the two-state target tracking problem. In continuous time, closed form analytic expressions for the trackers and their performance are determined. To evaluate the trackers using a neutral, realistic, criterion, the probability of target escape is developed. That is, the probability that the target position error will be such that the target is outside the radar beam width resulting in a loss of measurement. In discrete time, a numerical example, using the probability of target escape, is presented to illustrate the differences in tracker performance.

  5. Management of three-dimensional intrafraction motion through real-time DMLC tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawant, Amit; Venkat, Raghu; Srivastava, Vikram; Carlson, David; Povzner, Sergey; Cattell, Herb; Keall, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Tumor tracking using a dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) represents a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in thoracic and abdominal cancer radiotherapy. In this work, we develop, empirically demonstrate, and characterize a novel 3D tracking algorithm for real-time, conformal, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based radiation delivery to targets moving in three dimensions. The algorithm obtains real-time information of target location from an independent position monitoring system and dynamically calculates MLC leaf positions to account for changes in target position. Initial studies were performed to evaluate the geometric accuracy of DMLC tracking of 3D target motion. In addition, dosimetric studies were performed on a clinical linac to evaluate the impact of real-time DMLC tracking for conformal, step-and-shoot (S-IMRT), dynamic (D-IMRT), and VMAT deliveries to a moving target. The efficiency of conformal and IMRT delivery in the presence of tracking was determined. Results show that submillimeter geometric accuracy in all three dimensions is achievable with DMLC tracking. Significant dosimetric improvements were observed in the presence of tracking for conformal and IMRT deliveries to moving targets. A gamma index evaluation with a 3%-3 mm criterion showed that deliveries without DMLC tracking exhibit between 1.7 (S-IMRT) and 4.8 (D-IMRT) times more dose points that fail the evaluation compared to corresponding deliveries with tracking. The efficiency of IMRT delivery, as measured in the lab, was observed to be significantly lower in case of tracking target motion perpendicular to MLC leaf travel compared to motion parallel to leaf travel. Nevertheless, these early results indicate that accurate, real-time DMLC tracking of 3D tumor motion is feasible and can potentially result in significant geometric and dosimetric advantages leading to more effective management of intrafraction motion

  6. Intracellular siRNA delivery dynamics of integrin-targeted, PEGylated chitosan-poly(ethylene imine) hybrid nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragelle, Héloïse; Colombo, Stefano; Pourcelle, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    chitosan-poly(ethylene imine) hybrid nanoparticles. The amount of intracellular siRNA delivered by αvβ3-targeted versus non-targeted nanoparticles was quantified in the human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line H1299 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) using a stem-loop reverse...... that these nanoparticles might end up in late endosomes or lysosomes without releasing their cargo to the cell cytoplasm. Thus, the silencing efficiency of the chitosan-based nanoparticles is strongly dependent on the uptake and the intracellular trafficking in H1299 EGFP cells, which is critical information towards...

  7. Dynamic conformational change regulates the protein-DNA recognition: an investigation on binding of a Y-family polymerase to its target DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Chu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein-DNA recognition is a central biological process that governs the life of cells. A protein will often undergo a conformational transition to form the functional complex with its target DNA. The protein conformational dynamics are expected to contribute to the stability and specificity of DNA recognition and therefore may control the functional activity of the protein-DNA complex. Understanding how the conformational dynamics influences the protein-DNA recognition is still challenging. Here, we developed a two-basin structure-based model to explore functional dynamics in Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Y-family polymerase IV (DPO4 during its binding to DNA. With explicit consideration of non-specific and specific interactions between DPO4 and DNA, we found that DPO4-DNA recognition is comprised of first 3D diffusion, then a short-range adjustment sliding on DNA and finally specific binding. Interestingly, we found that DPO4 is under a conformational equilibrium between multiple states during the binding process and the distributions of the conformations vary at different binding stages. By modulating the strength of the electrostatic interactions, the flexibility of the linker, and the conformational dynamics in DPO4, we drew a clear picture on how DPO4 dynamically regulates the DNA recognition. We argue that the unique features of flexibility and conformational dynamics in DPO4-DNA recognition have direct implications for low-fidelity translesion DNA synthesis, most of which is found to be accomplished by the Y-family DNA polymerases. Our results help complete the description of the DNA synthesis process for the Y-family polymerases. Furthermore, the methods developed here can be widely applied for future investigations on how various proteins recognize and bind specific DNA substrates.

