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Sample records for dynamic multileaf collimation

  1. Dynamic multileaf collimation without `tongue-and-groove' underdosage effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Santvoort, J. P. C.; Heijmen, B. J. M.

    1996-10-01

    In all commercially available multileaf collimators, a `tongue-and-groove' - or similar - construction is used for reduction of leakage radiation between adjacent leaves. These constructions can cause serious underdosages in intensity-modulated photon beams. A method for leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation, which fully avoids these underdosage effects, is presented. The method is based on pairwise synchronizations of trajectories of adjacent leaf pairs, such that the delivered beam intensity in each `tongue-and-groove' region is always equal to the smallest of the two prescribed intensities for the two corresponding leaf pairs. The effectiveness of the method has been proven for a large number of intensity-modulated fields, using the dynamic multileaf collimation mode of our MM50 Racetrack Microtron. Compared to dynamic multileaf collimation without synchronization, beam-on times are always equal or longer. For the cases that we studied, the beam-on time was typically increased by 5 to 15%.

  2. Dynamic multileaf collimation without 'tongue-and-groove' underdosage effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Santvoort, J P; Heijmen, B J

    1996-10-01

    In all commercially available multileaf collimators, a 'tongue-and-groove'--or similar--construction is used for reduction of leakage radiation between adjacent leaves. These constructions can cause serious underdosages in intensity-modulated photon beams. A method for leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation, which fully avoids these underdosage effects, is presented. The method is based on pairwise synchronizations of trajectories of adjacent leaf pairs, such that the delivered beam intensity in each 'tongue-and-groove' region is always equal to the smallest of the two prescribed intensities for the two corresponding leaf pairs. The effectiveness of the method has been proven for a large number of intensity-modulated fields, using the dynamic multileaf collimation mode of our MM50 Racetrack Microtron. Compared to dynamic multileaf collimation without synchronization, beam-on times are always equal or longer. For the cases that we studied, the beam-on time was typically increased by 5 to 15%.

  3. Implementation of intensity modulation with dynamic multileaf collimation

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    Wong, J.W.; Yu, C.; Jaffray, D. [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The computer-controlled multileaf collimator (MLC) marks one of the most important advances in radiation therapy. The device efficiently replaces manual blocking to shape fields and can be used to modulate beam intensity. The results of a research programme at William Beaumont Hospital, aimed at bringing dynamic intensity modulation into clinical use, are discussed.

  4. Leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation to realize optimized fluence profiles

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    Dirkx, M.L.P.; Heijmen, B.J.M.; Santvoort, J.P.C. van [University Hospital Rotterdam/Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    1998-05-01

    An algorithm for the calculation of the required leaf trajectories to generate optimized intensity modulated beam profiles by means of dynamic multileaf collimation is presented. This algorithm iteratively accounts for leaf transmission and collimator scatter and fully avoids tongue-and-groove underdosage effects. Tests on a large number of intensity modulated fields show that only a limited number of iterations, generally less than 10, are necessary to minimize the differences between optimized and realized fluence profiles. To assess the accuracy of the algorithm in combination with the dose calculation algorithm of the Cadplan 3D treatment planning system, predicted absolute dose distributions for optimized fluence profiles were compared with dose distributions measured on the MM50 Racetrack Microtron and resulting from the calculated leaf trajectories. Both theoretical and clinical cases yield an agreement within 2%, or within 2 mm in regions with a high dose gradient, showing that the accuracy is adequate for clinical application. (author)

  5. Leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation to realize optimized fluence profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, M. L. P.; Heijmen, B. J. M.; van Santvoort, J. P. C.

    1998-05-01

    An algorithm for the calculation of the required leaf trajectories to generate optimized intensity modulated beam profiles by means of dynamic multileaf collimation is presented. This algorithm iteratively accounts for leaf transmission and collimator scatter and fully avoids tongue-and-groove underdosage effects. Tests on a large number of intensity modulated fields show that only a limited number of iterations, generally less than 10, are necessary to minimize the differences between optimized and realized fluence profiles. To assess the accuracy of the algorithm in combination with the dose calculation algorithm of the Cadplan 3D treatment planning system, predicted absolute dose distributions for optimized fluence profiles were compared with dose distributions measured on the MM50 Racetrack Microtron and resulting from the calculated leaf trajectories. Both theoretical and clinical cases yield an agreement within 2%, or within 2 mm in regions with a high dose gradient, showing that the accuracy is adequate for clinical application.

  6. An independent system for real-time dynamic multileaf collimation trajectory verification using EPID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Woodruff, Henry C.; Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; O'Connor, Daryl J.; Middleton, Richard H.; Greer, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    A new tool has been developed to verify the trajectory of dynamic multileaf collimators (MLCs) used in advanced radiotherapy techniques using only the information provided by the electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) measured image frames. The prescribed leaf positions are resampled to a higher resolution in a pre-processing stage to improve the verification precision. Measured MLC positions are extracted from the EPID frames using a template matching method. A cosine similarity metric is then applied to synchronise measured and planned leaf positions for comparison. Three additional comparison functions were incorporated to ensure robust synchronisation. The MLC leaf trajectory error detection was simulated for both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (prostate) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) (head-and-neck) deliveries with anthropomorphic phantoms in the beam. The overall accuracy for MLC positions automatically extracted from EPID image frames was approximately 0.5 mm. The MLC leaf trajectory verification system can detect leaf position errors during IMRT and VMAT with a tolerance of 3.5 mm within 1 s.

  7. Determining leaf trajectories for dynamic multileaf collimators with consideration of marker visibility: an algorithm study.

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    Zhao, Bo; Dai, Jianrong

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a leaf-setting algorithm for Dynamic Multileaf Collimator-Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (DMLC-IMRT) for optimal marker visibility. Here, a leaf-setting algorithm (called a Delta algorithm) was developed with the objective of maximizing marker visibility so as to improve the tracking effectiveness of fiducial markers during treatment delivery. The initial leaf trajectories were generated using a typical leaf-setting algorithm, then the leaf trajectories were adjusted by Delta algorithm operations (analytical computations and a series of matrix calculations) to achieve the optimal solution. The performance of the Delta algorithm was evaluated with six test fields (with randomly generated intensity profiles) and 15 clinical fields from IMRT plans of three prostate cancer patients. Compared with the initial solution, the Delta algorithm kept the total delivered intensities (TDIs) constant (without increasing the beam delivery time), but improved marker visibility (the percentage ratio of marker visibility time to beam delivery time). For the artificial fields (with three markers), marker visibility increased from 68.00-72.00% for a small field (5 × 5), from 38.46-43.59% for a medium field (10 × 10), and from 28.57-37.14% for a large field (20 × 20). For the 15 clinical fields, marker visibility increased 6-30% for eight fields and > 50% for two fields but did not change for five fields. A Delta algorithm was proposed to maximize marker visibility for DMLC-IMRT without increasing beam delivery time, and this will provide theoretical fundamentals for future studies of 4D DMLC tracking radiotherapy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  8. Testing of the stability of intensity modulated beams generated with dynamic multileaf collimation, applied to the MM50 racetrack microtron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, M L; Heijmen, B J

    2000-12-01

    Recently, we have published a method for the calculation of required leaf trajectories to generate optimized intensity modulated x-ray beams by means of dynamic multileaf collimation [Phys. Med. Biol. 43, 1171-1184 (1998)]. For the MM50 Racetrack Microtron it has been demonstrated that the dosimetric accuracy of this method, in combination with the dose calculation algorithm of the Cadplan 3D treatment planning system, is adequate for a clinical application (within 2% or 0.2 cm). Prior to initiating patient treatment with dynamic multileaf collimation (DMLC), tests have been performed to investigate the stability of DMLC fields generated at the MM50, (i) in time, (ii) subject to gantry rotation and (iii) in case of treatment interrupts, e.g., caused by an error detected by the treatment machine. The stability of relative dose profiles, normalized to a reference point in a relatively flat part of the modulated beam profile, was assessed from measurements with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), with a linear diode array attached to the collimator and with film. The dose in the reference point was monitored using an ionization chamber. Tests were performed for several intensity modulated fields using 10 and 25 MV photon beams. Based on film measurements for sweeping 0.1 cm leaf gaps it was concluded that in an 80 days period the variation in leaf positioning was within 0.05 cm, without requiring any recalibration. For a uniform 10x10 cm2 field, realized dynamically by a scanning 0.4x10 cm2 slit beam, a maximum variation in slit width of 0.01 cm was derived from ionization chamber measurements, both in time and for gantry rotation. For a clinical example, the dose in the reference point reproduced within 0.2% (1 SD) over a period of 100 days. Apart from regions with very large dose gradients, variations in the relative beam profiles measured with the EPID were generally less than 1% (1 SD). For different gantry angles the dose profiles also reproduced within 1

  9. Modeling of a multileaf collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Siyong

    A comprehensive physics model of a multileaf collimator (MLC) field for treatment planning was developed. Specifically, an MLC user interface module that includes a geometric optimization tool and a general method of in- air output factor calculation were developed. An automatic tool for optimization of MLC conformation is needed to realize the potential benefits of MLC. It is also necessary that a radiation therapy treatment planning (RTTP) system is capable of modeling MLC completely. An MLC geometric optimization and user interface module was developed. The planning time has been reduced significantly by incorporating the MLC module into the main RTTP system, Radiation Oncology Computer System (ROCS). The dosimetric parameter that has the most profound effect on the accuracy of the dose delivered with an MLC is the change in the in-air output factor that occurs with field shaping. It has been reported that the conventional method of calculating an in-air output factor cannot be used for MLC shaped fields accurately. Therefore, it is necessary to develop algorithms that allow accurate calculation of the in-air output factor. A generalized solution for an in-air output factor calculation was developed. Three major contributors of scatter to the in-air output-flattening filter, wedge, and tertiary collimator-were considered separately. By virtue of a field mapping method, in which a source plane field determined by detector's eye view is mapped into a detector plane field, no additional dosimetric data acquisition other than the standard data set for a range of square fields is required for the calculation of head scatter. Comparisons of in-air output factors between calculated and measured values show a good agreement for both open and wedge fields. For rectangular fields, a simple equivalent square formula was derived based on the configuration of a linear accelerator treatment head. This method predicts in-air output to within 1% accuracy. A two

  10. Toward the development of intrafraction tumor deformation tracking using a dynamic multi-leaf collimator

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    Ge, Yuanyuan; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Booth, Jeremy T. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intrafraction deformation limits targeting accuracy in radiotherapy. Studies show tumor deformation of over 10 mm for both single tumor deformation and system deformation (due to differential motion between primary tumors and involved lymph nodes). Such deformation cannot be adapted to with current radiotherapy methods. The objective of this study was to develop and experimentally investigate the ability of a dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) tracking system to account for tumor deformation. Methods: To compensate for tumor deformation, the DMLC tracking strategy is to warp the planned beam aperture directly to conform to the new tumor shape based on real time tumor deformation input. Two deformable phantoms that correspond to a single tumor and a tumor system were developed. The planar deformations derived from the phantom images in beam's eye view were used to guide the aperture warping. An in-house deformable image registration software was developed to automatically trigger the registration once new target image was acquired and send the computed deformation to the DMLC tracking software. Because the registration speed is not fast enough to implement the experiment in real-time manner, the phantom deformation only proceeded to the next position until registration of the current deformation position was completed. The deformation tracking accuracy was evaluated by a geometric target coverage metric defined as the sum of the area incorrectly outside and inside the ideal aperture. The individual contributions from the deformable registration algorithm and the finite leaf width to the tracking uncertainty were analyzed. Clinical proof-of-principle experiment of deformation tracking using previously acquired MR images of a lung cancer patient was implemented to represent the MRI-Linac environment. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment delivered with enabled deformation tracking was simulated and demonstrated. Results: The first

  11. Megavoltage Image-Based Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking of a NiTi Stent in Porcine Lungs on a Linear Accelerator

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    Poulsen, Per R., E-mail: perpolse@rm.dk [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane; Nielsen, Martin S.; Thomsen, Jakob B. [Department of Medical Physics, Aalborg Hospital, University of Aarhus, Aalborg (Denmark); Jensen, Henrik K. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Aalborg Hospital, University of Aarhus, Aalborg (Denmark); Kjaergaard, Benedict; Zepernick, Peter R. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Aalborg Hospital, University of Aarhus, Aalborg (Denmark); Worm, Esben; Fledelius, Walther [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Cho, Byungchul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sawant, Amit [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Ruan, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Keall, Paul J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy and potential limitations of MV image-based dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking in a porcine model on a linear accelerator. Methods and Materials: A thermo-expandable NiTi stent designed for kilovoltage (kV) X-ray visualization of lung lesions was inserted into the bronchia of three anaesthetized Goettingen minipigs. A four-dimensional computed tomography scan was used for planning a five-field conformal treatment with circular multileaf collimator (MLC) apertures. A 22.5 Gy single fraction treatment was delivered to the pigs. The peak-to-peak stent motion was 3 to 8 mm, with breathing periods of 1.2 to 4 s. Before treatment, X-ray images were used for image-guided setup based on the stent. During treatment delivery, continuous megavoltage (MV) portal images were acquired at 7.5 Hz. The stent was segmented in the images and used for continuous adaptation of the MLC aperture. Offline, the tracking error in beam's eye view of the treatment beam was calculated for each MV image as the difference between the MLC aperture center and the segmented stent position. The standard deviations of the systematic error {Sigma} and the random error {sigma} were determined and compared with the would-be errors for a nontracking treatment with pretreatment image-guided setup. Results: Reliable stent segmentation was obtained for 11 of 15 fields. Segmentation failures occurred when image contrast was dominated by overlapping anatomical structures (ribs, diaphragm) rather than by the stent, which was designed for kV rather than MV X-ray visibility. For the 11 fields with reliable segmentation, {Sigma} was 0.5 mm/0.4 mm in the two imager directions, whereas {sigma} was 0.5 mm/1.1 mm. Without tracking, {Sigma} and {sigma} would have been 1.7 mm/1.4 mm and 0.8 mm/1.4 mm, respectively. Conclusion: For the first time, in vivo DMLC tracking has been demonstrated on a linear accelerator showing the potential for improved targeting accuracy

  12. Evaluation of the penumbras of a Philips multileaf collimator

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    Lafay, F.; Malet, C.; Mombard, C.; Ginestet, C. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Blondel, E. [Isotec, Saint-Quentin (France); Desfarges, Y.; Dupin, G. [Philips Medical System, Lyon (France)

    1995-12-01

    Since January 1995, a Philips SL20 linear accelerator which is connected to a multileaf collimator has been used. Computer-controlled multileaf collimators open up the opportunity to practice conformal radiotherapy. Its aim is to adjust as well as possible the Planning Target Volume (PTV) to the effective treated volume with an homogeneous dose distribution in the PTV, and to protect healthy tissues and delicate organs. This is possible by means of a multileaf collimator by increasing the number of complex fields with different incidences during a same session. Moreover, the Beam`s Eye View function of the three-dimensional treatment planning system allows to define the shape of complex fields. For rectangular fields, the penumbra is defined by the distance between the 80% and 20% isodoses relative to the beam axis. In addition, the distances between, respectively, the 95% and 50% isodoses, the 90% and 50% isodoses, the 50% and 20% isodoses relative to the beam axis have been analysed. Different penumbras were evaluated. The result of this work will enable to adjust the reference isodose to the PTV either by integrating this result into dosimetry software, or by taking it into account for drawing the PTV.

  13. Commissioning and quality assurance for intensity modulated radiotherapy with dynamic multileaf collimator: experience of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venencia, Carlos Daniel; Besa, Pelayo

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present our experience in the commissioning and quality assurance (QA) for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using dynamic multileaf collimator (dMLC), sliding window technique. Using Varian equipment solution, the connectivity and operation between all IMRT chain components was checked. Then the following test were done: stability of leaf positioning and leaf speed, sensitivity to treatment interruptions (acceleration and deceleration), evaluation of standard field patterns, stability of dMLC output, segmental dose accuracy check, average leaf transmission, dosimetric leaf separation, effects of lateral disequilibrium between adjacent leaves in dose profiles and multiple carriage field verification. Standard patterns were generated for verification: uniform field, pyramid, hole, wedge, peaks and chair. Weekly QA Protocol include: sweeping gap output, Garden Fence Test (narrow bands, 2 mm wide, of exposure spaced at 2-cm intervals) and segmental dose accuracy check. Monthly QA include: sweeping gap output at multiple gantry and collimator angle, sweeping gap output off-axis, Picket Fence Test (eight consecutive movements of a 5-cm wide rectangular field spaced at 5-cm intervals), stability of leaf speed and leaf motor current test (PWM test). Patient QA procedure consists of an absolute dose measurement for all treatments fields in the treatment condition, analysis of actual leaf position versus planned leaf position (dynalog files) for each treatment field, film relative dose determination for each field, film relative dose determination for the plan (all treatment fields) in two axial planes and patient positioning verification with orthogonal films. The tests performed showed acceptable result. After more than one year of IMRT treatment the routine QA machine checks confirm the precision and stability of the IMRT system.

  14. Execution of mantle field with multileaf collimator: A simple approach

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    Prabhakar Ramachandran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Until very recently mantle field radiotherapy remained the gold standard for the treatment of favorable early-stage Hodgkin′s lymphoma. The classic mantle includes all the major lymph nodes above the diaphragm and extends from the inferior portion of the mandible to the level of the insertion of the diaphragm. Aims: To describe a simple technique that has been devised to treat the mantle field with the help of multileaf collimator and using computed tomography (CT-based treatment planning. Materials and Methods: CT scan was performed with the patient in the supine position and the datasets were transferred to the Eclipse™ treatment planning system. Elekta Precise™ linear accelerator equipped with 40 pairs of multileaf collimator (MLC was used for the execution of the mantle field. The MLC′s shapes were designed to take the shape of the conventional customized blocks used for treatment of mantle field. The anterior mantle field was divided into three separate MLC segments with the collimator kept at 0°. The first MLC segment was shaped to cover the neck, clavicular regions, and mediastinum. The second and the third MLC segments covered the right and left axilla, respectively. The posterior fields were opposed to the anterior subfields in a similar fashion. The dose was prescribed at the midplane, using reference points. Results and Conclusion: The technique described in this study is very simple, easy to implement, and avoids unnecessary delay in the execution of the mantle field. The mantle field can be easily shaped with the multileaf collimators, without any collimator rotation.

  15. Characteristics of scattered electron beams shaped with a multileaf collimator.

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    Moran, J M; Martel, M K; Bruinvis, I A; Fraass, B A

    1997-09-01

    Characteristics of dual-foil scattered electron beams shaped with a multileaf collimator (MLC) (instead of an applicator system) were studied. The electron beams, with energies between 10 and 25 MeV, were produced by a racetrack microtron using a dual-foil scattering system. For a range of field sizes, depth dose curves, profiles, penumbra width, angular spread in air, and effective and virtual source positions were compared. Measurements were made when the MLC alone provided collimation and when an applicator provided collimation. Identical penumbra widths were obtained at a source-to-surface distance of 85 cm for the MLC and 110 cm for the applicator. The MLC-shaped beams had characteristics similar to other machines which use trimmers or applicators to collimate scanned or scattered electron beams. Values of the effective source position and the angular spread parameter for the MLC beams were similar to those of the dual-foil scattered beams of the Varian Clinac 2100 CD and the scanned beams of the Sagittaire linear accelerators. A model, based on Fermi-Eyges multiple scattering theory, was adapted and applied successfully to predict penumbra width as a function of collimator-surface distance.

  16. Application of multileaf collimator in breast cancer radiation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiszewska, Marzena; Dupla, Dorota; Nowakowski, Grzegorz

    2004-07-01

    Modern radiation therapy tools allow a precise delivery of a high dose to a target area (so-called planning target volume -- PTV) and spare, at the same time, critical organs in the vicinity of cancerous lesions. One of the tools of conformal therapy is a multi-leaf collimator, which provides the opportunity to optimally adjust the therapeutic field to the tumor area. More difficult areas for radiation therapy include: mamma, after BCT, and chest after mammectomy with regional lymph nodes. The objective of the study is to present technical and physical aspects of breast carcinoma irradiation when applying a multi-leaf collimator. The following techniques were applied: (a) the isocentric technique of tangent fields (from two to four) for the mamma after BCT; (b) the method of a common isocenter, for the areas of mamma and for regional lymph nodes; (c) the technique of complementary photon + electron fields, for the area of chest after mammectomy and lymph nodes. The presented techniques were implemented as standard procedures in the preparation of breast carcinoma radiation treatment in the Lower Silesian Oncology Center.

  17. Scattered electron beams shaped by a multileaf collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jean Marie

    Recent developments in conformal radiation therapy have focused primarily on applying computer-controlled equipment and techniques to photon beams. Despite favorable characteristics of the dose fall-off with depth for electron beams, their application to conformal therapy has been limited. Factors such as geometrically limiting applicator systems, lack of automatic field shaping, and dose calculation model limitations must be addressed before routine clinical use of electron beams for conformal radiotherapy becomes common. This work evaluates dose characteristics and modeling of dose distributions and output factors for a system specifically designed for computer-controlled collimation of dual-foil scattered and scanned electron beams. Dose characteristics determined from measured depth dose curves and profiles were evaluated for multileaf- collimated and applicator-collimated beams produced by the dual-foil scattered gantry of a two-gantry racetrack microtron system. The resulting dose distributions and characteristics were used to evaluate and modify the existing 3-D electron pencil beam algorithm in UMPlan, the University of Michigan treatment planning system, to predict relative dose distributions for MLC-shaped fields. Output factors (dose of a field relative to that of a reference field) were measured, analyzed, and modeled for MLC-collimated rectangular and shaped fields. For output factor calculations, two models were evaluated: a pencil beam-derived model and an empirical edge model originally developed for photon dose calculations. The current work shows that the dosimetric characteristics of MLC and applicator-collimated beams of the racetrack microtron are similar once the collimation geometry is accounted for. The dosimetric characteristics are also consistent with those for other dual-foil scattered machines with applicator systems and earlier generation scanned beams collimated with trimmer bars. By accounting for collimation geometry, electron

  18. IMRT delivery performance with a varian multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losasso, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The use of a multileaf collimator (MLC) for intensity-modulated radiotherapy poses unique dosimetric issues. The nature of intensity-modulated radiotherapy dosimetry, centered on leaf position accuracy, is common to all MLCs. However, the mechanical and software designs of MLCs from the different manufacturers distinguish them. This report focused on the Varian Millennium 120, although the concepts are applicable to the earlier Varian Mark series as well. The factors that affect dose delivery in clinical fields (i.e., mechanical tolerances, motor fatigue, and latency effects) have been quantified. Moreover, inadequate modeling of the MLC in the planning system can be perceived as erratic performance. Individually, some problems have been shown to be insignificant; others are correctable using software. If these problems are rectified or at least understood by the physicist, quality assurance can be simplified.

  19. High-resolution field shaping utilizing a masked multileaf collimator.

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    Williams, P C; Cooper, P

    2000-08-01

    Multileaf collimators (MLCs) have become an important tool in the modern radiotherapy department. However, the current limit of resolution (1 cm at isocentre) can be too coarse for acceptable shielding of all fields. A number of mini- and micro-MLCs have been developed, with thinner leaves to achieve approved resolution. Currently however, such devices are limited to modest field sizes and stereotactic applications. This paper proposes a new method of high-resolution beam collimation by use of a tertiary grid collimator situated below the conventional MLC. The width of each slit in the grid is a submultiple of the MLC width. A composite shaped field is thus built up from a series of subfields, with the main MLC defining the length of each strip within each subfield. Presented here are initial findings using a prototype device. The beam uniformity achievable with such a device was examined by measuring transmission profiles through the grid using a diode. Profiles thus measured were then copied and superposed to generate composite beams, from which the uniformity achievable could be assessed. With the average dose across the profile normalized to 100%, hot spots up to 5.0% and troughs of 3% were identified for a composite beam of 2 x 5.0 mm grids, as measured at Dmax for a 6 MV beam. For a beam composed from 4 x 2.5 mm grids, the maximum across the profile was 3.0% above the average, and the minimum 2.5% below. Actual composite profiles were also formed using the integrating properties of film, with the subfield indexing performed using an engineering positioning stage. The beam uniformity for these fields compared well with that achieved in theory using the diode measurements. Finally sine wave patterns were generated to demonstrate the potential improvements in field shaping and conformity using this device as opposed to the conventional MLC alone. The scalloping effect on the field edge commonly seen on MLC fields was appreciably reduced by use of 2 x 5.0 mm

  20. Electronic tissue compensation achieved with both dynamic and static multileaf collimator in eclipse treatment planning system for Clinac 6 EX and 2100 CD Varian linear accelerators: Feasibility and dosimetric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A.; Sharma, Pramod K.; Patkar, Sachin; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Deshpande, Deepak D.

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) and static multileaf collimator (SMLC), along with three-dimensional treatment planning system (3-D TPS), open the possibility of tissue compensation. A method using electronic tissue compensator (ETC) has been implemented in Eclipse 3-D TPS (V 7.3, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) at our center. The ETC was tested for head and neck conformal radiotherapy planning. The purpose of this study was to verify the feasibility of DMLC and SMLC in head and neck field irradiation for delivering homogeneous dose in the midplane at a pre-defined depth. In addition, emphasis was given to the dosimetric aspects in commissioning ETC in Eclipse. A Head and Neck Phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, USA) was used for the dosimetric verification. Planning was carried out for both DMLC and SMLC ETC plans. The dose calculated at central axis by eclipse with DMLC and SMLC was noted. This was compared with the doses measured on machine with ion chamber and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). The calculated isodose curves and profiles were compared with the measured ones. The dose profiles along the two major axes from Eclipse were also compared with the profiles obtained from Amorphous Silicon (AS500) Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) on Clinac 6 EX machine. In uniform dose regions, measured dose values agreed with the calculated doses within 3%. Agreement between calculated and measured isodoses in the dose gradient zone was within 3 mm. The isodose curves and the profiles were found to be in good agreement with the measured curves and profiles. The measured and the calculated dose profiles along the two major axes were flat for both DMLC and SMLC. The dosimetric verification of ETC for both the linacs demonstrated the feasibility and the accuracy of the ETC treatment modality for achieving uniform dose distributions. Therefore, ETC can be used as a tool in head and neck treatment planning optimization for improved dose uniformity. PMID

  1. Electronic tissue compensation achieved with both dynamic and static multileaf collimator in eclipse treatment planning system for Clinac 6 EX and 2100 CD Varian linear accelerators: Feasibility and dosimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinhikar Rajesh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC and static multileaf collimator (SMLC, along with three-dimensional treatment planning system (3-D TPS, open the possibility of tissue compensation. A method using electronic tissue compensator (ETC has been implemented in Eclipse 3-D TPS (V 7.3, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA at our center. The ETC was tested for head and neck conformal radiotherapy planning. The purpose of this study was to verify the feasibility of DMLC and SMLC in head and neck field irradiation for delivering homogeneous dose in the midplane at a pre-defined depth. In addition, emphasis was given to the dosimetric aspects in commissioning ETC in Eclipse. A Head and Neck Phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, USA was used for the dosimetric verification. Planning was carried out for both DMLC and SMLC ETC plans. The dose calculated at central axis by eclipse with DMLC and SMLC was noted. This was compared with the doses measured on machine with ion chamber and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD. The calculated isodose curves and profiles were compared with the measured ones. The dose profiles along the two major axes from Eclipse were also compared with the profiles obtained from Amorphous Silicon (AS500 Electronic portal imaging device (EPID on Clinac 6 EX machine. In uniform dose regions, measured dose values agreed with the calculated doses within 3%. Agreement between calculated and measured isodoses in the dose gradient zone was within 3 mm. The isodose curves and the profiles were found to be in good agreement with the measured curves and profiles. The measured and the calculated dose profiles along the two major axes were flat for both DMLC and SMLC. The dosimetric verification of ETC for both the linacs demonstrated the feasibility and the accuracy of the ETC treatment modality for achieving uniform dose distributions. Therefore, ETC can be used as a tool in head and neck treatment planning optimization for improved dose uniformity.

  2. The role of AGFA high-energy CR in the calibration and quality control of multileaf collimators (MLC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhaobin; XIONG Fei; HUANG Guofeng; CAO Zheng; JIANG Ruiyao; FU Shen

    2007-01-01

    Linear accelerators equipped with multileaf collimators (MLC) are becoming more common and are widely used in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). There is an imperative need to ensure the commissioning specification of the linear accelerators for the sake of quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC). This paper is aimed to investigate the role of AGFA high-energy CR (Computed Radiography) in calibrating dynamic multileaf collimators and evaluating the accuracy of the leaf position. The result shows that AGFA high-energy CR can easily and conveniently be used to calibrate MLC and verify its position. Hence, the application of AGFA high-energy CR is proved to be an accurate and time-saving method for routine MLC QC, especially when MLC calibration adjustments are required.

  3. Variable Circular Collimator in Robotic Radiosurgery: A Time-Efficient Alternative to a Mini-Multileaf Collimator?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Water, S.; Hoogeman, M.S.; Breedveld, S.; Nuyttens, J.J.M.E.; Schaart, D.R.; Heijmen, B.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    urpose Compared with many small circular beams used in CyberKnife treatments, beam’s eye view-shaped fields are generally more time-efficient for dose delivery. However, beam’s eye view-shaping devices, such as a mini-multileaf collimator (mMLC), are not presently available for CyberKnife, although

  4. Pitfalls of tungsten multileaf collimator in proton beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States) and Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center (Formerly Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Particle beam therapy is associated with significant startup and operational cost. Multileaf collimator (MLC) provides an attractive option to improve the efficiency and reduce the treatment cost. A direct transfer of the MLC technology from external beam radiation therapy is intuitively straightforward to proton therapy. However, activation, neutron production, and the associated secondary cancer risk in proton beam should be an important consideration which is evaluated. Methods: Monte Carlo simulation with FLUKA particle transport code was applied in this study for a number of treatment models. The authors have performed a detailed study of the neutron generation, ambient dose equivalent [H*(10)], and activation of a typical tungsten MLC and compared with those obtained from a brass aperture used in a typical proton therapy system. Brass aperture and tungsten MLC were modeled by absorber blocks in this study, representing worst-case scenario of a fully closed collimator. Results: With a tungsten MLC, the secondary neutron dose to the patient is at least 1.5 times higher than that from a brass aperture. The H*(10) from a tungsten MLC at 10 cm downstream is about 22.3 mSv/Gy delivered to water phantom by noncollimated 200 MeV beam of 20 cm diameter compared to 14 mSv/Gy for the brass aperture. For a 30-fraction treatment course, the activity per unit volume in brass aperture reaches 5.3 x 10{sup 4} Bq cm{sup -3} at the end of the last treatment. The activity in brass decreases by a factor of 380 after 24 h, additional 6.2 times after 40 days of cooling, and is reduced to background level after 1 yr. Initial activity in tungsten after 30 days of treating 30 patients per day is about 3.4 times higher than in brass that decreases only by a factor of 2 after 40 days and accumulates to 1.2 x 10{sup 6} Bq cm{sup -3} after a full year of operation. The daily utilization of the MLC leads to buildup of activity with time. The overall activity continues to increase

  5. Comparison of multileaf collimation and shield alloy blocks on an irregular target volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirican, B.; Beyzadeoglu, M.; Turgay, H.T.; Pak, Y. [Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara (Turkey)

    1996-09-01

    Multileaf collimation (MLC) is a crucial component dynamic conformal radiotherapy and can be used as a replacement for conventional blocks. The most appropriate volumetric approach for the lesion`s shape is achieved by MLC by conforming the prescribed dose to the critical structure or normal tissue dose. In this study, the edge effects of dose profiles on an irregular radiation field obtained by MLC and shield alloy blocks drawn by a water-phantom system were compared. We used a SL25 linac machine with MLC consisting of 40 pairs of opposing leaves and conventional alloy block shielding on a water phantom system. We found no significant edge effect difference between MLC and conventional shielding, but MLC showed clear advantages over conventional blocks in terms of time-saving, repeatability, and reliability. (author)

  6. A quality assurance technique for the static multileaf collimator mode based on intrinsic base lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Ahmed El-Maraghy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The inspection of the static leaf positions of Multileaf Collimator (MLC devices is essential for safe radiotherapy deliveries in both static and dynamic modes. The purpose of this study was to develop a robust, accurate and generic algorithm to measure the individual static MLC leaf positions. This was performed by extracting leaf tip locations from the radiographic film image and measuring their relative distance from a reference line on the film. The reference line was created with a selected set of MLC leaf sides. The film scaling was created and verified using the physical leaf width. The average measured distance corresponds to a leaf width of 10 mm was 9.95 ± 0.09 mm. The estimated reproducibility of the leaf tips location was ±0.26 mm. The code accuracy was checked by intentionally positioning set of leaves with small errors (1 mm, and the detected deviations from the expected positions ranged from −0.25 mm and +0.32 mm. The algorithm includes two self testing functions in order to detect failures of leaf positioning due to poor film quality and to avoid the potential systematic errors attributable to the improper collimator setting. The code is promising to be more efficient with Gafchromic and Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID.

  7. Development and validation of a BEAMnrc component module for a miniature multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, E; Hartmann, G H

    2012-05-21

    A new component module (CM) named mini multileaf collimator (mMLC) was developed for the Monte Carlo code BEAMnrc. It models the geometry of the add-on miniature multileaf collimator ModuLeaf (MRC Systems GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany, now part of Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The new CM is partly based on the existing CM called DYNVMLC. The development was performed using a modified EGSnrc platform which enables us to work in the Microsoft Visual Studio environment. In order to validate the new CM, the PRIMUS linac with 6 MV x-rays (Siemens OCS, Concord, CA, USA) equipped with the ModuLeaf mMLC was modelled. Validation was performed by two methods: (a) a ray-tracing method to check the correct geometry of the multileaf collimator (MLC) and (b) a comparison of calculated and measured results of the following dosimetrical parameters: output factors, dose profiles, field edge position penumbra, MLC interleaf leakage and transmission values. Excellent agreement was found for all parameters. It was, in particular, found that the relationship between leaf position and field edge depending on the shape of the leaf ends can be investigated with a higher accuracy by this new CM than by measurements demonstrating the usefulness of the new CM.

  8. Technical Note: Modeling a complex micro-multileaf collimator using the standard BEAMnrc distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kairn, T.; Kenny, J.; Crowe, S. B.; Fielding, A. L.; Franich, R. D.; Johnston, P. N.; Knight, R. T.; Langton, C. M.; Schlect, D.; Trapp, J. V. [School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Premion, Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St., Auchenflower, Queensland 4066 (Australia); School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, G.P.O. Box 2476, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, 619 Lower Plenty Road, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Premion, Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St., Auchenflower, Queensland 4066 (Australia); School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Premion, Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St., Auchenflower, Queensland 4066 (Australia); School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The component modules in the standard BEAMnrc distribution may appear to be insufficient to model micro-multileaf collimators that have trifaceted leaf ends and complex leaf profiles. This note indicates, however, that accurate Monte Carlo simulations of radiotherapy beams defined by a complex collimation device can be completed using BEAMnrc's standard VARMLC component module. Methods: That this simple collimator model can produce spatially and dosimetrically accurate microcollimated fields is illustrated using comparisons with ion chamber and film measurements of the dose deposited by square and irregular fields incident on planar, homogeneous water phantoms. Results: Monte Carlo dose calculations for on-axis and off-axis fields are shown to produce good agreement with experimental values, even on close examination of the penumbrae. Conclusions: The use of a VARMLC model of the micro-multileaf collimator, along with a commissioned model of the associated linear accelerator, is therefore recommended as an alternative to the development or use of in-house or third-party component modules for simulating stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments. Simulation parameters for the VARMLC model are provided which should allow other researchers to adapt and use this model to study clinical stereotactic radiotherapy treatments.

  9. Multileaf Collimator Tracking Improves Dose Delivery for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy: Results of the First Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy T; O'Brien, Ricky T;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered dose compared with the dose without MLC tracking, in the setting of a prostate cancer volumetric modulated arc therapy trial. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Multileaf...... collimator tracking was implemented for 15 patients in a prostate cancer radiation therapy trial; in total, 513 treatment fractions were delivered. During each treatment fraction, the prostate trajectory and treatment MLC positions were collected. These data were used as input for dose reconstruction...

  10. Penumbra characteristics of square photon beams delimited by a GEMS multi-leaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briot, E.; Julia, F. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1995-12-01

    A multi-leaf collimator (MLC) has been designed to replace directly the standard collimator of a SATURNE IV Series linac. It consists of 2 x 32 tungsten leaves and one set of upper block jaws. Isodose curves and dose profiles were measured for symmetric fields at the depth of the maximum and the reference depths for 6 MV, 10 MV, 18 MV photon beams. The penumbra (80%-20%) corresponding to the face and the side of the leaves have been compared with the standard collimators. Along with the X direction, the field delimitation is performed primarily with the leaves which are continuously variable in position. Along the Y direction, the field is initially approximated by the closure of opposite leaf pairs; then the Y upper jaws produce the exact size of the required field. As the leaves move linearly the penumbra (80%-20%) corresponding to the leaf ends is minimized and held constant at all positions by curvature of their faces. Penumbra obtained with the superposition of leaves and Y jaws depend on their relative position. The penumbra is minimum when the leaf side and the Y jaw edge coincide and the comparison of the measurement values with the conventional collimator shows that the differences are within 1 mm. When the leaves delineating the field are not entirely covered by the Y block upper jaws, the penumbra increases, and the junction of the opposing leaves, a width increase up to 3.5 mm has been measured.

  11. Evaluation of the vidar`s VXR-12 digitizer performances for film dosimetry of beams delimited by multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julia, F. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Briot, E.

    1995-12-01

    The development of new irradiation techniques such as conformal radiotherapy increasingly implies the use of a multileaf collimator. The measurement of dose gradients in the penumbra region, and of dose distributions at the edge of complex shaped fields defined by multileaf collimators requires a high definition dosimetric method. Nowadays film digitizers have been notably improved and allow the film dosimetry to be faster, more accurate, presenting a sensitivity and high spatial resolution. To be able to perform the study of physical and dosimetric specifications of a multileaf collimator, we have evaluated the performances of the Vidar VCR-12 digitizer, with respect to its sensitivity, linearity, optical density range and the resolution. These performances were compared with the performances of different systems already in use in our department, either manual or automatic, using specific patterns. The main limitation for dosimetric use is the detection threshold that can introduce errors in isodose calculation, especially for the lowest values. The result of the intercomparisons have allowed corrections to be added, taking into account this Vidar problem. The results obtained after correction for the dose profiles of squared fields are in good agreement with ionization chamber measurements in a water phantom. It is concluded that Vidar digitizer is suitable for the use of film dosimetry for the dose distributions in fields defined by multileaf collimator.

  12. Evaluation of dosimetric effect caused by slowing with multi-leaf collimator (MLC leaves for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhengzheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is to report 1 the sensitivity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT QA method for clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans with multi-leaf collimator (MLC leaf errors that will not trigger MLC interlock during beam delivery; 2 the effect of non-beam-hold MLC leaf errors on the quality of VMAT plan dose delivery.

  13. Dosimetric performance of the new high-definition multileaf collimator for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabaan, Anees; Elder, Eric; Schreibmann, Eduard; Crocker, Ian; Curran, Walter J; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Fox, Tim

    2010-06-21

    The objective was to evaluate the performance of a high-definition multileaf collimator (MLC) of 2.5 mm leaf width (MLC2.5) and compare to standard 5 mm leaf width MLC (MLC5) for the treatment of intracranial lesions using dynamic conformal arcs (DCA) technique with a dedicated radiosurgery linear accelerator. Simulated cases of spherical targets were created to study solely the effect of target volume size on the performance of the two MLC systems independent of target shape complexity. In addition, 43 patients previously treated for intracranial lesions in our institution were retrospectively planned using DCA technique with MLC2.5 and MLC5 systems. The gross tumor volume ranged from 0.07 to 40.57 cm3 with an average volume of 5.9 cm3. All treatment parameters were kept the same for both MLC-based plans. The plan evaluation was performed using figures of merits (FOM) for a rapid and objective assessment on the quality of the two treatment plans for MLC2.5 and MLC5. The prescription isodose surface was selected as the greatest isodose surface covering >or= 95% of the target volume and delivering 95% of the prescription dose to 99% of target volume. A Conformity Index (CI) and conformity distance index (CDI) were used to quantifying the dose conformity to a target volume. To assess normal tissue sparing, a normal tissue difference (NTD) was defined as the difference between the volume of normal tissue receiving a certain dose utilizing MLC5 and the volume receiving the same dose using MLC2.5. The CI and normal tissue sparing for the simulated spherical targets were better with the MLC2.5 as compared to MLC5. For the clinical patients, the CI and CDI results indicated that the MLC2.5 provides better treatment conformity than MLC5 even at large target volumes. The CI's range was 1.15 to 2.44 with a median of 1.59 for MLC2.5 compared to 1.60-2.85 with a median of 1.71 for MLC5. Improved normal tissue sparing was also observed for MLC2.5 over MLC5, with the NTD always

  14. Planning 4D intensity-modulated arc therapy for tumor tracking with a multileaf collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ying; Betzel, Gregory T.; Yang, Xiaocheng; Gui, Minzhi; Parke, William C.; Yi, Byongyong; Yu, Cedric X.

    2017-02-01

    This study introduces a practical four-dimensional (4D) planning scheme of IMAT using 4D computed tomography (4D CT) for planning tumor tracking with dynamic multileaf beam collimation. We assume that patients can breathe regularly, i.e. the same way as during 4D CT with an unchanged period and amplitude, and that the start of 4D-IMAT delivery can be synchronized with a designated respiratory phase. Each control point of the IMAT-delivery process can be associated with an image set of 4D CT at a specified respiratory phase. Target is contoured at each respiratory phase without a motion-induced margin. A 3D-IMAT plan is first optimized on a reference-phase image set of 4D CT. Then, based on the projections of the planning target volume in the beam’s eye view at different respiratory phases, a 4D-IMAT plan is generated by transforming the segments of the optimized 3D plan by using a direct aperture deformation method. Compensation for both translational and deformable tumor motion is accomplished, and the smooth delivery of the transformed plan is ensured by forcing connectivity between adjacent angles (control points). It is envisioned that the resultant plans can be delivered accurately using the dose rate regulated tracking method which handles breathing irregularities (Yi et al 2008 Med. Phys. 35 3955–62).This planning process is straightforward and only adds a small step to current clinical 3D planning practice. Our 4D planning scheme was tested on three cases to evaluate dosimetric benefits. The created 4D-IMAT plans showed similar dose distributions as compared with the 3D-IMAT plans on a single static phase, indicating that our method is capable of eliminating the dosimetric effects of breathing induced target motion. Compared to the 3D-IMAT plans with large treatment margins encompassing respiratory motion, our 4D-IMAT plans reduced radiation doses to surrounding normal organs and tissues.

  15. Matching of electron and photon beams with a multi-leaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, M; Zackrisson, B

    1993-12-01

    Multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) are offered as an accessory to many accelerators for radiation therapy. However, beam edges generated with these collimators are not as smooth as can be achieved with individually made blocks. The clinical drawbacks and benefits of this ripple were evaluated both for single field treatments and for combined adjacent fields of different beam qualities. In this investigation the MLC-collimated beams of the MM50 racetrack microtron were studied. The distance between the field edge and the 90% isodose was measured at the reference depth for four beam qualities (20 MV photons and 10, 20 and 50 MeV electrons). This distance was found to vary from approximately 6 mm for straight beam edges (i.e., all collimator leaves aligned) to approximately 2 mm from the tip of the leaves for a saw-tooth shaped beam edge. The over- and under-dosage in the joint between combined adjacent fields was found to be typically +/- 10% in small volumes. Improved clinical techniques using adjacent photon and electron fields with the same isocentre and source position (without moving the gantry) have been developed. For treatments of the breast, including the mammary chain, a uniform dose distribution was created with special attention given to the irradiation of the heart and lung outside the target volume. A method for head and neck treatments was optimised to give uniform dose distribution in the joint between the photon and electron fields and a method of treating the mediastinum, including the chest wall in front of the left lung, was analysed with respect to dose uniformity in the tumour and shielding of the lung.

  16. Evaluation of dosimetric characteristics of multi-leaf and conventional collimated radiation fields using a scanning liquid ionization chamber EPID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, M; Bezak, E

    2008-12-01

    The characteristics of radiation fields set up using conventional and Multi-Leaf collimators were investigated using a Scanning Liquid Ionization Chamber Electronic Portal Imaging Device (SLIC-EPID). Results showed that the radiation fields set up using MLCs are generally larger than those set up using conventional collimators. A significant difference was observed between the penumbra width for conventional and MLC radiation fields. SLIC-EPID was found to be a sensitive device to evaluate the characteristics of the radiation fields generated with MLCs.

  17. Modeling Monte Carlo of multileaf collimators using the code GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Alex C.H.; Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: oliveira.ach@yahoo.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Luciano S.; Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: lusoulima@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Radiotherapy uses various techniques and equipment for local treatment of cancer. The equipment most often used in radiotherapy to the patient irradiation is linear accelerator (Linac). Among the many algorithms developed for evaluation of dose distributions in radiotherapy planning, the algorithms based on Monte Carlo (MC) methods have proven to be very promising in terms of accuracy by providing more realistic results. The MC simulations for applications in radiotherapy are divided into two parts. In the first, the simulation of the production of the radiation beam by the Linac is performed and then the phase space is generated. The phase space contains information such as energy, position, direction, etc. of millions of particles (photons, electrons, positrons). In the second part the simulation of the transport of particles (sampled phase space) in certain configurations of irradiation field is performed to assess the dose distribution in the patient (or phantom). Accurate modeling of the Linac head is of particular interest in the calculation of dose distributions for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), where complex intensity distributions are delivered using a multileaf collimator (MLC). The objective of this work is to describe a methodology for modeling MC of MLCs using code Geant4. To exemplify this methodology, the Varian Millennium 120-leaf MLC was modeled, whose physical description is available in BEAMnrc Users Manual (20 11). The dosimetric characteristics (i.e., penumbra, leakage, and tongue-and-groove effect) of this MLC were evaluated. The results agreed with data published in the literature concerning the same MLC. (author)

  18. Modification of a 3D-planning system for use with a multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Duyse, B. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Colle, C.; De Wagter, C.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    Recently, the Philips SL25 linear accelerator of the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital of Gent was retro-fitted with a multileaf collimator (MLC). To allow treatment planning with the MLC, the currently use GRATISTM 3D-planning system (developed by G. Sherouse) needed some adaptations, using the C source code. The virtual Simulator section was extended so that the leaves are graphically set in the Beams Eye View. The leaves can be set manually or automatically, based on a previously defined margin around the target. Once the leaves are set, a data file is created for each beam, containing the leaf settings. This file is finally transferred to the MLC computer over the network or by disk. The entire process does not require any manual transfer of leaf settings, not only adding a time-saving but also an error preventing factor to the GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Measurements to verify the accuracy of the adaptations to the planning system are addressed.

  19. Dosimetric verification of modulated electron radiotherapy delivered using a photon multileaf collimator for intact breasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, L; Ma, C-M; Fan, J; Eldib, A; Price, R A; Chen, L; Wang, L; Chi, Z; Xu, Q; Sherif, M; Li, J S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States)], E-mail: lihui.jin@fccc.edu

    2008-11-07

    Modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) may potentially be an effective modality for the treatment of shallow tumors, but dose calculation accuracy and delivery efficiency challenges remain. The purpose of this work is to investigate the dose accuracy of MERT delivery using a photon multileaf collimator (pMLC) on a Siemens Primus accelerator. A Monte Carlo (MC)-based inverse treatment planning system was developed for the 3D treatment planning process. Phase space data of 6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV electron beams were commissioned and used as the input source for MC dose calculations. A treatment plan was performed based on the 3D CT data of a heterogeneous 'breast phantom' that mimics a breast cancer patient, and delivered with 22 segments, each associated with a particular energy and Monitor Unit value. Film and ion chamber dosimetry was carefully performed for the conversion from measurement reading to dose, and the results were employed for plan verification using the heterogeneous breast phantom and a solid water phantom. Dose comparisons between measurements and calculations showed agreement within 2% or 1 mm. We conclude that our in-house MC treatment planning system is capable of performing treatment planning and accurate dose calculations for MERT using the pMLC to deliver radiation therapy to the intact breast.

  20. Dosimetric characteristics of novalis Tx system with high definition multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Wu, Q Jackie; Yan, Hui; Bowsher, Jim; Zhang, Junan; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2008-10-01

    A new Novalis Tx system equipped with a high definition multileaf collimator (HDMLC) recently became available to perform both image-guided radiosurgery and conventional radiotherapy. It is capable of delivering a highly conformal radiation dose with three energy modes: 6 MV photon energy, 15 MV photon energy, and 6 MV photon energy in a stereotactic radiosurgery mode with 1000 MU/min dose rate. Dosimetric characteristics of the new Novalis Tx treatment unit with the HDMLC are systematically measured for commissioning. A high resolution diode detector and miniion-chamber detector are used to measure dosimetric data for a range of field sizes from 4 x 4 mm to 400 x 400 mm. The commissioned Novalis Tx system has passed the RPC stereotactic radiosurgery head phantom irradiation test. The Novalis Tx system not only expands its capabilities with three energy modes, but also achieves better beam conformity and sharer beam penumbra with HDMLC. Since there is little beam data information available for the new Novalis Tx system, we present in this work the dosimetric data of the new modality for reference and comparison.

  1. Monte Carlo modeling of a Novalis Tx Varian 6 MV with HD-120 multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Quino, Luis Alberto; Massingill, Brian; Shi, Chengyu; Gutierrez, Alonso; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2012-09-06

    A Monte Carlo model of the Novalis Tx linear accelerator equipped with high-definition multileaf collimator (HD-120 HD-MLC) was commissioned using ionization chamber measurements in water. All measurements in water were performed using a liquid filled ionization chamber. Film measurements were made using EDR2 film in solid water. Open rectangular fields defined by the jaws or the HD-MLC were used for comparison against measurements. Furthermore, inter- and intraleaf leakage calculated by the Monte Carlo model was compared against film measurements. The statistical uncertainty of the Monte Carlo calculations was less than 1% for all simulations. Results for all regular field sizes show an excellent agreement with commissioning data (percent depth-dose curves and profiles), well within 1% of difference in the relative dose and 1 mm distance to agreement. The computed leakage through HD-MLCs shows good agreement with film measurements. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the new Novalis Tx Varian linac with HD-MLC and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations.

  2. Dosimetric characteristics of Novalis Tx system with high definition multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Zheng; Wang Zhiheng; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yan Hui; Bowsher, Jim; Zhang Junan; Yin Fangfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Box 3295, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    A new Novalis Tx system equipped with a high definition multileaf collimator (HDMLC) recently became available to perform both image-guided radiosurgery and conventional radiotherapy. It is capable of delivering a highly conformal radiation dose with three energy modes: 6 MV photon energy, 15 MV photon energy, and 6 MV photon energy in a stereotactic radiosurgery mode with 1000 MU/min dose rate. Dosimetric characteristics of the new Novalis Tx treatment unit with the HDMLC are systematically measured for commissioning. A high resolution diode detector and miniion-chamber detector are used to measure dosimetric data for a range of field sizes from 4x4 mm to 400x400 mm. The commissioned Novalis Tx system has passed the RPC stereotactic radiosurgery head phantom irradiation test. The Novalis Tx system not only expands its capabilities with three energy modes, but also achieves better beam conformity and sharer beam penumbra with HDMLC. Since there is little beam data information available for the new Novalis Tx system, we present in this work the dosimetric data of the new modality for reference and comparison.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of a multi-leaf collimator design for telecobalt machine using BEAMnrc code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyangar Komanduri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation aims to design a practical multi-leaf collimator (MLC system for the cobalt teletherapy machine and check its radiation properties using the Monte Carlo (MC method. The cobalt machine was modeled using the BEAMnrc Omega-Beam MC system, which could be freely downloaded from the website of the National Research Council (NRC, Canada. Comparison with standard depth dose data tables and the theoretically modeled beam showed good agreement within 2%. An MLC design with low melting point alloy (LMPA was tested for leakage properties of leaves. The LMPA leaves with a width of 7 mm and height of 6 cm, with tongue and groove of size 2 mm wide by 4 cm height, produced only 4% extra leakage compared to 10 cm height tungsten leaves. With finite 60 Co source size, the interleaf leakage was insignificant. This analysis helped to design a prototype MLC as an accessory mount on a cobalt machine. The complete details of the simulation process and analysis of results are discussed.

  4. Design and fabrication of the control part of a prototype multileaf collimator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Abdolreza; Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Nasseri, Shahrokh

    2014-10-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC) is among the radiation field shaping systems used for conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulation radiation therapy techniques. The MLC system that has been designed and fabricated in this study includes 52 leaves, 52 stepper motors, 2 DC motors, 16 programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and one human machine interface (HMI). This system can be mounted on conventional linear accelerators (linac) as an add-on accessory. The 52 leaves are mounted on two carriages that are moved independently. The leaves sequence acquired from the image processing of computed tomography images is used to arrange leaves. This sequence is saved in a text file. The leaves are arranged by HMI and labVIEW. Using HMI it is possible to test the operation of PLCs and manually enter the numerical values of the leaves edges. An executable file is developed by labVIEW program, which is graphically user interfaced between the operator and the MLC control system. The projected width of each leaf on the isocenter accelerator (usually at 100 cm from the source) is 10 mm. The positioning accuracy of each leaf is approximately 1.4 mm.

  5. Characterization of an add-on multileaf collimator for electron beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, T.; Sokoll, J.; Cremers, F.; Harmansa, R.; Luzzara, M.; Schmidt, R.

    2008-02-01

    An add-on multileaf collimator for electrons (eMLC) has been developed that provides computer-controlled beam collimation and isocentric dose delivery. The design parameters result from the design study by Gauer et al (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5987-6003) and were configured such that a compact and light-weight eMLC with motorized leaves can be industrially manufactured and stably mounted on a conventional linear accelerator. In the present study, the efficiency of an initial computer-controlled prototype was examined according to the design goals and the performance of energy- and intensity-modulated treatment techniques. This study concentrates on the attachment and gantry stability as well as the dosimetric characteristics of central-axis and off-axis dose, field size dependence, collimator scatter, field abutment, radiation leakage and the setting of the accelerator jaws. To provide isocentric irradiation, the eMLC can be placed either 16 or 28 cm above the isocentre through interchangeable holders. The mechanical implementation of this feature results in a maximum field displacement of less than 0.6 mm at 90° and 270° gantry angles. Compared to a 10 × 10 cm applicator at 6-14 MeV, the beam penumbra of the eMLC at a 16 cm collimator-to-isocentre distance is 0.8-0.4 cm greater and the depth-dose curves show a larger build-up effect. Due to the loss in energy dependence of the therapeutic range and the much lower dose output at small beam sizes, a minimum beam size of 3 × 3 cm is necessary to avoid suboptimal dose delivery. Dose output and beam symmetry are not affected by collimator scatter when the central axis is blocked. As a consequence of the broader beam penumbra, uniform dose distributions were measured in the junction region of adjacent beams at perpendicular and oblique beam incidence. However, adjacent beams with a high difference in a beam energy of 6 to 14 MeV generate cold and hot spots of approximately 15% in the abutting region. In order to

  6. A machine learning approach to the accurate prediction of multi-leaf collimator positional errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joel N. K.; Park, Jong Min; Park, So-Yeon; In Park, Jong; Choi, Yunseok; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2016-03-01

    Discrepancies between planned and delivered movements of multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) are an important source of errors in dose distributions during radiotherapy. In this work we used machine learning techniques to train models to predict these discrepancies, assessed the accuracy of the model predictions, and examined the impact these errors have on quality assurance (QA) procedures and dosimetry. Predictive leaf motion parameters for the models were calculated from the plan files, such as leaf position and velocity, whether the leaf was moving towards or away from the isocenter of the MLC, and many others. Differences in positions between synchronized DICOM-RT planning files and DynaLog files reported during QA delivery were used as a target response for training of the models. The final model is capable of predicting MLC positions during delivery to a high degree of accuracy. For moving MLC leaves, predicted positions were shown to be significantly closer to delivered positions than were planned positions. By incorporating predicted positions into dose calculations in the TPS, increases were shown in gamma passing rates against measured dose distributions recorded during QA delivery. For instance, head and neck plans with 1%/2 mm gamma criteria had an average increase in passing rate of 4.17% (SD  =  1.54%). This indicates that the inclusion of predictions during dose calculation leads to a more realistic representation of plan delivery. To assess impact on the patient, dose volumetric histograms (DVH) using delivered positions were calculated for comparison with planned and predicted DVHs. In all cases, predicted dose volumetric parameters were in closer agreement to the delivered parameters than were the planned parameters, particularly for organs at risk on the periphery of the treatment area. By incorporating the predicted positions into the TPS, the treatment planner is given a more realistic view of the dose distribution as it will truly be

  7. Secondary neutron spectra from modern Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linacs with multileaf collimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan E; Followill, David S

    2009-09-01

    Neutrons are a by-product of high-energy x-ray radiation therapy (threshold for [gamma,n] reactions in high-Z material -7 MeV). Neutron production varies depending on photon beam energy as well as on the manufacturer of the accelerator. Neutron production from modern linear accelerators (linacs) has not been extensively compared, particularly in terms of the differences in the strategies that various manufacturers have used to implement multileaf collimators (MLCs) into their linac designs. However, such information is necessary to determine neutron dose equivalents for different linacs and to calculate vault shielding requirements. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to measure the neutron spectra from the most up-to-date linacs from three manufacturers: Varian 21EX operating at 15, 18, and 20 MV, Siemens ONCOR operating at 15 and 18 MV, and Elekta Precise operating at 15 and 18 MV. Neutron production was measured by means of gold foil activation in Bonner spheres. Based on the measurements, the authors determined neutron spectra and calculated the average energy, total neutron fluence, ambient dose equivalent, and neutron source strength. The shapes of the neutron spectra did not change significantly between accelerators or even as a function of treatment energy. However, the neutron fluence, and therefore the ambient dose equivalent, did vary, increasing with increasing treatment energy. For a given nominal treatment energy, these values were always highest for the Varian linac. The current study thus offers medical physicists extensive information about the neutron production of MLC-equipped linacs currently in operation and provides them information vital for accurate comparison and prediction of neutron dose equivalents and calculation of vault shielding requirements.

  8. Characteristics and performance of the first commercial multileaf collimator for a robotic radiosurgery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fürweger, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.fuerweger@cyber-knife.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam 3075 EA, The Netherlands and European CyberKnife Center Munich, Munich 81377 (Germany); Prins, Paulette; Coskan, Harun; Heijmen, Ben J. M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam 3075 EA (Netherlands)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The “InCise™ multileaf-collimator (MLC)” is the first commercial MLC to be mounted on a robotic SRS/SBRT platform (CyberKnife). The authors assessed characteristics and performance of this novel device in a preclinical five months test period. Methods: Commissioning beam data were acquired with unshielded diodes. EBT3 radiochromic films were employed for measurement of transmission, leaf/bank position accuracy (garden fence) before and after exercising the MLC, for end-to-end testing and further characterization of the beam. The robot workspace with MLC was assessed analytically by transformation to an Euler geometry (“plane,” “gantry,” and “collimator” angles) and by measuring pointing accuracy at each node. Stability over time was evaluated in picket fence and adapted Winston–Lutz tests (AQA). Results: Beam penumbrae (80%–20%, with 100% = 2 × dose at inflection point for field sizes ≥ 50 × 50 mm{sup 2}) were 2.2–3.7 mm for square fields in reference condition (source-axis-distance 800 mm, depth 15 mm) and depended on field size and off-axis position. Transmission and leakage did not exceed 0.5%. Accessible clinical workspace with MLC covered non-coplanar gantry angles of [−113°; +112°] and collimator angles of [−100°; +107°], with an average robot pointing accuracy of 0.12 ± 0.09 mm. For vertical beams, garden fence tests exhibited an average leaf positioning error of ≤0.2 mm, which increased by 0.25 and 0.30 mm (banks X1 and X2) with leaves traveling parallel to gravity. After execution of a leaf motion stress routine, garden fence tests showed slightly increased jaggedness and allowed to identify one malfunctioning leaf motor. Total system accuracy with MLC was 0.38 ± 0.05 mm in nine end-to-end tests. Picket fence and AQA tests displayed stable results over the test period. Conclusions: The InCise™ MLC for CyberKnife showed high accuracy and adequate characteristics for SRS/SBRT applications. MLC performance

  9. Evaluation of dosimetric effect caused by slowing with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background This study is to report 1) the sensitivity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) QA method for clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaf errors that will not trigger MLC interlock during beam delivery; 2) the effect of non-beam-hold MLC leaf errors on the quality of VMAT plan dose delivery. Materials and methods. Eleven VMAT plans were selected and modified using an in-house developed software. For each control point of a...

  10. 6 MV dosimetric characterization of the 160 MLC, the new Siemens multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacke, Martin B; Nill, Simeon; Häring, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2008-05-01

    New technical developments constantly aim at improving the outcome of radiation therapy. With the use of a computer-controlled multileaf collimator (MLC), the quality of the treatment and the efficiency in patient throughput is significantly increased. New MLC designs aim to further enhance the advantages. In this article, we present the first detailed experimental investigation of the new 160 MLC, Siemens Medical Solutions. The assessment included the experimental investigation of typical MLC characteristics such as leakage, tongue-and-groove effect, penumbra, leaf speed, and leaf positioning accuracy with a 6 MV treatment beam. The leakage is remarkably low with an average of 0.37% due to a new design principle of slightly tilted leaves instead of the common tongue-and-groove design. But due to the tilt, the triangular tongue-and-groove effect occurs. Its magnitude of approximately 19% is similar to the dose defect measured for MLCs with the common tongue-and-groove design. The average longitudinal penumbra measured at depth d(max) = 15 mm with standard 100 x 100 mm2 fields is 4.1 +/- 0.5 mm for the central range and increases to 4.9 +/- 1.3 mm for the entire field range of 400 x 400 mm2. The increase is partly due to the single-focusing design and the large distance between the MLC and the isocenter enabling a large patient clearance. Regarding the leaf speed, different velocity tests were performed. The positions of the moving leaves were continuously recorded with the kilovoltage-imaging panel. The maximum leaf velocities measured were 42.9 +/- 0.6 mm/s. In addition, several typical intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments were performed and the delivery times compared to the Siemens OPTIFOCUS MLC. An average decrease of 11% in delivery time was observed. The experimental results presented in this article indicate that the dosimetric characteristics of the 160 MLC are capable of improving the quality of dose delivery with respect to precision and dose

  11. Dosimetric comparison between 3DCRT and IMRT using different multileaf collimators in the treatment of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Meisong; Newman, Francis; Chen, Changhu; Stuhr, Kelly; Gaspar, Laurie E

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the differences between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and the impact of collimator leaf-width on IMRT plans for the treatment of nonspherical brain tumors. Eight patients treated by 3DCRT with Novalis were selected. We developed 3 IMRT plans with different multileaf collimators (Novalis m3, Varian MLC-120, and Varian MLC-80) with the same treatment margins, number of beams, and gantry positions as in the 3DCRT treatment plans. Treatment planning utilized the BrainLAB treatment planning system. For each patient, the dose constraints and optimization parameters remained identical for all plans. The heterogeneity index, the percentage target coverage, critical structures, and normal tissue volumes receiving 50% of the prescription dose were calculated to compare the dosimetric difference. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) were also introduced to evaluate the radiobiological effect for different plans. We found that IMRT significantly improved the target dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT. However, IMRT showed the same radiobiological effect as 3DCRT. For the brain tumors adjacent to (or partially overlapping with) critical structures, IMRT dramatically spared the volume of the critical structures to be irradiated. In IMRT plans, the smaller collimator leaf width could reduce the volume of critical structures irradiated to the 50% level for those partially overlapping with the brain tumors. For relatively large and spherical brain tumors, the smaller collimator leaf widths give no significant benefit.

  12. SIEMENS MLC-82日常维护及故障检修%Routine maintenance and trouble shooting of SIEMENS MLC-82 multi-leaf collimator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶长龙

    2011-01-01

    The MLC-82 electric multi-leaf collimator (MLC-Multileaf Collimator) system of Siemens is composed of two parts of hardware and software. In this paper, the author introduced the effect of the collimator and methods for maintenance of its hardware to share with counterparts.%西门子MLC-82电动多叶准直器(MLC—MultileafCollimator)系统由硬件和软件两部分组成。简要阐述了多叶准直器的作用,系统硬件的维修经验,介绍SIEMENS MLC-82硬件系统的日常维护及常见故障的检修。

  13. Multibeam tomotherapy: a new treatment unit devised for multileaf collimation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Nils; Müller, Reinhold G

    2007-10-01

    A fully integrated system for treatment planning, application, and verification for automated multileaf collimator (MLC) based, intensity-modulated, image-guided, and adaptive radiation therapy (IMRT, IGRT and ART, respectively) is proposed. Patient comfort, which was the major development goal, will be achieved through a new unit design and short treatment times. Our device for photon beam therapy will consist of a new dual energy linac with five fixed treatment heads positioned evenly along one plane but one electron beam generator only. A minimum of moving parts increases technical reliability and reduces motion times to a minimum. Motion is allowed solely for the MLCs, the robotic patient table, and the small angle gantry rotation of +/- 36 degrees. Besides sophisticated electron beam guidance, this compact setup can be built using existing modules. The flattening-filter-free treatment heads are characterized by reduced beam-on time and contain apertures restricted in one dimension to the area of maximum primary fluence output. In the case of longer targets, this leads to a topographic intensity modulation, thanks to the combination of "step and shoot" MLC delivery and discrete patient couch motion. Owing to the limited number of beam directions, this multislice cone beam serial tomotherapy is referred to as "multibeam tomotherapy." Every patient slice is irradiated by one treatment head at any given moment but for one subfield only. The electron beam is then guided to the next head ready for delivery, while the other heads are preparing their leaves for the next segment. The "Multifocal MLC-positioning" algorithm was programmed to enable treatment planning and optimize treatment time. We developed an overlap strategy for the longitudinally adjacent fields of every beam direction, in doing so minimizing the field match problem and the effects of possible table step errors. Clinical case studies show for the same or better planning target volume coverage, better

  14. Sensitivity of volumetric modulated arc therapy patient specific QA results to multileaf collimator errors and correlation to dose volume histogram based metrics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coleman, Linda

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the impact of systematic multileaf collimator (MLC) positional errors on gamma analysis results used for quality assurance (QA) of Rapidarc treatments. In addition, this study evaluates the relationship of these gamma analysis results and clinical dose volume histogram metrics (DVH) for Rapidarc treatment plans.

  15. Determination of Tongue and Groove parameters for multileaf collimators; Determinaco de parametros de Tongue and Groove de colimadores de multilaminas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Aluisio; Almeida, Carlos E. de, E-mail: alu_neto@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas; Nguyen, Bihn [Prowess Inc., Concord, CA (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The Tongue and Groove effect (TandG) is characterized by an additional attenuation between adjacent and opposing leaves on multileaf collimators (MLCs) in adjacent or complementary fields. This is a typical situation in of intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatments. The aim of this study was to measure the width and transmission of TandG effect for two commercial MLCs: Varian Millennium 120 (6 MV and 16 MV beams) and BrainLab m3 (only for 6 MV). The methodology used was based on the creation of MLC shapes that emphasizes TandG effect, the irradiation of these fields on radiochromic film and the sensitometric evaluation of the films in order to determine the TandG width and transmission. The results for TandG width for studied MLCs were 2.5, 1.8 and 2 mm, respectively, whit transmission TandG values of 87, 90 and 85%. (author)

  16. ‘Inverted Y’ field radiotherapy planning with multi-leaf collimator: A single isocentric technique using multiple fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Sahai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study is to describe a planning technique using multi-leaf collimator and asymmetric fields for irradiating an ‘inverted Y’ shaped geometry in a patient with testicular seminoma. The entire target area covering the para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal nodal regions was split into three fields. Single isocenter half-beam block technique was employed. The fields were planned with antero-posterior and postero-anterior portals with a differential weightage. The dose was prescribed at the respective reference points of the fields. A uniform dose distribution for the entire portal was achieved without any under- or over-dosing at the field junctions.  

  17. Dose calculation for asymmetric fields and irregular fields with multileaf collimators. Approximation of tissue-maximum ratio and field factor using modified Day`s calculation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Manabu; Okada, Takashi; Komai, Yoshinori; Nohara, Hiroki [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    1996-08-01

    Modern linear accelerators have four independent jaws and multileaf collimators (MLC) of 1 cm width at the isocenter. Asymmetric fields defined by such independent jaws and irregular multileaf collimated fields can be used to match adjacent fields or to spare the spinal cord in external photon beam radiotherapy. We have developed a new approximate algorithm for depth dose calculations at the collimator rotation axis. The program is based on Clarkson`s principle, and uses a more accurate modification of Day`s method for asymmetric fields. Using this method, tissue-maximum ratios (TMR) and field factors of ten kinds of asymmetric fields and ten different irregular multileaf collimated fields were calculated and compared with the measured data for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. The dose accuracy with the general A/Pe method was about 3%, however, with the new modified Day`s method, accuracy was within 1.7% for TMR and 1.2% for field factors. The calculated TMR and field factors were found to be in good agreement with measurements for both the 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. (author)

  18. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of CyberKnife M6TM InCise multileaf collimator over IRISTM variable collimator in prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindu Kathriarachchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The impetus behind our study was to establish a quantitative comparison between the IRIS collimator and the InCise multileaf collimator (MLC (Accuray Inc. Synnyvale, CA for prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. Treatment plans for ten prostate cancer patients were performed on MultiPlan™ 5.1.2 treatment planning system utilizing MLC and IRIS for 36.25 Gy in five fractions. To reduce the magnitude of variations between cases, the planning tumor volume (PTV was defined and outlined for treating prostate gland only, assuming no seminal vesicle or ex-capsule involvement. Evaluation indices of each plan include PTV coverage, conformity index (CI, Paddick's new CI, homogeneity index, and gradient index. Organ at risk (OAR dose sparing was analyzed by the bladder wall Dmaxand V37Gy, rectum Dmaxand V36Gy. The radiobiological response was evaluated by tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability based on equivalent uniform dose. The dose delivery efficiency was evaluated on the basis of planned monitor units (MUs and the reported treatment time per fraction. Statistical significance was tested using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The studies indicated that CyberKnife M6™ IRIS and InCise™ MLC produce equivalent SBRT prostate treatment plans in terms of dosimetry, radiobiology, and OAR sparing, except that the MLC plans offer improvement of the dose fall-off gradient by 29% over IRIS. The main advantage of replacing the IRIS collimator with MLC is the improved efficiency, determined from the reduction of MUs by 42%, and a 36% faster delivery time.

  19. Quality control program of multi-leaf collimation based EPID for teams with Rapidarc; Programa de control de calidad del sistema de colimacion Multilamina basado en EPID para equipos con Rapidarc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.; Gimeno Olmos, J.; Lliso Valverde, F.; Carmona Mesenguer, V.; Garcia Martinez, M. T.; Palomo Llinares, R.; Ballester Pallares, F.; Perez Calatayud, J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is to show a collection of different recommendations on the control of quality of collimation multi-leaf system and present the selection of tests based on the electronic imaging device (EPID) portal that have decided to establish in our Center, where in addition to the requirements of quality assurance generic for collimation multi-leaf system quality control methods have been included for RapidArc. (Author)

  20. Measurement of back-scattered radiation from micro multileaf collimator into the beam monitor chamber from a dual energy linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements designed to find the collimator backscatter into the beam monitor chamber from Micro Multileaf collimator of 6 MV photon beams of the Siemens Primus linear accelerator were made with the help of dose rate feedback control. The photons and electrons backscattered from the upper and lower secondary collimator jaws give rise to a significant increase in the ion charge measured by monitor chamber. This increase varies between the different accelerators. The output measurements were carried out in air at the isocenter. The effect of collimator backscatter was investigated by measuring the pulse width, number of beam pulses per monitor unit, monitor unit rate and dose for different mMLC openings. These measurements were made with and without dose rate feedback control, i.e., with constant electron beam current in the accelerator. Monitor unit rate (MU/min was almost constant for all field sizes. The maximum variation between the open and the closed feedback control circuits was 2.5%. There was no difference in pulse width and negligible difference in pulse frequency. Maximum value of backscattered radiation from the micro Multileaf collimator into the beam monitor chamber was found to be 0.5%.

  1. The treatment planning of segmental, conformal stereotactic radiosurgery utilizing a standard multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, P G; Balter, J M; Ross, D A; Hayman, J A; Sandler, H M

    1999-01-01

    Over a period of approximately 3 years, our institution has implemented and refined a system of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) which utilizes the standard multi leaf collimator (MLC) of the Scanditronix MM50 Racetrack Microtron and treats in an arrangement of segmental "pseudo-arcs." This system employs a commercial BRW based stereotactic frame which is mounted to the treatment table. With the exception of the table-mounted frame hardware there have been no modifications to the treatment machine to accommodate these treatments. By use of standard evaluation parameters (e.g., treatment time, planning time, dose conformance and dose heterogeneity ratios) this system compares quite favorably with reported data from institutions treating SRS with either a GammaKnife or a standard linear accelerator with tertiary collimators.

  2. SU-E-T-467: Implementation of Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for a Multileaf Collimator Equipped Robotic Radiotherapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, JS; Fan, J; Ma, C-M [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the treatment efficiency and capabilities for full-body treatment, a robotic radiosurgery system has equipped with a multileaf collimator (MLC) to extend its accuracy and precision to radiation therapy. To model the MLC and include it in the Monte Carlo patient dose calculation is the goal of this work. Methods: The radiation source and the MLC were carefully modeled to consider the effects of the source size, collimator scattering, leaf transmission and leaf end shape. A source model was built based on the output factors, percentage depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles measured in a water phantom. MLC leaf shape, leaf end design and leaf tilt for minimizing the interleaf leakage and their effects on beam fluence and energy spectrum were all considered in the calculation. Transmission/leakage was added to the fluence based on the transmission factors of the leaf and the leaf end. The transmitted photon energy was tuned to consider the beam hardening effects. The calculated results with the Monte Carlo implementation was compared with measurements in homogeneous water phantom and inhomogeneous phantoms with slab lung or bone material for 4 square fields and 9 irregularly shaped fields. Results: The calculated output factors are compared with the measured ones and the difference is within 1% for different field sizes. The calculated dose distributions in the phantoms show good agreement with measurements using diode detector and films. The dose difference is within 2% inside the field and the distance to agreement is within 2mm in the penumbra region. The gamma passing rate is more than 95% with 2%/2mm criteria for all the test cases. Conclusion: Implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation for a MLC equipped robotic radiosurgery system is completed successfully. The accuracy of Monte Carlo dose calculation with MLC is clinically acceptable. This work was supported by Accuray Inc.

  3. Dosimetric comparison of different multileaf collimators in volumetric modulated arc therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuli Zhang; Jun Hou; Jianping Chen; Huayong Jiang; Weidong Xu; Yadi Wang; Junmao Gao; Qingzhi Liu; Na Lu; Diandian Chen; Bo Yao

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aiom of the study was to compare the impacts of two types of multileaf col imators (MLC) [standard MLC with a width of 10 mm (sMLC) and micro-MLC with a width of 5 mm (mMLC)] on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods VMAT for ten patients with inoperable malignant pleural mesotheliomas was retrospectively planned with the sMLC and mMLC. Histogram-based dose-volume parameters of the planning target vol-ume (PTV) [conformity index (CI) and homogeneous index (HI)] and organs-at-risk were compared for VMAT plans with sMLC (sMLC-VMAT) and mMLC (mMLC-VMAT). Results The mMLC-VMAT plans were more ef icient (average delivery time: 2.67±1.49 min) than the sMLC-VMAT plans (average delivery time: 4.21 ± 2.03 min; P 0.05). In addition, significant dose sparing in the fraction of the ipsilateral lung volume receiving > 20 Gy (V20; 54.72 ± 27.08 vs 58.52 ± 29.30) and > 30 Gy (V30; 42.74 ± 27.86 vs 46.86 ± 31.49) radiation, respectively, was observed for the mMLC plans (P < 0.05). Conclusion Comparing sMLC-VMAT and mMLC-VMAT not only demonstrated the higher ef iciency and better optimal target coverage of mMLC-VMAT, but also considerably improved the dose sparing of the ipsilateral lung in the VMAT plans for malignant pleural mesothelioma.

  4. Lateral loss and dose discrepancies of multileaf collimator segments in intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chee W; Das, Indra J; Huq, M Saiful

    2003-11-01

    In the step-and-shoot technique delivery of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), each static field consists of a number of beamlets, some of which may be very small. In this study, we measured the dose characteristics for a range of field sizes: 2 x 2 to 12 x 10 cm2 for 6 and 15 MV x rays. For a given field length, a number of treatment fields are set up by sequentially increasing the field width using a multi leaf collimator. A set of fields is delivered with the accelerator operated in the IMRT mode. Using an ion chamber, the output factors at 1 cm and 3 cm laterally from a field edge are measured at different depths in a solid water phantom. Our results show that with insufficient lateral distance in at least one direction, the absorbed dose never reaches the equilibrium values, and can be significantly lower for very small field sizes. For example, the output factor of the 2 x 2 cm2 field relative to 10 x 10 cm2 at d(max0 is 0.832 and 0.790 for 6 MV and 15 MV x rays, respectively. Multiple output factor curves are obtained for different field lengths and different buildup conditions. Thus under nonequilibrium conditions, output factors are critically dependent on the field size and the conventional method of determining the equivalent square does not apply. Comparison of output factors acquired in the commissioning of the accelerator with those measured in the present study under conditions of nonequilibrium shows large discrepancies between the two sets of measurements. Thus monitor units generated by a treatment planning system using beam data commissioned with symmetric fields may be underestimated by > 5%, depending on the size and shape of the segments. To facilitate manual MU calculation as an independent check in step-and-shoot IMRT, the concept of effective equivalent square (EES) is introduced. Using EES, output factors can be calculated using existing beam data for fields with asymmetric collimator settings and under conditions of lateral

  5. A comparative study of the peripheral doses from a linear accelerator with a multileaf collimator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acun, Hediye; Zubaroglu, Ali; Kemikler, Gönül; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a comparison of peripheral doses (PDs) measured using an ionisation chamber with treatment planning system (TPS) data and a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of a 6-MV photon beam. The ion chamber measurements and MC simulation produced similar results for all out-of-field distances and field sizes considered in this study. For the 0° and 90° collimation angles, the average local per cent dose differences between the MC and TPS calculations were 2.7 % (range: -2.4, +22.6) and -1.7 % (range: -12.2, +10.8), respectively. The corresponding differences between the MC calculations and the ion chamber measurements were 2.2 % (range: -2.4, 24.7) and -1.8 % (range: -17, 15.2) for all field sizes and depths, respectively. Whereas the PDs increased with field sizes, the variations with depth were negligible at large distances. The TPS calculations usually yielded higher PDs than ion chamber measurements at distances close to the field edge. In contrast, at the farther distances, the TPS results indicated lower doses than both the ion chamber and the MC data. TPS data are not sufficient for use in calculating the out-of-field doses. These results can be used to estimate non-target organ doses to patients.

  6. Evaluation of dosimetric effect caused by slowing with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhengzheng; Wang, Iris Z; Kumaraswamy, Lalith K; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2016-03-01

    This study is to report 1) the sensitivity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) QA method for clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaf errors that will not trigger MLC interlock during beam delivery; 2) the effect of non-beam-hold MLC leaf errors on the quality of VMAT plan dose delivery. Eleven VMAT plans were selected and modified using an in-house developed software. For each control point of a VMAT arc, MLC leaves with the highest speed (1.87-1.95 cm/s) were set to move at the maximal allowable speed (2.3 cm/s), which resulted in a leaf position difference of less than 2 mm. The modified plans were considered as 'standard' plans, and the original plans were treated as the 'slowing MLC' plans for simulating 'standard' plans with leaves moving at relatively lower speed. The measurement of each 'slowing MLC' plan using MapCHECK®2 was compared with calculated planar dose of the 'standard' plan with respect to absolute dose Van Dyk distance-to-agreement (DTA) comparisons using 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria. All 'slowing MLC' plans passed the 90% pass rate threshold using 3%/3 mm criteria while one brain and three anal VMAT cases were below 90% with 2%/2 mm criteria. For ten out of eleven cases, DVH comparisons between 'standard' and 'slowing MLC' plans demonstrated minimal dosimetric changes in targets and organs-at-risk. For highly modulated VMAT plans, pass rate threshold (90%) using 3%/3mm criteria is not sensitive in detecting MLC leaf errors that will not trigger the MLC leaf interlock. However, the consequential effects of non-beam hold MLC errors on target and OAR doses are negligible, which supports the reliability of current patient-specific IMRT quality assurance (QA) method for VMAT plans.

  7. Dosimetric impact assessment using a general algorithm in geant4 simulations for a complex-shaped multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Á; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Miras, H; Arráns, R; Gallardo, M I

    2017-04-07

    We have developed an inhouse algorithm for the multileaf collimator (MLC) geometry model construction with an appropriate accuracy for dosimetric tests. Our purpose is to build a complex type of MLC and analyze the influence of the modeling parameters on the dose calculation. Using radiochromic films as detector the following tests were done: (I) Density test field: to compare measured and calculated dose distributions in order to determine the tungsten alloy physical density value. (II) Leaf ends test field: to verify the penumbra shape sensitivity against the discretization level set to simulate the curved leaf ends. (III) MLC-closed field: to obtain the value of the air gap between opposite leaves for a closed configuration which completes the modeling of the MLC leakage radiation. (IV) Picket-fence field: to fit the leaf tilt angle with respect of the divergent ray emerging from the source. For a 18.5g/cm(3) density value we have obtained a maximum, minimum and mean leakage values of 0.43%, 0.36% and 0.38%, similar to the experimental ones. The best discretization level in the leaf ends field shows a 5.51mm FWHM, very close to the measured value (5.49mm). An air gap of 370μm has been used in the simulation for the separation between opposite leaves. Using a 0.44° tilt angle, we found the same pattern as the experimental values. Our code can reproduce complex MLC designs with a submilimetric dosimetric accuracy which implies the necessary background for dose calculation of high clinical interest small fields. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of Multileaf Collimator Configuration Parameters on the Dosimetric Accuracy of 6-MV Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Nick; Perrin, David; Newhauser, Wayne; Zhang, Rui

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected configuration parameters that govern multileaf collimator (MLC) transmission and rounded leaf offset in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (Pinnacle(3), Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA, USA) on the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose calculation. The MLC leaf transmission factor was modified based on measurements made with ionization chambers. The table of parameters containing rounded-leaf-end offset values was modified by measuring the radiation field edge as a function of leaf bank position with an ionization chamber in a scanning water-tank dosimetry system and comparing the locations to those predicted by the TPS. The modified parameter values were validated by performing IMRT quality assurance (QA) measurements on 19 gantry-static IMRT plans. Planar dose measurements were performed with radiographic film and a diode array (MapCHECK2) and compared to TPS calculated dose distributions using default and modified configuration parameters. Based on measurements, the leaf transmission factor was changed from a default value of 0.001 to 0.005. Surprisingly, this modification resulted in a small but statistically significant worsening of IMRT QA gamma-index passing rate, which revealed that the overall dosimetric accuracy of the TPS depends on multiple configuration parameters in a manner that is coupled and not intuitive because of the commissioning protocol used in our clinic. The rounded leaf offset table had little room for improvement, with the average difference between the default and modified offset values being -0.2 ± 0.7 mm. While our results depend on the current clinical protocols, treatment unit and TPS used, the methodology used in this study is generally applicable. Different clinics could potentially obtain different results and improve their dosimetric accuracy using our approach.

  9. Impact of multileaf collimator configuration parameters on the dosimetric accuracy of 6-MV Intensity-Modulated radiation therapy treatment plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Petersen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected configuration parameters that govern multileaf collimator (MLC transmission and rounded leaf offset in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA, USA on the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT dose calculation. The MLC leaf transmission factor was modified based on measurements made with ionization chambers. The table of parameters containing rounded-leaf-end offset values was modified by measuring the radiation field edge as a function of leaf bank position with an ionization chamber in a scanning water-tank dosimetry system and comparing the locations to those predicted by the TPS. The modified parameter values were validated by performing IMRT quality assurance (QA measurements on 19 gantry-static IMRT plans. Planar dose measurements were performed with radiographic film and a diode array (MapCHECK2 and compared to TPS calculated dose distributions using default and modified configuration parameters. Based on measurements, the leaf transmission factor was changed from a default value of 0.001 to 0.005. Surprisingly, this modification resulted in a small but statistically significant worsening of IMRT QA gamma-index passing rate, which revealed that the overall dosimetric accuracy of the TPS depends on multiple configuration parameters in a manner that is coupled and not intuitive because of the commissioning protocol used in our clinic. The rounded leaf offset table had little room for improvement, with the average difference between the default and modified offset values being −0.2 ± 0.7 mm. While our results depend on the current clinical protocols, treatment unit and TPS used, the methodology used in this study is generally applicable. Different clinics could potentially obtain different results and improve their dosimetric accuracy using our approach.

  10. Dosimetric effects of multileaf collimator leaf width on intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chae-Seon; Ju, Sang Gyu; Kim, Minkyu; Kim, Jung-In; Kim, Jin Man; Suh, Tae-Suk; Han, Youngyih; Ahn, Yong Chan; Choi, Doo Ho; Nam, Heerim; Park, Hee Chul

    2014-02-01

    The authors evaluated the effects of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf width (2.5 vs. 5 mm) on dosimetric parameters and delivery efficiencies of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head and neck (H&N) cancers. The authors employed two types of mock phantoms: large-sized head and neck (LH&N) and small-sized C-shape (C-shape) phantoms. Step-and-shoot IMRT (S&S_IMRT) and VMAT treatment plans were designed with 2.5- and 5.0-mm MLC for both C-shape and LH&N phantoms. Their dosimetric characteristics were compared in terms of the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the planning target volume (PTV), the dose to organs at risk (OARs), and the dose-spillage volume. To analyze the effects of the field and arc numbers, 9-field IMRT (9F-IMRT) and 13-field IMRT (13F-IMRT) plans were established for S&S_IMRT. For VMAT, single arc (VMAT1) and double arc (VMAT2) plans were established. For all plans, dosimetric verification was performed using the phantom to examine the relationship between dosimetric errors and the two leaf widths. Delivery efficiency of the two MLCs was compared in terms of beam delivery times, monitor units (MUs) per fraction, and the number of segments for each plan. 2.5-mm MLC showed better dosimetric characteristics in S&S_IMRT and VMAT for C-shape, providing better CI for PTV and lower spinal cord dose and high and intermediate dose-spillage volume as compared with the 5-mm MLC (p 0.05). Further, beam delivery efficiency was not observed to be significantly associated with leaf width for either C-shape or LH&N. However, MUs per fraction were significantly reduced for the 2.5-mm MLC for the LH&N. In dosimetric error analysis, absolute dose evaluations had errors of less than 3%, while the Gamma passing rate was greater than 95% according to the 3%/3 mm criteria. There were no significant differences in dosimetric error between the 2.5- and 5-mm MLCs. As compared with MLC of 5-mm leaf

  11. Performance evaluation of a high-speed multileaf collimator in real-time IMRT delivery to moving targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Ye, Peiqing; Zhang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking can be used for motion management. However, on account of mechanical constraints, it is a crucial challenge for conventional MLCs (3-4 cm/s in leaf speed) to track fast targets, especially moving in 2D in the beam's eye view (BEV). Our group has recently developed a "high-speed" MLC (HS-MLC) prototype with a maximum leaf speed of 40 cm/s, which makes it possible to track the vast majority of moving targets without violation of mechanical constraints. The major innovation of the HS-MLC design is that it employs linear motors instead of rotary motors to drive leaves. This paper mainly aims to evaluate the performance of the HS-MLC in real-time intensity-modulated radiation therapy delivery to targets moving in 2D in the BEV. A 2D real-time tracking algorithm was proposed first based on a previous superimposing leaf sequencing method. Then, simulations were performed to evaluate the delivery performance including fluence accuracy, efficiency, delivery time, and number of monitor units under various settings of limiting coefficient and dose rate for four clinical fluence maps and two target speeds. The comparisons between the HS-MLC with a "medium-speed" MLC (MS-MLC, 10 cm/s) and a "low-speed" MLC (LS-MLC, 5 cm/s) were also made. For validation, experiments were carried out on the HS-MLC prototype in the lab environment. A camera-based measurement system was set up to detect actual leaf trajectories. Simulation results indicate that a limiting coefficient of 0.5 and a dose rate of 400 MU/min are "optimal" in the sense of getting best compromise between delivery time and number of monitor units. Under the optimal parameters, the HS-MLC achieved 100% in efficiency, 18.1 s in delivery time, and 121.2 MU in number of monitor units on average for the "fast" target speed, compared to 94%, 20.6 s, and 129.9 MU with the MS-MLC, and to 53%, 40.2 s, and 141.1 MU with the LS-MLC. The benefits of increased leaf speed were demonstrated. The

  12. SU-E-T-766: Treatment Planning Comparison Study On Two Different Multileaf Collimators Delivered with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Xiaomei, F; Bai, W [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China); Zhang, X [The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China); Gao, Y [Hebei General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the performance of two different multileaf collimators(MLCi2 and Agility) delivery with volumetric modulated arc therapy techniques. Methods: Treatment plans were graded four (Low, Moderate, Moderate-High and High complexity) accorrding to the complexity. This includes 1 Low complexity(brain metastasis), 2 Moderate complexity(Lung and Liver), 1 Moderate-High complexity(prostate) and 1 High complexity ( head and neck) cases. Total dose of 60 Gy was given for all the plans. All cases were desigined two VMAT plans, one with MLCi2(group A) and the other with Agility(group B). All plans were done on Elekta VMAT with Monaco treatment planning system. All plans were generated with 6 MV X-rays for both Plan A and Plan B. Plans were evaluated based on the ability to meet the dose volume histogram, radiation conformity index, estimated radiation delivery time, dose homogeneity index(HI) and monitor units(MU) needed to deliver the prescribed dose. Results: Plans of group B achieved the best HI (HI = 1.05 Vs. 1.06) at the Low complexity cases while plans of group A were slightly better at the high complexity cases (HI = 1.12 Vs. 1.14). Faster VMAT plan delivery with Agility than with MLCi2 as plan complexity increased (Low complexity:52s Vs.52s, Moderate complexity:58s Vs. 55s, Moderate-High complexity: 171s Vs.152s, High complexity : 326s Vs. 202s ), especially for the most complex paradigms delivered time can be decresed 38%. No Significant changes were observed between the group B and group A plans in terms of the healthy tissue mean dose and MU. Both plans respected the planning objective for all organs at risk. Conclusion: The study concludes that VMAT plans with the novel Agility MLC can significant decrease the delivering time at the high complexity cases, while a slight compromise in the dose homogeneity index should be noted. This work was supported by The Medical Science Foundation of The health department of Hebei Province (No

  13. Real-time verification of multileaf collimator-driven radiotherapy using a novel optical attenuation-based fluence monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-03-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC)-driven conformal radiotherapy modalities [e.g., such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), intensity-modulated arc therapy, and stereotactic body radiotherapy] are more subject to delivery errors and dose calculation inaccuracies than standard modalities. Fluence monitoring during treatment delivery could reduce such errors by allowing an independent interface to quantify and assess measured difference between the delivered and planned treatment administration. We developed an optical attenuation-based detector to monitor fluence for the on-line quality control of radiotherapy delivery. The purpose of the current study was to develop the theoretical background of the invention and to evaluate the detector's performance both statistically and in clinical situations. We aligned 60 27-cm scintillating fibers coupled to a photodetector via clear optical fibers in the direction of motion of each of the 60 leaf pairs of a 120 leaves Millenium MLC on a Varian Clinac iX. We developed a theoretical model to predict the intensity of light collected on each side of the scintillating fibers when placed under radiation fields of varying sizes, intensities, and positions. The model showed that both the central position of the radiation field on the fiber (x(c)) and the integral fluence passing through the fiber (phi(int)) could be assessed independently in a single measurement. We evaluated the performance of the prototype by (1) measuring the intrinsic variation of the measured values of x(c) and phi(int), (2) measuring the impact on the measured values of x(c) and phi(int) of random leaf positioning errors introduced into IMRT fields, and (3) comparing the predicted values of x(c) and phi(int) calculated with the treatment planning software to the measured values of x(c) and phi(int) in order to assess the predictive effectiveness of the developed theoretical model. We observed a very low intrinsic dispersion, dominated by Poisson statistics

  14. Neutron dosimetry in organs of an adult human phantom using linacs with multileaf collimator in radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ovalle, S. A.; Barquero, R.; Gomez-Ros, J. M.; Lallena, A. M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada y Simulacion, Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Tunja 15001000 (Colombia); Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Clinico Universitario, E-47012 Valladolid (Spain) and Departamento de Radiologia, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid E-47071 (Spain); CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid, E-28040 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, Granada E-18071 (Spain)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To calculate absorbed doses due to neutrons in 87 organs/tissues for anthropomorphic phantoms, irradiated in position supine (head first into the gantry) with orientations anteroposterior (AP) and right-left (RLAT) with a 18 MV accelerator. Conversion factors from monitor units to {mu}Gy per neutron in organs, equivalent doses in organs/tissues, and effective doses, which permit to quantify stochastic risks, are estimated. Methods: MAX06 and FAX06 phantoms were modeled with MCNPX and irradiated with a 18 MV Varian Clinac 2100C/D accelerator whose geometry included a multileaf collimator. Two actual fields of a pelvic treatment were simulated using electron-photon-neutron coupled transport. Absorbed doses due to neutrons were estimated from kerma. Equivalent doses were estimated using the radiation weighting factor corresponding to an average incident neutron energy 0.47 MeV. Statistical uncertainties associated to absorbed doses, as calculated by MCNPX, were also obtained. Results: Largest doses were absorbed in shallowest (with respect to the neutron pathway) organs. In {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, values of 2.66 (for penis) and 2.33 (for testes) were found in MAX06, and 1.68 (for breasts), 1.05 (for lenses of eyes), and 0.94 (for sublingual salivary glands) in FAX06, in AP orientation. In RLAT, the largest doses were found for bone tissues (leg) just at the entrance of the beam in the body (right side in our case). Values, in {mu}GyMU{sup -1}, of 1.09 in upper leg bone right spongiosa, for MAX06, and 0.63 in mandible spongiosa, for FAX06, were found. Except for gonads, liver, and stomach wall, equivalent doses found for FAX06 were, in both orientations, higher than for MAX06. Equivalent doses in AP are higher than in RLAT for all organs/tissues other than brain and liver. Effective doses of 12.6 and 4.1 {mu}SvMU{sup -1} were found for AP and RLAT, respectively. The organs/tissues with larger relative contributions to the effective dose were testes and breasts, in

  15. Use of a matrix of diodes for the quality control of a collimation multi-leafs system; Utilizacion de un matriz de diodos para el control de calidad de un sistema de colimacion multilaminas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejar Navarro, M. J.; Prieto Moran, D.; Sanchez Noriega, K.; Rodriguez Meijide, P.; Esteve Sanchez, S.; Colmenares Fernandez, R.; Capuz Suarez, B.; Ordonez Marquez, J.; Moris Pablos, R.

    2013-07-01

    This study aims to show the first results of the application of the Radiation Defined Reference Line method in our system collimation multi-leafs and verify the effectiveness of this method to align between the leafs of a bed. (Author)

  16. Implications of a high-definition multileaf collimator (HD-MLC on treatment planning techniques for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT: a planning study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yiyi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess the impact of two multileaf collimator (MLC systems (2.5 and 5 mm leaf widths on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and dynamic conformal arc techniques for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT of liver and lung lesions. Methods Twenty-nine SBRT plans of primary liver (n = 11 and lung (n = 18 tumors were the basis of this study. Five-millimeter leaf width 120-leaf Varian Millennium (M120 MLC-based plans served as reference, and were designed using static conformal beams (3DCRT, sliding-window intensity-modulated beams (IMRT, or dynamic conformal arcs (DCA. Reference plans were either re-optimized or recomputed, with identical planning parameters, for a 2.5-mm width 120-leaf BrainLAB/Varian high-definition (HD120 MLC system. Dose computation was based on the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA, Varian Medical Systems with tissue heterogeneity taken into account. Each plan was normalized such that 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the planning target volume (PTV. Isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVHs were computed and plans were evaluated with respect to target coverage criteria, normal tissue sparing criteria, as well as treatment efficiency. Results Dosimetric differences achieved using M120 and the HD120 MLC planning were generally small. Dose conformality improved in 51.7%, 62.1% and 55.2% of the IMRT, 3DCRT and DCA cases, respectively, with use of the HD120 MLC system. Dose heterogeneity increased in 75.9%, 51.7%, and 55.2% of the IMRT, 3DCRT and DCA cases, respectively, with use of the HD120 MLC system. DVH curves demonstrated a decreased volume of normal tissue irradiated to the lower (90%, 50% and 25% isodose levels with the HD120 MLC. Conclusion Data derived from the present comparative assessment suggest dosimetric merit of the high definition MLC system over the millennium MLC system. However, the clinical significance of these results

  17. Tracking 'differential organ motion' with a 'breathing' multileaf collimator: magnitude of problem assessed using 4D CT data and a motion-compensation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J R; Webb, S; McQuaid, D; Binnie, D M; Hawkes, D J

    2007-08-21

    Intrafraction tumour (e.g. lung) motion due to breathing can, in principle, be compensated for by applying identical breathing motions to the leaves of a multileaf collimator (MLC) as intensity-modulated radiation therapy is delivered by the dynamic MLC (DMLC) technique. A difficulty arising, however, is that irradiated voxels, which are in line with a bixel at one breathing phase (at which the treatment plan has been made), may move such that they cease to be in line with that breathing bixel at another phase. This is the phenomenon of differential voxel motion and existing tracking solutions have ignored this very real problem. There is absolutely no tracking solution to the problem of compensating for differential voxel motion. However, there is a strategy that can be applied in which the leaf breathing is determined to minimize the geometrical mismatch in a least-squares sense in irradiating differentially-moving voxels. A 1D formulation in very restricted circumstances is already in the literature and has been applied to some model breathing situations which can be studied analytically. These are, however, highly artificial. This paper presents the general 2D formulation of the problem including allowing different importance factors to be applied to planning target volume and organ at risk (or most generally) each voxel. The strategy also extends the literature strategy to the situation where the number of voxels connecting to a bixel is a variable. Additionally the phenomenon of 'cross-leaf-track/channel' voxel motion is formally addressed. The general equations are presented and analytic results are given for some 1D, artificially contrived, motions based on the Lujan equations of breathing motion. Further to this, 3D clinical voxel motion data have been extracted from 4D CT measurements to both assess the magnitude of the problem of 2D motion perpendicular to the beam-delivery axis in clinical practice and also to find the 2D optimum breathing-leaf strategy

  18. Multileaf collimator intercomparison for intensity modulated radiation therapy implementation; Intercomparacao de colimadores de multiplas laminas para implementacao de terapia de feixes de intensidade modulada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viteri, Juan Fernando Delgado

    2006-07-01

    In this work a dosimetric comparison between three multileaf collimator systems is presented: a Varian Millennium with 120 leaves, Brainlab mMLC m3 and Varian Mark II both with 52 leaves. The width projection at isocenter level in field's central region are: 0,5 cm; 0,35 cm and 1,0 cm respectively. Common dosimetric characteristics for the three systems in static mode and dynamic capabilities for the two first were compared. In dynamic mode, tests validating proper MLC function through film irradiation were done, such MLC stability, MU linearity, treatment interruptions sensitivity, stability of MLC in dynamic mode, leaf speed stability, were found within {+-}3% deviation in all cases. Dose rate linearity showed differences when this parameter decreases in dynamic mode. Average dose errors for fixed width gaps moving at constant speed were found to be proportional to gap errors and inversely proportional to the gap width. Output factors differences delivered through a sweeping gap were found less than {+-}1% when the gantry was in a lateral position. For the three MLC systems, when comparing beam profiles for the same field was observed that for mMLC presents the sharpest dose gradient region. In the output factors small differences where observed in every MLC system. Dosimetric leaf gap was determined for MLC 120, mMLC and MLC 52, obtained values for a 6 MV beam are: (0,202 {+-} 0,054) cm; (0,157 {+-} 0,070) cm and (0,189 {+-} 0,081) cm respectively. The transmission showed an increase with depth and field width for 6 MV in all the three systems. Average values obtained with ionization chamber for this energy were: (1,630 {+-} 0,018)% for MLC 120; (1,291 {+-} 0,029)% for mMLC and (1,638 {+-} 0,010)% for MLC 52. When obtained through film irradiation, inter and intra leaf transmission showed an off axis dependent behavior for MLC 120 and mMLC. Scatter produced by MLC as a 6 MV open reference field ratio was: (0,297 {+-} 0,024)% for MLC 120; (0,239 {+-} 0

  19. SU-E-T-515: Field-In-Field Compensation Technique Using Multi-Leaf Collimator to Deliver Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakeman, T [The State University of New York at Buffalo (United States); Wang, IZ [The State University of New York at Buffalo (United States); Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) uses large parallel-opposed radiation fields to suppress the patient's immune system and eradicate the residual cancer cells in preparation of recipient for bone marrow transplant. The manual placement of lead compensators has been used conventionally to compensate for the varying thickness through the entire body in large-field TBI. The goal of this study is to pursue utilizing the modern field-in-field (FIF) technique with the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) to more accurately and efficiently deliver dose to patients in need of TBI. Method: Treatment plans utilizing the FIF technique to deliver a total body dose were created retrospectively for patients for whom CT data had been previously acquired. Treatment fields include one pair of opposed open large fields (collimator=45°) with a specific weighting and a succession of smaller fields (collimator=90°) each with their own weighting. The smaller fields are shaped by moving MLC to block the sections of the patient which have already received close to 100% of the prescribed dose. The weighting factors for each of these fields were calculated using the attenuation coefficient of the initial lead compensators and the separation of the patient in different positions in the axial plane. Results: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were calculated for evaluating the FIF compensation technique. The maximum body doses calculated from the DVH were reduced from the non-compensated 179.3% to 148.2% in the FIF plans, indicating a more uniform dose with the FIF compensation. All calculated monitor units were well within clinically acceptable limits and exceeded those of the original lead compensation plan by less than 50 MU (only ~1.1% increase). Conclusion: MLC FIF technique for TBI will not significantly increase the beam on time while it can substantially reduce the compensator setup time and the potential risk of errors in manually placing lead compensators.

  20. SU-E-T-600: Utilizing Collimator Rotation to Increase Maximum Treatable Target Dimensions Using an Elekta Synergy-S with Beam Modulator Multileaf Collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, C; Campbell, S; Shields, W; Fabien, J; Colussi, V; Wessels, B

    2012-06-01

    To determine if a rotated collimator on an Elekta Synergy-S with Beam Modulator MLC (BMx) allows for dosimetrically acceptable treatment of targets exceeding the length of the maximum field size (21×16cm). The BMx is a high-resolution MLC with 4mm leaves but is of limited clinical use on patient target volumes exceeding 20cm in length. Rotation of the collimator utilizes the Pythagorean geometry to extend treatment length. This potentially increases the length of the PTV that be conformally treated. Rods of 21-23cm length were contoured in water with the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The width of the rods varies from 1 -5cm. Four isocentric treatment plans were generated for each target: four-field conformal, 7-field IMRT, single-arc VMAT, and a modified double-arc VMAT (MDAV), with the collimator angled at 55°. The MDAV method consists of two opposing 180° arcs with the collimator turned 55° in opposite directions. A successful plan is defined as 99% of the target volume being covered by a minimum of 95% of the prescribed dose. Conformality is determined as a ratio of the volume exposed to prescribed isodose and target volume. Targets of length 21cm, 22cm, and 23 cm are able to be treated with widths of 4cm, 5 cm, and 4cm respectively. The MDAV method achieves these results on all trials. The VMAT method achieves these results for the 21cm and 23cm long target. The IMRT Method achieves these results for the 21cm long target. With the exception of the 1cm wide targets, the average conformality is approximately 2.5. Changing the collimator angle of the BMx Elekta-S machine allows for a 3cm length increase of targets up to 5cm. Further work will assess clinical suitability of these findings for treatment of head and neck tumors and spinal masses. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. SU-E-T-348: Verification MU Calculation for Conformal Radiotherapy with Multileaf Collimator Using Report AAPM TG 114

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrada, A; Tello, Z; Medina, L; Garrigo, E; Venencia, D [Instituto de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an open source independent MU dose calculation software for 3D conformal radiotherapy with multileaf high and low resolution according to the report of AAPM TG 11 Methods: Treatment plans were done using Iplan v4.5 BrainLAB TPS. A 6MV photon beam produced by Primus and Novalis linear accelerators equipped with an Optifocus MLC and HDMLC, respectively. TPS dose calculation algorithms were pencil beam and Monte Carlo. 1082 treatments plans were selected for the study. The algorithm was written in free and open source CodeBlocks C++ platform. Treatment plans were imported by the software using RTP format. Equivalent size field is obtained from the positions of the leaves; the effective depth of calculation can be introduced by TPS's dosimetry report or automatically calculated starting from SSD. The inverse square law is calculated by the 3D coordinates of the isocenter and normalization point of the treatment plan. The dosimetric parameters TPR, Sc, Sp and WF are linearly interpolated. Results: 1082 plans of both machines were analyzed. The average uncertainty between the TPS and the independent calculation was −0.43% ± 2.42% [−7.90%, 7.50%]. Specifically for the Primus the variation obtained was −0.85% ± 2.53% and for the Novalis 0.00% ± 2.23%. Data show that 94.8% of the cases the uncertainty was less than or equal to 5%, while 98.9% is less than or equal to 6%. Conclusion: The developed software is appropriate for use in calculation of UM. This software can be obtained upon request.

  2. The influence of field size on stopping-power ratios in- and out-of-field: quantitative data for the BrainLAB m3 micro-multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michael; Kairn, Tanya; Kron, Tomas; Dunn, Leon; Johnston, Peter N; Franich, Rick D

    2012-11-08

    The objective of this work is to quantify the systematic errors introduced by the common assumption of invariant secondary electron spectra with changing field sizes, as relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and other treatment modes incorporating small beam segments delivered with a linac-based stereotactic unit. The EGSnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to construct a dosimetrically-matched model of a Varian 600C linear accelerator with mounted BrainLAB micro-multileaf collimator. Stopping-power ratios were calculated for field sizes ranging from 6 × 6 mm2 up to the maximum (98 × 98 mm2), and differences between these and the reference field were computed. Quantitative stopping power data for the BrainLAB micro-multileaf collimator has been compiled. Field size dependent differences to reference conditions increase with decreasing field size and increasing depth, but remain a fraction of a percent for all field sizes studied. However, for dosimetry outside the primary field, errors induced by the assumption of invariant electron spectra can be greater than 1%, increasing with field size. It is also shown that simplification of the Spencer-Attix formulation by ignoring secondary electrons below the cutoff kinetic energy applied to the integration results in underestimation of stopping-power ratios of about 0.3% (and is independent of field size and depth). This work is the first to quantify stopping powers from a BrainLAB micro-multileaf collimator. Many earlier studies model simplified beams, ignoring collimator scatter, which is shown to significantly influence the spectrum. Importantly, we have confirmed that the assumption of unchanging electron spectra with varying field sizes is justifiable when performing (typical) in-field dosimetry of stereotactic fields. Clinicians and physicists undertaking precise out-of-field measurements for the purposes of risk estimation, ought to be aware that the more pronounced spectral variation results

  3. Serial tomotherapy vs. MLC-IMRT (Multileaf Collimator Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy) for simultaneous boost treatment large intracerebral lesions; Serielle Tomotherapie vs. MLC-IMRT (Multileaf Collimator Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy) fuer die simultane Boostbestrahlung mehrerer groesserer Hirnfiliae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Dirk; Lohr, Frank; Mai, Sabine; Polednik, Martin; Wenz, Frederik [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Abo-Madyan, Yasser [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Kasr-El-Einy Hospital. Cairo Univ. (EG). Dept. of Oncology (NEMROCK); Dobler, Barbara [Klinikum der Universitaet Regensburg (Germany). Strahlentherapie

    2009-07-01

    Introduction: Recent data suggest that a radiosurgery boost treatment for up to three brain metastases in addition to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is beneficial. Sequential treatment of multiple metastatic lesions is time-consuming and optimal normal tissue sparing is not trivial for larger metastases when separate plans are created and are only superimposed afterwards. Sequential Tomotherapy with noncoplanar arcs and Multi-field IMRT may streamline the process and enable easy simultaneous treatment. We compared plans for 2-3 intracerebral targets calculated with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) based on treatment with MLC or sequential Tomotherapy using the Peacock-System. Treatment time was not to exceed 90 min on a linac with standart dose rate. MIMiC plans without treatment-time restrictions were created as a benchmark. Materials and methods: Calculations are based on a Siemens KD2 linac with a dose rate of 200 MU/min. Step-and-Shoot IMRT is performed with a standard MLC (2 x 29 leaves, 1 cm), serial Tomotherapy with the Multivane-Collimator MIMiC (NOMOS Inc. USA). Treatment plans are created with Corvus 5.0. To create plans with good conformity we chose a noncoplanar beam- and arc geometry for each approach (IMRT 4-, MIMiC 5-couch angles). The benchmark MIMiC plans with maximally steep dose gradients had 9 couch angles. For plan comparison reasons, 10Gy were prescribed to 90% of the PTV. Steepness of dose gradients, homogeneity and conformity were assessed by the following parameters: Volume encompassed by certain isodoses outside the target as well as homogeneity and conformity as indicated by Homogeneity- and Conformity-Index. Results: Plans without treatment-time restrictions had slightest dose to organ at risk (OAR), normal tissue and least Conformity-index. MIMiC- and MLC-IMRT based plans can be treated within the intended period of 90 min, all plans met the required dose. MLC based plans resulted in higher dose to organs at risk (OAR) and dose

  4. Development and verification of a time delivery model for prostate intensity modulated radiotherapy using a Siemens(®) Artiste™ 160 Multi-leaf Collimator Linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourie, Nicola; Ali, Omer A; Rae, William I D

    2017-03-01

    Time delivery models thus far proposed for prediction of radiotherapy delivery times are not applicable to all makes of Linac. Our purpose was to develop a time delivery model, which would also be applicable for a Siemens(®) ARTISTE™ 160 Multi-leaf Collimator (MLC) linear accelerator (Linac) and validate the model using prostate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) treatment plans. To our knowledge, a time delivery model has not yet been proposed for a Siemens(®) ARTISTE™ 160 MLC Linac. We used the principles of the time delivery model created for a Varian(®) Linac and added the radio frequency (RF) wave component, and the MLC delay time to the MLC travel time component. Machine input parameters were confirmed using a WIN(®) stopwatch. We tested our derived model by selecting ten random 15 MV prostate IMRT treatment plans from our clinic. The delivery time was measured three times, once per day on three different days. The calculated and measured times were compared by means of correlation. The time delivery ranged between 314 and 480 s. The largest percentage difference was 3.3% (16 s) and the smallest 0.2% (1 s); the mean percentage difference was 1.9%. MLC delay and MLC speed, representing segment delivery, had the greatest uncertainties. From the successfully verified time delivery model created, it is concluded that the inter-segmental component of the process is most time-consuming. In order to decrease delivery time it is proposed that the total segments of a treatment plan be decreased.

  5. SU-E-T-424: Dosimetric Verification of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Delivered Using An Electron Specific Multileaf Collimator for Treatment of Scalp Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldib, A [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Al-Azhar University Cairo (Egypt); Jin, L; Martin, J; Li, J; Chibani, O; Galloway, T; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has the potential to achieve better treatment outcome for shallow tumors such as those of breast and scalp. In a separate study with scalp lesions, MERT was compared to volumetric modulated arc therapy. Our results showed a reduction in the dose reaching the brain with MERT. However dose calculation accuracy and delivery efficiency challenges remain. Thus in the current study we proceed to add more cases to demonstrate MERT beneficial outcome and its delivery accuracy using an electron specific multileaf collimator (eMLC). Methods: We have used the MCBEAM code for treatment head simulation and for generating phase space files to be used as radiation source input for our Monte Carlo based treatment planning system (MC TPS). MCPLAN code is used for calculation of patient specific dose deposition coefficient and for final MERT plan dose calculation. An in-house developed optimization code is used for the optimization process. MERT plans were generated for real patients and head and neck phantom. Film was used for dosimetric verification. The film was cut following the contour of the curved phantom surface and then sealed with black masking tape. In the measurement, the sealed film packet was sandwiched between two adjacent slabs of the head and neck phantom. The measured 2D dose distribution was then compared with calculations. Results: The eMLC allows effective treatment of scalps with multi-lesions spreading around the patient head, which was usually difficult to plan or very time consuming with conventional applicators. MERT continues to show better reduction in the brain dose. The dosimetric measurements showed slight discrepancy, which was attributed to the film setup. Conclusion: MERT can improve treatment plan quality for patients with scalp cancers. Our in-house MC TPS is capable of performing treatment planning and accurate dose calculation for MERT using the eMLC.

  6. Multileaf collimator tongue-and-groove effect on depth and off-axis doses: A comparison of treatment planning data with measurements and Monte Carlo calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Jung [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Siyong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Park, Yang-Kyun [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kim, Jung-in [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Min [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Sung-Joon, E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how accurately treatment planning systems (TPSs) account for the tongue-and-groove (TG) effect, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and radiochromic film (RCF) measurements were performed for comparison with TPS results. Two commercial TPSs computed the TG effect for Varian Millennium 120 multileaf collimator (MLC). The TG effect on off-axis dose profile at 3 depths of solid water was estimated as the maximum depth and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the dose dip at an interleaf position. When compared with the off-axis dose of open field, the maximum depth of the dose dip for MC and RCF ranged from 10.1% to 20.6%; the maximum depth of the dose dip gradually decreased by up to 8.7% with increasing depths of 1.5 to 10 cm and also by up to 4.1% with increasing off-axis distances of 0 to 13 cm. However, TPS results showed at most a 2.7% decrease for the same depth range and a negligible variation for the same off-axis distances. The FWHM of the dose dip was approximately 0.19 cm for MC and 0.17 cm for RCF, but 0.30 cm for Eclipse TPS and 0.45 cm for Pinnacle TPS. Accordingly, the integrated value of TG dose dip for TPS was larger than that for MC and RCF and almost invariant along the depths and off-axis distances. We concluded that the TG dependence on depth and off-axis doses shown in the MC and RCF results could not be appropriately modeled by the TPS versions in this study.

  7. Dosimetric evaluation of multi-pattern spatially fractionated radiation therapy using a multi-leaf collimator and collapsed cone convolution superposition dose calculation algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stathakis, Sotirios [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, 7979 Wurzbach Rd, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)], E-mail: stathakis@uthscsa.edu; Esquivel, Carlos; Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Shi, ChengYu; Papanikolaou, Niko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, 7979 Wurzbach Rd, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: In this paper, we present an alternative to the originally proposed technique for the delivery of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (GRID) using multi-leaf collimator (MLC) shaped fields. We employ the MLC to deliver various pattern GRID treatments to large solid tumors and dosimetrically characterize the GRID fields. Methods and materials: The GRID fields were created with different open to blocked area ratios and with variable separation between the openings using a MLC. GRID designs were introduced into the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system, and the dose was calculated in a water phantom. Ionization chamber and film measurements using both Kodak EDR2 and Gafchromic EBT film were performed in a SolidWater phantom to determine the relative output of each GRID design as well as its spatial dosimetric characteristics. Results: Agreement within 5.0% was observed between the Pinnacle{sup 3} predicted dose distributions and the measurements for the majority of experiments performed. A higher magnitude of discrepancy (15%) was observed using a high photon beam energy (18 MV) and small GRID opening. Skin dose at the GRID openings was higher than the corresponding open field by a factor as high as three for both photon energies and was found to be independent of the open-to-blocked area ratio. Conclusion: In summary, we reaffirm that the MLC can be used to deliver spatially fractionated GRID therapy and show that various GRID patterns may be generated. The Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS can accurately calculate the dose of the different GRID patterns in our study to within 5% for the majority of the cases based on film and ion chamber measurements. Disadvantages of MLC-based GRID therapy are longer treatment times and higher surface doses.

  8. Daily quality control of collimator multi-leaf for IMRT static through flat panel (EPID); Control de calidad diario del colimador multilamina para IMRT estatica mediante panel plano (EPID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Benitez Serrano, J. A.; Sanchez Jimenez, E.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.

    2013-07-01

    When techniques are employed such as radiotherapy for intensity modulated (IMRT) is necessary to establish a proper quality assurance program. According to national and international recommendations, such a program must include, in addition to verification of treatment for each patient, a multi-leaf collimator quality control daily, easy to perform and analyze, to ensure the quality of the given treatments daily. This paper intends to make such quality control through the irradiation of a number of fields in the imaging system flat panel portal and its subsequent analysis. (Author)

  9. Feasibility of using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation for IMRT dose calculations for the Novalis Tx with a HD-120 multi-leaf collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyunuk; Shin, Jungsuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Han, Youngyih; Kim, Jinsung; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an independent dose verification system by using a Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) conducted by using a Varian Novalis Tx (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) equipped with a highdefinition multi-leaf collimator (HD-120 MLC). The Geant4 framework was used to implement a dose calculation system that accurately predicted the delivered dose. For this purpose, the Novalis Tx Linac head was modeled according to the specifications acquired from the manufacturer. Subsequently, MC simulations were performed by varying the mean energy, energy spread, and electron spot radius to determine optimum values of irradiation with 6-MV X-ray beams by using the Novalis Tx system. Computed percentage depth dose curves (PDDs) and lateral profiles were compared to the measurements obtained by using an ionization chamber (CC13). To validate the IMRT simulation by using the MC model we developed, we calculated a simple IMRT field and compared the result with the EBT3 film measurements in a water-equivalent solid phantom. Clinical cases, such as prostate cancer treatment plans, were then selected, and MC simulations were performed. The accuracy of the simulation was assessed against the EBT3 film measurements by using a gamma-index criterion. The optimal MC model parameters to specify the beam characteristics were a 6.8-MeV mean energy, a 0.5-MeV energy spread, and a 3-mm electron radius. The accuracy of these parameters was determined by comparison of MC simulations with measurements. The PDDs and the lateral profiles of the MC simulation deviated from the measurements by 1% and 2%, respectively, on average. The computed simple MLC fields agreed with the EBT3 measurements with a 95% passing rate with 3%/3-mm gamma-index criterion. Additionally, in applying our model to clinical IMRT plans, we found that the MC calculations and the EBT3 measurements agreed well with a passing rate of greater

  10. Dosimetry characteristics of multi-leaf collimator field for TrueBeam%TrueBeam加速器多叶准直器射野剂量学特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊绮丽; 石勇; 徐刚; 顾强

    2015-01-01

    医用电子直线加速器未均整射束的剂量学特征和优势早已被证明,但是随着三维适形和调强放射治疗技术的发展,临床治疗的射野(Field)主要是由多叶准直器射野形成,而有关未均整射束的多叶准直器射野剂量特征的研究很少。本文研究TrueBeam加速器6 MV-X未均整射束的多叶准直器射野剂量特征。利用蒙特卡罗(Monte Carlo, MC)模拟和三维剂量扫描系统临床测量,对比和分析射野离轴比曲线剂量特征。结果表明:蒙特卡罗模拟和临床测量未均整射束下多叶准直器叶片到位精度、X和Y方向的漏射量、射野半影、叶片间凹凸结构对射野剂量的影响大体一致。多叶准直器形成不规则射野的几何学、蒙特卡罗模拟和临床测量的不符合度(MC 或临床测量50%等剂量曲线的面积与射野几何面积的差值相对于射野实际面积的百分数)分别为3.629%、3.2626%和2.0394%。圆形射野、具有凹凸边界射野几何学和蒙特卡罗模拟的不符合度分别为0.8662%、0.8794%和0.2314%、0.8170%。为未均整射束条件下多叶准直器的临床合理使用提供可靠的依据。%Background: The dose distribution of the Flatting-Filter-Free (FFF) of medical linear accelerator (LINACS) has been proved to have its advantages in clinical use. With the recent development of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy, field of clinical treatment is mainly achieved by using Multi-leaf Collimator (MLC). Because of the rare researches on dosimetry characteristics of MLC field under FFF beam, it is interesting to note the importance of its further development.Purpose:For the TureBeam accelerator of 6 MV-X, the dose characteristics of the MLC are studied in the presence of the FFF beam.Methods:The off-axis dose curve characteristics are analyzed by using the Monte Carlo (MC) method, combined with three-dimensional dose scanning data

  11. SU-E-T-88: Acceptance Testing and Commissioning Measurements of a Newly Released InCiseâ„¢ Multileaf Collimator for CyberKnife M6â„¢ System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huq, M Saiful; Ozhasoglu, C; Jang, S; Hwang, M; Heron, D; Lalonde, R [UPMC CancerCenter, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accuray recently released a new collimator, the InCise™ Multileaf Collimator (MLC), for clinical use with the CyberKnife M6™ System. This work reports the results of acceptance testing and commissioning measurements for this collimator. Methods: The MLC consists of 41 pairs of 2.5 mm wide leaves projecting a clinical maximum field size of 110 mm x 97.5 mm at 800 mm SAD. The leaves are made of tungsten, 90 mm in height and tilted by 0.5 degree. The manufacturer stated leaf positioning accuracy and reproducibility are 0.5 mm and 0.4 mm respectively at 800 mm SAD. The leaf over-travel is 100% with full interdigitation capability. Acceptance testing included, but are not limited to, the verification of the specifications of various parameters described above, leakage measurements and end-to-end tests. Dosimetric measurements included, but not limited to, measurements of output factors, open beam profiles, tissue-phantom ratios, beam flatness and symmetry, and patient specific QA. Results: All measurements were well within the manufacturer specifications. The values of output factors ranged from 0.804 (smallest field size of 7.6 mm x 7.5 mm) to 1.018 (largest field size of 110.0 mm x 97.5 mm). End-to-end test results for the various tracking modes are: Skull (0.27mm), fiducial (0.16mm), Xsight Spine (0.4mm), Xsight Lung (0.93 mm) and Synchrony (0.43mm). Measured maximum and average leakage was 0.37% and 0.3%, respectively. Patient-specific QA measurements with chamber were all within 5% absolute dose agreement, and film measurements all passed 2%/2mm gamma evaluation for more than 95% of measurement points. Conclusion: The presented results are the first set of data reported on the InCise™ MLC. The MLC proved to be very reliable and is currently in clinical use.

  12. Planning and delivering high doses to targets surrounding the spinal cord at the lower neck and upper mediastinal levels: static beam-segmentation technique executed by a multileaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelfhout, J.; Derycke, S.; Fortan, L.; Van Duyse, B.; Colle, C.; De Wagter, C.; De Neve, W. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde

    1995-12-01

    The possibility to plan and deliver beam intensity modulated radiotherapy using a general purpose 3D-planning system (Sherouse`s GRATISTM) and a linear accelerator equipped with a standard multileaf collimator (MLC) was investigated in view of limiting the dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. During the planning process, dose homogenization at the target is obtained by the calculation of the weights, given to beam segments of a specific predetermined geometry. This specific geometry maximizes the area of each segment and thus reduces the number of segments. With a virtual patient in supine position, a first planning using a single isocenter, with gantry positions of -60, -30, 0, 30 and 60 degrees was performed. Medial edges of all segments were located tangential to the spinal cord. The resulting dose distribution allowed to encompass the target by an isodose surface of 66-70 Gy without exceeding spinal cord tolerance but required 42 segments distributed over 5 gantry angles. Therefore, dose-volume histogram analysis were performed for those cases where: (1) for some gantry positions, all beam segments could be omitted; (2) at the remaining gantry angles, segments could be omitted; (3) at least 2 segments could be traded off against 1 additional gantry angle. This procedure resulted in a final plan containing 22 segments spread over 8 gantry angles. Preliminary dosimetric results on a RANDO phantom support the robustness of the method. The first clinical applications have been planned. Although up to 99 beam segments can be programmed on the Philips SL25 linear accelerator, it remained impossible to use these segments synchronized with the MLC. From a clinical viewpoint, the proposed treatment for irradiating lower neck and upper mediastinal targets could be used as a standard against which other solutions might be tested.