  8. Pulsed laser ablation of wire-shaped target in a thin water jet: effects of plasma features and bubble dynamics on the PLAL process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell’Aglio, Marcella; De Giacomo, Alessandro; Kohsakowski, Sebastian; Barcikowski, Stephan; Wagener, Philipp; Santagata, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, emission spectroscopy and fast imaging surveys during pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) for nanoparticles (NPs) production have been used, in order to provide further details about the process involved and the potentialities offered by a wire-shaped sample ablated in a flowing water jet. This kind of set-up has been explored because the laser ablation efficiency in water increases when a thin water layer and a wire-shaped target are used. In order to understand the physical processes causing the increasing ablation efficiency, both the laser-induced plasma and bubble dynamics generated in a flowing liquid jet have been analysed. The plasma parameters and the bubble behaviour in such a system have been compared with those observed in conventional PLAL experiments, where either a bulk or a wire-shaped target is immersed in bulk water. From the data presented here it is evidenced that the plasma and shockwave induced during the breakdown process can play a direct role in the ablation efficiency variation observed. With regard to the cavitation bubbles evolving near a free surface (the interface between water and air) it should be noted that these have to be treated with caution as a consequence of the strong influence played in these circumstances by the boundary of the water jet during its expansion dynamics. The effects due to the size of the liquid layer, the presence of the water/air interface, the liquid characteristics, the target shape, the plasma evolution and the bubble dynamics together with their outcomes on the NPs’ production, are presented and discussed. (paper)

  9. Targeting Feeding and Eating Behaviors: Development of the Feeding Dynamic Intervention for Caregivers of 2- to 5-Year-Old Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihuoma U. Eneli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting feeding dynamics, a concept centered on the roles and interaction of the caregiver and child in a feeding relationship, may have significant potential for obesity intervention. The aim of this paper is to describe the 3-phase development of the Feeding Dynamics Intervention (FDI, an acceptability and feasibility study on implementing the feeding dynamic roles (Study 1, development of the FDI content (Study 2, and a pilot study on use of the 6-lesson FDI to promote behaviors consistent with a feeding dynamic approach (Study 3. Sample population was mothers with young children, 2–5 years old. An effect size (Hedges’ g greater than 0.20 was seen in more than half (57% of maternal feeding behaviors, with the largest effect sizes (Hedges’ g≥0.8 occurring with behaviors that represent the mother adopting her roles of determining what food is served, not using food as a reward, and not controlling her child’s intake. There was a significant decline in Pressure to Eat behaviors (2.9 versus 2.2, p<0.01 and Monitoring (4.1 versus 3.5, p<0.001. The FDI emerged as an acceptable and implementable intervention. Future studies need to investigate effects of the FDI on the child’s eating behaviors, self-regulation of energy intake, and anthropometrics.

  10. Flight and Stability of a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Target in the Drift Region between Injection and the Reaction Chamber with Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitori, T. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    A Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) target’s flight through a low Reynolds number and high Mach number regime was analyzed with computational fluid dynamics software. This regime consisted of xenon gas at 1,050 K and approximately 6,670 Pa. Simulations with similar flow conditions were performed with a sphere and compared with experimental data and published correlations for validation purposes. Transient considerations of the developing flow around the target were explored. Simulations of the target at different velocities were used to determine correlations for the drag coefficient and Nusselt number as functions of the Reynolds number. Simulations with different angles of attack were used to determine the aerodynamic coefficients of drag, lift, Magnus moment, and overturning moment as well as target stability. The drag force, lift force, and overturning moment changed minimally with spin. Above an angle of attack of 15°, the overturning moment would be destabilizing. At low angles of attack (less than 15°), the overturning moment would tend to decrease the target’s angle of attack, indicating the lack of a need for spin for stability at small angles. This stabilizing moment would cause the target to move in a mildly damped oscillation about the axis parallel to the free-stream velocity vector through the target’s center of gravity.