  13. New multileaf collimator with a leaf width of 5 mm improves plan quality compared to 10 mm in step-and-shoot IMRT of HNC using integrated boost procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicker, Felix; Roeder, Falk; Timke, Carmen; Zabel-du Bois, Angelika; Huber, Peter E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); Hauswald, Henrik; Debus, Juergen [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, Simeon; Rhein, Bernhard [Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); Thieke, Christian [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose: to investigate whether a new multileaf collimator with a leaf width of 5 mm (MLC-5) over the entire field size of 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} improves plan quality compared to a leaf width of 10 mm (MLC-10) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with integrated boost for head and neck cancer. Patients and methods: a plan comparison was performed for ten patients with head and neck cancer. For each patient, seven plans were calculated: one plan with MLC-10 and nine beams, four plans with MLC-5 and nine beams (with different intensity levels and two-dimensional median filter sizes [2D-MFS]), and one seven-beam plan with MLC-5 and MLC-10, respectively. Isocenter, beam angles and planning constraints were not changed. Mean values of common plan parameters over all ten patients were estimated, and plan groups of MLC-5 and MLC-10 with nine and seven beams were compared. Results: the use of MLC-5 led to a significantly higher conformity index and an improvement of the 90% coverage of PTV1 (planning target volume) and PTV2 compared with MLC-10. This was noted in the nine- and seven-beam plans. Within the nine-beam group with MLC-5, a reduction of the segment number by up to 25% at reduced intensity levels and for increased 2D-MFS did not markedly worsen plan quality. Interestingly, a seven-beam IMRT with MLC-5 was inferior to a nine-beam IMRT with MLC-5, but superior to a nine-beam IMRT with MLC-10. Conclusion: the use of an MLC-5 has significant advantages over an MLC-10 with respect to target coverage and protection of normal tissues in step-and-shoot IMRT of head and neck cancer. (orig.)

  14. New multileaf collimator with a leaf width of 5 mm improves plan quality compared to 10 mm in step-and-shoot IMRT of HNC using integrated boost procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, Felix; Hauswald, Henrik; Nill, Simeon; Rhein, Bernhard; Thieke, Christian; Roeder, Falk; Timke, Carmen; Zabel-du Bois, Angelika; Debus, Jürgen; Huber, Peter E

    2010-06-01

    To investigate whether a new multileaf collimator with a leaf width of 5 mm (MLC-5) over the entire field size of 40 x 40 cm(2) improves plan quality compared to a leaf width of 10 mm (MLC-10) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with integrated boost for head and neck cancer. A plan comparison was performed for ten patients with head and neck cancer. For each patient, seven plans were calculated: one plan with MLC-10 and nine beams, four plans with MLC-5 and nine beams (with different intensity levels and two-dimensional median filter sizes [2D-MFS]), and one seven-beam plan with MLC-5 and MLC-10, respectively. Isocenter, beam angles and planning constraints were not changed. Mean values of common plan parameters over all ten patients were estimated, and plan groups of MLC-5 and MLC-10 with nine and seven beams were compared. The use of MLC-5 led to a significantly higher conformity index and an improvement of the 90% coverage of PTV1 (planning target volume) and PTV2 compared with MLC-10. This was noted in the nine- and seven-beam plans. Within the nine-beam group with MLC-5, a reduction of the segment number by up to 25% at reduced intensity levels and for increased 2D-MFS did not markedly worsen plan quality. Interestingly, a seven-beam IMRT with MLC-5 was inferior to a nine-beam IMRT with MLC-5, but superior to a nine-beam IMRT with MLC-10. The use of an MLC-5 has significant advantages over an MLC-10 with respect to target coverage and protection of normal tissues in step-and-shoot IMRT of head and neck cancer.

  15. SU-E-T-604: Penumbra Characteristics of a New InCiseâ„¢ Multileaf Collimator of CyberKnife M6â„¢ System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, M; Jang, S; Ozhasoglu, C; Lalonde, R; Heron, D; Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The InCise™ Multileaf Collimator (MLC) of CyberKnife M6™ System has been released recently. The purpose of this study was to explore the dosimetric characteristics of the new MLC. In particular, the penumbra characteristics of MLC fields at varying locations are evaluated. Methods: EBT3-based film measurements were performed with varying MLC fields ranging from 7.5 mm to 27.5 mm. Seventeen regions of interests (ROIs) were identified for irradiation. These are regions located at the central area (denoted as reference field), at the left/right edge areas of reference open field, at an intermediate location between central and edge area. Single beam treatment plans were designed by using the MultiPlan and was delivered using the Blue Phantom. Gafchromic films were irradiated at 1.5 cm depth in the Blue Phantom and analyzed using the Film Pro software. Variation of maximum dose, penumbra of MLC-defined fields, and symmetry/flatness were calculated as a function of locations of MLC fields. Results: The InCise™ MLC System showed relatively consistent dose distribution and penumbra size with varying locations of MLC fields. The measured maximum dose varied within 5 % at different locations compared to that at the central location and agreed with the calculated data well within 2%. The measured penumbrae were in the range of 2.9 mm and 3.7 mm and were relatively consistent regardless of locations. However, dose profiles in the out-of-field and in-field regions varied with locations and field sizes. Strong variation was seen for all fields located at 55 mm away from the central field. The MLC leakage map showed that the leakage is dependent on position. Conclusion: The size of penumbra and normalized maximum dose for MLC-defined fields were consistent in different regions of MLC. However, dose profiles in the out-field region varied with locations and field sizes.

  16. SU-E-T-225: Correction Matrix for PinPoint Ionization Chamber for Dosimetric Measurements in the Newly Released Incise™ Multileaf Collimator Shaped Small Field for CyberKnife M6™ Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Li, T; Heron, D; Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC CancerCenter, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For small field dosimetry, such as measurements of output factors for cones or MLC-shaped irregular small fields, ion chambers often Result in an underestimation of the dose, due to both the volume averaging effect and the lack of lateral charged particle equilibrium. This work presents a mathematical model for correction matrix for a PTW PinPoint ionization chamber for dosimetric measurements made in the newly released Incise™ Multileaf collimator fields of the CyberKnife M6™ machine. Methods: A correction matrix for a PTW 0.015cc PinPoint ionization chamber was developed by modeling its 3D dose response in twelve cone-shaped circular fields created using the 5mm, 7.5mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 15mm, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm cones in a CyberKnife M6™ machine. For each field size, hundreds of readings were recorded for every 2mm chamber shift in the horizontal plane. The contribution of each dose pixel to a measurement point depended on the radial distance and the angle to the chamber axis. These readings were then compared with the theoretical dose as obtained with Monte Carlo calculation. A penalized least-square optimization algorithm was developed to generate the correction matrix. After the parameter fitting, the mathematical model was validated for MLC-shaped irregular fields. Results: The optimization algorithm used for parameter fitting was stable and the resulted response factors were smooth in spatial domain. After correction with the mathematical model, the chamber reading matched with the calculation for all the tested fields to within 2%. Conclusion: A novel mathematical model has been developed for PinPoint chamber for dosimetric measurements in small MLC-shaped irregular fields. The correction matrix is dependent on detector, treatment unit and the geometry of setup. The model can be applied to non-standard composite fields and provides an access to IMRT point dose validation.

  17. Conformal Stereotactic Radiosurgery With Multileaf Collimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    R. Virudachalam, D.R. Spelbring, G.T.Y. Chen, "Beam’s eye view based prostate treatment planning: Is it useful?" Int. J. Radiation Oncology Biol...G.T.Y. Chen, "Beam’s eye view based prostate treatment planning: Is it useful?" Int. J. Radiation Oncology Biol. Phys. 19:759 (1990) Lul87 B. Lulu...tbinsum, *bins, *tbins, nbins, nbinsuiu, thk, *aplim, *laljm, *axlim, apmax, apmin, ].amax, lamin, tapi, tap2, tHal, tla2, taxi , tax2, ctap, ctla, ctax

  18. Efficacy of a dynamic collimator for overranging dose reduction in a second- and third-generation dual source CT scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Booij, Ronald; Dijkshoorn, Marcel; Straten, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of the renewed dynamic collimator in a third-generation dual source CT (DSCT) scanner and to determine the improvements over the second-generation scanner. Methods: Collimator efficacy is defined as the percentage overranging dose in terms of dose–length product (DLP) that is blocked by the dynamic collimator relative to the total overranging dose in case of a static collimator. Efficacy was assessed at various pitch...

  19. Influence of multileaf collimator leaf width on volumetric modulated arc therapy plans evaluated on AAPM standard phantom%应用AAPM标准模体评估MLC宽度对VMAT计划的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄娜; 王培; 张德康; 唐斌; 黎杰; 王先良; 吴凡; 秦远; 康盛伟

    2016-01-01

    目的:使用AAPM119报告标准模体和标准靶区设计双弧VMAT计划,依照AAPM119报告剂量目标要求比较Agility和MLCi2两种叶片剂量参数。方法利用AAPM119报告中Cshape、Head and Neck、Prostate和Multitarget标准靶区勾画结构,按照AAPM计划目标要求,首先采用医科达Agility MLC进行计划设计,在计划设计参数不变情况下仅更换为医科达MLCi2进行计划优化和剂量计算。以AAPM119报告目标剂量为标准,分析两种MLC叶片在4种靶区勾画结构下的靶区和OAR剂量体积参数的差异。结果依照AAPM119号报告所达到的平均剂量标准,Cshape、Head and Neck和Multitarget 靶区结构采用Agility制作的放疗计划剂量指标多优于采用MLCi2制作的放疗计划, Prostate靶区结构采用MLCi2制作的放疗计划剂量指标优于采用Agility制作的放疗计划。结论在靶区勾画结构、计划设计人员、计划设计参数和评价标准全部相同下,对严苛剂量限值目标医科达Agility比医科达MLCi2能更好达到剂量目标要求。%Objective To develop double-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy ( VMAT) plans using standard phantom and standard target volume in AAPM119 report, and to investigate the dosimetric parameters of Agility and MLCi2 leafs according to the requirements for target dose in AAPM119 report. Methods The Cshape, Head and Neck, Prostate, and Multitarget structures for standard target volume delineation in AAPM119 report were used.The Elekta Agility multi-leaf collimator was used to develop plans, and then with other parameters remaining unchanged, Elekta MLCi2 was used for plan optimization and dose calculation.The target dose in AAPM119 report was used as the standard to analyze the differences in target volume and dose-volume parameters of organs at risk between the four structures for target volume delineation.Results According to the mean dose in AAPM119 report, in the Cshape, Head and Neck, and

  20. 多发脑转移瘤VMAT计划中MLC插指功能剂量学研究%A dosimetric study of multileaf collimator interdigitation in volumetric modulated arc therapy plans for multiple brain metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段敬豪; 李成强; 王若峥; 巩贯忠; 陶城; 刘潇; 朱健; 尹勇

    2016-01-01

    目的 通过比较有无MLC插指功能的VMAT计划剂量学差异,探究MLC插指在多发脑转移瘤VMAT计划中的优势.方法 回顾本院15例多发脑转移瘤患者数据.首先在定位CT图像上设计有MLC插指功能权限的双弧VMAT计划(VMAT-1).随后不改变计划参数,摒弃插指功能权限,重新优化计算得到无MLC插指功能的VMAT-2计划.比较两种计划在靶区CI和HI、OAR受量、机器跳数、控制点数、计划执行时间和计划耗时方面差异.采用Wilcoxon符号秩和检验.结果 VMAT-1的均匀性优于VMAT-2(P=0.04),两种计划的适形度基本相当(P=0.33).VMAT-1计划中PTV的D98%高于VMAT-2(P=0.04).VMAT-1中的脑干Dmean比VMAT-2降低了4%(P=0.04),其他OAR参数基本相当.部分病例显示VMAT-1计划有着相邻横断面的肿瘤交界处正常组织受量更少的特点.VMAT-1计划机器跳数比VMAT-2增加了4%(P=0.01).两种计划的控制点数和预估执行时间相近(P=0.81、0.73).VMAT-1的计划制作耗时较VMAT-2减少了26%(P=0.00).结论 在多发脑转移瘤VMAT计划中,MLC插指功能可缩短VMAT优化时间,提高优化效率.%Objective To evaluate the dosimetric difference between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with and without an interdigitating multileaf collimator (MLC) in the treatment of multiple brain metastases, and to investigate the advantages of MLC interdigitation in VMAT plans for multiple brain metastasis. Methods A retrospective study was performed on clinical data from 15 patients with multiple brain metastases in our hospital. A dual arc VMAT plan with an interdigitating MLC ( VMAT-1) was designed on computed tomography ( CT) images. Then, keeping all parameters unchanged, another VMAT plan with a non-interdigitating MLC ( VMAT-2) was made after re-optimization. The conformity index ( CI) and homogeneity index ( HI) of the planning target volume ( PTV) , doses to organs at risk ( OARs) , monitor units (MUs), control points, delivery time

  1. A dynamic dispersion insert in the Fermilab Main Injector for momentum collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.E.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector (MI) accelerator is designed as a FODO lattice with zero dispersion straight sections. A scheme will be presented that can dynamically alter the dispersion of one of the long straight sections to create a non-zero dispersion straight section suitable for momentum collimation. During the process of slip stacking DC beam is generated which is lost during the first few milliseconds of the ramp. A stationary massive primary collimator/absorber with optional secondary masks could be utilized to isolate beam loss due to uncaptured beam.

  2. 不同机架角时多叶准直器叶片对不同调强放疗剂量影响%Impact of accelerator′s multi-leaf collimator leaves on the intensity modulated radiation therapy dose at different gantry angles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮长利; 徐利明; 宋启斌; 马广栋; 李长虎

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of accelerator′s multi-leaf collimator (MLC) on the radiotherapy dose with different gantry angles.Methods Measured with Mapcheck 2D diode array and 30 cm×30 cm×3 cm solid water, Pre-selecting the 30 appropriate single fields and 0°,45°,90°,270°,315° gantry angles of static and dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), quantification analysis of the passing rate with MapCheck γ(3%/3 mm) and (5%/3 mm) analysis methods, and the same method to 30 examples static and dynamic IMRT plans.Results When the accelerator collimator angle is 0°,the 30 appropriate single fields′ passing rate of between 0°gantry angle and 45°,90°,270°,315°gantry angles of static and dynamic IMRT accordingly is 97.71% and 96.25%(t=1.70, P=0.389), 96.34% and 93.72%(t=2.95, P=0.002), 96.65% and 92.98%(t=2.87, P=0.005), 95.87% and 93.15%(t=2.71, P=0.006), 96.09% and 93.51%(t=2.89, P=0.004) with MapCheck γ(3%/3 mm) analysis methods, however, the passing rate also does not have the difference, respectively is 99.31%-99.73% and 98.89-99.68%(t=0.57-1.90, P=0.913-0.725) with MapCheck γ(5%/3 mm) analysis methods;the passing rate of 30 examples static and dynamic IMRT plans accordingly is 96.11%-96.76% and 94.88%-95.78%(t=1.02-1.61, P=0.317-0.235).Conclusions When the accelerator collimator angle is 0°, at different gantry angles, MLC leaves due to gravity, friction, inertia, etc caused by errors in place, the physical penumbra and leakage radiation will indeed affect the IMRT dose, however, the deviation of dose distribution is within acceptable 5%.%目的 研究加速器多叶准直器角度为0°和不同机架角时多叶准直器叶片对不同调强放疗剂量的影响.方法 用30 cm×30 cm×3 cm固体水模体预选静态调强和动态调强中大小合适的30个单方向野和机架角为0°、45°、90°、270°、315°,用Mapcheck二维半导体矩阵测量和其剂量分析系统的γ分析方法(3%/3 mm、5%/3 mm)对相

  3. Efficacy of a dynamic collimator for overranging dose reduction in a second- and third-generation dual source CT scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Booij (Ronald); M.L. Dijkshoorn (Marcel); M. van Straten (Marcel)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of the renewed dynamic collimator in a third-generation dual source CT (DSCT) scanner and to determine the improvements over the second-generation scanner. Methods: Collimator efficacy is defined as the percentage overrangi

  4. Beam collimator

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    A four-block collimator installed on a control table for positioning the alignment reference marks. Designed for use with SPS secondary beams, the collimator operates under vacuum conditions. See Annual Report 1976 p. 121 and photo 7701014.

  5. 电子射野影像装置在容积调强旋转放疗多叶准直器到位精度质控中的应用%Application of Electronic Portal Imaging Device in Quality Control for Multileaf Collimator Position Accuracy of Volumetric-modulated Arc Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈诚; 韩光; 周晓艺; 谭文勇; 王晓红

    2015-01-01

    目的 研究利用电子射野影像装置(electronic portal imaging device,EPID)检测容积调强旋转放疗(volumetric-modulated arc therapy,VMAT)执行过程中多叶准直器(multileaf collimator,MLC)到位精度的方法.方法 随机选取了8例鼻咽癌患者的放疗计划进行分析,通过二维电离室矩阵进行剂量学验证,得到剂量验证通过率.借助Heimann Imaging Software拍摄软件和医科达Synergy直线加速器机载EPID,获取VMAT计划执行过程中MLC的到位信息,通过梯度检测算法获取MLC实际位置,并与VMAT计划中规定的MLC位置进行比较,得到MLC的位置误差,计算计划通过率.结果 8例鼻咽癌患者的放疗计划在评价标准为3%/3 mm时,剂量验证通过率是(94.8±2.1)%;当叶片到位误差允许值为1mm时,叶片验证的通过率是(91.1±4.0)%.结论 8例VMAT计划全部通过了剂量验证,但仍存在不同程度的叶片到位误差,因此只对VMAT计划进行剂量验证是不够的,对VMAT计划剂量的验证需要对MLC进行专门的质量控制.通过EPID进行MLC到位精度的检测能够提供更详细、更深入的质控信息,为VMAT技术的开展提供更多的保障.

  6. 基于不同多叶准直器的胸膜间皮瘤容积旋转调强放疗剂量学比较%Dosimetric comparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy with different multileaf collimators for pleural mesothelioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张富利; 蒋华勇; 许卫东; 王雅棣; 高军茂; 刘清智; 路娜; 陈点点; 姚波

    2015-01-01

    目的:比较基于两种类型多叶准直器(Multileaf Collimator,MLC)的胸膜间皮瘤容积旋转调强放疗(Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy,VMAT)计划差异.材料与方法:回顾性选取10例因各种无法手术的胸膜间皮瘤患者CT图像,分别采用配置常规多叶准直器(Standar MLC,sMLC)和微型多叶准直器(micro-MLC,mMLC)的医科达直线加速器进行VMAT的计划设计.比较两种计划在靶区(Planning Target Volume,PTV)适形度(Conformity Index,CI)、均匀度(Heterogeneity Index,HI)以及危及器官(Organs At Risk,OAR)剂量体积参数方面的异同.结果:与基于sMLC的VMAT计划(sMLC-VMAT)相比,基于mMLC的VMAT计划(mMLC-VMAT)实施效率高(平均实施时间:2.57士1.66 min vs 3.27士1.65 rmin,P<0.05).此外,mMLC-VMAT计划靶区适形度和均匀度优于sMLC-VMAT (CI:0.75+0.08 vs 0.71士0.12;HI:1.09士0.02 vs 1.11士0.03).就OARs而言,除心脏的Dmean(P=0.042)以外,其它各个OARs的剂量体积参数差异均无显著性意义(P>0.05).结论:与sMLC-VMAT计划相比,mMLC-VMAT计划不仅明显缩短了治疗时间,提高靶区的覆盖度与均匀性,而且显著降低了心脏的平均受照剂量,有助于减小心血管病的发生风险.

  7. Development of a Multileaf Collimator for Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    a pair of scintillators for using cosmic rays, calibration signals, and coincidence electronics for cosmic ray triggers. The test system also has a...sensitivity relative to the radiation used for calibration can be assumed to be unity because the Compton effect predominates in both the x-ray calibration...The quality of the video remained stable at 15 frames per second (FPS) (VGA quality), although greater movement on camera would have an adverse

  8. Development of a Multileaf Collimator for Proton Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    to generate different spread-out Bragg peaks. 14 Fig. I.6. Resulting dose distributions using the pr top left, the energy of the...planning and proton therapy in the outcome of maxillary sinus cancer” Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 22:305-310, 1991. 5. Slater JM, Slater JD

  9. Development of a Multileaf Collimator for Proton Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    specifications and evaluating proposals, the University of Pennsylvania Health System ( UPHS ) signed a contract with Ion Beam Applications, S.A. (IBA...related to the work supported by this grant to develop technology for proton therapy. The development agreements between UPHS , IBA and Varian Medical...Reed Military Medical Center (WRMMC) in these areas. To that end UPHS personnel have met with IBA and Varian engineers multiple times and have

  10. A dosimetric characterization of a novel linear accelerator collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, C. M.; Weston, S. J., E-mail: steve.weston@leedsth.nhs.uk; Cosgrove, V. C. [Leeds Cancer Centre, Bexley Wing, St. James’ University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006, Australia and Division of Medical Physics, Leeds Institute of Genetics, Health and Therapeutics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to characterize a new linear accelerator collimator which contains a single pair of sculpted diaphragms mounted orthogonally to a 160 leaf multileaf collimator (MLC). The diaphragms have “thick” regions providing full attenuation and “thin” regions where attenuation is provided by both the leaves and the diaphragm. The leaves are mounted on a dynamic leaf guide allowing rapid leaf motion and leaf travel over 350 mm. Methods: Dosimetric characterization, including assessment of leaf transmission, leaf tip transmission, penumbral width, was performed in a plotting tank. Head scatter factor was measured using a mini-phantom and the effect of leaf guide position on output was assessed using a water phantom. The tongue and groove effect was assessed using multiple exposures on radiochromic film. Leaf reproducibility was assessed from portal images of multiple abutting fields. Results: The maximum transmission through the multileaf collimator is 0.44% at 6 MV and 0.52% at 10 MV. This reduced to 0.22% and 0.27%, respectively, when the beam passes through the dynamic leaf guide in addition to the MLC. The maximum transmission through the thick part of the diaphragm is 0.32% and 0.36% at 6 and 10 MV. The combination of leaf and diaphragm transmission ranges from 0.08% to 0.010% at 6 MV and 0.10% to 0.14% depending on whether the shielding is through the thick or thin part of the diaphragm. The off-axis intertip transmission for a zero leaf gap is 2.2% at 6 and 10 MV. The leaf tip penumbra for a 100 × 100 mm field ranges from 5.4 to 4.3 mm at 6 and 10 MV across the full range of leaf motion when measured in the AB direction, which reduces to 4.0–3.4 mm at 6 MV and 4.5–3.8 mm at 10 MV when measured in the GT direction. For a 50 × 50 mm field, the diaphragm penumbra ranges from 4.3 to 3.7 mm at 6 MV and 4.5 to 4.1 mm at 10 MV in the AB direction and 3.7 to 3.2 mm at 6 MV and 4.2 to 3.7 mm when measured in the GT direction. The

  11. 多叶准直器位置误差对静态野调强放疗计划验证通过率影响的研究%Study on the Inlfuence of Multi-leaf Collimator Position Error on the Veriifcation Pass Rate of the Static IMRT Plan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王猛

    2016-01-01

    目的:通过实验分析多叶准直器(Multi-leaf Collimator,MLC)位置误差对静态野调强放疗(IMRT)计划验证通过率的影响。方法选取8例鼻咽癌IMRT计划,通过计划系统设置为每个病例计划的MLC叶片末端位置分别带入±0.5 mm、±1 mm、±2 mm的误差,分别命名为Trail-0.5、Trail+0.5、Trail-1、Trail+1、Trail-2、Trail+2。利用Octavius 4D剂量验证系统对每个计划进行测量,得到所有计划的三维剂量分布。采用γ分析方法,得到所有计划的剂量验证通过率。结果当评价指标为2%/2 mm时,8例原计划的平均通过率为76.3%。Trail-1、Trail-2、Trail+2的通过率均小于原计划的通过率,但是只有Trail+2的平均通过率与原计划相比具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。当评价指标为3%/3 mm时,8例原计划的平均通过率为91.7%,Trail-1、Trail-2、Trail+2的通过率小于原计划的通过率,只有Trail+2的平均通过率与原计划的通过率相比具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论针对MLC的位置误差需要进行独立质控以保证放疗计划的准确实施。%Objective To analyze the influence of MLC (Multi-Leaf Collimator) position error on the veriifcation pass rate of IMRT (Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy) plan through experiments.Methods Altogether 8 cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma IMRT plans were selected. And then, for each case, the errors of±0.5 mm,±1 mm and±2 mm in MLC leaf terminal positions were set respectively through the program system, which was named as Trail-0.5, Trail+0.5, Trail-1, Trail+1, Trail-2 and Trail+2 respectively. Each program was measured by using Octavius 4D dose veriifcation system to obtain all the three dimensional dose distribution of each plan. And the dose veriifcation pass rate of all the plans was acquired by using the gamma analysis method.Results When the evaluation index was 2%/2 mm, the average pass rate of 8 cases was 76.3%. The pass rate of Trail-1

  12. Independent collimators are sufficient to conform and combine adjacent fields?; Os colimadores independentes sao suficientes para conformar e combinar campos adjacentes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade Neto, Enock de A. [Hospital Sirio Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Sociedade Beneficente de Senhoras. Servico de Radioterapia; Santos Neto, Geraldo [Grupo COI, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia; Sant' Anna, Marcelo C., E-mail: enock92@gmail.com [RADCLIN Centro de Oncologia, Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2014-12-15

    Consider a radiotherapy treatment in which the tumor is located in the region of head and neck. In general, isocentric technique combined with three tangents half-beam fields are used. How these fields must be collimated? We show that the combination of independent collimators and multi-leaf results in a uniform dose in the region which these fields touch each other. Moreover, we recommend a setup that minimizes the heterogeneity for LINAC's that doesn't possess a multi-leaf collimator. (author)

  13. 多叶准直器叶片速度对滑窗调强放疗剂量分布的影响研究%The Effect of Speed of Multileaf Collimator on Dose Distribution With Sliding Windows Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐利明; 李长虎; 李承军; 王陆州; 姚颐

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of speed of multileaf colhmator (MLC) on the dose distribution of the dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods: A group of MLC files was designed with sliding window intensity-modulated (SW-IMRT) radiation fields and was run with different dose rate and different machine unit (MU), so that the speed of the leaf were modulated at 1.0 cm/s, 2.0 cm/s, 3.0 cm/s, 4.0 cm/s, 5.0 cm/s, 6.0 cm/s, 7.0 cm/s, 8.0 cm/s, 10.0 cm/s respectively. The dose distribution with Mapcheck was measured, and the dose distribution which calculated in planning system was compared. Ten cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma intensity-modulated plan, with 100 MU/m 200 MU/m, 300 MU/m, 400 MU/m, 500 MU/m, 600 MU/m dose rate separatively on the accelerator and dose distribution was measured with Mapcheck, and compared the dose distribution planning system in passing; simultaneously recording ten patients under the condition of different dose rate run-time accelerator log files, will log file conversion into actual operation after DMLC MLC documents, will DMLC import plan system recalculate, comparing different dose rate in patients die under the condition of the dose distribution and primitive dose distribution difference. Results: The accelerator actual blade movement speed reached (2.78±1.45) cm/s, maximum speed 4.55 cm/s; for in not more than 5.00 set speed cm/s, accelerator in operation plan file, the way by lowering the dose rate can match the vane motion speed limit, to ensure the actual illuminate the accelerator output when shooting wild flux and plan the best shot when designing Mapcheck wild flux consistent and verified in above 99%, but pass in setting cm/s faster than 5.00 when planning document, the accelerator in operation by lowering the dose rate, already can't match the way blade movement speed limits, Mapcheck verification with the speed of the passing rate rise and set down; on the actual clinical case research does not appear afore

  14. The ARCS radial collimator

    OpenAIRE

    Stone M.B.; Niedziela J.L.; Overbay M.A.; Abernathy D.L.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. W...

  15. The ARCS radial collimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. We present here characterization of the collimator's performance and methodologies for its effective use.

  16. The ARCS radial collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M. B.; Niedziela, J. L.; Overbay, M. A.; Abernathy, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. We present here characterization of the collimator's performance and methodologies for its effective use.

  17. Characterization of Embedded BPM Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    VALENTINO, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    During LS1, 16 tertiary collimators (TCTs) and 2 secondary collimators (TCSGs) in IR6 were replaced by new embedded BPM collimators. The BPM functionality allows the possibility to align the collimators more quickly and therefore be able to respond faster to machine configuration changes, as well as a direct monitoring of the beam orbit at the collimators. Following an initial commissioning phase, an MD was carried out to test the new collimators and acquisition electronics with beam in the LHC.

  18. Electromagnetic guided couch and multileaf collimator tracking on a TrueBeam accelerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rune; Ravkilde, Thomas; Worm, Esben Schjødt

    2016-01-01

    of the couch or MLC as recorded by continuous MV portal imaging. The geometric and dosimetric tracking accuracies were measured in tracking experiments with motion phantoms that reproduced four prostate and four lung tumor trajectories. The geometric tracking error in beam's eye view was determined...

  19. Conformal radiotherapy using multileaf collimation: quality assurance and in vivo dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aletti, P. [Centre A. Vautrin, Nancy (France)

    1995-12-01

    The application of quality assurance principles in three dimensional conformal therapy is discussed.Critical requirements in three dimensional radiotherapy are the patient immobilization, the location, and the delivered dose. General recommendations with respect to the equipment for conformal radiotherapy and personnel are made.

  20. Jet quenching via jet collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, J; Wiedemann, U

    2011-01-01

    The strong modifications of dijet properties in heavy ion collisions measured by ATLAS and CMS provide important constraints on the dynamical mechanisms underlying jet quenching. In this work, we show that the transport of soft gluons away from the jet cone - jet collimation - can account for the observed dijet asymmetry with values of $\\hat{q}\\, L$ that lie in the expected order of magnitude. Further, we show that the energy loss attained through this mechanism results in a very mild distortion of the azimuthal angle dijet distribution.

  1. Collimation study for LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, E.; Raubenhaimer, T.; Welch, J.; White, G.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the power deposition along the undulator section of the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) due to the primary e--beam but also due to potential secondary particles. The expected beam distribution after the LCLS injector is deliberately broadened as an approximated representation of the beam halo. Secondary particles, as e+, e- and photons, are generated as a result of tracking the intercepted beam through a dense material. This process is carried out by means of GEANT-4, which has been convoluted into our main tracking engine, LUCRETIA. Simulations show no losses along the undulator section when assuming the nominal primary beam and collimator gaps. However when opening the gaps of collimators located at the first collimator section, by 25%, the fattened beam is partially intercepted by the second collimator section, which is aligned to the undulators. Secondary particles, mostly photons generated at the second collimator section, deposit their energy along the undulator section, at a rate of the order of a milliwatt.

  2. Cleaning insertions and collimation challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Bertarelli, A; Bruce, R; Jowett, J M; Lechner, A; Losito, R

    2015-01-01

    High-performance collimation systems are essential for operating efficiently modern hadron machine with large beam intensities. In particular, at the LHC the collimation system ensures a clean disposal of beam halos in the superconducting environment. The challenges of the HL-LHC study pose various demanding requests for beam collimation. In this paper we review the present collimation system and its performance during the LHC Run 1 in 2010–2013. Various collimation solutions under study to address the HL-LHC requirements are then reviewed, identifying the main upgrade baseline and pointing out advanced collimation concept for further enhancement of the performance.

  3. Effect of the Collimator Angle on Dosimetric Verification of the Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Yong Ho; Kim, Won Taek; Kim, Dong Won; Ki, Yongkan; Lee, Juhye; Bae, Jinsuk; Park, Dahl

    2015-01-01

    Collimator angle is usually rotated when planning volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) due to the leakage of radiation between multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves. We studied the effect of the collimator angles on the results of dosimetric verification of the VMAT plans for head and neck patients. We studied VMAT plans for 10 head and neck patients. We made 2 sets of VMAT plans for each patient. Each set was composed of 10 plans with collimator angles of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 degrees. Plans in the first set were optimized individually and plans in the second set shared the 30 degree collimator angle optimization. Two sets of plans were verified using the 2-dimensional ion chamber array MatriXX (IBA Dosimetry, Germany). The comparison between the calculation and measurements were made by the $\\gamma$-index analysis. The $\\gamma$-index (2\\%/2 mm) and (3\\%/3 mm) passing rates had negative correlations with the collimator angle. Maximum difference between $\\gamma$-index (3\\%/3 mm) passing rates o...

  4. Process for manufacturing slit collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, V. P.; Yemelyanov, A. A.; Churbakov, K. I.

    1974-01-01

    Peculiarities are described of the manufacturing process and the control of elements of slit collimators, the structural design of the required equipment and the process or assembling the collimators.

  5. VIRUS instrument collimator assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; DePoy, Darren L.; Prochaska, Travis; Allen, Richard D.; Williams, Patrick; Rheault, Jean-Philippe; Li, Ting; Nagasawa, Daniel Q.; Akers, Christopher; Baker, David; Boster, Emily; Campbell, Caitlin; Cook, Erika; Elder, Alison; Gary, Alex; Glover, Joseph; James, Michael; Martin, Emily; Meador, Will; Mondrik, Nicholas; Rodriguez-Patino, Marisela; Villanueva, Steven; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah; Vattiat, Brian; Lee, Hanshin; Chonis, Taylor S.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Tacon, Mike

    2014-07-01

    The Visual Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument is a baseline array 150 identical fiber fed optical spectrographs designed to support observations for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). The collimator subassemblies of the instrument have been assembled in a production line and are now complete. Here we review the design choices and assembly practices used to produce a suite of identical low-cost spectrographs in a timely fashion using primarily unskilled labor.

  6. Collimation Cleaning at the LHC with Advanced Secondary Collimator Materials

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085459; Bruce, Roderik; Mereghetti, Alessio; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, A

    2015-01-01

    The LHC collimation system must ensure efficient beam halo cleaning in all machine conditions. The first run in 2010-2013 showed that the LHC performance may be limited by collimator material-related concerns, such as the contribution from the present carbon-based secondary collimators to the machine impedance and, consequently, to the beam instability. Novel materials based on composites are currently under development for the next generation of LHC collimators to address these limitations. Particle tracking simulations of collimation efficiency were performed using the Sixtrack code and a material database updated to model these composites. In this paper, the simulation results will be presented with the aim of studying the effect of the advanced collimators on the LHC beam cleaning.

  7. Beam Cleaning and Collimation Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S

    2016-01-01

    Collimation systems in particle accelerators are designed to dispose of unavoidable losses safely and efficiently during beam operation. Different roles are required for different types of accelerator. The present state of the art in beam collimation is exemplified in high-intensity, high-energy superconducting hadron colliders, like the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where stored beam energies reach levels up to several orders of magnitude higher than the tiny energies required to quench cold magnets. Collimation systems are essential systems for the daily operation of these modern machines. In this document, the design of a multistage collimation system is reviewed, taking the LHC as an example case study. In this case, unprecedented cleaning performance has been achieved, together with a system complexity comparable to no other accelerator. Aspects related to collimator design and operational challenges of large collimation systems are also addressed.

  8. Tracking studies of the Compact Linear Collider collimation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, I.; Burkhardt, H.; Schulte, D.; /CERN; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Blair, G.A.; Malton, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Resta-Lopez, J.; /Oxford U., JAI

    2009-08-01

    A collimation system performance study includes several types of computations performed by different codes. Optics calculations are performed with codes such as MADX, tracking studies including additional effects such as wakefields, halo and tail generation, and dynamical machine alignment are done with codes such as PLACET, and energy deposition can be studied with BDSIM. More detailed studies of hadron production in the beam halo interaction with collimators are better performed with GEANT4 and FLUKA. A procedure has been developed that allows one to perform a single tracking study using several codes simultaneously. In this paper we study the performance of the Compact Linear Collider collimation system using such a procedure.

  9. Four-block beam collimator

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The photo shows a four-block collimator installed on a control table for positioning the alignment reference marks. Designed for use with the secondary beams, the collimators operated in vacuum conditions. The blocks were made of steel and had a standard length of 1 m. The maximum aperture had a square coss-section of 144 cm2. (See Annual Report 1976.)

  10. Dosimetric comparison using different multileaf collimeters in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuchuan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To study the impacts of multileaf collimators (MLC width [standard MLC width of 10 mm (sMLC and micro-MLC width of 4 mm (mMLC] in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT planning for the upper thoracic esophageal cancer (UTEC. Methods and materials 10 patients with UTEC were retrospectively planned with the sMLC and the mMLC. The monitor unites (MUs and dose volume histogram-based parameters [conformity index (CI and homogeneous index (HI] were compared between the IMRT plans with sMLC and with mMLC. Results The IMRT plans with the mMLC were more efficient (average MUs: 703.1 ± 68.3 than plans with the sMLC (average MUs: 833.4 ± 73.8 (p p 5 (3260.3 ± 374.0 vs 3404.5 ± 374.4/gEUD (1815.1 ± 281.7 vs 1849.2 ± 297.6 of the spinal cord, the V10 (33.2 ± 6.5 vs 34.0 ± 6.7, V20 (16.0 ± 4.6 vs 16.6 ± 4.7, MLD (866.2 ± 174.1 vs 887.9 ± 172.1 and gEUD (938.6 ± 175.2 vs 956.8 ± 171.0 of the lungs were observed in the plans with the mMLC, respectively (p Conclusions Comparing to the sMLC, the mMLC not only demonstrated higher efficiencies and more optimal target coverage, but also considerably improved the dose sparing of OARs in the IMRT planning for UTEC.

  11. Mechanical Design for Robustness of the LHC Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, Alessandro; Assmann, R W; Calatroni, Sergio; Dallocchio, Alessandro; Kurtyka, Tadeusz; Mayer, Manfred; Perret, Roger; Redaelli, Stefano; Robert-Demolaize, Guillaume

    2005-01-01

    The functional specification of the LHC Collimators requires, for the start-up of the machine and the initial luminosity runs (Phase 1), a collimation system with maximum robustness against abnormal beam operating conditions. The most severe cases to be considered in the mechanical design are the asynchronous beam dump at 7 TeV and the 450 GeV injection error. To ensure that the collimator jaws survive such accident scenarios, low-Z materials were chosen, driving the design towards Graphite or Carbon/Carbon composites. Furthermore, in-depth thermo-mechanical simulations, both static and dynamic, were necessary.This paper presents the results of the numerical analyses performed for the 450 GeV accident case, along with the experimental results of the tests conducted on a collimator prototype in Cern TT40 transfer line, impacted by a 450 GeV beam of 3.1·1013

  12. Beam Loss and Beam Shape at the LHC Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Burkart, Florian

    In this master thesis the beam loss and the beam shape at the LHC collimators was measured, analysed, presented and discussed. Beginning with a short introduction of the LHC, the experiments, the supercon- ducting magnet system, the basics on linear beam dynamics and a describtion of the LHC collimation system are given. This is followed by the presentation of the performance of the LHC collimation sys- tem during 2011. A method to convert the Beam Loss Monitor signal in Gy/s to a proton beam loss rate will be introduced. Also the beam lifetime during the proton physics runs in 2011 will be presented and discussed. Finally, the shape of the LHC beams is analysed by using data obtained by scraping the beam at the LHC primary collimators.

  13. Collimation: a silicon solution

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Silicon crystals could be used very efficiently to deflect high-energy beams. Testing at CERN has produced conclusive results, which could pave the way for a new generation of collimators. The set of five crystals used to test the reflection of the beams. The crystals are 0.75 mm wide and their alignment is adjusted with extreme precision. This figure shows the deflection of a beam by channelling and by reflection in the block of five crystals. Depending on the orientation of the crystals: 1) The beam passes without "seeing" the crystals and is not deflected 2) The beam is deflected by channelling (with an angle of around 100 μrad) 3) The beam is reflected (with an angle of around 50 μrad). The intensity of the deflected beam is illustrated by the intensity of the spot. The spot of the reflected beam is clearly more intense than that one of the channelled beam, demonstrating the efficiency of t...

  14. SU-E-T-11: A Dosimetric Comparison of Robotic Prostatic Radiosugery Using Multi- Leaf Collimation Vs Circular Collimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, J; Yang, J; Lamond, J; Lavere, N; Laciano, R; Ding, W; Arrigo, S; Brady, L [Philadelphia Cyberknife, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The study compared the dosimetry plans of Stereotatic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) prostate cancer patients using the M6 Cyberknife with Multi-leaf Collimation (MLC) compared with the plans using G4 Cyberknife with circular collimators. Methods: Eight previously treated prostate cancer patients' SBRT plans using circular collimators, designed with Multiplan v3.5.3, were used as a benchmark. The CT, contours and the optimization scripts were imported into Multiplan v5.0 system and replanned with MLC. The same planning objectives were used: more than 95% of PTV received 36.25Gy, 90% of prostate received 40Gy and maximum dose <45Gy, in five fractions. For organs at risk, less than 1cc of rectum received 36Gy and less than 10cc of bladder received 37Gy. Plans were evaluated on parameters derived from dose volume. The beam number, MU and delivery time were recorded to compare the treatment efficiency. Results: The mean CTV volume was 41.3cc (27.5∼57.6cc) and mean PTV volume was 76.77cc (59.1∼99.7cc). The mean PTV coverage was comparable between MLC (98.87%) and cone (98.74%). MLC plans had a slightly more favorable homogeneity index (1.22) and conformity index (1.17), than the cone (1.24 and 1.15). The mean rectum volume of 36 Gy (0.52cc) of MLC plans was slightly larger than cone (0.38cc) and the mean bladder volume of 37 Gy was smaller in MLC (1.82cc) than in cone plans (3.09cc). The mean number of nodes and beams were 65.9 and 80.5 in MLC vs 65.9 and 203.6 in cone. The mean MUs were significantly less for MLC plans (24,228MUs) than cone (32,347MUs). The total delivery time (which included 5 minutes for setup) was less, 29.6min (26∼32min) for MLC vs 45min (35∼55min) for cone. Conclusion: While the differences in the dosimetry between the MLC and circular collimator plans were rather minor, the MLC plans were much more efficient and required significantly less treatment time.

  15. Fermilab Recycler Collimation System Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B. C. [Fermilab; Adamson, P. [Fermilab; Ainsworth, R. [Fermilab; Capista, D. [Fermilab; Hazelwood, K. [Fermilab; Kourbanis, I. [Fermilab; Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Morris, D. K. [Fermilab; Murphy, M. [Fermilab; Sidorov, V. [Fermilab; Stern, E. [Fermilab; Tropin, I. [Fermilab; Yang, M-J. [Fermilab

    2016-10-04

    To provide 700 kW proton beams for neutrino production in the NuMI facility, we employ slip stacking in the Recycler with transfer to the Main Injector for recapture and acceleration. Slip stacking with 12 Booster batches per 1.33 sec cycle of the Main Injector has been implemented and briefly tested while extensive operation with 8 batches and 10 batches per MI cycle has been demonstrated. Operation in this mode since 2013 shows that loss localization is an essential component for long term operation. Beam loss in the Recycler will be localized in a collimation region with design capability for absorbing up to 2 kW of lost protons in a pair of 20-Ton collimators (absorbers). This system will employ a two stage collimation with a thin molybdenum scattering foil to define the bottom edge of both the injected and decelerated-for-slipping beams. Optimization and engineering design of the collimator components and radiation shielding are based on comprehensive MARS15 simulations predicting high collimation efficiency as well as tolerable levels of prompt and residual radiation. The system installation during the Fermilab 2016 facility shutdown will permit commissioning in the subsequent operating period.

  16. Rounded leaf end effect of multileaf collimator on penumbra width and radiation field offset: an analytical and numerical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Dong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Penumbra characteristics play a significant role in dose delivery accuracy for radiation therapy. For treatment planning, penumbra width and radiation field offset strongly influence target dose conformity and organ at risk sparing.

  17. The six-bank multi-leaf system : A large field size, high resolution collimator for advanced

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Topolnjak, R.

    2006-01-01

    A linear accelerator (linac) is the most commonly used device for treatment of patients with cancer in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The Linac delivers a high-energy ionizing radiation (photons or electrons) to the region of the patient's tumor. The absorption of radiation in the treated area d

  18. A predictive method of calculating the dosimetric effect of 1-D motion on narrow multileaf collimated segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A; Williams, M; Metcalfe, P

    2009-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the utility of 1-D convolution as a predictive method to quantify the effect of patient movement as a result of respiration on segmented dose distributions typically found in IMRT. This is for the restricted case of 1-D motion perpendicular to the beam direction. A modified respiratory motion phantom was coupled to a solid water phantom and used to measure the dose distribution of several narrow MLC segments. The measured data was compared to dose distribution calculated by the mathematical convolution of static profiles with a probability distribution function (PDF) generated for sinusoidal motion and power cosine motion. The MLC segments for an IMRT field were also studied. Additionally, the dosimetric effect of intra-fraction patient motion combined with that of inter-fraction setup error, modelled using a Gaussian PDF, was calculated. Set-up variation and respiratory motion can significantly degrade the dose distribution of narrow segments. Our results emphasise the need to maintain the smallest feasible amplitude of respiratory motion and minimise set-up uncertainties, particularly when narrow segments are used.

  19. First cleaning with LHC collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Wollmann, D; Arnau-Izquiedo, G; Assmann, R; Bacher, J P; Baglin, V; Bellodi, G; Bertarelli, A; Bouzoud, A; Bracco, C; Bruce, R; Brugger, M; Calatroni, S; Cerruti, F; Chamizo, R; Cherif, A; Chiaveri, E; Chiggiato, P; Dallochio, A; Dehning, B; Donze, M; Ferrari, A; Folch, R; Francon, P; Gander, P; Geisser, J M; Grudiev, A; Holzer, EB; Jacquet, D; Jeanneret, J B; Jimenez, J M; Jonker, M; Jowett, J; Kershaw, K; Lari, L; Lendaro, J; Loprete, F; Losito, R; Magistris, M; Malabaila, M; Mayer, M; Marsili, A; Masi, A; Mathot, S; Métral, E; Mitifiot, C; Mounet, N; de Morais Amaral, R; Nordt, A; Perret, R; Perrollaz, S; Rathjen, C; Redaelli, S; Robert-Demolaize, G; Roesler, S; Rossi, A; Salvant, B; Santana, M; Sexton, I; Sievers, P; Tardy, T; Timmins, M; Tsoulou, K; Veyrunes, E; Vincke, H; Vlachoudis, V; Vuillemin, V; Weiler, T; Zimmermann, F; Baishev, I; Kurochkin, I; Kaltchev, D; Caspers, F; Kadi, Y

    2010-01-01

    The LHC has two dedicated cleaning insertions: IR3 for momentum cleaning and IR7 for betatron cleaning. The collimation system has been specified and built with tight mechanical tolerances (e.g. jaw flatness ~ 40 μm ) and is designed to achieve a high accuracy and reproducibility of the jaw positions (~ 20 μm). The practically achievable cleaning efficiency of the present Phase-I system depends on the precision of the jaw centering around the beam, the accuracy of the gap size and the jaw parallelism against the beam. The reproducibility and stability of the collimation system is important to avoid the frequent repetition of beam based alignment which is currently a lengthy procedure. Within this paper we describe the method used for the beam based alignment of the LHC collimation system, its achieved accuracy and stability and its performance at 450GeV.

  20. Transverse Impedance of LHC Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Métral, E; Assmann, Ralph Wolfgang; Boccardi, A; Bracco, C; Bohl, T; Caspers, Friedhelm; Gasior, M; Jones, O R; Kasinski, K; Kroyer, T; Redaelli, S; Robert-Demolaize, R; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvant, B; Steinhagen, R; Weiler, T; Zimmermann, F

    2007-01-01

    The transverse impedance in the LHC is expected to be dominated by the numerous collimators, most of which are made of Fibre-Reinforced-Carbon to withstand the impacts of high intensity proton beams in case of failures, and which will be moved very close to the beam, with full gaps of few millimetres, in order to protect surrounding super-conducting equipments. We present an estimate of the transverse resistive-wall impedance of the LHC collimators, the total impedance in the LHC at injection and top energy, the induced coupled-bunch growth rates and tune shifts, and finally the result of the comparison of the theoretical predictions with measurements performed in 2004 and 2006 on a prototype collimator installed in the SPS.

  1. Crystal collimator systems for high energy frontier

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2100516; Tikhomirov, Viktor; Lobko, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Crystalline collimators can potentially considerably improve the cleaning performance of the presently used collimator systems using amorphous collimators. A crystal-based collimation scheme which relies on the channeling particle deflection in bent crystals has been proposed and extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally. However, since the efficiency of particle capture into the channeling regime does not exceed ninety percent, this collimation scheme partly suffers from the same leakage problems as the schemes using amorphous collimators. To improve further the cleaning efficiency of the crystal-based collimation system to meet the requirements of the FCC, we suggest here a double crystal-based collimation scheme, to which the second crystal is introduced to enhance the deflection of the particles escaping the capture to the channeling regime in its first crystal. The application of the effect of multiple volume reflection in one bent crystal and of the same in a sequence of crystals is simu...

  2. Optimizing Collimator Margins for Isotoxically Dose-Escalated Conformal Radiation Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: Samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Oxford Cancer Centre, Oxford University Hospitals, Oxford (United Kingdom); Panettieri, Vanessa [William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road, Melbourne (Australia); Panakis, Niki; Bates, Nicholas [Oxford Cancer Centre, Oxford University Hospitals, Oxford (United Kingdom); Lester, Jason F. [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Road, Whitchurch, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Jain, Pooja [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Clatterbridge Road, Wirral (United Kingdom); Landau, David B. [Department of Radiotherapy, Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Nahum, Alan E.; Mayles, W. Philip M. [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Clatterbridge Road, Wirral (United Kingdom); Fenwick, John D. [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Oxford Cancer Centre, Oxford University Hospitals, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Isotoxic dose escalation schedules such as IDEAL-CRT [isotoxic dose escalation and acceleration in lung cancer chemoradiation therapy] (ISRCTN12155469) individualize doses prescribed to lung tumors, generating a fixed modeled risk of radiation pneumonitis. Because the beam penumbra is broadened in lung, the choice of collimator margin is an important element of the optimization of isotoxic conformal radiation therapy for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with stage I-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were replanned retrospectively using a range of collimator margins. For each plan, the prescribed dose was calculated according to the IDEAL-CRT isotoxic prescription method, and the absolute dose (D{sub 99}) delivered to 99% of the planning target volume (PTV) was determined. Results: Reducing the multileaf collimator margin from the widely used 7 mm to a value of 2 mm produced gains of 2.1 to 15.6 Gy in absolute PTV D{sub 99}, with a mean gain ± 1 standard error of the mean of 6.2 ± 1.1 Gy (2-sided P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with conformal radiation therapy and an isotoxic dose prescription, absolute doses in the PTV may be increased by using smaller collimator margins, reductions in relative coverage being offset by increases in prescribed dose.

  3. Carbon nanotube collimator fabrication and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lee; Chai, Guangyu; Schenkel, Thomas

    2010-07-06

    Apparatus, methods, systems and devices for fabricating individual CNT collimators. Micron size fiber coated CNT samples are synthesized with chemical vapor deposition method and then the individual CNT collimators are fabricated with focused ion beam technique. Unfocused electron beams are successfully propagated through the CNT collimators. The CNT nano-collimators are used for applications including single ion implantation and in high-energy physics, and allow rapid, reliable testing of the transmission of CNT arrays for transport of molecules.

  4. Collimator with attachment mechanism and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kross, Brian J.; McKisson, John; Stolin, Aleksandr; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Zorn, Carl

    2012-07-10

    A self-aligning collimator for a radiation imaging device that is secured and aligned through the use of a plurality of small magnets. The collimator allows for the rapid exchange, removal, or addition of collimators for the radiation imaging device without the need for tools. The accompanying method discloses the use of magnets and accompanying magnetic fields to align and secure collimators in a radiation imaging assembly.

  5. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul

    2012-01-01

    -to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system. The dosimetric results were evaluated using gamma index evaluation with static target measurements as reference. Results: The plan quality......Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced...... on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans...

  6. Optimization of the CLIC Baseline Collimation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resta-Lopez, Javier; /Oxford U., JAI; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa; /Daresbury; Fernandez-Hernando, Juan; /Daresbury; Jackson, Frank; /Daresbury; Dalena, Barbara; /CERN; Schulte, Daniel; /CERN; Tomas, Rogelio; /CERN; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    Important efforts have recently been dedicated to the improvement of the design of the baseline collimation system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Different aspects of the design have been optimized: the transverse collimation depths have been recalculated in order to reduce the collimator wakefield effects while maintaining a good efficiency in cleaning the undesired beam halo; the geometric design of the spoilers have also been reviewed to minimize wakefields; in addition, the optics design have been polished to improve the collimation efficiency. This paper describes the current status of the CLIC collimation system after this optimization.

  7. Radiation collimation in a thick crystalline undulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wistisen, Tobias Nyholm; Uggerhøj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Hansen, John Lundsgaard; Lauth, Werner; Klag, Pascal

    2017-05-01

    With the recent experimental confirmation of the existence of energetic radiation from a Small Amplitude, Small Period (SASP) crystalline undulator [T.N. Wistisen, K.K. Andersen, S. Yilmaz, R. Mikkelsen, J. Lundsgaard Hansen, U.I. Uggerhøj, W. Lauth, H. Backe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 254801 (2014)], the field of specially manufactured crystals, from which specific radiation characteristics can be obtained, has evolved substantially. In this paper we confirm the existence of the crystalline undulator radiation, using electrons of energies of 855 GeV from the MAinzer MIcrotron (MAMI) in a crystal that is approximately 10 times thicker than the previous one. Furthermore, we have measured a significant increase in enhancement, in good agreement with calculations, of the undulator peak by collimation to angles smaller than the natural opening angle of the radiation emission process, 1 /γ. Contribution to the Topical Issue: "Dynamics of Systems at the Nanoscale", edited by Andrey Solov'yov and Andrei Korol.

  8. Jet Quenching via Jet Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration recently reported strong modifications of dijet properties in heavy ion collisions. In this work, we discuss to what extent these first data constrain already the microscopic mechanism underlying jet quenching. Simple kinematic arguments lead us to identify a frequency collimation mechanism via which the medium efficiently trims away the soft components of the jet parton shower. Through this mechanism, the observed dijet asymmetry can be accomodated with values of $\\hat{q}\\, L$ that lie in the expected order of magnitude.

  9. Beam halo collimation in heavy ion synchrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strašík, I.; Prokhorov, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a systematic study of the halo collimation of ion beams from proton up to uranium in synchrotrons. The projected Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research synchrotron SIS100 is used as a reference case. The concepts are separated into fully stripped (e.g., 238U92+ ) and partially stripped (e.g., 238U28+ ) ion collimation. An application of the two-stage betatron collimation system, well established for proton accelerators, is intended also for fully stripped ions. The two-stage system consists of a primary collimator (a scattering foil) and secondary collimators (bulky absorbers). Interaction of the particles with the primary collimator (scattering, momentum losses, and nuclear interactions) was simulated by using fluka. Particle-tracking simulations were performed by using mad-x. Finally, the dependence of the collimation efficiency on the primary ion species was determined. The influence of the collimation system adjustment, lattice imperfections, and beam parameters was estimated. The concept for the collimation of partially stripped ions employs a thin stripping foil in order to change their charge state. These ions are subsequently deflected towards a dump location using a beam optical element. The charge state distribution after the stripping foil was obtained from global. The ions were tracked by using mad-x.

  10. Digital chest radiography: collimation and dose reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian

    Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... of clinical supervisors. Optimal collimation is determined by European and Regional Danish guidelines. The areal between current and optimal collimation is calculated. The experimental research is performed in September - October 2014 Siemens Axiom Aristos digital radiography system DR using 150 kV, 1,25 -3...

  11. Calibrating the HXMT collimators using diffuse illumination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new method to calibrate the HXMT collimators by measuring the optical point spread function(PSF) of the hard X-ray modulation telescope(HXMT).The light transmission of the collimator at different viewing angles with a camera and a diffuse backlight placed behind the collimator is measured.This method is much easier to accomplish than measuring the PSF with a parallel optical beam.The experimental results are very consistent with the simulations.The PSF of the collimator of the high energy X-ray telescope on HXMT is found to be in good agreement with the design,with accuracy better than 1 arcmin.

  12. Measuring Collimator Infrared (IR) Spectral Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT RDMR-WD-16-15 MEASURING COLLIMATOR INFRARED (IR) SPECTRAL TRANSMISSION Christopher L. Dobbins Weapons...Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. DESTRUCTION NOTICE FOR CLASSIFIED DOCUMENTS...AND DATES COVERED Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Measuring Collimator Infrared (IR) Spectral Transmission 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Christopher L

  13. Cálculo independente de dose para tratamentos de arco dinâmico com colimador micromultilâminas Independent dose calculation for dynamic arc treatments delivered with micromultileaf collimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fernando Delgado

    2006-10-01

    colimador micromultilâminas, nos quais um cálculo manual é muito difícil ou inviável, pela complexidade da técnica.OBJECTIVE: In treatment techniques such as dynamic arc, the manual verification of treatment planning system calculations is very difficult. In these cases, the use of computational tools is useful and becomes an essential component of the quality assurance program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A worksheet-based software has been created to perform an independent dose or monitor unit calculation in treatments applying the dynamic arc technique delivered with micromultileaf collimator. The dose values calculated per arc and per complete treatment, are compared with values obtained from BrainScan v5.3 treatment planning system. The software has been tested with 229 dynamic arc fields representing 42 skull treatments. From these 229 fields, 109 have been calculated in 3D reconstruction of patients CT images, 109 in reconstruction of polymethylmetacrylate phantom images, and 21 in reconstruction of images from a water equivalent phantom. RESULTS: The mean difference of total doses found in the 42 treatments (composites of one or more dynamic arcs, between the verification software and the treatment planning system, was of +1.73% with a 0.76% standard deviation. The maximum difference was 3.32% and the minimum -0.20%. When the 229 dynamic arcs were tested one by one, the average difference found was 1.61% with a 1.04% standard deviation. Maximum and minimum differences were, respectively 4.01% and -2.04%. As a result of the test, in 80.35% the doses calculated have presented a ± 2.5% difference in relation to the doses generated by the planning system. CONCLUSION: The software presented in this study is recommended for checking point dose included in treatment plans as an integral part of the process of quality assurance in radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery when the dynamic arc technique is utilized in treatment with micromultileaf collimator, where a

  14. Nonlinear Energy Collimation System for Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The post-linac energy collimation system of multi-TeV linear colliders is designed to fulfil an important function of protection of the Beam Delivery System (BDS) against miss-steered beams likely generated by failure modes in the main linac. For the case of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), the energy collimators are required to withstand the impact of a full bunch train in case of failure. This is a very challenging task, assuming the nominal CLIC beam parameters at 1.5 TeV beam energy. The increase of the transverse spot size at the collimators using nonlinear magnets is a potential solution to guarantee the survival of the collimators. In this paper we present an alternative nonlinear optics based on a skew sextupole pair for energy collimation. Performance simulation results are also presented.

  15. Influence of collimator rotation on dose distribution and delivery in intensity modulated radiation therapy for parotid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the influence of collimator rotation in IMRT planning with respect to the target coverage and dose to critical structures. In addition, the delivery efficiency of desired fluence with collimator rotation is assessed.Methods: The computed tomography (CT datasets of 5 patients with parotid cancer were employed for this study. Dynamic IMRT plans were generated with a dose prescription of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. IMRT plans were generated with five unilateral fields using 6MV X-rays. Four different plans were generated for each patient by keeping the collimator angle at 0, 30, 60, and 90 degree. All plans were analyzed using dose volume histogram. Conformity index (CI and heterogeneity index (HI were calculated. The total monitor units (MU required to deliver one fraction were noted and compared. To verify the delivery efficiency; the measured fluence on IBA I’mRT MatriXX ionization chamber array detector was compared with the TPS dose plan with 2D gamma evaluation.Results: There is not much difference in the PTV Dmax and Dmean with respect to the different collimator angles. The PTV coverage is best at collimator angle of 0 degree. A slight reduction in CI was observed with plans at other collimator angles as compared to 0 degree. The HI values were almost similar for plans with collimator angle 0, 30, and 60 degree. The plan with 90 degree collimator showed a slightly higher heterogeneity for the PTV. A slight reduction in the average Dmax to spinal cord was observed for the plan with collimator angle 30 degree as compared to other angles whereas maximum value of Dmax to spinal cord was at collimator angle 60 degree. No clinically relevant difference was observed among the plans with respect to brainstem and mandible Dmax. An increase in average of oral cavity Dmax and Dmean was observed for collimator angle 60 and 90 degree as compared to collimator angle 0 and 30 degree. Not much difference was observed with respect to Dmax

  16. Characterisation of fan-beam collimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareto, D; Pavía, J; Falcón, C; Juvells, I; Cot, A; Ros, D

    2001-02-01

    Fan-beam collimators offer a good balance between resolution and noise. The collimator response may be included in iterative reconstruction algorithms in order to improve single-photon emission tomography (SPET) resolution. To this end, accurate determination of the focal region and characterisation of the collimator response as a function of the source co-ordinates must be performed. In this paper, a method to characterise fanbeam collimators is evaluated. First, we calculated the real focal region and the accuracy of the collimator convergence. Then, we confirmed the hypothesis that Gaussian distributions adequately fit the collimator responses, although no individualised treatment was performed for the tails of detector response which are associated with scattering and septal penetration. Finally, analytical functions were used to model the resolution and sensitivity. The parameter values in these functions were obtained from experimental measures by non-linear regression fitting. Our findings show differences of 1.43% between nominal and real focal length and standard deviations of 2.5 mm in the x-direction and 7.1 mm in the y-direction for the focal convergence. The correlation coefficients between experimental and predicted values were 0.994 for resolution and 0.991 for sensitivity. As a consequence, the proposed method can be used to characterise the collimator response.

  17. Scrapping and Collimation Tests in the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, C; Jung, R; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2004-01-01

    Scraping of the SPS beam will be required prior to extraction towards the LHC in order to remove the beam tails and ensure clean injection conditions. Scraper mechanisms recuperated from the ISR and collimators coming from LEP are installed since a few years in the SPS to test this concept. The purpose of these tests was to show that with the help of the associated two stage collimation system, it is possible to make the scraping process very clean by confining the losses at the collimator locations, hence without irradiating any other part of the machine.

  18. Crystal Collimation with protons at injection energy

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Roberto; Masi, Alessandro; Mirarchi, Daniele; Montesano, Simone; Redaelli, Stefano; Valentino, Gianluca; Scandale, Walter; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    During this MD, performed on August 30th, 2015, bent silicon crystals were tested with protons beams for a possible usage of crystal-assisted collimation. Tests were performed at injection energy, using both horizontal and vertical crystals, providing a crucial test of the hardware for precise crystal angle adjustments (goniometers). Proton channeling was observed for the first time with LHC beams and the channeled beams were probed with scans performed with secondary collimators. Measurements of cleaning efficiency of a crystal-based collimation system were also performed.

  19. CODEX sounding rocket wire grid collimator design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Ann; Zeiger, Ben; Rogers, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    CODEX is a sounding rocket payload designed to operate in the soft x-ray (0.1-1.0 kV) regime. The instrument has a 3.25 degree square field of view that uses a one meter long wire grid collimator to create a beam that converges to a line in the focal plane. Wire grid collimator performance is directly correlated to the geometric accuracy of actual grid features and their relative locations. Utilizing a strategic combination of manufacturing and assembly techniques, this design is engineered for precision within the confines of a typical rocket budget. Expected resilience of the collimator under flight conditions is predicted by mechanical analysis.

  20. Collimator for the SPS extracted beam

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    This is a water cooled copper collimator (TCSA) which has exactly the shape of the cross section of the downstream magnetic beam splitter. Parts of the blown up primary proton beam pass above/below and left through this collimator. A small part of the protons is absorbed in the thin copper wedges. In this way the downstream magnetic splitter of the same cross section receives already a beam where its magnetic wedges are no longer hit by protons. The upstream, water cooled collimator, more resistant to protons, has cast a 'shadow' onto the downstream magnetic splitter, less resistant to protons. Gualtero Del Torre stands on the left.

  1. Simulation of MHD collimation from differential rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Christopher

    2005-10-01

    Recent observations indicate that astrophysical outflows from active galactic nuclei are permeated with helical magnetic fields[1]. The most promising theory for the formation of the magnetic configurations in these magnetically driven jets is the coiling of an initial seed field by the differential rotation of the accretion disk surrounding the central object. We have begun simulations that are relevant to these Poynting jets using the NIMROD code[2]. To simulate dynamics on length scales that are significantly larger than the accretion disk, the non-relativistic MHD equations are evolved on a hemispherical logarithmic mesh. The accretion disk is treated as a condition on the lower boundary by applying a Keplerian velocity to the azimuthal component of the fluid velocity and a prescribed flux of mass through the boundary. The magnetic field configuration is initialized to a dipole like field. Formation of a jet outflow is observed later in time. The initial field is coiled up and collimated, driving a large current density on the axis of symmetry. Slipping of magnetic field lines due to non-ideal effects has been investigated. 1. Asada K. et. al., Pub. of the Astr. Soc. of Japan, 54, L39-L43, 2002 2. Sovinec C. et. al., J. Comp. Phys., 195, 355-386, 2004

  2. Semiautomatic beam-based LHC collimator alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, Gianluca; Bruce, Roderik; Wollmann, Daniel; Sammut, Nicholas; Rossi, Adriana; Redaelli, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Full beam-based alignment of the LHC collimation system was a time-consuming procedure (up to 28 hours) as the collimators were set up manually. A yearly alignment campaign has been sufficient for now, although in the future due to tighter tolerances this may lead to a decrease in the cleaning efficiency if machine parameters such as the beam orbit drift over time. Automating the collimator setup procedure can reduce the beam time for collimator setup and allow for more frequent alignments, therefore reducing the risk of performance degradation. This article describes the design and testing of a semiautomatic algorithm as a first step towards a fully automatic setup procedure. The parameters used to measure the accuracy and performance of the alignment are defined and determined from experimental data. A comparison of these measured parameters at 450 GeV and 3.5 TeV with manual and semiautomatic alignment is provided.

  3. New methods of particle collimation in colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    The collimation system is an essential part of the design of any high-power accelerator. Its functions include protection of components from accidental and intentional energy deposition, reduction of backgrounds, and beam diagnostics. Conventional multi-stage systems based on scatterers and absorbers offer robust shielding and efficient collection of losses. Two complementary concepts have been proposed to address some of the limitations of conventional systems: channeling and volume reflection in bent crystals and collimation with hollow electron beams. The main focus of this paper is the hollow electron beam collimator, a novel concept based on the interaction of the circulating beam with a 5-keV, magnetically confined, pulsed hollow electron beam in a 2-m-long section of the ring. The electrons enclose the circulating beam, kicking halo particles transversely and leaving the beam core unperturbed. By acting as tunable diffusion enhancer and not as a hard aperture limitation, the hollow electron beam collim...

  4. Crystal collimator systems for high energy frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytov, A. I.; Tikhomirov, V. V.; Lobko, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    Crystalline collimators can potentially considerably improve the cleaning performance of the presently used collimator systems using amorphous collimators. A crystal-based collimation scheme which relies on the channeling particle deflection in bent crystals has been proposed and extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally. However, since the efficiency of particle capture into the channeling regime does not exceed ninety percent, this collimation scheme partly suffers from the same leakage problems as the schemes using amorphous collimators. To improve further the cleaning efficiency of the crystal-based collimation system to meet the requirements of the FCC, we suggest here a double crystal-based collimation scheme, to which the second crystal is introduced to enhance the deflection of the particles escaping the capture to the channeling regime in its first crystal. The application of the effect of multiple volume reflection in one bent crystal and of the same in a sequence of crystals is simulated and compared for different crystal numbers and materials at the energy of 50 TeV. To enhance also the efficiency of use of the first crystal of the suggested double crystal-based scheme, we propose: the method of increase of the probability of particle capture into the channeling regime at the first crystal passage by means of fabrication of a crystal cut and the method of the amplification of nonchanneled particle deflection through the multiple volume reflection in one bent crystal, accompanying the particle channeling by a skew plane. We simulate both of these methods for the 50 TeV FCC energy.

  5. Comparison of carbon and HI-Z primary collimators for the LHC phase II collimation system

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, L; Smith, J; Assmann, R; Bracco, C; Weiler, T

    2010-01-01

    A current issue with the LHC collimation system is single-diffractive, off-energy protons from the primary collimators that pass completely through the secondary collimation system and are absorbed immediately downbeam in the cold magnets of the dispersion suppressor section. Simulations suggest that the high impact rate could result in quenching of these magnets. We have studied replacing the 60 cm primary graphite collimators, which remove halo mainly by inelastic strong interactions, with 5.25 mm tungsten, which remove halo mainly by multiple coulomb scattering and thereby reduce the rate of single-diffractive interactions that cause losses in the dispersion suppressor.

  6. Comparison of the current LHC Collimators and the SLAC Phase 2 Collimator Impedances

    CERN Document Server

    Day, Hugo; Metral, Elias; Salvant, Benoit; Jones, Roger

    2011-01-01

    One of the key sources of transverse impedance in the LHC has been the secondary graphite collimators that sit close to the beam at all energies. This limits the stable bunch intensity due to transverse coupled-bunch instabilities and transverse mode coupling instability. To counteract this, new secondary collimators have been proposed for the phase II upgrade of the LHC collimation system. A number of designs based on different jaw materials and mechanical designs have been proposed. A comparison of the beam coupling impedance of these different designs derived from simulations are presented, with reference to the existing phase I secondary collimator design.

  7. Comparison of the current LHC Collimators and the SLAC phase 2 Collimator impedances

    CERN Document Server

    Day, H A; Metral, E; Salvant, B; Jones, R M

    2011-01-01

    One of the key sources of transverse impedance in the LHC has been the secondary graphite collimators that sit close to the beam at all energies. This limits the stable bunch intensity due to transverse coupled-bunch instabilities and transverse mode coupling instability. To counteract this, new secondary collimators have been proposed for the phase II upgrade of the LHC collimation system. A number of designs based on different jaw materials and mechanical designs have been proposed. A comparison of the beam coupling impedance of these different designs derived from simulations are presented, with reference to the existing phase I secondary collimator design.

  8. Comparison of the current LHC Collimators and the SLAC Phase 2 Collimator Impedances

    CERN Document Server

    Day, Hugo; Metral, Elias; Salvant, Benoit; Jones, Roger

    2011-01-01

    One of the key sources of transverse impedance in the LHC has been the secondary graphite collimators that sit close to the beam at all energies. This limits the stable bunch intensity due to transverse coupled-bunch instabilities and transverse mode coupling instability. To counteract this, new secondary collimators have been proposed for the phase II upgrade of the LHC collimation system. A number of designs based on different jaw materials and mechanical designs have been proposed. A comparison of the beam coupling impedance of these different designs derived from simulations are presented, with reference to the existing phase I secondary collimator design.

  9. A Simple and Inexpensive Collimator for Neutron Radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J.; Mortensen, L.

    1974-01-01

    A neutron beam collimator was constructed by means of plastic drinking “straws”. The properties of the collimator were investigated, and especially the distribution of the neutrons at different distances.......A neutron beam collimator was constructed by means of plastic drinking “straws”. The properties of the collimator were investigated, and especially the distribution of the neutrons at different distances....

  10. A study of RHIC crystal collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Trbojevic, D; Harrison, M; Parker, B; Thompson, P; Stevens, A; Mokhov, N V; Drozhdin, A I

    1998-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will experience increasing longitudinal and transverse heavy ion emittances, mostly due to intra-beam scattering (IBS). The experiments in RHIC are expected to not only have reduced luminosities due to IBS but also an unwanted beam halo. Primary betatron collimators will be used to remove the large amplitude particles. The efficiency of the primary collimator in RHIC depends very much on the alignment of the jaws which needs to be within few micro-radians for the best conditions. As proposed by V. Biryukov bent crystals could be used to improve the efficiency of an existing collimation system by installing them upstream of the collimator jaws. Bent crystals have been successfully used in SPS, Protvino and Fermilab for extraction of the beam particles channeled through them. This study examines possible improvements of the primary collimator system for heavy ions at RHIC by use of bent crystals. Bent crystals will reduce the collimator jaws alignment requirement and w...

  11. Wake fields in SLAC Linac Collimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novokhatski, Alexander [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Decker, F. -J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Smith, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Sullivan, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-12-02

    When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible for the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. In addition, we also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.

  12. Finite element analysis on the static and fatigue characteristics of composite multi-leaf spring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo-teck Jeffrey KUEH; Tarlochan FARIS

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigated the static and fatigue behaviors of steel and composite multi-leaf spring using the ANSYS V12 software.The dimensions of an existing conventional leaf spring of a light commercial vehicle were used.The same dimensions were used to design composite multi-leaf spring for the two materials,E-glass fiber/epoxy and E-glass fiber/vinyl ester,which are of great interest to the transportation industry.Main consideration was given to the effects of material composition and its fiber orientation on the static and fatigue behaviors of leaf spring.The design constraints were bending stresses,deflection and fatigue life.Compared to the steel leaf spring,the designed composite spring has much lower bending stresses and deflections and higher fatigue life cycles.

  13. Collimating Slicer for Optical Integral Field Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) is a technique that gives simultaneously the spectrum of each spatial sampling element in a given object field. It is a powerful tool which rearranges the data cube (x, y, lambda) represented by two spatial dimensions defining the field and the spectral decomposition in a detector plane. In IFS, the spatial unit reorganizes the field and the spectral unit is being composed of a classical spectrograph.The development of a Collimating Slicer aims at proposing a new type of integral field spectrograph which should be more compact. The main idea is to combine the image slicer with the collimator of the spectrograph, thus mixing the spatial and spectral units. The traditional combination of slicer, pupil and slit elements and the spectrograph collimator is replaced by a new one composed of a slicer and collimator only. In this paper, the state of the art of integral field spectroscopy using image slicers is described. The new system based onto the development of a Collimating Slic...

  14. Collimating slicer for optical integral field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Florence; Hénault, François

    2016-07-01

    Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) is a technique that gives simultaneously the spectrum of each spatial sampling element of a given field. It is a powerful tool which rearranges the data cube represented by two spatial dimensions defining the field and the spectral decomposition (x, y, λ) in a detector plane. In IFS, the "spatial" unit reorganizes the field, the "spectral" unit is being composed of a classical spectrograph. For the spatial unit, three main techniques - microlens array, microlens array associated with fibres and image slicer - are used in astronomical instrumentations. The development of a Collimating Slicer is to propose a new type of optical integral field spectroscopy which should be more compact. The main idea is to combine the image slicer with the collimator of the spectrograph mixing the "spatial" and "spectral" units. The traditional combination of slicer, pupil and slit elements and spectrograph collimator is replaced by a new one composed of a slicer and spectrograph collimator only. After testing few configurations, this new system looks very promising for low resolution spectrographs. In this paper, the state of art of integral field spectroscopy using image slicers will be described. The new system based onto the development of a Collimating Slicer for optical integral field spectroscopy will be depicted. First system analysis results and future improvements will be discussed.

  15. Upgrade scenario for the RHIC collimation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert-Demolaize, G.; Drees, A.

    2012-01-19

    The RHIC collimation system is used to reduce background levels in both STAR and PHENIX detectors. With a push for higher luminosity in the near future, it becomes critical to check if and how the level of performance of the collimators can be improved. The following reviews a proposal for additional collimators placed further downstream of the current system and designed to intercept the tertiary halo coming out of the IR8 insertion before it can reach the triplet quadrupoles in either STAR or PHENIX. Simulations have been peformed to quantify the efficiency of additional collimator jaws in RHIC. Each figure presented in this article clearly shows that the additional mask collimators provide the expected reduction in losses around the machine, and especially to the incoming triplet to the STAR experiment (IP6), for the Yellow beam as much as for the Blue beam. Looking at compiled statistics for all three working point cases studied, proton losses around the machine are reduced by roughly one order of magnitude: at most a factor 30 for magnet losses, and at most a factor 40 for losses in spaces between magnets.

  16. Vol. 31 - Crystal Collimation for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mirarchi, Daniele; Scandale, Walter; Hall, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Future upgrades of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may demand improved cleaning performance of its collimation system. Very efficient collimation is required during regular operations at high intensities, because even a small amount of energy deposited on superconducting magnets can cause an abrupt loss of superconducting conditions (quench). The present collimation system has accomplished its tasks during the LHC Run I very well, where no quench with circulating beam took place with up to 150 MJ of stored energy at 4 TeV. On the other hand, uncertainty remains on the performance at the design energy of 7 TeV and with 360 MJ of stored energy. In particular, a further increase up to about 700 MJ is expected for the high luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC), where improved cleaning performance may be needed together with a reduction of collimator impedance. The possibility to use a crystal-based collimation system represents an option for improving both cleaning performance and impedance compared to the present s...

  17. Upgrade scenario for the RHIC collimation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert-Demolaize, G.; Drees, A.

    2012-01-19

    The RHIC collimation system is used to reduce background levels in both STAR and PHENIX detectors. With a push for higher luminosity in the near future, it becomes critical to check if and how the level of performance of the collimators can be improved. The following reviews a proposal for additional collimators placed further downstream of the current system and designed to intercept the tertiary halo coming out of the IR8 insertion before it can reach the triplet quadrupoles in either STAR or PHENIX. Simulations have been peformed to quantify the efficiency of additional collimator jaws in RHIC. Each figure presented in this article clearly shows that the additional mask collimators provide the expected reduction in losses around the machine, and especially to the incoming triplet to the STAR experiment (IP6), for the Yellow beam as much as for the Blue beam. Looking at compiled statistics for all three working point cases studied, proton losses around the machine are reduced by roughly one order of magnitude: at most a factor 30 for magnet losses, and at most a factor 40 for losses in spaces between magnets.

  18. A SPECT imager with synthetic collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelin, Ronan J.; Miller, Brian W.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Murphy, J. M.; Foley, Mark J.

    2013-09-01

    This work outlines the development of a multi-pinhole SPECT system designed to produce a synthetic-collimator image of a small field of view. The focused multi-pinhole collimator was constructed using rapid-prototyping and casting techniques. The collimator projects the field of view through forty-six pinholes when the detector is adjacent to the collimator. The detector is then moved further from the collimator to increase the magnification of the system. The amount of pinhole-projection overlap increases with the system magnification. There is no rotation in the system; a single tomographic angle is used in each system configuration. The maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) algorithm is implemented on graphics processing units to reconstruct the object in the field of view. Iterative reconstruction algorithms, such as MLEM, require an accurate model of the system response. For each system magnification, a sparsely-sampled system response is measured by translating a point source through a grid encompassing the field of view. The pinhole projections are individually identified and associated with their respective apertures. A 2D elliptical Gaussian model is applied to the pinhole projections on the detector. These coefficients are associated with the object-space location of the point source, and a finely-sampled system matrix is interpolated. Simulations with a hot-rod phantom demonstrate the efficacy of combining low-resolution non-multiplexed data with high-resolution multiplexed data to produce high-resolution reconstructions.

  19. Fast regional readout CMOS Image Sensor for dynamic MLC tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, H.; Harris, E.; Osmond, J.; Evans, P.

    2014-03-01

    Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) require verification of the complex beam delivery including tracking of multileaf collimators (MLC) and monitoring the dose rate. This work explores the feasibility of a prototype Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor Image Sensor (CIS) for tracking these complex treatments by utilising fast, region of interest (ROI) read out functionality. An automatic edge tracking algorithm was used to locate the MLC leaves edges moving at various speeds (from a moving triangle field shape) and imaged with various sensor frame rates. The CIS demonstrates successful edge detection of the dynamic MLC motion within accuracy of 1.0 mm. This demonstrates the feasibility of the sensor to verify treatment delivery involving dynamic MLC up to ~400 frames per second (equivalent to the linac pulse rate), which is superior to any current techniques such as using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). CIS provides the basis to an essential real-time verification tool, useful in accessing accurate delivery of complex high energy radiation to the tumour and ultimately to achieve better cure rates for cancer patients.

  20. High power collimated diode laser stack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuan-yuan; FANG Gao-zhan; MA Xiao-yu; LIU Su-ping; FENG Xiao-ming

    2006-01-01

    A high power collimated diode laser stack is carried out based on fast-axis collimation and stack packaging techniques.The module includes ten typical continuous wave (cw) bars and the total output power can be up to 368W at 48.6A.Using a cylindrical lens as the collimation elements,we can make the fast-axis divergence and the slow-axis divergence are 0.926 40 and 8.2060 respectively.The light emitting area is limited in a square area of 18.3 mm×11 mm.The module has the advantage of high power density and offers a wide potential applications in pumping and material processing.

  1. Macrostrain measurement using radial collimators at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Roberts, J.A.; Davis, D.

    1996-06-01

    A series of `short` radial collimators have been implemented in the 90{degrees} scattering geometries on the neutron powder diffractometer at Los Alamos. The capability to perform macrostrain measurements has been improved by the commensurate ability to rapidly select a sampling volume appropriate to the specimen. The compact design of the collimators was dictated by the need to fit them in a cylindrical vacuum chamber as well as providing space in which to manipulate a specimen in three dimensions. Collimators of different vane lengths were fabricated to give 4 different resolutions for which 2/3 of the diffracted intensity comes form distances of 0.75, 1. 25, 2.5, and 4.0 mm along the incident beam. Qualifying scans and a demonstration of a cracked ring, containing a steep stress gradient, are included.

  2. Dielectric Collimators for Linear Collider Beam Delivery System

    CERN Document Server

    Kanareykin, A; Baturin, S; Tomás, R

    2011-01-01

    The current status of ILC and CLIC concepts require additional research on wakefield reduction in the collimator sections. New materials and new geometries have been considered recently*. Dielectric collimators for the CLIC Beam Delivery System have been discussed with a view to minimize the BDS collimation wakefields**. Dielectric collimator concepts for the linear collider are presented in this paper; cylindrical and planar collimators for the CLIC parameters have been considered, and simulations to minimize the beam impedance have been performed. The prototype collimator system is planned to be fabricated and experimentally tested at Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams (FACET) at SLAC.

  3. Channeling collimation studies at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, Richard A.; Drozhdin, Alexandr I.; Fliller, Raymond P., III; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Shiltsev, Vladimir D.; Still, Dean A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Bent crystal channeling has promising advantages for accelerator beam collimation at high energy hadron facilities such as the LHC. This significance has been amplified by several surprising developments including multi-pass channeling and the observation of enhanced deflections over the entire arc of a bent crystal. The second effect has been observed both at RHIC and recently at the Tevatron. Results are reported showing channeling collimation of the circulating proton beam halo at the Tevatron. Parenthetically, this study is the highest energy proton channeling experiment ever carried out. The study is continuing.

  4. Photonic crystal self-collimation sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufei; Wang, Hailing; Xue, Qikun; Zheng, Wanhua

    2012-05-21

    A novel refractive index sensor based on the two dimensional photonic crystal folded Michelson interferometer employing the self-collimation effect is proposed and its performances are theoretically investigated. Two sensing areas are included in the sensor. Simulation results indicate the branch area is suitable for the small index variety range and fine detection, whereas the reflector area prone to the large index change range and coarse detection. Because of no defect waveguides and no crosstalk of signal, the sensor is desirable to perform monolithic integrated, low-cost, label-free real-time parallel sensing. In addition, a flexible design of self-collimation sensors array is demonstrated.

  5. Online Status and Settings Monitoring for the LHC Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, G; Jacquet, D; Redaelli, S; Veyrunes, E

    2014-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is equipped with 100 movable collimators. The LHC collimator control system is responsible for the accurate synchronization of around 400 axes of motion at the microsecond level, and with the precision of a few micrometers.

  6. ENERGY DEPOSITION STUDIES FOR POSSIBLE INNOVATIVE PHASE II COLLIMATOR DESIGNS

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Vlachoudis, V; Weiler, T

    2009-01-01

    Due to the known limitations of Phase I LHC collimators in stable physics conditions, the LHC collimation system will be complemented by additional 30 Phase II collimators. The Phase II collimation system is designed to improve cleaning efficiency and to minimize the collimator-induced impedance with the main function of protecting the Super Conducting (SC) magnets from quenching due to beam particle losses. To fulfil these requirements, different possible innovative collimation designs were taken in consideration. Advanced jaw materials, including new composite materials (e.g. Cu–Diamond), jaw SiC insertions, coating foil, in-jaw instrumentation (e.g. BPM) and improved mechanical robustness of the jaw are the main features of these new promising Phase II collimator designs developed at CERN. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used to evaluate the behavior of these collimators in the most radioactive areas of LHC, supporting the mechanical integration. These studies aim to identify the possible criti...

  7. Energy Deposition Studies for Possible Innovative Phase II Collimator Designs

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Vlachoudis, V; Weiler, T

    2010-01-01

    Due to the known limitations of Phase I LHC collimators in stable physics conditions, the LHC collimation system will be complemented by additional 30 Phase II collimators. The Phase II collimation system is designed to improve cleaning efficiency and to minimize the collimator-induced impedance with the main function of protecting the Super Conducting (SC) magnets from quenching due to beam particle losses. To fulfil these requirements, different possible innovative collimation designs were taken in consideration. Advanced jaw materials, including new composite materials (e.g. Cu–Diamond), jaw SiC insertions, coating foil, in-jaw instrumentation (e.g. BPM) and improved mechanical robustness of the jaw are the main features of these new promising Phase II collimator designs developed at CERN. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used to evaluate the behavior of these collimators in the most radioactive areas of LHC, supporting the mechanical integration. These studies aim to identify the possible criti...

  8. Robust Collimation Control of Laser-Generated Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, S; Kamiyama, D; Nagashima, T; Barada, D; Gu, Y J; Li, X; Yu, Q; Kong, Q; Wang, P X

    2015-01-01

    The robustness of a structured collimation device is discussed for an intense-laser-produced ion beam. In this paper the ion beam collimation is realized by the solid structured collimation device, which produces the transverse electric field; the electric field contributes to reduce the ion beam transverse velocity and collimate the ion beam. Our 2.5 dimensional particle-in cell simulations demonstrate that the collimation device is rather robust against the changes in the laser parameters and the collimation target sizes. The intense short-pulse lasers are now available, and are used to generate an ion beam. The issues in the laser ion acceleration include an ion beam collimation, ion energy spectrum control, ion production efficiency, ion energy control, ion beam bunching, etc. The laser-produced ion beam tends to expand in the transverse and longitudinal directions during the ion beam propagation. The ion beam collimation is focused in this paper.

  9. BPM Design and Impedance Considerations for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Collimation Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; /SLAC; Keller, Lewis; /SLAC; Lundgren, Steven; /SLAC; Markiewicz, Thomas; /SLAC; Young, Andrew; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the 30 high robust Phase I graphite secondary collimators with 30 high Z Phase II collimators. This paper reports on BPM and impedance considerations and measurements of the integrated BPMs in the prototype rotatable collimator to be installed in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN. The BPMs are necessary to align the jaws with the beam. Without careful design the beam impedance can result in unacceptable heating of the chamber wall or beam instabilities. The impedance measurements involve utilizing both a single displaced wire and two wires excited in opposite phase to disentangle the driving and detuning transverse impedances. Trapped mode resonances and longitudinal impedance are to also be measured and compared with simulations. These measurements, when completed, will demonstrate the device is fully operational and has the impedance characteristics and BPM performance acceptable for installation in the SPS.

  10. Grazing function g and collimation angular acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen G. Peggs

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The grazing function g is introduced—a synchrobetatron optical quantity that is analogous (and closely connected to the Twiss and dispersion functions β, α, η, and η^{′}. It parametrizes the rate of change of total angle with respect to synchrotron amplitude for grazing particles, which just touch the surface of an aperture when their synchrotron and betatron oscillations are simultaneously (in time at their extreme displacements. The grazing function can be important at collimators with limited acceptance angles. For example, it is important in both modes of crystal collimation operation—in channeling and in volume reflection. The grazing function is independent of the collimator type—crystal or amorphous—but can depend strongly on its azimuthal location. The rigorous synchrobetatron condition g=0 is solved, by invoking the close connection between the grazing function and the slope of the normalized dispersion. Propagation of the grazing function is described, through drifts, dipoles, and quadrupoles. Analytic expressions are developed for g in perfectly matched periodic FODO cells, and in the presence of β or η error waves. These analytic approximations are shown to be, in general, in good agreement with realistic numerical examples. The grazing function is shown to scale linearly with FODO cell bend angle, but to be independent of FODO cell length. The ideal value is g=0 at the collimator, but finite nonzero values are acceptable. Practically achievable grazing functions are described and evaluated, for both amorphous and crystal primary collimators, at RHIC, the SPS (UA9, the Tevatron (T-980, and the LHC.

  11. Collimator scatter and 2D dosimetry in small proton beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Luijk, P.; van 't Veld, A.A.; Zelle, H.D.; Schippers, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to determine the influence of collimator-scattered protons from a 150 MeV proton beam on the dose distribution behind a collimator. Slit-shaped collimators with apertures between 2 and 20 mm have been simulated. The Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 has been val

  12. Crab dispersion and its impact on the CERN Large Hadron Collider collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, P; Tomàs, R; Zimmermann, F

    2010-01-01

    Crab cavities are proposed to be used for a luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The crab cavity introduces another kind of dispersion to the particles which is z dependent, and thus could complicate the beam dynamics and have an impact on the LHC collimation system. As for LHC, the off-momentum beta-beat and dispersion-beat already compromise the performance of the collimation system; the crab dispersion introduced by global crab cavities might do the same, and should be carefully evaluated. In this paper, we present a definition for the crab dispersion, and study its impact on the LHC collimation system.

  13. Beam Collimation and Machine-Detector Interface at the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, Nikolai V; Kostin, Mikhail A

    2005-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation, spray from the dumps and extraction lines, beam-gas and beam halo interactions with collimators and other components in the ILC beam delivery system create fluxes of muons and other secondaries which can exceed the tolerable levels at a detector by a few orders of magnitude. It is shown that with a multi-stage collimation system, magnetized iron spoilers which fill the tunnel and a set of masks in the detector, one can hopefully meet the design goals. Results of modeling with the STRUCT and MARS15 codes of beam loss and energy deposition effects are presented in this paper. We concentrate on collimation system and mask design and optimization, short- and long-term survivability of the critical components (spoilers, absorbers, magnets, separators, dumps), dynamic heat loads and radiation levels in magnets and other components, machine-related backgrounds and damage in collider detectors, and environmental aspects (prompt dose, ground-water and air activation).

  14. Monte Carlo modeling of HD120 multileaf collimator on Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator for verification of 6X and 6X FFF VMAT SABR treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Alanah M; Gete, Ermias; Duzenli, Cheryl; Teke, Tony

    2014-05-08

    A Monte Carlo (MC) validation of the vendor-supplied Varian TrueBeam 6 MV flattened (6X) phase-space file and the first implementation of the Siebers-Keall MC MLC model as applied to the HD120 MLC (for 6X flat and 6X flattening filter-free (6X FFF) beams) are described. The MC model is validated in the context of VMAT patient-specific quality assurance. The Monte Carlo commissioning process involves: 1) validating the calculated open-field percentage depth doses (PDDs), profiles, and output factors (OF), 2) adapting the Siebers-Keall MLC model to match the new HD120-MLC geometry and material composition, 3) determining the absolute dose conversion factor for the MC calculation, and 4) validating this entire linac/MLC in the context of dose calculation verification for clinical VMAT plans. MC PDDs for the 6X beams agree with the measured data to within 2.0% for field sizes ranging from 2 × 2 to 40 × 40 cm2. Measured and MC profiles show agreement in the 50% field width and the 80%-20% penumbra region to within 1.3 mm for all square field sizes. MC OFs for the 2 to 40 cm2 square fields agree with measurement to within 1.6%. Verification of VMAT SABR lung, liver, and vertebra plans demonstrate that measured and MC ion chamber doses agree within 0.6% for the 6X beam and within 2.0% for the 6X FFF beam. A 3D gamma factor analysis demonstrates that for the 6X beam, > 99% of voxels meet the pass criteria (3%/3 mm). For the 6X FFF beam, > 94% of voxels meet this criteria. The TrueBeam accelerator delivering 6X and 6X FFF beams with the HD120 MLC can be modeled in Monte Carlo to provide an independent 3D dose calculation for clinical VMAT plans. This quality assurance tool has been used clinically to verify over 140 6X and 16 6X FFF TrueBeam treatment plans.

  15. SU-E-T-534: Dosimetric Effect of Multileaf Collimator Leaf Width On Volumetric Modulated Arc Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Spine Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoush, A; Djemil, T [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Subedi, L [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Huang, L [Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric impact of MLC leaf width in patients treated with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for spine Stereotactic Body radiation Therapy (SBRT). Methods: Twelve spine SBRT patients were retrospectively selected for this study. The patients were treated with IMRT following the RTOG-0631 of spine metastasis. The prescription dose was 16 Gy in one fraction to 90% of the target volume (V16 > 90%). The maximum spinal cord dose of 14 Gy and 10% of the cord receiving < 10 Gy (V10) were set as dose constraints. For purpose of this study, three dual arc VMAT plans were created for each patient using three different MLC leaf widths: 2.5 mm, 4mm, and 5mm. The compliance to RTOG 0631, conformal index (CI), dose gradient index (DGI), and number of monitor units (MUs) were compared. Results: The average V16 of the target was 91.91±1.36%, 93.73±2.38%, and 92.25±2.49% for 2.5 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm leaf widths, respectively (p=0.39). Accordingly, the average CI was 1.36±0.39, 1.36±0.34, and 1.41±0.3 (0.96), respectively. The average DGI was 0.24 ± 0.05, 0.22 ± 0.05, and 0.23 ± 0.04, respectively (p=0.86). The average spinal cord maximum dose was 12.10 ± 0.88 Gy, 12.52 ± 1.15 Gy, and 12.05 ± 1.12 (p=0.75) and V10 was 2.69 ± 1.71 cc, 5.43 ± 2.16 cc, and 3.71 ± 2.34 cc (p=0.15) for 2.5 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm leaf widths, respectively. According, the average number of MUs was 4255 ± 431 MU, 5049 ± 1036 MU, and 4231 ± 580 MU respectively (p=0.17). Conclusion: The use of 2.5 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm MLCs achieved similar VMAT plan quality as recommended by RTOG-0631. The dosimetric parameters were also comparable for the three MLCs.

  16. Shielding in whole brain irradiation in the multileaf collimator era: Dosimetric evaluation of coverage using SFOP guidelines against in-house guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Vijay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : Compare the planning target volume (PTV coverage in three different shielding techniques in cranial irradiation. Settings and Design : Tertiary care center, prospective study. Materials and Methods : The whole brain and meninges were contoured in ten planning CT scans, and expanded by 5 mm for the PTV. Shielding was designed using the French Society of Pediatric Oncology (SFOP guidelines (SFOP plan, in-house recommendation (with 1 cm margin from the orbital roof and sphenoid wing on a igitally Reconstructed Radiograph (DRR and a third plan was generated using a 3D conformal radiation technique (3DCRT. The coverage of the PTV was noted using the isodose covering 95% of the PTV(D95, minimum dose within the PTV(D min , and maximum dose within the PTV(D max . The location of PTV not covered by the 95% isodose curve was noted. The median dose and maximum dose (D max to both eyes and maximum dose D max for the lens were noted. Statistical Analysis : General linear model method repeated the measure of analysis of variance test (ANOVA. Results : PTV coverage was significantly poorer in the SFOP and in-house plans as compared to 3DCRT plan (P=0.04. Median volume of PTV not covered by 95% isodose curve was 4.18 cc, 1.01 cc, and 0 cc in SFOP, in-house, and 3DCRT plan, respectively. Conclusions : In the absence of volumetric planning techniques, SFOP guidelines lead to inadequate coverage and the in-house method is recommended.

  17. PERFORMANCE OF AND UPGRADES TO THE SNS COLLIMATOR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plum, Michael A [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; Jacobs, Lorelei L [ORNL; Janney, Jim G [ORNL; Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; McTeer, Stephen Mark [ORNL; Popova, Irina [ORNL; Ferguson, Phillip D [ORNL; Zhukov, Alexander P [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    As the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam power is increased, the collimator systems are becoming correspondingly more important. The High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) transverse collimators are now routinely used during neutron production. We are in the process of redesigning the HEBT momentum collimation system due to problems with gas production from radiolysis. The Ring collimators are designed for two-stage operation but to date they are mainly used in one-stage mode. In this paper we will discuss the status, the operational performance, and upgrades to the collimation systems.

  18. Performance of a novel collimator for high-sensitivity brain SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong; Zimmerman, Robert E; Fischman, Alan J; Kijewski, Marie Foley

    2006-01-01

    the central regions to allow estimation of sphere activity. In 99mTc-HMPAO human studies, SNR was improved by 21 to 41% in the cortex, 66% in the basal ganglia, and 74% in the thalamus. The new collimator leads to substantially improved detection and estimation performance throughout the brain. The higher sensitivity will be particularly important for dynamic imaging.

  19. Collimated Magnetron Sputter Deposition for Mirror Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickery, A.; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2008-01-01

    At the Danish National Space Center (DNSC), a planar magnetron sputtering chamber has been established as a research and production coating facility for curved X-ray mirrors for hard X-ray optics for astronomical X-ray telescopes. In the following, we present experimental evidence that a collimat......At the Danish National Space Center (DNSC), a planar magnetron sputtering chamber has been established as a research and production coating facility for curved X-ray mirrors for hard X-ray optics for astronomical X-ray telescopes. In the following, we present experimental evidence...... that a collimation of the sputtered particles is an efficient way to suppress the interfacial roughness of the produced multilayer. We present two different types of collimation optimized for the production of low roughness curved mirrors and flat mirrors, respectively....

  20. Can Collimated Extraterrestrial Signals be Intercepted?

    CERN Document Server

    Forgan, Duncan H

    2014-01-01

    The Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (OSETI) attempts to detect collimated, narrowband pulses of electromagnetic radiation. These pulses may either consist of signals intentionally directed at the Earth, or signals between two star systems with a vector that unintentionally intersects the Solar System, allowing Earth to intercept the communication. But should we expect to be able to intercept these unintentional signals? And what constraints can we place upon the frequency of intelligent civilisations if we do? We carry out Monte Carlo Realisation simulations of interstellar communications between civilisations in the Galactic Habitable Zone (GHZ) using collimated beams. We measure the frequency with which beams between two stars are intercepted by a third. The interception rate increases linearly with the fraction of communicating civilisations, and as the cube of the beam opening angle, which is somewhat stronger than theoretical expectations, which we argue is due to the geometry of the GHZ...

  1. A Novel Collimation Method for Large Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Ye; Tang, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel collimation method for large hadron colliders by arranging betatron and momentum collimation systems in the same insertion to improve the overall cleaning efficiency. The method has the potential of avoiding beam losses at the downstream dispersion suppression section following the conventional betatron collimation section, which is caused by those particles with single diffractive scattering at the collimators. Evident beam loss in arc sections should be avoided to protect the superconducting magnets from quenching, especially when the stored beam energy is up to hundreds of MJ level or even higher in modern proton-proton collider. Our studies show that it is beneficial to arrange the momentum collimation system just after the betatron collimation system so that it can clean the particles with lower momentum due to the single diffractive scattering in the betatron collimators. This method is being applied to the future proton-proton collider SPPC. Preliminary multi-particle simula...

  2. Gamma Imaging using Rotational Modulation Collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    in detection probabilities over traditional gamma detection, especially when the radiation source was shielded . Within DSTO the gamma imaging program...container Figure A2: Experimental setup used to measure radiation source stored in its lead and steel shielding transport container 16 UNCLASSIFIED...characterise the performance of two rotating modulation collimator (RMC) gamma imagers built by DSTO. The ability of these devices to image shielded and

  3. Electron Lenses for particle collimation in LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, V

    2008-01-01

    Electron Lenses built and installed in Tevatron have proven themselves as safe and very reliable instruments which can be effectively used in hadron collider operation for a number of applications, including compensation of beam-beam effects , DC beam removal from abort gaps , as a diagnostic tool. In this presentation we – following original proposal – consider in more detail a possibility of using electron lenses with hollow electron beam for ion and proton collimation in LHC.

  4. Coronal Jet Collimation by Nonlinear Induced Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasheghani Farahani, S.; Hejazi, S. M.

    2017-08-01

    Our objective is to study the collimation of solar jets by nonlinear forces corresponding to torsional Alfvén waves together with external forces. We consider a straight, initially non-rotating, untwisted magnetic cylinder embedded in a plasma with a straight magnetic field, where a shear between the internal and external flows exists. By implementing magnetohydrodynamic theory and taking into account the second-order thin flux tube approximation, the balance between the internal nonlinear forces is visualized. The nonlinear differential equation containing the ponderomotive, magnetic tension, and centrifugal forces in the presence of the shear flow is obtained. The solution presents the scale of influence of the propagating torsional Alfvén wave on compressive perturbations. Explicit expressions for the compressive perturbations caused by the forces connected to the torsional Alfvén wave show that, in the presence of a shear flow, the magnetic tension and centrifugal forces do not cancel each other’s effects as they did in its absence. This shear flow plays in favor of the magnetic tension force, resulting in a more efficient collimation. Regarding the ponderomotive force, the shear flow has no effect. The phase relations highlight the interplay of the shear flow and the plasma-β. As the shear flow and plasma-β increase, compressive perturbation amplitudes emerge. We conclude that the jet collimation due to the torsional Alfvén wave highly depends on the location of the jet. The shear flow tightens the collimation as the jet elevates up to the solar corona.

  5. Source holder collimator for encapsulating radioactive material and collimating the emanations from the material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurer, G.R.

    1974-01-22

    This invention provides a transportable device capable of detecting normal levels of a trace element, such as lead in a doughnutshaped blood sample by x-ray fluorescence with a minimum of sample preparation in a relatively short analyzing time. In one embodiment, the blood is molded into a doughnut-shaped sample around an annular array of low-energy radioactive material that is at the center of the doughnut-shaped sample but encapsulated in a collimator, the latter shielding a detector that is close to the sample and facing the same so that the detector receives secondary emissions from the sample while the collimator collimates ths primary emissions from the radioactive material to direct these emissions toward the sample around 360 deg and away from the detector. (Official Gazette)

  6. Performance evaluation of advanced industrial SPECT system with diverging collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jang Guen; Jung, Sung-Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Moon, Jinho; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2014-12-01

    An advanced industrial SPECT system with 12-fold-array diverging collimator was developed for flow visualization in industrial reactors and was discussed in the previous study. The present paper describes performance evaluation of the SPECT system under both static- and dynamic- flow conditions. Under static conditions, the movement of radiotracer inside the test reactor was compared with that of color tracer (blue ink) captured with a high-speed camera. The comparison of the reconstructed images obtained with the radiotracer and the SPECT system showed fairly good agreement with video-frames of the color tracer obtained with the camera. Based on the results of the performance evaluation, it is concluded that the SPECT system is suitable for investigation and visualization of flows in industrial flow reactors.

  7. SU-F-BRB-12: A Novel Haar Wavelet Based Approach to Deliver Non-Coplanar Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using Sparse Orthogonal Collimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, D; Ruan, D; Low, D; Sheng, K [Deparment of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); O’Connor, D [Deparment of Mathematics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Boucher, S [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Existing efforts to replace complex multileaf collimator (MLC) by simple jaws for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) resulted in unacceptable compromise in plan quality and delivery efficiency. We introduce a novel fluence map segmentation method based on compressed sensing for plan delivery using a simplified sparse orthogonal collimator (SOC) on the 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy platform. Methods: 4π plans with varying prescription doses were first created by automatically selecting and optimizing 20 non-coplanar beams for 2 GBM, 2 head & neck, and 2 lung patients. To create deliverable 4π plans using SOC, which are two pairs of orthogonal collimators with 1 to 4 leaves in each collimator bank, a Haar Fluence Optimization (HFO) method was used to regulate the number of Haar wavelet coefficients while maximizing the dose fidelity to the ideal prescription. The plans were directly stratified utilizing the optimized Haar wavelet rectangular basis. A matching number of deliverable segments were stratified for the MLC-based plans. Results: Compared to the MLC-based 4π plans, the SOC-based 4π plans increased the average PTV dose homogeneity from 0.811 to 0.913. PTV D98 and D99 were improved by 3.53% and 5.60% of the corresponding prescription doses. The average mean and maximal OAR doses slightly increased by 0.57% and 2.57% of the prescription doses. The average number of segments ranged between 5 and 30 per beam. The collimator travel time to create the segments decreased with increasing leaf numbers in the SOC. The two and four leaf designs were 1.71 and 1.93 times more efficient, on average, than the single leaf design. Conclusion: The innovative dose domain optimization based on compressed sensing enables uncompromised 4π non-coplanar IMRT dose delivery using simple rectangular segments that are deliverable using a sparse orthogonal collimator, which only requires 8 to 16 leaves yet is unlimited in modulation resolution. This work is

  8. The use of a realistic VMAT delivery emulator to optimize dynamic machine parameters for improved treatment efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boylan, C J; Rowbottom, C G; Mackay, R I, E-mail: Christopher.Boylan@physics.cr.man.ac.uk [North Western Medical Physics, Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-07

    The delivery of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) requires the simultaneous movement of the linear accelerator gantry, multi-leaf collimators and jaws while the dose rate is varied. In this study, a VMAT delivery emulator was developed to accurately predict the characteristics of a given treatment plan, incorporating realistic parameters for gantry inertia and the variation in leaf speed with respect to gravity. The emulator was used to assess the impact of dynamic machine parameters on the delivery efficiency, using a set of prostate and head and neck VMAT plans. Initially, assuming a VMAT system with fixed dose rate bins, the allowable leaf and jaw speeds were increased and a significant improvement in treatment time and average dose rate was observed. The software was then adapted to simulate a VMAT system with continuously varying dose rate, and the increase in delivery efficiency was quantified, along with the impact of an increased leaf and jaw speed. Finally, a set of optimal dynamic machine parameters was derived assuming an idealized scenario in which the treatment is delivered in a single arc at constant maximum gantry speed.

  9. Preliminary assessment of beam impact consequences on LHC Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Cauchi, M; Bertarelli, A; Bruce, R; Carra, F; Dallocchio, A; Deboy, D; Mariani, N; Rossi, A; Lari, L; Mollicone, P; Sammut, N

    2011-01-01

    The correct functioning of the LHC collimation system is crucial to attain the desired LHC luminosity performance. However, the requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, the robustness of the collimators plays an important role. An accident, which causes the proton beam to hit a collimator, might result in severe beam-induced damage and, in some cases, replacement of the collimator, with consequent downtime for the machine. In this paper, several case studies representing different realistic beam impact scenarios are shown. A preliminary analysis of the thermal response of tertiary collimators to beam impact is presented, from which the most critical cases can be identified. Such work will also help to give an initial insight on the operational constraints of the LHC by taking into account all relevant collimator damage limits.

  10. Beam Delivery WG Summary: Optics, Collimation & Background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jackson, F.; /Daresbury; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab; Kuroda, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Seryi, A.A.; /SLAC

    2006-01-20

    The presented paper partially summarizes the work of the Beam Delivery working group (WG4) at Snowmass, concentrating on status of optics, layout, collimation, and background. The strawman layout with 2 interaction regions was recommended at the first ILC workshop at KEK in November 2004. Two crossing-angle designs were included in this layout. The design of the ILC BDS has evolved since the first ILC workshop. The progress on the BDS design and extraction line design has been reviewed and the design issues were discussed during the optics and layout session at the Snowmass.

  11. Design of optimal collimation for dedicated molecular breast imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann, Amanda L.; Hruska, Carrie B.; O' Connor, Michael K. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a functional imaging technique that uses specialized small field-of-view gamma cameras to detect the preferential uptake of a radiotracer in breast lesions. MBI has potential to be a useful adjunct method to screening mammography for the detection of occult breast cancer. However, a current limitation of MBI is the high radiation dose (a factor of 7-10 times that of screening mammography) associated with current technology. The purpose of this study was to optimize the gamma camera collimation with the aim of improving sensitivity while retaining adequate resolution for the detection of sub-10-mm lesions. Square-hole collimators with holes matched to the pixilated cadmium zinc telluride detector elements of the MBI system were designed. Data from MBI patient studies and parameters of existing dual-head MBI systems were used to guide the range of desired collimator resolutions, source-to-collimator distances, pixel sizes, and collimator materials that were examined. General equations describing collimator performance for a conventional gamma camera were used in the design process along with several important adjustments to account for the specialized imaging geometry of the MBI system. Both theoretical calculations and a Monte Carlo model were used to measure the geometric efficiency (or sensitivity) and resolution of each designed collimator. Results showed that through optimal collimation, collimator sensitivity could be improved by factors of 1.5-3.2, while maintaining a collimator resolution of either {<=}5 or {<=}7.5 mm at a distance of 3 cm from the collimator face. These gains in collimator sensitivity permit an inversely proportional drop in the required dose to perform MBI.

  12. Optimization of convergent collimators for pixelated SPECT systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capote, Ricardo M.; Matela, Nuno; Conceicao, Raquel C.; Almeida, Pedro [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: The optimization of the collimator design is essential to obtain the best possible sensitivity in single photon emission computed tomography imaging. The aim of this work is to present a methodology for maximizing the sensitivity of convergent collimators, specifically designed to match the pitch of pixelated detectors, for a fixed spatial resolution value and to present some initial results using this approach. Methods: Given the matched constraint, the optimal collimator design cannot be simply found by allowing the highest level of septal penetration and spatial resolution consistent with the imposed restrictions, as it is done for the optimization of conventional collimators. Therefore, an algorithm that interactively calculates the collimator dimensions, with the maximum sensitivity, which respect the imposed restrictions was developed and used to optimize cone and fan beam collimators with tapered square-shaped holes for low (60-300 keV) and high energy radiation (300-511 keV). The optimal collimator dimensions were locally calculated based on the premise that each hole and septa of the convergent collimator should locally resemble an appropriate optimal matched parallel collimator. Results: The optimal collimator dimensions, calculated for subcentimeter resolutions (3 and 7.5 mm), common pixel sizes (1.6, 2.1, and 2.5 mm), and acceptable septal penetration at 140 keV, were approximately constant throughout the collimator, despite their different hole incidence angles. By using these input parameters and a less strict septal penetration value of 5%, the optimal collimator dimensions and the corresponding mass per detector area were calculated for 511 keV. It is shown that a low value of focal distance leads to improvements in the average sensitivity at a fixed source-collimator distance and resolution. The optimal cone beam performance outperformed that of other optimal collimation geometries (fan and parallel beam) in imaging objects close to the

  13. Random and systematic beam modulator errors in dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsai, Homayon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cho, Paul S [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Phillips, Mark H [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Giansiracusa, Robert S [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Axen, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2003-05-07

    This paper reports on the dosimetric effects of random and systematic modulator errors in delivery of dynamic intensity modulated beams. A sliding-widow type delivery that utilizes a combination of multileaf collimators (MLCs) and backup diaphragms was examined. Gaussian functions with standard deviations ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 mm were used to simulate random positioning errors. A clinical example involving a clival meningioma was chosen with optic chiasm and brain stem as limiting critical structures in the vicinity of the tumour. Dose calculations for different modulator fluctuations were performed, and a quantitative analysis was carried out based on cumulative and differential dose volume histograms for the gross target volume and surrounding critical structures. The study indicated that random modulator errors have a strong tendency to reduce minimum target dose and homogeneity. Furthermore, it was shown that random perturbation of both MLCs and backup diaphragms in the order of {sigma} = 1 mm can lead to 5% errors in prescribed dose. In comparison, when MLCs or backup diaphragms alone was perturbed, the system was more robust and modulator errors of at least {sigma} = 1.5 mm were required to cause dose discrepancies greater than 5%. For systematic perturbation, even errors in the order of {+-}0.5 mm were shown to result in significant dosimetric deviations.

  14. Leaky wave lenses for spoof plasmon collimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaretos, Anastasios H; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-06-27

    We theoretically demonstrate the feasibility of collimating radiating spoof plasmons using a leaky wave lens approach. Spoof plasmons are surface waves excited along reactance surfaces realized through metallic corrugations. By employing a periodic perturbation to the geometric profile of this type of reactance surface, it becomes feasible to convert the excited spoof plasmons into free-space radiating leaky wave modes. It is demonstrated that by structurally modifying such a corrugated surface through the introduction of a non-uniform sinusoidally modulated reactance profile, then a tapered wavenumber, with a real part less than that of free space, can be established along the surface. In this way the radiating properties of the structure (amplitude and phase) can be locally controlled thereby creating a radiating effect similar to that of a non-uniform current distribution. By properly engineering the space dependent wavenumber along the corrugated surface, different regions of the structure will emit spoof plasmon energy at different angles with varying intensity. The combined effect is the emission of an electromagnetic wave exhibiting a converging wave-front that eventually collimates spoof plasmon energy at some desired focal point.

  15. Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training: Effects of Collimation on Accommodation and Vergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    Training ( ASPT ), used for training R&D by AFHRL, employs seven collimated display windows to provide a virtual image covering a 300 degree horizontal by...with relatively low luminance and contrast. One potential solution to the limited lumirance and contrast of the ASPT display system is simply to remove...while viewing ASPT imagery through a ILIOS. Measurements were made while the observer viewed a dynamic computer-generated scene representing the pilot’s

  16. Unsolved Problems of AGN Jets in Sub Parsec Scale: Acceleration, Collimation, and Stability Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M.; Meier, D. L.

    2009-08-01

    What can we expect in the VSOP-2 mission to reveal the sub parsec scale structures of AGN jets? Based on the MHD process of jet formation and evolution, we discuss about unsolved problems of sub parsec AGN jets in terms of the acceleration, the collimation, and the stability properties. Several key features will be proved by the VSOP-2 observations; they play an important role in determining how the MHD process will work in the jet dynamics.

  17. Study of Collimated Neutron Flux Monitors for MAST and MAST Upgrade

    OpenAIRE

    Sangaroon, Siriyaporn

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the neutron emission, resulting from nuclear fusion reactions between the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, can provide a wealth of information on the confinement properties of fusion plasmas and how these are affected by Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) instabilities. This thesis describes work aimed to develop neutron measurement techniques for nuclear fusion plasma experiments, specifically regarding the performance and design of collimated neutron flux monitors (neutron ...

  18. An open source solution for an in-house built dynamic platform for the validation of stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy for VMAT and IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Luis; Ziebell, Amy; Morton, Jason; Bhat, Madhava

    2016-12-01

    An in-house solution for the verification of dose delivered to a moving phantom as required for the clinical implementation of lung stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy was developed. The superior-inferior movement required to simulate tumour motion during a normal breathing cycle was achieved via the novel use of an Arduino Uno™, a low-cost open-source microcontroller board connected to a high torque servo motor. Slow CT imaging was used to acquire the image set and a 4D cone beam CT (4D-CBCT) verified the efficacy of contoured margins before treatment on the moving phantom. Treatment fields were delivered to a section of a CIRS™ anthropomorphic phantom. Dose verification to the dynamic phantom with Gafchromic EBT3 film using 3 %-1 mm gamma analysis acceptance criteria registered an absolute dose pass rate for IMRT and VMAT of 98 and 96.6 %, respectively. It was verified that 100 % of the PTV received the prescribed dose of 12 Gy per fraction using the dynamic phantom, and no major discrepancy between planned and measured results due to interplay between multileaf collimator sequences and target motion was observed. This study confirmed that the use of an in-house solution using open source hardware and software with existing quality assurance equipment was appropriate in validating a new treatment technique.

  19. Self-collimation in photonic crystals with anisotropic constituents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. W. Haus; M. Siraj; P. Prasad; P. Markowicz

    2007-01-01

    @@ In a photonic crystal composed of anisotropic constituents we quantify the range of input angles and the degree of collimation of the beam inside the crystal. The optical properties of a photobleached 4-dimethylamino-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium-tosylate (DAST) crystal are used in our model to demonstrate the efficacy of the self-collimation features.

  20. Towards Optimum Material Choices for HL-LHC Collimator Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Quaranta, E.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.; Carra, F.; Métral, E.; Redaelli, S.; Rossi, A.; Salvant, B.

    2016-01-01

    properties that address different limitations of the present collimation system, solutions have been found to fulfil various upgrade challenges. This paper describes the proposed staged approach to deploy new materials in the upgraded HL-LHC collimation system. Beam tests at the CERN HiRadMat facility were also performed to benchmark simulation methods and constitutive material models.

  1. Magnetic collimation of the relativistic jet in M 87

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gracia, JG; Tsinganos, KT; Bogovalov, SV

    2005-01-01

    We apply a two-zone MHD model to the jet of M87. The model consists of an inner relativistic outflow, which is surrounded by a non-nonrelativistic outer disk-wind. The relativistic outer disk-wind collimates very well through magnetic self-collimation and confines the inner relativistic jet into a n

  2. Preliminary Exploratory Study of Different Phase II Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Bertarelli, A; Bracco, C; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, Alessandro; Doyle, E; Ferrari, A; Keller, L; Lundgren, S; Markiewicz, T; Mauri, M; Roesler, S; Sarchiapone, L; Smith, J; Vlachoudis, V

    2008-01-01

    The LHC collimation system is installed and commissioned in different phases, following the natural evolution of the LHC performance. To improve cleaning efficiency towards the end of the low beta squeeze at 7TeV, and in stable physics conditions, it is foreseen to complement the 30 highly robust Phase I secondary collimators with low impedance Phase II collimators. At this stage, their design is not yet finalized. Possible options include metallic collimators, graphite jaws with a movable metallic foil, or collimators with metallic rotating jaws. As part of the evaluation of the different designs, the FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used for calculating energy deposition and studying material damage and activation. This report outlines the simulation approach and defines the critical quantities involved.

  3. Photonic crystals for broadband, omnidirectional self-collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Y.-C.; Suleski, T. J.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, multiple photonic crystal (PC) structures are proposed to improve three-dimensional (3D) self-collimation performance, including two 3D PCs (tetragonal lattice structures and a complex hexagonal lattice structure) and two two-dimensional (2D) PCs (triangular lattice structures and kagome lattice structures) with out-of-plane orientation. Different design strategies are investigated and compared in terms of the resulting self-collimation performance. Several desired 3D properties are numerically realized for the first time, including broadband 3D self-collimation, omnidirectional beam confinement and broadband omnidirectional self-collimation. These developments can enable future self-collimation applications, such as multiplexers, PC core fibers and solar light collection.

  4. [Influence of collimation system on static Fourier transform spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cheng-Zhi; Liang, Jing-Qiu; Liang, Zhong-Zhu; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Wei-Biao

    2014-01-01

    Collimation system provides collimated light for the static Fourier-transform spectroscopy (SFTS). Its quality is crucial to the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of SFTS. In the present paper, the physical model of SFTS was established based on the Fresnel diffraction theory by means of numerical software. The influence of collimation system on the SFTS was discussed in detail focusing on the aberrations of collimation lens and the quality of extended source. The results of simulation show that the influences of different kinds of aberrations on SNR take on obvious regularity, and in particular, the influences of off-axis aberrations on SNR are closely related to the location of off-axis point source. Finally the extended source's maximum radius allowed was obtained by simulation, which equals to 0.65 mm. The discussion results will be used for the design of collimation system.

  5. Beam diffusion measurements using collimator scans in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, Gianluca; Bruce, Roderik; Burkart, Florian; Previtali, Valentina; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Stancari, Giuliov; Valishev, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The time evolution of beam losses during a collimator scan provides information on halo diffusion and population. This is an essential input for machine performance characterization and for the design of collimation systems. Beam halo measurements in the CERN Large Hadron Collider were conducted through collimator scrapings in a dedicated beam study for the first time at 4 TeV. Four scans were performed with two collimators, in the vertical plane for beam 1 and horizontally for beam 2, before and after bringing the beams into collisions. Inward and outward steps were performed. A diffusion model was used to interpret the observed loss rate evolution in response to the collimator steps. With this technique, diffusion coefficients were estimated as a function of betatron oscillation amplitude from approximately 3 to 7 standard deviations of the transverse beam distribution. A comparison of halo diffusion and core emittance growth rates is also presented.

  6. Modeling and simulation of LHC beam-based collimator setup

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, G; Assmann, R W; Burkart, F; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Lari, L

    2012-01-01

    In the 2011 Large Hadron Collider run, collimators were aligned for proton and heavy ion beams using a semiautomatic setup algorithm. The algorithm provided a reduction in the beam time required for setup, an elimination of beam dumps during setup and better reproducibility with respect to manual alignment. A collimator setup simulator was developed based on a Gaussian model of the beam distribution as well as a parametric model of the beam losses. A time-varying beam loss signal can be simulated for a given collimator movement into the beam. The simulation results and comparison to measurement data obtained during collimator setups and dedicated fills for beam halo scraping are presented. The simulator will then be used to develop a fully automatic collimator alignment algorithm.

  7. Determination of optimal collimation parameters for a rotating slat collimator system: a system matrix method using ML-EM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, F.; Bekaert, V.; Brasse, D.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, Single Photon imaging has become an essential part of molecular imaging and nuclear medicine. Whether to establish a diagnosis or in the therapeutic monitoring, this modality presents performance that continues to improve. For over 50 years, several collimators have been proposed. Mainly governed by collimation parameters, the resolution-sensitivity trade-off is the factor determining the collimator the most suitable for an intended study. One alternative to the common approaches is the rotating slat collimator (RSC). In the present study, we are aiming at developing a preclinical system equipped with a RSC dedicated to mice and rats imaging, which requires both high sensitivity and spatial resolution. We investigated the resolution-sensitivity trade-offs obtained by varying different collimation parameters: (i) the slats height (H), and (ii) the gap between two consecutive slats (g), considering different intrinsic spatial resolutions. One system matrix was generated for each set of collimation parameters (H,g). Spatial resolutions, Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and sensitivity obtained for all the set of collimation parameters (H,g) were measured in the 2D projections reconstructed with ML-EM. According to our results, 20 mm high slats and a 1 mm gap were chosen as a good RSC candidate for a preclinical detection module. This collimator will ensure a sensitivity greater than 0.2% and a system spatial resolution below 1 mm, considering an intrinsic spatial resolution below 0.8 mm.

  8. Dynamic tumor tracking using the Elekta Agility MLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, Martin F., E-mail: martin.fast@icr.ac.uk; Nill, Simeon, E-mail: simeon.nill@icr.ac.uk; Bedford, James L.; Oelfke, Uwe [Joint Department of Physics, The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of the Elekta Agility multileaf collimator (MLC) for dynamic real-time tumor tracking. Methods: The authors have developed a new control software which interfaces to the Agility MLC to dynamically program the movement of individual leaves, the dynamic leaf guides (DLGs), and the Y collimators (“jaws”) based on the actual target trajectory. A motion platform was used to perform dynamic tracking experiments with sinusoidal trajectories. The actual target positions reported by the motion platform at 20, 30, or 40 Hz were used as shift vectors for the MLC in beams-eye-view. The system latency of the MLC (i.e., the average latency comprising target device reporting latencies and MLC adjustment latency) and the geometric tracking accuracy were extracted from a sequence of MV portal images acquired during irradiation for the following treatment scenarios: leaf-only motion, jaw + leaf motion, and DLG + leaf motion. Results: The portal imager measurements indicated a clear dependence of the system latency on the target position reporting frequency. Deducting the effect of the target frequency, the leaf adjustment latency was measured to be 38 ± 3 ms for a maximum target speed v of 13 mm/s. The jaw + leaf adjustment latency was 53 ± 3 at a similar speed. The system latency at a target position frequency of 30 Hz was in the range of 56–61 ms for the leaves (v ≤ 31 mm/s), 71–78 ms for the jaw + leaf motion (v ≤ 25 mm/s), and 58–72 ms for the DLG + leaf motion (v ≤ 59 mm/s). The tracking accuracy showed a similar dependency on the target position frequency and the maximum target speed. For the leaves, the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) was between 0.6–1.5 mm depending on the maximum target speed. For the jaw + leaf (DLG + leaf) motion, the RMSE was between 0.7–1.5 mm (1.9–3.4 mm). Conclusions: The authors have measured the latency and geometric accuracy of the Agility MLC, facilitating its future use for clinical

  9. Enhanced proton beam collimation in the ultra-intense short pulse regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. S.; Dover, N. P.; Borghesi, M.; Brenner, C. M.; Cameron, F. H.; Carroll, D. C.; Foster, P. S.; Gallegos, P.; Gregori, G.; McKenna, P.; Murphy, C. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Prasad, R.; Romagnani, L.; Quinn, K. E.; Schreiber, J.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Tresca, O.; Zepf, M.; Neely, D.