  11. Estimation of error in maximal intensity projection-based internal target volume of lung tumors: a simulation and comparison study using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Read, Paul W; Baisden, Joseph M; Larner, James M; Benedict, Stanley H; Sheng, Ke

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)-based lung tumor internal target volume determination using a simulation method based on dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI). Eight healthy volunteers and six lung tumor patients underwent a 5-min MRI scan in the sagittal plane to acquire dynamic images of lung motion. A MATLAB program was written to generate re-sorted dMRI using 4D-CT acquisition methods (RedCAM) by segmenting and rebinning the MRI scans. The maximal intensity projection images were generated from RedCAM and dMRI, and the errors in the MIP-based internal target area (ITA) from RedCAM (epsilon), compared with those from dMRI, were determined and correlated with the subjects' respiratory variability (nu). Maximal intensity projection-based ITAs from RedCAM were comparatively smaller than those from dMRI in both phantom studies (epsilon = -21.64% +/- 8.23%) and lung tumor patient studies (epsilon = -20.31% +/- 11.36%). The errors in MIP-based ITA from RedCAM correlated linearly (epsilon = -5.13nu - 6.71, r(2) = 0.76) with the subjects' respiratory variability. Because of the low temporal resolution and retrospective re-sorting, 4D-CT might not accurately depict the excursion of a moving tumor. Using a 4D-CT MIP image to define the internal target volume might therefore cause underdosing and an increased risk of subsequent treatment failure. Patient-specific respiratory variability might also be a useful predictor of the 4D-CT-induced error in MIP-based internal target volume determination.

  12. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  13. [Dynamic hierarchy of regulatory peptides. Structure of the induction relations of regulators as the target for therapeutic agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, S V; Miasoedov, N F

    2012-01-01

    Based on the database information (literature period 1970-2010 gg.) on the effects of regulatory peptides (RP) and non-peptide neurotransmitters (dopamine, serotonin, norepi-nephrine, acetylcholine) it was analyzed of possible cascade processes of endogenous regulators. It was found that the entire continuum of RP and mediators is a chaotic soup of the ordered three-level compartments. Such a dynamic functional hierarchy of endogenous regulators allows to create start-up and corrective tasks for a variety of physiological functions. Some examples of static and dynamic patterns of induction processes of RP and mediators (that regulate the states of anxiety, depression, learning and memory, feeding behavior, reproductive processes, etc.) are considered.

  14. Quantifying Human Performance of a Dynamic Military Target Detection Task: An Application of the Theory of Signal Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    applied to analyze numerous experimental tasks (Macmillan and Creelman , 1991). One of these tasks, target detection, is the subject research. In...between each associated pair of false alarm rate and hit rate z-scores is d’ for the bias level associated with the pairing (Macmillan and Creelman , 1991...unequal variance in normal distributions (Macmillan and Creelman , 1991). 61 1966). It is described in detail for the interested reader by Green and

  15. Live Cells as Dynamic Laboratories: Time Lapse Raman Spectral Microscopy of Nanoparticles with Both IgE Targeting and pH-Sensing Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy L. Nowak-Lovato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review captures the use of live cells as dynamic microlaboratories through implementation of labeled nanoparticles (nanosensors that have both sensing and targeting functions. The addition of 2,4-ε-dinitrophenol-L-lysine (DNP as a FcεRI targeting ligand and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy as a pH-sensing ligand enables spatial and temporal monitoring of FcεRI receptors and their pH environment within the endocytic pathway. To ensure reliability, the sensor is calibrated in vivo using the ionophore nigericin and standard buffer solutions to equilibrate the external [H+] concentration with that of the cell compartments. This review highlights the nanosensors, ability to traffic and respond to pH of receptor-bound nanosensors (1 at physiological temperature (37°C versus room temperature (25°C, (2 after pharmacological treatment with bafilomycin, an H+ ATPase pump inhibitor, or amiloride, an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchange, and (3 in response to both temperature and pharmacological treatment. Whole-cell, time lapse images are demonstrated to show the ability to transform live cells into dynamic laboratories to monitor temporal and spatial endosomal pH. The versatility of these probes shows promise for future applications relevant to intracellular trafficking and intelligent drug design.