    2014-08-01

    The collimation of proton beams accelerated during ultra-intense laser irradiation of thin aluminum foils was measured experimentally whilst varying laser contrast. Increasing the laser contrast using a double plasma mirror system resulted in a marked decrease in proton beam divergence (20° to <10°), and the enhanced collimation persisted over a wide range of target thicknesses (50 nm-6 µm), with an increased flux towards thinner targets. Supported by numerical simulation, the larger beam divergence at low contrast is attributed to the presence of a significant plasma scale length on the target front surface. This alters the fast electron generation and injection into the target, affecting the resultant sheath distribution and dynamics at the rear target surface. This result demonstrates that careful control of the laser contrast will be important for future laser-driven ion applications in which control of beam divergence is crucial.

  10. A Collimation Scheme for Ions Changing Charge State in the LEIR Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Pasternak, Jaroslaw; Carli, Christian; Chanel, Michel; Mahner, Edgar

    2005-01-01

    Avalanche-like pressure rise and an associated decrease of the beam life-time, caused by (i) beam loss due to charge exchange interactions with rest gas molecules and (ii) electron capture from the electron beam of the electron cooler and (iii) ion impact induced outgassing, is a potential limitation for heavy ion accelerators. The vacuum system of the LEIR ring as to be upgraded to reach the dynamical vacuum pressure in the low 10-12 Torr range necessary to reach design performance. A collimation system to intercept lost ions by absorber blocks made of low beam-induced outgassing material will be installed. This paper reviews the collimation scheme and simulations of beam loss patterns around the ring.

  11. Multipinhole collimator with 20 apertures for a brain SPECT application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Ellin, Justin R.; Shrestha, Uttam; Seo, Youngho, E-mail: youngho.seo@ucsf.edu [Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94107 (United States); Huang, Qiu [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Gullberg, Grant T. [Department of Radiotracer Development and Imaging Technology, Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94702 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Several new technologies for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) instrumentation with parallel-hole collimation have been proposed to improve detector sensitivity and signal collection efficiency. Benefits from improved signal efficiency include shorter acquisition times and lower dose requirements. In this paper, the authors show a possibility of over an order of magnitude enhancement in photon detection efficiency (from 7.6 × 10{sup −5} to 1.6 × 10{sup −3}) for dopamine transporter (DaT) imaging of the striatum over the conventional SPECT parallel-hole collimators by use of custom-designed 20 multipinhole (20-MPH) collimators with apertures of 0.75 cm diameter. Methods: Quantifying specific binding ratio (SBR) of {sup 123}I-ioflupane or {sup 123}I-iometopane’s signal at the striatal region is a common brain imaging method to confirm the diagnosis of the Parkinson’s disease. The authors performed imaging of a striatal phantom filled with aqueous solution of I-123 and compared camera recovery ratios of SBR acquired between low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) parallel-hole collimators and 20-MPH collimators. Results: With only two-thirds of total acquisition time (20 min against 30 min), a comparable camera recovery ratio of SBR was achieved using 20-MPH collimators in comparison to that from the LEHR collimator study. Conclusions: Their systematic analyses showed that the 20-MPH collimator could be a promising alternative for the DaT SPECT imaging for brain over the traditional LEHR collimator, which could give both shorter scan time and improved diagnostic accuracy.

  12. The HEAO-1 Scanning Modulation Collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    My niche on this panel seems to be the High Energy Astronomy Observatory-1 Scanning Modulation Collimator experiment. Our chair, Hale Bradt, and the late Herb Gursky each proposed a different version modulation collimator, which was condensed by NASA via "forced marriage," to the SMC. I worked as Project Scientist under Herb, later inheriting the PI role. The MIT Project Scientist, the late Rodger Doxsey, and I were told "this is your experiment," and "we are a seamless team regardless of institution." Rodger and I were young enough to believe this, and we made it happen (and not always with the best results vis a vis higher internal management). I was never interested in astronomy, and allegedly am still not. Why do an astro-metrical job of measuring and reporting the coordinates of X-ray sources? In fact we participated widely in the identification of the sources with astronomical object, and making each paper a discussion of the physics of the emission. An enjoyable way to learn some astronomy. The stated purpose of the Gursky/Bradt experiment was to enable optical identifications so that more detailed study could be done. I remember meeting with John Whelan to discuss his collaboration in making the optical identifications. He said he only wanted to study sources after they were identified. For many milliseconds I became very angry - "who is going to to the work to MAKE those identifications," but luckily before speaking I realized how satisfying it was that astronomers indeed wanted to study X-ray sources in other wavebands. The second biggest excitement in the HEAO-1 program was the "glitches" that appeared in the gyro data during final functional testing. This took some high-powered politics by all the PI's to convince MSFC to delay for 4 months, replacing the "funny" unit with one from HEAO-2 (Einstein) and later refurbishing that unit. Third biggest excitement was when a computer failed and final checkout during countdown at the Cape was done by looking at

  13. Momentum slits, collimators and masks in the SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, D.R.; McFarlane, A.; Lewandowski, E.; Zabdyr, J.

    1989-04-01

    The high specific power densities in the SLC give rise to a multitude of challenging problems in collimation and momentum analysis, beam containment, machine protection and background control. The results of an extensive program to develop most of the devices deemed necessary for operation of the arcs matching sections and the final focus region are presented. Emphasis is placed on materials selection and on unique features of remotely adjustable slits and halo clipper collimators which have to operate with great precision in a high-radiation, ultra-high vacuum environment. Also covered are solutions for a few fixed aperture machine protection collimators. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Studies for an alternative LHC non-linear collimation system

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Boccone, V; Cerutti, F; Versaci, R; Vlachoudis, V; Mereghetti, A; Faus-Golfe, A; Resta-Lopez, J

    2012-01-01

    A LHC non-linear betatron cleaning collimation system would allow larger gap for the mechanical jaws, reducing as a consequence the collimator-induced impedance, which may limit the LHC beam intensity. In this paper, the performance of the proposed system is analyzed in terms of beam losses distribution around the LHC ring and cleaning efficiency in stable physics condition at 7TeV for Beam1. Moreover, the energy deposition distribution on the machine elements is compared to the present LHC Betatron cleaning collimation system in the Point 7 Insertion Region (IR).

  15. A Fresnel zone plate collimator: potential and aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Benedikt; Bräuninger, Heinrich; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela; Predehl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    A collimator, that parallelizes an X-ray beam, provides a significant improvement of the metrology to characterize X-ray optics for space instruments at MPE's PANTER X-ray test facility. A Fresnel zone plate was selected as a collimating optic, as it meets a good angular resolution 10 cm2. Such an optic is ideally suited to illuminate Silicon Pore Optic (SPO) modules as proposed for ATHENA. This paper provides the theoretic description of such a Fresnel zone plate especially considering resolution and efficiency. Based on the theoretic results the collimator setup performance is analyzed and requirements for fabrication and alignment are calculated.

  16. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, G.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.G.; Assmann, R.; Kabantsev, A.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams

  17. Hollow Electron Beam Collimator: R&D Status Report

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, G; Kuznetsov, G; Shiltsev, V; Valishev, A; Kabantsev, A; Vorobiev, L

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  18. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, G; Kuznetsov, G; Shiltsev, V; Still, D A; Valishev, A; Vorobiev, L G; Assmann, R; Kabantsev, A

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  19. The final collimator has been installed ready for the LHC restart (phase 1 of the LHC collimator project)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN audiovisual service

    2009-01-01

    The collimators are installed around the LHC ring and the transfer lines to absorb ‘stray’ particles that have spread out, forming a halo around the beam. It is important to absorb this halo to protect the rest of the machine from damage, in particular the superconducting magnets, where any slight heating by the ‘stray particles’ could cause a magnet quench. The one-meter long collimators absorb the particles in the halo by closing a set of ‘jaws’ of various materials around the beam; the most robust collimators use fiber-reinforced graphite. Before the start-up last year, 88 collimators were installed. The unforeseen shutdown caused by the incident in Sector 3-4, allowed the collimator team to continue with the final 20 collimators necessary to maximize the LHC intensity and luminosity reach with the phase 1 collimation system. This marks the end of 6.5 years of hard work since the project began

  20. Collimator system for the stabilization of the dynamical residual-gas pressure in the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS18; Kollimatorsystem zur Stabilisierung des dynamischen Restgasdruckes im Schwerionensynchrotron SIS18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omet, Carsten

    2009-01-15

    In order to achieve higher beam intensities of heavy ion beams in ring accelerators, low charge state ions can be used. By lowering the charge state, the space charge limit is shifted to higher particle numbers and stripping losses can be avoided. During test operation of the SIS18 at GSI with high intensity low charge state heavy ion beams, strong intensity dependent beam losses have been observed. It was found that these beam losses are originated to a large extent by the change of charge state of the circulating ions during collisions with residual gas atoms. The resulting deviation of m/q relative to the reference ion leads, in combination with dispersive elements in the ion optic lattice, to a modified trajectory, followed by the loss of the ion on the beam pipe. At the impact position, loosely bound residual gas molecules are released by ion stimulated desorption which increases the residual gas pressure locally. This pressure rise itself enhances the charge exchange rate, which can develop into a self amplifying process of pressure rise and subsequent beam loss. A method for the stabilization of the dynamic residual gas pressure is the use of special catcher systems, which minimize the production of desorption gases and remove them by strong pumping. Therefore, the pressure on the beam axis should remain as stable as possible. Other processes, e.g. Coulomb scattering of the beam ions by residual gas particles and unavoidable systematic beam losses can increase the gas pressure additionally. The pressure in the accelerator is further subjected to ionization of the residual gas atoms themselves, thermal out gassing of the beam pipes, insertions and pumps. In this work, a detailed numerical model of the interplay between the residual gas pressure dynamics in the accelerator, possible stabilization measures, e.g. by catchers and the resulting beam life time has been developed. The forecasted beam life times and pressures are verified by machine experiments, as

  1. Euclid mirrors and test collimator: AMOS developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloesener, Pierre; Wolfs, Fabrice; Cola, Marcel; Pirnay, Olivier; Flebus, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    EUCLID is an optical/near-infrared survey mission to be launched in 2020 towards the L2 Lagrange point. It will aim at studying the dark universe and providing a better understanding of the origin of the accelerating expansion of the universe. Through the use of cosmological sounding, it will investigate the nature of dark energy, dark matter and gravity by tracking their observational signatures on the geometry of the universe and on the cosmic history of large structures formation. The EUCLID payload module (PLM) consists of a 1.2 m-class telescope and will accommodate two instruments. As a subcontractor of AIRBUS Defence and Space, AMOS is responsible for the manufacturing of the secondary and the third mirrors of the telescope as well as for the flat folding mirror set within the focal plane arrangement of EUCLID telescope, which incorporates dedicated filtering functions. AMOS produces in addition the 1.3 m-class test collimator for the on-ground validation of the EUCLID instrument.

  2. Radionuclide annular single crystal scintillator camera with rotating collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genna, S.; Pang, S.-C.

    1986-04-22

    A radionuclide emission tomography camera is described for sensing gamma ray emissions from a source within the field of view consisting of: a fixed, position-sensitive detector means, responsive to the gamma ray emissions and surrounding the field of view for detecting the contact position and the trajectory from which a gamma ray emission originates, the fixed, position-sensitive detector including a single continuous stationary scintillation crystal; rotatable collimator means, disposed between the fixed, position-sensitive detecto means and the field of view, and including at least one array of collimator elements, for restricting and collimating the gamma ray emissions; and means for rotating the collimator means relative to the fixed, position-sensitive detector, for exposing different sections of the position-sensitive detector to the gamma ray emissions in order to view the source from different angles.

  3. COLLIMATORS AND MATERIALS FOR HIGH INTENSITY HEAVY ION SYNCHROTRONS

    CERN Document Server

    Stadlmann, J; Kollmus, H; Spiller, P; Strasik, I; Tahir, N A; Tomut, M; Trautmann, C

    2012-01-01

    The operation of high power high brightness accelerators requires huge efforts for beam cleaning and machine protection. Within the WP 8 (ColMat) of the EU research framework EuCARD[1] we investigate new materials and methods for beam collimation and machine protection. We present an overview of these activities at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum f¨ur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. Simulations of accidental beam losses in LHC and SIS100 have been performed. Scenarios for halo collimation of heavy ions and protons in SIS100 routine operation have been investigated. A prototype of a cryogenic collimator for charge exchange losses during intermediate charge state heavy ion operation in SIS100 has been build and tested with beam. Several candidates of advanced composite materials for collimation system upgrades of present and future high power accelerators have been irradiated and their properties are being characterized. Most deliverables and milestones of the R&D programme were already reached before the end of...

  4. Beam Loss Patterns at the LHC Collimators Measurements & Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Böhlen, Till Tobias

    2008-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) detects particle losses of circulating beams and initiates an emergency extraction of the beam in case that the BLM thresholds are exceeded. This protection is required as energy deposition in the accelerator equipment due to secondary shower particles can reach critical levels; causing damage to the beam-line components and quenches of superconducting magnets. Robust and movable beam line elements, so-called collimators, are the aperture limitations of the LHC. Consequently, they are exposed to the excess of lost beam particles and their showers. Proton loss patterns at LHC collimators have to be determined to interpret the signal of the BLM detectors and to set adequate BLM thresholds for the protection of collimators and other equipment in case of unacceptably increased loss rates. The first part of this work investigates the agreement of BLM detector measurements with simulations for an LHC-like collimation setup. The setup consists ...

  5. Magnetized and collimated millimeter scale plasma jets with astrophysical relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Parrish C.; Quevedo, Hernan J. [Texas Center for High Intensity Laser Science, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Valanju, Prashant M. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1060 (United States); Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, Todd [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Magnetized collimated plasma jets are created in the laboratory to extend our understanding of plasma jet acceleration and collimation mechanisms with particular connection to astrophysical jets. In this study, plasma collimated jets are formed from supersonic unmagnetized flows, mimicking a stellar wind, subject to currents and magnetohydrodynamic forces. It is found that an external poloidal magnetic field, like the ones found anchored to accretion disks, is essential to stabilize the jets against current-driven instabilities. The maximum jet length before instabilities develop is proportional to the field strength and the length threshold agrees well with Kruskal-Shafranov theory. The plasma evolution is modeled qualitatively using MHD theory of current-carrying flux tubes showing that jet acceleration and collimation arise as a result of electromagnetic forces.

  6. Errors generated with the use of rectangular collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, E.T. (Department of Allied Health, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green (USA))

    1991-04-01

    This study was designed to determine whether various techniques for achieving rectangular collimation generate different numbers and types of errors and remakes and to determine whether operator skill level influences errors and remakes. Eighteen students exposed full-mouth series of radiographs on manikins with the use of six techniques. The students were grouped according to skill level. The radiographs were evaluated for errors and remakes resulting from errors in the following categories: cone cutting, vertical angulation, and film placement. Significant differences were found among the techniques in cone cutting errors and remakes, vertical angulation errors and remakes, and total errors and remakes. Operator skill did not appear to influence the number or types of errors or remakes generated. Rectangular collimation techniques produced more errors than did the round collimation techniques. However, only one rectangular collimation technique generated significantly more remakes than the other techniques.

  7. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  8. Collimation of fast electrons in critical density plasma channel

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Significantly collimated fast electron beam with a divergence angle 10° (FWHM) is generated through the interaction of ultra-intense laser light with a uniform critical density plasma in experiments and 2D PIC simulations. In the experiment, the uniform critical density plasma is created by ionizing an ultra-low density foam target. The spacial distribution of the fast electron is observed by Imaging Plate. 2D PIC simulation and post process analysis reveal magnetic collimation of energetic e...

  9. Benchmarking of collimation tracking using RHIC beam loss data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert-Demolaize,G.; Drees, A.

    2008-06-23

    State-of-the-art tracking tools were recently developed at CERN to study the cleaning efficiency of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system. In order to estimate the prediction accuracy of these tools, benchmarking studies can be performed using actual beam loss measurements from a machine that already uses a similar multistage collimation system. This paper reviews the main results from benchmarking studies performed with specific data collected from operations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  10. Mini-beam collimator applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Shenglan, E-mail: sxu@anl.gov [GM/CA CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Keefe, Lisa J.; Mulichak, Anne [IMCA CAT, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Yan Lifen; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao Jiyong [X-ray Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fischetti, Robert F. [GM/CA CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    In 2007, the General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA CAT, Sector 23, Advanced Photon Source) began providing mini-beam collimators to its users. These collimators contained individual, 5- or 10-{mu}m pinholes and were rapidly exchangeable, thereby allowing users to tailor the beam size to their experimental needs. The use of these collimators provided a reduction in background noise, and thus improved the signal-to-noise ratio . Recent improvements in the collimator design include construction of the device from a monolithic piece of molybdenum with multiple pinholes mounted inside . This allows users to select from various size options from within the beamline control software without the realignment that was previously necessary. In addition, a new, 20-{mu}m pinhole has been added to create a 'quad-collimator', resulting in greater flexibility for the users. The mini-beam collimator is now available at multiple crystallographic beamlines and also is a part of the first Moessbauer Microscopic system at sector 3-ID.

  11. Parallel-hole collimator concept for stationary SPECT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pato, Lara R V; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Zedda, Tiziana; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-11-21

    Parallel-hole SPECT collimators have traditionally been manufactured by stacking sheets of lead foil or by casting. These techniques significantly restrict our options in terms of collimator geometry. However, recent developments in metal additive manufacturing are making novel collimator designs possible, giving rise to new opportunities in SPECT imaging. In this paper we propose an innovative type of collimator for stationary SPECT, using parallel-holes whose collimation direction depends on their axial position. Its main advantage compared to current stationary SPECT systems (which are based on pinholes) is that, using only axial bed translations, we can achieve complete angular sampling of an increased portion of the transaxial area of the collimator bore. This allows the system to be much more compact than current stationary SPECT systems that image objects of the same size. We describe three possible designs, for full-body, brain and small-animal imaging, respectively, and test their feasibility using simulations. The system modeling method is validated against realistic Monte Carlo simulations, and then used in the evaluation of the systems' performances and reconstructions. The simulations show that the system is able to reconstruct objects occupying the predicted field of view ([Formula: see text] of the transaxial area of the bore) without sampling artifacts. In particular, we perform reconstructions from noisy projection data obtained for an activity and scanning time similar to standard protocols for the three applications, and the resulting images indicate the possibility of using the proposed systems in practice.

  12. Dual self-image technique for beam collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Fernandez, Jose Maria; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Torcal-Milla, Francisco Jose; Morlanes, Tomas; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2016-07-01

    We propose an accurate technique for obtaining highly collimated beams, which also allows testing the collimation degree of a beam. It is based on comparing the period of two different self-images produced by a single diffraction grating. In this way, variations in the period of the diffraction grating do not affect to the measuring procedure. Self-images are acquired by two CMOS cameras and their periods are determined by fitting the variogram function of the self-images to a cosine function with polynomial envelopes. This way, loss of accuracy caused by imperfections of the measured self-images is avoided. As usual, collimation is obtained by displacing the collimation element with respect to the source along the optical axis. When the period of both self-images coincides, collimation is achieved. With this method neither a strict control of the period of the diffraction grating nor a transverse displacement, required in other techniques, are necessary. As an example, a LED considering paraxial approximation and point source illumination is collimated resulting a resolution in the divergence of the beam of δ φ =+/- 1.57 μ {rad}.

  13. End-of-fill study on collimator tight settings

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Burkart, F; Cauchi, M; Deboy, D; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Schmidt, R; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2012-01-01

    In 2010 and 2011 the collimation system has been operated with relaxed settings, i.e. with retractions between different collimator families larger than the nominal settings that provide optimum cleaning. This configuration ensured a sufficient cleaning performance at 3.5 TeV while allowing larger tolerances on orbit control. Tighter collimator settings were proposed to push the cleaning performance and to allow larger orbit margins between TCDQ dump protection and tertiary collimators, which opens the possibility to push further the LHC β* reach. After having verified with beam that the cleaning is improved as expected, the feasibility of tighter collimator settings must be addressed with high stored intensity. For this purpose, an end-of-fill study was proposed after a standard physics fill with 1380 bunches nominal bunches at 3.5 TeV, for a total stored energy of 95 MJ. During this test, primary and secondary collimators were moved to that tight settings after about 8 hours of stable physics conditions in...

  14. Small animal imaging by single photon emission using pinhole and coded aperture collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibaldi, F.; Accorsi, R.; Cinti, M.N.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; De Vincentis, G.; Fortuna, A.; Girolami, B.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lanza, R.; Loizzo, A.; Loizzo, S.; Lucentini, M.; Majewski, S.; Santavenere, F.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Signore, A.; Scopinaro, F.

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the basic properties and limits of the small animal imaging systems based on single photon detectors. The detectors for radio imaging of small animals are challenging because of the very high spatial resolution needed, possibly coupled with high efficiency to allow dynamic studies. These performances are hardly attainable with single photon technique because of the collimator that limits both spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this paper we describe a simple desktop detector based on pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator array coupled with a pinhole collimator and a PSPMT, the Hamamatsu R2486. The limits of such systems as well as the way to overcome them will be shown. In fact better light sampling at the anode level would allow better pixel identification for higher number of pixel that is one of the parameters defining the image quality. Also the spatial resolution would improve. The performances of such layout are compared with others using PSPMTs differing from R2486 for the light sampling at the anode level and different areas. We show how a further step, namely the substitution of the pinhole collimator with a coded aperture, will allow a great improvement in system sensitivity while maintaining very good spatial resolution, possibly submillimetric. Calculations and simulations show that sensitivity would improve by a factor of 50.

  15. Evaluation of calculation methods of collimator scatter factors in a linear accelerator equipped with MLC instead of lower collimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Tomo; Sasaki, Koji

    2009-09-20

    In the monitor unit verification for high-energy radiation therapy, we evaluated methods of calculation of collimator scatter factors (S(c)) in a linear accelerator equipped with MLC instead of lower collimators. Routinely,S(c) is calculated from rectangular fields shaped by upper and lower jaws in the linear accelerator. However, this calculation method should not be used for the linear accelerator equipped with MLC instead of lower collimators. Consequently, we used a backprojected field at the flattening filter plane projected by calculation point's eye view on each MLC. We then attempted to deviseS(c) by using Clarkson's integration for these backprojected irregular fields. This method makes it possible to calculate collimator scatter factors in error of less than +/-0.3% in all of sixteen measured irregular fields.

  16. Implementation and acceptance of dynamic MLC for IMRT and VMAT; Implementacion y aceptacion de MLC dinamicos para IMRT y VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, B.; Marquina, J.; Ramirez, J.; Gonzales, A., E-mail: bertha.garcia@aliada.com.pe [ALIADA, Oncologia Integral, Av. Jose Galvez Barrenechea 1044, San Isidro, Lima 27 (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    The use of Multi-leaf Collimator (MLC) in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for dynamic treatment techniques as Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) makes that the movement controls as the speed of the MLC are quantified by means of an acceptance test. The objective determination of the operation regulations of the radiotherapy equipment requires ideally the establishment of the quantitative relationship among the performance deviations and clinical results or some acceptable substitute. Different protocols exist detailed with parameters and acceptance ranges according to the MLC thickness. In our case the acceptance test was carried out for 120-MLC of Trilogy equipment brand Varian. For all the test were used 300-200 Um for each formed beam lets; source-surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm. 9 acceptance tests were used each one with different purposes like to quantify, synchronization, stability, complexity, precision, positioning, conformity, dynamic movements for the case of dynamic wedges, consecutive moves, among others, for the measurements were used film badges dosimetry (Gafchromic Ebt-3 scanner Epson expression 10000 XL); additionally the results were compared with a diodes arrangement Map-Check 2 brand Sun Nuclear; that consists of 1527 diodes prepared in a field of 32 x 26 cm located at a distance of 1 cm parallel, 0.5 cm diagonally. All the developed tests were inside the acceptance tolerance parameters when comparing the obtained result regarding the badges and the Map-Check was found a discrepancy of 0.01%, what gives a treatment certainty to the moment to impart volumetric dose in dynamic fields to the patients. (Author)

  17. The dynamic correction of collimation errors of CT slicing pictures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya-xiong; Sekou Sing-are; LI Di-chen; LU Bing-heng

    2006-01-01

    To eliminate the motion artifacts of CT images caused by patient motions and other related errors,two kinds of correctors (A type and U type) are proposed to monitor the scanning process and correct the motion artifacts of the original images via reverse geometrical transformation such as reverse scaling,moving,rotating and offsetting.The results confirm that the correction method with any of the correctors can improve the accuracy and reliability of CT images,which facilitates in eliminating or decreasing the motion artifacts and correcting other static errors and image processing errors.This provides a foundation for the 3D reconstruction and accurate fabrication of the customized implants.

  18. TU-EF-304-11: Therapeutic Benefits of Collimation in Spot Scanning Proton Therapy in the Treatment of Brain Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moignier, A; Gelover, E; Wang, D; Flynn, R; Hyer, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kirk, M; Lin, L; Solberg, T; Lin, A [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A dynamic collimation system (DCS) based on two orthogonal pairs of mobile trimmer blades has recently been proposed to reduce the lateral penumbra in spot scanning proton therapy (SSPT). The purpose of this work is to quantify the therapeutic benefit of using the DCS for SSPT of brain cancer by comparing un-collimated and collimated treatment plans. Methods: Un-collimated and collimated brain treatment plans were created for five patients, previously treated with SSPT, using an in-house treatment planning system capable of modeling collimated and un-collimated beamlets. Un-collimated plans reproduced the clinically delivered plans in terms of target coverage and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, whereas collimated plans were re-optimized to improve the organ-at-risk sparing while maintaining target coverage. Physical and biological comparison metrics such as dose distribution conformity, mean and maximum doses, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and risk of secondary brain cancer were used to evaluate the plans. Results: The DCS systematically improved the dose distribution conformity while preserving the target coverage. The average reduction of the mean dose to the 10-mm ring surrounding the target and the healthy brain were 7.1% (95% CI: 4.2%–9.9%; p<0.01) and 14.3% (95% CI: 7.8%–20.8%; p<0.01), respectively. This yielded an average reduction of 12.0% (95% CI: 8.2%–15.7%; p<0.01) for the brain necrosis NTCP using the Flickinger model, and 14.2% (95% CI: 7.7%–20.8%; p<0.01) for the risk of secondary brain cancer. The average maximum dose reductions for the brainstem, chiasm, optic nerves, cochleae and pituitary gland when comparing un-collimated and collimated plans were 14.3%, 10.4%, 11.2%, 13.0%, 12.9% and 3.4%, respectively. Evaluating individual plans using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman NTCP model also yielded improvements. Conclusion: The lateral penumbra reduction performed by the DCS increases the normal tissue sparing capabilities of

  19. An improved scattering routine for collimation tracking studies at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tambasco, Claudia; Salvachua Ferrando, Maria Belen; Cavoto, Gianluca

    The present Master thesis work has been carried out at CERN in the framework of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) Collimation project. The LHC accelerates proton beams up to 7 TeV colliding in the experiment detectors installed in four points of the accelerator ring. The LHC is built to store a energy of 360MJ for each beam. The energy deposition induced by local beam losses could quench the superconducting magnets located around the accelerator beam pipes. To prevent and keep under control dangerous beam losses, an efficient collimation system is required. In addition, the achievable LHC beam intensity is related to the beam loss rate and, consequently, to the cleaning efficiency of the collimation system. Collimation studies at LHC are carried out also by means of simulations by using SixTrack, a dedicated simulation tool that tracks a large numbers of particles for many turns around the ring. The SixTrack code includes a scattering routine to model proton interactions with the material of the collimators j...

  20. Radiation shielding for the Main Injector collimation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding studies performed with the MARS15 code for the Main Injector collimation system are presented and discussed. A Proton Plan was developed recently at Fermilab for the benefit of the existing neutrino programs as well as to increase anti-proton production for the Tevatron programs [1]. As a part of the plan, the intensity of proton beams in the Main Injector (MI) should be increased by means of slip-stacking injection. In order to localize beam loss associated with the injection, a collimation system was designed [2] that satisfies all the radiation and engineering constraints. The system itself comprises a primary collimator and four secondary ones to which various masks are added. It is assumed that beam loss at the slip-stacking injection is equal to 5% of total intensity which is 5.5 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse [2]. As far as pulse separation is 2.2 seconds, one has (5.5 x 10{sup 13}/2.2) x 0.05 = 1.25 x 10{sup 12} protons interacting per second with the primary collimator. In the paper the geometry model of the corresponding MI region and beam loss model are described. The model of the region was built by means of the MAD-MARS Beam Line Builder (MMBLB) [3] using results of the collimation studies [2]. The results of radiation shielding calculations performed with the MARS15 code [4] are presented.

  1. Observing the onset of outflow collimation in a massive protostar

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-González, C; Cantó, J; Curiel, S; Surcis, G; Vlemmings, W H T; van Langevelde, H J; Goddi, C; Anglada, G; Kim, S -W; Kim, J -S; Gómez, J F

    2015-01-01

    The current paradigm of star formation through accretion disks, and magnetohydrodynamically driven gas ejections, predicts the development of collimated outflows, rather than expansion without any preferential direction. We present radio continuum observations of the massive protostar W75N(B)-VLA 2, showing that it is a thermal, collimated ionized wind and that it has evolved in 18 years from a compact source into an elongated one. This is consistent with the evolution of the associated expanding water-vapor maser shell, which changed from a nearly circular morphology, tracing an almost isotropic outflow, to an elliptical one outlining collimated motions. We model this behavior in terms of an episodic, short-lived, originally isotropic, ionized wind whose morphology evolves as it moves within a toroidal density stratification.

  2. Broadband super-collimation with low-symmetric photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giden, Ibrahim H.; Turduev, Mirbek; Kurt, Hamza

    2013-05-01

    We investigate dispersive properties of two dimensional photonic crystal (PC) called star-shaped PC (STAR-PC) in order to succeed super-collimation over a broad bandwidth. Both time- and frequency-domain numerical methods are conducted. Due to introduced low-symmetry in the primitive cell, flat contours are observed at the fifth band for transverse magnetic mode. The proposed structure supports a super-collimation effect over a broad wavelength range between 1443 nm and 1701 nm with a bandwidth of Δω = 16.42%. The intrinsic characteristic of STAR-PC provides in-plane beam propagation with a limited diffraction length of 120a, where a is the lattice constant. By means of STAR-PC, one may realize super-collimation based single-mode optical devices with a low insertion loss, reduced dispersion and wide bandwidth.

  3. Novel Materials for Collimators at LHC and its Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108536; Dallocchio, Alessandro; Garlasche, Marco; Gentini, Luca; Gradassi, Paolo; Guinchard, Michael; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Sacristan De Frutos, Oscar; Carra, Federico; Quaranta, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Collimators for last-generation particle accelerators like the LHC, must be designed to withstand the close interaction with intense and energetic particle beams, safely operating over an extended range of temperatures in harsh environments, while minimizing the perturbing effects, such as instabilities induced by RF impedance, on the circulating beam. The choice of materials for collimator active components is of paramount importance to meet these requirements, which are to become even more demanding with the increase of machine performances expected in future upgrades, such as the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). Consequently, a farreaching R&D program has been launched to develop novel materials with excellent thermal shock resistance and high thermal and electrical conductivity, replacing or complementing materials used for present collimators. Molybdenum Carbide - Graphite and Copper-Diamond composites have been so far identified as the most promising materials. The manufacturing methods, properties and...

  4. Scraping for LHC and collimation tests in the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Facchini, M; Gras, J J; Hutchins, S; Jung, R

    2005-01-01

    Scraping of the SPS beam prior to extraction towards the LHC will be important in order to remove the beam tails and ensure clean injection conditions. Scrapers recuperated from the ISR were installed in the SPS for this purpose. The scrapers are associated with a two stage collimation system using collimators previously installed in LEP to reduce the irradiated area in the SPS. Tests have been performed to demonstrate that with the help of these collimators, it is possible to scrape with very little contamination outside the scraping area. Another issue was whether enough time is left for ejection towards the LHC after scraping, before repopulation of the removed tails. This was investigated with the SPS rest gas profile monitor and synchrotron radiation telescope. The system is described and the results of these tests are presented and discussed.

  5. Updated Simulation Studies of Damage Limit of LHC Tertiary Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085459; Bertarelli, Alessandro; Bruce, Roderik; Carra, Federico; Cerutti, Francesco; Gradassi, Paolo; Lechner, Anton; Redaelli, Stefano; Skordis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    The tertiary collimators (TCTs) in the LHC, installed in front of the experiments, in standard operation intercept fractions of 10−3 halo particles. However, they risk to be hit by high-intensity primary beams in case of asynchronous beam dump. TCT damage thresholds were initially inferred from results of destructive tests on a TCT jaw, supported by numerical simulations, assuming simplified impact scenarios with one single bunch hitting the jaw with a given impact parameter. In this paper, more realistic failure conditions, including a train of bunches and taking into account the full collimation hierarchy, are used to derive updated damage limits. The results are used to update the margins in the collimation hierarchy and could thus potentially have an influence on the LHC performance.

  6. Photon collimator system for the ILC Positron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Riemann, S; Moortgat-Pick, G; Ushakov, A

    2014-01-01

    High energy e+e- linear colliders are the next large scale project in particle physics. They need intense sources to achieve the required luminosity. In particular, the positron source must provide about 10E+14 positrons per second. The positron source for the International Linear Collider (ILC) is based on a helical undulator passed by the electron beam to create an intense circularly polarized photon beam. With these photons a longitudinally polarized positron beam is generated; the degree of polarization can be enhanced by collimating the photon beam. However, the high photon beam intensity causes huge thermal load in the collimator material. In this paper the thermal load in the photon collimator is discussed and a flexible design solution is presented.

  7. Modeling the Kinetics of Enhanced Photo-Polymerization under a Collimated and a Reflecting Focused UV Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Teng Lin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the kinetics of ultraviolet (UV laser photoinitiated polymerization in thick polymer systems to achieve improved polymerization efficiency and uniformity. The modeling system comprised an incident UV laser and its reflecting beam, which was focused by a concave mirror to compensate for the exponential decay in the absorbing medium. The polymerization kinetic equation was numerically solved for the initiator concentration. The crossover time was calculated and compared among single beam, two collimated beam and collimated plus reflecting focused-beam systems. For the single beam case, analytic formulas for the time dependent incident beam is derived and demonstrated by measured data. A theoretical crossover time is defined to analyze the measured data based on the dynamic moduli. Lastly, the polymerization boundary dynamics are illustrated, showing the advantage of the combined two beam system. The numerical results provide useful guidance and a novel means for accelerated uniform photo-polymerization, which cannot be achieved by other means.

  8. Poster — Thur Eve — 19: Performance assessment of a 160-leaf beam collimation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, E. S. M.; La Russa, D. J.; Vandervoort, E. [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    In this study, the performance of the new beam collimation system with 160 leaves, each with a 5 mm leaf width projected at isocenter, is evaluated in terms of positional accuracy and plan/delivery quality. Positional accuracy was evaluated using a set of static and dynamic MLC/jaw delivery patterns at different gantry angles, dose rates, and MLC/jaw speeds. The impact on IMRT plan quality was assessed by comparing against a previous generation collimation system using the same optimization parameters, while delivery quality was quantified using a combination of patient-specific QA measurements with ion chambers, film, and a bi-planar diode array. Positional accuracy for four separate units was comparable. The field size accuracy, junction width, and total displacement over 16 cm leaf travel are 0.3 ± 0.2 mm, 0.4 ± 0.3 mm, and 0.5 ± 0.2 mm, respectively. The typical leaf minor offset is 0.05 ± 0.04 mm, and MLC hysteresis effects are 0.2 ± 0.1 mm over 16 cm travel. The dynamic output is linear with MU and MLC/jaw speed, and is within 0.7 ± 0.3 % of the planning system value. Plan quality is significantly improved both in terms of target coverage and OAR sparing due, in part, to the larger allowable MLC and jaw speeds. γ-index pass rates for the patient-specific QA measurements exceeded 97% using criteria of 2%/2 mm. In conclusion, the performance of the Agility system is consistent among four separate installations, and is superior to its previous generations of collimation systems.

  9. Betatron Cleaning for Heavy Ion Beams with IR7 Dispersion Suppressor Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083002; Bruce, Roderik; Jowett, John; Redaelli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The betatron collimators in IR7 constitute the backbone of the collimation system of the LHC. A fraction of the secondary halo protons or heavy-ion fragments, scattered out of the primary collimator, is not captured by the secondary collimators but hits cold magnets in the IR7 dispersion suppressor (DS) where the dispersion starts to increase. A possible approach to reduce these losses is based on the installation of additional collimators in the DS region. In this paper, simulations of the cleaning efficiency for Pb82+ ions are used to evaluate the effect of the additional collimators. The results indicate a significant improvement of the heavyion cleaning efficiency.

  10. Simulation of the low-frequency collimator impedance

    CERN Document Server

    Kroyer, T

    2008-01-01

    The low-frequency transverse collimator impedance constitutes a major part of the LHC impedance budget. In this paper numerical simulations for frequencies below 1 MHz using a commercial package are presented. From the 3D field solution of the two-wire simulations the transverse impedance is directly calculated. After a cross-check with theory for rotationally symmetric structures a geometry with two jaws and an LHC graphite collimator is examined. Furthermore, a simple physics picture that explains the principal characteristics of the impedance at high and low frequencies is given.

  11. ILC Beam delivery WG summary: Optics, collimation and background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jackson, F.; /Daresbury; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab; Kuroda, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Seryi, A.A.; /SLAC

    2006-07-01

    The paper summarizes the work of the Beam Delivery working group (WG4) at Snowmass 2005 workshop, focusing on status of optics, layout, collimation and detector background. The strawman layout with two interaction regions was recommended at the first ILC workshop at KEK in November 2004. Two crossing-angle designs were included in this layout. The design of the ILC BDS has evolved since the first ILC workshop. The progress on the BDS design including the collimation system, and extraction line design have been reviewed and the design issues were discussed during the WG4 sessions at the Snowmass, and are described in this paper.

  12. Measurements of Collimator Wakefields at End Station A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Hernando, J.L.; /Daresbury; Molloy, S.; /SLAC; Smith, J.D.A.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Watson, Nigel Keith; /Birmingham U.

    2011-11-01

    The angular deflection of a 28.5 GeV electron beam passing off-axis between the jaws of a collimator, generating a transverse wakefield, were measured in End Station A (ESA) at SLAC. In total, fifteen different configurations of collimator geometry and material were tested: some were chosen for compatibility with previous measurements while others served to study the effect of geometry and taper angles (geometrical contribution to the wakefield) and the effect of the material resistivity (resistive contribution) to the imparted kick. This paper summarises the last update of preliminary experimental results before they are finalised. The reconstructed kick factor is compared to analytical calculations and simulations.

  13. Impedance Studies for the Phase 2 LHC Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Métral, E; Grudiev, A; Kroyer, T; Zotter, B; Roncarolo, F; Salvant, B

    2010-01-01

    The LHC phase 2 collimation project aims at gaining a factor ten in cleaning efficiency, robustness and impedance reduction. From the impedance point of view, several ideas emerged during the last year, such as using dielectric collimators, slots or rods in copper plates, or Litz wires. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possible choices, showing analytical estimates, electromagnetic simulations performed using Maxwell, HFSS and GdFidL, and preliminary bench measurements. The corresponding complex tune shifts are computed for the different cases and compared on the stability diagram defined by the settings of the Landau octupoles available in the LHC at 7 TeV.

  14. Advances in pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators for single photon emission computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Azazrm, AhmadReza; Mahmoudian, Babak; Gharapapagh, Esmail

    2015-01-01

    The collimator in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is an important part of the imaging chain. One of the most important collimators that used in research, preclinical study, small animal, and organ imaging is the pinhole collimator. Pinhole collimator can improve the tradeoff between sensitivity and resolution in comparison with conventional parallel-hole collimator and facilities diagnosis. However, a major problem with pinhole collimator is a small field of view (FOV). Multi-pinhole collimator has been investigated in order to increase the sensitivity and FOV with a preserved spatial resolution. The geometry of pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators is a critical factor in the image quality and plays a key role in SPECT imaging. The issue of the material and geometry for pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators have been a controversial and much disputed subject within the field of SPECT imaging. On the other hand, recent developments in collimator optimization have heightened the need for appropriate reconstruction algorithms for pinhole SPECT imaging. Therefore, iterative reconstruction algorithms were introduced to minimize the undesirable effect on image quality. Current researches have focused on geometry and configuration of pinhole and multi-pinhole collimation rather than reconstruction algorithm. The lofthole and multi-lofthole collimator are samples of novel designs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review on recent researches in the pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators for SPECT imaging.

  15. A feasibility study of Dynamic Phantom scanner for quality assurance of photon beam profiles at various gantry angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Hsi, Wen C; Chu, James C H; Bernard, Damian B; Abrams, Ross A

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gantry rotation on beam profiles of photon and electron beams is an important issue in quality assurance for radiotherapy. To address variations in the profiles of photon and electron beams at different gantry angles, a Dynamic Phantom scanner composed of a 20 x 12 x 6 cm3 scanning Lucite block was designed as a cross-beam-profile scanner. To our knowledge, differences between scanned profiles acquired at different gantry angles with a small size Lucite block and those acquired a full-size (60 x 60 x 50 cm3) water phantom have not been previously investigated. We therefore performed a feasibility study for a first prototype Dynamic Phantom scanner without a gantry attachment mount. Radiation beams from a Varian LINAC 21EX and 2100C were used. Photon beams (6 MV and 18 MV) were shaped by either collimator jaws or a Varian 120 Multileaf (MLC) collimator, and electron beams (6 MeV, 12 MeV, and 20 MeV) were shaped by a treatment cone. To investigate the effect on profiles by using a Lucite block, a quantitative comparison of scanned profiles with the Dynamic Phantom and a full-size water phantom was first performed at a 0 degrees gantry angle for both photon and electron beams. For photon beam profiles defined by jaws at 1.0 cm and 5.0 cm depths of Lucite (i.e., at 1.1 cm and 5.7 cm depth of water), a good agreement (less than 1% variation) inside the field edge was observed between profiles scanned with the Dynamic Phantom and with a water phantom. The use of Lucite in the Dynamic Phantom resulted in reduced penumbra width (about 0.5 mm out of 5 mm to 8mm) and reduced (1% to 2%) scatter dose beyond the field edges for both 6 MV and 18 MV beams, compared with the water phantom scanner. For profiles of the MLC-shaped 6 MV photon beam, a similar agreement was observed. For profiles of electron beams scanned at 2.9 cm depth of Lucite (i.e., at 3.3 cm depth of water), larger disagreements in profiles (3% to 4%) and penumbra width (3 mm to 4 mm out of 12 mm

  16. Collimation of energetic neutrinos and muons inside EAS cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherif Talai Mohammed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available High-energy muon and neutrino components are simulated inside cores of EAS generated by primary protons and heavy nuclei of energies 1014-1020 eV. The collimation of muons and neutrinos inside the core is compared with present penetrating beams generated by accelerators.

  17. Geometric Beam Coupling Impedance of LHC Secondary Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Frasciello, O; Zobov, M; Grudiev, A; Mounet, N; Salvant, B

    2014-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC project is aimed at increasing the LHC luminosity by an order of magnitude. One of the key ingredients to achieve the luminosity goal is the beam intensity increase. In order to keep under control beam instabilities and to avoid excessive power losses a careful design of new vacuum chamber components and an improvement of the present LHC impedance model are required. Collimators are the main impedance contributors. Measurements with beam have revealed that the betatron coherent tune shifts were by about a factor of 2 higher with respect to the theoretical predictions based on the current model. Up to now the resistive wall impedance has been considered as the major impedance contribution for collimators. By carefully simulating their geometric impedance we show that for the graphite collimators with half-gaps higher than 10 mm the geometric impedance exceeds the resistive wall one. In turn, for the tungsten collimators the geometric impedance dominates for all used gap values. Hence, i...

  18. Geometric beam coupling impedance of LHC secondary collimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasciello, Oscar, E-mail: oscar.frasciello@lnf.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Tomassini, Sandro; Zobov, Mikhail [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Salvant, Benoit; Grudiev, Alexej; Mounet, Nicolas [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-02-21

    The High Luminosity LHC project is aimed at increasing the LHC luminosity by an order of magnitude. One of the key ingredients to achieve the luminosity goal is the beam intensity increase. In order to keep beam instabilities under control and to avoid excessive power losses a careful design of new vacuum chamber components and an improvement of the present LHC impedance model are required. Collimators are among the major impedance contributors. Measurements with beam have revealed that the betatron coherent tune shifts were higher by about a factor of 2 with respect to the theoretical predictions based on the LHC impedance model up to 2012. In that model the resistive wall impedance has been considered as the dominating impedance contribution for collimators. By carefully simulating also their geometric impedance we have contributed to the update of the LHC impedance model, reaching also a better agreement between the measured and simulated betatron tune shifts. During the just ended LHC Long Shutdown I (LSI), TCS/TCT collimators were replaced by new devices embedding BPMs and TT2-111R ferrite blocks. We present here preliminary estimations of their broad-band impedance, showing that an increase of about 20% is expected in the kick factors with respect to previous collimators without BPMs.

  19. The practical Pomeron for high energy proton collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleby, R.B. [University of Manchester, The Cockcroft Institute, Manchester (United Kingdom); Barlow, R.J.; Toader, A. [The University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Molson, J.G. [Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, LAL, Orsay (France); Serluca, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    We present a model which describes proton scattering data from ISR to Tevatron energies, and which can be applied to collimation in high energy accelerators, such as the LHC and FCC. Collimators remove beam halo particles, so that they do not impinge on vulnerable regions of the machine, such as the superconducting magnets and the experimental areas. In simulating the effect of the collimator jaws it is crucial to model the scattering of protons at small momentum transfer t, as these protons can subsequently survive several turns of the ring before being lost. At high energies these soft processes are well described by Pomeron exchange models. We study the behaviour of elastic and single-diffractive dissociation cross sections over a wide range of energy, and show that the model can be used as a global description of the wide variety of high energy elastic and diffractive data presently available. In particular it models low mass diffraction dissociation, where a rich resonance structure is present, and thus predicts the differential and integrated cross sections in the kinematical range appropriate to the LHC. We incorporate the physics of this model into the beam tracking code MERLIN and use it to simulate the resulting loss maps of the beam halo lost in the collimators in the LHC. (orig.)

  20. The practical Pomeron for high energy proton collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, R. B.; Barlow, R. J.; Molson, J. G.; Serluca, M.; Toader, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a model which describes proton scattering data from ISR to Tevatron energies, and which can be applied to collimation in high energy accelerators, such as the LHC and FCC. Collimators remove beam halo particles, so that they do not impinge on vulnerable regions of the machine, such as the superconducting magnets and the experimental areas. In simulating the effect of the collimator jaws it is crucial to model the scattering of protons at small momentum transfer t, as these protons can subsequently survive several turns of the ring before being lost. At high energies these soft processes are well described by Pomeron exchange models. We study the behaviour of elastic and single-diffractive dissociation cross sections over a wide range of energy, and show that the model can be used as a global description of the wide variety of high energy elastic and diffractive data presently available. In particular it models low mass diffraction dissociation, where a rich resonance structure is present, and thus predicts the differential and integrated cross sections in the kinematical range appropriate to the LHC. We incorporate the physics of this model into the beam tracking code MERLIN and use it to simulate the resulting loss maps of the beam halo lost in the collimators in the LHC.

  1. Crystal Collimation with protons at flat top energy

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Roberto; Galluccio, Francesca; Masi, Alessandro; Mirarchi, Daniele; Montesano, Simone; Valentino, Gianluca; Scandale, Walter; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    During this MD, performed on November 6th, 2015, bent silicon crystals were tested with proton beams for a possible usage of crystal-assisted collimation. Tests were performed at both injection and at top energy using horizontal crystal. Proton channeling was observed for the first time at 6.5 TeV.

  2. MD1878: Operation with primary collimators at tighter settings

    CERN Document Server

    Mirarchi, Daniele; Biancacci, Nicolo; Bruce, Roderik; Buffat, Xavier; Carver, Lee Robert; Fiascaris, Maria; Mereghetti, Alessio; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Roberto; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Soderen, Martin; Trad, Georges

    2017-01-01

    Primary (TCP) collimators of the betatron cleaning insertion determine the betatron cut of the LHC beam. During the 2016 they were set at 5.5 nominal beam sigmas at 6.5 TeV (i.e. by using a normalized emittance " = 3:5 m is used). Reducing their settings is a possible way to push the at the LHC, which depends on the collimation hierarchy. This study aims at understanding possible limitations of operating the LHC with tighter settings of the primary collimators. This is a crucial input to the choice of operational conguration in terms of at the LHC as well as at the HL-LHC. This study follows a successful MD done in block 3 to understand limitations from TCP impedance [1]. The outcome of this MD can also have an impact for the design of the FCC collimation system, which is currently based on the present TCP gaps. Studies of beam stability as a function of octupole current, transverse feedback gain (ADT) and transverse separation at the IPs were also carried out.

  3. EPICS Controlled Collimator for Controlling Beam Sizes in HIPPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napolitano, Arthur Soriano [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogel, Sven C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-03

    Controlling the beam spot size and shape in a diffraction experiment determines the probed sample volume. The HIPPO - High-Pressure-Preferred Orientation– neutron time-offlight diffractometer is located at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center in Los Alamos National Laboratories. HIPPO characterizes microstructural parameters, such as phase composition, strains, grain size, or texture, of bulk (cm-sized) samples. In the current setup, the beam spot has a 10 mm diameter. Using a collimator, consisting of two pairs of neutron absorbing boron-nitride slabs, horizontal and vertical dimensions of a rectangular beam spot can be defined. Using the HIPPO robotic sample changer for sample motion, the collimator would enable scanning of e.g. cylindrical samples along the cylinder axis by probing slices of such samples. The project presented here describes implementation of such a collimator, in particular the motion control software. We utilized the EPICS (Experimental Physics Interface and Control System) software interface to integrate the collimator control into the HIPPO instrument control system. Using EPICS, commands are sent to commercial stepper motors that move the beam windows.

  4. Inverse-collimated proton radiography for imaging thin materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Matthew S.; Allison, Jason; Andrews, Malcolm; Ferm, Eric; Goett, John J.; Kwiatkowski, Kris; Lopez, Julian; Mariam, Fesseha; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Martinez, Michael; Medina, Jason; Medina, Patrick; Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Chris L.; Murray, Matthew M.; Nedrow, Paul; Neukirch, Levi P.; Prestridge, Katherine; Rigg, Paolo; Saunders, Alexander; Schurman, Tamsen; Tainter, Amy; Trouw, Frans; Tupa, Dale; Tybo, Josh; Vogan-McNeil, Wendy; Wilde, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Relativistic, magnetically focused proton radiography was invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the 800 MeV LANSCE beam and is inherently well-suited to imaging dense objects, at areal densities >20 g cm-2. However, if the unscattered portion of the transmitted beam is removed at the Fourier plane through inverse-collimation, this system becomes highly sensitive to very thin media, of areal densities <100 mg cm-2. Here, this inverse-collimation scheme is described in detail and demonstrated by imaging Xe gas with a shockwave generated by an aluminum plate compressing the gas at Mach 8.8. With a 5-mrad inverse collimator, an areal density change of just 49 mg cm-2 across the shock front is discernible with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 3. Geant4 modeling of idealized and realistic proton transports can guide the design of inverse-collimators optimized for specific experimental conditions and show that this technique performs better for thin targets with reduced incident proton beam emittance. This work increases the range of areal densities to which the system is sensitive to span from ˜25 mg cm-2 to 100 g cm-2, exceeding three orders of magnitude. This enables the simultaneous imaging of a dense system as well as thin jets and ejecta material that are otherwise difficult to characterize with high-energy proton radiography.

  5. The collimation of magnetic jets by disk winds

    CERN Document Server

    Globus, Noemie

    2016-01-01

    The collimation of a Poynting-flux dominated jet by a wind emanating from the surface of an accretion flow is computed using a semi-analytic model. The injection of the disk wind is treated as a boundary condition in the equatorial plane, and its evolution is followed by invoking a prescribed geometry of streamlines. Solutions are obtained for a wide range of disk wind parameters. It is found that jet collimation generally occurs when the total wind power exceeds about ten percents of the jet power. For moderate wind powers we find gradual collimation. For strong winds we find rapid collimation followed by focusing of the jet, after which it remains narrow over many Alfv\\'en crossing times before becoming conical. We estimate that in the later case the jet's magnetic field may be dissipated by the current-driven kink instability over a distance of a few hundreds gravitational radii. We apply the model to M87 and show that the observed parabolic shape of the radio jet within the Bondi radius can be reproduced ...

  6. Inverse-collimated proton radiography for imaging thin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Matthew S; Allison, Jason; Andrews, Malcolm; Ferm, Eric; Goett, John J; Kwiatkowski, Kris; Lopez, Julian; Mariam, Fesseha; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Martinez, Michael; Medina, Jason; Medina, Patrick; Merrill, Frank E; Morris, Chris L; Murray, Matthew M; Nedrow, Paul; Neukirch, Levi P; Prestridge, Katherine; Rigg, Paolo; Saunders, Alexander; Schurman, Tamsen; Tainter, Amy; Trouw, Frans; Tupa, Dale; Tybo, Josh; Vogan-McNeil, Wendy; Wilde, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Relativistic, magnetically focused proton radiography was invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the 800 MeV LANSCE beam and is inherently well-suited to imaging dense objects, at areal densities >20 g cm(-2). However, if the unscattered portion of the transmitted beam is removed at the Fourier plane through inverse-collimation, this system becomes highly sensitive to very thin media, of areal densities <100 mg cm(-2). Here, this inverse-collimation scheme is described in detail and demonstrated by imaging Xe gas with a shockwave generated by an aluminum plate compressing the gas at Mach 8.8. With a 5-mrad inverse collimator, an areal density change of just 49 mg cm(-2) across the shock front is discernible with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 3. Geant4 modeling of idealized and realistic proton transports can guide the design of inverse-collimators optimized for specific experimental conditions and show that this technique performs better for thin targets with reduced incident proton beam emittance. This work increases the range of areal densities to which the system is sensitive to span from ∼25 mg cm(-2) to 100 g cm(-2), exceeding three orders of magnitude. This enables the simultaneous imaging of a dense system as well as thin jets and ejecta material that are otherwise difficult to characterize with high-energy proton radiography.

  7. Creating a collimated ultrasound beam in highly attenuating fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeymaekers, Bart; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N

    2012-04-01

    We have devised a method, based on a parametric array concept, to create a low-frequency (300-500 kHz) collimated ultrasound beam in fluids highly attenuating to sound. This collimated beam serves as the basis for designing an ultrasound visualization system that can be used in the oil exploration industry for down-hole imaging in drilling fluids. We present the results of two different approaches to generating a collimated beam in three types of highly attenuating drilling mud. In the first approach, the drilling mud itself was used as a nonlinear mixing medium to create a parametric array. However, the short absorption length in mud limits the mixing length and, consequently, the resulting beam is weak and broad. In the second improved approach, the beam generation process was confined to a separate "frequency mixing tube" that contained an acoustically non-linear, low attenuation medium (e.g., water) that allowed establishing a usable parametric array in the mixing tube. A low-frequency collimated beam was thus created prior to its propagation into the drilling fluid. Using the latter technique, the penetration depth of the low frequency ultrasound beam in the drilling fluid was significantly extended. We also present measurements of acoustic nonlinearity in various types of drilling mud.

  8. The collimation of magnetic jets by disc winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, N.; Levinson, A.

    2016-09-01

    The collimation of a Poynting-flux dominated jet by a wind emanating from the surface of an accretion flow is computed using a semi-analytic model. The injection of the disc wind is treated as a boundary condition in the equatorial plane, and its evolution is followed by invoking a prescribed geometry of streamlines. Solutions are obtained for a wide range of disc wind parameters. It is found that jet collimation generally occurs when the total wind power exceeds about 10 percents of the jet power. For moderate wind powers, we find gradual collimation. For strong winds, we find rapid collimation followed by focusing of the jet, after which it remains narrow over many Alfvén crossing times before becoming conical. We estimate that in the later case, the jet's magnetic field may be dissipated by the current-driven kink instability over a distance of a few hundreds gravitational radii. We apply the model to M87 and show that the observed parabolic shape of the radio jet within the Bondi radius can be reproduced provided that the wind injection zone extends to several hundreds gravitational radii, and that its total power is about one-third of the jet power. The radio spectrum can be produced by synchrotron radiation of relativistically hot, thermal electrons in the sheath flow surrounding the inner jet.

  9. MD1878: Operation with primary collimators at tighter settings

    CERN Document Server

    Mirarchi, Daniele; Biancacci, Nicolo; Bruce, Roderik; Buffat, Xavier; Carver, Lee Robert; Fiascaris, Maria; Mereghetti, Alessio; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Roberto; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Soderen, Martin; Trad, Georges; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    Primary (TCP) collimators of the betatron cleaning insertion determine the betatron cut of the LHC beam. During the 2016 they were set at 5.5 nominal beam sigmas at 6.5 TeV (i.e. by using a normalized emittance ε* = 3:5 μm is used). Reducing their settings is a possible way to push the ß* at the LHC, which depends on the collimation hierarchy. This study aims at understanding possible limitations of operating the LHC with tighter settings of the primary collimators. This is a crucial input to the choice of operational configuration in terms of ß* at the LHC as well as at the HL-LHC. This study follows a successful MD done in block 3 to understand limitations from TCP impedance [1]. The outcome of this MD can also have an impact for the design of the FCC collimation system, which is currently based on the present TCP gaps. Studies of beam stability as a function of octupole current, transverse feedback gain (ADT) and transverse separation at the IPs were also carried out.

  10. Slow axis collimation lens with variable curvature radius for semiconductor laser bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ling-Ling; Cai, Lei; Zheng, Yan-Fang; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Pu; Nie, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Xing-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Based on Snell's law and the constant phase in the front of optical field, a design method of the slow axis collimation lens with variable curvature radius is proposed for semiconductor laser bars. Variable radius of the collimator is designed by the transmission angle, and it is demonstrated that the collimator has good beam collimation ability by material with low refractive index. Resorting to the design thought of finite element method, the surface of the collimator has been divided, and it is feasible to be fabricated. This method is applied as an example in collimation of a 976 nm semiconductor laser bar. 6 mrad divergence angle of collimated beam at slow axis is realized by the designed collimation lens with refraction index of 1.51.

  11. Automatic Computer Algorithms for Beam-based Setup of the LHC Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, G; Assmann, R W; Bruce, R; Redaelli, S; Salvachua, B; Wollmann, D

    2012-01-01

    Beam-based setup of the LHC collimators is necessary to establish the beam centers and beam sizes at the collimator locations and determine the operational settings during various stages of the LHC machine cycle.

  12. Observation of strong leakage reduction in crystal assisted collimation of the SPS beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandale, W.; Arduini, G.; Butcher, M.; Cerutti, F.; Garattini, M.; Gilardoni, S.; Lechner, A.; Losito, R.; Masi, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Metral, E.; Mirarchi, D.; Montesano, S.; Redaelli, S.; Rossi, R.; Schoofs, P.; Smirnov, G.; Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Baricordi, S.; Dalpiaz, P.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Vincenzi, D.; Claps, G.; Dabagov, S.; Hampai, D.; Murtas, F.; Cavoto, G.; Iacoangeli, F.; Ludovici, L.; Santacesaria, R.; Valente, P.; Galluccio, F.; Afonin, A. G.; Chesnokov, Yu. A.; Durum, A. A.; Maisheev, V. A.; Sandomirskiy, Yu. E.; Yanovich, A. A.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Taratin, A. M.; Gavrikov, Yu. A.; Ivanov, Yu. M.; Lapina, L. P.; Fulcher, J.; Hall, G.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, M.

    2015-09-01

    In ideal two-stage collimation systems, the secondary collimator-absorber should have its length sufficient to exclude practically the exit of halo particles with large impact parameters. In the UA9 experiments on the crystal assisted collimation of the SPS beam a 60 cm long tungsten bar is used as a secondary collimator-absorber which is insufficient for the full absorption of the halo protons. Multi-turn simulation studies of the collimation allowed to select the position for the beam loss monitor downstream the collimation area where the contribution of particles deflected by the crystal in channeling regime but emerging from the secondary collimator-absorber is considerably reduced. This allowed observation of a strong leakage reduction of halo protons from the SPS beam collimation area, thereby approaching the case with an ideal absorber.

  13. Halo collimation of light and heavy ions in the FAIR synchrotron SIS100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokhorov, Ivan [TU Darmstadt (Germany); Strasik, Ivan [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver [TU Darmstadt (Germany); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The halo collimation system in the FAIR synchrotron SIS100 is needed to prevent an interception of the beam halo particles by the accelerator structure. The two-stage betatron collimation system is considered for operation with protons and fully-stripped ions. An adequate numerical simulation of the collimation system performance taking into account a precise description of the following processes: 1) particle scattering by the primary collimator; 2) inelastic nuclear interaction of the ions with the collimator foil; 3) momentum losses during the interaction with the collimator foil; 4) multi-turn tracking of the particles with the collimation optics included. The concept of the halo collimation, the current status of research and future plans are presented. Scattering processes and momentum losses were analytically estimated for various ion species and energies; analytical results were compared with the numerical simulations by the ATIMA code. Preliminary results of particle tracking using MAD-X code were obtained.

  14. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mejia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target’s three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology.

  15. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y., E-mail: mejia_famerp@yahoo.com.b [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular; Castro, A.A. de; Simoes, M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Leite, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Neurociencias e Ciencias do Comportamento; Braga, J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Astrofisica

    2010-11-15

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology. (author)

  16. Improved robustness of the LHC collimation system by operating with a jaw-beam angle

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Rossi, A; Cauchi, M; Faus-Golfe, A

    2012-01-01

    The robustness of the Phase I collimation system could be improved playing with the angular orientation of each single jaw. A preliminary study on the asymmetric misalignment of the collimator jaws, scanning through different jaw angles and varying beam sizes and energy, have been carried out, aiming at minimizing the energy deposited on metallic collimators, following an asynchronous dump.