  16. Dynamic mathematical modeling of IL13-induced signaling in Hodgkin and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma allows prediction of therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raia, Valentina; Schilling, Marcel; Böhm, Martin; Hahn, Bettina; Kowarsch, Andreas; Raue, Andreas; Sticht, Carsten; Bohl, Sebastian; Saile, Maria; Möller, Peter; Gretz, Norbert; Timmer, Jens; Theis, Fabian; Lehmann, Wolf-Dieter; Lichter, Peter; Klingmüller, Ursula

    2011-02-01

    Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) share a frequent constitutive activation of JAK (Janus kinase)/STAT signaling pathway. Because of complex, nonlinear relations within the pathway, key dynamic properties remained to be identified to predict possible strategies for intervention. We report the development of dynamic pathway models based on quantitative data collected on signaling components of JAK/STAT pathway in two lymphoma-derived cell lines, MedB-1 and L1236, representative of PMBL and cHL, respectively. We show that the amounts of STAT5 and STAT6 are higher whereas those of SHP1 are lower in the two lymphoma cell lines than in normal B cells. Distinctively, L1236 cells harbor more JAK2 and less SHP1 molecules per cell than MedB-1 or control cells. In both lymphoma cell lines, we observe interleukin-13 (IL13)-induced activation of IL4 receptor α, JAK2, and STAT5, but not of STAT6. Genome-wide, 11 early and 16 sustained genes are upregulated by IL13 in both lymphoma cell lines. Specifically, the known STAT-inducible negative regulators CISH and SOCS3 are upregulated within 2 hours in MedB-1 but not in L1236 cells. On the basis of this detailed quantitative information, we established two mathematical models, MedB-1 and L1236 model, able to describe the respective experimental data. Most of the model parameters are identifiable and therefore the models are predictive. Sensitivity analysis of the model identifies six possible therapeutic targets able to reduce gene expression levels in L1236 cells and three in MedB-1. We experimentally confirm reduction in target gene expression in response to inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation, thereby validating one of the predicted targets.

  17. Conformal Radiotherapy: Physics, Treatment Planning and Verification. Proceedings book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wagter, C [ed.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to establish radiation dose distributions that conform tightly to the target volume in view of limiting radiation to normal tissues. Conformal radiotherapy significantly improves both local control and palliation and thus contributes to increase survival and to improve the quality of life. The subjects covered by the symposium include : (1) conformal radiotherapy and multi-leaf collimation; (2) three dimensional imaging; (3) treatment simulation, planning and optimization; (4) quality assurance; and (5) dosimetry. The book of proceedings contains the abstracts of the invited lectures, papers and poster presentations as well as the full papers of these contributions.

  18. Measurement of activity distribution using photostimulable phosphor imaging plates in decommissioned 10 MV medical linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Yonai, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sakae, Takeji; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Abe, Yoshihisa; Itami, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Photonuclear reactions generate neutrons in the head of the linear accelerator. Therefore, some parts of the linear accelerator can become activated. Such activated materials must be handled as radioactive waste. The authors attempted to investigate the distribution of induced radioactivity using photostimulable phosphor imaging plates. Autoradiographs were produced from some parts of the linear accelerator (the target, upper jaw, multileaf collimator and shielding). The levels of induced radioactivity were confirmed to be non-uniform within each part from the autoradiographs. The method was a simple and highly sensitive approach to evaluating the relative degree of activation of the linear accelerators, so that appropriate materials management procedures can be carried out.

  19. Conformal Radiotherapy: Physics, Treatment Planning and Verification. Proceedings book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wagter, C.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to establish radiation dose distributions that conform tightly to the target volume in view of limiting radiation to normal tissues. Conformal radiotherapy significantly improves both local control and palliation and thus contributes to increase survival and to improve the quality of life. The subjects covered by the symposium include : (1) conformal radiotherapy and multi-leaf collimation; (2) three dimensional imaging; (3) treatment simulation, planning and optimization; (4) quality assurance; and (5) dosimetry. The book of proceedings contains the abstracts of the invited lectures, papers and poster presentations as well as the full papers of these contributions

  20. The pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, Naoki; Kodama, Takashi; Hatano, K.

    2013-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows higher radiation dose to be focused to the target volumes while minimizing the dose to OAR. To start of clinical treatment in IMRTvwe must perform commissioning strictly than 3D-conformal radiotherapy (CRT). In this report, pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy were reviewed. Multileaf collimator (MLC) offsets and MLC transmissions are important parameters in commissioning of RTPS for IMRT. Correction of depth scaling and fluence scaling is necessary for dose measurement using solid phantom. (author)