  17. Development of the ICOSIM Program and Application to Magnetised Collimators in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, N

    2008-01-01

    This note has two parts. The first part provides documentation for the ICOSIM program used to simulate collimation of Ion beams. The second part contains results of a preliminary study of the effectiveness of magnetised collimators as a means to increase collimation efficiency for lead ion beams in the LHC.

  18. One cryogenic collimator, tested with beam

    CERN Document Server

    EuCARD, Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The main accelerator SIS100 of the FAIR-complex will provide heavy ion beams of highest intensities. Beam loss due to ionization is the most demanding loss mechanism at operation with high intensity, intermediate charge state heavy ions. A special synchrotron design has been developed for SIS100, aiming for hundred percent control of ionization beam loss by means of a dedicated cryogenic ion catcher system. To suppress dynamic vacuum effects, the cryocatcher system shall provide a significantly reduced effective desorption yield. The construction and test of a prototype cryocatcher is a task of the EuCARD WP8 ColMat. A prototype test setup, including cryostat has been constructed, manufactured and tested under realistic conditions with beams from the heavy ion synchrotron SIS18. The design and results are presented.

  19. A radial collimator for a time-of-flight neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. B.; Abernathy, D. L. [Quantum Condensed Matter Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Niedziela, J. L.; Loguillo, M. J.; Overbay, M. A. [Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    We have engineered and installed a radial collimator for use in the scattered beam of a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer at a spallation neutron source. The radial collimator may be used with both thermal and epithermal neutrons, reducing the detected scattering intensity due to material outside of the sample region substantially. The collimator is located inside of the sample chamber of the instrument, which routinely cycles between atmospheric conditions and cryogenic vacuum. The oscillation and support mechanism of the collimator allow it to be removed from use without breaking vacuum. We describe here the design and characterization of this radial collimator.

  20. A radial collimator for a time-of-flight neutron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M. B.; Niedziela, J. L.; Loguillo, M. J.; Overbay, M. A.; Abernathy, D. L.

    2014-08-01

    We have engineered and installed a radial collimator for use in the scattered beam of a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer at a spallation neutron source. The radial collimator may be used with both thermal and epithermal neutrons, reducing the detected scattering intensity due to material outside of the sample region substantially. The collimator is located inside of the sample chamber of the instrument, which routinely cycles between atmospheric conditions and cryogenic vacuum. The oscillation and support mechanism of the collimator allow it to be removed from use without breaking vacuum. We describe here the design and characterization of this radial collimator.

  1. Impedance simulations and measurements on the LHC collimators with embedded beam position monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Biancacci, N; Kuczerowski, J; Métral,; Mounet, N; Salvant, B; Mostacci, A; Frasciello, O; Zobov, M

    2017-01-01

    The LHC collimation system is a critical element for the safe operation of the LHC machine. The necessity of fast accurate positioning of the collimator’s jaws, recently introduced the need to have button beam position monitors directly embedded in the jaws extremities of the LHC tertiary collimators and some secondary collimators. This addition led to a new design of these collimators including ferrites to damp higher order modes instead of rf fingers. In this work we will present the impedance bench measurements and simulations on a TCT (Transverse Tertiary Collimator) prototype including estimations for beam stability for the LHC.

  2. Impedance simulations and measurements on the LHC collimators with embedded beam position monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Biancacci

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The LHC collimation system is a critical element for the safe operation of the LHC machine. The necessity of fast accurate positioning of the collimator’s jaws, recently introduced the need to have button beam position monitors directly embedded in the jaws extremities of the LHC tertiary collimators and some secondary collimators. This addition led to a new design of these collimators including ferrites to damp higher order modes instead of rf fingers. In this work we will present the impedance bench measurements and simulations on a TCT (Transverse Tertiary Collimator prototype including estimations for beam stability for the LHC.

  3. Experimental demonstration of an inertial collimation mechanism in nested outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Yurchak, R; Pelka, A; Pikuz, S; Falize, E; Vinci, T; Koenig, M; Loupias, B; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Fatenejad, M; Tzeferacos, P; Lamb, D Q; Blackman, E G

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between a central outflow and a surrounding wind is common in astrophysical sources powered by accretion. Understanding how the interaction might help to collimate the inner central outflow is of interest for assessing astrophysical jet formation paradigms. In this context, we studied the interaction between two nested supersonic plasma flows generated by focusing a long pulse high-energy laser beam onto a solid target. A nested geometry was created by shaping the energy distribution at the focal spot with a dedicated phase plate. Optical and X-ray diagnostics were used to study the interacting flows. Experimental results and numerical hydrodynamic simulations indeed show the formation of strongly collimated jets. Our work experimentally confirms the "shock-focused inertial confinement" mechanism proposed in previous theoretical astrophysics investigations.

  4. Ocular vergence measurement in projected and collimated simulator displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morahan, P; Meehan, J W; Patterson, J; Hughes, P K

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate electrooculography (EOG) as a measurement of ocular vergence in both collimated and projected simulator environments. The task required participants to shift their gaze between a central fixation point and a target appearing at one of three eccentricities. EOG was effective in recording ocular vergence. The EOG results were similar between collimated and projected displays, except for differences in vergence changes during lateral movement of the eyes, and ocular excursions downward elicited a greater EOG response than the reverse upward movement. The computer-based technique of recording vergence was found to produce measurable traces from a majority of participants. The technique has potential for further development as a tool for measuring ocular vergence in virtual environments where methods that require the wearing of head-mounted apparatus to track ocular structures (e.g., the pupil), which cannot be worn at the same time as a flight or flight-simulator helmet, are unsuitable.

  5. On Magnetic Self-Collimation of Relativistic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, N.; Cayatte, V.; Sauty, C.

    We present a semi-analytical model using the equations of general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) for jets emitted by a rotating black hole. We assume steady axisymmetric outflows of a relativistic ideal fluid in Kerr metrics. We express the conservation equations in the frame of the FIDucial Observer (FIDO or ZAMO) using a 3+1 space-time splitting. Calculating the total energy variation between a non-polar field line and the polar axis, we extend to the Kerr metric the simple criterion for the magnetic collimation of jets obtained for a nonrotating black hole by Meliani et al.10 We show that the black role rotation induced a more efficient magnetic collimation of the jet.

  6. Synchrotron radiation of self-collimating relativistic MHD jets

    CERN Document Server

    Porth, Oliver; Meliani, Zakaria; Vaidya, Bhargav

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to derive signatures of synchrotron radiation from state-of-the-art simulation models of collimating relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets featuring a large-scale helical magnetic field. We perform axisymmetric special relativistic MHD simulations of the jet acceleration region using the PLUTO code. The computational domain extends from the slow magnetosonic launching surface of the disk up to 6000^2 Schwarzschild radii allowing to reach highly relativistic Lorentz factors. The Poynting dominated disk wind develops into a jet with Lorentz factors of 8 and is collimated to 1 degree. In addition to the disk jet, we evolve a thermally driven spine jet, emanating from a hypothetical black hole corona. Solving the linearly polarized synchrotron radiation transport within the jet, we derive VLBI radio and (sub-) mm diagnostics such as core shift, polarization structure, intensity maps, spectra and Faraday rotation measure (RM), directly from the Stokes parameters. We also investigate...

  7. Advanced Bent Crystal Collimation Studies at the Tevatron (T-980)

    CERN Document Server

    Zvoda, V; Carrigan, R; Drozhdin, A; Johnson, T; Kwan, S; Mokhov, N; Prosser, A; Reilly, R; Uplegger, R Rivera L; Shiltsev, V; Still, D; Zagel, J; Guidi, V; Bagli, E; Mazzolari, A; Ivanov, Yu; Chesnokov, Yu; Yazynin, I

    2011-01-01

    The T-980 bent crystal collimation experiment at the Tevatron has recently acquired substantial enhancements. First, two new crystals - a 16-strip one manufactured and characterized by the INFN Ferrara group and a quasi-mosaic crystal manufactured and characterized by the PNPI group. Second, a two plane telescope with 3 high-resolution pixel detectors per plane along with corresponding mechanics, electronics, control and software has been manufactured, tested and installed in the E0 crystal region. The purpose of the pixel telescope is to measure and image channeled (CH), volume-reflected (VR) and multiple volume-reflected (MVR) beam profiles produced by bent crystals. Third, an ORIGIN-based system has been developed for thorough analysis of experimental and simulation data. Results of analysis are presented for different types of crystals used from 2005 to present for channeling and volume reflection including pioneering tests of two-plane crystal collimation at the collider, all in comparison with detailed ...

  8. Fabricating High-Resolution X-Ray Collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Michael; Atkinson, James E.; Fraser, Iain; Klinger, Jill

    2008-01-01

    A process and method for fabricating multi-grid, high-resolution rotating modulation collimators for arcsecond and sub-arcsecond x-ray and gamma-ray imaging involves photochemical machining and precision stack lamination. The special fixturing and etching techniques that have been developed are used for the fabrication of multiple high-resolution grids on a single array substrate. This technology has application in solar and astrophysics and in a number of medical imaging applications including mammography, computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and gamma cameras used in nuclear medicine. This collimator improvement can also be used in non-destructive testing, hydrodynamic weapons testing, and microbeam radiation therapy.

  9. Collimation and splitting of valley electron diffraction in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mou; Bai, Yan-Kui; Zhang, Wen-Lian; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    We reported the collimation and splitting effects of the diffraction of valley electrons in graphene. When the incident energy increases from the neutral point, the diffraction tends to be collimated for one valley and split for the other valley. The difference in the diffraction between valleys results in valley-dependent transport. We investigated the left-right conductance of a four-terminal graphene device. The conductance ratio between the two valleys was derived to be 1 -(8 /3 )E , where E is the incident energy in units of the atom-atom hopping. The ratio is independent of the device dimensions and reflects the intrinsic properties of the electronic structure of graphene.

  10. Simulator for beam-based LHC collimator alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Gianluca; Aßmann, Ralph; Redaelli, Stefano; Sammut, Nicholas

    2014-02-01

    In the CERN Large Hadron Collider, collimators need to be set up to form a multistage hierarchy to ensure efficient multiturn cleaning of halo particles. Automatic algorithms were introduced during the first run to reduce the beam time required for beam-based setup, improve the alignment accuracy, and reduce the risk of human errors. Simulating the alignment procedure would allow for off-line tests of alignment policies and algorithms. A simulator was developed based on a diffusion beam model to generate the characteristic beam loss signal spike and decay produced when a collimator jaw touches the beam, which is observed in a beam loss monitor (BLM). Empirical models derived from the available measurement data are used to simulate the steady-state beam loss and crosstalk between multiple BLMs. The simulator design is presented, together with simulation results and comparison to measurement data.

  11. Collimation in the Transfer Lines to the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Helmut; Kadi, Yacine; Kain, Verena; Risselada, Thys; Weterings, Wim

    2005-01-01

    Injection intensities for the LHC are over an order of magnitude above damage level. The TI 2 and TI 8 transfer lines between the SPS and LHC are each about 2.5 km long and comprise many active elements running in pulsed mode. The collimation system in the transfer lines is designed to dilute the beam energy sufficiently in case of accidental beam loss or mis-steered beam. A system using three collimator families spaced by 60 degrees in phase advance, both in the horizontal and the vertical plane has been chosen. We discuss the reasons for this choice, the layout and, the expected performance of the system in terms of maximum amplitudes and energy deposition.

  12. Collimator Improvements 2011 and Upgrade 2012: What Do We Plan?

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S

    2011-01-01

    The LHC collimation system has provided an outstanding performance during the first year of high-intensity beam operation. The complete Phase I system was commissioned and delivered routinely a cleaning performance close to the nominal exceptions with relaxed collimator settings. On the other hand, the first commissioning experience has also provided first indications of system limitations alongside of hints for possible improvements. In particular, the expected performance limitations from losses in the cold dispersion suppressors (DSs) at either side of the warm cleaning insertions have been confirmed. While improvements of the system will already be implemented during the 2010 shutdown, the major performance limitation from the DS require a change of the machine layout that will be addresses in the 2012 long shutdown. In this papers, the proposed improvements of the system are presented. The expected gains and the implication of the proposed changes on the system re-commissioning are discussed.

  13. Transmission characteristics of x-ray in MCP collimator in parallel structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xulei; Li, Ye; Chen, Weijun

    2016-11-01

    In order to improve the imaging quality of X-ray and reduce the effects of X-ray and scatter line on image, the adoption of X-ray collimator is the most effective method. MCP collimator in parallel structure can effectively reduce the ratio of X-ray and scatter line to reach on image plane, and reduce the atomization degree of images, so as to improve the image contrast. Through the establishment first-order radiation transmittance model of MCP collimator, test the performance of MCP collimator, it is prove that the MCP collimator can be used in the imaging system that consists of proximity of X-ray image intensifier, first-order radiation transmittance calculation formula of MCP absorption type collimator in parallel structure is reduced, obtain the transmittance distribution non cosine curve distribution of MCP collimator through calculating.

  14. Neutron collimator design of neutron radiography based on the BNCT facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Peng; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Li, Yi-Guo; Peng, Dan; Lu, Jin; Zhang, Gao-Long; Zhao, Hang; Zhang, Ai-Wu; Li, Chun-Yang; Liu, Wan-Jin; Hu, Tao; Lü, Jun-Guang

    2014-02-01

    For the research of CCD neutron radiography, a neutron collimator was designed based on the exit of thermal neutron of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) reactor. Based on the Geant4 simulations, the preliminary choice of the size of the collimator was determined. The materials were selected according to the literature data. Then, a collimator was constructed and tested on site. The results of experiment and simulation show that the thermal neutron flux at the end of the neutron collimator is greater than 1.0×106 n/cm2/s, the maximum collimation ratio (L/D) is 58, the Cd-ratio(Mn) is 160 and the diameter of collimator end is 10 cm. This neutron collimator is considered to be applicable for neutron radiography.

  15. Neutron collimator design of neutron radiography based on the BNCT facility

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, XP; Li, YG; Peng, D; Lu, J; Zhang, GL; Zhao, H; Zhang, AW; Li, CY; Liu, WJ; Hu, T; Lv, JG

    2013-01-01

    For the research of CCD neutron radiography, a neutron collimator was designed based on the exit of thermal neutron of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) reactor. Based on the Geant4 simulations, the preliminary choice of the size of the collimator was determined. The materials were selected according to the literature data. Then, a collimator was constructed and tested on site. The results of experiment and simulation show that the thermal neutron flux at the end of theneutron collimator is greater than 10^6 n/cm^2/s, the maximum collimation ratio (L/D) is 58, the Cd-ratio(Mn) is 160 and the diameter of collimator end is 10 cm. This neutron collimator is considered to be applicable for neutron radiography.

  16. Mechanical Engineering and Design of Novel Collimators for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Carra, F; Dallocchio, A; Gentini, L; Gradassi, P; Maitrejean, G; Manousos, A; Mariani, N; Mounet, N; Quaranta, E; Redaelli, S; Vlachoudis, V

    2014-01-01

    In view of High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades, collimator materials may become a limit to the machine performance: the high RF impedance of Carbon-Carbon composites used for primary and secondary collimators can lead to beam instabilities, while the Tungsten alloy adopted in tertiary collimators exhibits low robustness in case of beam-induced accidents. An R&D program has been pursued to develop new materials overcoming such limitations. Molybdenum-Graphite, in addition to its outstanding thermal conductivity, can be coated with pure molybdenum, reducing collimator impedance by a factor of 10. A new secondary collimator is being designed around this novel composite. New high-melting materials are also proposed to improve the robustness of tertiary collimators. New collimators will also be equipped with BPMs, significantly enhancing the alignment speed and the beta-star reach. This implies additional constraints of space, as well as detailed static and fatigue calculations on cables and connectors. This...

  17. Changes to the Transfer Line Collimation System for the High-Luminosity LHC Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kain, V. [CERN; Aberle, O. [CERN; Bracco, C. [CERN; Fraser, M. [CERN; Galleazzi, F. [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, E. [Fermilab; Kosmicki, A. [CERN; Maciariello, F. [CERN; Meddahi, M. [CERN; Nuiry, F. X. [CERN; Steele, G. [CERN; Velotti, F. [CERN

    2015-06-01

    The current LHC transfer line collimation system will not be able to provide enough protection for the high brightness beams in the high-luminosity LHC era. The new collimation system will have to attenuate more and be more robust than its predecessor. The active jaw length of the new transfer line collimators will therefore be 2.1 m instead of currently 1.2 m. The transfer line optics will have to be adjusted for the new collimator locations and larger beta functions at the collimators for absorber robustness reasons. In this paper the new design of the transfer line collimation system will be presented with its implications on transfer line optics and powering, maintainability, protection of transfer line magnets in case of beam loss on a collimator and protection of the LHC aperture.

  18. Changes to the Transfer Line Collimation System for the High-Luminosity LHC Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, V; Bracco, C; Fraser, M; Galleazzi, F; Gianfelice-Wendt, E; Kosmicki, A; Maciariello, F; Meddahi, M; Nuiry, F X; Steele, G; Velotti, F

    2015-01-01

    The current LHC transfer line collimation system will not be able to provide enough protection for the high brightness beams in the high-luminosity LHC era. The new collimation system will have to attenuate more and be more robust than its predecessor. The active jaw length of the new transfer line collimators will therefore be 2.1 m instead of currently 1.2 m. The transfer line optics will have to be adjusted for the new collimator locations and larger beta functions at the collimators for absorber robustness reasons. In this paper the new design of the transfer line collimation system will be presented with its implications on transfer line optics and powering, maintainability, protection of transfer line magnets in case of beam loss on a collimator and protection of the LHC aperture.

  19. New Post-Linac Collimation System for the Next Linear Collider(LCC-0052)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, P.

    2003-12-03

    We present a new design for the NLC post-linac collimation system. The new design separates the collimation of off-energy particles and particles with large betatron amplitudes. The energy collimation system achieves passive protection against damage by an errant bunch train via large horizontal dispersion and vertical betatron functions, and makes use of optical symmetries to reduce jitter amplification. The betatron collimation system permits infrequent damage to the thin ''spoiler'' collimators, while the thick ''absorber'' collimators have a much larger aperture and are thus more difficult to hit. The physical phenomena which are relevant to the design and operation of the collimation system are reviewed, and the associated properties of the new system are discussed.

  20. The Practical Pomeron for High Energy Proton Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108501; Molson, J. G; Serluca, M.; Toader, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a model which describes proton scattering data from ISR to Tevatron energies, and which can be applied to collimation n high energy accelerators, such as the LHC and FCC. Collimators remove beam halo particles, so that they do not impinge on vulnerable regions of the machine, such as the superconducting magnets and the experimental areas. In simulating the effect of the collimator jaws it is crucial to model the scattering of protons at small momentum transfer~$t$,as these protons can subsequently survive several turns of the ring before being lost. At high energies these soft processes are well described by Pomeron exchange models. We study the behaviour of elastic and single-diffractive dissociation cross sections over a wide range of energy, and show that the model can be used as a global description of the wide variety of high energy elastic and diffractive data presently available. In particular it models low mass diffraction dissociation, where a rich resonance structure is present, and thus ...

  1. Negative particle planar and axial channeling and channeling collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    While information exists on high energy negative particle channeling there has been little study of the challenges of negative particle bending and channeling collimation. Partly this is because negative dechanneling lengths are relatively much shorter. Electrons are not particularly useful for investigating negative particle channeling effects because their material interactions are dominated by channeling radiation. Another important factor is that the current central challenge in channeling collimation is the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) where both beams are positive. On the other hand in the future the collimation question might reemerge for electon-positron or muon colliders. Dechanneling lengths increase at higher energies so that part of the negative particle experimental challenge diminishes. In the article different approaches to determining negative dechanneling lengths are reviewed. The more complicated case for axial channeling is also discussed. Muon channeling as a tool to investigate dechanneling is also discussed. While it is now possible to study muon channeling it will probably not illuminate the study of negative dechanneling.

  2. First Sub-arcsecond Collimation of Monochromatic Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, Apoorva G; Abbas, Sohrab; Treimer, Wolfgang, E-mail: nintsspd@barc.gov.in

    2010-11-01

    We have achieved the tightest collimation to date of a monochromatic neutron beam by diffracting neutrons from a Bragg prism, viz. a single crystal prism operating in the vicinity of Bragg incidence. An optimised silicon {l_brace}111{r_brace} Bragg prism has collimated 5.26A neutrons down to 0.58 arcsecond. In conjunction with a similarly optimised Bragg prism analyser of opposite asymmetry, this ultra-parallel beam yielded a 0.62 arcsecond wide rocking curve. This beam has produced the first SUSANS spectrum in Q {approx} 10{sup -6} A{sup -1} range with a hydroxyapatite casein protein sample and demonstrated the instrument capability of characterising agglomerates upto 150 {mu}m in size. The super-collimation has also enabled recording of the first neutron diffraction pattern from a macroscopic grating of 200 {mu}m period. An analysis of this pattern yielded the beam transverse coherence length of 175 {mu}m (FWHM), the greatest achieved to date for A wavelength neutrons.

  3. Precessing collimated outflows in the planetary nebula IC 4846

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, L F; Torrelles, J M; Miranda, Luis F; Guerrero, Martin A; Torrelles, Jose M

    2000-01-01

    We present [N II] and H-alpha images and high resolution long-slit spectra of the planetary nebula IC 4846, which reveal, for the first time, its complex structure and the existence of collimated outflows. The object consists of a moderately elongated shell, two (and probably three) pairs of collimated bipolar outflows at different orientations, and an attached circular shell. One of the collimated pairs is constituted by two curved, extended filaments whose properties indicate a high velocity, bipolar precessing jet. A difference of \\~10 km/s is found between the systemic velocity of the precessing jets and the centroid velocity of the nebula, as recently report for Hu 2-1. We propose that this difference is due to orbital motion of the ejection source in a binary central star. The orbital separation and period estimates for the binary star are less than or equal to 30 AU and 100 yr, respectively. These are similar to those previously estimated for Hu 2-1, linking the central stars of both planetary nebulae ...

  4. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S.; Metzler, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanners. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present a LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the non-negative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  5. Real-time tracking of tumor motions and deformations along the leaf travel direction with the aid of a synchronized dynamic MLC leaf sequencer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, Martin; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Department of Medical Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-11-21

    Advanced radiotherapeutical techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) are based on an accurate knowledge of the location of the radiation target. An accurate dose delivery, therefore, requires a method to account for the inter- and intrafractional target motion and the target deformation occurring during the course of treatment. A method to compensate in real time for changes in the position and shape of the target is the use of a dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) technique which can be devised to automatically arrange the treatment field according to real-time image information. So far, various approaches proposed for leaf sequencers have had to rely on a priori known target motion data and have aimed to optimize the overall treatment time. Since for a real-time dose delivery the target motion is not known a priori, the velocity range of the leading leaves is restricted by a safety margin to c x v{sub max} while the following leaves can travel with an additional maximum speed to compensate for the respective target movements. Another aspect to be considered is the tongue and groove effect. A uniform radiation field can only be achieved if the leaf movements are synchronized. The method presented in this note is the first to combine a synchronizing sequencer and real-time tracking with a dynamic MLC. The newly developed algorithm is capable of online optimizing the leaf velocities by minimizing the overall treatment time while at the same time it synchronizes the leaf trajectories in order to avoid the tongue and groove effect. The simultaneous synchronization is performed with the help of an online-calculated mid-time leaf trajectory which is common for all leaf pairs and which takes into account the real-time target motion and deformation information. (note)

  6. Technical Note: Motion-perturbation method applied to dosimetry of dynamic MLC target tracking—A proof-of-concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feygelman, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.feygelman@moffitt.org; Tonner, Brian; Hunt, Dylan; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Stambaugh, Cassandra [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Previous studies show that dose to a moving target can be estimated using 4D measurement-guided dose reconstruction based on a process called virtual motion simulation, or VMS. A potential extension of VMS is to estimate dose during dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC)-tracking treatments. The authors introduce a modified VMS method and quantify its performance as proof-of-concept for tracking applications. Methods: Direct measurements with a moving biplanar diode array were used to verify accuracy of the VMS dose estimates. A tracking environment for variably sized circular MLC apertures was simulated by sending preprogrammed control points to the MLC while simultaneously moving the accelerator treatment table. Sensitivity of the method to simulated tracking latency (0–700 ms) was also studied. Potential applicability of VMS to fast changing beam apertures was evaluated by modeling, based on the demonstrated dependence of the cumulative dose on the temporal dose gradient. Results: When physical and virtual latencies were matched, the agreement rates (2% global/2 mm gamma) between the VMS and the biplanar dosimeter were above 96%. When compared to their own reference dose (0 induced latency), the agreement rates for VMS and biplanar array track closely up to 200 ms of induced latency with 10% low-dose cutoff threshold and 300 ms with 50% cutoff. Time-resolved measurements suggest that even in the modulated beams, the error in the cumulative dose introduced by the 200 ms VMS time resolution is not likely to exceed 0.5%. Conclusions: Based on current results and prior benchmarks of VMS accuracy, the authors postulate that this approach should be applicable to any MLC-tracking treatments where leaf speeds do not exceed those of the current Varian accelerators.

  7. Technical Note: Motion-perturbation method applied to dosimetry of dynamic MLC target tracking--A proof-of-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feygelman, Vladimir; Tonner, Brian; Stambaugh, Cassandra; Hunt, Dylan; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Nelms, Benjamin E

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies show that dose to a moving target can be estimated using 4D measurement-guided dose reconstruction based on a process called virtual motion simulation, or VMS. A potential extension of VMS is to estimate dose during dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC)-tracking treatments. The authors introduce a modified VMS method and quantify its performance as proof-of-concept for tracking applications. Direct measurements with a moving biplanar diode array were used to verify accuracy of the VMS dose estimates. A tracking environment for variably sized circular MLC apertures was simulated by sending preprogrammed control points to the MLC while simultaneously moving the accelerator treatment table. Sensitivity of the method to simulated tracking latency (0-700 ms) was also studied. Potential applicability of VMS to fast changing beam apertures was evaluated by modeling, based on the demonstrated dependence of the cumulative dose on the temporal dose gradient. When physical and virtual latencies were matched, the agreement rates (2% global/2 mm gamma) between the VMS and the biplanar dosimeter were above 96%. When compared to their own reference dose (0 induced latency), the agreement rates for VMS and biplanar array track closely up to 200 ms of induced latency with 10% low-dose cutoff threshold and 300 ms with 50% cutoff. Time-resolved measurements suggest that even in the modulated beams, the error in the cumulative dose introduced by the 200 ms VMS time resolution is not likely to exceed 0.5%. Based on current results and prior benchmarks of VMS accuracy, the authors postulate that this approach should be applicable to any MLC-tracking treatments where leaf speeds do not exceed those of the current Varian accelerators.

  8. aSi-EPID transit signal calibration for dynamic beams: a needful step for the IMRT in vivo dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Francesca; Piermattei, Angelo; Azario, Luigi; Placidi, Lorenzo; Cilla, Savino; Caivano, Rocchina; Fusco, Vincenzo; Fidanzio, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    This work reports a method based on correlation functions to convert EPID transit signals into in vivo dose values at the isocenter point, D iso, of dynamic IMRT beams supplied by Varian linac. Dose reconstruction for intensity-modulated beams required significant corrections of EPID response, due to the X-ray component transmitted through multileaf collimator. The algorithm was formulated using a set of simulated IMRT beams. The beams were parameterized by means of a fluence inhomogeneity index, FI, introduced to describe the degree of beam modulation with respect to open beams. This way, all dosimetric parameters involved in D iso reconstruction algorithm, such as the correlation functions, the correction factor for EPID to phantom distance and the modulated tissue maximum ratios, were determined as a function of the FI index. Clinical IMRT beams were used to irradiate a homogeneous phantom, and for each beam, the agreement between the reconstructed dose, D iso, and the dose computed by TPS, D iso,TPS, was well within 5 %. Moreover, the average ratios, R, between the D iso, and D iso,TPS, resulted equal to 1.002 ± 0.030. Thirty-five IMRT fields of 5 different patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-neck tumors were tested and the results were displayed on a computer screen after 2 min from the end of the treatment. However, 350 in vivo tests supplied an average ratio R equal to 1.004 ± 0.040. The in vivo dosimetry procedure here presented is among the objectives of a National Project financially supported by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare for the development of in vivo dosimetry procedures (Piermattei et al. in Nucl Instrum Methods Phys Res B 274:42-50, 2012) connected to the Record-Verify system of the radiotherapy center.

  9. Tomographic image quality of rotating slat versus parallel hole-collimated SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Holen, Roel; Staelens, Steven; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2011-11-01

    Parallel and converging hole collimators are most frequently used in nuclear medicine. Less common is the use of rotating slat collimators for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The higher photon collection efficiency, inherent to the geometry of rotating slat collimators, results in much lower noise in the data. However, plane integrals contain spatial information in only one direction, whereas line integrals provide two-dimensional information. It is not a trivial question whether the initial gain in efficiency will compensate for the lower information content in the plane integrals. Therefore, a comparison of the performance of parallel hole and rotating slat collimation is needed. This study compares SPECT with rotating slat and parallel hole collimation in combination with MLEM reconstruction with accurate system modeling and correction for scatter and attenuation. A contrast-to-noise study revealed an improvement of a factor 2-3 for hot lesions and more than a factor of 4 for cold lesion. Furthermore, a clinically relevant case of heart lesion detection is simulated for rotating slat and parallel hole collimators. In this case, rotating slat collimators outperform the traditional parallel hole collimators. We conclude that rotating slat collimators are a valuable alternative for parallel hole collimators.

  10. First Results of an Experiment on Advanced Collimator Materials at CERN HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Assmann, R; Berthome, E; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Donzé, M; Francon, P; Garlasché, M; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Moyret, P; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Peroni, L; Scapin, M; Calderon, M; Charitonidis, N

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment (HRMT-14) has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility on six different materials of interest for Beam Intercepting Devices (collimators, targets, dumps). Both traditional materials (Mo, W and Cu alloys) as well as advanced metal/diamond and metal/graphite composites were tested under extreme conditions as to pressure, density and temperature, leading to the development of highly dynamic phenomena as shock-waves, spallation, explosions. Experimental data were acquired, mostly in real time, relying on extensive integrated instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature and vacuum sensors) and on remote acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The experiment was a success under all points of view in spite of the technological challenges and harsh environment. First measurements are in good agreement with results of complex simulations, confirming the effectiveness of the acquisition system and the reliability of advanced numerical...

  11. Simultaneous reduction of radiation dose and scatter for CBCT by using collimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tianfang; Li, Xiang; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Yongqian; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: On-board cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging has been widely available in radiotherapy clinic for target localization. However, the extra radiation dose from CBCT is always a concern for its frequent use. Additionally, the relatively large scatter in CBCT often degrades the image quality. By using collimators, some of the X-rays can be stopped from reaching the patient and the detectors, hence both the scatter and the patient doses are simultaneously reduced. The authors show in this work that the collimated CBCT data can be reconstructed without any noticeable artifacts for certain collimator blocking ratios and blocking patterns, and the focus of this work is to study the relationship between the image quality and these two collimator factors.Methods: A CBCT system with collimators was simulated following the typical geometry used in clinic. Different collimator designs were tested by varying the size and the number of the collimator slits, and at the same time, the ratio of transmitted beams to total beams was varied from 100% to 10%, resulting in hundreds of different simulation scenarios. Lung and pelvis phantoms created from patients CT images were used in the simulations, and an iterative reconstruction algorithm using the compressed sensing technique was adopted. The image quality was examined by root mean square errors (RMSEs) and compared with the conventional CBCT images.Results: The CBCT image quality increases as the amount of beams passing through the collimators increases, and decreases as the size of the collimator slits increases. With ultra-high resolution collimators, the RMSEs were comparable to the conventional CBCT image quality until the beam transmission rate is reduced below 25%.Conclusions: Collimators can reduce the scatters and radiation dose, however, the collimated CBCT image quality is strongly dependent on both the collimator blocking ratio and the blocking pattern. To achieve image quality comparable to the conventional CBCT, the

  12. Cerrobend collimation effect on electron beams; Efeito de colimacoes de cerrobend em feixes de eletrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnari, Laura; Albino, Lucas D.; Ribeiro, Victor A.B.; Santos, Gabriela R., E-mail: laurafurnari@hotmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (InRad/FM/USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas. Instituto de Radiologia

    2012-12-15

    The aim of this work was to discuss about the cerrobend collimation effect on clinical electron beams. When a cerrobend collimation is used, both the percentage depth dose (PDD) and the absolute dose that is delivered to the patient changes. It was analyzed how those parameters change and it was evaluated in which cases a correction factor should be applied due to this collimation. It was founded that, when the smallest dimension of the collimation is smaller than the minimum radius to lateral scatter equilibrium, the collimation will change the PDD in such a way that it should take into account in the treatment planning. For one specific collimation usually applied in head and neck treatments, it was found that no correction factor is necessary. (author)

  13. First Design of a Proton Collimation System for 50 TeV FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    Fiascaris, Maria; Mirarchi, Daniele; Redaelli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We present studies aimed at defining a first conceptual solution for a collimation system for the hadron-hadron option for the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh). The baseline collimation layout is based on the scaling of the present LHC collimation system to the FCC-hh energy. It currently includes a dedicated betatron cleaning insertion as well as collimators in the experimental insertions to protect the inner triplets. An aperture model for the FCC-hh is defined and the geometrical acceptance is calculated at top energy taking into account mechanical and optics imperfections. Based on these studies the collimator settings needed to protect the machine are defined. The performance of the collimation system is then assessed with particle tracking simulation tools assuming a perfect machine.

  14. Efficient Dielectric Metasurface Collimating Lenses for Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Arbabi, Amir; Horie, Yu; Bagheri, Mahmood; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Light emitted from single-mode semiconductor lasers generally has large divergence angles, and high numerical aperture lenses are required for beam collimation. Visible and near infrared lasers are collimated using aspheric glass or plastic lenses, yet collimation of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers typically requires more costly aspheric lenses made of germanium, chalcogenide compounds, or other infrared-transparent materials. Here we report mid-infrared dielectric metasurface flat lenses that efficiently collimate the output beam of single-mode quantum cascade lasers. The metasurface lenses are composed of amorphous silicon posts on a flat sapphire substrate and can be fabricated at low cost using a single step conventional UV binary lithography. Mid-infrared radiation from a 4.8 $\\mu$m distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser is collimated using a polarization insensitive metasurface lens with 0.86 numerical aperture and 79% transmission efficiency. The collimated beam has a half divergence angle of 0...

  15. A combined radial collimator and cooled beryllium filter for neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groitl, Felix, E-mail: felix.groitl@psi.ch [Laboratory for Quantum Magnetism, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Rantsiou, Emmanouela; Bartkowiak, Marek; Filges, Uwe; Graf, Dieter [Laboratory for Scientific Developments and Novel Materials, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Niedermayer, Christof [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Rüegg, Christian [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Department of Quantum Matter Physics, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Rønnow, Henrik M. [Laboratory for Quantum Magnetism, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-05-21

    A flexible, combined, radial collimator and beryllium (Be) filter have been designed and manufactured at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Switzerland. The Be is integrated in the radial collimator by placing thin Be slices between the collimator lamellas. The filter/collimator is mounted within a vacuum vessel and dry cooled. The flexible design allows for different degrees of collimation and for different Be lengths. Results of measurements carried out at the BOA beamline at PSI are presented. These experiments include rotation scans determining the focal full width half maximum (FWHM), transmission measurements, test of different collimator lamellas and performance tests of the cooling of the filter. This new combined device will be a crucial part of the CAMEA spectrometer at SINQ, PSI.

  16. Proposal for Single-Bunch Collimator Wakefield Measurements at SLAC ESTB

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, J; Faus-Golfe, A; Fuster-Martinez, N; Hast, C; Jones, R M; Latina, A; Pivi, M; Rumolo, G; Schulte, D; Smith, J; Tomas, R

    2012-01-01

    Collimator wakefields in the Beam Delivery System (BDS) of future linear colliders, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), can be an important source of emittance growth and beam jitter amplification, consequently degrading the luminosity. Therefore, a better understanding of collimator wakefield effects is essential to optimise the collimation systems of future linear colliders in order to minimise wakefield effects. In the past, measurements of single-bunch collimator wakefields have been carried out at SLAC with the aim of benchmarking theory, numerical calculations and experiments. Those studies revealed some discrepancies between the measurements and the theoretical models. New experimental tests using available beam test facilities, such as the End Station A Test Beam (ESTB) at SLAC, would help to improve our understanding on collimator wakefields. ESTB will provide the perfect test bed to investigate collimator wakefields for different bunch length condi...

  17. Remote Estimation of Collimator Jaw Damages With Sounds Measurements During Beam Impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Deboy, D; Aberle, O; Carra, F; Cauchi, M; Lendaro, J; Masi, A; Redaelli, S

    2013-01-01

    Irregular hits of high-intensity LHC beams on collimators can lead to severe damage of the collimator jaws. The identification of damaged collimator jaws by observation of beam measurements is challenging: online loss measurements at the moment of the impacts can be tricky and degradation of the overall performance from single collimator damage can be difficult to measure. Visual inspections are excluded because collimator jaws are enclosed in vacuum tanks without windows. However, the sound generated during the beam impact can be used to give an estimate of the damage level. In 2012, high-intensity beam comparable to a full nominal LHC bunch at 7 TeV was shot on a tertiary type LHC collimator at the HiRadMat test facility at CERN. The paper presents results from sound recordings of this experiment.

  18. Off-momentum collimation and cleaning in the energy ramp in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Quaranta, Elena; Giulini Castiglioni Agosteo, Stefano Luigi Maria

    This Master thesis work has been carried out at CERN in the framework of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) Collimation project. The LHC is a two-beam proton collider, built to handle a stored energy of 360MJ for each beam. Since the energy deposition from particle losses could quench the superconducting magnets, a system of collimators has been installed in two cleaning insertions in the ring and in the experimental areas. The achievable LHC beam intensity is directly coupled to the beam loss rate and, consequently, to the cleaning eciency of the collimation system. This study analyses the collimation cleaning performance in dierent scenarios inside the accelerator. First, simulations are performed of the transverse losses in the LHC collimation system during the acceleration process. The results are compared with data taken during a dedicated session at the LHC machine. Simulations are also performed to predict the collimation eciency during future operation at higher energy. Furthermore, an investigation of t...

  19. A combined radial collimator and cooled beryllium filter for neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groitl, Felix; Rantsiou, Emmanouela; Bartkowiak, Marek; Filges, Uwe; Graf, Dieter; Niedermayer, Christof; Rüegg, Christian; Rønnow, Henrik M.

    2016-05-01

    A flexible, combined, radial collimator and beryllium (Be) filter have been designed and manufactured at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Switzerland. The Be is integrated in the radial collimator by placing thin Be slices between the collimator lamellas. The filter/collimator is mounted within a vacuum vessel and dry cooled. The flexible design allows for different degrees of collimation and for different Be lengths. Results of measurements carried out at the BOA beamline at PSI are presented. These experiments include rotation scans determining the focal full width half maximum (FWHM), transmission measurements, test of different collimator lamellas and performance tests of the cooling of the filter. This new combined device will be a crucial part of the CAMEA spectrometer at SINQ, PSI.

  20. Self-collimated axial jets from thin accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Tirabassi, Giulio; Carlevaro, Nakia; Benini, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    We show how an appropriate stationary crystalline structure of the magnetic field can induce a partial fragmentation of the accretion disk, generating an axial jet composed of hot rising plasma twisted in a funnel-like structure by the rotation of the system. The most important feature of the obtained jet is its high degree of collimation, naturally arising from the condition for its existence. The presence of non-zero dissipative effects allows the plasma ejection throughout the axial jet and the predicted values of the accretion rate are in agreement with observations.

  1. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, V; Solberg, J; Ferriera, T; Tully, L; Stephan, P

    2008-10-02

    We have developed and tested a compact collimated sixteen channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with {approx}mm spatial and sub-{micro}s temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore Fixed Hybrid Armature experiment are presented and compared with 1-D simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  2. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, V; Solberg, J M; Ferriera, T J; Tully, L K; Stephan, P L

    2009-01-01

    We developed and tested a compact collimated 16 channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with approximately millimeter spatial and submicrosecond temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore fixed hybrid armature experiment are presented and compared with one-dimensional simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  3. Acceleration and Collimation of Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Disk Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian

    2010-02-01

    We perform axisymmetric relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate the acceleration and collimation of jets and outflows from disks around compact objects. Newtonian gravity is added to the relativistic treatment in order to establish the physical boundary condition of an underlying accretion disk in centrifugal and pressure equilibrium. The fiducial disk surface (respectively a slow disk wind) is prescribed as boundary condition for the outflow. We apply this technique for the first time in the context of relativistic jets. The strength of this approach is that it allows us to run a parameter study in order to investigate how the accretion disk conditions govern the outflow formation. Substantial effort has been made to implement a current-free, numerical outflow boundary condition in order to avoid artificial collimation present in the standard outflow conditions. Our simulations using the PLUTO code run for 500 inner disk rotations and on a physical grid size of 100 × 200 inner disk radii. The simulations evolve from an initial state in hydrostatic equilibrium and an initially force-free magnetic field configuration. Two options for the initial field geometries are applied—an hourglass-shaped potential magnetic field and a split monopole field. Most of our parameter runs evolve into a steady state solution which can be further analyzed concerning the physical mechanism at work. In general, we obtain collimated beams of mildly relativistic speed with Lorentz factors up to 6 and mass-weighted half-opening angles of 3-7 deg. The split-monopole initial setup usually results in less collimated outflows. The light surface of the outflow magnetosphere tends to align vertically—implying three relativistically distinct regimes in the flow—an inner subrelativistic domain close to the jet axis, a (rather narrow) relativistic jet and a surrounding subrelativistic outflow launched from the outer disk surface—similar to the spine-sheath structure

  4. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  5. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  6. Characteristic of laser diode beam propagation through a collimating lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Han, Yiping; Cui, Zhiwei

    2010-01-20

    A mathematical model of a laser diode beam propagating through a collimating lens is presented. Wave propagation beyond the paraxial approximation is studied. The phase delay of the laser diode wave in passing through the lens is analyzed in detail. The propagation optical field after the lens is obtained from the diffraction integral by the stationary phase method. The model is employed to predict the light intensity at various beam cross sections, and the computed intensity distributions are in a good agreement with the corresponding measurements.

  7. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  8. Preliminary Comparison of the Response of LHC Tertiary Collimators to Proton and Ion Beam Impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Cauchi, M; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Lari, L; Mollicone, P; Sammut, N

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider is designed to bring into collision protons as well as heavy ions. Accidents involving impacts on collimators can happen for both species. The interaction of lead ions with matter differs to that of protons, thus making this scenario a new interesting case to study as it can result in different damage aspects on the collimator. This paper will present a preliminary comparison of the response of collimators to proton and ion beam impacts.

  9. Dosimetric dependence on the collimator angle in prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Isa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV and organs-at-risk (OARs in prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT when varying collimator angle. The collimator angle has the largest impact and is worth considering, so, its awareness is essential for a planner to produce an optimal prostate VMAT plan in a reasonable time frame. Methods: Single-arc VMAT plans at different collimator angles (0o, 15o, 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o and 90o were created systematically using a Harold heterogeneous pelvis phantom. The conformity index (CI, homogeneity index (HI, gradient index (GI, machine monitor units (MUs, dose-volume histogram and mean and maximum dose of the PTV were calculated and analyzed. On the other hand, the dose-volume histogram and mean and maximum doses of the OARs such as the bladder, rectum and femoral heads for different collimator angles were determined from the plans.Results: There was no significant difference, based on the planned dose-volume evaluation criteria, found in the VMAT optimizations for all studied collimator angles. A higher CI (0.53 and lower HI (0.064 were found in the 45o collimator angle. In addition, the 15o collimator angle provided a lower value of HI similar to the 45o collimator angle. Collimator angles of 75o and 90o were found to be good for rectum sparing, and collimator angles of 75o and 30o were found to be good for sparing of right and left femur, respectively. The PTV dose coverage for each plan was comparatively independent of the collimator angle. Conclusion: Our study indicates that the dosimetric results provide support and guidance to allow the clinical radiation physicists to make careful decisions in implementing suitable collimator angles to improve the PTV coverage and OARs sparing in prostate VMAT.

  10. A phased rotating collimator for a pulsed-neutron fixed scattering angle spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahba, M. (Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Engineering Physics and Mathematics)

    1991-06-01

    The design principle of a phased rotating collimator for a pulsed-neutron fixed scattering angle spectrometer is given. The collimator's dimensions were selected to match the curved slot rotor of the spectrometer which is in operation at the ET-RR-1 reactor. The collimator has one slot, whose shape was determined to satisfy a 100% transmission of the polyenergetic neutron bursts produced by the curved slot rotor. (orig.).

  11. Influence of atomic screening on fragmentation of ultrarelativistic lead ions in LHC collimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan C.; Sørensen, Allan H.

    2009-01-01

    When a lead beam is collimated in the CERN LHC some of the ions fragment in the collimators causing problems downstream. For design purposes the fragmentation probability needs to be assessed. At LHC energies ( γ 3000 ; the Lorentz-factor γ is the total energy of an ion in units of its rest energ...... case for various collimator materials and find a significant effect for tungsten, the heaviest candidate planned for use....

  12. Anatomically shaped cranial collimation (ACC) for lateral cephalometric radiography: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeveen, R C; van der Stelt, P F; Berkhout, W E R

    2014-01-01

    Lateral cephalograms in orthodontic practice display an area cranial of the base of the skull that is not required for diagnostic evaluation. Attempts have been made to reduce the radiation dose to the patient using collimators combining the shielding of the areas above the base of the skull and below the mandible. These so-called "wedge-shaped" collimators have not become standard equipment in orthodontic offices, possibly because these collimators were not designed for today's combination panoramic-cephalometric imaging systems. It also may be that the anatomical variability of the area below the mandible makes this area unsuitable for standardized collimation. In addition, a wedge-shaped collimator shields the cervical vertebrae; therefore, assessment of skeletal maturation, which is based on the stage of development of the cervical vertebrae, cannot be performed. In this report, we describe our investigations into constructing a collimator to be attached to the cephalostat and shield the cranial area of the skull, while allowing the visualization of diagnostically relevant structures and markedly reducing the size of the irradiated area. The shape of the area shielded by this "anatomically shaped cranial collimator" (ACC) was based on mean measurements of cephalometric landmarks of 100 orthodontic patients. It appeared that this collimator reduced the area of irradiation by almost one-third without interfering with the imaging system or affecting the quality of the image. Further research is needed to validate the clinical efficacy of the collimator.

  13. MERLIN Cleaning Studies with Advanced Collimator Materials for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Valloni, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Molson, J. G.; Appleby, R.; Bruce, R.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.

    2016-01-01

    The challenges of the High-Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider require improving the beam collimation system. An intense R&D program has started at CERN to explore novel materials for new collimator jaws to improve robustness and reduce impedance. Particle tracking simulations of collimation efficiency are performed using the code MERLIN which has been extended to include new materials based on composites. After presenting two different implementations of composite materials tested in MERLIN, we present simulation studies with the aim of studying the effect of the advanced collimators on the LHC beam cleaning.

  14. Optimization of the collimation system for CSNS/RCS with the robust conjugate direction search algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, H F; Huang, M Y; Xu, S Y; Wang, N; Wang, S

    2016-01-01

    The Robust Conjugate Direction Search (RCDS) method is used to optimize the collimation system for Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the Chinese Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS). The parameters of secondary collimators are optimized for a better performance of the collimation system. To improve the efficiency of the optimization, the Objective Ring Beam Injection and Tracking (ORBIT) parallel module combined with MATLAB parallel computing is used, which can run multiple ORBIT instances simultaneously. This study presents a way to figure out an optimal parameter combination of the secondary collimators for a machine model in preparation for CSNS/RCS commissioning.

  15. Collimator equipment of the Large Optical Test Facility Vertical for testing space telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Pavel A.; Gogolev, Yuri A.; Zvonkova, V. V.; Kobozev, I. R.; Ostapenko, S. V.; Malamed, Evgeny R.; Demidov, V. V.

    1995-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the collimator equipment of the large optical test facility (LOTF) 'vertical' designed for testing space telescopes. It is being created in the Research Center 'S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute' in Russia. The optical scheme and special structural features of the vacuum vertical-type double-mirror collimator will be covered here. This paper deals with technical data and potentials of collimator focal equipment. Estimations of the collimator thermal aberrations caused by temperature fields coming from thermal simulators are put forward.

  16. Design and Performance Optimization of the LHC Collimation System

    CERN Document Server

    Robert-Démolaize, G

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presently under construction at CERN. The LHC is a circular accelerator that stores proton beams and accelerates them to a 7 TeV beam energy. The required bending fields are achieved with super-conducting magnets. The stored proton beams are collided in experimental detectors and produce a design luminosity of 1E+34 cm-2.s-1. Every storage ring encounters unavoidable proton losses. The protons that diffuse into the so-called beam halo can touch accelerator components. In order to avoid quenches of the superconducting magnets, the halo protons must be removed before reaching the magnets. This is achieved with a multi-stage cleaning system, built out of two-sided collimators that are located at adequate positions in the machine. Due to the high stored beam intensity (required for high luminosity), the efficiency of the LHC beam cleaning must be much better than in any other exisiting machine: not more than 0.00002% of protons hitting the collimators may escape and impact on an...

  17. Calculating and measuring thermal neutrons exiting from neutron diffractometers collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Tafazolee, K

    2000-01-01

    process, effectiveness of them are studied for the enhancement of the available system. Final conclusion from the simulation process, indicates that the heavy water with the thickness of 50 to 60 cm. is the best moderator for gaining the better thermal neutrons flux for enhancement of P.N.D. in the T.R.R. Powder Neutron Diffractometer y (P.N.D.) is relatively good and practical way for identification of the 3 dimensional construction of materials. In order to exploit the capabilities of this method, in one of the neutron beam of the Tehran Research Reactor (T.R.R.), a collimator embedded inside the concrete wall, direct the neutrons produced in the core reactor towards a monochromator e. Neutrons having been monochromated by 2 nd collimator are then directed towards the sample. Then the pattern of diffracted neutrons from the sample are studied. In order to make the best out of it, neutrons coming to sit on the sample must be of the thermal type. That means the number/amount of thermal neutrons flux in compar...

  18. Acceleration and collimation of relativistic MHD disk winds

    CERN Document Server

    Porth, O

    2009-01-01

    We perform axisymmetric relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate the acceleration and collimation of jets and outflows from disks around compact objects. The fiducial disk surface (respectively a slow disk wind) is prescribed as boundary condition for the outflow. We apply this technique for the first time in the context of relativistic jets. The strength of this approach is that it allows us to run a parameter study in order to investigate how the accretion disk conditions govern the outflow formation. Our simulations using the PLUTO code run for 500 inner disk rotations and on a physical grid size of 100x200 inner disk radii. In general, we obtain collimated beams of mildly relativistic speed and mass-weighted half-opening angles of 3-7 degrees. When we increase the outflow Poynting flux by injecting an additional disk toroidal field into the inlet, Lorentz factors up to 6 are reached. These flows gain super-magnetosonic speed and remain Poynting flux dominated. The light surface of...

  19. Collimation with tighter TCTs at β*=40 cm

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Kwee-Hinzmann, Regina; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Quaranta, Elena; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Valentino, Gianluca; Valloni, Alessandra; Garcia Morales, Hector; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    MD 310 was carried out on August 28 2015, in order to investigate the collimation performance using nominal optics with β* =40 cm, 2 σ retraction collimator settings in IR7, and the very tight TCT settings which are necessary to protect the small normalized aperture. With these tight settings, we expect higher losses on the TCTs which should cause also higher beam-halo background at the experiments. During the MD, a total of 70 betatron loss maps were performed over a range of TCT settings and for dierent settings of the TCLAs in IR7. ATLAS and CMS were exceptionally taking data outside stable beams, in order to monitor the background. Furthermore, betatron loss maps were performed with a small momentum oset of the whole beam, induced by a shift of the RF frequency. The MD results can therefore also be used to assess the cleaning eciency in IR7 with the β* =40 cm optics, as well as the eects of energy osets on the cleaning. At the end of the MD, an asynchronous dump test was performed, in order to monitor ...

  20. An energy-optimized collimator design for a CZT-based SPECT camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Fenghua [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Bagchi, Srijeeta [Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Zan, Yunlong [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Huang, Qiu, E-mail: qiuhuang@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Seo, Youngho, E-mail: youngho.seo@ucsf.edu [Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-01-11

    In single photon emission computed tomography, it is a challenging task to maintain reasonable performance using only one specific collimator for radiotracers over a broad spectrum of diagnostic photon energies, since photon scatter and penetration in a collimator differ with the photon energy. Frequent collimator exchanges are inevitable in daily clinical SPECT imaging, which hinders throughput while subjecting the camera to operational errors and damage. Our objective is to design a collimator, which is independent of the photon energy, performs reasonably well for commonly used radiotracers with low- to medium-energy levels of gamma emissions. Using the Geant4 simulation toolkit, we simulated and evaluated a parallel-hole collimator mounted to a CZT detector. With the pixel-geometry-matching collimation, the pitch of the collimator hole was fixed to match the pixel size of the CZT detector throughout this work. Four variables, hole shape, hole length, hole radius/width and the source-to-collimator distance were carefully studied. Scatter and penetration of the collimator, sensitivity and spatial resolution of the system were assessed for four radionuclides including {sup 57}Co, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 123}I and {sup 111}In, with respect to the aforementioned four variables. An optimal collimator was then decided upon such that it maximized the total relative sensitivity (TRS) for the four considered radionuclides while other performance parameters, such as scatter, penetration and spatial resolution, were benchmarked to prevalent commercial scanners and collimators. Digital phantom studies were also performed to validate the system with the optimal square-hole collimator (23 mm hole length, 1.28 mm hole width, and 0.32 mm septal thickness) in terms of contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio and recovery ratio. This study demonstrates promise of our proposed energy-optimized collimator to be used in a CZT-based gamma camera, with comparable or even better imaging performance

  1. Lumbar spine radiography — poor collimation practices after implementation of digital technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetterberg, Lars Gøran; Espeland, Ansgar

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The transition from analogue to digital radiography may have reduced the motivation to perform proper collimation, as digital techniques have made it possible to mask areas irradiated outside the area of diagnostic interest (ADI). We examined the hypothesis that collimation practices ...

  2. Design and experimental validation of a compact collimated Knudsen source

    CERN Document Server

    Wouters, Steinar H W; Mutsaers, Peter H A; Vredenbregt, Edgar J D

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the design and performance of a collimated Knudsen source which has the benefit of a simple design over recirculating sources. Measurements of the flux, transverse velocity distribution and brightness at different temperatures were conducted to evaluate the performance. The scaling of the flux and brightness with the source temperature follow the theoretical predictions. The transverse velocity distribution in the transparent operation regime also agrees with the simulated data. The source was found able to produce a flux of $10^{14}$ s$^{-1}$ at a temperature of 433 K. Furthermore the transverse reduced brightness of an ion beam with equal properties as the atomic beam reads $1.7 \\times 10^2$ A/(m${}^2$ sr eV) which is sufficient for our goal: the creation of an ultra-cold ion beam by ionization of a laser-cooled and compressed atomic rubidium beam.

  3. Adaptive fiber optics collimator based on flexible hinges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Ma, Pengfei; Si, Lei; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu

    2014-08-20

    In this manuscript, we present a new design for an adaptive fiber optics collimator (AFOC) based on flexible hinges by using piezoelectric stacks actuators for X-Y displacement. Different from traditional AFOC, the new structure is based on flexible hinges to drive the fiber end cap instead of naked fiber. We fabricated a real AFOC based on flexible hinges, and the end cap's deviation and resonance frequency of the device were measured. Experimental results show that this new AFOC can provide fast control of tip-tilt deviation of the laser beam emitting from the end cap. As a result, the fiber end cap can support much higher power than naked fiber, which makes the new structure ideal for tip-tilt controlling in a high-power fiber laser system.

  4. Solar Divergence Collimators for Optical Characterisation of Solar Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Fontani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimentation and laboratory optical tests on solar components are central aspects of the research on renewable energies. The key element of the proposed testing systems is a solar divergence collimator, which exactly reproduces in laboratory the sunlight divergence, while commercial solar simulators are mainly aimed to replicate intensity and spectrum of the sun. Precise solar divergence reproduction is essential to correctly assess the optical properties and to simulate the operative conditions of a solar collecting device. Optical characterisation and experimentation can give information about production quality and homogeneity; moreover, specific tests can address the serial production of solar components detecting defects type and location. For Concentrating Photovoltaic systems, appropriate tests can analyze solar concentrators of various shapes, dimensions, and collection features. Typically, to characterise a solar component the most important and commonly examined quantities are collection efficiency, image plane analysis, and angle dependence.

  5. Solar wind collimation of the Jupiter high velocity dust streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, A.; Krueger, H.

    2006-12-01

    The dust bursts discovered by the Ulysses dust sensor when approaching Jupiter in 1992 were later confirmed as collimated streams of high velocity (~200 km/s) charged (~5V) dust grains escaping from Jupiter and dominated by the interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF). With Cassini, a similar phenomenon was observed in Saturn. It was demonstrated that the Jovian dust streams are closely related to the solar wind compressed regions, either Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ¨Cto a minor extent-. Actually the dust streams seem ultimately to be generated by such events. This can be explained considering that dust grains are accelerated as they gain substantial energy while compressed at the forward and reverse shocks that bound or precede these solar wind regions.

  6. Augmented reality aiding collimator exchange at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, Héctor, E-mail: hector.martinez@sensetrix.com [SenseTrix, PL 20 FI-00101 Helsinki (Finland); Fabry, Thomas [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Laukkanen, Seppo [SenseTrix, PL 20 FI-00101 Helsinki (Finland); Mattila, Jouni [Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 527, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Tabourot, Laurent [SYMME, Université de Savoie, Polytech Annecy-Chambéry, 5 chemin de Bellevue, 74944 Annecy le Vieux (France)

    2014-11-01

    Novel Augmented Reality techniques have the potential to have a large positive impact on the way remote maintenance operations are carried out in hazardous areas, e.g. areas where radiation doses that imply careful planning and optimization of maintenance operations are present. This paper describes an Augmented Reality strategy, system and implementation for aiding the remote collimator exchange in the LHC, currently the world's largest and highest-energy particle accelerator. The proposed system relies on marker detection and multi-modal augmentation in real-time. A database system has been used to ensure flexibility. The system has been tested in a mock-up facility, showing real time performance and great potential for future use in the LHC. The technical-scientific difficulties identified during the development of the system and the proposed solutions described in this paper may help the development of future Augmented Reality systems for remote handling in scientific facilities.

  7. Preliminary thermo-mechanical analysis of angular beam impact on LHC collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Cauchi, M; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Dallocchio, A; Deboy, D; Mariani, N; Rossi, A; Lari, L; Mollicone, P; Sammut, N

    2012-01-01

    The correct functioning of the LHC Collimation System is crucial to attain the desired LHC luminosity performance. However, the requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess their effect on the robustness of the collimators. One of the most probable accident scenarios identified is an asynchronous beam dump coupled with slight angular misalignment errors of the collimator installation at the beam-line. Previous work presented a preliminary thermal evaluation of the extent of beam-induced damage for such scenarios, where it was shown that in some cases, a tilt of the jaw could actually serve to mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. This paper will further analyze the response of tertiary collimators in presence of such angular jaw alignments. Such work will also help to start identifying optimal operational conditions.

  8. Observation of strong leakage reduction in crystal assisted collimation of the SPS beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scandale, W. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire (LAL), Universite Paris Sud Orsay, Orsay (France); INFN Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Rome (Italy); Arduini, G.; Butcher, M.; Cerutti, F.; Garattini, M.; Gilardoni, S.; Lechner, A.; Losito, R.; Masi, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Metral, E. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mirarchi, D. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Montesano, S.; Redaelli, S. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Rossi, R. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); INFN Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Rome (Italy); Schoofs, P.; Smirnov, G. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Baricordi, S. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); and others

    2015-09-02

    In ideal two-stage collimation systems, the secondary collimator–absorber should have its length sufficient to exclude practically the exit of halo particles with large impact parameters. In the UA9 experiments on the crystal assisted collimation of the SPS beam a 60 cm long tungsten bar is used as a secondary collimator–absorber which is insufficient for the full absorption of the halo protons. Multi-turn simulation studies of the collimation allowed to select the position for the beam loss monitor downstream the collimation area where the contribution of particles deflected by the crystal in channeling regime but emerging from the secondary collimator–absorber is considerably reduced. This allowed observation of a strong leakage reduction of halo protons from the SPS beam collimation area, thereby approaching the case with an ideal absorber.

  9. Calculation of effective dose in whole body in dependence of angle of collimator for photon fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenzalida, M. [Universidad de la Frontera, Temuco (Chile). Programa de Magister en Fisica Medica; Varon, C.; Piriz, G.; Banguero, Y.; Lozano, E.; Mancilla, C., E-mail: fisicamedica@incancer.c [Instituto Nacional del Cancer, Santiago (Chile). Unidad de Fisica Medica

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain quantifiable data of whole body effective dose for photons fields of 6 MV and 18 MV in function of the collimator angle of a Varian Clinac 21EX lineal accelerator. It has been made a variety of studies which investigate the form to reduce the dose in whole body with photons fields, specially over the potential risks and the influence of the collimator angle, as performed Stanthakis et al. [1] with the Monte Carlo method. As a result of this work, the values of whole body effective doses are higher with a 0 deg collimator than with a 90 deg collimator, and as the field size increases, the effective doses difference in whole body, between 0 deg and 90 deg collimator angle, for both energies, becomes smaller. (author)

  10. Studying ATHENA optics with divergent and collimated x-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Benedikt; Bräuninger, Heinrich; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela; Predehl, Peter

    2014-07-01

    An open question in the measurement of X-ray optics for satellite experiments is what the PSF (point spread function) looks like in orbit and what the focal length for a source at infinite distance is. In order to measure segmented optics as proposed for ATHENA a collimated X-ray beam with a size of several square centimeters is necessary. We showed that by using a zone plate such a collimated beam can be achieved. We discuss here the requirements such a zone plate collimator has to comply in order to characterize with this collimator an ATHENA type optic. Additional we can present results obtained with a first version of such a collimator and can show so the proof of principle.

  11. Observation of strong leakage reduction in crystal assisted collimation of the SPS beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Scandale

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In ideal two-stage collimation systems, the secondary collimator–absorber should have its length sufficient to exclude practically the exit of halo particles with large impact parameters. In the UA9 experiments on the crystal assisted collimation of the SPS beam a 60 cm long tungsten bar is used as a secondary collimator–absorber which is insufficient for the full absorption of the halo protons. Multi-turn simulation studies of the collimation allowed to select the position for the beam loss monitor downstream the collimation area where the contribution of particles deflected by the crystal in channeling regime but emerging from the secondary collimator–absorber is considerably reduced. This allowed observation of a strong leakage reduction of halo protons from the SPS beam collimation area, thereby approaching the case with an ideal absorber.

  12. Note: Detector collimators for the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamalonis, A. [Materials Development, Inc., Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004, USA; Weber, J. K. R. [Materials Development, Inc., Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004, USA; Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Neuefeind, J. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, USA; Carruth, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, USA; Skinner, L. B. [Materials Development, Inc., Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004, USA; Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA; Alderman, O. L. G. [Materials Development, Inc., Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004, USA; Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Benmore, C. J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA

    2015-09-01

    Five neutron collimator designs were constructed and tested at the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) instrument. Collimators were made from High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) or 5% borated HDPE. In all cases, collimators improved the signal to background ratio and reduced detection of secondary scattering. In the Q-range 10-20 (angstrom)-1, signal to background ratio improved by factors of approximately 1.6 and 2.0 for 50 and 100 mm deep collimators, respectively. In the Q-range 40-50 angstrom-1, the improvement factors were 1.8 and 2.7. Secondary scattering as measured at Q similar to 9.5 angstrom-1 was significantly decreased when the collimators were installed.

  13. Note: Detector collimators for the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamalonis, A. [Materials Development, Inc., Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004 (United States); Weber, J. K. R., E-mail: rweber@anl.gov; Alderman, O. L. G. [Materials Development, Inc., Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004 (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Neuefeind, J. C.; Carruth, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Skinner, L. B. [Materials Development, Inc., Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004 (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Benmore, C. J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Five neutron collimator designs were constructed and tested at the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) instrument. Collimators were made from High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) or 5% borated HDPE. In all cases, collimators improved the signal to background ratio and reduced detection of secondary scattering. In the Q-range 10-20 Å{sup −1}, signal to background ratio improved by factors of approximately 1.6 and 2.0 for 50 and 100 mm deep collimators, respectively. In the Q-range 40-50 Å{sup −1}, the improvement factors were 1.8 and 2.7. Secondary scattering as measured at Q ∼ 9.5 Å{sup −1} was significantly decreased when the collimators were installed.

  14. Collimation Down to 2 Sigma in Special Physics Runs in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, H; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G

    2013-01-01

    We report on observations with collimation very close to the beam. Primary collimators were moved in small steps down to 2 σ from the beam axis to allow for measurements of very forward proton scattering in special highbeta runs in the LHC. We studied the reduction in intensity as a function of collimator position which provides information about the halo shape. After scraping at 2σ, collimators were retracted to 2:5 σ. This allowed for measurements of very forward proton-proton scattering with roman pot detectors at 3 σ from the beam axis at acceptable background levels for about an hour. Good background conditions were restored by another scraping with primary collimators at 2 σ. Beam lifetimes and halo repopulation times were found to be sufficiently long to allow for several hours of data taking between scraping in a single LHC fill.

  15. Collimator optimization and collimator-detector response compensation in myocardial perfusion SPECT using the ideal observer with and without model mismatch and an anthropomorphic model observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Michael; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric C.

    2016-03-01

    The collimator is the primary factor that determines the spatial resolution and noise tradeoff in myocardial perfusion SPECT images. In this paper, the goal was to find the collimator that optimizes the image quality in terms of a perfusion defect detection task. Since the optimal collimator could depend on the level of approximation of the collimator-detector response (CDR) compensation modeled in reconstruction, we performed this optimization for the cases of modeling the full CDR (including geometric, septal penetration and septal scatter responses), the geometric CDR, or no model of the CDR. We evaluated the performance on the detection task using three model observers. Two observers operated on data in the projection domain: the Ideal Observer (IO) and IO with Model-Mismatch (IO-MM). The third observer was an anthropomorphic Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO), which operated on reconstructed images. The projection-domain observers have the advantage that they are computationally less intensive. The IO has perfect knowledge of the image formation process, i.e. it has a perfect model of the CDR. The IO-MM takes into account the mismatch between the true (complete and accurate) model and an approximate model, e.g. one that might be used in reconstruction. We evaluated the utility of these projection domain observers in optimizing instrumentation parameters. We investigated a family of 8 parallel-hole collimators, spanning a wide range of resolution and sensitivity tradeoffs, using a population of simulated projection (for the IO and IO-MM) and reconstructed (for the CHO) images that included background variability. We simulated anterolateral and inferior perfusion defects with variable extents and severities. The area under the ROC curve was estimated from the IO, IO-MM, and CHO test statistics and served as the figure-of-merit. The optimal collimator for the IO had a resolution of 9-11 mm FWHM at 10 cm, which is poorer resolution than typical collimators

  16. 3D Laboratory Measurements of Forces, Flows, and Collimation in Arched Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Magnus; Bellan, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Fully 3D, vector MHD force measurements from an arched, current carrying flux tube (flux rope) are presented. The experiment consists of two arched plasma-filled flux ropes each powered by a capacitor bank. The two loops are partially overlapped, as in a Venn diagram, and collide and reconnect during their evolution. B-field data is taken on the lower plasma arch using a 54 channel B-dot probe. 3D volumetric data is acquired by placing the probe at 2700 locations and taking 5 plasma shots at each location. The resulting data set gives high resolution (2cm, 10ns) volumetric B-field data with high reproducibility (deviation of 3% between shots). Taking the curl of the measured 3D B-field gives current densities (J) in good agreement with measured capacitor bank current. The JxB forces calculated from the data have a strong axial component at the base of the current channel and are shown to scale linearly with axial gradients in current density. Assuming force balance in the flux tube minor radius direction, we infer near-Alfvenic axial flows from the footpoint regions which are consistent with the measured axial forces. Flux tube collimation is observed in conjunction with these axial flows. These dynamic processes are relevant to the stability and dynamics of coronal loops. Supported provided by NSF, AFOSR.

  17. Fast, daily linac verification for segmented IMRT using electronic portal imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, S.C.; Bolt, R.A.; Dirkx, M.L.; Visser, A.G.; Heijmen, B.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) requires dedicated quality assurance (QA). Recently, we have published a method for fast (1-2 min) and accurate linac quality control for dynamic multileaf collimation, using a portal imaging device. This method is in routine use for daily leaf motion

  18. Fast, daily linac verification for segmented IMRT using electronic portal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, Sandra C.; Bolt, Rene A.; Dirkx, Maarten L. P.; Visser, Andries G.; Heijmen, Ben J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) requires dedicated quality assurance (QA). Recently, we have published a method for fast (1-2 min) and accurate linac quality control for dynamic multileaf collimation, using a portal imaging device. This method is in routine use for daily leaf motion

  19. The impact of leaf width and plan complexity on DMLC tracking of prostate intensity modulated arc therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Tobias; Falk, Marianne; Poulsen, Per Rugaard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of leaf width and plan complexity on dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking for prostate motion management during IMAT treatments.Methods: Prostate...

  20. Real-Time Motion Management of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Tobias

    of this thesis is to manage prostate motion in real-time by aligning the radiation beam to the prostate using the novel dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking method. Specifically, the delivered dose with tracking was compared to the planned dose, and the impact of treatment plan complexity and limitations...

  1. Experimental investigation of a moving averaging algorithm for motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction in dynamic MLC target tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jai-Woong; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Cho, Byung-Chul; Suh, Tae-Suk; Keall, Paul [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea 131-700 and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, 131-700 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, 131-700 and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, 131-700 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, 2006 (Australia)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: In dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion tracking with complex intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields, target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction can cause beam holds, which increase beam delivery time by up to a factor of 4. As a means to balance delivery efficiency and accuracy, a moving average algorithm was incorporated into a dynamic MLC motion tracking system (i.e., moving average tracking) to account for target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction. The experimental investigation of the moving average algorithm compared with real-time tracking and no compensation beam delivery is described. Methods: The properties of the moving average algorithm were measured and compared with those of real-time tracking (dynamic MLC motion tracking accounting for both target motion parallel and perpendicular to the leaf travel direction) and no compensation beam delivery. The algorithm was investigated using a synthetic motion trace with a baseline drift and four patient-measured 3D tumor motion traces representing regular and irregular motions with varying baseline drifts. Each motion trace was reproduced by a moving platform. The delivery efficiency, geometric accuracy, and dosimetric accuracy were evaluated for conformal, step-and-shoot IMRT, and dynamic sliding window IMRT treatment plans using the synthetic and patient motion traces. The dosimetric accuracy was quantified via a {gamma}-test with a 3%/3 mm criterion. Results: The delivery efficiency ranged from 89 to 100% for moving average tracking, 26%-100% for real-time tracking, and 100% (by definition) for no compensation. The root-mean-square geometric error ranged from 3.2 to 4.0 mm for moving average tracking, 0.7-1.1 mm for real-time tracking, and 3.7-7.2 mm for no compensation. The percentage of dosimetric points failing the {gamma}-test ranged from 4 to 30% for moving average tracking, 0%-23% for real-time tracking, and 10%-47% for no compensation

  2. An investigation of the dose distribution effect related with collimator angle for VMAT method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, B.; Bilge, H.; Ozturk, S. Tokdemir

    2016-03-01

    Aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of dose distribution in eleven prostate cancer patients with single VMAT and double VMAT when varying collimator angle. We generated optimum single and double VMAT treatment plans when collimator angle was 0°. We recalculated single VMAT plans at different collimator angles(0°,15°,30°,45°,60°,75°,90°) for double VMAT plans(0°-0°,15°-345°,30°-330°,45°-315°,60°-300°,75°-285°,90°-270°) without changing any optimization parameters. HI, DVH and %95 dose coverage of PTV calculated and analyzed. We determined better dose distribution with some collimator angles. Plans were verified using the 2 dimensional ion chamber array Matrixx® and 3 dimensional Compass® software program. A higher %95 dose coverage of PTV was found for single VMAT in the 15° collimator angle, for double VMAT in the 60°-300° and 75°-285° collimator angles. Because of lower rectum doses, we suggested 75°-285°. When we compared single and double VMAT's dose distribution, we had better % 95 dose coverage of PTV and lower HI with double VMAT. Our result was significant statistically. These finds are informative for choosing 75°-285° collimator angles in double VMAT plans for prostate cancer.

  3. Beam feasibility study of a collimator with in-jaw beam position monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, Daniel; Nosych, Andriy A.; Valentino, Gianluca; Aberle, Oliver; Aßmann, Ralph W.; Bertarelli, Alessandro; Boccard, Christian; Bruce, Roderik; Burkart, Florian; Calvo, Eva; Cauchi, Marija; Dallocchio, Alessandro; Deboy, Daniel; Gasior, Marek; Jones, Rhodri; Kain, Verena; Lari, Luisella; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana

    2014-12-01

    At present, the beam-based alignment of the LHC collimators is performed by touching the beam halo with both jaws of each collimator. This method requires dedicated fills at low intensities that are done infrequently and makes this procedure time consuming. This limits the operational flexibility, in particular in the case of changes of optics and orbit configuration in the experimental regions. The performance of the LHC collimation system relies on the machine reproducibility and regular loss maps to validate the settings of the collimator jaws. To overcome these limitations and to allow a continuous monitoring of the beam position at the collimators, a design with jaw-integrated Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) was proposed and successfully tested with a prototype (mock-up) collimator in the CERN SPS. Extensive beam experiments allowed to determine the achievable accuracy of the jaw alignment for single and multi-turn operation. In this paper, the results of these experiments are discussed. The non-linear response of the BPMs is compared to the predictions from electromagnetic simulations. Finally, the measured alignment accuracy is compared to the one achieved with the present collimators in the LHC.

  4. Thermal analysis and cooling structure design of the primary collimator in CSNS/RCS

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Yi-Qing; Kang, Ling; Qu, Hua-Min; He, Zhe-Xi; Yu, Jie-Bing; 10.1088/1674-1137/37/5/057004

    2013-01-01

    The rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a high intensity proton ring with beam power of 100 kW. In order to control the residual activation to meet the requirements of hands-on maintenance, a two-stage collimation system has been designed for the RCS. The collimation system consists of one primary collimator made of thin metal to scatter the beam and four secondary collimators as absorbers. Thermal analysis is an important aspect in evaluating the reliability of the collimation system. The calculation of the temperature distribution and thermal stress of the primary collimator with different materials is carried out by using ANSYS code. In order to control the temperature rise and thermal stress of the primary collimator to a reasonable level, an air cooling structure is intended to be used. The mechanical design of the cooling structure is presented, and the cooling effciency with different chin numbers and wind velocity is also analyzed. Finally, the fatigue life...

  5. Collimator design for a multipinhole brain SPECT insert for MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Audenhaege, Karen; Van Holen, Roel; Vanhove, Christian; Vandenberghe, Stefaan [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Ghent University-iMinds Medical IT, MEDISIP-IBiTech, De Pintelaan 185 block B/5, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is an important clinical tool, with unique tracers for studying neurological diseases. Nowadays, most commercial SPECT systems are combined with x-ray computed tomography (CT) in so-called SPECT/CT systems to obtain an anatomical background for the functional information. However, while CT images have a high spatial resolution, they have a low soft-tissue contrast, which is an important disadvantage for brain imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on the other hand, has a very high soft-tissue contrast and does not involve extra ionizing radiation. Therefore, the authors designed a brain SPECT insert that can operate inside a clinical MRI. Methods: The authors designed and simulated a compact stationary multipinhole SPECT insert based on digital silicon photomultiplier detector modules, which have shown to be MR-compatible and have an excellent intrinsic resolution (0.5 mm) when combined with a monolithic 2 mm thick LYSO crystal. First, the authors optimized the different parameters of the SPECT system to maximize sensitivity for a given target resolution of 7.2 mm in the center of the field-of-view, given the spatial constraints of the MR system. Second, the authors performed noiseless simulations of two multipinhole configurations to evaluate sampling and reconstructed resolution. Finally, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations and compared the SPECT insert with a clinical system with ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) fan beam collimators, based on contrast-to-noise ratio and a visual comparison of a Hoffman phantom with a 9 mm cold lesion. Results: The optimization resulted in a stationary multipinhole system with a collimator radius of 150.2 mm and a detector radius of 172.67 mm, which corresponds to four rings of 34 diSPM detector modules. This allows the authors to include eight rings of 24 pinholes, which results in a system volume sensitivity of 395 cps/MBq. Noiseless simulations

  6. Collimator design for a multipinhole brain SPECT insert for MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Audenhaege, Karen; Van Holen, Roel; Vanhove, Christian; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2015-11-01

    Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is an important clinical tool, with unique tracers for studying neurological diseases. Nowadays, most commercial SPECT systems are combined with x-ray computed tomography (CT) in so-called SPECT/CT systems to obtain an anatomical background for the functional information. However, while CT images have a high spatial resolution, they have a low soft-tissue contrast, which is an important disadvantage for brain imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on the other hand, has a very high soft-tissue contrast and does not involve extra ionizing radiation. Therefore, the authors designed a brain SPECT insert that can operate inside a clinical MRI. The authors designed and simulated a compact stationary multipinhole SPECT insert based on digital silicon photomultiplier detector modules, which have shown to be MR-compatible and have an excellent intrinsic resolution (0.5 mm) when combined with a monolithic 2 mm thick LYSO crystal. First, the authors optimized the different parameters of the SPECT system to maximize sensitivity for a given target resolution of 7.2 mm in the center of the field-of-view, given the spatial constraints of the MR system. Second, the authors performed noiseless simulations of two multipinhole configurations to evaluate sampling and reconstructed resolution. Finally, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations and compared the SPECT insert with a clinical system with ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) fan beam collimators, based on contrast-to-noise ratio and a visual comparison of a Hoffman phantom with a 9 mm cold lesion. The optimization resulted in a stationary multipinhole system with a collimator radius of 150.2 mm and a detector radius of 172.67 mm, which corresponds to four rings of 34 diSPM detector modules. This allows the authors to include eight rings of 24 pinholes, which results in a system volume sensitivity of 395 cps/MBq. Noiseless simulations show sufficient axial

  7. Bending self-collimated one-way light by using gyromagnetic photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qing-Bo [School of Electronic Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Key Construction Laboratory of Modern Measurement Technology and Intelligent System, Huaiyin Normal University, Huaian 223300 (China); Li, Zhen; Wu, Rui-xin, E-mail: rxwu@nju.edu.cn [School of Electronic Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-12-14

    We theoretically demonstrate that electromagnetic waves can self-collimate and propagate unidirectionally in photonic crystals fabricated using semicylindrical ferrite rods in magnetized states. The parity and time-reversal symmetries of such photonic crystals are broken, resulting in a self-collimated one-way body wave within the photonic crystals. By applying the bias magnetic field in a complex configuration, the self-collimated one-way wave beam can be bent into arbitrary trajectories within the photonic crystal, providing an avenue for controlling wave beams.

  8. Single photon image from position emission tomography with insertable collimator for boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joo Young; Yoo, Do Kun; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Key Jo [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Dept. of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford (United States)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of our proposed system is to confirm the feasibility of extraction of two types of images from one positron emission tomography (PET) module with an insertable collimator for brain tumor treatment during the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The BNCT theory and conceptual diagram of our proposed system are shown fig.1. Data from the PET module, neutron source, and collimator was entered in the Monte Carlon-particle extende source code. We attempted to acquire the PET and SPECT images simultaneously using only PET without an additional isotope. Single photon images were acquired using an insertable collimator on a PET detector.

  9. Polarization Beam Splitter Based on Self-Collimation of a Hybrid Photonic Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bagci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A photonic crystal polarization beam splitter based on photonic band gap and self-collimation effects is designed for optical communication wavelengths. The photonic crystal structure consists of a polarization-insensitive self-collimation region and a splitting region. TM- and TE-polarized waves propagate without diffraction in the self-collimation region, whereas they split by 90 degrees in the splitting region. Efficiency of more than 75% for TM- and TE-polarized light is obtained for a polarization beam splitter size of only 17 μm x 17 μm in a wavelength interval of 60 nm including 1.55 μm.

  10. Optimum angle-cut of collimator for dense objects in high-energy proton radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-Bo; Zheng, Na

    2016-02-01

    The use of minus identity lenses with an angle-cut collimator can achieve high contrast images in high-energy proton radiography. This article presents the principles of choosing the angle-cut aperture of the collimator for different energies and objects. Numerical simulation using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 has been implemented to investigate the entire radiography for the French test object. The optimum angle-cut apertures of the collimators are also obtained for different energies. Supported by NSAF (11176001) and Science and Technology Developing Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012A0202006)

  11. Low-loss fiber optic rotary joint using C-lens collimators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Da-gong; JING Wen-cai; ZHANG Yi-mo; ZHOU Ge; ZHANG Jin; TANG Feng

    2005-01-01

    A low-loss fiber optic rotary joint (FORJ) has been designed by using two kinds of C-lens collimators. Its insertion loss and insertion loss variation due to rotation with single-mode fiber collimator is less than 1.76 dB and 0.43 dB respectively.The maximum insertion loss and coupling variation due to rotation with multi-mode fiber collimator is 1.71 dB and 0.29 dB, respectively. This kind of FORJ features low insertion loss, small coupling variation due to rotation and low cost.

  12. Simulation and Measurements of Beam Losses on LHC Collimators During Beam Abort Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Bruce, R; Goddard, B; Redaelli, S; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G; Faus-Golfe, A

    2013-01-01

    One of the main purposes of tracking simulations for collimation studies is to produce loss maps along the LHC ring, in order to identify the level of local beam losses during nominal and abnormal operation scenarios. The SixTrack program is the standard tracking tool used at CERN to perform these studies. Recently, it was expanded in order to evaluate the proton load on different collimators in case of fast beam failures. Simulations are compared with beam measurements at 4 TeV. Combined failures are assumed which provide worst-case scenarios of the load on tungsten tertiary collimators.

  13. Role of boundary conditions in helicoidal flow collimation: Consequences for the von Kármán sodium dynamo experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, J; Brun, S; Dubrulle, B; Nore, C

    2015-12-01

    We present hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of liquid sodium flow with the PLUTO compressible MHD code to investigate influence of magnetic boundary conditions on the collimation of helicoidal motions. We use a simplified cartesian geometry to represent the flow dynamics in the vicinity of one cavity of a multiblades impeller inspired by those used in the Von-Kármán-sodium (VKS) experiment. We show that the impinging of the large-scale flow upon the impeller generates a coherent helicoidal vortex inside the blades, located at a distance from the upstream blade piloted by the incident angle of the flow. This vortex collimates any existing magnetic field lines leading to an enhancement of the radial magnetic field that is stronger for ferromagnetic than for conducting blades. The induced magnetic field modifies locally the velocity fluctuations, resulting in an enhanced helicity. This process possibly explains why dynamo action is more easily triggered in the VKS experiment when using soft iron impellers.

  14. Collimation and material science studies (ColMat) at GSI.

    CERN Document Server

    Stadlmann, J; Kollmus, H; Krause, M; Mustafin, E; Petzenhauser, I; Spiller, P; Strasik, I; Tahir, N; Tomut, M; Trautmann, C

    2010-01-01

    Within the frame of the EuCARD program, the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt is performing accelerator R&D in workpackage 8: ColMat. The coordinated effort is focussed on materials aspects important for building the FAIR accelerator facility at GSI and the LHC upgrade at CERN. Accelerator components and especially protection devices have to be operated in high dose environments. The radiation hazard occurs either by the primary proton and ion beams or the secondary radiation after initial beam loss. Detailed numerical simulations have been carried out to study the damage caused to solid targets by the full impact of the LHC beam as well as the SPS beam. Tungsten, copper and graphite as possible collimator materials have been studied. Experimental an theoretical studies on radiation damage on materials used for the LHC upgrade and the FAIR accelerators are performed at the present GSI experimental facilities. Technical decisions based on these results will have an impact on the F...

  15. DSP-Based Stepping Motor Drivers for the LHC Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Masi, A; Losito, R; Martino, M

    2008-01-01

    The control electronics of the LHC collimators stepping motors will be located in radiation safe zones up to 800 meters far from the motors. With such cable lengths the standard chopping drivers do not work properly because of the voltage losses on the cable and even more because of the high cable capacitance. The capacitance in fact produces a ringing phenomenon on the driver feedback current that limits the control chopping frequency to the point of being incompatible with the tight EM emissions requirements of the LHC tunnel. In some cases the feedback loop may even become unstable and the driver would fail. The problem was solved by accurately modeling the overall motor-cable system taking into account non-linearities due to hysteresis and eddy currents and by designing an adaptive digital controller, self-tuning to the real cable length. The controller will aim at increasing the chopping frequency to reduce the spectral density of the emissions and at damping the oscillations of the feedback current to a...

  16. Novel adaptive fiber-optics collimator for coherent beam combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Pengfei; Ma, Yanxing; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2014-12-15

    In this manuscript, we experimentally validate a novel design of adaptive fiber-optics collimator (AFOC), which utilizes two levers to enlarge the movable range of the fiber end cap. The enlargement of the range makes the new AFOC possible to compensate the end-cap/tilt aberration in fiber laser beam combining system. The new AFOC based on flexible hinges and levers was fabricated and the performance of the new AFOC was tested carefully, including its control range, frequency response and control accuracy. Coherent beam combination (CBC) of two 5-W fiber amplifiers array with simultaneously end-cap/tilt control and phase-locking control was implemented successfully with the novel AFOC. Experimental results show that the average normalized power in the bucket (PIB) value increases from 0.311 to 0.934 with active phasing and tilt aberration compensation simultaneously, and with both controls on, the fringe contrast improves to more than 82% from 0% for the case with both control off. This work presents a promising structure for tilt aberration control in high power CBC system.

  17. Review of BLM thresholds at tertiary LHC collimators

    CERN Document Server

    D'Andrea, Marco; Zanetti, Marco

    The Large Hadron Collider is designed to accelerate protons at the unprecedented energy of 7 TeV. With a total stored energy of 360 MJ, even tiny losses can cause machine downtime or induce damage to sensitive accelerator components. The Beam Loss Monitors (BLMs) are an important component of the complex LHC protection system. They consist of a series of ionisation chambers located all around the ring to detect secondary particle showers induced by beam losses. The monitors are assigned thresholds such that if the radiation generated by the loss is too high, the BLM triggers a beam dump, preventing the loss to grow excessively. BLM signals are recorded for different integration windows, in order to detect losses on very different time scales, ranging from the extremely short ones (taking place over half a turn) to those very close to steady state (i.e. lasting for more than a minute). The LHC is equipped with a complex collimation system, to provide the machine with passive protection in case of transient los...

  18. RADBALLTECHNOLOGY TESTING AND MCNP MODELING OF THE TUNGSTEN COLLIMATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.

    2010-07-08

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall{trademark}, which can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. RadBall{trademark} consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly more opaque, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner, which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation matrix provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach locations. The RadBall{trademark} technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This study focuses on the RadBall{trademark} testing and modeling accomplished at SRNL.

  19. A collimated neutron detector for RFP plasmas in MST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capecchi, W. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Bonofiglo, P. J.; Kim, J.; Sears, S.

    2016-11-01

    The neutron emissivity profile in the Madison Symmetric Torus is being reconstructed through the use of a collimated neutron detector. A scintillator-photomultiplier tube (PMT) system is employed to detect the fusion neutrons with the plasma viewing volume defined by a 55 cm deep, 5 cm diameter aperture. Effective detection of neutrons from the viewing volume is achieved through neutron moderation using 1300 lbs of high density polyethylene shielding, which modeling predicts attenuates the penetrating flux by a factor of 104 or more. A broad spectrum of gamma radiation is also present due to the unconfined fusion proton bombardment of the thick aluminum vacuum vessel. A 15 cm cylindrical liquid scintillator of 3.8 cm diameter is used to further increase directional sensitivity. A fast (5 ns rise time) preamplifier and digitization at 500 MHz prevent pulse pile-up even at high count rates (˜104/s). The entire neutron camera system is situated on an adjustable inclining base which provides the differing plasma viewing volumes necessary for reconstruction of the neutron emissivity profile. This profile, directly related to the fast-ion population, allows for an investigation of the critical fast-ion pressure gradient required to destabilize a neutral beam driven Alfvénic mode which has been shown to transport fast ions.

  20. Magnetically collimated pair jets at the LLNL Titan laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jackson; Chen, Hui; Barnak, Daniel; Betti, Riccardo; Fiksel, Gennady; Hazi, Andrew; Kerr, Shaun; Krauland, Christine; Link, Anthony; Manuel, Mario; Meyerhofer, David; Nagel, Sabrina; Park, Jaebum; Peebles, Jonathan; Pollock, Bradley; Tommasini, Riccardo

    2015-11-01

    Positron-electron pair production experiments were performed at the Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility to investigate the dependence of target thickness and atomic number on pair yield. Externally applied axial magnetic fields, generated by a Helmholtz coil, were used to collimate positrons where the signal observed at the detector increased by a factor of 20 over reference shots without a field. This enabled the detection of positrons from a range of target materials. The emitted positron yield was found to be proportional to the square of the atomic number. This scaling is reduced from the Bethe-Heitler cross section of Z4 by Compton scattering and the stopping power of the target. Monte Carlo simulations support these conclusions, providing a power-law scaling of emitted positrons for all materials and a range of mm-thick targets. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the LLNL LDRD program under tracking code 12-ERD-062 and the LLNL LGSP.

  1. Optimisation of the design of round-hole parallel collimators for ultra-compact nuclear medicine imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, D; Kwok, H; Bergman, A

    2002-01-01

    Hexagonal-hole parallel collimators are generally desirable over round-hole parallel collimators for most all medical imaging applications due to the optimum sensitivity offered by such a close-packed arrangement of apertures. However, such a sophisticated close-packed collimator arrangement is unlikely to adapt itself well to newly emerging, ultra-compact nuclear medicine gamma cameras. This is principally due to difficulties in machining and fabrication. In searching for alternative collimator designs, one must attempt, as far as possible, to preserve sensitivity, while optimising the spatial resolution achievable with the gamma camera. This work presents a general analysis of round-hole parallel collimator design for nuclear medicine imaging of 140 keV incident gamma-rays. Optimised designs are considered for a variety of source-collimator distances (z=10, 20, 30, 40 mm) which represent typical sentinel node to collimator distances for our particular medical imaging application. Resolution and sensitivity ...

  2. Collimated Jet Or Expanding Outflow: Possible Origins of GRBs And X-Ray Flashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuta, Akira; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto /Garching, Max Planck Inst.; Yamasaki, Tatsuya; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto; Nagataki, Shigehiro; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst.,; Mineshige, Shin; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto

    2006-08-10

    We investigate the dynamics of an injected outflow propagating in a progenitor in the context of the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through two dimensional axisymmetric relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. Initially, we locally inject an outflow near the center of a progenitor. We calculate 25 models, in total, by fixing its total input energy to be 10{sup 51} ergs s{sup -1} and radius of the injected outflow to be 7 x 10{sup 7} cm while varying its bulk Lorentz factor, {Lambda}{sub 0} = 1.05 {approx} 5, and its specific internal energy, {epsilon}{sub 0}/c{sup 2} 30 (with c being speed of light). The injected outflow propagates in the progenitor and drives a large-scale outflow or jet. We find a smooth but dramatic transition from a collimated jet to an expanding outflow among calculated models. The opening angle of the outflow ({theta}{sub sim}) is sensitive to {Lambda}{sub 0}; we find {theta}{sub sim} < 2{sup o} for {Lambda}{sub 0} {approx}> 3. The maximum Lorentz factor is, on the other hand, sensitive to both of {Lambda}{sub 0} and {epsilon}{sub 0}; roughly {Lambda}{sub max} {approx} {Lambda}{sub 0}(1 + {epsilon}{sub 0}/c{sup 2}). In particular, a very high Lorentz factor of {Lambda}{sub max} {approx}> 100 is achieved in one model. A variety of opening angles can arise by changing {epsilon}{sub 0}, even when the maximum Lorentz factor is fixed. The jet structure totally depends on {Lambda}{sub 0}. When {Lambda}{sub 0} is high, a strong bow shock appears and generates a back flow. High pressure progenitor gas heated by the bow shock collimates the outflow to form a narrow, relativistic jet. A number of internal oblique shocks within the jet are generated by the presence of the back flow and/or shear instability. When {Lambda}{sub 0} is low, on the contrary, the outflow expands soon after the injection, since the bow shock is weak and thus the pressure of the progenitor gas is not high enough to confine the flow. Our finding will explain a smooth

  3. Comparison of LHC collimator beam-based alignment to BPM-Interpolated centers

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, G; Assmann, R W; Bruce, R; Muller, G J; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Lari, L

    2012-01-01

    The beam centers at the Large Hadron Collider collimators are determined by beam-based alignment, where both jaws of a collimator are moved in separately until a loss spike is detected on a Beam LossMonitor downstream. Orbit drifts of more than a few hundred micrometers cannot be tolerated, as they would compromise the performance of the collimation system. Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) are installed at various locations around the LHC ring, and a linear interpolation of the orbit can be obtained at the collimator positions. In this paper, the results obtained from beam-based alignment are compared with the orbit interpolated from the BPM data throughout the 2011 and 2012 LHC proton runs.

  4. Astrophysics of magnetically collimated jets generated from laser-produced plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ciardi, A; Fuchs, J; Albertazzi, B; Riconda, C; Pépin, H; Portugall, O

    2012-01-01

    The generation of astrophysically relevant jets, from magnetically collimated, laser-produced plasmas, is investigated through three-dimensional, magneto-hydrodynamic simulations. We show that for laser intensities I ~ 10^12 - 10^14 W/cm^2, a magnetic field in excess of ~ 0.1 MG, can collimate the plasma plume into a prolate cavity bounded by a shock envelope with a standing conical shock at its tip, which re-collimates the flow into a super magneto-sonic jet beam. This mechanism is equivalent to astrophysical models of hydrodynamic inertial collimation, where an isotropic wind is focused into a jet by a confining circumstellar torus-like envelope. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for a large-scale magnetic field to produce jets from wide-angle winds. (abridged version)

  5. Micro-Slit Collimators for X-ray/Gamma-ray Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mikro Systems, Inc. (MSI) will advance the state-of-the-art in high resolution, high-aspect-ratio x-ray/gamma-ray collimator fabrication into the micro-slit regime...

  6. A numerical model of a coated capillary-plate thermal neutron collimator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yang; YANG Yi-Gang; LI Yu-Lan; LI Yuan-Jing

    2012-01-01

    A novel thermal neutron collimator was successfully fabricated by coating the inner surface of the capillary plate (CP) with gadolinium oxide using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology.This CP-based collimator is efficient and compact.A numerical model is presented in the paper to estimate the main performance characteristics of the collimator and to optimize the design for specific applications.According to the results of the calculation based on currently available CPs,the FWHM of the collimator's rocking curve can be smaller than 0.15° while suppressing more than 99.9% of the incident thermal neutrons on the double wings of the curve.Such a coated CP is as thin as 1.25 mm or even thinner,providing high angular resolution with good transmission in a very limited space.

  7. Thermo-mechanical Analysis of the CLIC Post-Linac Energy Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, J; Latina, A

    2012-01-01

    The post-linac energy collimation system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) has been designed for passive protection of the Beam Delivery System (BDS) against miss-steered beams due to failure modes in the main linac. In this paper, a thermo-mechanical analysis of the CLIC energy collimators is presented. This study is based on simulations using the codes FLUKA and ANSYS when an entire bunch train hits the collimators. Different failure mode scenarios in the main linac are considered. The aim is to improve the collimator in order to make a reliable and robust design so that survives without damage the impact of a full bunch train in case of likely events generating energy errors.

  8. Successive approximation algorithm for beam-position-monitor-based LHC collimator alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Gianluca; Nosych, Andriy A.; Bruce, Roderik; Gasior, Marek; Mirarchi, Daniele; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Wollmann, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Collimators with embedded beam position monitor (BPM) button electrodes will be installed in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during the current long shutdown period. For the subsequent operation, BPMs will allow the collimator jaws to be kept centered around the beam orbit. In this manner, a better beam cleaning efficiency and machine protection can be provided at unprecedented higher beam energies and intensities. A collimator alignment algorithm is proposed to center the jaws automatically around the beam. The algorithm is based on successive approximation and takes into account a correction of the nonlinear BPM sensitivity to beam displacement and an asymmetry of the electronic channels processing the BPM electrode signals. A software implementation was tested with a prototype collimator in the Super Proton Synchrotron. This paper presents results of the tests along with some considerations for eventual operation in the LHC.

  9. Optimization of the collimation system for CSNS/RCS with the robust conjugate direction search algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hong-Fei; Jiao, Yi; Huang, Ming-Yang; Xu, Shou-Yan; Wang, Na; Wang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    The Robust Conjugate Direction Search (RCDS) method is used to optimize the collimation system for the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS). The parameters of secondary collimators are optimized for a better performance of the collimation system. To improve the efficiency of the optimization, the Objective Ring Beam Injection and Tracking (ORBIT) parallel module combined with MATLAB parallel computing is used, which can run multiple ORBIT instances simultaneously. This study presents a way to find an optimal parameter combination of the secondary collimators for a machine model in preparation for CSNS/RCS commissioning. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475202, 11405187, 11205185) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences (2015009)

  10. Collimation quench test with 6.5 TeV proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Bruce, Roderik; Hermes, Pascal Dominik; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Jacquet, Delphine; Kalliokoski, Matti; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Redaelli, Stefano; Skordis, Eleftherios; Valentino, Gianluca; Valloni, Alessandra; Wollmann, Daniel; Zerlauth, Markus; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    We show here the analysis of the MD test that aimed to quench the superconducting magnets in the dispersion suppressor region downstream of the main betatron collimation system. In Run I there were several attempts to quench the magnets in the same region. This was done by exciting the Beam 2 in a controlled way using the transverse damper and generating losses leaking from the collimation cleaning. No quench was achieved in 2013 with a maximum of 1 MW of beam power loss absorbed by the collimation system at 4 TeV beam energy. In 2015 a new collimation quench test was done at 6.5 TeV aiming at similar power loss over longer period, 5-10 s. The main outcome of this test is reviewed.

  11. Significance of self magnetic field in long-distance collimation of laser-generated electron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shi; Niu, Yifei; Dan, Jiakun; Chen, Ziyu; Li, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Long-distance collimation of fast electron beams generated by laser-metallic-wire targets has been observed in recent experiments, while the mechanism behind this phenomenon remains unclear. In this work, we investigate in detail the laser-wire interaction processes with a simplified model and Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, and demonstrate the significance of the self magnetic fields of the beams in the long-distance collimation. Good agreements of simulated image plate patterns with various experiments and detailed analysis of electron trajectories show that the self magnetic fields provide restoring force that is critical for the beam collimation. By studying the wire-length dependence of beam divergence in certain experiments, we clarify that the role of the metallic wire is to balance the space-charge effect and thus maintain the collimation.

  12. The Performance of Reflecting Multichannel Collimators as a Neutron Beam Filter and Polarizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Passell, L.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.

    1963-01-01

    Summarizes the results obtained to date from a study of the properties of reflecting multi-channel collimators. The measurements have not yet been completed but enough information is available to give an indication of the capabilities of the system....

  13. VLBI collimation tower technique for time-delay studies of a large ground station communications antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Young, L. E.; Rusch, W. V. T.

    1983-01-01

    A need for an accurate but inexpensive method for measuring and evaluating time delays of large ground antennas for VLBI applications motivated the development of the collimation tower technique. Supporting analytical work which was performed primarily to verify time delay measurement results obtained for a large antenna when the transmitter was at a collimation distance of 1/25 of the usual far field criterion is discussed. Comparisons of theoretical and experimental results are also given.

  14. Mesoscopic self-collimation and slow light in all-positive index layered photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Arlandis, Julien; Pollès, Rémi; Moreau, Antoine; Campos, Julien; Gauthier-Lafaye, Olivier; Monmayrant, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a mesoscopic self-collimation effect in photonic crystal superlattices consisting of a periodic set of all-positive index 2D photonic crystal and homogeneous layers. We develop an electromagnetic theory showing that diffraction-free beams are observed when the curvature of the optical dispersion relation is properly compensated for. This approach allows to combine slow light regime together with self-collimation in photonic crystal superlattices presenting an extremely low filling ratio in air.

  15. Evaluating Red Reflex and Surgeon Preference Between Nearly-Collimated and Focused Beam Microscope Illumination Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cionni, Robert J; Pei, Ron; Dimalanta, Ramon; Lubeck, David

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the intensity and stability of the red reflex produced by ophthalmic surgical microscopes with nearly-collimated versus focused illumination systems and to assess surgeon preference in a simulated surgical setting. This two-part evaluation consisted of postproduction surgical video analysis of red reflex intensity and a microscope use and preference survey completed by 13 experienced cataract surgeons. Survey responses were based on bench testing and experience in a simulated surgical setting. A microscope with nearly-collimated beam illumination and two focused beam microscopes were assessed. Red reflex intensity and stability were greater with the nearly-collimated microscope illumination system. In the bench testing survey, surgeons reported that the red reflex was maintained over significantly greater distances away from pupillary center, and depth of focus was numerically greater with nearly-collimated illumination relative to focused illumination. Most participating surgeons (≥64%) reported a preference for the microscope with nearly-collimated illumination with regard to red reflex stability, depth of focus, visualization, surgical working distance, and perceived patient comfort. The microscope with nearly-collimated illumination produced a more intense and significantly more stable red reflex and was preferred overall by more surgeons. This is the first report of an attempt to quantify red reflex intensity and stability and to evaluate surgically-relevant parameters between microscope systems. The data and methods presented here may provide a basis for future studies attempting to quantify differences between surgical microscopes that may affect surgeon preference and microscope use in ophthalmic surgery.

  16. Study on the optical properties of the off-axis parabolic collimator with eccentric pupil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Gao, Xin; Duan, Jing; Zhang, Henjin

    2017-02-01

    The off-axis parabolic collimator with eccentric pupil has the advantages of wide spectrum, simple structure, easy assembly and adjustment, high performance price ratio. So, it is widely used for parameters testing and image quality calibration of ground-based and space-based cameras. In addition to the Strehl ratio, resolution, wavefront aberration, modulation transfer function, the general evaluation criteria on the imaging quality of the optical system, the beam parallelism characterize the collimator angle resolving capability and collimation condition of the collimator with the target board, can be measured easily ,quickly and operation process is simple, but the study mainly focus on how to measure it so far. In order to solve Quantitative calculation of this problem, firstly, the discussion of aberration condition of the off- axis parabolic is carried out based on the primary aberration theory. Secondly, analysis on the influencing factor on collimator optical properties is given, including the geometrical aberrations of spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism , the relation between the position of the eccentric pupil and the aberration and optical element surface wavefront aberration, after that, according to the basis of diffraction and wavefront aberration theory, the paper deduced calculation method of the beam parallelism, at last, an example of a 400mm diameter off-axis parabolic collimator with eccentric pupil is given to calculate, the practical results shows that calculation data is well in accordance with actual measurement data and results can meet the demand and has a guiding significance to the actual project manufacture and the theory analysis.

  17. Final implementation, commissioning, and performance of embedded collimator beam position monitors in the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Valentino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During Long Shutdown 1, 18 Large Hadron Collider (LHC collimators were replaced with a new design, in which beam position monitor (BPM pick-up buttons are embedded in the collimator jaws. The BPMs provide a direct measurement of the beam orbit at the collimators, and therefore can be used to align the collimators more quickly than using the standard technique which relies on feedback from beam losses. Online orbit measurements also allow for reducing operational margins in the collimation hierarchy placed specifically to cater for unknown orbit drifts, therefore decreasing the β^{*} and increasing the luminosity reach of the LHC. In this paper, the results from the commissioning of the embedded BPMs in the LHC are presented. The data acquisition and control software architectures are reviewed. A comparison with the standard alignment technique is provided, together with a fill-to-fill analysis of the measured orbit in different machine modes, which will also be used to determine suitable beam interlocks for a tighter collimation hierarchy.

  18. Final implementation, commissioning, and performance of embedded collimator beam position monitors in the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Gianluca; Baud, Guillaume; Bruce, Roderik; Gasior, Marek; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Olexa, Jakub; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Valloni, Alessandra; Wenninger, Jorg

    2017-08-01

    During Long Shutdown 1, 18 Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimators were replaced with a new design, in which beam position monitor (BPM) pick-up buttons are embedded in the collimator jaws. The BPMs provide a direct measurement of the beam orbit at the collimators, and therefore can be used to align the collimators more quickly than using the standard technique which relies on feedback from beam losses. Online orbit measurements also allow for reducing operational margins in the collimation hierarchy placed specifically to cater for unknown orbit drifts, therefore decreasing the β* and increasing the luminosity reach of the LHC. In this paper, the results from the commissioning of the embedded BPMs in the LHC are presented. The data acquisition and control software architectures are reviewed. A comparison with the standard alignment technique is provided, together with a fill-to-fill analysis of the measured orbit in different machine modes, which will also be used to determine suitable beam interlocks for a tighter collimation hierarchy.

  19. Development of the Collimator System for the 3GEV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Kazami

    2005-01-01

    In order to localize the beam loss in the restricted area, the beam collimation system is prepared in the 3GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) Project. The amount of the localized beam loss on the one collimator is estimated about 1.2kW, and that loss generates a large quantity of the secondary radiations. So the beam collimator must be designed that it is covered with enough shielding. We calculated the radiation level of the collimator and decided necessary shielding thickness. This result indicated that the residual dose rate at the outside surface of the shielding is mostly under 1mSv/h. We developed the remote cramp system and rad-hard components in order to reduce the radiation exposure during maintenance of the collimator. And also we coated Titanium Nitride (TiN) film on the inside surface of the vacuum chamber in order to reduce the secondary electron emission from the collimator and chamber surface. Now we investigate the possibility of another coatin...

  20. Single- and double-slit collimating effects on fast-atom diffraction spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravielle, M. S.; Miraglia, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    Diffraction patterns produced by fast He atoms grazingly impinging on a LiF(0 0 1) surface are investigated focusing on the influence of the beam collimation. Single- and double-slit collimating devices situated in front of the beam source are considered. To describe the scattering process we use the Surface Initial Value Representation (SIVR) approximation, which is a semi-quantum approach that incorporates a realistic description of the initial wave packet in terms of the collimating parameters. Our initial wave-packet model is based on the Van Cittert-Zernike theorem. For a single-slit collimation the width of the collimating aperture controls the shape of the azimuthal angle distribution, making different interference mechanisms visible, while the length of the slit affects the polar angle distribution. Additionally, we found that by means of a double-slit collimation it might be possible to obtain a wide polar angle distribution, which is associated with a large spread of the initial momentum perpendicular to the surface, derived from the uncertainty principle. It might be used as a simple way to probe the surface potential for different normal energies.

  1. The design of the radial collimator for residual stress analysis diffractometer of J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torii, Shuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)]. E-mail: torii@post.kek.jp; Moriai, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    Radial collimators are devices needed to define gauge sizes in neutron diffraction experiments. A design work of collimators needed for an engineering diffractometer that will be built at J-PARC is being progressed. Several collimators for different gauge sizes (1, 3, 5mm, etc ...) are going to be designed to define a gauge size range from 1 to 10mm. An equation was established to express a relation between the gauge size and geometrical design parameters of the collimator, by applying a normal distribution curve to the error distribution of measured gauge size. Currently, the geometric calculations for several collimators have been finished. A prototype collimator for a gauge size of 1mm was made and an FWHM (full width at half maximum) of the normal distribution of 1mm was obtained from performance tests conducted at the neutron diffractometer for residual stress analysis RESA in JRR-3 (Japan Research Reactor-3) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). In addition, the performance test results are in a good agreement with results from a Monte Carlo simulation with the McStas using the design parameters.

  2. The design of the radial collimator for residual stress analysis diffractometer of J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Shuki; Moriai, Atsushi

    2006-11-01

    Radial collimators are devices needed to define gauge sizes in neutron diffraction experiments. A design work of collimators needed for an engineering diffractometer that will be built at J-PARC is being progressed. Several collimators for different gauge sizes (1, 3, 5 mm, etc …) are going to be designed to define a gauge size range from 1 to 10 mm. An equation was established to express a relation between the gauge size and geometrical design parameters of the collimator, by applying a normal distribution curve to the error distribution of measured gauge size. Currently, the geometric calculations for several collimators have been finished. A prototype collimator for a gauge size of 1 mm was made and an FWHM (full width at half maximum) of the normal distribution of 1 mm was obtained from performance tests conducted at the neutron diffractometer for residual stress analysis RESA in JRR-3 (Japan Research Reactor-3) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). In addition, the performance test results are in a good agreement with results from a Monte Carlo simulation with the McStas using the design parameters.

  3. Collimator design for a dedicated molecular breast imaging-guided biopsy system: Proof-of-concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann, Amanda L.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Conners, Amy L.; O' Connor, Michael K. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a dedicated nuclear medicine breast imaging modality that employs dual-head cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) gamma cameras to functionally detect breast cancer. MBI has been shown to detect breast cancers otherwise occult on mammography and ultrasound. Currently, a MBI-guided biopsy system does not exist to biopsy such lesions. Our objective was to consider the utility of a novel conical slant-hole (CSH) collimator for rapid (<1 min) and accurate monitoring of lesion position to serve as part of a MBI-guided biopsy system. Methods: An initial CSH collimator design was derived from the dimensions of a parallel-hole collimator optimized for MBI performed with dual-head CZT gamma cameras. The parameters of the CSH collimator included the collimator height, cone slant angle, thickness of septa and cones of the collimator, and the annular areas exposed at the base of the cones. These parameters were varied within the geometric constraints of the MBI system to create several potential CSH collimator designs. The CSH collimator designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. The model included a breast compressed to a thickness of 6 cm with a 1-cm diameter lesion located 3 cm from the collimator face. The number of particles simulated was chosen to represent the count density of a low-dose, screening MBI study acquired with the parallel-hole collimator for 10 min after a {approx}150 MBq (4 mCi) injection of Tc-99m sestamibi. The same number of particles was used for the CSH collimator simulations. In the resulting simulated images, the count sensitivity, spatial resolution, and accuracy of the lesion depth determined from the lesion profile width were evaluated. Results: The CSH collimator design with default parameters derived from the optimal parallel-hole collimator provided 1-min images with error in the lesion depth estimation of 1.1 {+-} 0.7 mm and over 21 times the lesion count sensitivity relative to 1-min images

  4. SU-E-T-604: Dosimetric Dependence On the Collimator Angle in Prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M; Rehman, J; Khan, M [The Islaimia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur, Punjab (Pakistan); Chow, J [Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) when using different collimator angles. It is because collimator angle awareness is essential for planner to produce an optimal prostate VMAT plan in a rational time. Methods: Single-arc VMAT plans at different collimator angles (0o, 15o, 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o and 90o) were created systematically using a Harold heterogeneous pelvis phantom. For each change of collimator angle, a new plan was re-optimized for that angle. The prescription dose was 78 Gy per 39 fractions. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index, machine monitor unit, dose-volume histogram, the mean and maximum doses of the PTV were calculated and analyzed. On the other hand, dose-volume histogram, the mean and maximum doses of the OARs such as bladder, rectum and femoral heads for different collimator angles were determined from the plans. Results: There was no significance difference, based on the plan dose-volume evaluation criteria, found in the VMAT optimizations for all studied collimator angles. Higher CI and lower HI were found for the 45o collimator angle. In addition, the 15o collimator angle provided lower HI similar to the 45o collimator angle. The 75o and 90o collimator angle were found good for the rectum sparing, and the 75o and 30o collimator angle were found good for the right and left femur sparing, respectively. The PTV dose coverage for each plan was comparatively independent of the collimator angle. Conclusion: The dosimetric results in this study are useful to the planner to select different collimator angles to improve the PTV coverage and OAR sparing in prostate VMAT.

  5. Evaluation of collimators' response: round and hexagonal holes in parallel and fan beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Abdollah; Ashoor, Mansour; Hosseini, S Hamed; Rajaee, Azimeh

    2012-08-01

    With regard to the different requirements, various collimators are widely employed within nuclear medicine systems in order to evaluate the metabolism of organs as well as improve the contrast of images and better diagnosis. In this study, Fan Beam (FB) and Parallel Beam (PB) collimators in the shapes of round and hexagonal holes have been investigated and compared based on the Geometric Efficiency (G), Geometric Resolution (R(c)), Total Resolution (R(t)), FWHM and Scatter and Penetration (S + P) components using the Monte Carlo simulation. Calculations demonstrated that the G was improved with the increase in the distance between point source and collimator face (z). In contrast, the G was reduced with an increase in the angle of slant hole. In the FB collimator, the R(c) and R(t) were increased when the increase in the hole angle and/or the distance. The simulated results indicated in both collimators with the increase in z, a) the FWHM was increased as well as the peak of the PSF curve was decreased, and b) the S + P amounts decreased, but in the distinct z, the FWHM of the FB collimator is better than that of the PB collimator. It is shown that the results were in agreement with the ADAC company data. Also, Benchmark for measuring ADAC company demonstrated the calculated and simulated amounts of the R(c) and R(t) with round and hexagonal holes shapes had maximum and minimum average relative differences equal to -7.6% for PB and 1% for FB, respectively.

  6. Failure mode and effect analysis-based quality assurance for dynamic MLC tracking systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, Amit; Dieterich, Sonja; Svatos, Michelle; Keall, Paul [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94394 (United States); Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, California 94394 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA)-based commissioning and quality assurance framework for dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tumor tracking systems. Methods: A systematic failure mode and effect analysis was performed for a prototype real-time tumor tracking system that uses implanted electromagnetic transponders for tumor position monitoring and a DMLC for real-time beam adaptation. A detailed process tree of DMLC tracking delivery was created and potential tracking-specific failure modes were identified. For each failure mode, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of the probability of occurrence, the severity of effect, and the detectibility of the failure. Based on the insights obtained from the FMEA, commissioning and QA procedures were developed to check (i) the accuracy of coordinate system transformation, (ii) system latency, (iii) spatial and dosimetric delivery accuracy, (iv) delivery efficiency, and (v) accuracy and consistency of system response to error conditions. The frequency of testing for each failure mode was determined from the RPN value. Results: Failures modes with RPN{>=}125 were recommended to be tested monthly. Failure modes with RPN<125 were assigned to be tested during comprehensive evaluations, e.g., during commissioning, annual quality assurance, and after major software/hardware upgrades. System latency was determined to be {approx}193 ms. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Tracking accuracy was within 3%-3 mm gamma (100% pass rate) for sinusoidal as well as a wide variety of patient-derived respiratory motions. The total time taken for monthly QA was {approx}35 min, while that taken for comprehensive testing was {approx}3.5 h. Conclusions: FMEA proved to be a powerful and flexible tool to develop and implement a quality management (QM) framework for DMLC tracking. The authors conclude that the use of FMEA-based QM ensures

  7. The Mechanical Design of a Collimator and Cryogenic Bypass for Installation in the Dispersion Suppressors of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, D; Bertarelli, A; Cherif, A; Chritin, N; Claret, R; Gentini, L; Lombard, D; Minginette, P; Moyret, P; Redondas, M; Renaglia, T; Timmins, M

    2012-01-01

    A project to install collimators in the dispersion suppressor regions of the LHC was launched early 2010, aiming to reduce the power deposition in superconducting magnets by a factor of 10. To be placed in the continuous arc cryostat, the design of such collimators had to comply with challenging integration, functional and time constraints. A pre-study for a cold collimator solution was launched in parallel with an alternative design consisting of a room temperature collimator and a cryogenic bypass. The second was eventually preferred, as it was based on proven LHC technologies for cryogenic, vacuum, electrical and collimator material solutions, despite the increased difficulty on the mechanical integration and assembly. This paper presents the mechanical design of a cryogenic bypass for the LHC continuous cryostat andrespective collimator unit, both made to comply with the functionality of existing LHC systems. The approach taken to achieve a reliable design within schedule will be explained alongside the m...

  8. MD 755: Instability threshold and tune shift study with reduced retraction between primary and secondary collimators in IR7

    CERN Document Server

    Carver, Lee Robert; Mereghetti, Alessio; Bruce, Roderik; Metral, Elias; Salvant, Benoit; Nisbet, David; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this MD is to quantify in terms of stabilising octupole current threshold the impedance change when reducing the retraction between the primary and secondary collimators in IR7. This will be performed by first measuring the octupole current threshold required for stability with the tighter secondary collimator settings at 6.5 (w.r.t. to the nominal settings at 8 ), and then measuring the tune shift that occurs when the collimators are moved to the new settings.

  9. The design, physical properties and clinical utility of an iris collimator for robotic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echner, G G; Kilby, W; Rhein, B; Lang, C; Schlegel, W [Department of Medical Physics, DKFZ, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Lee, M; Earnst, E; Sayeh, S; Dooley, J R; Lessard, E; Maurer, C R Jr [Accuray Incorporated, 1310 Chesapeake Terrace, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Schlaefer, A; Blanck, O [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Gebaeude 64, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538 Luebeck (Germany)], E-mail: wkilby@accuray.com

    2009-09-21

    Robotic radiosurgery using more than one circular collimator can improve treatment plan quality and reduce total monitor units (MU). The rationale for an iris collimator that allows the field size to be varied during treatment delivery is to enable the benefits of multiple-field-size treatments to be realized with no increase in treatment time due to collimator exchange or multiple traversals of the robotic manipulator by allowing each beam to be delivered with any desired field size during a single traversal. This paper describes the Iris(TM) variable aperture collimator (Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, CA, USA), which incorporates 12 tungsten-copper alloy segments in two banks of six. The banks are rotated by 30 deg. with respect to each other, which limits the radiation leakage between the collimator segments and produces a 12-sided polygonal treatment beam. The beam is approximately circular, with a root-mean-square (rms) deviation in the 50% dose radius of <0.8% (corresponding to <0.25 mm at the 60 mm field size) and an rms variation in the 20-80% penumbra width of about 0.1 mm at the 5 mm field size increasing to about 0.5 mm at 60 mm. The maximum measured collimator leakage dose rate was 0.07%. A commissioning method is described by which the average dose profile can be obtained from four profile measurements at each depth based on the periodicity of the isodose line variations with azimuthal angle. The penumbra of averaged profiles increased with field size and was typically 0.2-0.6 mm larger than that of an equivalent fixed circular collimator. The aperture reproducibility is {<=}0.1 mm at the lower bank, diverging to {<=}0.2 mm at a nominal treatment distance of 800 mm from the beam focus. Output factors (OFs) and tissue-phantom-ratio data are identical to those used for fixed collimators, except the OFs for the two smallest field sizes (5 and 7.5 mm) are considerably lower for the Iris Collimator. If average collimator profiles are used, the assumption

  10. Collimator angle influence on dose distribution optimization for vertebral metastases using volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Lattuada, Paola; Reggiori, Giacomo; Cantone, Marie Claire; Navarria, Pierina; Scorsetti, Marta [Department of Radiation Oncology, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Milano (Rozzano) 20089 (Italy); Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona 6504 (Switzerland); Department of Radiation Oncology, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Milano (Rozzano) 20089 (Italy); Department of Physics, Universita Degli Studi di Milano, Milano 20133 (Italy); Department of Radiation Oncology, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Milano (Rozzano) 20089 (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The cylindrical symmetry of vertebrae favors the use of volumetric modulated arc therapy in generating a dose ''hole'' on the center of the vertebrae limiting the dose to the spinal cord. The authors have evaluated if collimator angle is a significant parameter for dose distribution optimization in vertebral metastases. Methods: Three patients with one-three vertebrae involved were considered. Twenty-one differently optimized plans (nine single-arc and 12 double-arc plans) were performed, testing various collimator angle positions. Clinical target volume was defined as the whole vertebrae, excluding the spinal cord canal. The planning target volume (PTV) was defined as CTV+5 mm. Dose prescription was 5x4 Gy{sup 2} with normalization to PTV mean dose. The dose at 1 cm{sup 3} of spinal cord was limited to 11.5Gy. Results: The best plans in terms of target coverage and spinal cord sparing were achieved by two arcs and Arc1-80 deg. and Arc2-280 deg. collimator angles for all the cases considered (i.e., leaf travel parallel to the spinal cord primary orientation). If one arc is used, only 80 deg. reached the objectives. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the role of collimation rotation for the vertebrae metastasis irradiation, with the leaf travel parallel to the spinal cord primary orientation to be better than other solutions. Thus, optimal choice of collimator angle increases the optimization freedom to shape a desired dose distribution.

  11. Design and development of new collimator cones for fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy in Samsung Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Y C; Ju, S G; Kim, D Y; Choi, D R; Huh, S J; Park, Y H; Lim, D H; Kim, M K

    1999-05-01

    In stereotactic radiotherapy using X-Knife system, the commercially supplied collimator cone system had a few mechanical limitations. The authors have developed new collimator cones to overcome these limitations and named them "SMC type" collimator cones. We made use of cadmium-free cerrobend alloy within the stainless steel cylinder housing. We made nine cones of relatively larger sizes (3.0 cm to 7.0 cm in diameter) and of shorter length with bigger clearance from the isocenter than the commercial cones. The cone housing and the collimator cones were designed to insert into the wedge mount of the gantry head to enable double-exposure linac-gram taking. The mechanical accuracy of pointing to the isocenter was tested by ball test and cone rotation test, and the dosimetric measurements were performed, all of which were with satisfactory results. A new innovative quality assurance procedure using linac-grams on the patients at the actual treatment setup was attempted after taking 10 sets of AP and lateral linac-grams and the overall mechanical isocenter accuracy was excellent (average error = 0.4 +/- 0.2 mm). We have developed the SMC type collimator cone system mainly for fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy use with our innovative ideas. The new cones' mechanical accuracy and physical properties were satisfactory for clinical use, and the verification of the isocenter accuracy on the actual treatment setup has become possible.

  12. Evaluation of Beam Losses and Energy Depositions for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Bracco, C; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Doyle, E; Ferrari, A; Keller, L; Lundgren, S; Keller, L; Mauri, M; Redaelli, S; Sarchiapone, L; Smith, J; Vlachoudis, V; Weiler, T

    2008-01-01

    The LHC beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can ...

  13. Impact of the A48 collimator on the Tevatron B0 dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolas, L Y

    2003-01-01

    To protect the CDF detector components in an event of an abort kicker prefire (AKP) in the Tevatron, a new collimator is to be installed at the A48 location during the summer 2003 shutdown. Detailed calculations have shown that this 0.5-m long ''single L-shape'' steel collimator will intercept a bunch of protons when such an incident occurs, providing reliable protection of the CDF main detector at an AKP. It will also mitigate the backgrounds induced by elastic beam-gas interactions upstream of B0. Although the Roman Pot detectors downstream of the A48 collimator will see an increased background, the amount of radiation they will receive either resulting from beam halo interactions in the collimator or during an AKP will not damage their sensitive parts. Secondaries resulting from beam halo interactions with the A48 collimator do not noticeably affect the downstream dipoles. The case of an AKP is quite different. As opposed to halo hits in the ''single-L shape'' unit (around 10 sup 5 p/s), a bunch lost on A4...

  14. Design of the pre-collimator for the NeXT x-ray telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hideyuki; Ogasaka, Yasushi; Ishida, Manabu; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Tamura, Keisuke; Kunieda, Hideyo; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Haba, Yoshito; Miyazawa, Takuya; Yamashita, Koujun; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Soong, Yang; Chan, Kai-Wing; Okajima, Takashi

    2008-07-01

    We present the design of the pre-collimator for the X-ray telescopes (XRTs) onboard New X-ray Telescope (NeXT). The optical design adopted for the NeXT XRTs is conically-approximated Wolter-I type optics. The tightly-nested reflectors with thin substrates (150-300 μm) enable us to achieve the large effective area and extremely light weight simultaneously. However, due to the packed reflector shells, X-rays from the outside of the XRT field of view occasionally arrive at the focal plane without the normal double reflection (stray lights), and then produce a ghost image on the detector. Thus, the stray-lights contamination degrades sensitivity of the source detection In order to reduce the stray lights efficiently, we plan to mount a collimator onto each telescope (referred to as pre-collimator), which is similar to that equipped with the Suzaku XRTs. The pre-collimator consists of coaxially-nested cylindrical blades, each of which is aligned radially with the corresponding primary refector. We found the height of the pre-collimator blade to be ~100 mm that is required to block the X-rays with off-axis angles of 30'-50', which are the main ligth pass of the stray lights for the NeXT XRTs.

  15. Two-dimensional dielectric collimator design and its experimental verification for microwave beam focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Park, J.; Seo, I.; Yoo, J.

    2016-10-01

    A collimator is an electromagnetic device that focuses or aligns the direction of wave propagation to achieve a narrow, intense beam. In this study, we propose a two-dimensional dielectric collimator for microwave beam focusing. This is something that is difficult to achieve using theoretical- or intuition-based approaches. We therefore used a systematic design process, which is referred to as the phase field design method, to obtain an optimal topological configuration for the collimator. The phase field parameter determines the optimal configuration of the dielectric material and, as a consequence, it determines the relative permittivity of the component. To verify the design results, we fabricated a prototype via three-dimensional printing and performed an experimental verification using an electric field scanner to measure the near field distributions of the designed collimator positioned parallel to an incident wave. We also performed angle dependent experiments for which the collimator position was offset at various angles. We confirmed that the experimental results are consistent with the simulation results.

  16. Aperture correction with an asymmetrically trimmed Gaussian weight in SPECT with a fan-beam collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Ryo; Ogawa, Koichi

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study is to improve the spatial resolution of SPECT images acquired with a fan-beam collimator. The aperture angle of a hole in the fan-beam collimator depends on the position of the collimator. To correct the aperture effect in an iterative image reconstruction, an asymmetrically trimmed Gaussian weight was used for a model. To confirm the validity of our method, point source phantoms and brain phantom were used in the simulation, and we applied the method to the clinical data. The results of the simulation showed that the spatial resolution of point sources improved from about 6 to 2 pixels full width at half maximum, and the corrected point sources were isotropic. The results of the simulation with the brain phantom showed that our proposed method could improve the spatial resolution of the phantom, and our method was effective for different fan-beam collimators with different focal lengths. The results of clinical data showed that the quality of the reconstructed image was improved with our proposed method. Our proposed aperture correction method with the asymmetrically trimmed Gaussian weighting function was effective in improving the spatial resolution of SPECT images acquired with the fan-beam collimator.

  17. Measurements and analysis of a high-brightness electron beam collimated in a magnetic bunch compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zhou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A collimator located in a magnetic bunch compressor of a linear accelerator driven x-ray free electron laser has many potential applications, such as the removal of horns in the current distribution, the generation of ultrashort beams, and as a diagnostic of the beam slice emittance. Collective effects, however, are a major concern in applying the technique. Systematic measurements of emittance and analysis were performed using a collimator in the first bunch compressor of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS. In the nominal, undercompressed configuration using the collimator we find that the y emittance (nonbending plane is not increased, and the x emittance (in the bending plane is increased by about 25%, in comparison to the injector emittance. From the analysis we conclude that the parasitic effects associated with this method are dominated by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR, which causes a “systematic error” for measuring slice emittance at the bending plane using the collimation method. In general, we find good agreement between the measurements and simulations including CSR. However, for overcompressed beams at smaller collimator gaps, an extra emittance increase is found that does not agree with 1D simulations and is not understood.

  18. Development of a 0.5m clear aperture Cassegrain type collimator telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Mustafa; Selimoǧlu, Özgür

    2016-07-01

    Collimator is an optical instrument used to evaluate performance of high precision instruments, especially space-born high resolution telescopes. Optical quality of the collimator telescope needs to be better than the instrument to be measured. This requirement leads collimator telescope to be a very precise instrument with high quality mirrors and a stable structure to keep it operational under specified conditions. In order to achieve precision requirements and to ensure repeatability of the mounts for polishing and metrology, opto-mechanical principles are applied to mirror mounts. Finite Element Method is utilized to simulate gravity effects, integration errors and temperature variations. Finite element analyses results of deformed optical surfaces are imported to optical domain by using Zernike polynomials to evaluate the design against specified WFE requirements. Both mirrors are aspheric and made from Zerodur for its stability and near zero CTE, M1 is further light-weighted. Optical quality measurements of the mirrors are achieved by using custom made CGHs on an interferometric test setup. Spider of the Cassegrain collimator telescope has a flexural adjustment mechanism driven by precise micrometers to overcome tilt errors originating from finite stiffness of the structure and integration errors. Collimator telescope is assembled and alignment methods are proposed.

  19. β*-Reach – IR7 Collimation Hierarchy Limit and Impedance

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, Alessio; Bruce, Roderik; Carver, Lee Robert; Kwee-Hinzmann, Regina; Metral, Elias; Mirarchi, Daniele; Quaranta, Elena; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Rossi, Roberto; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Salvant, Benoit; Valentino, Gianluca; Valloni, Alessandra; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This report summarises the results of the MD314 about the hierarchy limit of the IR7 collimation system and its impedance. While the activity, the procedures and the results concerning the collimator hierarchy limit are detailed here, the main outcomes from the impedance studies are only briefly reported, as a detailed MD report has been prepared. The MD was carried out during MD block II of 2015, on 29th August, at 6.5 TeV. Different retractions of the IR7 secondary collimators (TCSGs) from the primary collimators (TCPs) were qualified in terms of cleaning inefficiency and impedance. For each retraction, settings of the IR7 movable shower absorbers (TCLAs) tighter than those operationally deployed were qualified as well. Afterwards, the alignment of all IR7 collimators was performed and the beam-based centers compared to those from the alignment done in May 2015, to verify stability. Selected configurations were qualified with loss maps, to spot possible improvements in the cleaning inefficiency due to the ...

  20. A dynamic compensation strategy to correct patient-positioning errors in conformal prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauve, A D; Siebers, J V; Crimaldi, A J; Hagan, M P; Kealla, P J

    2006-06-01

    Traditionally, pretreatment detected patient-positioning errors have been corrected by repositioning the couch to align the patient to the treatment beam. We investigated an alternative strategy: aligning the beam to the patient by repositioning the dynamic multileaf collimator and adjusting the beam weights, termed dynamic compensation. The purpose of this study was to determine the geometric range of positioning errors for which the dynamic compensation method is valid in prostate cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Twenty-five previously treated prostate cancer patients were replanned using a four-field technique to deliver 72 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Patient-positioning errors were introduced by shifting the patient reference frame with respect to the treatment isocenter. Thirty-six randomly selected isotropic displacements with magnitudes of 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 cm were sampled for each patient, for a total of 5400 errors. Dynamic compensation was used to correct each of these errors by conforming the beam apertures to the new target position and adjusting the monitor units using inverse-square and off-axis factor corrections. The dynamic compensation plans were then compared with the original treatment plans via dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Changes of more than 5% of the prescription dose, 3.6 Gy, were deemed significant. Compared with the original treatment plans, dynamic compensation produced small discrepancies in isodose distributions and DVH analyses. These differences increased with the magnitudes of the initial patient-positioning errors. Coverage of the PTV was excellent: D95 and Dmean were not increased or decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose, and D5 was not decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose for any of the 5400 simulated positioning errors. D5 was increased by more than 5% of the prescription dose in only three of the 5400 positioning errors

  1. QUALITY OF RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGES: LABORATORY EVALUATION OF INTRAORAL FILMS, FILTERS, COLLIMATORS, AND RADIATION EXPOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAMBURUS José Roberto

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate density, radiographic contrast and dose of radiation exposure, the author analyzed 80 radiographs containing 640 optical density data of the images of a penetrometer, exposed to the radiation beam with combinations between D and E periapical films, aluminum and copper/aluminum filters, and circular or rectangular collimators. The data obtained were analyzed by ANOVA and allowed the following conclusions: 1 aluminum filtration resulted in improved image contrast; 2 the use of group D film and an aluminum filter produced improved image contrast quality; 3 the rectangular collimator contributed to the production of improved contrast and to the reduction of radiation exposure, but did not affect density; 4 the combination of copper/aluminum filter, E group film and rectangular collimation significantly reduced radiation exposure.

  2. Development and Beam Tests of an Automatic Algorithm for Alignment of LHC Collimators with Embedded BPMs

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, G; Gasior, M; Mirarchi, D; Nosych, A A; Redaelli, S; Salvachua, B; Assmann, R W; Sammut, N

    2013-01-01

    Collimators with embedded Beam Position Monitor (BPM) buttons will be installed in the LHC during the upcoming long shutdown period. During the subsequent operation, the BPMs will allow the collimator jaws to be kept centered around the beam trajectory. In this manner, the best possible beam cleaning efficiency and machine protection can be provided at unprecedented higher beam energies and intensities. A collimator alignment algorithm is proposed to center the jaws automatically around the beam. The algorithm is based on successive approximation, as the BPM measurements are affected by non-linearities, which vary with the distance between opposite buttons, as well as the difference between the beam and the jaw centers. The successful test results, as well as some considerations for eventual operation in the LHC are also presented.

  3. Acoustic logic gates and Boolean operation based on self-collimating acoustic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Cheng, Ying; Guo, Jian-zhong; Xu, Jian-yi; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2015-03-01

    The reveal of self-collimation effect in two-dimensional (2D) photonic or acoustic crystals has opened up possibilities for signal manipulation. In this paper, we have proposed acoustic logic gates based on the linear interference of self-collimated beams in 2D sonic crystals (SCs) with line-defects. The line defects on the diagonal of the 2D square SCs are actually functioning as a 3 dB splitter. By adjusting the phase difference between two input signals, the basic Boolean logic functions such as XOR, OR, AND, and NOT are achieved both theoretically and experimentally. Due to the non-diffracting property of self-collimation beams, more complex Boolean logic and algorithms such as NAND, NOR, and XNOR can be realized by cascading the basic logic gates. The achievement of acoustic logic gates and Boolean operation provides a promising approach for acoustic signal computing and manipulations.

  4. Acoustic logic gates and Boolean operation based on self-collimating acoustic beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ting; Xu, Jian-yi [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Department of Physics and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Cheng, Ying, E-mail: chengying@nju.edu.cn; Liu, Xiao-jun, E-mail: liuxiaojun@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Department of Physics and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Guo, Jian-zhong [School of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710119 (China)

    2015-03-16

    The reveal of self-collimation effect in two-dimensional (2D) photonic or acoustic crystals has opened up possibilities for signal manipulation. In this paper, we have proposed acoustic logic gates based on the linear interference of self-collimated beams in 2D sonic crystals (SCs) with line-defects. The line defects on the diagonal of the 2D square SCs are actually functioning as a 3 dB splitter. By adjusting the phase difference between two input signals, the basic Boolean logic functions such as XOR, OR, AND, and NOT are achieved both theoretically and experimentally. Due to the non-diffracting property of self-collimation beams, more complex Boolean logic and algorithms such as NAND, NOR, and XNOR can be realized by cascading the basic logic gates. The achievement of acoustic logic gates and Boolean operation provides a promising approach for acoustic signal computing and manipulations.

  5. Long-range visible light communication system based on LED collimating lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingcong; Wen, Shangsheng; Wu, Yuxiang; Ren, Yuanyuan; Guan, Weipeng; Zhou, Yunlin

    2016-10-01

    An advanced visible light communication (VLC) system is proposed for long-range VLC, such as marine communication. The design of the system is conducted into two parts. Firstly, we design and optimize a collimating lens for the optical antenna by using Taguchi method. The lighting effects and optical power of the receiving end in different distances are simulated by TracePro software. Then, the long-range VLC channel is reconstructed by integrating the influence of the atmospheric attenuation and frequency response. The performance of the OOK coding VLC system is tested by Matlab software. The results show that: the emitting angle of the optimized collimating lens is 1.7°. By using 1 W LED and collimating lens as an optical antenna, the system can achieve a data rate of 210 Mbit/s at a bit error rate of 10-3 in 90 m.

  6. Numerical Calculations of Wake Fields and Impedances of LHC Collimators' Real Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Frasciello, Oscar; Zobov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    The LHC collimators have very complicated mechanical designs including movable jaws made of higly resistive materials, ferrite materials, tiny RF contacts. Since the jaws are moved very close to the circulating beams their contribution in the overall LHC coupling impedance is dominant, with respect to other machine components. For these reasons accurate simulation of collimators' impedance becomes very important and challenging. Besides, several dedicated tests have been performed to verify correct simulations of lossy dispersive material properties, such as resistive wall and ferrites, benchmarking code results with analytical, semi-analytical and other numerical codes outcomes. Here we describe all the performed numerical tests and discuss the results of LHC collimators' impedances and wake fields calculations.

  7. The effect of pitch and collimation on radiation dose in spiral CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Qi-Jun; TSANG Cheung; FENG Ding-Hua

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of radiation dose to patients in spiral computed tomography (CT) were completed for various collimations, table speeds and pitch. A standard CT head dosimetry phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used for the measurement. The.effect of collimation and pitch on radiation dose was studied. The results indicated that the radiation dose at the given tube current, voltage and rotation speed was inversely proportional to pitch. And the increasing times of dose were as decreasing times of pitch. This regular pattern was tenable for radiation dose at both central holes and peripheral holes of the phantom at pitch = 1, >1 and <1. The collimation had no impact on the radiation dose. The results also indicated that radiation dose at central holes was nearly equal to that at peripheral holes. There was no significant difference between them statistically. The study demonstrates that the pitch in spiral CT scans is the primary parameter and has significant impact on radiation dose.

  8. Systematic study on visible light collimation by nanostructured slits in the metal surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Jin-Xin; Hua Yi-Lei; Chen Yu-Hui; Liu Rong-Juan; Li Jia-Fang; Li Zhi-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematic experimental investigation on visible light collimation by a nanostructured slit flanked with a pair of periodic array of grooves in gold thin film. A wide variety of aspects are considered, such as the polarization state, the transport path of incident light, the groove-groove spacing, the groove width and depth. Our results clearly show that the relationship between the collimation wavelength and the periodicity of the slit-groove structure accords well with the surface plasmon dispersion model proposed by previous researchers. Furthermore, the surface plasmon wave phase retardation effect induced by the surface structure is also verified via the measurement for samples with different groove widths and depths. These results indicate that the detailed geometry of the groove structure has obvious impacts on the collimation effect and the angular distribution of the diffraction light in the subwavelength plasmonic system.

  9. Diffusion and Halo Population Measurements with Collimator Scans at 6.5 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, Gianluca; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Roberto; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Stancari, Giulio; Valloni, Alessandra; Wagner, Joschka; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    Beam halo measurements at 6.5 TeV in the LHC were conducted via collimator scrapings in an MD carried out on the 4th November 2015. From the time evolution of the beam losses in a collimator scan, it is possible to extract information on the halo diffusion and population. Six scans were performed with two collimators in the vertical and horizontal planes in B1 and B2 respectively. The scans were done with squeezed, separated beams, with colliding beams and once again with separated beams but with a gentle continuous transverse blow-up with the ADT. The results obtained were compared with those from similar scrapings performed in a MD in 2012 at 4 TeV.

  10. Self-collimated waveguide bends and partial bandgap reflection of photonic crystals with parallelogram lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dingshan; Zhou, Zhiping; Citrin, David S

    2008-03-01

    The photonic crystal structure with parallelogram lattice, capable of bending a self-collimated wave with free angles and partial bandgap reflection, is presented. The equifrequency contours show that the direction of the collimation wave can be turned by tuning the angle between the two basic vectors of the lattice. Acute, right, and obtuse angles of collimating waveguide bends have been realized by arc lattices of parallelogram photonic crystals. Moreover, partial bandgap reflection of the parallelogram lattice photonic crystals is validated from the equifrequency contours and the projected band structures. A waveguide taper based on this partial bandgap reflection is also designed and proved to have above 85% transmittance over a very wide operating bandwidth of 180 nm.

  11. Handling High Activity Components on the SNS (Collimators and Linac Passive Dump Window)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, G.; Decarlo, A.; Potter, K.; Roseberry, T.; Schubert, J.; Brodowski, J.; Ludewig, H.; Tuozzolo, J.; Simos, N.; Hirst, J.

    2003-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator will provide a 1 GeV, 1.44 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The expected highest doses to components are in the collimation regions. This paper presents the mechanical engineering design of a typical collimator highlighting the features incorporated to assist with collimator removal once it is activated. These features include modular shielding, integrated crane mounting, remote water fittings and vacuum clamps. Also presented is the design work in progress at present to validate the remote vacuum clamp design. This includes a test rig that mimics an active handling scenario where vacuum bellows can be compressed and clamps removed/replaced from a safe distance.

  12. Structured mirror array for two-dimensional collimation of a chromium beam in atom lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wan-Jing; Ma Yan; Li Tong-Bao; Zhang Ping-Ping; Deng Xiao; Chen Sheng; Xiao Sheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Direct-write atom lithography,one of the potential nanofabrication techniques,is restricted by some difficulties in producing optical masks for the deposition of complex structures.In order to make further progress,a structured mirror array is developed to transversely collimate the chromium atomic beam in two dimensions.The best collimation is obtained when the laser red detunes by natural line-width of transition 7S3 → 7P40 of the chromium atom.The collimation ratio is 0.45 vertically (in x axis),and it is 0.55 horizontally (in y axis).The theoretical model is also simulated,and success of our structured mirror array is achieved.

  13. Heavy-Ion Collimation at the Large Hadron Collider Simulations and Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083002; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Bruce, Roderik; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Bruce, Roderik

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) stores and collides proton and $^{208}$Pb$^{82+}$ beams of unprecedented energy and intensity. Thousands of superconducting magnets, operated at 1.9 K, guide the very intense and energetic particle beams, which have a large potential for destruction. This implies the demand for a multi-stage collimation system to provide protection from beam-induced quenches or even hardware damage. In heavy-ion operation, ion fragments with significant rigidity offsets can still scatter out of the collimation system. When they irradiate the superconducting LHC magnets, the latter risk to quench (lose their superconducting property). These secondary collimation losses can potentially impose a limitation for the stored heavy-ion beam energy. Therefore, their distribution in the LHC needs to be understood by sophisticated simulations. Such simulation tools must accurately simulate the particle motion of many different nuclides in the magnetic LHC lattice and simulate their interaction with t...

  14. Beam Collimation Using an Anisotropic Metamaterial Slab without Any Nanometer-sized Aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shou; Cui, Yanxia; Zhang, Feng; He, Sailing; Hao, Yuying; Zhu, Furong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic beam collimation effect has been thoroughly investigated based on the well-known nanometer-scale bull's eye structure formed by complex and high-cost fabrication processes. In this work, we report our effort for attaining beam collimation using an anisotropic metamaterial (AMM) slab that consists of a stack of alternating metal/dielectric layers and an integrated top metal grating. The results show that AMM slab allows creating the beam collimation effect similar to that of the bull's eye structure, an enabling technology for practical application due to its simple architecture and cost benefits. The excitation of surface plasmons at the AMM/air interface is derived. The structure of the AMM slab and its impact on beaming performance were analyzed using the effective medium theory and Finite Element Method.

  15. All-angle collimation of incident light in μ-near-zero metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Vladimir Yu.; Nakajima, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    We use the theory of inhomogeneous waves to study the transmission of light in $\\mu$-near-zero metamaterials. We find the effect of all-angle collimation of incident light, which means that the vector of energy flow in a wave transmitted to a $\\mu$-near-zero metamaterial is perpendicular to the interface for any incident angles if an incident wave is s-polarized. This effect is similar to the all-angle collimation of incident light recently found through a different theoretical framework in $\\varepsilon$-near-zero metamaterials for a p-polarized incident wave [S. Feng, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 193904 (2012)]. To provide a specific example, we consider the transmission of light in a negative-index metamaterial in the spectral region with a permeability resonance, and show that all-angle collimation indeed takes place at the wavelength for which the real part of permeability is vanishingly small.

  16. Study on collimation and shielding of the back-streaming neutrons at the CSNS target

    CERN Document Server

    Han-Tao, Jing; Zheng, Yang

    2013-01-01

    The back-streaming neutrons from the spallation target at CSNS are very intense, and can pose serious damage problems for the devices in the accelerator-target interface region. To tackle the problems, a possible scheme for this region was studied, namely a specially designed optics for the proton beam line produces two beam waists, and two collimators are placed at the two waist positions to maximize the collimation effect of the back-streaming neutrons. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations with the beams in the two different CSNS phases show the effectiveness of the collimation system, and the radiation dose rate decreases largely in the interface section. This can ensure the use of epoxy coils for the last magnets and other devices in the beam transport line with reasonable lifetimes, e.g. thirty years. The design philosophy for such an accelerator-target interface region can also be applicable to other high-power proton beam applications.

  17. Astrophysics of magnetically collimated jets generated from laser-produced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardi, A; Vinci, T; Fuchs, J; Albertazzi, B; Riconda, C; Pépin, H; Portugall, O

    2013-01-11

    The generation of astrophysically relevant jets, from magnetically collimated, laser-produced plasmas, is investigated through three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We show that for laser intensities I∼10(12)-10(14) W cm(-2), a magnetic field in excess of ∼0.1  MG, can collimate the plasma plume into a prolate cavity bounded by a shock envelope with a standing conical shock at its tip, which recollimates the flow into a supermagnetosonic jet beam. This mechanism is equivalent to astrophysical models of hydrodynamic inertial collimation, where an isotropic wind is focused into a jet by a confining circumstellar toruslike envelope. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for a large-scale magnetic field to produce jets from wide-angle winds.

  18. Rapid additive manufacturing of MR compatible multipinhole collimators with selective laser melting of tungsten powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez, Karel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Van Audenhaege, Karen; Van Vaerenbergh, Jonas; Van Holen, Roel

    2013-01-01

    The construction of complex collimators with a high number of oblique pinholes is very labor intensive, expensive or is sometimes impossible with the current available techniques (drilling, milling or electric discharge machining). All these techniques are subtractive: one starts from solid plates and the material at the position of the pinholes is removed. The authors used a novel technique for collimator construction, called metal additive manufacturing. This process starts with a solid piece of tungsten on which a first layer of tungsten powder is melted. Each subsequent layer is then melted on the previous layer. This melting is done by selective laser melting at the locations where the CAD design file defines solid material. A complex collimator with 20 loftholes with 500 μm diameter pinhole opening was designed and produced (16 mm thick and 70 × 52 mm(2) transverse size). The density was determined, the production accuracy was measured (GOM ATOS II Triple Scan, Nikon AZ100M microscope, Olympus IMT200 microscope). Point source measurements were done by mounting the collimator on a SPECT detector. Because there is increasing interest in dual-modality SPECT-MR imaging, the collimator was also positioned in a 7T MRI scanner (Bruker Pharmascan). A uniform phantom was acquired using T1, T2, and T2* sequences to check for artifacts or distortion of the phantom images due to the collimator presence. Additionally, three tungsten sample pieces (250, 500, and 750 μm thick) were produced. The density, attenuation (140 keV beam), and uniformity (GE eXplore Locus SP micro-CT) of these samples were measured. The density of the collimator was equal to 17.31 ± 0.10 g∕cm(3) (89.92% of pure tungsten). The production accuracy ranges from -260 to +650 μm. The aperture positions have a mean deviation of 5 μm, the maximum deviation was 174 μm and the minimum deviation was -122 μm. The mean aperture diameter is 464 ± 19 μm. The calculated and measured sensitivity and

  19. Tuning negative refractive collimation beam by square lattice sonic crystal with concave incident surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Negative refractive collimation beam at the low frequency region is achieved in a square lattice sonic crystal with the small magnitude of effective refractive index. A simple tuning approach for such acoustic beam is also proposed by attaching an additional concave surface of incidence to the crystal slab. This can increase the propagation distance of collimation beam, enhance or suppress the beam intensity. The proposed approach is rather general and applicable to other acoustic materials as long as their effective index can be retrieved. Moreover, the results can be applied to wavefront manipulation and transmission enhancement.

  20. Collimating lamp with well color mixing of red/green/blue LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ching-Cherng; Moreno, Ivan; Lo, Yi-Chien; Chiu, Bo-Chun; Chien, Wei-Ting

    2012-01-02

    A novel light luminaire is proposed and experimentally analyzed, which efficiently mixes and projects the tunable light from red, green and blue (RGB) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Simultaneous light collimation and color mixing is a challenging task because most collimators separate colors, and most color mixers spread the light beam. Our method is simple and compact; it only uses a short light pipe, a thin diffuser, and a total internal reflection lens. We performed an experimental study to find a balance between optical efficiency and color uniformity by changing light recycling and color mixing.

  1. An adjustable in-pile fan collimator for focusing at a neutron diffractometer

    CERN Document Server

    Stüsser, N

    2002-01-01

    An adjustable in-pile fan collimator was built and tested in a neutron diffraction set-up with a large horizontally curved monochromator for focusing in real and reciprocal space. For small samples, enhancements of intensity up to a factor of five without losing 2 theta-resolution are possible in comparison to a conventional diffractometer equipped with Soller-type collimators. Our geometry will be discussed and compared to both the conventional diffractometer and a focusing arrangement using an in-pile diaphragm.

  2. Geometric wakefield regimes study of a rectangular tapered collimator for ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Fuster-Martinez, Nuria; Latina, Andrea; Snuverink, Jochem

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the discrepancy found between the wakefield impact effect induced by a rectangular tapered collimator prototype for ATF2 calculated using analytical models, calculated from CST PS numerical simulations and implemented in the tracking code PLACET v1.0.0. In order to get consistent results between the analytical calculations, CST PS simulations and the tracking code PLACET v1.0.0 the collimator wakefield module in PLACET v1.0.0 has to be modified. The changes have been implemented in the tracking code PLACET v1.0.1.

  3. Collimator optimization for small animal radiation therapy at a micro-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Manuela C. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection; Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Glatting, Gerhard [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection; Giordano, Frank A.; Wenz, Frederik; Fleckenstein, Jens [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Brockmann, Marc A. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; University Medical Center Mainz (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2017-05-01

    In radiation therapy of small animals treatment depths range from a few millimetres to several centimetres. In order to spare surrounding organs at risk steep dose gradients are necessary. To minimize the treatment time, and therefore the strain to the animals, a high dose rate is required. A description how these parameters can be optimized through an appropriate choice of collimators with different source surface distances (SSD) as well as different materials and geometries is presented. An industrial micro-CT unit (Y.Fox, YXLON GmbH, Hamburg, Germany) was converted into a precision irradiator for small animals. Different collimators of either stainless steel (Fe) with cylindrical bores (SSD = 42 mm) or tungsten (W) with conical bores (SSD = 14 mm) were evaluated. The dosimetry of very small radiation fields presents a challenge and was performed with GafChromic EBT3 films (Ashland, Vayne, KY, USA) in a water phantom. The films were calibrated with an ionization chamber in the uncollimated field. Treatments were performed via a rotation of the objects with a fixed radiation source. As expected, the shorter SSD of the W-collimators resulted in a (4.5 ± 1.6)-fold increase of the dose rates compared to the corresponding Fe-collimators. The ratios of the dose rates at 1 mm and 10 mm depth in the water phantom was (2.6 ± 0.2) for the Fe- and (4.5 ± 0.1) for the W-collimators. For rotational treatments in a cylindrical plastic phantom maximum dose rates of up to 1.2 Gy/min for Fe- and 5.1 Gy/min for W-collimators were measured. Choosing the smallest possible SSD leads to a high dose rate and a high surface dose, which is of advantage for the treatment of superficial target volumes. For larger SSD the dose rate is lower and the depth dose curve is shallower. This leads to a reduction of the surface dose and is best suited for treatments of deeper seated target volumes. Divergent collimator bores have, due to the reduced scatter within the collimators, a steeper

  4. External-cavity diode lasers with different devices and collimating optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, D M; Willis, A P

    1995-07-20

    Comparative operating characteristics of external-cavity diode lasers (ECDL's) with either a channel substrate planar device or a multi-quantum-well (MQW) device are presented. These include the output beam profile, which is significantly altered depending on the collimating lens used (either multielement or graded index), power versus injection-current characteristics, and the optical frequency and the rf spectra. The coherence lengths of the different laser diode-collimating-lens combinations in the ECDL are measured, and a new method for calculating the coupling coefficient and the coupled values of the internal quantum efficiency and the internal lumped loss is demonstrated for the MQW device.

  5. Metal micro-arrays for collimating neutrons and X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allman, B.E.; Cimmino, A.; Klein, A.G. [Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia). School of Physics; Hamilton, W.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Neutron Scattering Group

    1998-08-01

    The authors describe the theory, fabrication and experimental results of novel, compact optical elements for collimating and/or focusing beams of X-rays or thermal neutrons. These optical elements are solid composites consisting of regular stacks of alternating micro-foils, analogous in action to Soller slits. They are made out of pairs of metals with suitable refractive indices for reflection and/or absorption of the radiation. The performance of these proof-in-principle collimating elements is limited only by the choice of micro-foil materials and the uniformity of their interfaces.

  6. Hollow Electron Beam Collimation for HL-LHC - Effects on the Beam Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitterer, M. [Fermilab; Stancari, G. [Fermilab; Valishev, A. [Fermilab; Bruce, R. [CERN; Papotti, G [CERN; Redaelli, S. [CERN; Valentino, G. [Malta U.; Valentino, G. [CERN; Valuch, D. [CERN; Xu, C. [CERN

    2017-06-13

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). To ensure the successful operation of the hollow beam collimator the unwanted effects on the beam core, which might arise from the operation with a pulsed electron beam, must be minimized. This paper gives a summary of the effect of hollow electron lenses on the beam core in terms of sources, provides estimates for HL-LHC and discusses the possible mitigation methods.

  7. High-frequency impedance of small-angle tapers and collimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stupakov

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Collimators and transitions in accelerator vacuum chambers often include small-angle tapering to lower the wakefields generated by the beam. While the low-frequency impedance is well described by Yokoya’s formula (for axisymmetric geometry, much less is known about the behavior of the impedance in the high-frequency limit. In this paper we develop an analytical approach to the high-frequency regime for round collimators and tapers. Our analytical results are compared with computer simulations using the code ECHO.

  8. Final layout and expected cleaning for the first crystal-assisted collimation test at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mirarchi, D; Redaelli, S; Scandale, W; Taratin, A M; Galluccio, F

    2014-01-01

    The installation in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of two crystals in the horizontal and vertical planes was accomplished during the present LHC long shutdown (LS1) for crystal collimation studies. An appropriate layout was designed to demonstrate the principle feasibility of crystal collimation at the LHC. Extensive simulation campaigns were made to evaluate different crystal positions and parameters, in order to ensure that the main goals of these first feasibility tests in the LHC are within reach. In this paper, the final layout is presented. An overview of the considerations behind the design choices and the crystal parameters is given, and the expected performance of the system is discussed.

  9. Hollow Electron Beam Collimation for HL-LHC - Effects on the Beam Core

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, M; Valishev, A; Bruce, R; Papotti, G; Redaelli, S; Valentino, G; Valentino, G; Valuch, D; Xu, C

    2017-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). To ensure the successful operation of the hollow beam collimator the unwanted effects on the beam core, which might arise from the operation with a pulsed electron beam, must be minimized. This paper gives a summary of the effect of hollow electron lenses on the beam core in terms of sources, provides estimates for HL-LHC and discusses the possible mitigation methods.

  10. Comparison between vertical parallel hole collimator and 30/sup 0/ rotating slant hole collimator for assessing global and regional left ventricular function by radionuclide angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthout, P.; Faivre, R.; Bernard, Y.; Bassand, J.P.; Maurat, J.P.; Cardot, J.C.; Baud, M.; Jouan, A.; Verdenet, J.; Bidet, R.

    1988-06-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and regional wall motion abnormalities were determined in 40 patients using equilibrium radionuclide angiography. Scintigraphic acquisitions were collected in random order with 2 different collimators. Results were compared to contrast ventriculography (CV) performed in the 30/sup 0/ right anterior view and in a 60/sup 0/ left anterior oblique view. Radionuclide LVEF in both series was closely correlated with contrast ventriculographic LVEF. Regional wall motion analysis was only performed among the 30 patients suffering from coronary heart disease. Eight contrast angiographic studies were normal and 22 abnormal. Global sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 63% with the VTC and 91% and 87% with the 30/sup 0/ RSHC. Agreement for the localisation of the regional wall motion abnormalities between CV and radionuclide angiography was 70.6% with the VTC and 71.2% with the RSHC (P=ns). Intensity of the regional wall motion abnormalities was assessed with the 30/sup 0/ RSHC as well as with the VTC. We conclude that the use of a rotating slant hole collimator associated with radionuclide ventriculography allows improved determination of left ventricular ejection fraction and more accurate assessment of regional wall motion abnormalities with only two projections while the vertical collimator requires three.

  11. Dynamic MLC tracking of moving targets with a single kV imager for 3D conformal and IMRT treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulsen, Per R. (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark)), E-mail: perpolse@rm.dk; Cho, Byungchul; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Univ., Stanford (United States))

    2010-10-15

    Background. Tumor motion during radiotherapy is a major challenge for accurate dose delivery, in particular for hypofractionation and dose painting. The motion may be compensated by dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking. Previous work has demonstrated that a single kV imager can accurately localize moving targets for DMLC tracking during rotational delivery, however this method has not been investigated for the static gantry geometry used for conformal and IMRT treatments. In this study we investigate the accuracy of single kV-imager based DMLC tracking for static-gantry delivery. Material and methods. A 5-field treatment plan with circular field shape and 200 MU per field was delivered in 20 s per field to a moving phantom with an embedded gold marker. Fluoroscopic kV images were acquired at 5 Hz perpendicular to the treatment beam axis during a 120 deg pre-treatment gantry rotation, during treatment delivery, and during inter-field gantry rotations. The three-dimensional marker position was estimated from the kV images and used for MLC adaptation. Experiments included 12 thoracic/abdominal tumor trajectories and five prostate trajectories selected from databases with 160 and 548 trajectories, respectively. The tracking error was determined as the mismatch between the marker position and the MLC aperture center in portal images. Simulations extended the study to all trajectories in the databases and to treatments with prolonged duration of 60 s per field. Results. In the experiments, the mean root-mean-square (rms) tracking error was 0.9 mm (perpendicular to MLC) and 1.1 mm (parallel to MLC) for thoracic/abdominal tumor trajectories and 0.6 mm (perpendicular) and 0.5 mm (parallel) for prostate trajectories. Simulations of these experiments agreed to within 0.1 mm. Simulations of all trajectories in the databases resulted in mean rms tracking errors of 0.6 mm (perpendicular) and 0.9 mm (parallel) for thorax/abdomen tumors and 0.4 mm (perpendicular) and 0

  12. COMPARISON OF THE PERIPHERAL DOSES FROM DIFFERENT IMRT TECHNIQUES FOR PEDIATRIC HEAD AND NECK RADIATION THERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Masahiko; Saigo, Yasumasa; Higuchi, Kenta; Fujimura, Takuya; Koriyama, Chihaya; Yoshiura, Takashi; Akiba, Suminori

    2017-02-25

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver high and homogeneous doses to the target area while limiting doses to organs at risk. We used a pediatric phantom to simulate the treatment of a head and neck tumor in a child. The peripheral doses were examined for three different IMRT techniques [dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC), segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)]. Peripheral doses were evaluated taking thyroid, breast, ovary and testis as the points of interest. Doses were determined using a radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeter, and the COMPASS system was used for three-dimensional dose evaluation. VMAT achieved the lowest peripheral doses because it had the highest monitor unit efficiency. However, doses in the vicinity of the irradiated field, i.e. the thyroid, could be relatively high, depending on the VMAT collimator angle. DMLC and SMLC had a large area of relatively high peripheral doses in the breast region.

  13. Development of unmatched system model for iterative image reconstruction for pinhole collimator of imaging systems in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jae Keon; Bae, Seung Bin; Lee, Ki Sung; Kim, Yong Kwon; Joung, Jin Hun [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Diverse designs of collimator have been applied to Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) according to the purpose of acquisition; thus, it is necessary to reflect geometric characteristic of each collimator for successive image reconstruction. This study carry out reconstruction algorithm for imaging system in nuclear medicine with pinhole collimator. Especially, we study to solve sampling problem which caused in the system model of pinhole collimator. System model for a maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) was developed based on the geometry of the collimator. The projector and back-projector were separately implemented based on the ray-driven and voxel-driven methods, respectively, to overcome sparse sampling problem. We perform phantom study for pinhole collimator by using geant4 application for tomographic emission(GATE) simulation tool. The reconstructed images show promising results. Designed iterative reconstruction algorithm with unmatched system model effective to remove sampling problem artefact. Proposed algorithm can be used not only for pinhole collimator but also for various collimator system of imaging system in nuclear medicine.

  14. Outgassing measurement of an LHC collimator and estimation for the NEG performances

    CERN Document Server

    Kamiya, Junichiro; Jimenez, J M; Bregliozzi, G

    2011-01-01

    The outgassing rate of the collimators in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has an important role for the life-time of the Non-Evaporable Getter (NEC), and an accurate analysis allows the definition of future activities, like NEC vacuum activation. For these reasons, both, total outgassing rate and gas composition of a secondary collimator have been measured in the laboratory. The outgassing rate decreases by about two orders of magnitude by after bake-out and moreover, repeated bake-out further reduced the outgassing rate. The gas transmission through the NEC coated beam pipes and the resulting pressure distributions near the collimator were also measured in a dedicated setup. It is found that the main gas component after just 2 m of NEC coated beam pipe is CH(4) due to the extreme pumping speed of NEC for the other gases. Large amount of outgassing for H(2) and carbon related molecules are released when moving the collimator jaws. It is found that the NEC is very effective even in such case with large...

  15. Verification of passive cooling techniques in the Super-FRS beam collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, C. A.; Gellanki, J.; Najafi, M. A.; Moeini, H.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Rigollet, C.; Kuiken, O. J.; Lindemulder, M. F.; Smit, H. A. J.; Timersma, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Super FRagment Separator (Super-FRS) at the FAIR facility will be the largest in-flight separator of heavy ions in the world. One of the essential steps in the separation procedure is to stop the unwanted ions with beam collimators. In one of the most common situations, the heavy ions are produced by a fission reaction of a primary 238U-beam (1.5 GeV/u) hitting a 12C target (2.5 g/cm2). In this situation, some of the produced ions are highly charged states of 238U. These ions can reach the collimators with energies of up to 1.3 GeV/u and a power of up to 500 W. Under these conditions, a cooling system is required to prevent damage to the collimators and to the corresponding electronics. Due to the highly radioactive environment, both the collimators and the cooling system must be suitable for robot handling. Therefore, an active cooling system is undesirable because of the increased possibility of malfunctioning and other complications. By using thermal simulations (performed with NX9 of Siemens PLM), the possibility of passive cooling is explored. The validity of these simulations is tested by independent comparison with other simulation programs and by experimental verification. The experimental verification is still under analysis, but preliminary results indicate that the explored passive cooling option provides sufficient temperature reduction.

  16. Gaussian Schell Source as Model for Slit-Collimated Atomic and Molecular Beams

    CERN Document Server

    McMorran, Ben

    2008-01-01

    We show how to make a Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam. Then we compare the intensity profile, the transverse coherence width and the divergence angle of a GSM beam with those same properties of a beam that is collimated with two hard-edged slits. This work offers an intuitive way to understand various interferometer designs, and we compare our results with data.

  17. Fast Automatic Beam-Based Alignment of the LHC Collimator Jaws

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080813; Assmann, R W

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland is the largest and most powerful particle accelerator ever built. With a circumference of 27 km, it is designed to collide particles in two counter-rotating beams at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV to explore the fundamental forces and constituents of matter. Due to its potentially destructive high energy particle beams, the LHC is equipped with several machine protection systems. The LHC collimation system is tasked with scattering and absorbing beam halo particles before they can quench the superconducting magnets. The 108 collimators also protect the machine from damage in the event of very fast beam losses, and shields sensitive devices in the tunnel from radiation over years of operation. Each collimator is made up of two blocks or ‘jaws’ of carbon, tungsten or copper material. The collimator jaws need be placed symmetrically on either side of the beam trajectory, to clean halo particles with maximum efficiency. The beam orbit and beam siz...

  18. Investigation of collimator materials for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Quaranta, Elena; Bertarelli, Alessandro; Redaelli, Stefano

    This PhD thesis work has been carried out at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva, Switzerland), in the framework of the High Luminosity (HL) upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The HL-LHC upgrade will bring the accelerator beyond the nominal performance: it is planning to reach higher stored beam energy up to 700 MJ, through more intense proton beams. The present multi-stage LHC collimation system was designed to handle 360 MJ stored beam energy and withstand realistic losses only for this nominal beam. Therefore, the challenging HL-LHC beam parameters pose strong concerns for beam collimation, which call for important upgrades of the present system. The objective of this thesis is to provide solid basis for optimum choices of materials for the different collimators that will be upgraded for the baseline layout of the HL-LHC collimation system. To achieve this goal, material-related limitations of the present system are identified and novel advanced composite materials are se...

  19. Anatomically shaped cranial collimation (ACC) for lateral cephalometric radiography: a technical report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, R.C.; van der Stelt, P.F.; Berkhout, W.E.R.

    2013-01-01

    Lateral cephalograms in orthodontic practice display an area cranial of the base of the skull that is not required for diagnostic evaluation. Attempts have been made to reduce the radiation dose to the patient using collimators combining the shielding of the areas above the base of the skull and bel

  20. Thermal behavior of TAXN and TCDXM D2 collimator mask, Finite element studies

    CERN Document Server

    Sklariks, Stepans

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to perform thermal loading simulations of TCDXM (D2 collimator mask) and TAXN so as to allow the preliminary evaluation of the suitability of the given parts for the upcoming high luminosity upgrade that is to be performed in LHC in the nearest future.

  1. Summary of the CERN Workshop on Materials for Collimators and Beam Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, R; Bertarelli, A; Ferrari, A; Weterings, W; Mokhov, N V

    2008-01-01

    The main focus of the workshop was on collimators and beam absorbers for (mainly) High Energy Hadron Accelerators, with the energy stored in the beams far above damage limit. The objective was to better understand the technological limits imposed by mechanisms related to beam impact on materials. The idea to organise this workshop came up during the High Intensity High Brightness Hadron Beams, ICFA-HB2006 in Japan [1]. The workshop was organised 3-5 September 2007 at CERN, with about 60 participants, including 20 from outside CERN. About 30 presentations were given [2]. The event was driven by the LHC challenge, with more than 360 MJoule stored in each proton beam. The entire beam or its fraction will interact with LHC collimators and beam absorbers, and with the LHC beam dump blocks. Collimators and beam absorbers are also of the interest for other labs and accelerators: - CERN: for the CNGS target, for SPS beam absorbers (extraction protection) and collimators for protecting the transfer line between SPS an...

  2. A collimation system for ELI-NP Gamma Beam System - design and simulation of performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternò, G.; Cardarelli, P.; Marziani, M.; Bagli, E.; Evangelisti, F.; Andreotti, M.; Gambaccini, M.; Petrillo, V.; Drebot, I.; Bacci, A.; Vaccarezza, C.; Palumbo, L.; Variola, A.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance and refine the design of the collimation system for the gamma radiation source (GBS) currently being realised at ELI-NP facility. The gamma beam, produced by inverse Compton scattering, will provide a tunable average energy in the range between 0.2 and 20 MeV, an energy bandwidth 0.5% and a flux of about 108 photons/s. As a result of the inverse Compton interaction, the energy of the emitted radiation is related to the emission angle, it is maximum in the backscattering direction and decreases as the angle increase [1,2]. Therefore, the required energy bandwidth can be obtained only by developing a specific collimation system of the gamma beam, i.e. filtering out the radiation emitted at larger angles. The angular acceptance of the collimation for ELI-NP-GBS must be continuously adjustable in a range from about 700 to 60 μrad, to obtain the required parameters in the entire energy range. The solution identified is a stack of adjustable slits, arranged with a relative rotation around the beam axis to obtain an hole with an approximately circular shape. In this contribution, the final collimation design and its performance evaluated by carrying out a series of detailed Geant4 simulations both of the high-energy and the low-energy beamline are presented.

  3. LHC Heavy-Ion Collimation Quench Test at 6.37Z TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Hermes, Pascal Dominik; Bruce, Roderik; Hofle, Wolfgang; Holzer, Eva Barbara; Kalliokoski, Matti; Kotzian, Gerd; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Quaranta, Elena; Redaelli, Stefano; Valentino, Gianluca; Valuch, Daniel; Wollmann, Daniel; Zerlauth, Markus; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This note summarizes the collimation quench test MD with 208Pb82+ beams at 6.37Z TeV in which a quench of a dipole magnet in the dispersion suppressor (DS) downstream of the betatron collimation region (IR7) was achieved. The aim of the test was to experimentally validate the quench limit in this region by means of inducing high losses at the LHC collimation system and quench the magnet with the collimation debris mainly lost at the IR7 DS. It was the first test with heavy-ions in which the transverse damper (ADT) could be used to induce these losses over extended periods of time (approximately 10-15s) while previous tests used tune resonance crossing methods in which the beam loss is less controllable and faster. The quench was achieved at a beam loss rate of 15 kW. The note summarizes the measurement strategy, technical realization, the test results and implications for future heavy-ion operation.

  4. Studies on heavy ion losses from collimation cleaning at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hermes, P D; Jowett, J M; Redaelli, S; Salvachua, B M; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2015-01-01

    The LHC collimation system protects superconducting magnets from beam losses. By design, it was optimized for the high-intensity proton challenges but so far provided adequate protection also during the LHC heavy-ion runs with 208Pb82+ ions up to a beam energy of 4 Z TeV. Ion beam cleaning brings specific challenges due to different physical interactions with the collimator materials and might require further improvements for operation at 7 Z TeV. In this article, we study heavy-ion beam losses leaking out of the LHC collimation system, both in measurement and simulations. The simulations are carried out using both ICOSIM, with a simplified ion physics model implemented, and SixTrack, including more detailed starting conditions from FLUKA but without including online scattering in subsequent collimator hits. The results agree well with measurements overall, although some discrepancies are present. The reasons for the discrepancies are investigated and, on this basis, the requirements for an improved simulatio...

  5. Comparative results on collimation of the SPS beam of protons and Pb ions with bent crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, W.; Assmann, R.; Bracco, C.; Cerutti, F.; Christiansen, J.; Gilardoni, S.; Laface, E.; Losito, R.; Masi, A.; Metral, E.; Mirarchi, D.; Montesano, S.; Previtali, V.; Redaelli, S.; Valentino, G.; Schoofs, P.; Smirnov, G.; Tlustos, L.; Bagli, E.; Baricordi, S.; Dalpiaz, P.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Vincenzi, D.; Dabagov, S.; Murtas, F.; Carnera, A.; Della Mea, G.; De Salvador, D.; Lombardi, A.; Lytovchenko, O.; Tonezzer, M.; Cavoto, G.; Ludovici, L.; Santacesaria, R.; Valente, P.; Galluccio, F.; Afonin, A.G.; Bulgakov, M.K.; Chesnokov, Yu.A.; Maisheev, V.A.; Yazynin, I.A.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Taratin, A.M.; Uzhinskiy, V.V.; Gavrikov, Yu.A.; Ivanov, Yu.M.; Lapina, L.P.; Skorobogatov, V.V.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Hall, G.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, M.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M.; Zorba, O.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Markiewicz, T.; Oriunno, M.; Wienands, U.

    2011-01-01

    New experiments on crystal assisted collimation have been carried out at the CERN SPS with stored beams of 120 Gev/c protons and Pb ions. Bent silicon crystals of 2 mm long with about 170 mu rad bend angle and a small residual torsion were used as primary collimators. In channeling conditions, the beam loss rate induced by inelastic interactions of particles with the crystal nuclei is minimal. The loss reduction was about 6 for protons and about 3 for Pb ions. Lower reduction value for Pb ions can be explained by their considerably larger ionization losses in the crystal. In one of the crystals, the measured fraction of the Pb ion beam halo deflected in channeling conditions was 74\\%, a value very close to that for protons. The intensity of the off-momentum halo leaking out from the collimation station was measured in the first high dispersion area downstream. The particle population in the shadow of the secondary collimator-absorber was considerably smaller in channeling conditions than for amorphous orienta...

  6. Low-frequency ultrasonic Bessel-like collimated beam generation from radial modes of piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillara, Vamshi Krishna; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2017-02-01

    We present a very simple approach to generate a collimated ultrasonic beam that exploits the natural Bessel-like vibration pattern of the radial modes of a piezoelectric disc with lateral clamping. This eliminates the need for the conventional annular Bessel pattern of the electrodes with individual electrode excitation on the piezo-disc, thus simplifying the transducer design. Numerical and experimental studies are carried out to investigate the Bessel-like vibration patterns of these radial modes showing an excellent agreement between these two studies. Measured ultrasonic beam-profiles in water from the radial modes confirm the profile to be a Bessel beam. Collimated beam generation from radial modes is investigated using a coupled electromechanical finite-element model. It is found that clamping the lateral edges of piezoelectric transducers results in a high-degree of collimation with practically no side-lobes similar to a parametric array beam. Ultrasonic beam-profile measurements in water with both free and clamped piezoelectric transducer are presented. The collimated beam generation using the present technique of using the laterally clamped radial modes finds significant applications in low-frequency imaging through highly attenuating materials.

  7. Bent silicon crystals for the LHC collimation Studies with an ultrarelativistic proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Hasan, Said; Scandale, Walter; Vallazza, Erik

    2007-01-01

    LHC is a source of new challenges in every HEP field; among these, the beam collimation requires an innovative approach. The H8RD22 collaboration is undertaking an intense study of bent crystal properties with the goal of using crystals as primary collimators. The thesis gives an introduction to the theory of channeling and its related phenomena in bent crystals explaining how these can be used to perform an efficient beam collimation. The pre-thesis experiments are described to introduce the scientific context in which the H8RD22 collaboration is working. The thesis core is the description of two beam tests held in Sept. 2006 and May 2007 on the CERN SPS H8 beamline with 400 GeV/c protons: the experimental setups and procedures are shown together with the analysis of the collected data. With the observation of the volume reflection for the first time at these energies and the use of multi crystal systems, these experiments are a clear indication that crystal collimation is a real possibility for the second p...

  8. Design of a Tri-PET collimator for high-resolution whole-body mouse imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFilippo, Frank P

    2017-08-01

    Tri-PET refers to high-resolution 511-keV emission tomography using a multipinhole collimator in conjunction with lower resolution PET detectors operating in coincidence mode. Tri-PET is unique in that three spatial locations are associated with each event (two detector coordinates and one pinhole location). Spatial resolution and sensitivity are similar to that of 511-keV SPECT and are governed mainly by the collimator design. However because of a third spatial location in Tri-PET, the line-of-response is overdetermined. This feature permits new opportunities in data processing which impact collimator design. In particular, multiplexing can be avoided since the coincidence data identify the pinhole through which the photon passed. In this paper, the principles of Tri-PET collimator design are reviewed and then applied to the case of high-resolution imaging of a small animal in a clinical PET scanner. The design of a 148-pinhole collimator for whole-body imaging of a mouse is presented. Two pinhole designs were investigated: knife-edge pinholes with 1.1 mm aperture and novel hyperboloidal pinholes with 1.2 mm aperture, both having 18° cone angle. The pinhole configuration is unfocused, covering a whole-body mouse field of view with nearly uniform sensitivity. Computer simulations were performed of a micro hot rods phantom imaged with this collimator in a clinical PET scanner. Sensitivity was estimated by simulating a point source centered on-axis at locations spanning a 70-mm axial range, similar to the NEMA NU-4 standard for whole-body mouse imaging. Reconstructed images of the hot rods phantom demonstrated the ability to resolve 1.1 mm structures with the knife-edge pinholes and 1.0 mm structures with the hyperboloidal pinholes. Sensitivity was found to be 0.093% and 0.054% for the knife-edge and hyperboloidal pinholes, respectively. With a properly designed multipinhole collimator, high-resolution and acceptable sensitivity are achievable with Tri-PET using

  9. A novel compact three-dimensional laser-sintered collimator for neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridley, Christopher J., E-mail: c.ridley@ed.ac.uk [The School of Engineering and the Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions, The University of Edinburgh, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Kirichek, Oleg [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Kamenev, Konstantin V. [The School of Engineering and the Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions, The University of Edinburgh, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Improvements in the available flux at neutron sources are making it increasingly feasible to obtain refineable neutron diffraction data from samples smaller than 1 mm{sup 3}. The signal is typically too weak to introduce any further sample environment in the 30–50 mm diameter surrounding the sample (such as the walls of a pressure cell) due to the high ratio of background to sample signal, such that even longer count times fail to reveal reflections from the sample. Many neutron instruments incorporate collimators to reduce parasitic scattering from the instrument and from any surrounding material and larger pieces of sample environment, such as cryostats. However, conventional collimation is limited in the volume it can focus on due to difficulties in producing tightly spaced neutron-absorbing foils close to the sample and in integrating this into neutron instruments. Here we present the design of a novel compact 3D rapid-prototyped (or “printed”) collimator which reduces these limitations and is shown to improve the ratio of signal to background, opening up the feasibility of using additional sample environment for neutron diffraction from small sample volumes. The compactness and ease of customisation of the design allows this concept to be integrated with existing sample environment and with designs that can be tailored to individual detector geometries without the need to alter the setup of the instrument. Results from online testing of a prototype collimator are presented. The proof of concept shows that there are many additional collimator designs which may be manufactured relatively inexpensively, with a broad range of customisation, and geometries otherwise impossible to manufacture by conventional techniques.

  10. The Structure and Dynamics of GRB Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-10-25

    There are several lines of evidence which suggest that the relativistic outflows in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are collimated into narrow jets. The jet structure has important implications for the true energy release and the event rate of GRBs, and can constrain the mechanism responsible for the acceleration and collimation of the jet. Nevertheless, the jet structure and its dynamics as it sweeps up the external medium and decelerates, are not well understood. In this review I discuss our current understanding of GRB jets, stressing their structure and dynamics.

  11. Assessment of a fast generated analytical matrix for rotating slat collimation iterative reconstruction: a possible method to optimize the collimation profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, F.; Bekaert, V.; Reilhac, A.; Wurtz, J.; Brasse, D.

    2015-03-01

    In SPECT imaging, improvement or deterioration of performance is mostly due to collimator design. Classical SPECT systems mainly use parallel hole or pinhole collimators. Rotating slat collimators (RSC) can be an interesting alternative to optimize the tradeoff between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The present study was conducted using a RSC system for small animal imaging called CLiR. The CLiR system was used in planar mode only. In a previous study, planar 2D projections were reconstructed using the well-known filtered backprojection algorithm (FBP). In this paper, we investigated the use of the statistical reconstruction algorithm maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) to reconstruct 2D images with the CLiR system using a probability matrix calculated using an analytic approach. The primary objective was to propose a method to quickly generate a light system matrix, which facilitates its handling and storage, while providing accurate and reliable performance. Two other matrices were calculated using GATE Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the performance obtained using the matrix calculated analytically. The first matrix calculated using GATE took all the physics processes into account, where the second did not consider for the scattering, as the analytical matrix did not take this physics process into account either. 2D images were reconstructed using FBP and MLEM with the three different probability matrices. Both simulated and experimental data were used. A comparative study of these images was conducted using different metrics: the modulation transfert function, the signal-to-noise ratio and quantification measurement. All the results demonstrated the suitability of using a probability matrix calculated analytically. It provided similar results in terms of spatial resolution (about 0.6 mm with differences image.

  12. Hypersonic Buckshot: Astrophysical Jets as Heterogeneous Collimated Plasmoids

    CERN Document Server

    Yirak, Kristopher; Cunningham, Andrew J; Mitran, Sorin

    2008-01-01

    Herbig-Haro (HH) jets are commonly thought of as homogeneous beams of plasma traveling at hypersonic velocities. Structure within jet beams is often attributed to periodic or ``pulsed'' variations of conditions at the jet source. Simulations based on this scenario result in knots extending across the jet diameter. Observations and recent high energy density laboratory experiments shed new light on structures below this scale and indicate they may be important for understanding the fundamentals of jet dynamics. In this paper we offer an alternative to ``pulsed'' models of protostellar jets. Using direct numerical simulations we explore the possibility that jets are chains of sub-radial clumps propagating through a moving inter-clump medium. Our models explore an idealization of this scenario by injecting small ($r\\rho_{jet}$) spheres embedded in an otherwise smooth inter-clump jet flow. The spheres are initialized with velocities differing from the jet velocity by $\\sim15$%. We find the consequences of shiftin...

  13. Collimation of laser-produced plasmas using axial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Amitava; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassan, Syed M.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas; Hassanein, A.

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the expansion dynamics of laser-produced plasmas expanding into an axial magnetic field. Plasmas were generated by focusing 1.064 µm Nd:YAG laser pulses onto a planar tin target in vacuum and allowed to expand into a 0.5 T magnetic-filed where field lines were aligned along the plume expansion direction. Gated images employing intensified CCD showed focusing of the plasma plume, which were also compared with results obtained using particle-in-cell modelling methods. The estimated density and temperature of the plasma plumes employing emission spectroscopy revealed significant changes in the presence and absence of the 0.5T magnetic field. In the presence of the field, the electron temperature is increased with distance from the target, while the density showed opposite effects.

  14. Monte-Carlo simulation of pinhole collimator of a small field of view gamma camera for small animal imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jie; MA Wenyan; ZHU Yufeng; MA Hongguang; WU Yuelei; HU Huasi; ZHANG Boping; HUO Yonggang; LIU Silu; JIAN Bin; WANG Zhaomin

    2009-01-01

    Needs in scintimammography applications,especially for small animal cardiac imaging,lead to develop a small field of view,high spatial resolution gamma camera with a pinhole collimator.However the ideal pinhole collimator must keep a compromise between spatial resolution and sensitivity.In order to design a pinhole collimator with an optimized sensitivity and spatial resolution,the spatial resolution and the geometric sensitivity response as a function of the source to collimator distance has been obtained by means of Monte-Carlo simulation for a small field of view gamma camera with a pinhole collimator of various-hole diameters.The results show that the camera with pinhole of 1 mm,1.5 mm and 2 mm diameter has respectively spatial resolution of 1.5 mm,2.25 mm and 3 mm and geometric sensitivity of 0.016%,0.022% and 0.036%,while the source to collimator distance is 3 cm.We chose the pinhole collimator with hole diameter size of 1.2 mm for our the gamma camera designed based on the wade-off between sensitivity and resolution.

  15. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Lari, L.; Rossi, A.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more) of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  16. The effect of laser beam size in a zig-zag collimator on transverse cooling of a krypton atomic beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek Singh; V B Tiwari; S Singh; S R Mishra; H S Rawat

    2014-07-01

    The effect of size of a cooling laser beam in a zig-zag atomic beam collimator on transverse cooling of a krypton atomic beam is investigated. The simulation results show that discreteness in the interaction between the cooling laser beam and atomic beam, arising due to finite size and incidence angle of the cooling laser beam, significantly reduces the value of transverse velocity capture range of the collimator. The experimental observations show the trend similar to that obtained from simulations. Our study can be particularly useful where a small zig-zag collimator is required.

  17. Controlling the self-collimation characteristics of a near-infrared two-dimensional metallic photonic crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Shuai; Ren Cheng; Wang Wen-Zhong; Wang Yi-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Self-collimation characteristics of the two-dimensional square-lattice photonic crystal (PC) consisting of metal rods immersed in silicon are studied by the finite-difference time-domain method.The Drude dispersion model is adopted to describe the metal rod,and the self-collimation behaviours of the near-infrared light through the PC are studied.The frequency region and the tolerance of incident angle for the self-collimation behaviour can be controlled by changing the shape of the metal rods.

  18. A novel method involving Matlab coding to determine the distribution of a collimated ionizing radiation beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioan, M.-R.

    2016-08-01

    In ionizing radiation related experiments, precisely knowing of the involved parameters it is a very important task. Some of these experiments are involving the use of electromagnetic ionizing radiation such are gamma rays and X rays, others make use of energetic charged or not charged small dimensions particles such are protons, electrons, neutrons and even, in other cases, larger accelerated particles such are helium or deuterium nuclei are used. In all these cases the beam used to hit an exposed target must be previously collimated and precisely characterized. In this paper, a novel method to determine the distribution of the collimated beam involving Matlab coding is proposed. The method was implemented by using of some Pyrex glass test samples placed in the beam where its distribution and dimension must be determined, followed by taking high quality pictures of them and then by digital processing the resulted images. By this method, information regarding the doses absorbed in the exposed samples volume are obtained too.

  19. Simulation of the in-flight calibration of the collimator alignment and PSF for HXMT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope(HXMT) is an X-ray astronomical satellite in 1-250 keV,consisting of three collimated instruments.We present the in-flight calibration approach of the collimator alignment and Point Spread Function(PSF) for HXMT,using both the direct fitting method and the imaging method.According to observational simulations of the Crab Nebula,we find that these two methods produce almost the same calibration accuracy of the alignment,and with a one-day scanning observation,the alignment can be calibrated to better than 0.45’ and 0.1’ along the wide and narrow directions of the Field of View(FOV) for a detector module,which corresponds to a localization accuracy of better than 0.1’ and meets the scientific requirement.

  20. Solar concentrator with integrated tracking and light delivery system with collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxey, Lonnie Curt

    2015-06-09

    A solar light distribution system includes a solar light concentrator that is affixed externally to a light transfer tube. Solar light waves are processed by the concentrator into a collimated beam of light, which is then transferred through a light receiving port and into the light transfer tube. A reflector directs the collimated beam of light through the tube to a light distribution port. The interior surface of the light transfer tube is highly reflective so that the light transfers through the tube with minimal losses. An interchangeable luminaire is attached to the light distribution port and distributes light inside of a structure. A sun tracking device rotates the concentrator and the light transfer tube to optimize the receiving of solar light by the concentrator throughout the day. The system provides interior lighting, uses only renewable energy sources, and releases no carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere.