WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic critical phenomena

  1. Dynamical critical phenomena in driven-dissipative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberer, L M; Huber, S D; Altman, E; Diehl, S

    2013-05-10

    We explore the nature of the Bose condensation transition in driven open quantum systems, such as exciton-polariton condensates. Using a functional renormalization group approach formulated in the Keldysh framework, we characterize the dynamical critical behavior that governs decoherence and an effective thermalization of the low frequency dynamics. We identify a critical exponent special to the driven system, showing that it defines a new dynamical universality class. Hence critical points in driven systems lie beyond the standard classification of equilibrium dynamical phase transitions. We show how the new critical exponent can be probed in experiments with driven cold atomic systems and exciton-polariton condensates.

  2. Dynamic critical phenomena in two-dimensional fully frustrated Coulomb gas model with disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Luo Mengbo

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic critical phenomena near depinning transition in two-dimensional fully frustrated square lattice Coulomb gas model with disorders was studied using Monte Carlo technique. The ground state of the model system with disorder σ=0.3 is a disordered state. The dependence of charge current density J on electric field E was investigated at low temperatures. The nonlinear J-E behavior near critical depinning field can be described by a scaling function proposed for three-dimensional flux line system [M.B. Luo, X. Hu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 (2007) 267002]. We evaluated critical exponents and found an Arrhenius creep motion for field region E c /2 c . The scaling law of the depinning transition is also obtained from the scaling function

  3. Critical Phenomena in Gravitational Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gundlach Carsten

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As first discovered by Choptuik, the black hole threshold in the space of initial data for general relativity shows both surprising structure and surprising simplicity. Universality, power-law scaling of the black hole mass, and scale echoing have given rise to the term 'critical phenomena'. They are explained by the existence of exact solutions which are attractors within the black hole threshold, that is, attractors of codimension one in phase space, and which are typically self-similar. This review gives an introduction to the phenomena, tries to summarize the essential features of what is happening, and then presents extensions and applications of this basic scenario. Critical phenomena are of interest particularly for creating surprising structure from simple equations, and for the light they throw on cosmic censorship and the generic dynamics of general relativity.

  4. Introductory lectures on critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khajehpour, M.R.H.

    1988-09-01

    After a presentation of classical models for phase transitions and critical phenomena (Van der Waals theory, Weiss theory of ferromagnetism) and theoretical models (Ising model, XY model, Heisenberg model, spherical model) the Landau theory of critical and multicritical points and some single applications of renormalization group method in static critical phenomena are presented. 115 refs, figs and tabs

  5. Renormalization group and critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Qing

    2004-01-01

    The basic clue and the main steps of renormalization group method used for the description of critical phenomena is introduced. It is pointed out that this method really reflects the most important physical features of critical phenomena, i.e. self-similarity, and set up a practical solving method from it. This way of setting up a theory according to the features of the physical system is really a good lesson for today's physicists. (author)

  6. Strings, fields and critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambjoern, J.

    1987-07-01

    The connection between field theory and critical phenomena is reviewed. Emphasis is put on the use of Monte Carlo methods in the study of non-perturbative aspects of field theory. String theory is then described as a statistical theory of random surfaces and the critical behaviour is analyzed both by analytical and numerical methods. (orig.)

  7. Phase transitions and critical phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Domb, Cyril

    2001-01-01

    The field of phase transitions and critical phenomena continues to be active in research, producing a steady stream of interesting and fruitful results. It has moved into a central place in condensed matter studies.Statistical physics, and more specifically, the theory of transitions between states of matter, more or less defines what we know about 'everyday' matter and its transformations.The major aim of this serial is to provide review articles that can serve as standard references for research workers in the field, and for graduate students and others wishing to obtain reliable in

  8. Phase transitions and critical phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Domb, Cyril

    2000-01-01

    The field of phase transitions and critical phenomena continues to be active in research, producing a steady stream of interesting and fruitful results. No longer an area of specialist interest, it has acquired a central focus in condensed matter studies. The major aim of this serial is to provide review articles that can serve as standard references for research workers in the field, and for graduate students and others wishing to obtain reliable information on important recent developments.The two review articles in this volume complement each other in a remarkable way. Both deal with what m

  9. Critical Phenomena Associated with Boson Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Hawley, Scott H.; Choptuik, Matthew W.

    2001-01-01

    We present a brief synopsis of related work (gr-qc/0007039), describing a study of black hole threshold phenomena for a self-gravitating, massive complex scalar field in spherical symmetry. We construct Type I critical solutions dynamically by tuning a one-parameter family of initial data consisting of a boson star and a massless real scalar field, and numerically evolving this data. The resulting critical solutions appear to correspond to boson stars on the unstable branch, as we show via co...

  10. Two-dimensional critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleur, H.

    1987-09-01

    Two dimensional critical systems are studied using transformation to free fields and conformal invariance methods. The relations between the two approaches are also studied. The analytical results obtained generally depend on universality hypotheses or on renormalization group trajectories which are not established rigorously, so numerical verifications, mainly using the transfer matrix approach, are presented. The exact determination of critical exponents; the partition functions of critical models on toruses; and results as the critical point is approached are discussed [fr

  11. Nonlinear Dynamic Phenomena in Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Warminski, Jerzy; Cartmell, Matthew P

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear phenomena should play a crucial role in the design and control of engineering systems and structures as they can drastically change the prevailing dynamical responses. This book covers theoretical and applications-based problems of nonlinear dynamics concerned with both discrete and continuous systems of interest in civil and mechanical engineering. They include pendulum-like systems, slender footbridges, shape memory alloys, sagged elastic cables and non-smooth problems. Pendulums can be used as a dynamic absorber mounted in high buildings, bridges or chimneys. Geometrical nonlinear

  12. Antagonistic Phenomena in Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Adilson E.; Timme, Marc

    2018-03-01

    Recent research on the network modeling of complex systems has led to a convenient representation of numerous natural, social, and engineered systems that are now recognized as networks of interacting parts. Such systems can exhibit a wealth of phenomena that not only cannot be anticipated from merely examining their parts, as per the textbook definition of complexity, but also challenge intuition even when considered in the context of what is now known in network science. Here, we review the recent literature on two major classes of such phenomena that have far-reaching implications: (a) antagonistic responses to changes of states or parameters and (b) coexistence of seemingly incongruous behaviors or properties - both deriving from the collective and inherently decentralized nature of the dynamics. They include effects as diverse as negative compressibility in engineered materials, rescue interactions in biological networks, negative resistance in fluid networks, and the Braess paradox occurring across transport and supply networks. They also include remote synchronization, chimera states, and the converse of symmetry breaking in brain, power-grid, and oscillator networks as well as remote control in biological and bioinspired systems. By offering a unified view of these various scenarios, we suggest that they are representative of a yet broader class of unprecedented network phenomena that ought to be revealed and explained by future research.

  13. From critical phenomena to gauge gields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bellac, M.

    1988-01-01

    In this book the author gives an introduction to the following questions: critical phenomena (Landau theory, renormalization group, two dimensional models); Perturbation theory and renormalization, scalar euclidian field (Feynman diagrams, Callan-Symanzik equations); Quantum theory of scalar fields (path integrals in quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics, green functions and S matrix, quantization of Klein-Gordon field); Gauge theories (quantization of Dirac field and electromagnetic field, quantum electrodynamics, non-abelian gauge theories) [fr

  14. Conformal field theories and critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Bowei

    1993-01-01

    In this article we present a brief review of the conformal symmetry and the two dimensional conformal quantum field theories. As concrete applications of the conformal theories to the critical phenomena in statistical systems, we calculate the value of central charge and the anomalous scale dimensions of the Z 2 symmetric quantum chain with boundary condition. The results are compatible with the prediction of the conformal field theories

  15. Chemical Dynamics and Critical Phenomena: Electrical Conductivity and Reactivity of Benzyl Bromide in Triethylamine+Water Near its Consolute Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specker, Christopher D.; Ellis, Joel M.; Baird, James K.

    2007-06-01

    The binary liquid mixture of triethylamine+water has a lower consolute point at a critical composition of 32.27mass% triethylamine. Starting at a temperature within the one-phase region, the electrical conductivity of a sample of this mixture was measured and found to increase smoothly with increasing temperature before falling sharply at 291.24K (18.09°C). Since opalescence was visible at this temperature, it was identified with the critical solution temperature of the binary mixture. A solution of 90 μL of benzyl bromide dissolved in 90mL of 32.27mass% triethylamine+water was prepared, and the resulting Menschutkin reaction between benzyl bromide and triethylamine was allowed to come to equilibrium. The electrical conductivity of this equilibrium mixture was measured in the one-phase region and was found to increase smoothly with increasing temperature before rising sharply at 291.55K (18.40°C). This temperature was identified as the critical temperature of the ternary. The rate of approach of the ternary mixture to chemical equilibrium was also measured and shown to be governed by a first-order rate law. The temperature dependence of the rate coefficient followed the Arrhenius equation up to a temperature of about 290.74K (17.59°C). Above this temperature, the rate coefficient fell by as much as 22% below the value predicted by extrapolation of the Arrhenius equation. This suppression in the rate reaction in the vicinity of the critical temperature can be interpreted as evidence for the existence of critical slowing down.

  16. Renormalization group theory of critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.V.G.

    1995-01-01

    Renormalization group theory is a framework for describing those phenomena that involve a multitude of scales of variations of microscopic quantities. Systems in the vicinity of continuous phase transitions have spatial correlations at all length scales. The renormalization group theory and the pertinent background material are introduced and applied to some important problems in this monograph. The monograph begins with a historical survey of thermal phase transitions. The background material leading to the renormalization group theory is covered in the first three chapters. Then, the basic techniques of the theory are introduced and applied to magnetic critical phenomena in the next four chapters. The momentum space approach as well as the real space techniques are, thus, discussed in detail. Finally, brief outlines of applications of the theory to some of the related areas are presented in the last chapter. (author)

  17. Characterizing critical phenomena via the Purcell effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Neto, M. B.; Szilard, D.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Farina, C.; Pinheiro, F. A.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the role of phase transitions into the spontaneous-emission rate of a single quantum emitter embedded in a critical medium. Using a Landau-Ginzburg approach, we find that in the broken symmetry phase, the emission rate is reduced, or even suppressed, due to the photon mass generated by the Higgs mechanism. Remarkably, its sensitivity to the critical exponents of the phase transition allows for an optical determination of universality classes. When applied to the cases of superconductivity and superfluidity, we show that the Purcell effect also provides valuable information on spectroscopic and thermodynamic quantities, such as the size of the superconducting gap and the discontinuity in the specific heat at the transition. By unveiling that a deeper connection between the Purcell effect and phase transitions exists, we demonstrate that the former is an efficient optical probe of distinct critical phenomena and their associated observables.

  18. Phantom black holes and critical phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azreg-Aïnou, Mustapha [Engineering Faculty, Başkent University, Bağlıca Campus, Ankara (Turkey); Marques, Glauber T. [Universidade Federal Rural da Amazônia ICIBE-LASIC, Av. Presidente Tancredo Neves 2501, CEP 66077-901—Belém/PA (Brazil); Rodrigues, Manuel E., E-mail: azreg@baskent.edu.tr, E-mail: gtadaiesky@hotmail.com, E-mail: esialg@gmail.com [Faculdade de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Pará, Campus Universitário de Abaetetuba, CEP 68440-000, Abaetetuba, Pará (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    We consider the two classes cosh and sinh of normal and phantom black holes of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. The thermodynamics of these holes is characterized by heat capacities that may have both signs depending on the parameters of the theory. Leaving aside the normal Reissner-Nordström black hole, it is shown that only some phantom black holes of both classes exhibit critical phenomena. The two classes share a nonextremality, but special, critical point where the transition is continuous and the heat capacity, at constant charge, changes sign with an infinite discontinuity. This point yields a classification scheme for critical points. It is concluded that the two unstable and stable phases coexist on one side of the criticality state and disappear on the other side, that is, there is no configuration where only one phase exists. The sinh class has an extremality critical point where the entropy diverges. The transition from extremality to nonextremality with the charge held constant is accompanied by a loss of mass and an increase in the temperature. A special case of this transition is when the hole is isolated (microcanonical ensemble), it will evolve by emission of energy, which results in a decrease of its mass, to the final state of minimum mass and vanishing heat capacity. The Ehrenfest scheme of classification is inaccurate in this case but the generalized one due to Hilfer leads to conclude that the transition is of order less than unity. Fluctuations near criticality are also investigated.

  19. Critical phenomena and renormalization group transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, C.; Castro, C. di

    1980-01-01

    Our main goal is to guide the reader to find out the common rational behind the various renormalization procedures which have been proposed in the last ten years. In the first part of these lectures old arguments on universality and scaling will be briefly recalled. To our opinion these introductory remarks allow one to stress the physical origin of the two majore renormalization procedures, which have been used in the theory of critical phenomena: the Wilson and the field theoretic approach. All the general properties of a ''good'' renormalization transformation will also come out quite naturally. (author)

  20. Quantum field theory and critical phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Zinn-Justin, Jean

    1996-01-01

    Over the last twenty years quantum field theory has become not only the framework for the discussion of all fundamental interactions except gravity, but also for the understanding of second-order phase transitions in statistical mechanics. This advanced text is based on graduate courses and summer schools given by the author over a number of years. It approaches the subject in terms of path and functional intergrals, adopting a Euclidean metric and using the language of partition and correlation functions. Renormalization and the renormalization group are examined, as are critical phenomena and the role of instantons. Changes for this edition 1. Extensive revision to eliminate a few bugs that had survived the second edition and (mainly) to improve the pedagogical presentation, as a result of experience gathered by lecturing. 2. Additional new topics; holomorphic or coherent state path integral; functional integral and representation of the field theory S-matrix in the holomorphic formalis; non-relativistic li...

  1. GIS and dynamic phenomena modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Dana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 4 (2006), s. 11-15 ISSN 0139-570X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : dynamic modelling * temporal analysis * dynamics evaluation * temporal space Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory

  2. SUPERCOMPUTER SIMULATION OF CRITICAL PHENOMENA IN COMPLEX SOCIAL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrus M.A. Sloot

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a problem of computer simulation of critical phenomena in complex social systems on a petascale computing systems in frames of complex networks approach. The three-layer system of nested models of complex networks is proposed including aggregated analytical model to identify critical phenomena, detailed model of individualized network dynamics and model to adjust a topological structure of a complex network. The scalable parallel algorithm covering all layers of complex networks simulation is proposed. Performance of the algorithm is studied on different supercomputing systems. The issues of software and information infrastructure of complex networks simulation are discussed including organization of distributed calculations, crawling the data in social networks and results visualization. The applications of developed methods and technologies are considered including simulation of criminal networks disruption, fast rumors spreading in social networks, evolution of financial networks and epidemics spreading.

  3. Critical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekker, H.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown how to solve the master equation for a Markov process including a critical point by means of successive approximations in terms of a small parameter. A critical point occurs if, by adjusting an externally controlled quantity, the system shows a transition from normal monostable to bistable behaviour. The fundamental idea of the theory is to separate the master equation into its proper irreducible part and a corrective remainder. The irreducible or zeroth order stochastic approximation will be a relatively simple Fokker-Planck equation that contains the essential features of the process. Once the solution of this irreducible equation is known, the higher order corrections in the original master equation can be incorporated in a systematic manner. (Auth.)

  4. Critical phenomena in quasi-two-dimensional vibrated granular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Marcelo; Soto, Rodrigo

    2018-01-01

    The critical phenomena associated to the liquid-to-solid transition of quasi-two-dimensional vibrated granular systems is studied using molecular dynamics simulations of the inelastic hard sphere model. The critical properties are associated to the fourfold bond-orientational order parameter χ_{4}, which measures the level of square crystallization of the system. Previous experimental results have shown that the transition of χ_{4}, when varying the vibration amplitude, can be either discontinuous or continuous, for two different values of the height of the box. Exploring the amplitude-height phase space, a transition line is found, which can be either discontinuous or continuous, merging at a tricritical point and the continuous branch ends in an upper critical point. In the continuous transition branch, the critical properties are studied. The exponent associated to the amplitude of the order parameter is β=1/2, for various system sizes, in complete agreement with the experimental results. However, the fluctuations of χ_{4} do not show any critical behavior, probably due to crossover effects by the close presence of the tricritical point. Finally, in quasi-one-dimensional systems, the transition is only discontinuous, limited by one critical point, indicating that two is the lower dimension for having a tricritical point.

  5. Introduction to the critical and multicritical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, S.R.A.

    1982-09-01

    The behavior of matter in the neighborhood of simple critical points is treated. The concepts of critical exponents and universality is introduced and the classical theories of the critical behavior and the phenomenological scaling theories of the thermodynamic functions and the critical correlations are described. Finally, a description of the theory of the renormalization group, which gives the microscopic bases of the scaling laws is ended . Four types of multicritical points which have already been detected in solid crystals tricritical, bicritical, tetracritical, and Lifshitz points are studied. Landa's theory and the formulation of the scaling laws in the neighborhood of these points is described. Also, the main features of some theoretical models which produce multicritical points-the Ising metamagnet and BEG model, which exhibit tricritical points, and the ANNNI model, which exhibits a Lifshitz point are described. The renormalization group approach in the Fourier space to the Ising metamagnet, and the new techniques of partial differential aproximants to analyze the scaling behavior in the neighborhood of the multicritical points are presented. (Author) [pt

  6. Introduction to critical and multicritical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, S.R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The behavior of matter in the neighborhood of simple critical points is treated. The concepts of critical exponents and universality are introduced, and the classical theories of the critical behavior and the phenomenological scaling theories of the thermodynamic functions and the critical correlations are described. Finally the first part is ended with a discription of the theory of the renormalization group, which gives the microscopic bases of the scaling laws. In the second part of these notes four types of multicritical points which have already been detected in solid crystals; tricritical, bicritical, tetracritical, and Lifshitz points are studied. Landau's theory and the formulation of the scaling laws in the neighborhood of these points is described. The main features of some theoretical models which produce multicritical points - the Ising metamagnet and the BEG model which exhibit tricritical points, and the ANNNI model, which exhibits a Lifshitz point are also described. The renormalization group approach in the Fourier space to the Ising metamagnet, and the new techniques of partial differential approximants to analyze the scaling behavior in the neighborhood of the multicritical points is presented. (Author) [pt

  7. Developing Critical Thinking through the Study of Paranormal Phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesp, Richard; Montgomery, Kathleen

    1998-01-01

    Argues that accounts of paranormal phenomena can serve as an ideal medium in which to encourage students to develop critical-thinking skills. Describes a cooperative-learning approach used to teach critical thinking in a course on paranormal events. Reports that critical-thinking skills increased and that the course received favorable student…

  8. Introductory note on phase transitions and critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.N.

    1983-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the development of classical statistical mechanics, particularly the contributions of Gibbs. The author then turns to quantum mechanical formulations of phase transitions and critical phenomena, mentioning several seminal works

  9. Critical Phenomena of Rainfall in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Sh.; Vasquez, N.; Jacome, P.; Basile, L.

    2014-02-01

    Self-organized criticality (SOC) is characterized by a power law behavior over complex systems like earthquakes and avalanches. We study rainfall using data of one day, 3 hours and 10 min temporal resolution from INAMHI (Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia e Hidrologia) station at Izobamba, DMQ (Metropolitan District of Quito), satellite data over Ecuador from Tropical Rainfall Measure Mission (TRMM,) and REMMAQ (Red Metropolitana de Monitoreo Atmosferico de Quito) meteorological stations over, respectively. Our results show a power law behavior of the number of rain events versus mm of rainfall measured for the high resolution case (10 min), and as the resolution decreases this behavior gets lost. This statistical property is the fingerprint of a self-organized critical process (Peter and Christensen, 2002) and may serve as a benchmark for models of precipitation based in phase transitions between water vapor and precipitation (Peter and Neeling, 2006).

  10. Quantum critical phenomena and conformal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhe Chang.

    1995-05-01

    We show that the Abelian bosonization of continuum limit of the 1D Hubbard model corresponds to the 2D explicitly conformal invariant Gaussian model at weak coupling limit. A universality argument is used to extend the equivalence to an entire segment of the critical line of the strongly correlated electron system. An integral equation satisfied by the mapping function between critical lines of the 1D Hubbard model and 2D Gaussian model is obtained and then solved in some limiting cases. By making use of the fact that the free Hubbard system reduces to four fermions and each of them is related to a c = 1/2 conformal field theory, we present exactly the partition function of the Hubbard model on a finite 1D lattice. (author). 16 refs

  11. Critical phenomena and polymer coil-to-globule transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, B.; Xu Renliang; Wang Zhulun; Zuo Ju

    1988-01-01

    Small-angle scattering techniques including laser light scattering (LLS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) have been useful tools to measure the static and dynamic properties (in terms of critical fluctuations) of fluids, fluid mixtures, polymer and micellar solutions, polymer blends and metallic alloys. A brief review is given of recent results in critical-phenomena experiments using small-angle scattering techniques. Topics of current interest are pointed out, and a guide to the vast literature on critical opalescence is provided. Coil-to-globule transition in polymer solutions has been a classic experimental challenge over the past decade. In order to succeed in reaching the collapsed regime, it becomes important to realize that single coil contraction of a linear polymer molecule in solution takes place in the neighborhood of phase separations. By using the recent development of a small-angle light-scattering spectrometer and by taking advantage of a successful polymer fractionation experiment, the transition behavior of linear polystyrene in cyclohexane from the Θ state to the collapsed regime can be characterized based on both the radius of gyration and the hydrodynamic radius. (orig.)

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of laser shock phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Advanced Photon Research Center, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan).

    2001-10-01

    Recently, ultrashort-pulse lasers with high peak power have been developed, and their application to materials processing is expected as a tool of precision microfabrication. When a high power laser irradiates, a shock wave propagates into the material and dislocations are generated. In this paper, laser shock phenomena of the metal were analyzed using the modified molecular dynamics method, which has been developed by Ohmura and Fukumoto. The main results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The shock wave induced by the Gaussian beam irradiation propagates radially from the surface to the interior. (2) A lot of dislocations are generated at the solid-liquid interface by the propagation of a shock wave. (3) Some dislocations are moved instantaneously with the velocity of the longitudinal wave when the shock wave passes, and their velocity is not larger than the transverse velocity after the shock wave has passed. (author)

  13. Critical phenomena in magnetic vortex formation probed by noise spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, E.; Harii, K.; Miyajima, H.; Yamaoka, T.

    2004-01-01

    Transition between a vortex magnetic state and a uniform magnetic state in a Ni 81 Fe 19 mesoscopic ring has been investigated in terms of resistive-noise spectroscopy. The observed low-frequency noise exhibits critical enhancement around the magnetization saturation. This noise enhancement can be argued from the viewpoint of the critical phenomena due to the chiral-symmetry breakdown of mesoscopic magnetic-structure, which can present a typical mechanism of symmetry transition of magnetic structure in mesoscopic ferromagnets

  14. The theory of critical phenomena in two-dimensional systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olvera de la C, M.

    1981-01-01

    An exposition of the theory of critical phenomena in two-dimensional physical systems is presented. The first six chapters deal with the mean field theory of critical phenomena, scale invariance of the thermodynamic functions, Kadanoff's spin block construction, Wilson's renormalization group treatment of critical phenomena in configuration space, and the two-dimensional Ising model on a triangular lattice. The second part of this work is made of four chapters devoted to the application of the ideas expounded in the first part to the discussion of critical phenomena in superfluid films, two-dimensional crystals and the two-dimensional XY model of magnetic systems. Chapters seven to ten are devoted to the following subjects: analysis of long range order in one, two, and three-dimensional physical systems. Topological defects in the XY model, in superfluid films and in two-dimensional crystals. The Thouless-Kosterlitz iterated mean field theory of the dipole gas. The renormalization group treatment of the XY model, superfluid films and two-dimensional crystal. (author)

  15. Random walks, critical phenomena, and triviality in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, R.; Froehlich, J.; Sokal, A.D.

    1992-01-01

    The subject of this book is equilibrium statistical mechanics - in particular the theory of critical phenomena - and quantum field theory. A general review of the theory of critical phenomena in spin systems, field theories, and random-walk and random-surface models is presented. Among the more technical topics treated in this book, the central theme is the use of random-walk representations as a tool to derive correlation inequalities. The consequences of these inequalities for critical-exponent theory and the triviality question in quantum field theory are expounded in detail. The book contains some previously unpublished results. It addresses both the researcher and the graduate student in modern statistical mechanics and quantum field theory. (orig.)

  16. Critical point phenomena: universal physics at large length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, A.; Wallace, D.

    1993-01-01

    This article is concerned with the behaviour of a physical system at, or close to, a critical point (ebullition, ferromagnetism..): study of the phenomena displayed in the critical region (Ising model, order parameter, correlation length); description of the configurations (patterns) formed by the microscopic degrees of freedom near a critical point, essential concepts of the renormalization group (coarse-graining, system flow, fixed-point and scale-invariance); how these concepts knit together to form the renormalization group method; and what kind of problems may be resolved by the renormalization group method. 12 figs., 1 ref

  17. Nonlinear dynamical phenomena in liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.Y.; Sun, Z.M.

    1988-09-01

    Because of the existence of the orientational order and anisotropy in liquid crystals, strong nonlinear phenomena and singular behaviors, such as solitary wave, transient periodic structure, chaos, fractal and viscous fingering, can be excited by a very small disturbance. These phenomena and behaviors are in connection with physics, biology and mathematics. 12 refs, 6 figs

  18. Conformal field theory and 2D critical phenomena. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamolodchikov, A.B.; Zamolodchikov, Al.B.

    1989-01-01

    Review of the recent developments in the two-dimensional conformal field theory and especially its applications to the physics of 2D critical phenomena is given. It includes the Ising model, the Potts model. Minimal models, corresponding to theories invariant under higher symmetries, such as superconformal theories, parafermionic theories and theories with current and W-algebras are also discussed. Non-hamiltonian approach to two-dimensional field theory is formulated. 126 refs

  19. Universal role of correlation entropy in critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Shijian; Sun Changpu; Lin Haiqing

    2008-01-01

    In statistical physics, if we divide successively an equilibrium system into two parts, we will face a situation that, to a certain length ξ, the physics of a subsystem is no longer the same as the original one. The extensive property of the thermal entropy S(A union B) = S(A) + S(B) is then violated. This observation motivates us to introduce a concept of correlation entropy between two points, as measured by the mutual information in information theory, to study the critical phenomena. A rigorous relation is established to display some drastic features of the non-vanishing correlation entropy of a subsystem formed by any two distant particles with long-range correlation. This relation actually indicates a universal role played by the correlation entropy for understanding the critical phenomena. We also verify these analytical studies in terms of two well-studied models for both the thermal and quantum phase transitions: the two-dimensional Ising model and the one-dimensional transverse-field Ising model. Therefore, the correlation entropy provides us with a new physical intuition of the critical phenomena from the point of view of information theory

  20. Hyperchaotic phenomena in dynamic decision making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Mosekilde, Erik; Sterman, John David

    1992-01-01

    of this article is to show how the decision making behavior of real people in simulated corporate environments can lead to chaotic, hyperchaotic and higher-order hyperchaotic phenomena. Characteristics features of these complicated forms of behavior are analyzed with particular emphasis on an interesting form...

  1. Crossover phenomena in the critical range near magnetic ordering transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbler, U.

    2018-05-01

    Among the most important issues of Renormalization Group (RG) theory are crossover events and relevant (or non-relevant) interactions. These terms are unknown to atomistic theories but they will be decisive for future field theories of magnetism. In this experimental study the importance of these terms for the critical dynamics above and below magnetic ordering transition is demonstrated on account of new analyses of published data. When crossover events are overlooked and critical data are fitted by a single power function of temperature over a temperature range including a crossover event, imprecise critical exponents result. The rather unsystematic and floating critical exponents reported in literature seem largely to be due to this problem. It is shown that for appropriate data analyses critical exponents are obtained that are to a good approximation rational numbers. In fact, rational critical exponents can be expected when spin dynamics is controlled by the bosons of the continuous magnetic medium (Goldstone bosons). The bosons are essentially magnetic dipole radiation generated by the precessing spins. As a result of the here performed data analyses, critical exponents for the magnetic order parameter of β = 1/2, 1/3, 1/4 and 1/6 are obtained. For the critical paramagnetic susceptibility the exponents are γ = 1 and γ = 4/3.

  2. Parasitic phenomena in the dynamics of industrial devices

    CERN Document Server

    Borboni, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    In the real world the dynamic behavior of a real machine presents either unforeseen or limiting phenomena: both are undesired, and can be therefore be classified as parasitic phenomena - unwanted, unforeseen, or limiting behaviors. Parasitic Phenomena in the Dynamics of Industrial Devices describes the potential causes and effects of these behaviors and provides indications that could minimize their influence on the mechanical system in question. The authors introduce the phenomena and explore them through real cases, avoiding academic introductions, but inserting the entire academic and experimental knowledge that is useful to understand and solve real-world problems. They then examine these parasitic phenomena in the machine dynamics, using two cases that cover the classical cultural division between cam devices and mechanisms. They also present concrete cases with an amount of experimental data higher than the proposed ones and with a modern approach that can be applied to various mechanical devices, acqui...

  3. Development of INCTAC code for analyzing criticality accident phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitake, Susumu; Hayashi, Yamato; Sakurai, Shungo

    2003-01-01

    Aiming at understanding nuclear transients and thermal- and hydraulic-phenomena of the criticality accident, a code named INCTAC has been newly developed at the Institute of Nuclear Safety. The code is applicable to the analysis of criticality accident transients of aqueous homogenous fuel solution system. Neutronic transient model is composed of equations for the kinetics and for the spatial distributions, which are deduced from the time dependent multi-group transport equations with the quasi steady state assumption. Thermal-hydraulic transient model is composed of a complete set of the mass, momentum and energy equations together with the two-phase flow assumptions. Validation tests of INCTAC were made using the data obtained at TRACY, a transient experiment criticality facility of JAERI. The calculated results with INCTAC showed a very good agreement with the experiment data, except a slight discrepancy of the time when the peak of reactor power was attained. But, the discrepancy was resolved with the use of an adequate model for movement and transfer of the void in the fuel solution mostly generated by radiolysis. With a simulation model for the transport of radioactive materials through ventilation systems to the environment, INCTAC will be used as an overall safety evaluation code of the criticality accident. (author)

  4. Wilson's theory of critical phenomena. Higher order corrections to critical exponents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinn-Justin, J.

    1973-01-01

    The Wilson's theory of critical phenomena is presented, in the context of renormalized field theory in d dimension and of the Callan-Symanzik equations. This theory allows in particular to compute critical exponents that govern the behavior of some correlation functions near the critical temperature, as power series in epsilon=4-d, using the standard perturbation theory. Owing to the large value of the expansion parameter epsilon, whose physical value is one, it is very important to perform higher order calculations [fr

  5. Computational and experimental investigation of dynamic shock reflection phenomena

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, K

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available wedge are used to analyse dynamic flow field phenomena and response of the triple point below and within the dual solution domain. Computed, unsteady pressure traces on the reflection plane are also analysed...

  6. Critical phenomena at perfect and non-perfect surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleimling, M

    2004-01-01

    In the past, perfect surfaces have been shown to yield local critical behaviour that differs from bulk critical behaviour. On the other hand, surface defects, whether they are of natural origin or created artificially, are known to modify local quantities. It is therefore important to clarify whether these defects are relevant or irrelevant for the surface critical behaviour. The purpose of this review is two-fold. In the first part we summarize some of the important results on surface criticality at perfect surfaces. Special attention is thereby paid to new developments such as for example the study of the surface critical behaviour in systems with competing interactions or of surface critical dynamics. In the second part the effect of surface defects (presence of edges, steps, quenched randomness, lines of adatoms, regular geometric patterns) on local critical behaviour in semi-infinite systems and in thin films is discussed in detail. Whereas most of the defects commonly encountered are shown to be irrelevant, some notable exceptions are highlighted. It is shown furthermore that under certain circumstances non-universal local critical behaviour may be observed at surfaces. (topical review)

  7. Nonlinear dynamic phenomena in the beer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Laugesen, Jakob Lund

    2007-01-01

    The production-distribution system or "beer game" is one of the most well-known system dynamics models. Notorious for the complex dynamics it produces, the beer game has been used for nearly five decades to illustrate how structure generates behavior and to explore human decision making. Here we...

  8. Recent developments in the theory of critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, B.

    1974-01-01

    The work of Kadanoff, Wilson and Wegner, in the language of Euclidian field theory, is revised. In addition to Wilson's renormalization group method, which is based on the idea of eliminating short range fluctuations, the renormalization method of quantum field theory is discussed, which, in the present context, is called reparametrization (in order to avoid confusion). A reparametrization which is of particular interest in the theory of critical phenomena is the one which leads to scaling equations. New scaling equations which remain free of infrared divergences in two and three dimensions, are derived. The method allows a rather compact and unified discussion of Kadanoff's scaling laws and the related concept of global scaling fields, as well as the scale invariant correlation functions [pt

  9. Nonlinear structural mechanics theory, dynamical phenomena and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Lacarbonara, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear Structural Mechanics: Theory, Dynamical Phenomena and Modeling offers a concise, coherent presentation of the theoretical framework of nonlinear structural mechanics, computational methods, applications, parametric investigations of nonlinear phenomena and their mechanical interpretation towards design. The theoretical and computational tools that enable the formulation, solution, and interpretation of nonlinear structures are presented in a systematic fashion so as to gradually attain an increasing level of complexity of structural behaviors, under the prevailing assumptions on the geometry of deformation, the constitutive aspects and the loading scenarios. Readers will find a treatment of the foundations of nonlinear structural mechanics towards advanced reduced models, unified with modern computational tools in the framework of the prominent nonlinear structural dynamic phenomena while tackling both the mathematical and applied sciences. Nonlinear Structural Mechanics: Theory, Dynamical Phenomena...

  10. Nonlinear dynamics and chaotic phenomena an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K

    2014-01-01

    This book starts with a discussion of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, bifurcation theory and Hamiltonian dynamics. It then embarks on a systematic discussion of the traditional topics of modern nonlinear dynamics  -- integrable systems, Poincaré maps, chaos, fractals and strange attractors. The Baker’s transformation, the logistic map and Lorenz system are discussed in detail in view of their central place in the subject. There is a detailed discussion of solitons centered around the Korteweg-deVries equation in view of its central place in integrable systems. Then, there is a discussion of the Painlevé property of nonlinear differential equations which seems to provide a test of integrability. Finally, there is a detailed discussion of the application of fractals and multi-fractals to fully-developed turbulence -- a problem whose understanding has been considerably enriched by the application of the concepts and methods of modern nonlinear dynamics. On the application side, there is a special...

  11. Phenomena, dynamics and instabilities of vortex pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, C H K; Asselin, D J; Leweke, T; Harris, D M

    2014-01-01

    Our motivation for studying the dynamics of vortex pairs stems initially from an interest in the trailing wake vortices from aircraft and the dynamics of longitudinal vortices close to a vehicle surface. However, our motivation also comes from the fact that vortex–vortex interactions and vortex–wall interactions are fundamental to many turbulent flows. The intent of the paper is to present an overview of some of our recent work concerning the formation and structure of counter-rotating vortex pairs. We are interested in the long-wave and short-wave three-dimensional instabilities that evolve for an isolated vortex pair, but also we would like to know how vortex pairs interact with a wall, including both two-dimensional interactions, and also the influence of the surface on the three-dimensional instabilities. The emphasis of this presentation is on physical mechanisms by which vortices interact with each other and with surfaces, principally from an experimental approach, but also coupled with analytical studies. (paper)

  12. Emergence of dynamical order synchronization phenomena in complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Manrubia, Susanna C; Zanette, Damián H

    2004-01-01

    Synchronization processes bring about dynamical order and lead tospontaneous development of structural organization in complex systemsof various origins, from chemical oscillators and biological cells tohuman societies and the brain. This book provides a review and adetailed theoretical analysis of synchronization phenomena in complexsystems with different architectures, composed of elements withperiodic or chaotic individual dynamics. Special attention is paid tostatistical concepts, such as nonequilibrium phase transitions, orderparameters and dynamical glasses.

  13. Universality classes and critical phenomena in confined liquid systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Chalyi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the similar universal behavior of infinite-size (bulk systems of different nature requires the same basic conditions: space dimensionality; number components of order parameter; the type (short- or long-range of the intermolecular interaction; symmetry of the fluctuation part of thermodynamical potential. Basic conditions of similar universal behavior of confined systems needs the same supplementary conditions such as the number of monolayers for a system confinement; low crossover dimensionality, i.e., geometric form of restricted volume; boundary conditions on limiting surfaces; physical properties under consideration. This review paper is aimed at studying all these conditions of similar universal behavior for diffusion processes in confined liquid systems. Special attention was paid to the effects of spatial dispersion and low crossover dimensionality. This allowed us to receive receiving correct nonzero expressions for the diffusion coefficient at the critical point and to take into account the specific geometric form of the confined liquid volume. The problem of 3D⇔2D dimensional crossover was analyzed. To receive a smooth crossover for critical exponents, the Kawasaki-like approach from the theory of mode coupling in critical dynamics was proposed. This ensured a good agreement between data of computer experiment and theoretical calculations of the size dependence of the critical temperature Tc(H of water in slitlike pores. The width of the quasi-elastic scattering peak of slow neutrons near the structural phase transition in the aquatic suspensions of plasmatic membranes (mesostructures with the typical thickness up to 10 nm was studied. It was shown that the width of quasi-elastic peak of neutron scattering decreases due to the process of cell proliferation, i.e., with an increase of the membrane size (including the membrane thickness. Thus, neutron studies could serve as an additional diagnostic test for the

  14. Experimental study on dynamic buckling phenomena for supercavitating underwater vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minho Chung

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic buckling, also known as parametric resonance, is one of the dynamic instability phenomena which may lead to catastrophic failure of structures. It occurs when compressive dynamic loading is applied to the structures. Therefore it is essential to establish a reliable procedure to test and evaluate the dynamic buckling behaviors of structures, especially when the structure is designed to be utilized in compressive dynamic loading environment, such as supercavitating underwater vehicle. In the line of thought, a dynamic buckling test system is designed in this work. Using the test system, dynamic buckling tests including beam, plate, and stiffened plate are carried out, and the dynamic buckling characteristics of considered structures are investigated experimentally as well as theoretically and numerically.

  15. Maxwell Prize Talk: Scaling Laws for the Dynamical Plasma Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryutov, Livermore, Ca 94550, Usa, D. D.

    2017-10-01

    The scaling and similarity technique is a powerful tool for developing and testing reduced models of complex phenomena, including plasma phenomena. The technique has been successfully used in identifying appropriate simplified models of transport in quasistationary plasmas. In this talk, the similarity and scaling arguments will be applied to highly dynamical systems, in which temporal evolution of the plasma leads to a significant change of plasma dimensions, shapes, densities, and other parameters with respect to initial state. The scaling and similarity techniques for dynamical plasma systems will be presented as a set of case studies of problems from various domains of the plasma physics, beginning with collisonless plasmas, through intermediate collisionalities, to highly collisional plasmas describable by the single-fluid MHD. Basic concepts of the similarity theory will be introduced along the way. Among the results discussed are: self-similarity of Langmuir turbulence driven by a hot electron cloud expanding into a cold background plasma; generation of particle beams in disrupting pinches; interference between collisionless and collisional phenomena in the shock physics; similarity for liner-imploded plasmas; MHD similarities with an emphasis on the effect of small-scale (turbulent) structures on global dynamics. Relations between astrophysical phenomena and scaled laboratory experiments will be discussed.

  16. Dynamical system analysis of unstable flow phenomena in centrifugal blower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia David

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Methods of dynamical system analysis were employed to analyze unsteady phenomena in a centrifugal blower. Pressure signals gathered at different control points were decomposed into their Principal Components (PCs by means of Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA. Certain number of PCs was considered in the analysis based on their statistical correlation. Projection of the original signal onto its PCs allowed to draw the phase trajectory that clearly separated non-stable blower working conditions from its regular operation.

  17. Two-dimensional fractal geometry, critical phenomena and conformal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplantier, B.

    1988-01-01

    The universal properties of critical geometrical systems in two-dimensions (2D) like the O (n) and Potts models, are described in the framework of Coulomb gas methods and conformal invariance. The conformal spectrum of geometrical critical systems obtained is made of a discrete infinite series of scaling dimensions. Specific applications involve the fractal properties of self-avoiding walks, percolation clusters, and also some non trivial critical exponents or fractal dimensions associated with subsets of the planar Brownian motion. The statistical mechanics of the same critical models on a random 2D lattice (namely in presence of a critically-fluctuating metric, in the so-called 2D quantum gravity) is also addressed, and the above critical geometrical systems are shown to be exactly solvable in this case. The new ''gravitational'' conformal spectrum so derived is found to satisfy the recent Knizhnik, Polyakov and Zamolodchikov quadratic relation which links it to the standard conformal spectrum in the plane

  18. Marginalism, quasi-marginalism and critical phenomena in micellar solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reatto, L.

    1986-01-01

    The observed nonuniversal critical behaviour of some micellar solutions is interpreted in terms of quasi-marginalism, i.e. the presence of a coupling which scales with an exponent very close to the spatial dimensionality. This can give rise to a preasymptotic region with varying effective critical exponents with a final crossover to the Ising ones. The reduced crossover temperature is estimated to be below 10 -6 . The exponents β and γ measured in C 12 e 5 are in good agreement with the scaling law expected to hold for the effective exponents. The model considered by Shnidman is found unable to explain the nonuniversal critical behaviour

  19. SANS studies of critical phenomena in ternary mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Bulavyn, L A; Hohryakov, A; Garamus, V; Avdeev, M; Almasy, L

    2002-01-01

    Critical behaviour of a quasi-binary liquid mixture is investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. Analysis of the changes of the critical parameters, caused by addition of a small amount of electrolyte into the binary mixture 3-methylpyridine-heavy water, shows that the third component does not change the 3D Ising-type behaviour of the system; a crossover towards the mean-field behaviour is not observed. (orig.)

  20. Slow dynamics at critical points: the field-theoretical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambassi, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics at a critical point provides a simple instance of slow collective evolution, characterised by aging phenomena and by a violation of the fluctuation-dissipation relation even for long times. By virtue of the universality in critical phenomena it is possible to provide quantitative predictions for some aspects of these behaviours by field-theoretical methods. We review some of the theoretical results that have been obtained in recent years for the relevant (universal) quantities, such as the fluctuation-dissipation ratio, associated with the non-equilibrium critical dynamics

  1. Quantitative physical models of volcanic phenomena for hazards assessment of critical infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic hazards may have destructive effects on economy, transport, and natural environments at both local and regional scale. Hazardous phenomena include pyroclastic density currents, tephra fall, gas emissions, lava flows, debris flows and avalanches, and lahars. Volcanic hazards assessment is based on available information to characterize potential volcanic sources in the region of interest and to determine whether specific volcanic phenomena might reach a given site. Volcanic hazards assessment is focussed on estimating the distances that volcanic phenomena could travel from potential sources and their intensity at the considered site. Epistemic and aleatory uncertainties strongly affect the resulting hazards assessment. Within the context of critical infrastructures, volcanic eruptions are rare natural events that can create severe hazards. In addition to being rare events, evidence of many past volcanic eruptions is poorly preserved in the geologic record. The models used for describing the impact of volcanic phenomena generally represent a range of model complexities, from simplified physics based conceptual models to highly coupled thermo fluid dynamical approaches. Modelling approaches represent a hierarchy of complexity, which reflects increasing requirements for well characterized data in order to produce a broader range of output information. In selecting models for the hazard analysis related to a specific phenomenon, questions that need to be answered by the models must be carefully considered. Independently of the model, the final hazards assessment strongly depends on input derived from detailed volcanological investigations, such as mapping and stratigraphic correlations. For each phenomenon, an overview of currently available approaches for the evaluation of future hazards will be presented with the aim to provide a foundation for future work in developing an international consensus on volcanic hazards assessment methods.

  2. Critical Phenomena of the Disorder Driven Localization-Delocalization Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marc Ruehlaender

    2001-01-01

    Metal-to-insulator transitions are generally linked to two phenomena: electron-electron correlations and disorder. Although real systems are usually responding to a mixture of both, they can be classified as undergoing a Mott-transition, if the former process dominates, or an Anderson-transition, if the latter dominates. High-T c superconductors, e.g., are a candidate for the first class. Materials in which disorder drives the metal-to-insulator transition include doped semiconductors and amorphous materials. After briefly reviewing the previous research on transport in disordered materials and the disorder-induced metal-to-insulator transition, a summary of the model and the methods used in subsequent chapters is given

  3. Bifurcation phenomena in internal dynamics of gear systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hortel M.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact effects in gear mesh represent specific phenomena in the dynamic investigation of highspeed light transmission systems with kinematic couplings. They are caused of greater dynamic than static elastic deformations in meshing gear profiles. In term of internal dynamics they are influenced among others by time heteronomous stiffness functions in gear mesh and resonance tuning of stiffness level. The damping in gear mesh and in gear system is concerned significantly in the amplitude progress, greatness and phase shift of relative motion towards stiffness function alternatively towards its modify form in gear mesh. In consequence of these and another actions rise above resonance characteristics certain singular locations with jump amplitude course.

  4. Scattering of neutrons and critical phenomena in antiferromagnetic fermi liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhiezer, I.A.; Barannik, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of slow neutrons in an antiferromagnetic with collectivized magnetic electrons is considered and it is shown to significantly differ from the neutron scattering in an antiferromagnetic with localized magnetic electrons. The behaviour of scattering cross sections and fluctuation correlators near the Neel point is studied. These magnitudes are shown to increase with the critical index r=-1 [ru

  5. Type II critical phenomena of neutron star collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, Scott C.; Choptuik, Matthew W.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate spherically symmetric, general relativistic systems of collapsing perfect fluid distributions. We consider neutron star models that are driven to collapse by the addition of an initially 'ingoing' velocity profile to the nominally static star solution. The neutron star models we use are Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff solutions with an initially isentropic, gamma law equation of state. The initial values of (1) the amplitude of the velocity profile, and (2) the central density of the star, span a parameter space, and we focus only on that region that gives rise to type II critical behavior, wherein black holes of arbitrarily small mass can be formed. In contrast to previously published work, we find that--for a specific value of the adiabatic index (Γ=2)--the observed type II critical solution has approximately the same scaling exponent as that calculated for an ultrarelativistic fluid of the same index. Further, we find that the critical solution computed using the ideal-gas equations of state asymptotes to the ultrarelativistic critical solution.

  6. Causal relations among events and states in dynamic geographical phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhaoqiang; Feng, Xuezhi; Xuan, Wenling; Chen, Xiuwan

    2007-06-01

    There is only a static state of the real world to be recorded in conventional geographical information systems. However, there is not only static information but also dynamic information in geographical phenomena. So that how to record the dynamic information and reveal the relations among dynamic information is an important issue in a spatio-temporal information system. From an ontological perspective, we can initially divide the spatio-temporal entities in the world into continuants and occurrents. Continuant entities endure through some extended (although possibly very short) interval of time (e.g., houses, roads, cities, and real-estate). Occurrent entities happen and are then gone (e.g., a house repair job, road construction project, urban expansion, real-estate transition). From an information system perspective, continuants and occurrents that have a unique identity in the system are referred to as objects and events, respectively. And the change is represented implicitly by static snapshots in current spatial temporal information systems. In the previous models, the objects can be considered as the fundamental components of the system, and the change is modeled by considering time-varying attributes of these objects. In the spatio-temporal database, the temporal information that is either interval or instant is involved and the underlying data structures and indexes for temporal are considerable investigated. However, there is the absence of explicit ways of considering events, which affect the attributes of objects or the state. So the research issue of this paper focuses on how to model events in conceptual models of dynamic geographical phenomena and how to represent the causal relations among events and the objects or states. Firstly, the paper reviews the conceptual modeling in a temporal GIS by researchers. Secondly, this paper discusses the spatio-temporal entities: objects and events. Thirdly, this paper investigates the causal relations amongst

  7. Search for critical phenomena in Pb - Pb collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kopytine, Mikhail L.; Boggild, H.; Boissevain, J.; Conin, L.; Dodd, J.; Erazmus, B.; Esumi, S.; Fabjan, C.W.; Ferenc, D.; Fields, D.E.; Franz, A.; Gaardhoje, J.J.; Hansen, A.G.; Hansen, O.; Hardtke, D.; Van Hecke, H.; Holzer, E.B.; Humanic, T.J.; Hummel, P.; Jacak, B.V.; Jayanti, R.; Kaimi, K.; Kaneta, M.; Kohama, T.; Leltchouk, M.; Ljubicic, A., Jr.; Lorstad, B.; Maeda, N.; Martin, L.; Medvedev, A.; Murray, M.; Ohnishi, H.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S.U.; Piuz, F.; Pluta, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Potekhin, M.; Poulard, G.; Reichhold, D.; Sakaguchi, A.; Schmidt-Sorensen, J.; Simon-Gillo, J.; Sondheim, W.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J.P.; Sumi, Y.; Willis, W.J.; Wolf, K.L.; Xu, N.; Zachary, D.S.; Kopytine, Mikhail

    2001-01-01

    NA44 uses a 512 channel Si pad array covering $1.5 <\\eta < 3.3$ to study charged hadron production in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS. We apply a multiresolution analysis, based on a Discrete Wavelet Transformation, to probe the texture of particle distributions event-by-event, by simultaneous localization of features in space and scale. Scanning a broad range of multiplicities, we look for a possible critical behaviour in the power spectra of local density fluctuations. The data are compared with detailed simulations of detector response, using heavy ion event generators, and with a reference sample created via event mixing.

  8. Critical crossover phenomena in compatible polymer blends studied with SANS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwahn, D.; Janssen, S.; Willner, L.

    1995-01-01

    Polymer blends show a much larger 3d-Ising regime, e.g. a much larger Ginzburg number Gi than predicted by the Ginzburg criterion. This discrepancy is supposed to be explained by the compressibility or the free volume of the blend. In this paper we present and discuss the Gi number of polymer...... on monomeric microstructure and on pressure. This clearly shows that Gi is not a universal function. The observed strong decrease of Gi with pressure is a clear experimental proof that the critical crossover behaviour in polymer blends is indeed strongly influenced by the compressibility or free volume...

  9. Thermal dynamics of thermoelectric phenomena from frequency resolved methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. García-Cañadas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamics of thermoelectric (TE phenomena is important for the detailed knowledge of the operation of TE materials and devices. By analyzing the impedance response of both a single TE element and a TE device under suspended conditions, we provide new insights into the thermal dynamics of these systems. The analysis is performed employing parameters such as the thermal penetration depth, the characteristic thermal diffusion frequency and the thermal diffusion time. It is shown that in both systems the dynamics of the thermoelectric response is governed by how the Peltier heat production/absorption at the junctions evolves. In a single thermoelement, at high frequencies the thermal waves diffuse semi-infinitely from the junctions towards the half-length. When the frequency is reduced, the thermal waves can penetrate further and eventually reach the half-length where they start to cancel each other and further penetration is blocked. In the case of a TE module, semi-infinite thermal diffusion along the thickness of the ceramic layers occurs at the highest frequencies. As the frequency is decreased, heat storage in the ceramics becomes dominant and starts to compete with the diffusion of the thermal waves towards the half-length of the thermoelements. Finally, the cancellation of the waves occurs at the lowest frequencies. It is demonstrated that the analysis is able to identify and separate the different physical processes and to provide a detailed understanding of the dynamics of different thermoelectric effects.

  10. Geometrical critical phenomena on a random surface of arbitrary genus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplantier, B.; Kostov, I.K.

    1990-01-01

    The statistical mechanics of self-avoiding walks (SAW) or of the O(n)-loop model on a two-dimensional random surface are shown to be exactly solvable. The partition functions of SAW and surface configurations (possibly in the presence of vacuum loops) are calculated by planar diagram enumeration techniques. Two critical regimes are found: a dense phase where the infinite walks and loops fill the infinite surface, the non-filled part staying finite, and a dilute phase where the infinite surface singularity on the one hand, and walk and loop singularities on the other, merge together. The configuration critical exponents of self-avoiding networks of any fixed topology G, on a surface with arbitrary genus H, are calculated as universal functions of G and H. For self-avoiding walks, the exponents are built from an infinite set of basic conformal dimensions associated with central charges c = -2 (dense phase) and c = 0 (dilute phase). The conformal spectrum Δ L , L ≥ 1 associated with L-leg star polymers is calculated exactly, for c = -2 and c = 0. This is generalized to the set of L-line 'watermelon' exponents Δ L of the O(n) model on a random surface. The divergences of the partition functions of self-avoiding networks on the random surface, possibly in the presence of vacuum loops, are shown to satisfy a factorization theorem over the vertices of the network. This provides a proof, in the presence of a fluctuating metric, of a result conjectured earlier in the standard plane. From this, the value of the string susceptibility γ str (H,c) is extracted for a random surface of arbitrary genus H, bearing a field theory of central charge c, or equivalently, embedded in d=c dimensions. Lastly, by enumerating spanning trees on a random lattice, we solve the similar problem of hamiltonian walks on the (fluctuating) Manhattan covering lattice. We also obtain new results for dilute trees on a random surface. (orig./HSI)

  11. Dynamic critical behaviour and scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezoguz, B.E.

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally the scaling is the property of dynamical systems at thermal equilibrium. In second order phase transitions scaling behaviour is due to the infinite correlation length around the critical point. In first order phase transitions however, the correlation length remains finite and a different type of scaling can be observed. For first order phase transitions all singularities are governed by the volume of the system. Recently, a different type of scaling, namely dynamic scaling has attracted attention in second order phase transitions. In dynamic scaling, when a system prepared at high temperature is quenched to the critical temperature, it exhibits scaling behaviour. Dynamic scaling has been applied to various spin systems and the validity of the arguments are shown. Firstly, in this thesis project the dynamic scaling is applied to 4-dimensional using spin system which exhibits second order phase transition with mean-field critical indices. Secondly, it is shown that although the dynamic is quite different, first order phase transitions also has a different type of dynamic scaling

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of drops and bubbles and chaotic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Eugene H.; Leal, L. G.; Feng, Z. C.; Holt, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Nonlinear phenomena associated with the dynamics of free drops and bubbles are investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. Although newly developed levitation and measurement techniques have been implemented, the full experimental validation of theoretical predictions has been hindered by interfering artifacts associated with levitation in the Earth gravitational field. The low gravity environment of orbital space flight has been shown to provide a more quiescent environment which can be utilized to better match the idealized theoretical conditions. The research effort described in this paper is a closely coupled collaboration between predictive and guiding theoretical activities and a unique experimental program involving the ultrasonic and electrostatic levitation of single droplets and bubbles. The goal is to develop and to validate methods based on nonlinear dynamics for the understanding of the large amplitude oscillatory response of single drops and bubbles to both isotropic and asymmetric pressure stimuli. The first specific area on interest has been the resonant coupling between volume and shape oscillatory modes isolated gas or vapor bubbles in a liquid host. The result of multiple time-scale asymptotic treatment, combined with domain perturbation and bifurcation methods, has been the prediction of resonant and near-resonant coupling between volume and shape modes leading to stable as well as chaotic oscillations. Experimental investigations of the large amplitude shape oscillation modes of centimeter-size single bubbles trapped in water at 1 G and under reduced hydrostatic pressure, have suggested the possibility of a low gravity experiment to study the direct coupling between these low frequency shape modes and the volume pulsation, sound-radiating mode. The second subject of interest has involved numerical modeling, using the boundary integral method, of the large amplitude shape oscillations of charged and uncharged drops in the presence

  13. Critical dynamics in population vaccinating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pananos, A Demetri; Bury, Thomas M; Wang, Clara; Schonfeld, Justin; Mohanty, Sharada P; Nyhan, Brendan; Salathé, Marcel; Bauch, Chris T

    2017-12-26

    Vaccine refusal can lead to renewed outbreaks of previously eliminated diseases and even delay global eradication. Vaccinating decisions exemplify a complex, coupled system where vaccinating behavior and disease dynamics influence one another. Such systems often exhibit critical phenomena-special dynamics close to a tipping point leading to a new dynamical regime. For instance, critical slowing down (declining rate of recovery from small perturbations) may emerge as a tipping point is approached. Here, we collected and geocoded tweets about measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and classified their sentiment using machine-learning algorithms. We also extracted data on measles-related Google searches. We find critical slowing down in the data at the level of California and the United States in the years before and after the 2014-2015 Disneyland, California measles outbreak. Critical slowing down starts growing appreciably several years before the Disneyland outbreak as vaccine uptake declines and the population approaches the tipping point. However, due to the adaptive nature of coupled behavior-disease systems, the population responds to the outbreak by moving away from the tipping point, causing "critical speeding up" whereby resilience to perturbations increases. A mathematical model of measles transmission and vaccine sentiment predicts the same qualitative patterns in the neighborhood of a tipping point to greatly reduced vaccine uptake and large epidemics. These results support the hypothesis that population vaccinating behavior near the disease elimination threshold is a critical phenomenon. Developing new analytical tools to detect these patterns in digital social data might help us identify populations at heightened risk of widespread vaccine refusal. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  14. Quantum dynamical phenomena of independent electrons in semiconductor superlattices subject to a uniform electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Bloch oscillations and other dynamical phenomena of electrons in semiconductor superlattices; solvable dynamical model of an electron in a one-dimensional aperiodic lattice subject to a uniform electric field; and quantum dynamical phenomena of electrons in aperiodic semiconductor superlattices

  15. Soft-Cliff Retreat, Self-Organized Critical Phenomena in the Limit of Predictability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Carlos; Godoy, Clara; Castedo, Ricardo

    2015-03-01

    The coastal erosion along the world's coastlines is a natural process that occurs through the actions of marine and subaerial physico-chemical phenomena, waves, tides, and currents. The development of cliff erosion predictive models is limited due to the complex interactions between environmental processes and material properties over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. As a result of this erosive action, gravity driven mass movements occur and the coastline moves inland. Like other studied earth natural and synthetically modelled phenomena characterized as self-organized critical (SOC), the recession of the cliff has a seemingly random, sporadic behavior, with a wide range of yearly recession rate values probabilistically distributed by a power-law. Usually, SOC systems are defined by a number of scaling features in the size distribution of its parameters and on its spatial and/or temporal pattern. Particularly, some previous studies of derived parameters from slope movements catalogues, have allowed detecting certain SOC features in this phenomenon, which also shares the recession of cliffs. Due to the complexity of the phenomenon and, as for other natural processes, there is no definitive model of recession of coastal cliffs. In this work, various analysis techniques have been applied to identify SOC features in the distribution and pattern to a particular case: the Holderness shoreline. This coast is a great case study to use when examining coastal processes and the structures associated with them. It is one of World's fastest eroding coastlines (2 m/yr in average, max observed 22 m/yr). Cliffs, ranging from 2 m up to 35 m in height, and made up of glacial tills, mainly compose this coast. It is this soft boulder clay that is being rapidly eroded and where coastline recession measurements have been recorded by the Cliff Erosion Monitoring Program (East Riding of Yorkshire Council, UK). The original database has been filtered by grouping contiguous

  16. Stochastic light-cone CTMRG: a new DMRG approach to stochastic models 02.50.Ey Stochastic processes; 64.60.Ht Dynamic critical phenomena; 02.70.-c Computational techniques; 05.10.Cc Renormalization group methods;

    CERN Document Server

    Kemper, A; Nishino, T; Schadschneider, A; Zittartz, J

    2003-01-01

    We develop a new variant of the recently introduced stochastic transfer matrix DMRG which we call stochastic light-cone corner-transfer-matrix DMRG (LCTMRG). It is a numerical method to compute dynamic properties of one-dimensional stochastic processes. As suggested by its name, the LCTMRG is a modification of the corner-transfer-matrix DMRG, adjusted by an additional causality argument. As an example, two reaction-diffusion models, the diffusion-annihilation process and the branch-fusion process are studied and compared with exact data and Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the capability and accuracy of the new method. The number of possible Trotter steps of more than 10 sup 5 shows a considerable improvement on the old stochastic TMRG algorithm.

  17. Critical thinking of destabilizing interpretations of events and phenomena: the role of economic sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Тетяна Андріївна Непокупна

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the global transformations and their impact on the main society life; the specifics of modern interpretations of events and phenomena, their destabilizing effects on behavior, health and life of humans; the role of economic sciences in the formation of critical thinking as a means of combating ignorance and propaganda, formation of an objective world view that grounded on knowledge

  18. Data collapse and critical dynamics in neuronal avalanche data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas; Friedman, Nir; Dahmen, Karin; Beggs, John; Deville, Lee; Ito, Shinya

    2012-02-01

    The tasks of information processing, computation, and response to stimuli require neural computation to be remarkably flexible and diverse. To optimally satisfy the demands of neural computation, neuronal networks have been hypothesized to operate near a non-equilibrium critical point. In spite of their importance for neural dynamics, experimental evidence for critical dynamics has been primarily limited to power law statistics that can also emerge from non-critical mechanisms. By tracking the firing of large numbers of synaptically connected cortical neurons and comparing the resulting data to the predictions of critical phenomena, we show that cortical tissues in vitro can function near criticality. Among the most striking predictions of critical dynamics is that the mean temporal profiles of avalanches of widely varying durations are quantitatively described by a single universal scaling function (data collapse). We show for the first time that this prediction is confirmed in neuronal networks. We also show that the data have three additional features predicted by critical phenomena: approximate power law distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, samples in subcritical and supercritical phases, and scaling laws between anomalous exponents.

  19. Connectivity: a primer in phase transitions and critical phenomena for students of particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    This introduction to the phase transitions and critical phenomena focuses on the theme of connectivity, and illustrates concepts with a paradigm of connectivity, such as the percolation problem. The phenomenon of bond percolation, where a finite section of ''fence'' has both conducting and insulating links, is described. Three approaches to the study of connectivity phenomena are described: exact enumeration procedures, Monte Carlo simulation, and renormalization groups. Exact enumeration probabilities are calculated. Lattice animals are discussed. Computer simulation is described as simple: assign random numbers, then design algorithms that recognize clusters. The Monte Carlo simulations have not lead to higher accuracy in predicting critical exponents, but have given a graphic illustration of what a million-site cluster looks like. The incipient infinite cluster can also be described. In this case, the magnetic correlations of a dilute magnetic system will spread along the ''backbone bonds'' rather than by ''dangling ends.'' Renormalization group approaches are also treated. Finally, relations between connectivity and models of critical thermal phenomena such as the Ising Model, the Potts model, and polychromatic generalization of the Potts Model, are discussed

  20. Systematic approach to critical phenomena by the extended variational method and coherent-anomaly method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, N.; Katori, M.; Tsallis, C.; Suzuki, M.

    1989-01-01

    A general procedure to study critical phenomena of magnetic systems is discussed. It consists of systematic series of Landau-like approximations (Extended Variational Method) and the coherent-anomaly method (CAM). As for susceptibility, the present method is equivalent to the power-series CAM theory. On the other hand, the EVM gives a set of new approximants for other physical quantities. Applications to d-dimensional Ising ferromagnets are also described. The critical points and exponents are estimated with high accuracy. (author) [pt

  1. Critical Phenomena in Higher Curvature Charged AdS Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Lala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied the critical phenomena in higher curvature charged AdS black holes. We have considered Lovelock-Born-Infeld-AdS black hole as an example. The thermodynamics of the black hole have been studied which reveals the onset of a higher-order phase transition in the black hole in the canonical ensemble (fixed charge ensemble framework. We have analytically derived the critical exponents associated with these thermodynamic quantities. We find that our results fit well with the thermodynamic scaling laws and consistent with the mean field theory approximation. The suggestive values of the other two critical exponents associated with the correlation function and correlation length on the critical surface have been derived.

  2. Superaging and Subaging Phenomena in a Nonequilibrium Critical Behavior of the Structurally Disordered Two-Dimensional XY Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Popov, I. S.

    2018-03-01

    A Monte Carlo numerical simulation of the specific features of nonequilibrium critical behavior is carried out for the two-dimensional structurally disordered XY model during its evolution from a low-temperature initial state. On the basis of the analysis of the two-time dependence of autocorrelation functions and dynamic susceptibility for systems with spin concentrations of p = 1.0, 0.9, and 0.6, aging phenomena characterized by a slowing down of the relaxation system with increasing waiting time and the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT) are revealed. The values of the universal limiting fluctuation-dissipation ratio (FDR) are obtained for the systems considered. As a result of the analysis of the two-time scaling dependence for spin-spin and connected spin autocorrelation functions, it is found that structural defects lead to subaging phenomena in the behavior of the spin-spin autocorrelation function and superaging phenomena in the behavior of the connected spin autocorrelation function.

  3. Basic tasks for improving spectral-acoustic forecasting of dynamic phenomena in coal mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrin, A. V.; Kontrimas, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    A number of tasks for improving the spectral-acoustic method for forecasting dynamic phenomena and controlling stress condition in coalmines is considered. They are: considering the influence of a gas factor on the danger indicator, dependence of a relative pressure coefficient on the distance between the source and the receiver of the probing acoustic signal, correct selection of operating frequencies, the importance of developing the techniques for defining the critical value of the outburst danger index The influence of the rock mass stress condition ahead of the preliminary opening face on the relative pressure coefficient defined for installing the sound receiver in the wall of the opening behind the opening face is also justified in the article.

  4. Universal Critical Dynamics in High Resolution Neuronal Avalanche Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Nir; Ito, Shinya; Brinkman, Braden A. W.; Shimono, Masanori; DeVille, R. E. Lee; Dahmen, Karin A.; Beggs, John M.; Butler, Thomas C.

    2012-05-01

    The tasks of neural computation are remarkably diverse. To function optimally, neuronal networks have been hypothesized to operate near a nonequilibrium critical point. However, experimental evidence for critical dynamics has been inconclusive. Here, we show that the dynamics of cultured cortical networks are critical. We analyze neuronal network data collected at the individual neuron level using the framework of nonequilibrium phase transitions. Among the most striking predictions confirmed is that the mean temporal profiles of avalanches of widely varying durations are quantitatively described by a single universal scaling function. We also show that the data have three additional features predicted by critical phenomena: approximate power law distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, samples in subcritical and supercritical phases, and scaling laws between anomalous exponents.

  5. Broken dynamical symmetries in quantum mechanics and phase transition phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, N.J.

    1979-12-01

    This thesis describes applications of dynamical symmetries to problems in quantum mechanics and many-body physics where the latter is formulated as a Euclidean scalar field theory in d-space dimensions. By invoking the concept of a dynamical symmetry group a unified understanding of apparently disparate results is achieved. (author)

  6. Theory of critical phenomena in finite-size systems scaling and quantum effects

    CERN Document Server

    Brankov, Jordan G; Tonchev, Nicholai S

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this book is to familiarise the reader with the rich collection of ideas, methods and results available in the theory of critical phenomena in systems with confined geometry. The existence of universal features of the finite-size effects arising due to highly correlated classical or quantum fluctuations is explained by the finite-size scaling theory. This theory (1) offers an interpretation of experimental results on finite-size effects in real systems; (2) gives the most reliable tool for extrapolation to the thermodynamic limit of data obtained by computer simulations; (3) reveals

  7. Paranormal phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaina, Alex

    1996-08-01

    Critical analysis is given of some paranormal phenomena events (UFO, healers, psychokinesis (telekinesis))reported in Moldova. It is argued that correct analysis of paranormal phenomena should be made in the framework of electromagnetism.

  8. PREFACE: Dynamic crossover phenomena in water and other glass-forming liquids Dynamic crossover phenomena in water and other glass-forming liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2012-02-01

    This special section has been inspired by the workshop on Dynamic Crossover Phenomena in Water and Other Glass-Forming Liquids, held during November 11-13, 2010 at Pensione Bencistà, Fiesole, Italy, a well-preserved 14th century Italian villa tucked high in the hills overlooking Florence. The meeting, an assembly of world renowned scientists, was organized as a special occasion to celebrate the 75th birthday of Professor Sow-Hsin Chen of MIT, a pioneer in several aspects of complex fluids and soft matter physics. The workshop covered a large variety of experimental and theoretical research topics of current interest related to dynamic crossover phenomena in water and, more generally, in other glass-forming liquids. The 30 invited speakers/lecturers and approximately 60 participants were a select group of prominent physicists and chemists from the USA, Europe, Asia and Mexico, who are actively working in the field. Some highlights of this special issue include the following works. Professor Yamaguchi's group and their collaborators present a neutron spin echo study of the coherent intermediate scattering function of heavy water confined in cylindrical pores of MCM-41-C10 silica material in the temperature range 190-298 K. They clearly show that a fragile-to-strong (FTS) dynamic crossover occurs at about 225 K. They attribute the FTS dynamic crossover to the formation of a tetrahedral-like structure, which is preserved in the bulk-like water confined to the central part of the cylindrical pores. Mamontov and Kolesnikov et al study the collective excitations in an aqueous solution of lithium chloride over a temperature range of 205-270 K using neutron and x-ray Rayleigh-Brillouin (coherent) scattering. They detect both the low-frequency and the high-frequency sounds known to exist in pure bulk water above the melting temperature. They also perform neutron (incoherent) and x-ray (coherent) elastic intensity scan measurements. Clear evidence of the crossover in the

  9. Critical dynamics in associative memory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian eUhlig

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Critical behavior in neural networks is characterized by scale-free avalanche size distributions and can be explained by self-regulatory mechanisms. Theoretical and experimental evidence indicates that information storage capacity reaches its maximum in the critical regime. We study the effect of structural connectivity formed by Hebbian learning on the criticality of network dynamics. The network endowed with Hebbian learning only does not allow for simultaneous information storage and criticality. However, the critical regime is can be stabilized by short-term synaptic dynamics in the form of synaptic depression and facilitation or, alternatively, by homeostatic adaptation of the synaptic weights. We show that a heterogeneous distribution of maximal synaptic strengths does not preclude criticality if the Hebbian learning is alternated with periods of critical dynamics recovery. We discuss the relevance of these findings for the flexibility of memory in aging and with respect to the recent theory of synaptic plasticity.

  10. Fourier analysis in dynamic non periodic phenomena in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinesco, A.; Lallot, C.

    1984-01-01

    The success of Fourier analysis in assessing cardiac function has led us to investigate other possible uses of this technique. We show that phase analysis applied to dynamic non periodic activity changes gives useful parametric functional images. The phase image is comparable to a transit time image, the amplitude image is comparable to the maximum variations of activity and the mean image corresponds to a normalized sum of images. Exemples of this powerful application of Fourier analysis are discussed [fr

  11. Magnetic resonance phenomena in dynamics of relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternov, I.M.; Bordovitsyn, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    A relativistic generalization of Rabi's formula for magnetic resonance is given. On this basis, we consider fast and slow passage through resonance. We define a magnetic resonance exterior field as usual, using unit vectors of a Cartesian coordinate system, a homogeneous magnetic field, and the amplitude of a rotating magnetic field. For the description of spin dynamics we use the Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equation

  12. Carrier dynamics in graphene. Ultrafast many-particle phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malic, E.; Brem, S.; Jago, R. [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Winzer, T.; Wendler, F.; Knorr, A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Mittendorff, M.; Koenig-Otto, J.C.; Schneider, H.; Helm, M.; Winnerl, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Ploetzing, T.; Neumaier, D. [Advanced Microelectronic Center Aachen, AMO GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Graphene is an ideal material to study fundamental Coulomb- and phonon-induced carrier scattering processes. Its remarkable gapless and linear band structure opens up new carrier relaxation channels. In particular, Auger scattering bridging the valence and the conduction band changes the number of charge carriers and gives rise to a significant carrier multiplication - an ultrafast many-particle phenomenon that is promising for the design of highly efficient photodetectors. Furthermore, the vanishing density of states at the Dirac point combined with ultrafast phonon-induced intraband scattering results in an accumulation of carriers and a population inversion suggesting the design of graphene-based terahertz lasers. Here, we review our work on the ultrafast carrier dynamics in graphene and Landau-quantized graphene is presented providing a microscopic view on the appearance of carrier multiplication and population inversion. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. An alternative perspective to observe the critical phenomena of dilaton black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Jie-Xiong [Lingnan Normal University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Zhanjiang, Guangdong (China)

    2017-08-15

    The critical phenomena of dilaton black holes are probed from a totally different perspective other than the P-v criticality and the q-U criticality discussed in former literature. We investigate not only the two point correlation function but also the entanglement entropy of dilaton black holes. For both the two point correlation function and the entanglement entropy we consider 4 x 2 x 2 = 16 cases due to different choices of parameters. The van der Waals-like behavior can be clearly witnessed from all the T -δL (T -δS) graphs for q < q{sub c}. Moreover, the effects of dilaton gravity and the spacetime dimensionality on the phase structure of dilaton black holes are disclosed. Furthermore, we discuss the stability of dilaton black holes by applying the analogous specific heat definition and remove the unstable branch by introducing a bar T = T{sub *}. It is shown that the first order phase transition temperature T{sub *} is affected by both α and n. The analogous equal area laws for both the T -δL graph and the T -δS graph are examined numerically. The relative errors for all cases are small enough so that we can safely conclude that the analogous equal area laws hold for T -δL (T -δS) graph of dilaton black holes. (orig.)

  14. Stokes phenomena and quantum integrability in non-critical string/M theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Chuan-Tsung; Irie, Hirotaka; Yeh, Chi-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    We study Stokes phenomena of the k×k isomonodromy systems with an arbitrary Poincaré index r, especially which correspond to the fractional-superstring (or parafermionic-string) multi-critical points (p-hat,q-hat)=(1,r-1) in the k-cut two-matrix models. Investigation of this system is important for the purpose of figuring out the non-critical version of M theory which was proposed to be the strong-coupling dual of fractional superstring theory as a two-matrix model with an infinite number of cuts. Surprisingly the multi-cut boundary-condition recursion equations have a universal form among the various multi-cut critical points, and this enables us to show explicit solutions of Stokes multipliers in quite wide classes of (k,r). Although these critical points almost break the intrinsic Z k symmetry of the multi-cut two-matrix models, this feature makes manifest a connection between the multi-cut boundary-condition recursion equations and the structures of quantum integrable systems. In particular, it is uncovered that the Stokes multipliers satisfy multiple Hirota equations (i.e. multiple T-systems). Therefore our result provides a large extension of the ODE/IM correspondence to the general isomonodromy ODE systems endowed with the multi-cut boundary conditions. We also comment about a possibility that N=2 QFT of Cecotti-Vafa would be “topological series” in non-critical M theory equipped with a single quantum integrability.

  15. Precise Measurements of the Density and Critical Phenomena Near Phase Transitions in Liquid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Nai-Chang

    1997-01-01

    The first-year progress for the project of precise measurements of the density and critical phenomena of helium near phase transitions is summarized below: (1) completion of a cryogenic sample probe for the proposed measurements, and the rehabilitation of a designated laboratory at Caltech for this project; (2) construction and testing of a superconducting niobium cavity; (3) acquisition of one phase-locked-loop system for high-resolution frequency control and read- out; (4) setting up high-resolution thermometry (HRT) for temperature readout and control; (5) developing new approaches for calibrating the coefficient between the resonant frequency shift (delta f) and the helium density (rho), as well as for measuring the effect of gravity on T(sub lambda) to a much better precision; (6) programming of the interface control of all instruments for automatic data acquisition; and (7) improving data analyses and fitting procedures.

  16. Nonequilibrium Phenomena in Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, A Surjalal

    2005-01-01

    The complexity of plasmas arises mainly from their inherent nonlinearity and far from equilibrium nature. The nonequilibrium behavior of plasmas is evident in the natural settings, for example, in the Earth's magnetosphere. Similarly, laboratory plasmas such as fusion bottles also have their fair share of complex behavior. Nonequilibrium phenomena are intimately connected with statistical dynamics and form one of the growing research areas in modern nonlinear physics. These studies encompass the ideas of self-organization, phase transition, critical phenomena, self-organized criticality and turbulence. This book presents studies of complexity in the context of nonequilibrium phenomena using theory, modeling, simulations, and experiments, both in the laboratory and in nature.

  17. Critical phenomena of regular black holes in anti-de Sitter space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying [Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-04-15

    In General Relativity, addressing coupling to a non-linear electromagnetic field, together with a negative cosmological constant, we obtain the general static spherical symmetric black hole solution with magnetic charges, which is asymptotic to anti-de Sitter (AdS) space-times. In particular, for a degenerate case the solution becomes a Hayward-AdS black hole, which is regular everywhere in the full space-time. The existence of such a regular black hole solution preserves the weak energy condition, while the strong energy condition is violated. We then derive the first law and the Smarr formula of the black hole solution. We further discuss its thermodynamic properties and study the critical phenomena in the extended phase space where the cosmological constant is treated as a thermodynamic variable as well as the parameter associated with the non-linear electrodynamics. We obtain many interesting results such as: the Maxwell equal area law in the P-V (or S-T) diagram is violated and consequently the critical point (T{sub *},P{sub *}) of the first order small-large black hole transition does not coincide with the inflection point (T{sub c},P{sub c}) of the isotherms; the Clapeyron equation describing the coexistence curve of the Van der Waals (vdW) fluid is no longer valid; the heat capacity at constant pressure is finite at the critical point; the various exponents near the critical point are also different from those of the vdW fluid. (orig.)

  18. Critical phenomena and chemical potential of a charged AdS black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Liang, Bin; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2017-12-01

    Inspired by the interpretation of the cosmological constant from the boundary gauge theory, we here treat it as the number of colors N and its conjugate quantity as the associated chemical potential μ in the black hole side. Then the thermodynamics and the chemical potential for a five-dimensional charged AdS black hole are studied. It is found that there exists a small-large black hole phase transition of van der Waals type. The critical phenomena are investigated in the N2-μ chart. The result implies that the phase transition can occur for large number of colors N , while is forbidden for small number. This to some extent implies that the interaction of the system increases with the number. In particular, in the reduced parameter space, all the thermodynamic quantities can be rescaled with the black hole charge such that these reduced quantities are charge-independent. Then we obtain the coexistence curve and the phase diagram. The latent heat is also numerically calculated. Moreover, the heat capacity and the thermodynamic scalar are studied. The result indicates that the information of the first-order black hole phase transition is encoded in the heat capacity and scalar. However, the phase transition point cannot be directly calculated with them. Nevertheless, the critical point linked to a second-order phase transition can be determined by either the heat capacity or the scalar. In addition, we calculate the critical exponents of the heat capacity and the scalar for the saturated small and large black holes near the critical point.

  19. Critical phenomena in communication/computation networks with various topologies and suboptimal to optimal resource allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogoni, Marco; Busonera, Giovanni; Anedda, Paolo; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    We generalize previous studies on critical phenomena in communication networks [1,2] by adding computational capabilities to the nodes. In our model, a set of tasks with random origin, destination and computational structure is distributed on a computational network, modeled as a graph. By varying the temperature of a Metropolis Montecarlo, we explore the global latency for an optimal to suboptimal resource assignment at a given time instant. By computing the two-point correlation function for the local overload, we study the behavior of the correlation distance (both for links and nodes) while approaching the congested phase: a transition from peaked to spread g(r) is seen above a critical (Montecarlo) temperature Tc. The average latency trend of the system is predicted by averaging over several network traffic realizations while maintaining a spatially detailed information for each node: a sharp decrease of performance is found over Tc independently of the workload. The globally optimized computational resource allocation and network routing defines a baseline for a future comparison of the transition behavior with respect to existing routing strategies [3,4] for different network topologies.

  20. Introduction to monitoring dynamic environmental phenomena of the world using satellite data collection systems, 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, William Douglas; Paulson, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    The rapid development of satellite technology, especially in the area of radio transmission and imaging systems, makes it possible to monitor dynamic surface phenomena of the Earth in considerable detail. The monitoring systems that have been developed are compatible with standard monitoring systems such as snow, stream, and rain gages; wind, temperature and humidity measuring instruments; tiltmeters and seismic event counters. Supported by appropriate power, radios and antennae, remote stations can be left unattended for at least 1 year and consistently relay local information via polar orbiting or geostationary satellites. These data, in conjunction with timely Landsat images, can provide a basis for more accurate estimates on snowfall, water runoff, reservoir level changes, flooding, drought effects, and vegetation trends and may be of help in forecasting volcanic eruptions. These types of information are critical for resource inventory and development, especially in developing countries where remote regions are commonly difficult to access. This paper introduces the reader to the systems available, describes their features and limitations, and provides suggestions on how to employ them. An extensive bibliography is provided for those who wish more information.

  1. Run-time Phenomena in Dynamic Software Updating: Causes and Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Allan Raundahl; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2011-01-01

    The development of a dynamic software updating system for statically-typed object-oriented programming languages has turned out to be a challenging task. Despite the fact that the present state of the art in dynamic updating systems, like JRebel, Dynamic Code Evolution VM, JVolve and Javeleon, all...... written in statically-typed object-oriented programming languages. In this paper, we present our experience from developing dynamically updatable applications using a state-of-the-art dynamic updating system for Java. We believe that the findings presented in this paper provide an important step towards...... provide very transparent and flexible technical solutions to dynamic updating, case studies have shown that designing dynamically updatable applications still remains a challenging task. This challenge has its roots in a number of run-time phenomena that are inherent to dynamic updating of applications...

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Critical Phenomena in Natural Sciences: Chaos, Fractals, Selforganization and Disorder: Concepts and Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, S.

    2004-10-01

    Since the discovery of the renormalization group theory in statistical physics, the realm of applications of the concepts of scale invariance and criticality has pervaded several fields of natural and social sciences. This is the leitmotiv of Didier Sornette's book, who in Critical Phenomena in Natural Sciences reviews three decades of developments and applications of the concepts of criticality, scale invariance and power law behaviour from statistical physics, to earthquake prediction, ruptures, plate tectonics, modelling biological and economic systems and so on. This strongly interdisciplinary book addresses students and researchers in disciplines where concepts of criticality and scale invariance are appropriate: mainly geology from which most of the examples are taken, but also engineering, biology, medicine, economics, etc. A good preparation in quantitative science is assumed but the presentation of statistical physics principles, tools and models is self-contained, so that little background in this field is needed. The book is written in a simple informal style encouraging intuitive comprehension rather than stressing formal derivations. Together with the discussion of the main conceptual results of the discipline, great effort is devoted to providing applied scientists with the tools of data analysis and modelling necessary to analyse, understand, make predictions and simulate systems undergoing complex collective behaviour. The book starts from a purely descriptive approach, explaining basic probabilistic and geometrical tools to characterize power law behaviour and scale invariant sets. Probability theory is introduced by a detailed discussion of interpretative issues warning the reader on the use and misuse of probabilistic concepts when the emphasis is on prediction of low probability rare---and often catastrophic---events. Then, concepts that have proved useful in risk evaluation, extreme value statistics, large limit theorems for sums of independent

  3. Critical Phenomena in Natural Sciences: Chaos, Fractals, Selforganization and Disorder: Concepts and Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, S

    2004-01-01

    Since the discovery of the renormalization group theory in statistical physics, the realm of applications of the concepts of scale invariance and criticality has pervaded several fields of natural and social sciences. This is the leitmotiv of Didier Sornette's book, who in Critical Phenomena in Natural Sciences reviews three decades of developments and applications of the concepts of criticality, scale invariance and power law behaviour from statistical physics, to earthquake prediction, ruptures, plate tectonics, modelling biological and economic systems and so on. This strongly interdisciplinary book addresses students and researchers in disciplines where concepts of criticality and scale invariance are appropriate: mainly geology from which most of the examples are taken, but also engineering, biology, medicine, economics, etc. A good preparation in quantitative science is assumed but the presentation of statistical physics principles, tools and models is self-contained, so that little background in this field is needed. The book is written in a simple informal style encouraging intuitive comprehension rather than stressing formal derivations. Together with the discussion of the main conceptual results of the discipline, great effort is devoted to providing applied scientists with the tools of data analysis and modelling necessary to analyse, understand, make predictions and simulate systems undergoing complex collective behaviour. The book starts from a purely descriptive approach, explaining basic probabilistic and geometrical tools to characterize power law behaviour and scale invariant sets. Probability theory is introduced by a detailed discussion of interpretative issues warning the reader on the use and misuse of probabilistic concepts when the emphasis is on prediction of low probability rare - and often catastrophic - events. Then, concepts that have proved useful in risk evaluation, extreme value statistics, large limit theorems for sums of independent

  4. Modelling of Mass Transfer Phenomena in Chemical and Biochemical Reactor Systems using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Hilde Kristina

    the velocity and pressure distributions in a fluid. CFD also enables the modelling of several fluids simultaneously, e.g. gas bubbles in a liquid, as well as the presence of turbulence and dissolved chemicals in a fluid, and many other phenomena. This makes CFD an appreciated tool for studying flow structures......, mixing, and other mass transfer phenomena in chemical and biochemical reactor systems. In this project, four selected case studies are investigated in order to explore the capabilities of CFD. The selected cases are a 1 ml stirred microbioreactor, an 8 ml magnetically stirred reactor, a Rushton impeller...... and an ion-exchange reaction are also modelled and compared to experimental data. The thesis includes a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals behind a CFD software, as well as a more detailed review of the fluid dynamic phenomena investigated in this project. The momentum and continuity equations...

  5. The dynamic current-voltage characteristic as a powerful tool to analyze fast phenomena in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivan, L. M.; Mihai-Plugaru, M.; Amarandei, G.; Aflori, M.; Dimitriu, D. G.

    2006-01-01

    The static current-voltage characteristic of an electrode immersed in plasma is obtained by slowly increasing and subsequently decreasing the potential on the electrode with respect to the plasma potential or the ground. This characteristic can give us important information about the phenomena that take place in front of the electrode. Current jumps can be evidenced which were often associated with an hysteresis effect, regions with S-type or N-type negative differential resistance, etc. The method is always used when we investigate the appearance of complex space charge configurations (CSCC) in front of an electrode immersed in plasma. However, to investigate the dynamics of such structures or other fast phenomena (like instabilities) which take place in plasma devices with frequencies of tenth, hundred kHz or more, complex investigation techniques must be used. One of the most efficient methods to investigate fast phenomena in plasma devices is the dynamic current-voltage characteristic. This is obtained by recording the time series of the current collected by the electrode when the voltage applied on it is very fast modified (most likely increased) by using a signal generator. In this way, very fast oscillations of the current can be recorded and new phenomena can be evidenced. We used this technique to study the phenomena which take place at the onset of electrostatic instabilities in Q-machine plasma, namely the potential relaxation instability (PRI) and the electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability (EICI). The obtained experimental results prove that the negative differential resistance region in the static current-voltage characteristic is the result of a nonlinear dynamics of a CSCC in form of a double layer (DL) which takes place just before the onset of the instabilities. In the case of the PRI we emphasized current jumps related with the DL appearance, which are not present in the static current-voltage characteristic at high plasma density. (authors)

  6. Critical Dynamics of Burst Instabilities in the Portevin-Le Chatelier Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Anna, Gianfranco; Nori, Franco

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect (PLC), by compressing Al-Mg alloys in a very large deformation range, and interpret the results from the viewpoint of phase transitions and critical phenomena. The system undergoes two dynamical phase transitions between intermittent (or ''jerky'') and ''laminar'' plastic dynamic phases. Near these two dynamic critical points, the order parameter 1/τ of the PLC effect exhibits large fluctuations, and ''critical slowing down'' (i.e., the number τ of bursts, or plastic instabilities, per unit time slows down considerably)

  7. Dynamic trapping near a quantum critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodrubetz, Michael; Katz, Emanuel; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2015-02-01

    The study of dynamics in closed quantum systems has been revitalized by the emergence of experimental systems that are well-isolated from their environment. In this paper, we consider the closed-system dynamics of an archetypal model: spins driven across a second-order quantum critical point, which are traditionally described by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. Imbuing the driving field with Newtonian dynamics, we find that the full closed system exhibits a robust new phenomenon—dynamic critical trapping—in which the system is self-trapped near the critical point due to efficient absorption of field kinetic energy by heating the quantum spins. We quantify limits in which this phenomenon can be observed and generalize these results by developing a Kibble-Zurek scaling theory that incorporates the dynamic field. Our findings can potentially be interesting in the context of early universe physics, where the role of the driving field is played by the inflaton or a modulus field.

  8. A Detailed Study of the Rotational Augmentation and Dynamic Stall Phenomena for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guntur, Srinivas

    This thesis presents investigations into the aerodynamics of wind turbine rotors, with a focus on the in-board sections of the rotor. Two important aerodynamic phenomena that have challenged scientists over nearly the last half a century are the so-called rotational augmentation and dynamic stall....... This thesis presents an investigation into these two phenomena, using data from the MEXICO and the NREL UAE Phase VI experiments, as well as data obtained from full rotor CFD computations carried out using the in-house flow solver Ellipsys3D. The experimental data, CFD data and that from some of the existing...... on wind turbine blades using the N-sequence data of the NREL UAE Phase VI experiment. The experimental data is compared with the results from unsteady Delayed Detached Eddy Simulations (DDES). The same conditions are also modelled using a Beddoes-Leishman type dynamic stall model by Hansen et al. (2004...

  9. Critical phenomena at a first-order phase transition in a lattice of glow lamps: Experimental findings and analogy to neural activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minati, Ludovico, E-mail: lminati@ieee.org, E-mail: ludovico.minati@unitn.it, E-mail: ludovico.minati@ifj.edu [Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, 38123 Mattarello (Italy); Complex Systems Theory Department, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków (Poland); Candia, Antonio de [Department of Physics “E. Pancini,” University of Naples “Federico II,” Napoli (Italy); INFN Gr. Coll. Salerno, Unità di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Scarpetta, Silvia [INFN Gr. Coll. Salerno, Unità di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Department of Physics “E.R.Caianiello,” University of Salerno, Napoli (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    Networks of non-linear electronic oscillators have shown potential as physical models of neural dynamics. However, two properties of brain activity, namely, criticality and metastability, remain under-investigated with this approach. Here, we present a simple circuit that exhibits both phenomena. The apparatus consists of a two-dimensional square lattice of capacitively coupled glow (neon) lamps. The dynamics of lamp breakdown (flash) events are controlled by a DC voltage globally connected to all nodes via fixed resistors. Depending on this parameter, two phases having distinct event rate and degree of spatiotemporal order are observed. The transition between them is hysteretic, thus a first-order one, and it is possible to enter a metastability region, wherein, approaching a spinodal point, critical phenomena emerge. Avalanches of events occur according to power-law distributions having exponents ≈3/2 for size and ≈2 for duration, and fractal structure is evident as power-law scaling of the Fano factor. These critical exponents overlap observations in biological neural networks; hence, this circuit may have value as building block to realize corresponding physical models.

  10. Collective Phenomena Emerging from the Interactions between Dynamical Processes in Multiplex Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex; Latora, Vito

    2017-03-31

    We introduce a framework to intertwine dynamical processes of different nature, each with its own distinct network topology, using a multilayer network approach. As an example of collective phenomena emerging from the interactions of multiple dynamical processes, we study a model where neural dynamics and nutrient transport are bidirectionally coupled in such a way that the allocation of the transport process at one layer depends on the degree of synchronization at the other layer, and vice versa. We show numerically, and we prove analytically, that the multilayer coupling induces a spontaneous explosive synchronization and a heterogeneous distribution of allocations, otherwise not present in the two systems considered separately. Our framework can find application to other cases where two or more dynamical processes such as synchronization, opinion formation, information diffusion, or disease spreading, are interacting with each other.

  11. Design Considerations for Remote High-Speed Pressure Measurements of Dynamic Combustion Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, D.L.; Ferguson, D.H.; Rohrssen, Robert (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV); Perez, Eduardo (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV)

    2007-01-01

    As gas turbine combustion systems evolve to achieve ultra-low emission targets, monitoring and controlling dynamic combustion processes becomes increasingly important. These dynamic processes may include flame extinction, combustion-driven instabilities, or other dynamic combustion phenomena. Pressure sensors can be incorporated into the combustor liner design, but this approach is complicated by the harsh operating environment. One practical solution involves locating the sensor in a more remote location, such as outside the pressure casing. The sensor can be connected to the measurement point by small diameter tubing. Although this is a practical approach, the dynamics of the tubing can introduce significant errors into the pressure measurement. This paper addresses measurement errors associated with semi-infinite coil remote sensing setups and proposes an approach to improve the accuracy of these types of measurements.

  12. Collective Phenomena Emerging from the Interactions between Dynamical Processes in Multiplex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex; Latora, Vito

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a framework to intertwine dynamical processes of different nature, each with its own distinct network topology, using a multilayer network approach. As an example of collective phenomena emerging from the interactions of multiple dynamical processes, we study a model where neural dynamics and nutrient transport are bidirectionally coupled in such a way that the allocation of the transport process at one layer depends on the degree of synchronization at the other layer, and vice versa. We show numerically, and we prove analytically, that the multilayer coupling induces a spontaneous explosive synchronization and a heterogeneous distribution of allocations, otherwise not present in the two systems considered separately. Our framework can find application to other cases where two or more dynamical processes such as synchronization, opinion formation, information diffusion, or disease spreading, are interacting with each other.

  13. Applications of Canonical transformations and nontrivial vacuum solutions to flavor mixing and critical phenomena in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2004-01-01

    MISHCHENKO, YURIY. Applications of Canonical Transformations and Nontrivial Vacuum Solutions to flavor mixing and critical phenomena in Quantum Field Theory. (Under the direction of Chueng-Ryong Ji.) In this dissertation we consider two recent applications of Bogoliubov Transformation to the phenomenology of quantum mixing and the theory of critical phenomena. In recent years quantum mixing got in the focus of the searches for New Physics due to its unparalleled sensitivity to SM parameters and indications of neutrino mixing. It was recently suggested that Bogoliubov Transformation may be important in proper definition of the flavor states that otherwise results in problems in perturbative treatment. As first part of this dissertation we investigate this conjecture and develop a complete formulation of such a mixing field theory involving introduction of general formalism, analysis of space-time conversion and phenomenological implications. As second part of this dissertati

  14. Applications of Canonical transformations and nontrivial vacuum solutions to flavor mixing and critical phenomena in quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishchenko, Yuriy [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2004-12-01

    MISHCHENKO, YURIY. Applications of Canonical Transformations and Nontrivial Vacuum Solutions to flavor mixing and critical phenomena in Quantum Field Theory. (Under the direction of Chueng-Ryong Ji.) In this dissertation we consider two recent applications of Bogoliubov Transformation to the phenomenology of quantum mixing and the theory of critical phenomena. In recent years quantum mixing got in the focus of the searches for New Physics due to its unparalleled sensitivity to SM parameters and indications of neutrino mixing. It was recently suggested that Bogoliubov Transformation may be important in proper definition of the flavor states that otherwise results in problems in perturbative treatment. As first part of this dissertation we investigate this conjecture and develop a complete formulation of such a mixing field theory involving introduction of general formalism, analysis of space-time conversion and phenomenological implications. As second part of this dissertati

  15. Avoided critical behavior in dynamically forced wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeijer, Jacco H; Delon, Giles; Fermigier, Marc; Andreotti, Bruno

    2006-05-05

    A solid object can be coated by a nonwetting liquid since a receding contact line cannot exceed a critical speed. In this Letter we study the dynamical wetting transition at which a liquid film gets deposited by withdrawing a vertical plate out of a liquid reservoir. It has recently been predicted that this wetting transition is critical with diverging time scales and coincides with the disappearance of stationary menisci. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the transition is due to the formation of a solitary wave, well below the critical point. As a consequence, relaxation times remain finite at threshold. The structure of the liquid deposited on the plate involves a capillary ridge that does not trivially match the Landau-Levich film.

  16. Critical realism in supply chain research: Understanding the dynamics of a seasonal goods supply chain

    OpenAIRE

    Adamides, E. D.; Papachristos, G.; Pomonis, N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to show how a critical realist paradigmatic stance and its associated research methodology can contribute to supply‐chain research by providing explanations for specific supply‐chain‐ and logistics‐related dynamic phenomena. / Design/methodology/approach – Initially, the case for a critical realist research paradigm is made, and then a retroductive pluralistic research methodology is used for demonstrating its application. Starting from an observation in...

  17. Quench dynamics across quantum critical points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, K.; Powell, Stephen; Sachdev, Subir

    2004-01-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of a number of model systems as their coupling constants are changed rapidly across a quantum critical point. The primary motivation is provided by the recent experiments of Greiner et al. [Nature (London) 415, 39 (2002)] who studied the response of a Mott insulator of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice to a strong potential gradient. In a previous work, it had been argued that the resonant response observed at a critical potential gradient could be understood by proximity to an Ising quantum critical point describing the onset of density wave order. Here we obtain numerical results on the evolution of the density wave order as the potential gradient is scanned across the quantum critical point. This is supplemented by studies of the integrable quantum Ising spin chain in a transverse field, where we obtain exact results for the evolution of the Ising order correlations under a time-dependent transverse field. We also study the evolution of transverse superfluid order in the three-dimensional case. In all cases, the order parameter is best enhanced in the vicinity of the quantum critical point

  18. Critical Phenomena in Natural Sciences Chaos, Fractals, Selforganization and Disorder: Concepts and Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Sornette, Didier

    2006-01-01

    Concepts, methods and techniques of statistical physics in the study of correlated, as well as uncorrelated, phenomena are being applied ever increasingly in the natural sciences, biology and economics in an attempt to understand and model the large variability and risks of phenomena. This is the first textbook written by a well-known expert that provides a modern up-to-date introduction for workers outside statistical physics. The emphasis of the book is on a clear understanding of concepts and methods, while it also provides the tools that can be of immediate use in applications. Although this book evolved out of a course for graduate students, it will be of great interest to researchers and engineers, as well as to post-docs in geophysics and meteorology.

  19. Disability and deviance: Dario Argento's Phenomena and the maintenance of abledness as a critical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Jamie L

    2013-12-01

    This exploration of disability directly applies Campbell's understanding of "abledness" to the film Phenomena by Italian director Dario Argento. Phenomena (1985) explores, through the diegetic response to protagonist Jennifer Corvino's ability to communicate with insects, the shifting cultural association between disability and deviance. The film begins with the traditional response to disability, what education psychologist Kaoru Yamamoto considers the cultural importance of classifying and interpreting disabled bodies by fitting them into a narrative of deviance for surveillance and control. Throughout Argento's film, characters attempt to classify Jennifer; scientists seek to diagnose her "affliction" through the medical model of disability, while Jennifer's schoolmistresses interpret Jennifer's behavior as a disciplinary problem based in environmental factors. This represents the structural model of disability, but in each instance, the attempt to classify Jennifer fails to diagnose or discipline the supposed "deviant, disabled body." Through this failure, the film dramatizes contemporary critiques of traditional models that examine disability, moving beyond to explore what Fiona Kumari Campbell has called "the maintenance of abledness" in sexed, raced, and modified bodies. By normalizing Jennifer's ability, then, Phenomena offers a framework for examining the process through which elements of "abledness" become normalized, a concept which many theorists now argue should maintain the focus of disability studies.

  20. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope with open sample space observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Mitsuo; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji; Iwamatsu, Shinnosuke; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi; Sato, Chikara

    2011-12-01

    Although conventional electron microscopy (EM) requires samples to be in vacuum, most chemical and physical reactions occur in liquid or gas. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM) can observe dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas under atmospheric pressure in real time. An electron-permeable window made of pressure-resistant 100 nm-thick silicon nitride (SiN) film, set into the bottom of the open ASEM sample dish, allows an electron beam to be projected from underneath the sample. A detector positioned below captures backscattered electrons. Using the ASEM, we observed the radiation-induced self-organization process of particles, as well as phenomena accompanying volume change, including evaporation-induced crystallization. Using the electrochemical ASEM dish, we observed tree-like electrochemical depositions on the cathode. In silver nitrate solution, we observed silver depositions near the cathode forming incidental internal voids. The heated ASEM dish allowed observation of patterns of contrast in melting and solidifying solder. Finally, to demonstrate its applicability for monitoring and control of industrial processes, silver paste and solder paste were examined at high throughput. High resolution, imaging speed, flexibility, adaptability, and ease of use facilitate the observation of previously difficult-to-image phenomena, and make the ASEM applicable to various fields. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Low-temperature approach to the renormalization-group study of critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suranyi, P.

    1977-01-01

    A new method of exploring the contents of the renormalization-group equations for discrete spins is introduced. The equations are expanded in low-temperature series and the truncated series are used to obtain the critical exponents and critical temperature of a system. The method is demonstrated on the planar triangular Ising lattice and the critical parameters are found to be within a few percent of the exactly known values in third nonvanishing order of approximation

  2. Dynamical Response near Quantum Critical Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Andrew; Gazit, Snir; Podolsky, Daniel; Witczak-Krempa, William

    2017-02-03

    We study high-frequency response functions, notably the optical conductivity, in the vicinity of quantum critical points (QCPs) by allowing for both detuning from the critical coupling and finite temperature. We consider general dimensions and dynamical exponents. This leads to a unified understanding of sum rules. In systems with emergent Lorentz invariance, powerful methods from quantum field theory allow us to fix the high-frequency response in terms of universal coefficients. We test our predictions analytically in the large-N O(N) model and using the gauge-gravity duality and numerically via quantum Monte Carlo simulations on a lattice model hosting the interacting superfluid-insulator QCP. In superfluid phases, interacting Goldstone bosons qualitatively change the high-frequency optical conductivity and the corresponding sum rule.

  3. Critical phenomena of static charged AdS black holes in conformal gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The extended thermodynamics of static charged AdS black holes in conformal gravity is analyzed. The P–V criticality of these black holes has some unusual features. There exists a single critical point with critical temperature Tc and critical pressure Pc. At fixed T>Tc (or at fixed P>Pc, there are two zeroth order phase transition points but no first order phase transition points. The systems favors large pressure states at constant T, or high temperature states at constant P.

  4. Uncovering the Connection Between Low-Frequency Dynamics and Phase Transformation Phenomena in Molecular Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Michael T.; Zhang, Wei; Bond, Andrew D.; Mittleman, Daniel M.; Zeitler, J. Axel

    2018-05-01

    The low-frequency motions of molecules in the condensed phase have been shown to be vital to a large number of physical properties and processes. However, in the case of disordered systems, it is often difficult to elucidate the atomic-level details surrounding these phenomena. In this work, we have performed an extensive experimental and computational study on the molecular solid camphor, which exhibits a rich and complex structure-dynamics relationship, and undergoes an order-disorder transition near ambient conditions. The combination of x-ray diffraction, variable temperature and pressure terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, ab initio molecular dynamics, and periodic density functional theory calculations enables a complete picture of the phase transition to be obtained, inclusive of mechanistic, structural, and thermodynamic phenomena. Additionally, the low-frequency vibrations of a disordered solid are characterized for the first time with atomic-level precision, uncovering a clear link between such motions and the phase transformation. Overall, this combination of methods allows for significant details to be obtained for disordered solids and the associated transformations, providing a framework that can be directly applied for a wide range of similar systems.

  5. Mill and Mental Phenomena: Critical Contributions to a Science of Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Bistricky

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to define cognition preceded John Stuart Mill’s life and continue to this day. John Stuart Mill envisioned a science of mental phenomena informed by associationism, empirical introspection, and neurophysiology, and he advanced specific ideas that still influence modern conceptions of cognition. The present article briefly reviews Mill’s personal history and the times in which he lived, and it traces the evolution of ideas that have run through him to contemporary cognitive concepts. The article also highlights contemporary problems in defining cognition and supports specific criteria regarding what constitutes cognition.

  6. Mill and mental phenomena: critical contributions to a science of cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistricky, Steven L

    2013-06-01

    Attempts to define cognition preceded John Stuart Mill's life and continue to this day. John Stuart Mill envisioned a science of mental phenomena informed by associationism, empirical introspection, and neurophysiology, and he advanced specific ideas that still influence modern conceptions of cognition. The present article briefly reviews Mill's personal history and the times in which he lived, and it traces the evolution of ideas that have run through him to contemporary cognitive concepts. The article also highlights contemporary problems in defining cognition and supports specific criteria regarding what constitutes cognition.

  7. Static and Dynamic Criticality: Are They Different?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D E; Clouse, C J; Procassini, R; Little, R C

    2003-01-01

    Let us start by stating that this paper does not contain anything new. It only contains material that has been known for decades, but which is periodically forgotten. As such this paper is intended merely to refresh people's memories. We will also mention that this paper is an example of the occasional discrepancy between textbook methodologies and real world applications, in the sense that the conclusions reached here contradict what it says in most textbooks, i.e., most textbooks incorrectly interpret the methods presented here, particularly with respect to the use of importance sampling to maintain population control. This paper is not intended as a general tutorial on criticality calculations. It is intended only to clarify the accuracy of various methods for solving criticality problems, such as a true time dependent dynamic calculation, versus an alpha or K static calculation. In particular, we address the long standing controversy between users of the TART code [1] with the dynamic method, and users of the MCNP code [2] with the alpha static method. In this paper we will prove which methods are accurate and inaccurate

  8. Natural time analysis of critical phenomena: The case of pre-fracture electromagnetic emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potirakis, S. M. [Department of Electronics, Technological Education Institute (TEI) of Piraeus, 250 Thivon and P. Ralli, Aigaleo, Athens GR-12244 (Greece); Karadimitrakis, A. [Department of Physics, Section of Electronics, Computers, Telecommunications and Control, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens GR-15784 (Greece); Eftaxias, K. [Department of Physics, Section of Solid State Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens GR-15784 (Greece)

    2013-06-15

    Criticality of complex systems reveals itself in various ways. One way to monitor a system at critical state is to analyze its observable manifestations using the recently introduced method of natural time. Pre-fracture electromagnetic (EM) emissions, in agreement to laboratory experiments, have been consistently detected in the MHz band prior to significant earthquakes. It has been proposed that these emissions stem from the fracture of the heterogeneous materials surrounding the strong entities (asperities) distributed along the fault, preventing the relative slipping. It has also been proposed that the fracture of heterogeneous material could be described in analogy to the critical phase transitions in statistical physics. In this work, the natural time analysis is for the first time applied to the pre-fracture MHz EM signals revealing their critical nature. Seismicity and pre-fracture EM emissions should be two sides of the same coin concerning the earthquake generation process. Therefore, we also examine the corresponding foreshock seismic activity, as another manifestation of the same complex system at critical state. We conclude that the foreshock seismicity data present criticality features as well.

  9. Natural time analysis of critical phenomena: the case of pre-fracture electromagnetic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potirakis, S M; Karadimitrakis, A; Eftaxias, K

    2013-06-01

    Criticality of complex systems reveals itself in various ways. One way to monitor a system at critical state is to analyze its observable manifestations using the recently introduced method of natural time. Pre-fracture electromagnetic (EM) emissions, in agreement to laboratory experiments, have been consistently detected in the MHz band prior to significant earthquakes. It has been proposed that these emissions stem from the fracture of the heterogeneous materials surrounding the strong entities (asperities) distributed along the fault, preventing the relative slipping. It has also been proposed that the fracture of heterogeneous material could be described in analogy to the critical phase transitions in statistical physics. In this work, the natural time analysis is for the first time applied to the pre-fracture MHz EM signals revealing their critical nature. Seismicity and pre-fracture EM emissions should be two sides of the same coin concerning the earthquake generation process. Therefore, we also examine the corresponding foreshock seismic activity, as another manifestation of the same complex system at critical state. We conclude that the foreshock seismicity data present criticality features as well.

  10. Natural time analysis of critical phenomena: The case of pre-fracture electromagnetic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potirakis, S. M.; Karadimitrakis, A.; Eftaxias, K.

    2013-01-01

    Criticality of complex systems reveals itself in various ways. One way to monitor a system at critical state is to analyze its observable manifestations using the recently introduced method of natural time. Pre-fracture electromagnetic (EM) emissions, in agreement to laboratory experiments, have been consistently detected in the MHz band prior to significant earthquakes. It has been proposed that these emissions stem from the fracture of the heterogeneous materials surrounding the strong entities (asperities) distributed along the fault, preventing the relative slipping. It has also been proposed that the fracture of heterogeneous material could be described in analogy to the critical phase transitions in statistical physics. In this work, the natural time analysis is for the first time applied to the pre-fracture MHz EM signals revealing their critical nature. Seismicity and pre-fracture EM emissions should be two sides of the same coin concerning the earthquake generation process. Therefore, we also examine the corresponding foreshock seismic activity, as another manifestation of the same complex system at critical state. We conclude that the foreshock seismicity data present criticality features as well.

  11. Static critical phenomena in Co-Ni-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, Brahmananda; Sarma, S.; Srinivasan, A.; Santra, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    Ferromagnetic shape memory alloys are smart materials because they exhibit temperature driven shape memory effect and magnetic field induced strain. Thus two types of energy, i.e. thermal and magnetic, are used to control their shape memory behaviour. Study of critical phenomenon in such materials has received increased experimental and theoretical attention for better understanding of the magnetic phase transition behavior as well as further development of ferromagnetic shape memory materials. In the present study we report the preparation and characterization of bulk Co 45 Ni 25 Ga 30 alloy, prepared by a sequence of arc melting technique followed by homogenization at 1150 °C for 24 hours and ice-water quenching. Structural and magnetic properties of the alloys were studied by means of X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometer in an applied field range of ±18 kOe equipped with a high temperature oven. We have determined the critical temperature T C (∼375.5 K) and the critical exponents viz; β=0.40, γ=1.68 and δ=5.2. Asymptotic critical exponents β, γ, and δ obey Widom scaling relation, γ+β=βδ, and the magnetization data satisfy the scaling equation of state for second-order phase transition in the asymptotic critical region

  12. Non-linear hydrotectonic phenomena: Part I - fluid flow in open fractures under dynamical stress loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambeau, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    A fractured solid under stress loading (or unloading) can be viewed as behaving macroscopically as a medium with internal, hidden, degrees of freedom, wherein changes in fracture geometry (i.e. opening, closing and extension) and flow of fluid and gas within fractures will produce major changes in stresses and strains within the solid. Likewise, the flow process within fractures will be strongly coupled to deformation within the solid through boundary conditions on the fracture surfaces. The effects in the solid can, in part, be phenomenologically represented as inelastic or plastic processes in the macroscopic view. However, there are clearly phenomena associated with fracture growth and open fracture fluid flows that produce effects that can not be described using ordinary inelastic phenomenology. This is evident from the fact that a variety of energy release phenomena can occur, including seismic emissions of previously stored strain energy due to fracture growth, release of disolved gas from fluids in the fractures resulting in enhanced buoyancy and subsequent energetic flows of gas and fluids through the fracture system which can produce raid extension of old fractures and the creation of new ones. Additionally, the flows will be modulated by the opening and closing of fractures due to deformation in the solid, so that the flow process is strongly coupled to dynamical processes in the surrounding solid matrix, some of which are induced by the flow itself

  13. Fractional generalization of the Ginzburg–Landau equation: an unconventional approach to critical phenomena in complex media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milovanov, A.V.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    2005-01-01

    Equations built on fractional derivatives prove to be a powerful tool in the description of complex systems when the effects of singularity, fractal supports, and long-range dependence play a role. In this Letter, we advocate an application of the fractional derivative formalism to a fairly general...... class of critical phenomena when the organization of the system near the phase transition point is influenced by a competing nonlocal ordering. Fractional modifications of the free energy functional at criticality and of the widely known Ginzburg-Landau equation central to the classical Landau theory...... of second-type phase transitions are discussed in some detail. An implication of the fractional Ginzburg-Landau equation is a renormalization of the transition temperature owing to the nonlocality present. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  14. Static and dynamic properties of frictional phenomena in a one-dimensional system with randomness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, T.; Matsukawa, H.

    1997-01-01

    Static and dynamic frictional phenomena at the interface with random impurities are investigated in a two-chain model with incommensurate structure. Static frictional force is caused by the impurity pinning and/or by the pinning due to the regular potential, which is responsible for the breaking of analyticity transition for impurity-free cases. It is confirmed that the static frictional force is always finite in the presence of impurities, in contrast to the impurity-free system. The nature of impurity pinning is discussed in connection with that in density waves. The kinetic frictional force of a steady sliding state is also investigated numerically. The relationship between the sliding velocity dependence of the kinetic frictional force and the strength of impurity potential is discussed. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  15. Role of impurity dynamics in resistivity-gradient-driven turbulence and tokamak edge plasma phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.; Diamond, P.H.; Terry, P.W.; Garcia, L.; Carreras, B.A.

    1986-03-01

    The role of impurity dynamics in resistivity gradient driven turbulence is investigated in the context of modeling tokamak edge plasma phenomena. The effects of impurity concentration fluctuations and gradients on the linear behavior of rippling instabilities and on the nonlinear evolution and saturation of resistivity gradient driven turbulence are studied both analytically and computationally. At saturation, fluctuation levels and particle and thermal diffusivities are calculated. In particular, the mean-square turbulent radial velocity is given by 2 > = (E 0 L/sub s/B/sub z/) 2 (L/sub/eta/ -1 + L/sub z -1 ) 2 . Thus, edged peaked impurity concentrations tend to enhance the turbulence, while axially peaked concentrations tend to quench it. The theoretical predictions are in semi-quantitative agreement with experimental results from the TEXT, Caltech, and Tosca tokamaks. Finally, a theory of the density clamp observed during CO-NBI on the ISX-B tokamak is proposed

  16. Critical phenomena in Ising-type thin films by Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masrour, R.; Jabar, A.; Benyoussef, A.; Hamedoun, M.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic spin-2 and 3/2 Ising-typed thin films are studied by Monte Carlo simulation. The critical temperature is obtained for different values of thickness of the thin film and for different exchange interactions. The total magnetization has been determined for different values of exchange interactions in surface and in bulk and different temperatures. The magnetic hysteresis cycle is obtained for different values of exchange interactions ferro and antiferromagnetic in the surface and in the bulk and for different values of temperatures for a fixed size of the film thickness. The coercive field increase with increasing the film thickness. - Highlights: • The magnetic properties of thin films are studied by Monte Carlo simulation. • The critical temperature is obtained for different values of thickness of thin film. • The magnetic hysteresis cycle is obtained in the surface and in the bulk. • The coercive field increase with increasing the thin film thickness.

  17. Phase equilibria and critical phenomena in the cesium nitrate-water-diethylamine ternary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'in, K.K.; Kurskij, V.F.; Cherkasov, D.G.

    2008-01-01

    Phase equilibria and critical events in ternary cesium nitrate-water-diethylamine system, where border binary liquid system is characterized by aliquation with lower critical temperature of solution (LCTS), have been investigated by visual-polythermal method in the 60-150 Deg C range. Interaction of cesium nitrate in the water-diethylamine system leads to lowering of its LCTS from 146.1 to 69.3 Deg C and decrease of mutual solubility. Distribution ratios of diethylamine between water and organic phases of monotectic equilibrium are calculated at different temperatures. Diethylamine salting out from aqueous solutions by cesium nitrates becomes stronger with rising temperature. Plotted isotherms of phase confirms generalized scheme of topological transformations of ternary systems phase diagrams: salt-binary solvent with salting out

  18. Critical phenomena in Ising-type thin films by Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masrour, R., E-mail: rachidmasrour@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, 63, 46000 Safi (Morocco); Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Jabar, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Benyoussef, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco); Hamedoun, M. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco)

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic spin-2 and 3/2 Ising-typed thin films are studied by Monte Carlo simulation. The critical temperature is obtained for different values of thickness of the thin film and for different exchange interactions. The total magnetization has been determined for different values of exchange interactions in surface and in bulk and different temperatures. The magnetic hysteresis cycle is obtained for different values of exchange interactions ferro and antiferromagnetic in the surface and in the bulk and for different values of temperatures for a fixed size of the film thickness. The coercive field increase with increasing the film thickness. - Highlights: • The magnetic properties of thin films are studied by Monte Carlo simulation. • The critical temperature is obtained for different values of thickness of thin film. • The magnetic hysteresis cycle is obtained in the surface and in the bulk. • The coercive field increase with increasing the thin film thickness.

  19. Cut-off scaling and multiplicative reformalization in the theory of critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forgacs, G.; Solyom, J.; Zawadowski, A.

    1976-03-01

    In the paper a new method to study the critical fluctuations in systems of 4-epsilon dimensions around the phase transition point is developed. This method unifies the Kadanoff scaling hypothesis as formulated by Wilson by help of his renormalization group technique and the simple mathematical structure of the Lie equations of the Gell-Mann-Low multiplicative renormalization. The basic idea of the new method is that a change in the physical cut-off can be compensated by an effective coupling in such a way that the Green's function and vertex in the original and transformed system differ only by a multiplicative factor. The critical indices, the anomalous dimensions and the critical exponent describing the correction to scaling are determined to second order in epsilon. The specific heat exponent is also calculated, in four dimensions the effect of fluctuations appears in the form of logarithmic corrections. In the last sections the new method is compared to other ones and the differences are discussed. (Sz.N.Z.)

  20. Evaluation of equations of state for simultaneous representation of phase equilibrium and critical phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto Coelho Muniz Vinhal, Andre; Yan, Wei; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    of the Cubic-Plus-Association (CPA) equation of state (EoS). We obtained new parameters for methanol and alkanes from n-hexane to n-decane. The comparison with the original parameters showed that this procedure is important for associating compounds, since for inert species the equation reduces to the Soave......-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) EoS. The application of the rescaled parameters improved the critical point representation of pure fluids at the expense of the saturated liquid phase volume description. In the case of binary mixtures containing methanol and n-alkanes, the association model with the new parameters satisfactorily...

  1. The theory of critical phenomena an introduction to the renormalization group

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, J J; Fisher, A J; Newman, M E J

    1993-01-01

    The successful calculation of critical exponents for continuous phase transitions is one of the main achievements of theoretical physics over the last quarter-century. This was achieved through the use of scaling and field-theoretic techniques which have since become standard equipment in many areas of physics, especially quantum field theory. This book provides a thorough introduction to these techniques. Continuous phase transitions are introduced, then the necessary statistical mechanics is summarized, followed by standard models, some exact solutions and techniques for numerical simulation

  2. Emerging phenomena in neural networks with dynamic synapses and their computational implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin J. eTorres

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review our research on the effect and computational role of dynamical synapses on feed-forward and recurrent neural networks. Among others, we report on the appearance of a new class of dynamical memories which result from the destabilisation of learned memory attractors. This has important consequences for dynamic information processing allowing the system to sequentially access the information stored in the memories under changing stimuli. Although storage capacity of stable memories also decreases, our study demonstrated the positive effect of synaptic facilitation to recover maximum storage capacity and to enlarge the capacity of the system for memory recall in noisy conditions. Possibly, the new dynamical behaviour can be associated with the voltage transitions between up and down states observed in cortical areas in the brain. We investigated the conditions for which the permanence times in the up state are power-law distributed, which is a sign for criticality, and concluded that the experimentally observed large variability of permanence times could be explained as the result of noisy dynamic synapses with large recovery times. Finally, we report how short-term synaptic processes can transmit weak signals throughout more than one frequency range in noisy neural networks, displaying a kind of stochastic multi-resonance. This effect is due to competition between activity-dependent synaptic fluctuations (due to dynamic synapses and the existence of neuron firing threshold which adapts to the incoming mean synaptic input.

  3. Phenomena at the QCD phase transition in nonequilibrium chiral fluid dynamics (NχFD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahrgang, Marlene [Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham, NC (United States); Herold, Christoph [Suranaree University of Technology, School of Physics, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand)

    2016-08-15

    Heavy-ion collisions performed in the beam energy range accessible by the NICA collider facility are expected to produce systems of extreme net-baryon densities and can thus reach yet unexplored regions of the QCD phase diagram. Here, one expects the phase transition between the plasma of deconfined quarks and gluons and the hadronic matter to be of first order. A discovery of the first-order phase transition would as well prove the existence of the QCD critical point, a landmark in the phase diagram. In order to understand possible signals of the first-order phase transition in heavy-ion collision experiments it is very important to develop dynamical models of the phase transition. Here, we discuss the opportunities of studying dynamical effects at the QCD first-order phase transition within our model of nonequilibrium chiral fluid dynamics. (orig.)

  4. A consistent and unified picture for critical phenomena of f(R) AdS black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo, Jie-Xiong; Li, Gu-Qiang; Wu, Yu-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    A consistent and unified picture for critical phenomena of charged AdS black holes in f ( R ) gravity is drawn in this paper. Firstly, we investigate the phase transition in canonical ensemble. We derive the explicit solutions corresponding to the divergence of C Q . The two solutions merge into one when the condition Q c =√(−1/3 R 0 ) is satisfied. The curve of specific heat for Q < Q c has two divergent points and can be divided into three regions. Both the large radius region and the small radius region are thermodynamically stable with positive specific heat while the medium radius region is unstable with negative specific heat. However, when Q > Q c , the specific heat is always positive, implying the black holes are locally stable and no phase transition will take place. Secondly, both the T − r + curve and T − S curve f ( R ) AdS black holes are investigated and they exhibit Van der Vaals like behavior as the P − v curve in the former research. Critical physical quantities are obtained and they are consistent with those derived from the specific heat analysis. We carry out numerical check of Maxwell equal area law for the cases Q =0.2 Q c , 0.4 Q c , 0.6 Q c , 0.8 Q c . The relative errors are amazingly small and can be negligible. So the Maxwell equal area law holds for T − S curve of f ( R ) black holes. Thirdly, we establish geometrothermodynamics for f ( R ) AdS black hole to examine the phase structure. It is shown that the Legendre invariant scalar curvature R would diverge exactly where the specific heat diverges. To summarize, the above three perspectives are consistent with each other, thus providing a unified picture which deepens the understanding of critical phenomena of f ( R ) AdS black holes.

  5. Critical phenomena and their effect on thermal energy storage in supercritical fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobold, Gustavo M.; Da Silva, Alexandre K.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •High power thermal energy storage using supercritical fluids. •Influence of property variation on energy and power density. •Multi-fluid analysis and generalization for several storage temperatures. •Cost, heat transfer and energy density evaluation for high temperature storage. -- Abstract: Large-scale implementation of concentrated solar power plants requires energy storage systems if fossil sources are to be fully replaced. While several candidates have appeared, most still face major issues such as cost, limited energy density and material compatibility. The present paper explores the influence of property variation in the proximity of the critical point on thermal energy storage using supercritical fluids (sTES) from thermodynamic and heat transfer standpoints. Influence of thermodynamic operational parameters on energy density of isobaric and isochoric sTES and their optima is discussed, showing that the energy density results from a competition between average specific heat and loaded density. Moreover, sTES is shown to be applicable to virtually any storage temperature, depending only on the fluid’s critical point. Finally, a heat transfer and energy density comparison to other existing storage mechanisms is presented and supercritical water is shown to be competitive for high temperature thermal energy storage.

  6. Investigating the effects of critical phenomena in premixed methane-oxygen flames at cryogenic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Abishek; Yellapantula, Shashank; Larsson, Johan

    2017-11-01

    Methane is increasingly becoming viable as a rocket fuel in the latest generation of launch vehicles. In liquid rocket engines, fuel and oxidizer are injected under cryogenic conditions into the combustion chamber. At high pressures, typical of rocket combustion chambers, the propellants exist in supercritical states where the ideal gas thermodynamics are no longer valid. We investigate the effects of real-gas thermodynamics on transcritical laminar premixed methane-oxygen flames. The effect of the real-gas cubic equations of state and high-pressure transport properties on flame dynamics is presented. We also study real-gas effects on the extinction limits of the methane-oxygen flame.

  7. Electron spin resonance and quantum critical phenomena in VOx multiwall nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demishev, S.V.; Chernobrovkin, A.L.; Glushkov, V.V.; Samarin, N.A.; Sluchanko, N.E.; Semeno, A.V.; Goodilin, E.A.; Grigorieva, A.V.; Tretyakov, Yu.D.

    2008-01-01

    Basing on the high frequency (60 GHz) electron spin resonance study of the VO x multiwall nanotubes (VO x -NTs) carried out in the temperature range 4.2-200 K we report: (i) the first direct experimental evidence of the presence of the antiferromagnetic dimers in VO x -NTs and (ii) the observation of an anomalous low temperature growth of the magnetic susceptibility for quasi-free spins, which obey the power law χ(T)∝1/T α with the exponent α∼0.6 in a wide temperature range 4.2-50 K. We argue that the observed departures from the Curie-Weiss behaviour manifest the onset of the quantum critical regime and formation of the Griffiths phase as a magnetic ground state of these spin species. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. A gas dynamic and thermochemical model of steam/sodium microleak phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R.; Airey, R.; Daniels, L.C.

    1985-06-01

    Conflicting findings have been reported by 3 UK laboratories for the blockage or rapid escalation of steam/sodium microleaks. In an earlier paper it was shown that this discrepancy could be resolved through the influence on the steam flow of the geometry of the leak paths; the geometry being dependent upon the method of manufacture. The application of gas dynamics and thermochemical methods could account for the rapid escalation of some leaks in terms of the presence of shock waves in the gas flow within the leak path. In this paper the gas dynamic and thermochemical theories are re-stated and a series of leak experiments conducted to test the validity of the theory is described. The theory predicts that for some leaks of variable area of cross-section the blockage/escalation behaviour is determined by small changes in the sodium-side pressure; this effect was found and is discussed as a validation of the theory. Other aspects of leak phenomena are discussed and conclusions are drawn with emphasis on implications for further programmes of leak study and for leaks in LMFBR steam generators in service. (author)

  9. Multi-scaling in the critical phenomena in the quenched disordered systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X. T.

    2018-04-01

    The Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson Hamiltonian with random temperature for the phase transition in disordered systems from the Griffiths phase to ordered phase is reexamined. From the saddle point solutions, especially the excited state solutions, it is shown that the system self-organizes into blocks coupled with their neighbors like superspins, which are emergent variables. Taking the fluctuation around these saddle point solutions into account, we get an effective Hamiltonian, including the emergent superspins of the blocks, the fluctuation around the saddle point solutions, and their couplings. Applying Stratonovich-Hubbard transformation to the part of superspins, we get a Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson Hamiltonian for the blocks. From the saddle point equations for the blocks, we can get the second generation blocks, of which sizes are much larger than the first generation blocks. Repeating this procedure again and again, we get many generations of blocks to describe the asymptotic behavior. If a field is applied, the effective field on the superspins is multiplied greatly and proportional to the block size. For a very small field, the effective field on the higher generation superspins can be so strong to cause the superspins polarized radically. This can explain the extra large critical isotherm exponent discovered in the experiments. The phase space of reduced temperature vs. field is divided into many layers , in which different generation blocks dominate the critical behavior. The sizes of the different generation emergent blocks are new relevant length scales. This can explain a lot of puzzles in the experiments and the Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics studies for exotic clustering phenomena in neutron-rich nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, M. [Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Nuclear Reaction Data Centre, Faculty of Science, Sapporo (Japan); Suhara, T. [Matsue College of Technology, Matsue (Japan); Kanada-En' yo, Y. [Kyoto University, Department of Physics, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    We present a review of recent works on clustering phenomena in unstable nuclei studied by antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). The AMD studies in these decades have uncovered novel types of clustering phenomena brought about by the excess neutrons. Among them, this review focuses on the molecule-like structure of unstable nuclei. One of the earliest discussions on the clustering in unstable nuclei was made for neutron-rich Be and B isotopes. AMD calculations predicted that the ground state clustering is enhanced or reduced depending on the number of excess neutrons. Today, the experiments are confirming this prediction as the change of the proton radii. Behind this enhancement and reduction of the clustering, there are underlying shell effects called molecular and atomic orbits. These orbits form covalent and ionic bonding of the clusters analogous to the atomic molecules. It was found that this ''molecular-orbit picture'' reasonably explains the low-lying spectra of Be isotopes. The molecular-orbit picture is extended to other systems having parity asymmetric cluster cores and to the three cluster systems. O and Ne isotopes are the candidates of the former, while the 3α linear chains in C isotopes are the latter. For both subjects, many intensive studies are now in progress. We also pay a special attention to the observables which are the fingerprint of the clustering. In particular, we focus on the monopole and dipole transitions which are recently regarded as good probe for the clustering. We discuss how they have and will reveal the exotic clustering. (orig.)

  11. Critical heat flux phenomena in flow boiling during step wise and ramp wise power transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, G.P.; Cumo, M.; D'Annibale, F.; Farello, G.E.; Abou Said, S.

    1987-01-01

    The present paper deals with the results of an experimental investigation of the forced flow critical heat flux during power transients in a vertically heated channel. Experiments were carried out with a Refrigerant-12 1oop employing a circular test section which was electrically and uniformly heated. The power transients were performed with the step-wise and ramp-wise increase of the power to the test section. The test parameters included several values of the initial power (before the transient) and the final power (at the end of the transient) in the case of step-wise transients and the slope of the ramp in the case of ramp-wise transients. The pressure and specific mass flow rate, which were kept constant during the power transient,were varied from 1.2 to 2.7 MPa and 850 to 1500 Kg/sm 2 , respectively. Correlations of the experimental data for the time-to-crisis in terms of the independent parameters of the system are also proposed and verified for different values of pressure,mass flow rate, and inlet subcooling

  12. Critical phenomena of liquid 4He in the vicinity of the upper lambda point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, T.; Watanabe, T.

    1982-01-01

    We determined C/sub p/ along six isobars near T/sub lambda/ in the vicinity of the upper superfluid transition point (upper lambda point) from measurements of C/sub v/ and (partialP/partialT)/sub v/ along six isochores. C/sub p/ was analyzed with the function C/sub p/ = (A/α)epsilon/sup -alpha/(1+Depsilon/sup -Delta/)+B for T>T/sub lambda/, and the same function with primed coefficients for T 4 He near T/sub lambda/, that is, the correction term due to the irrelevant variable increases with pressure even in the small range epsilon - 3 . This indicates that the pressure depresses the true critical region. The universality of the amplitude ratio A/A' was confirmed even in the vicinity of the upper lambda point by specific heat measurements. With constraints α = α' = -0.02, δ = δ' = -0.5, and B = B' the pressure-independent amplitude ratios A/A' = 1.088 +- 0.007 and D/D' = 0.85 +- 0.2 were obtained. AD/A'D' = 0.93 +- 0.2 implies that the pressure has a similar effect on C/sub p/ in the normal fluid and superfluid regions, within experimental errors

  13. Soft deconfinement — critical phenomena at the Mott transition in a field theory for quarks and mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüfner, J.; Klevansky, S. P.; Rehberg, P.

    1996-02-01

    Critical phenomena associated with Mott transitions are investigated in the finite temperature SUf(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, that describes quarks u, d, s and bound mesons π, K. Critical exponents for the behavior close to the Mott temperature TM are determined for the static properties of a pion, such as mπ( T), gπqq( T), fπ( T), π, and the pion polarizabilities αC, N, as well as for the behavior of mK( T), gKqs( T) fK( T) in the strange sector. The effect of the Mott transitions on the q overlineq and ππ scattering lengths and for hadronization cross sections σ q overlineq→ππ (T) is discussed. Divergencies that occur in these quantities at TM indicate an intransparence with respect to hadronic and photonic probes, much like the phenomenon of critical opalescence. Physically, the Mott transition models the deconfinement transition expected of QCD since it corresponds to a delocalizayion of the bound states when the temperature is raised above TM.

  14. Critical phenomena and exchange interactions of an amorphous ferromagnet: gadolinium--gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, S.J.; Durand, J.

    1976-07-01

    Magnetization was measured between 4 and 290 0 K in fields up to 70 kOe on liquid-quenched Gd 80 Au 20 amorphous alloys. The Curie temperature and critical exponents β, γ and delta are found to be 149.45 0 K, 0.439, 1.294 and 3.948 respectively. These values are compared with the Heisenberg and molecular field values. The data are fitted to an equation of state previously derived for second order phase transition in fluid systems. The results illustrate clearly a second order phase transition in the amorphous state. A discussion in terms of the Heisenberg model is presented. The effective magnetic moment in the paramagnetic state has a value of 9.37 μ/sub B/ per gadolinium atom. The saturation moment extrapolated to 0 0 K is 7.0 μ/sub B/ per gadolinium atom. The low temperature saturation magnetization observes the T/sup 3 / 2 / law from 0.13 T/sub c/ to 0.80 T/sub c/. The effective exchange integrals J/sub n/ determined from the Rushbrooke--Wood formula and spin-wave theory are found to be 2.28 and 1.34 0 K respectively. The differences in J/sub n/ and that between the effective moment and saturation moment are attributed to the nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic couplings below T/sub c/. Possible effects of structural disorder on the magnetic properties of Gd in the amorphous state are discussed

  15. Nonlinear Phenomena in the Single-Mode Dynamics in an AFM Cantilever Beam

    KAUST Repository

    Ruzziconi, Laura

    2016-12-05

    profiles and integrity charts are drawn. The curves of constant percentage of integrity measure are detected, highlighting that they provide valuable quantitative information about the changes in the structural safety. Robustness as well as vulnerability to disturbances is examined. The practical range of existence of each branch is observed to be smaller, and sometimes remarkably smaller than the theoretical one. The issue of the dynamical integrity analysis in the AFM design is addressed, showing that these curves may be used to establish safety factors in order to operate the AFM according to the desired outcome, depending on the expected disturbances. Physical meaning and practical relevance of the nonlinear phenomena in the AFM engineering design are discussed.

  16. Dynamic asset trees in the US stock market: Structure variation and market phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Wei-Qiang; Yao, Shuang; Zhuang, Xin-Tian; Yuan, Ying

    2017-01-01

    In this work, employing a moving window to scan through every stock price time series over a period from 2 January 1986 to 20 October 2015, we use cross-correlations to measure the interdependence between stock prices, and we construct a corresponding minimal spanning tree for 170 U.S. stocks in every given window. We show how the asset tree evolves over time and describe the dynamics of its normalized length, centrality measures, vertex degree and vertex strength distributions, and single- and multiple-step edge survival ratios. We find that the normalized tree length shows a tendency to decrease over the 30 years. The power-law of vertex degree or vertex strength distribution does not hold for all trees. The survival ratio analysis reveals an increased stability of the dependence structure of the stock market as time elapses. We then examine the relationship between tree structure variation and market phenomena, such as average, volatility and tail risk of stock (market) return. Our main observation is that the normalized tree length has a positive relationship with the level of stock market average return, and it responds negatively to the market return volatility and tail risk. Furthermore, the majority of stocks have their vertex degrees significantly positively correlated to their average return, and significantly negatively correlated to their return volatility and tail risk.

  17. Local flooding phenomena in channel and land areas occurring during dynamic operation of a PEFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlen, S. von; Schneider, I.A. [Fuel Cell Diagnostics Activities, Paul Scherrer Institut, Electrochemistry Laboratory, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    In this work, we report on flooding phenomena occurring during dynamic operation of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). The combination of high spatially and temporally resolved neutron radiography and submillimeter resolved current density distribution measurements enables the simultaneous observation of local liquid water content and current density transients in the channel and land areas of a differentially operated PEFC air cathode. The local transients of a triangular voltage sweep and a voltage step are presented here. Both results demonstrate that in the land area the current density is only marginally affected by the local liquid water content. In the voltage sweep experiment, at higher cell polarization a limiting current density is observed in the land area as a result of mass transport limitations due to the high lateral diffusion path length. In the channel area the corresponding transients of the liquid water content and the current density both exhibit a hysteresis. The transients of the voltage step indicate liquid water rearrangement in channel and land areas as a slow process occurring on a time scale of several minutes. Thereby, the local cell performance is primarily affected by the local liquid water content in front of the oxygen electrode. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging of highly dynamic granular phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Alexander; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Müller, Christoph

    Probing non-intrusively the interior of three-dimensional granular systems is a challenging task for which a number of imaging techniques have been applied including positron emission particle tracking, X-ray tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A particular advantage of MRI is its versatility allowing quantitative velocimetry through phase contrast encoding and tagging, arbitrary slice orientations and the flexibility to trade spatial for temporal resolution and vice versa during image reconstruction. However, previous attempts to image granular systems using MRI were often limited to (pseudo-) steady state systems due to the poor temporal resolution of conventional imaging methodology. Here we present an experimental approach that overcomes previous limitations in temporal resolution by implementing a variety of methodological advances, viz. parallel data acquisition through tailored multiple receiver coils, fast gradient readouts for time-efficient data sampling and engineered granular materials that contain signal sources of high proton density. Achieving a spatial and temporal resolution of, respectively, 2 mm x 2 mm and 50 ms, we were able to image highly dynamic phenomena in granular media such as bubble coalescence and granular compaction waves.

  19. Advanced computational multi-fluid dynamics: a new model for understanding electrokinetic phenomena in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulamali, M. Y.; Saunders, J. H.; Jackson, M. D.; Pain, C. C.

    2009-04-01

    We present results from a new computational multi-fluid dynamics code, designed to model the transport of heat, mass and chemical species during flow of single or multiple immiscible fluid phases through porous media, including gravitational effects and compressibility. The model also captures the electrical phenomena which may arise through electrokinetic, electrochemical and electrothermal coupling. Building on the advanced computational technology of the Imperial College Ocean Model, this new development leads the way towards a complex multiphase code using arbitrary unstructured and adaptive meshes, and domains decomposed to run in parallel over a cluster of workstations or a dedicated parallel computer. These facilities will allow efficient and accurate modelling of multiphase flows which capture large- and small-scale transport phenomena, while preserving the important geology and/or surface topology to make the results physically meaningful and realistic. Applications include modelling of contaminant transport in aquifers, multiphase flow during hydrocarbon production, migration of carbon dioxide during sequestration, and evaluation of the design and safety of nuclear reactors. Simulations of the streaming potential resulting from multiphase flow in laboratory- and field-scale models demonstrate that streaming potential signals originate at fluid fronts, and at geologic boundaries where fluid saturation changes. This suggests that downhole measurements of streaming potential may be used to inform production strategies in oil and gas reservoirs. As water encroaches on an oil production well, the streaming-potential signal associated with the water front encompasses the well even when the front is up to 100 m away, so the potential measured at the well starts to change significantly relative to a distant reference electrode. Variations in the geometry of the encroaching water front could be characterized using an array of electrodes positioned along the well

  20. Critical Thresholds in Earth-System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, D.

    2017-12-01

    The history of the Earth system is a story of change. Some changesare gradual and benign, but others, especially those associated withcatastrophic mass extinction, are relatively abrupt and destructive.What sets one group apart from the other? Here I hypothesize thatperturbations of Earth's carbon cycle lead to mass extinction if theyexceed either a critical rate at long time scales or a critical sizeat short time scales. By analyzing 31 carbon-isotopic events duringthe last 542 million years, I identify the critical rate with a limitimposed by mass conservation. Further analysis identifies thecrossover timescale separating fast from slow events with thetimescale of the ocean's homeostatic response to a change in pH. Theproduct of the critical rate and the crossover timescale then yieldsthe critical size. The modern critical size for the marine carboncycle is roughly similar to the mass of carbon that human activitieswill likely have added to the oceans by the year 2100.

  1. Pre-critical phenomena of two-flavor color superconductivity in heated quark matter. Diquark-pair fluctuations and non-Fermi liquid behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Kunihiro, Teiji; Koide, Tomoi; Nemoto, Yukio

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the fluctuations of the diquark-pair field and their effects on observables above the critical temperature T c in two-flavor color superconductivity (CSC) at moderate density using a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type effective model of QCD. Because of the strong-coupling nature of the dynamics, the fluctuations of the pair field develop a collective mode, which has a prominent strength even well above T c . We show that the collective mode is actually the soft mode of CSC. We examine the effects of the pair fluctuations on the specific heat and the quark spectrum for T above but close to T c . We find that the specific heat exhibits singular behavior because of the pair fluctuations, in accordance with the general theory of second-order phase transitions. The quarks display a typical non-Fermi liquid behavior, owing to the coupling with the soft mode, leading to a pseudo-gap in the density of states of the quarks in the vicinity of the critical point. Some experimental implications of the precursory phenomena are also discussed. (author)

  2. Dynamical analysis of critical assembly CC-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman Fernandez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The computer code CC-1, elaborated for the analysis of transients in Critical Assemblies is described. The results by the program are compared with the ones presented in the Safety Report for the Critical Assembly of ''La Quebrada'' Nuclear Research Centre (CIN). 7 refs

  3. Critical dynamics a field theory approach to equilibrium and non-equilibrium scaling behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Täuber, Uwe C

    2014-01-01

    Introducing a unified framework for describing and understanding complex interacting systems common in physics, chemistry, biology, ecology, and the social sciences, this comprehensive overview of dynamic critical phenomena covers the description of systems at thermal equilibrium, quantum systems, and non-equilibrium systems. Powerful mathematical techniques for dealing with complex dynamic systems are carefully introduced, including field-theoretic tools and the perturbative dynamical renormalization group approach, rapidly building up a mathematical toolbox of relevant skills. Heuristic and qualitative arguments outlining the essential theory behind each type of system are introduced at the start of each chapter, alongside real-world numerical and experimental data, firmly linking new mathematical techniques to their practical applications. Each chapter is supported by carefully tailored problems for solution, and comprehensive suggestions for further reading, making this an excellent introduction to critic...

  4. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of core bypass flow phenomena in a prismatic VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Johnson, Richard; Schultz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The core bypass flow in a prismatic very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is an important design consideration and can have considerable impact on the condition of reactor core internals including fuels. The interstitial gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The occurrence of hot spots in the core and lower plenum and hot streaking in the lower plenum (regions of very hot gas flow) are affected by bypass flow. In the present study, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations of a typical prismatic VHTR are conducted to better understand bypass flow phenomena and establish an evaluation method for the reactor core using the commercial CFD code FLUENT. Parametric calculations changing several factors in a one-twelfth sector of a fuel column are performed. The simulations show the impact of each factor on bypass flow and the resulting flow and temperature distributions in the prismatic core. Factors include inter-column gap-width, turbulence model, axial heat generation profile and geometry change from irradiation-induced shrinkage in the graphite block region. It is shown that bypass flow provides a significant cooling effect on the prismatic block and that the maximum fuel and coolant channel outlet temperatures increase with an increase in gap-width, especially when a peak radial factor is applied to the total heat generation rate. Also, the presence of bypass flow causes a large lateral temperature gradient in the block and also dramatically increases the variation in coolant channel outlet temperatures for a given block that may have repercussions on the structural integrity of the graphite, the neutronics and the potential for hot streaking and hot spots occurring in the lower plenum.

  5. Phase distribution phenomena in upward cocurrent bubbly flows. A critical review of the experimental and theoretical works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossetete, C.

    1992-09-01

    The most important and challenging problems in two-phase bubbly flow today are related to the physical understanding and the modeling of multidimensional phenomena such as the distribution of phases in space. We present here a critical review of the available experimental and theoretical studies in gas-liquid adiabatic and non-reactive upward bubbly flows which have been carried out to define and improve the physical models needed to close the three-dimensional two-fluid model equations. It appears that: so far, the axial development of two-phase upward bubbly flows has not been handled thoroughly. Little is known about the way the pressure gradient as well as the gas-liquid mixing conditions affect the distribution of phases, the problems related to the closing of the two-fluid model equations are far from being solved. The physical models proposed seem often to be too much complex considering how little we know about the mechanisms involved, there are still very few multidimensional numerical models whose results have been compared with experimental data on bubbly flows. The boundary conditions introduced in the codes as well as the sensitivity of the results to the parameters of the codes are never precisely stated. To bridge some of those gaps, we propose to perform an experimental and numerical study of the axial development of two-phase air-water upward bubbly flows in vertical pipes

  6. Dynamics of quantum discord in a quantum critical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Zhengjun; Li Yongming; Lu Xiaoming; Sun Zhe

    2011-01-01

    We study the dynamics of quantum discord (QD) of two qubits independently coupled to an Ising spin chain in a transverse field, which exhibits a quantum phase transition. For this model, we drive the corresponding Kraus operators, obtain the analytic results of QD and compare the dynamics of QD with the dynamics of relative entropy of entanglement nearby the critical point. It is shown that the impact of the quantum criticality environment on QD can be concentrated in a very narrow region nearby the critical point, so it supplies an efficient way to detect the critical points. In the vicinity of the critical point, the evolution of QD is shown to be more complicated than that of entanglement. Furthermore, we find that separable states can also be used to reflect the quantum criticality of the environment.

  7. Suppression pool testing at the SIET laboratory. Experimental investigation of critical phenomena expected in the Fukushima Daiichi suppression chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, Marco; Naitoh, Masanori; Araneo, Lucio; Ninokata, Hisashi; Ricotti, Marco; Achilli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    possibly dependent on the distance of the pipe outlet to the pool floor. Given the reduced size of the pool compared to the plant scale, the observed phenomena should not be extrapolated for the whole S/C. The objective of the ongoing experimental activity is to construct a database based on the high-speed filming, measurements of major quantities such as water temperature, steam pressure and FPs concentration to foster the development of physical models for both lumped parameter SA codes and detailed computational fluid dynamics software, in an effort to enhance the understanding of the complex phenomena following the 1F accident. (author)

  8. Dynamic Hazards In Critical Infrastructure Of State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostrowska Teresa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors are interested in some aspects of a development project entitled “The methodology of risk assessment for the purposes of crisis management system RP (ID 193751”. The project funded by the National Research and Development Centre under the Competition 3/2012 (security and defense. As part of the project the following items were reviewed and analyzed: materials related to the Government Security Centre, already completed and available products of the project ID 193751, and literature relating to, among other things, crisis management, critical infrastructure, business continuity, security, and threats. The basic emphasis of the article is focused on the resource-critical infrastructure interpretation of the state, whereby the state is perceived as a complex administrative structure in which, on the basis of external and internal interactions of resources, the risk of threats measurement is done.

  9. Hybridized Kibble-Zurek scaling in the driven critical dynamics across an overlapping critical region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Liang-Jun; Wang, Huai-Yu; Yin, Shuai

    2018-04-01

    The conventional Kibble-Zurek scaling describes the scaling behavior in the driven dynamics across a single critical region. In this paper, we study the driven dynamics across an overlapping critical region, in which a critical region (Region A) is overlaid by another critical region (Region B). We develop a hybridized Kibble-Zurek scaling (HKZS) to characterize the scaling behavior in the driven process. According to the HKZS, the driven dynamics in the overlapping region can be described by the critical theories for both Region A and Region B simultaneously. This results in a constraint on the scaling function in the overlapping critical region. We take the quantum Ising chain in an imaginary longitudinal field as an example. In this model, the critical region of the Yang-Lee edge singularity and the critical region of the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition overlap with each other. We numerically confirm the HKZS by simulating the driven dynamics in this overlapping critical region. The HKZSs in other models are also discussed.

  10. Granular dynamics simulation of segregation phenomena in bubbling gas-fluidised beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoomans, B.P.B.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2000-01-01

    A hard-sphere discrete particle model of a gas-fluidised bed was used in order to simulate segregation phenomena in systems consisting of particles of different sizes. In the model, the gas-phase hydrodynamics is described by the spatially averaged Navier¿Stokes equations for two-phase flow. For

  11. Critical quench dynamics in confined systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collura, Mario; Karevski, Dragi

    2010-05-21

    We analyze the coherent quantum evolution of a many-particle system after slowly sweeping a power-law confining potential. The amplitude of the confining potential is varied in time along a power-law ramp such that the many-particle system finally reaches or crosses a critical point. Under this protocol we derive general scaling laws for the density of excitations created during the nonadiabatic sweep of the confining potential. It is found that the mean excitation density follows an algebraic law as a function of the sweeping rate with an exponent that depends on the space-time properties of the potential. We confirm our scaling laws by first order adiabatic calculation and exact results on the Ising quantum chain with a varying transverse field.

  12. Self-regulated dynamical criticality in human ECoG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo eSolovey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mounting experimental and theoretical results indicate that neural systems are poised near a critical state. In human subjects, however, most evidence comes from functional MRI studies, an indirect measurement of neuronal activity with poor temporal resolution. Electrocorticography (ECoG provides a unique window into human brain activity: each electrode records, with high temporal resolution, the activity resulting from the sum of the local field potentials of sim 10^5 neurons. We show that the human brain ECoG recordings display features of self-regulated dynamical criticality: dynamical modes of activation drift around the critical stability threshold, moving in and out of the unstable region and equilibrating the global dynamical state at a very fast time scale. Moreover, the analysis also reveals differences between the resting state and a motor task, associated with increased stability of a fraction of the dynamical modes.

  13. Visualizing dynamic geosciences phenomena using an octree-based view-dependent LOD strategy within virtual globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wu, Huayi; Yang, Chaowei; Wong, David W.; Xie, Jibo

    2011-09-01

    Geoscientists build dynamic models to simulate various natural phenomena for a better understanding of our planet. Interactive visualizations of these geoscience models and their outputs through virtual globes on the Internet can help the public understand the dynamic phenomena related to the Earth more intuitively. However, challenges arise when the volume of four-dimensional data (4D), 3D in space plus time, is huge for rendering. Datasets loaded from geographically distributed data servers require synchronization between ingesting and rendering data. Also the visualization capability of display clients varies significantly in such an online visualization environment; some may not have high-end graphic cards. To enhance the efficiency of visualizing dynamic volumetric data in virtual globes, this paper proposes a systematic framework, in which an octree-based multiresolution data structure is implemented to organize time series 3D geospatial data to be used in virtual globe environments. This framework includes a view-dependent continuous level of detail (LOD) strategy formulated as a synchronized part of the virtual globe rendering process. Through the octree-based data retrieval process, the LOD strategy enables the rendering of the 4D simulation at a consistent and acceptable frame rate. To demonstrate the capabilities of this framework, data of a simulated dust storm event are rendered in World Wind, an open source virtual globe. The rendering performances with and without the octree-based LOD strategy are compared. The experimental results show that using the proposed data structure and processing strategy significantly enhances the visualization performance when rendering dynamic geospatial phenomena in virtual globes.

  14. Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Fundamentals and Case Studies of Natural Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Lorrain, Paul; Houle, Stéphane

    2006-01-01

    This book concerns the generation of electric currents and of electric space charges inside conducting media that move in magnetic fields. The authors postulate nothing but the Maxwell equations. They discuss at length the disk dynamo, which serves as a model for the natural self-excited dynamos that generate magnetic fields such as that of sunspots. There are 36 Examples and 13 Case Studies. The Case Studies concern solar phenomena -- magnetic elements, sunspots, spicules, coronal loops -- and the Earth's magnetic field.

  15. Transport phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirczenow, G.; Marro, J.

    1974-01-01

    Some simple remarks on the basis of transport theory. - Entropy, dynamics and scattering theory. - Response, relaxation and fluctuation. - Fluctuating hydrodynamics and renormalization of susceptibilities and transport coefficients. - Irreversibility of the transport equations. - Ergodic theory and statistical mechanics. - Correlation functions in Heisenberg magnets. - On the Enskog hard-sphere kinetic eqquation and the transport phenomena of dense simple gases. - What can one learn from Lorentz models. - Conductivity in a magnetic field. - Transport properties in gases in presence of external fields. - Transport properties of dilute gases with internal structure. (orig.) [de

  16. New techniques for the characterisation of dynamical phenomena in solar coronal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbrecht, E.

    2007-02-01

    ) was an important step on the way to subarcsecond telescopes. It allows a spatial resolution of 1" in the EUV and UV bands and, simultaneously, a temporal resolution of the order of a few seconds. Coronal physics studies are dominated by two major and interlinked problems: coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Above the chromosphere there is a thin transition layer in which the temperature suddenly increases and density drops. How can the temperature of the solar corona be three orders of magnitude higher than the temperature of the photosphere? In order for this huge temperature gradient to be stationary, non-thermal energy must be transported from below the photosphere towards the chromosphere and corona and converted into heat to balance the radiative and conductive losses. This puzzle of origin, transport and conversion of energy is referred to as the "coronal heating problem". Due to its fundamental role in the structuring of the corona, the magnetic field is supposed to play an important role in the heating. In this dissertation we describe two aspects of solar coronal dynamics: waves in coronal loops (Part I) and coronal mass ejections (Part II). We investigate the influence of (semi-) automated techniques on solar coronal research. This is a timely discussion since the observation of solar phenomena is transitioning from manual detection to "Solar Image Processing". Our results are mainly based on images from the Extreme UV Imaging Telescope (EIT) and the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO), two instruments onboard the satellite SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) of which we recently celebrated its 11th anniversary. The high quality of the images together with the long timespan created a valuable database for solar physics research. Part I reports on the first detection of slow magnetoacoustic waves in transequatorial coronal loops observed in high cadence image sequences simultaneously produced by EIT and TRACE (Transition Region

  17. Quantum critical dynamics for a prototype class of insulating antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianda; Yang, Wang; Wu, Congjun; Si, Qimiao

    2018-06-01

    Quantum criticality is a fundamental organizing principle for studying strongly correlated systems. Nevertheless, understanding quantum critical dynamics at nonzero temperatures is a major challenge of condensed-matter physics due to the intricate interplay between quantum and thermal fluctuations. The recent experiments with the quantum spin dimer material TlCuCl3 provide an unprecedented opportunity to test the theories of quantum criticality. We investigate the nonzero-temperature quantum critical spin dynamics by employing an effective O (N ) field theory. The on-shell mass and the damping rate of quantum critical spin excitations as functions of temperature are calculated based on the renormalized coupling strength and are in excellent agreement with experiment observations. Their T lnT dependence is predicted to be dominant at very low temperatures, which will be tested in future experiments. Our work provides confidence that quantum criticality as a theoretical framework, which is being considered in so many different contexts of condensed-matter physics and beyond, is indeed grounded in materials and experiments accurately. It is also expected to motivate further experimental investigations on the applicability of the field theory to related quantum critical systems.

  18. Dynamical effects and the critical behavior of random-field systems (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapir, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of phenomena is observed experimentally in random-field (RF) systems realized by the application of an external field to diluted antiferromagnets. At low temperatures, infinitely long hysteretic effects are manifested by the history dependence of the final states: long-range order is observed if the field is applied after cooling, while domain states are reached when field cooled. While no indications for critical fluctuations are detected in 2-D systems, scaling behavior, for both the correlation length and the specific heat, is observed in 3-D systems over an intermediate range of temperatures. The related critical properties seem to be well described by the corresponding ones in the 2-D pure Ising model. The renormalization-group approach, which yields for the equilibrium critical exponents their values of the pure model in d-2 dimensions, is reviewed. A generalization of the dimensional-reduction approach, which accounts self-consistently for renormalized responses of the RF system, is presented. The dynamical effects are implicitly incorporated through the variation in the critical response between the local and the global regimes, associated with short- and long-time scales, respectively. In both regimes the lower critical dimension is found to be d = 2 in accordance with stability arguments. The short-time critical behavior indicates a dimensional reduction by one for the 3-D thermal exponents, in agreement with the experimental results

  19. Dynamical effects and the critical behavior of random-field systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapir, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of phenomena is observed experimentally in random-field (RF) systems realized by the application of an external field to diluted antiferromagnets. At low temperatures, infinitely long hysteretic effects are manifested by the history dependence of the final states: long-range order is observed if the field is applied after cooling, while domain states are reached when field cooled. While no indications for critical fluctuations are detected in 2-D systems, scaling behavior, for both the correlation length and the specific heat, is observed in 3-D systems over an intermediate range of temperatures. The related critical properties seem to be well described by the corresponding ones in the 2-D pure Ising model. The renormalization-group approach, which yields for the equilibrium critical exponents their values of the pure model in d-2 dimensions, is reviewed. A generalization of the dimensional-reduction approach, which accounts self-consistently for renormalized responses of the RF system, is presented. The dynamical effects are implicitly incorporated through the variation in the critical response between the local and the global regimes, associated with short- and long-time scales, respectively. In both regimes the lower critical dimension is found to be d = 2 in accordance with stability arguments. The short-time critical behavior indicates a dimensional reduction by one for the 3-D thermal exponents, in agreement with the experimental results. 37 references

  20. Nonlinear Phenomena in the Single-Mode Dynamics in an AFM Cantilever Beam

    KAUST Repository

    Ruzziconi, Laura; Lenci, Stefano; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    This study deals with the nonlinear dynamics arising in an atomic force microscope cantilever beam. After analyzing the static behavior, a single degree of freedom Galerkin reduced order model is introduced, which describes the overall scenario

  1. Dynamic modeling of physical phenomena for probabilistic assessment of spent fuel accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    If there should be an accident involving drainage of all the water from a spent fuel pool, the fuel elements will heat up until the heat produced by radioactive decay is balanced by that removed by natural convection to air, thermal radiation, and other means. If the temperatures become high enough for the cladding or other materials to ignite due to rapid oxidation, then some of the fuel might melt, leading to an undesirable release of radioactive materials. The amount of melting is dependent upon the fuel loading configuration and its age, the oxidation and melting characteristics of the materials, and the potential effectiveness of recovery actions. The authors have developed methods for modeling the pertinent physical phenomena and integrating the results with a probabilistic treatment of the uncertainty distributions. The net result is a set of complementary cumulative distribution functions for the amount of fuel melted

  2. Dynamic sensing model for accurate delectability of environmental phenomena using event wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missif, Lial Raja; Kadhum, Mohammad M.

    2017-09-01

    Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) has been widely used for monitoring where sensors are deployed to operate independently to sense abnormal phenomena. Most of the proposed environmental monitoring systems are designed based on a predetermined sensing range which does not reflect the sensor reliability, event characteristics, and the environment conditions. Measuring of the capability of a sensor node to accurately detect an event within a sensing field is of great important for monitoring applications. This paper presents an efficient mechanism for even detection based on probabilistic sensing model. Different models have been presented theoretically in this paper to examine their adaptability and applicability to the real environment applications. The numerical results of the experimental evaluation have showed that the probabilistic sensing model provides accurate observation and delectability of an event, and it can be utilized for different environment scenarios.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of shock wave and spallation phenomena in metal foils irradiated by femtosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Demaske, Brian; Inogamov, Nail; Oleynik, Ivan

    2010-03-01

    Femtosecond laser irradiation of metals is an effective technique to create a high-pressure frontal layer of 100-200 nm thickness. The associated ablation and spallation phenomena can be studied in the laser pump-probe experiments. We present results of a large-scale MD simulation of ablation and spallation dynamics developing in 1,2,3μm thick Al and Au foils irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse. Atomic-scale mechanisms of laser energy deposition, transition from pressure wave to shock, reflection of the shock from the rear-side of the foil, and the nucleation of cracks in the reflected tensile wave, having a very high strain rate, were all studied. To achieve a realistic description of the complex phenomena induced by strong compression and rarefaction waves, we developed new embedded atom potentials for Al and Au based on cold pressure curves. MD simulations revealed the complex interplay between spallation and ablation processes: dynamics of spallation depends on the pressure profile formed in the ablated zone at the early stage of laser energy absorption. It is shown that the essential information such as material properties at high strain rate and spall strength can be extracted from the simulated rear-side surface velocity as a function of time.

  4. Entanglement dynamics in critical random quantum Ising chain with perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yichen, E-mail: ychuang@caltech.edu

    2017-05-15

    We simulate the entanglement dynamics in a critical random quantum Ising chain with generic perturbations using the time-evolving block decimation algorithm. Starting from a product state, we observe super-logarithmic growth of entanglement entropy with time. The numerical result is consistent with the analytical prediction of Vosk and Altman using a real-space renormalization group technique. - Highlights: • We study the dynamical quantum phase transition between many-body localized phases. • We simulate the dynamics of a very long random spin chain with matrix product states. • We observe numerically super-logarithmic growth of entanglement entropy with time.

  5. Introduction to wetting phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indekeu, J.O.

    1995-01-01

    In these lectures the field of wetting phenomena is introduced from the point of view of statistical physics. The phase transition from partial to complete wetting is discussed and examples of relevant experiments in binary liquid mixtures are given. Cahn's concept of critical-point wetting is examined in detail. Finally, a connection is drawn between wetting near bulk criticality and the universality classes of surface critical phenomena. (author)

  6. Critical Assessment of Effective Interfacial Potentials Based on a Density Functional Theory for Wetting Phenomena on Curved Substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nold, A.; Malijevský, Alexandr; Kalliadasis, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 197, č. 1 (2011), s. 185-191 ISSN 1951-6355 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720710 Grant - others:EPSRC(GB) EP/E046029; FP7 ITN(XE) 214919; ERC(XE) 247301 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : wetting phenomena * curved substrates * theory Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.562, year: 2011

  7. The calculation of turbulence phenomena in plasma focus dynamics using REDUCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayd, A.; Maurer, M.; Meinke, P.; Kaeppeler, H.J.

    1982-05-01

    Based on previous calculations of the development of highly turbulent plasma states resulting from m=0 instabilities and the application to the turbulent development in the late stage of a plasma focus experiment, using REDUE, the treatment of plasma focus dynamics is extended to the compression stage and 'intermediate' stage between maximum density and m = o onset. For this, a two-fluid model of the magneto-fluid dynamic equations is employed. The non-linear development is again treated in ω, k-space and transformed back into r, t-space to obtain local dynamic variables as functions of time. The calculation is applied to the Stuttgart plasma focus experiment POSEIDON. It is shown that for relatively high pinch currents, neutron production also appears in the 'intermediate' phase, the life-time of which increases with increasing pinch current. (orig.)

  8. Application of dynamical systems theory to global weather phenomena revealed by satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Barry; Ebisuzaki, Wesley; Maasch, Kirk A.; Oglesby, Robert; Pandolfo, Lionel; Tang, Chung-Muh

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical studies of low frequency and seasonal weather variability; dynamical properties of observational and general circulation model (GCM)-generated records; effects of the hydrologic cycle and latent heat release on extratropical weather; and Earth-system science studies are summarized.

  9. BETAview: a digital {beta}-imaging system for dynamic studies of biological phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolucci, E.; Conti, M.; Mettivier, G.; Montesi, M.C. E-mail: montesi@na.infn.it; Russo, P

    2002-02-01

    We present a digital autoradiography (DAR) system, named BETAview, based on semiconductor pixel detectors and a single particle counting chip, for quantitative analysis of {beta}-emitting radioactive tracers in biological samples. The system is able to perform a real time monitoring of time-dependent biological phenomena. BETAview could be equipped either with GaAs or with Si semiconductor pixellated detectors. In this paper, we describe the results obtained with an assembly based on a Si detector, 300 {mu}m thick, segmented into 64x64 170 {mu}m size square pixels. The detector is bump-bonded to the low threshold, single particle counting chip named Medipix1, developed by a CERN-based European collaboration. The sensitive area is about 1 cm{sup 2}. Studies of background noise and detection efficiency have been performed. Moreover, time-resolved cellular uptake studies with radiolabelled molecules have been monitored. Specifically, we have followed in vivo and in real time, the [{sup 14}C]L-leucine amino acid uptake by eggs of Octopus vulgaris confirming the preliminary results of a previous paper. This opens the field of biomolecular kynetic studies with this new class of semiconductor DAR systems, whose evolution (using the Medipix2 chip, 256x256 pixels, 55 {mu}m pixel size) is soon to come.

  10. BETAview: a digital β-imaging system for dynamic studies of biological phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolucci, E.; Conti, M.; Mettivier, G.; Montesi, M.C.; Russo, P.

    2002-01-01

    We present a digital autoradiography (DAR) system, named BETAview, based on semiconductor pixel detectors and a single particle counting chip, for quantitative analysis of β-emitting radioactive tracers in biological samples. The system is able to perform a real time monitoring of time-dependent biological phenomena. BETAview could be equipped either with GaAs or with Si semiconductor pixellated detectors. In this paper, we describe the results obtained with an assembly based on a Si detector, 300 μm thick, segmented into 64x64 170 μm size square pixels. The detector is bump-bonded to the low threshold, single particle counting chip named Medipix1, developed by a CERN-based European collaboration. The sensitive area is about 1 cm 2 . Studies of background noise and detection efficiency have been performed. Moreover, time-resolved cellular uptake studies with radiolabelled molecules have been monitored. Specifically, we have followed in vivo and in real time, the [ 14 C]L-leucine amino acid uptake by eggs of Octopus vulgaris confirming the preliminary results of a previous paper. This opens the field of biomolecular kynetic studies with this new class of semiconductor DAR systems, whose evolution (using the Medipix2 chip, 256x256 pixels, 55 μm pixel size) is soon to come

  11. Anomalous quantum critical spin dynamics in YFe2Al10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K.; Tan, C.; Zhang, J.; Ding, Z.; MacLaughlin, D. E.; Bernal, O. O.; Ho, P.-C.; Baines, C.; Wu, L. S.; Aronson, M. C.; Shu, L.

    2018-04-01

    We report results of a muon spin relaxation (μ SR ) study of YFe2Al10 , a quasi-two-dimensional (2D) nearly ferromagnetic metal in which unconventional quantum critical behavior is observed. No static Fe2 + magnetism, with or without long-range order, is found down to 19 mK. The dynamic muon spin relaxation rate λ exhibits power-law divergences in temperature and magnetic field, the latter for fields that are too weak to affect the electronic spin dynamics directly. We attribute this to the proportionality of λ (ωμ,T ) to the dynamic structure factor S (ωμ,T ) , where ωμ≈105-107s-1 is the muon Zeeman frequency. These results suggest critical divergences of S (ωμ,T ) in both temperature and frequency. Power-law scaling and a 2D dissipative quantum XY model both yield forms for S (ω ,T ) that agree with neutron scattering data (ω ≈1012s-1 ). Extrapolation to μ SR frequencies agrees semiquantitatively with the observed temperature dependence of λ (ωμ,T ) , but predicts frequency independence for ωμ≪T , in extreme disagreement with experiment. We conclude that the quantum critical spin dynamics of YFe2Al10 is not well understood at low frequencies.

  12. Dynamics of fragments and associated phenomena in heavy-ion collisions using a modified secondary algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rohit [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India)

    2016-05-06

    We discuss the stability of fragments identified by secondary algorithms used to construct fragments within quantum molecular dynamics model. For this purpose we employ three different algorithms for fragment identification. 1) The conventional minimum spanning tree (MST) method based on the spatial correlations, 2) an improved version of MST with additional binding energy constraints of cold nuclear matter, 3) and that of hot matter. We find significant role of thermal binding energies over cold matter binding energies. Significant role is observed for fragment multiplicities and stopping of fragments. Whereas insignificant effect is observed on fragment’s flow.

  13. DTADH and quantum critical phenomena caused by anisotropy and external magnetic field for spin-1/2 Heisenberg diamond chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanchao

    2010-01-01

    Using the transfer matrix renormalization group (TMRG) method, we study the connection between the first derivative of the thermal average of driving-term Hamiltonian (DTADH) and the trace of quantum critical behaviors at finite temperatures. Connecting with the exact diagonalization method, we give the phase diagrams and analyze the properties of each phase for both the ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic frustrated J 3 anisotropy diamond chain models. The finite-temperature scaling behaviors near the critical regions are also investigated. Further, we show the critical behaviors driven by external magnetic field, analyze the formation of the 1/3 magnetic plateau and the influence of different interactions on those critical points for both the ferrimagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic distorted diamond chains.

  14. Quantum Critical Point revisited by the Dynamical Mean Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhu; Kotliar, Gabriel; Tsvelik, Alexei

    Dynamical mean field theory is used to study the quantum critical point (QCP) in the doped Hubbard model on a square lattice. The QCP is characterized by a universal scaling form of the self energy and a spin density wave instability at an incommensurate wave vector. The scaling form unifies the low energy kink and the high energy waterfall feature in the spectral function, while the spin dynamics includes both the critical incommensurate and high energy antiferromagnetic paramagnons. We use the frequency dependent four-point correlation function of spin operators to calculate the momentum dependent correction to the electron self energy. Our results reveal a substantial difference with the calculations based on the Spin-Fermion model which indicates that the frequency dependence of the the quasiparitcle-paramagnon vertices is an important factor. The authors are supported by Center for Computational Design of Functional Strongly Correlated Materials and Theoretical Spectroscopy under DOE Grant DE-FOA-0001276.

  15. Quantum critical point revisited by dynamical mean-field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhu; Kotliar, Gabriel; Tsvelik, Alexei M.

    2017-03-01

    Dynamical mean-field theory is used to study the quantum critical point (QCP) in the doped Hubbard model on a square lattice. The QCP is characterized by a universal scaling form of the self-energy and a spin density wave instability at an incommensurate wave vector. The scaling form unifies the low-energy kink and the high-energy waterfall feature in the spectral function, while the spin dynamics includes both the critical incommensurate and high-energy antiferromagnetic paramagnons. We use the frequency-dependent four-point correlation function of spin operators to calculate the momentum-dependent correction to the electron self-energy. By comparing with the calculations based on the spin-fermion model, our results indicate the frequency dependence of the quasiparticle-paramagnon vertices is an important factor to capture the momentum dependence in quasiparticle scattering.

  16. Quantum critical point revisited by dynamical mean-field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Wenhu; Kotliar, Gabriel; Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ; Tsvelik, Alexei M.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamical mean-field theory is used to study the quantum critical point (QCP) in the doped Hubbard model on a square lattice. We characterize the QCP by a universal scaling form of the self-energy and a spin density wave instability at an incommensurate wave vector. The scaling form unifies the low-energy kink and the high-energy waterfall feature in the spectral function, while the spin dynamics includes both the critical incommensurate and high-energy antiferromagnetic paramagnons. Here, we use the frequency-dependent four-point correlation function of spin operators to calculate the momentum-dependent correction to the electron self-energy. Furthermore, by comparing with the calculations based on the spin-fermion model, our results indicate the frequency dependence of the quasiparticle-paramagnon vertices is an important factor to capture the momentum dependence in quasiparticle scattering.

  17. The complex dynamics of wishful thinking: the critical positivity ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicholas J L; Sokal, Alan D; Friedman, Harris L

    2013-12-01

    We examine critically the claims made by Fredrickson and Losada (2005) concerning the construct known as the "positivity ratio." We find no theoretical or empirical justification for the use of differential equations drawn from fluid dynamics, a subfield of physics, to describe changes in human emotions over time; furthermore, we demonstrate that the purported application of these equations contains numerous fundamental conceptual and mathematical errors. The lack of relevance of these equations and their incorrect application lead us to conclude that Fredrickson and Losada's claim to have demonstrated the existence of a critical minimum positivity ratio of 2.9013 is entirely unfounded. More generally, we urge future researchers to exercise caution in the use of advanced mathematical tools, such as nonlinear dynamics, and in particular to verify that the elementary conditions for their valid application have been met. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Critical dynamics of an interacting magnetic nanoparticle system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Jonsson, P.E.; Nordblad, P.

    2002-01-01

    Effects of dipole-dipole interactions on the magnetic relaxation have been investigated for three Fe-C nanoparticle samples with volume concentrations of 0.06, 5 and 17 vol%. While both the 5 and 17 vol% samples exhibit collective behaviour due to dipolar interactions, only the 17 vol% sample dis...... displays critical behaviour close to its transition temperature. The behaviour of the 5 vol% sample can be attributed to a mixture of collective and single-particle dynamics....

  19. Fundamentals of Fire Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintiere, James

    analyses. Fire phenomena encompass everything about the scientific principles behind fire behaviour. Combining the principles of chemistry, physics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid dynamics necessary to understand the fundamentals of fire phenomena, this book integrates the subject into a clear...

  20. Computational fluid dynamic simulation of pressurizer safety valve loop seal purge phenomena in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon

    2012-01-01

    In Korean 3 Loop plants a water loop seal pipe is installed containing condensed water upstream of a pressurizer safety valve to protect the valve disk from the hot steam environment. The loop seal water purge time is a key parameter in safety analyses for overpressure transients, because it delays valve opening. The loop seal purge time is uncertain to measure by test and thus 3-dimensional realistic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed in this paper to predict the seal water purge time before full opening of the valve which is driven by steam after water purge. The CFD model for a typical pressurizer safety valve with a loop seal pipe is developed using the computer code of ANSYS CFX 11. Steady-state simulations are performed for full discharge of steam at the valve full opening. Transient simulations are performed for the loop seal dynamics and to estimate the loop seal purge time. A sudden pressure drop higher than 2,000 psia at the tip of the upper nozzle ring is expected from the steady-state calculation. Through the transient simulation, almost loop seal water is discharged within 1.2 second through the narrow opening between the disk and the nozzle of the valve. It can be expected that the valve fully opens at least before 1.2 second because constant valve opening is assumed in this CFX simulation, which is conservative because the valve opens fully before the loop seal water is completely discharged. The predicted loop seal purge time is compared with previous correlation. (orig.)

  1. Computational fluid dynamic simulation of pressurizer safety valve loop seal purge phenomena in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Woon [Dongguk Univ., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of). Nuclear and Energy Engineering Dept.

    2012-11-15

    In Korean 3 Loop plants a water loop seal pipe is installed containing condensed water upstream of a pressurizer safety valve to protect the valve disk from the hot steam environment. The loop seal water purge time is a key parameter in safety analyses for overpressure transients, because it delays valve opening. The loop seal purge time is uncertain to measure by test and thus 3-dimensional realistic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed in this paper to predict the seal water purge time before full opening of the valve which is driven by steam after water purge. The CFD model for a typical pressurizer safety valve with a loop seal pipe is developed using the computer code of ANSYS CFX 11. Steady-state simulations are performed for full discharge of steam at the valve full opening. Transient simulations are performed for the loop seal dynamics and to estimate the loop seal purge time. A sudden pressure drop higher than 2,000 psia at the tip of the upper nozzle ring is expected from the steady-state calculation. Through the transient simulation, almost loop seal water is discharged within 1.2 second through the narrow opening between the disk and the nozzle of the valve. It can be expected that the valve fully opens at least before 1.2 second because constant valve opening is assumed in this CFX simulation, which is conservative because the valve opens fully before the loop seal water is completely discharged. The predicted loop seal purge time is compared with previous correlation. (orig.)

  2. Dynamical Quantum Phase Transitions in Spin Chains with Long-Range Interactions: Merging Different Concepts of Nonequilibrium Criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žunkovič, Bojan; Heyl, Markus; Knap, Michael; Silva, Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of a transverse-field Ising chain with power-law decaying interactions characterized by an exponent α , which can be experimentally realized in ion traps. We focus on two classes of emergent dynamical critical phenomena following a quantum quench from a ferromagnetic initial state: The first one manifests in the time-averaged order parameter, which vanishes at a critical transverse field. We argue that such a transition occurs only for long-range interactions α ≤2 . The second class corresponds to the emergence of time-periodic singularities in the return probability to the ground-state manifold which is obtained for all values of α and agrees with the order parameter transition for α ≤2 . We characterize how the two classes of nonequilibrium criticality correspond to each other and give a physical interpretation based on the symmetry of the time-evolved quantum states.

  3. Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations of near-surface phenomena. Quarterly report 3. quarter 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkealahti, Seppo.

    1987-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is used to investigate positron and electron slowing down in solid matter. The description of elastic scattering is based on accurate cross sections of effective crystalline atom potentials. Inelastic processes are described separately for each energby level y Gryzinski's excitation function. Various materials are studied and several electron and positron slowing down parameters and distributions are extracted. The results are used to analyze and interprete a number of recent experiments utilizing keV electron and positron beams. Molecular dynamics simulation methods are used to study (i) damage production in aluminum (110) surfaces due to low-energy argon ion bombardment and (ii) the premelting effects of solid noble gas surfaces. Appropriately constructed pair potentials were assigned between the particles and an electronic friction term proportional to the velocity was used for energetic ions. Of particular interest in (i) are the defect and implanted atom distributions, which are compared against recent experiments. In (ii) the simulations show the equilibrium existence of liquid-like layers on the densely packed surfaces well below the bulk melting temperature. In (i) the mean vacancy concentration depth depends only slightly on the incident angle. The total number of vacancies is almost independent of the incident ion dose for very oblique angles of incidence (0>45 deg C). Vancancy profile is found to have a clear peak in the topmost atomic layers and a broader tail deep in the material. The interstitial and Ar + ion profiles are clearly deeper in the material than the vacancy profile. In (ii), a layer-by-layer premelting of Lennard-Jones (111) surfaces is observed. Also the (100) surfaces premelt, but the disordering mechanism for the loosely packed (110) surfaces is roughening. Furthermore, a general rule seems to be that melting proceeds along the directions of high packing densities

  4. Dynamic Strain Aging Phenomena and Tensile Response of Medium-Mn TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Daniel M.; Van Aken, David C.

    2018-04-01

    Dynamic strain aging (DSA) and rapid work hardening are typical behaviors observed in medium-Mn transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel. Three alloys with manganese ranging from 10.2 to 13.8 wt pct with calculated room temperature stacking fault energies varying from - 2.1 to 0.7 mJ/m2 were investigated. Significant serrations were observed in the stress-strain behavior for two of the steels and the addition of 4.6 wt pct chromium was effective in significantly reducing the occurrence of DSA. Addition of chromium to the alloy reduced DSA by precipitation of M23(C,N)6 during batch annealing at 873 K (600 °C) for 20 hours. Three distinct DSA mechanisms were identified: one related to manganese ordering in stacking faults associated with ɛ-martensite and austenite interface, with activation energies for the onset and termination of DSA being 145 and 277 kJ/mol. A second mechanism was associated with carbon diffusion in γ-austenite where Mn-C bonding added to the total binding energy, and activation energies of 88 and 155 kJ/mol were measured for the onset and termination of DSA. A third mechanism was attributed to dislocation pinning and unpinning by nitrogen in α-ferrite with activation energies of 64 and 123 kJ/mol being identified. Tensile behaviors of the three medium manganese steels were studied in both the hot band and batch annealed after cold working conditions. Ultimate tensile strengths ranged from 1310 to 1404 MPa with total elongation of 24.1 to 34.1 pct. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to determine the transformation response of the steels using interrupted tensile tests at room temperature. All three of the processed steels showed evidence of two-stage TRIP where γ-austenite first transformed to ɛ-martensite, and subsequently transformed to α-martensite.

  5. LIGHT BRIDGE IN A DEVELOPING ACTIVE REGION. I. OBSERVATION OF LIGHT BRIDGE AND ITS DYNAMIC ACTIVITY PHENOMENA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toriumi, Shin; Katsukawa, Yukio [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Cheung, Mark C. M., E-mail: shin.toriumi@nao.ac.jp [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Building/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Light bridges, the bright structures that divide the umbra of sunspots and pores into smaller pieces, are known to produce a wide variety of activity events in solar active regions (ARs). It is also known that the light bridges appear in the assembling process of nascent sunspots. The ultimate goal of this series of papers is to reveal the nature of light bridges in developing ARs and the occurrence of activity events associated with the light bridge structures from both observational and numerical approaches. In this first paper, exploiting the observational data obtained by Hinode, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we investigate the detailed structure of the light bridge in NOAA AR 11974 and its dynamic activity phenomena. As a result, we find that the light bridge has a weak, horizontal magnetic field, which is transported from the interior by a large-scale convective upflow and is surrounded by strong, vertical fields of adjacent pores. In the chromosphere above the bridge, a transient brightening occurs repeatedly and intermittently, followed by a recurrent dark surge ejection into higher altitudes. Our analysis indicates that the brightening is the plasma heating due to magnetic reconnection at lower altitudes, while the dark surge is the cool, dense plasma ejected from the reconnection region. From the observational results, we conclude that the dynamic activity observed in a light bridge structure such as chromospheric brightenings and dark surge ejections are driven by magnetoconvective evolution within the light bridge and its interaction with the surrounding magnetic fields.

  6. LIGHT BRIDGE IN A DEVELOPING ACTIVE REGION. I. OBSERVATION OF LIGHT BRIDGE AND ITS DYNAMIC ACTIVITY PHENOMENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toriumi, Shin; Katsukawa, Yukio; Cheung, Mark C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Light bridges, the bright structures that divide the umbra of sunspots and pores into smaller pieces, are known to produce a wide variety of activity events in solar active regions (ARs). It is also known that the light bridges appear in the assembling process of nascent sunspots. The ultimate goal of this series of papers is to reveal the nature of light bridges in developing ARs and the occurrence of activity events associated with the light bridge structures from both observational and numerical approaches. In this first paper, exploiting the observational data obtained by Hinode, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we investigate the detailed structure of the light bridge in NOAA AR 11974 and its dynamic activity phenomena. As a result, we find that the light bridge has a weak, horizontal magnetic field, which is transported from the interior by a large-scale convective upflow and is surrounded by strong, vertical fields of adjacent pores. In the chromosphere above the bridge, a transient brightening occurs repeatedly and intermittently, followed by a recurrent dark surge ejection into higher altitudes. Our analysis indicates that the brightening is the plasma heating due to magnetic reconnection at lower altitudes, while the dark surge is the cool, dense plasma ejected from the reconnection region. From the observational results, we conclude that the dynamic activity observed in a light bridge structure such as chromospheric brightenings and dark surge ejections are driven by magnetoconvective evolution within the light bridge and its interaction with the surrounding magnetic fields

  7. Dynamic relaxation processes in compressible multiphase flows. Application to evaporation phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Métayer O.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Phase changes and heat exchanges are examples of physical processes appearing in many industrial applications involving multiphase compressible flows. Their knowledge is of fundamental importance to reproduce correctly the resulting effects in simulation tools. A fine description of the flow topology is thus required to obtain the interfacial area between phases. This one is responsible for the dynamics and the kinetics of heat and mass transfer when evaporation or condensation occurs. Unfortunately this exchange area cannot be obtained easily and accurately especially when complex mixtures (drops, bubbles, pockets of very different sizes appear inside the transient medium. The natural way to solve this specific trouble consists in using a thin grid to capture interfaces at all spatial scales. But this possibility needs huge computing resources and can be hardly used when considering physical systems of large dimensions. A realistic method is to consider instantaneous exchanges between phases by the way of additional source terms in a full non-equilibrium multiphase flow model [2,15,17]. In this one each phase obeys its own equation of state and has its own set of equations and variables (pressure, temperature, velocity, energy, entropy,.... When enabling the relaxation source terms the multiphase mixture instantaneously tends towards a mechanical or thermodynamic equilibrium state at each point of the flow. This strategy allows to mark the boundaries of the real flow behavior and to magnify the dominant physical effects (heat exchanges, evaporation, drag,... inside the medium. A description of the various relaxation processes is given in the paper. Les changements de phase et les transferts de chaleur sont des exemples de phénomènes physiques présents dans de nombreuses applications industrielles faisant intervenir des écoulements compressibles multiphasiques. La connaissance des mécanismes associés est primordiale afin de reproduire

  8. Critical Heat Flux Phenomena at HighPressure & Low Mass Fluxes: NEUP Final Report Part I: Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Wu, Qiao [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-04-30

    This report is a preliminary document presenting an overview of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) phenomenon, the High Pressure Critical Heat Flux facility (HPCHF), preliminary CHF data acquired, and the future direction of the research. The HPCHF facility has been designed and built to study CHF at high pressure and low mass flux ranges in a rod bundle prototypical of conceptual Small Modular Reactor (SMR) designs. The rod bundle is comprised of four electrically heated rods in a 2x2 square rod bundle with a prototypic chopped-cosine axial power profile and equipped with thermocouples at various axial and circumferential positions embedded in each rod for CHF detection. Experimental test parameters for CHF detection range from pressures of ~80 – 160 bar, mass fluxes of ~400 – 1500 kg/m2s, and inlet water subcooling from ~30 – 70°C. The preliminary data base established will be further extended in the future along with comparisons to existing CHF correlations, models, etc. whose application ranges may be applicable to the conditions of SMRs.

  9. Network Randomization and Dynamic Defense for Critical Infrastructure Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, Adrian R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Mitchell Tyler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hamlet, Jason [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stout, William M.S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, Erik [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Critical Infrastructure control systems continue to foster predictable communication paths, static configurations, and unpatched systems that allow easy access to our nation's most critical assets. This makes them attractive targets for cyber intrusion. We seek to address these attack vectors by automatically randomizing network settings, randomizing applications on the end devices themselves, and dynamically defending these systems against active attacks. Applying these protective measures will convert control systems into moving targets that proactively defend themselves against attack. Sandia National Laboratories has led this effort by gathering operational and technical requirements from Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and performing research and development to create a proof-of-concept solution. Our proof-of-concept has been tested in a laboratory environment with over 300 nodes. The vision of this project is to enhance control system security by converting existing control systems into moving targets and building these security measures into future systems while meeting the unique constraints that control systems face.

  10. Nonequilibrium dynamic critical scaling of the quantum Ising chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodrubetz, Michael; Clark, Bryan K; Huse, David A

    2012-07-06

    We solve for the time-dependent finite-size scaling functions of the one-dimensional transverse-field Ising chain during a linear-in-time ramp of the field through the quantum critical point. We then simulate Mott-insulating bosons in a tilted potential, an experimentally studied system in the same equilibrium universality class, and demonstrate that universality holds for the dynamics as well. We find qualitatively athermal features of the scaling functions, such as negative spin correlations, and we show that they should be robustly observable within present cold atom experiments.

  11. Critical bifurcation surfaces of 3D discrete dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sonis

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the analytical representation of bifurcations of each 3D discrete dynamics depending on the set of bifurcation parameters. The procedure of bifurcation analysis proposed in this paper represents the 3D elaboration and specification of the general algorithm of the n-dimensional linear bifurcation analysis proposed by the author earlier. It is proven that 3D domain of asymptotic stability (attraction of the fixed point for a given 3D discrete dynamics is bounded by three critical bifurcation surfaces: the divergence, flip and flutter surfaces. The analytical construction of these surfaces is achieved with the help of classical Routh–Hurvitz conditions of asymptotic stability. As an application the adjustment process proposed by T. Puu for the Cournot oligopoly model is considered in detail.

  12. Critical behaviour of the randomly stirred dynamical Potts model: novel universality class and effects of compressibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, N V; Kapustin, A S

    2012-01-01

    Critical behaviour of the dynamical Potts model, subjected to vivid turbulent mixing, is studied by means of the renormalization group. The advecting velocity field is modelled by Kraichnan’s rapid-change ensemble: Gaussian statistics with a given pair correlator 〈vv〉∝δ(t − t′) k −d−ξ , where k is the wave number, d is the dimension of space and 0 < ξ < 2 is an arbitrary exponent. The system exhibits different types of infrared scaling behaviour, associated with four infrared attractors of the renormalization group equations. In addition to the known asymptotic regimes (equilibrium Potts model and passive scalar field), the existence of a new, strongly non-equilibrium type of critical behaviour (universality class) is established, where the self-interaction of the order parameter and the turbulent mixing are equally important. The corresponding critical dimensions and the regions of stability for all the regimes are calculated in the leading order of the double expansion in ξ and ε = 6 − d. Special attention is paid to the effects of compressibility of the fluid, because they lead to interesting crossover phenomena. (paper)

  13. Phase dynamics of low critical current density YBCO Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massarotti, D., E-mail: dmassarotti@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNR-SPIN UOS Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Stornaiuolo, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Rotoli, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Roma 29, 81031 Aversa (CE) (Italy); Carillo, F. [Nest, Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Galletti, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNR-SPIN UOS Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Longobardi, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Roma 29, 81031 Aversa (CE) (Italy); American Physical Society, 1 Research Road, Ridge, NY 11961 (United States); Beltram, F. [Nest, Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Tafuri, F. [CNR-SPIN UOS Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell’Informazione, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Roma 29, 81031 Aversa (CE) (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We study the phase dynamics of YBaCuO Josephson junctions using various tools. • We derive information on the dissipation in a wide range of transport parameters. • Dissipation in such devices can be described by a frequency dependent damping model. • The use of different substrates allows us to tune the shell circuit. - Abstract: High critical temperature superconductors (HTS) based devices can have impact in the study of the phase dynamics of Josephson junctions (JJs) thanks to the wide range of junction parameters they offer and to their unconventional properties. Measurements of current–voltage characteristics and of switching current distributions constitute a direct way to classify different regimes of the phase dynamics and of the transport, also in nontrivial case of the moderately damped regime (MDR). MDR is going to be more and more common in JJs with advances in nanopatterning superconductors and synthesizing novel hybrid systems. Distinctive signatures of macroscopic quantum tunneling and of thermal activation in presence of different tunable levels of dissipation have been detected in YBCO grain boundary JJs. Experimental data are supported by Monte Carlo simulations of the phase dynamics, in a wide range of temperatures and dissipation levels. This allows us to quantify dissipation in the MDR and partially reconstruct a phase diagram as guideline for a wide range of moderately damped systems.

  14. Unstable dynamics, nonequilibrium phases, and criticality in networked excitable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franciscis, S. de; Torres, J. J.; Marro, J.

    2010-01-01

    Excitable systems are of great theoretical and practical interest in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. Here, we numerically study models of excitable media, namely, networks whose nodes may occasionally be dormant and the connection weights are allowed to vary with the system activity on a short-time scale, which is a convenient and realistic representation. The resulting global activity is quite sensitive to stimuli and eventually becomes unstable also in the absence of any stimuli. Outstanding consequences of such unstable dynamics are the spontaneous occurrence of various nonequilibrium phases--including associative-memory phases and one in which the global activity wanders irregularly, e.g., chaotically among all or part of the dynamic attractors--and 1/f noise as the system is driven into the phase region corresponding to the most irregular behavior. A net result is resilience which results in an efficient search in the model attractor space that can explain the origin of some observed behavior in neural, genetic, and ill-condensed matter systems. By extensive computer simulation we also address a previously conjectured relation between observed power-law distributions and the possible occurrence of a ''critical state'' during functionality of, e.g., cortical networks, and describe the precise nature of such criticality in the model which may serve to guide future experiments.

  15. General Critical Properties of the Dynamics of Scientific Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettencourt, L. M. A. (LANL); Kaiser, D. I. (MIT)

    2011-05-31

    Scientific fields are difficult to define and compare, yet there is a general sense that they undergo similar stages of development. From this point of view it becomes important to determine if these superficial similarities can be translated into a general framework that would quantify the general advent and subsequent dynamics of scientific ideas. Such a framework would have important practical applications of allowing us to compare fields that superficially may appear different, in terms of their subject matter, research techniques, typical collaboration size, etc. Particularh' important in a field's history is the moment at which conceptual and technical unification allows widespread exchange of ideas and collaboration, at which point networks of collaboration show the analog of a percolation phenomenon, developing a giant connected component containing most authors. Here we investigate the generality of this topological transition in the collaboration structure of scientific fields as they grow and become denser. We develop a general theoretical framework in which each scientific field is an instantiation of the same large-scale topological critical phenomenon. We consider whether the evidence from a variety of specific fields is consistent with this picture, and estimate critical exponents associated with the transition. We then discuss the generality of the phenomenon and to what extent we may expect other scientific fields — including very large ones — to follow the same dynamics.

  16. Quantum critical matter. Quantum phase transitions with multiple dynamics and Weyl superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    In this PhD thesis, the physics of quantum critical matter and exotic quantum state close to quantum phase transitions is investigated. We will focus on three different examples that highlight some of the interesting phenomena related to quantum phase transitions. Firstly, we discuss the physics of quantum phase transitions in quantum wires as a function of an external gate voltage when new subbands are activated. We find that at these transitions, strong correlations lead to the formation of an impenetrable gas of polarons, and identify criteria for possible instabilities in the spin- and charge sectors of the model. Our analysis is based on the combination of exact resummations, renormalization group techniques and Luttinger liquid approaches. Secondly, we turn to the physics of multiple divergent time scales close to a quantum critical point. Using an appropriately generalized renormalization group approach, we identify that the presence of multiple dynamics at a quantum phase transition can lead to the emergence of new critical scaling exponents and thus to the breakdown of the usual scaling schemes. We calculate the critical behavior of various thermodynamic properties and detail how unusual physics can arise. It is hoped that these results might be helpful for the interpretation of experimental scaling puzzles close to quantum critical points. Thirdly, we turn to the physics of topological transitions, and more precisely the physics of Weyl superconductors. The latter are the superconducting variant of the topologically non-trivial Weyl semimetals, and emerge at the quantum phase transition between a topological superconductor and a normal insulator upon perturbing the transition with a time reversal symmetry breaking perturbation, such as magnetism. We characterize the topological properties of Weyl superconductors and establish a topological phase diagram for a particular realization in heterostructures. We discuss the physics of vortices in Weyl

  17. Boundary critical phenomena and a quasiparticle-quasihole symmetric metal-insulator: transition in a constricted quantum hall circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Siddhartha

    2007-09-01

    Motivated by surprises in recent experimental findings, we study transport in a model of a quantum Hall edge system with a gate-voltage controlled constriction. A finite backscattered current at finite edge-bias is explained as arising from the splitting of edge current caused by the difference in the filling fractions of the bulk (ν 1 ) and constriction (ν 2 ) quantum Hall fluid regions. We develop a hydrodynamic theory for bosonic edge modes inspired by this model. The constriction region splits the incident long-wavelength chiral edge density-wave excitations among the transmitting and reflecting edge states encircling it. The competition between two interedge tunneling processes taking place inside the constriction, related by a quasiparticle-quasihole (qp-qh) symmetry, is accounted for by computing the boundary theories of the system. This competition is found to determine the strong coupling configuration of the system. A separatrix of qp-qh symmetric gapless critical states is found to lie between the relevant RG flows to a metallic and an insulating configuration of the constriction system. This constitutes an interesting generalisation of the Kane-Fisher quantum impurity model. The features of the RG phase diagram are also confirmed by computing various correlators and chiral linear conductances of the system. In this way, our results find excellent agreement with many recent puzzling experimental results for the cases of ν 1 = 1/3, 1. We also discuss and make predictions for the case of a constriction system with ν 2 = 5/2. (author)

  18. Collective motion of macroscopic spheres floating on capillary ripples: dynamic heterogeneity and dynamic criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlı, Ceyda; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Luding, Stefan; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2014-09-01

    When a densely packed monolayer of macroscopic spheres floats on chaotic capillary Faraday waves, a coexistence of large scale convective motion and caging dynamics typical for glassy systems is observed. We subtract the convective mean flow using a coarse graining (homogenization) method and reveal subdiffusion for the caging time scales followed by a diffusive regime at later times. We apply the methods developed to study dynamic heterogeneity and show that the typical time and length scales of the fluctuations due to rearrangements of observed particle groups significantly increase when the system approaches its largest experimentally accessible packing concentration. To connect the system to the dynamic criticality literature, we fit power laws to our results. The resultant critical exponents are consistent with those found in densely packed suspensions of colloids.

  19. Static and Dynamic Verification of Critical Software for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, F.; Maia, R.; Costa, D.; Duro, N.; Rodríguez-Dapena, P.; Hjortnaes, K.

    Space technology is no longer used only for much specialised research activities or for sophisticated manned space missions. Modern society relies more and more on space technology and applications for every day activities. Worldwide telecommunications, Earth observation, navigation and remote sensing are only a few examples of space applications on which we rely daily. The European driven global navigation system Galileo and its associated applications, e.g. air traffic management, vessel and car navigation, will significantly expand the already stringent safety requirements for space based applications Apart from their usefulness and practical applications, every single piece of onboard software deployed into the space represents an enormous investment. With a long lifetime operation and being extremely difficult to maintain and upgrade, at least when comparing with "mainstream" software development, the importance of ensuring their correctness before deployment is immense. Verification &Validation techniques and technologies have a key role in ensuring that the onboard software is correct and error free, or at least free from errors that can potentially lead to catastrophic failures. Many RAMS techniques including both static criticality analysis and dynamic verification techniques have been used as a means to verify and validate critical software and to ensure its correctness. But, traditionally, these have been isolated applied. One of the main reasons is the immaturity of this field in what concerns to its application to the increasing software product(s) within space systems. This paper presents an innovative way of combining both static and dynamic techniques exploiting their synergy and complementarity for software fault removal. The methodology proposed is based on the combination of Software FMEA and FTA with Fault-injection techniques. The case study herein described is implemented with support from two tools: The SoftCare tool for the SFMEA and SFTA

  20. The Ramifications of Meddling with Systems Governed by Self-organized Critical Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, B. A.; Newman, D. E.; Dobson, I.

    2002-12-01

    Complex natural, well as man-made, systems often exhibit characteristics similar to those seen in self-organized critical (SOC) systems. The concept of self-organized criticality brings together ideas of self-organization of nonlinear dynamical systems with the often-observed near critical behavior of many natural phenomena. These phenomena exhibit self-similarities over extended ranges of spatial and temporal scales. In those systems, scale lengths may be described by fractal geometry and time scales that lead to 1/f-like power spectra. Natural applications include modeling the motion of tectonics plates, forest fires, magnetospheric dynamics, spin glass systems, and turbulent transport. In man-made systems, applications have included traffic dynamics, power and communications networks, and financial markets among many others. Simple cellular automata models such as the running sandpile model have been very useful in reproducing the complexity and characteristics of these systems. One characteristic property of the SOC systems is that they relax through what we call events. These events can happen over all scales of the system. Examples of these events are: earthquakes in the case of plate tectonic; fires in forest evolution extinction in the co evolution of biological species; and blackouts in power transmission systems. In a time-averaged sense, these systems are subcritical (that is, they lie in an average state that should not trigger any events) and the relaxation events happen intermittently. The time spent in a subcritical state relative to the time of the events varies from one system to another. For instance, the chance of finding a forest on fire is very low with the frequency of fires being on the order of one fire every few years and with many of these fires small and inconsequential. Very large fires happen over time periods of decades or even centuries. However, because of their consequences, these large but infrequent events are the important ones

  1. Phenomena induced by powerful HF pumping towards magnetic zenith with a frequency near the F-region critical frequency and the third electron gyro harmonic frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Blagoveshchenskaya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-instrument observational data from an experiment on 13 October 2006 at the EISCAT/HEATING facility at Tromsø, Norway are analysed. The experiment was carried out in the evening hours when the electron density in the F-region dropped, and the HF pump frequency fH was near and then above the critical frequency of the F2 layer. The distinctive feature of this experiment is that the pump frequency was just below the third electron gyro harmonic frequency, while both the HF pump beam and UHF radar beam were directed towards the magnetic zenith (MZ. The HF pump-induced phenomena were diagnosed with several instruments: the bi-static HF radio scatter on the London-Tromsø-St. Petersburg path, the CUTLASS radar in Hankasalmi (Finland, the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT UHF radar at Tromsø and the Tromsø ionosonde (dynasonde. The results show thermal electron excitation of the HF-induced striations seen simultaneously from HF bi-static scatter and CUTLASS radar observations, accompanied by increases of electron temperature when the heater frequency was near and then above the critical frequency of the F2 layer by up to 0.4 MHz. An increase of the electron density up to 25% accompanied by strong HF-induced electron heating was observed, only when the heater frequency was near the critical frequency and just below the third electron gyro harmonic frequency. It is concluded that the combined effect of upper hybrid resonance and gyro resonance at the same altitude gives rise to strong electron heating, the excitation of striations, HF ray trapping and extension of HF waves to altitudes where they can excite Langmuir turbulence and fluxes of electrons accelerated to energies that produce ionization.

  2. Phenomena induced by powerful HF pumping towards magnetic zenith with a frequency near the F-region critical frequency and the third electron gyro harmonic frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Blagoveshchenskaya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-instrument observational data from an experiment on 13 October 2006 at the EISCAT/HEATING facility at Tromsø, Norway are analysed. The experiment was carried out in the evening hours when the electron density in the F-region dropped, and the HF pump frequency fH was near and then above the critical frequency of the F2 layer. The distinctive feature of this experiment is that the pump frequency was just below the third electron gyro harmonic frequency, while both the HF pump beam and UHF radar beam were directed towards the magnetic zenith (MZ. The HF pump-induced phenomena were diagnosed with several instruments: the bi-static HF radio scatter on the London-Tromsø-St. Petersburg path, the CUTLASS radar in Hankasalmi (Finland, the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT UHF radar at Tromsø and the Tromsø ionosonde (dynasonde. The results show thermal electron excitation of the HF-induced striations seen simultaneously from HF bi-static scatter and CUTLASS radar observations, accompanied by increases of electron temperature when the heater frequency was near and then above the critical frequency of the F2 layer by up to 0.4 MHz. An increase of the electron density up to 25% accompanied by strong HF-induced electron heating was observed, only when the heater frequency was near the critical frequency and just below the third electron gyro harmonic frequency. It is concluded that the combined effect of upper hybrid resonance and gyro resonance at the same altitude gives rise to strong electron heating, the excitation of striations, HF ray trapping and extension of HF waves to altitudes where they can excite Langmuir turbulence and fluxes of electrons accelerated to energies that produce ionization.

  3. Experimental investigation of the fluid dynamic efficiency of a high performance multi-valve internal combustion engine during the intake phase: Influence of valve-valve interference phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algieri Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work is the analysis of the fluid dynamic behavior of a high performance internal combustion engine during the intake phase. In particular, a four-valve spark-ignition engine has been characterized at the steady flow rig. Dimensionless discharge coefficients have been used to define the global fluid dynamic efficiency of the intake system, while the Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA technique has been employed to evaluate the mean flow in the valve curtain area and to characterise the interference phenomena between the two intake valves. The investigation has shown the significant influence of the valve lift on the volumetric efficiency of the intake apparatus. Moreover, the experimental analysis has highlighted that the valve-valve interference phenomena have a relevant impact on the head breathability, on the flow development within the combustion chamber and on the velocity standard deviations.

  4. Analysis of construction dynamic plan using fuzzy critical path method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurij Kazimir V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical Path Method (CPM technique has become widely recognized as valuable tool for the planning and scheduling large construction projects. The aim of this paper is to present an analytical method for finding the Critical Path in the precedence network diagram where the duration of each activity is represented by a trapezoidal fuzzy number. This Fuzzy Critical Path Method (FCPM uses a defuzzification formula for trapezoidal fuzzy number and applies it on the total float (slack time for each activity in the fuzzy precedence network to find the critical path. The method presented in this paper is very effective in determining the critical activities and finding the critical paths.

  5. Switching Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Havlin, S.; Mallamace, F.; Mazza, M. G.; Kumar, P.; Plerou, V.; Preis, T.; Stokely, K.; Xu, L.

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these serious scientific disciplines can suddenly "switch" from one behavior to another, even though they possess no perfect metronome in time. As if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time. The past century has, philosophically, been concerned with placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a fine-tuned machine. Here we will address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at some of the many temporal patterns in physics, economics, and medicine and even begin to characterize the switching phenomena that enable a system to pass from one state to another. We discuss some applications of correlated randomness to understanding switching phenomena in various fields. Specifically, we present evidence from experiments and from computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water's anomalies are related to a switching point (which is not unlike the "tipping point" immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell), and that the bubbles in economic phenomena that occur on all scales are not "outliers" (another Gladwell immortalization).

  6. Analysis of flashing and swelling phenomena in tanks of nuclear power plants; the importance of bubble growth dynamics and bubble transport models with size tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerezo A, E [University of Caribe, Department of Basics Sciences and Engineering, Lote 1, Manzana 1, Region 78, esq. Fracc. Tabachines, 77500 Cancun, Quintana Roo (Mexico); Munoz C, J L [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a non-equilibrium model to describe flashing phenomena in tanks and cooling pools. The present model is based on Watanabe's work that we have extended by developing a realistic model for the growth of bubbles. We have made the corresponding venting model, continuity equation, gas and liquid phase energy conservation equations for the model. This model takes into account both drag and virtual mass force. The dynamics of bubble growth plays an important role in two-phase phenomena such as flashing. In our model the growth rate is assumed to be limited by the heat conduction in the liquid. The results of the analytic model were compared with the experimental data of Watanabe [1]. The results have shown that the present model evaluates fairly accurately the pressure evolution, the void fraction and the swelling level of a tank.

  7. Analysis of flashing and swelling phenomena in tanks of nuclear power plants; the importance of bubble growth dynamics and bubble transport models with size tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerezo A, E. [University of Caribe, Department of Basics Sciences and Engineering, Lote 1, Manzana 1, Region 78, esq. Fracc. Tabachines, 77500 Cancun, Quintana Roo (Mexico)]. E-mail: ecerezo@unicaribe.edu.mx; Munoz C, J.L. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a non-equilibrium model to describe flashing phenomena in tanks and cooling pools. The present model is based on Watanabe's work that we have extended by developing a realistic model for the growth of bubbles. We have made the corresponding venting model, continuity equation, gas and liquid phase energy conservation equations for the model. This model takes into account both drag and virtual mass force. The dynamics of bubble growth plays an important role in two-phase phenomena such as flashing. In our model the growth rate is assumed to be limited by the heat conduction in the liquid. The results of the analytic model were compared with the experimental data of Watanabe [1]. The results have shown that the present model evaluates fairly accurately the pressure evolution, the void fraction and the swelling level of a tank.

  8. Rigorous lower bound on the dynamic critical exponent of some multilevel Swendsen-Wang algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.; Sokal, A.D.

    1991-01-01

    We prove the rigorous lower bound z exp ≥α/ν for the dynamic critical exponent of a broad class of multilevel (or ''multigrid'') variants of the Swendsen-Wang algorithm. This proves that such algorithms do suffer from critical slowing down. We conjecture that such algorithms in fact lie in the same dynamic universality class as the stanard Swendsen-Wang algorithm

  9. Dynamic Diversity: Toward a Contextual Understanding of Critical Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Liliana M.; Jayakumar, Uma M.

    2014-01-01

    Through an analysis of relevant social science evidence, this article provides a deeper understanding of critical mass, a concept that has become central in litigation efforts related to affirmative action admissions policies that seek to further the educational benefits of diversity. We demonstrate that the concept of critical mass requires an…

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of the Critical Speed in Railway Vehicle Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; True, Hans; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2013-01-01

    -axle Cooperrider bogie, in order to study the sensitivity of the critical speed with respect to suspension parameters. The importance of a certain suspension component is expressed by the variance in critical speed that is ascribable to it. This proves to be useful in the identification of parameters for which...

  11. Thermoconvective phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashtovoy, V.G.; Berkovsky, B.M.; Vislovich, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    Nonisothermal flows of magnetic fluids as well as those with free surface, i.e., film flows, are of the greatest interest in the MF dynamics. In the former case, the thermomagnetic convection mechanism is most striking. In the latter, the magnetic field is responsible for the fluid dynamics by affecting the form and stability of its free surface. Both modes of flow are widely used in heat and mass exchangers and are of great practical interest

  12. Critical Dynamics : The Expansion of the Master Equation Including a Critical Point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.

    1980-01-01

    In this thesis it is shown how to solve the master equation for a Markov process including a critical point by means of successive approximations in terms of a small parameter. A critical point occurs if, by adjusting an externally controlled quantity, the system shows a transition from normal

  13. Transport phenomena II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Transport Phenomena II covers forced convention, temperature distribution, free convection, diffusitivity and the mechanism of mass transfer, convective mass transfer, concentration

  14. Reactor Dynamics Experiments with a Sub-Critical Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Yang, Y.; Wu, L.; Momota, H.

    2004-01-01

    A resurgence in use of nuclear power is now underway worldwide. However due to the shutdown of many university research reactors , student laboratories must rely more heavily on use of sub-critical assemblies. Here a driven sub-critical is described that uses a cylindrical Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device to provide a fusion neutron source. The small IEC neutron source would be inserted in a fuel element position, with its power input controlled externally at a control panel. This feature opens the way to use of the critical assembly for a number of transient experiments such as sub-critical pulsing and neutron wave propagation. That in turn adds important new insights and excitement for the student teaching laboratory

  15. Assessments of the kinetic and dynamic transient behavior of sub-critical systems (ADS) in comparison to critical reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schikorr, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    The neutron kinetic and the reactor dynamic behavior of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) is significantly different from those of conventional power reactor systems currently in use for the production of power. It is the objective of this study to examine and to demonstrate the intrinsic differences of the kinetic and dynamic behavior of accelerator driven systems to typical plant transient initiators in comparison to the known, kinetic and dynamic behavior of critical thermal and fast reactor systems. It will be shown that in sub-critical assemblies, changes in reactivity or in the external neutron source strength lead to an asymptotic power level essentially described by the instantaneous power change (i.e. prompt jump). Shutdown of ADS operating at high levels of sub-criticality, (i.e. k eff ∼0.99), without the support of reactivity control systems (such as control or safety rods), may be problematic in case the ability of cooling of the core should be impaired (i.e. loss of coolant flow). In addition, the dynamic behavior of sub-critical systems to typical plant transients such as protected or unprotected loss of flow (LOF) or heat sink (LOH) transients are not necessarily substantially different from the plant dynamic behavior of critical systems if the reactivity feedback coefficients of the ADS design are unfavorable. As expected, the state of sub-criticality and the temperature feedback coefficients, such as Doppler and coolant temperature coefficient, play dominant roles in determining the course and direction of plant transients. Should the combination of these safety coefficients be very unfavorable, not much additional margin in safety may be gained by making a critical system only sub-critical (i.e. k eff ∼0.95). A careful optimization procedure between the selected operating level of sub-criticality, the safety reactivity coefficients and the possible need for additional reactivity control systems seems, therefore, advisable during the early

  16. Nonlinear Dynamics and Nucleation Kinetics in Near-Critical Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patashinski, Alexander Z.; Ratner, Mark A.; Pines, Vladimir

    1996-01-01

    The objective of our study is to model the nonlinear behavior of a near-critical liquid following a rapid change of the temperature and/or other thermodynamic parameters (pressure, external electric or gravitational field). The thermodynamic critical point is manifested by large, strongly correlated fluctuations of the order parameter (particle density in liquid-gas systems, concentration in binary solutions) in the critical range of scales. The largest critical length scale is the correlation radius r(sub c). According to the scaling theory, r(sub c) increases as r(sub c) = r(sub 0)epsilon(exp -alpha) when the nondimensional distance epsilon = (T - T(sub c))/T(sub c) to the critical point decreases. The normal gravity alters the nature of correlated long-range fluctuations when one reaches epsilon approximately equal to 10(exp -5), and correspondingly the relaxation time, tau(r(sub c)), is approximately equal to 10(exp -3) seconds; this time is short when compared to the typical experimental time. Close to the critical point, a rapid, relatively small temperature change may perturb the thermodynamic equilibrium on many scales. The critical fluctuations have a hierarchical structure, and the relaxation involves many length and time scales. Above the critical point, in the one-phase region, we consider the relaxation of the liquid following a sudden temperature change that simultaneously violates the equilibrium on many scales. Below T(sub c), a non-equilibrium state may include a distribution of small scale phase droplets; we consider the relaxation of such a droplet following a temperature change that has made the phase of the matrix stable.

  17. Effects of stressor characteristics on early warning signs of critical transitions and "critical coupling" in complex dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Steffen O P; Sansavini, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    Complex dynamical systems face abrupt transitions into unstable and catastrophic regimes. These critical transitions are triggered by gradual modifications in stressors, which push the dynamical system towards unstable regimes. Bifurcation analysis can characterize such critical thresholds, beyond which systems become unstable. Moreover, the stochasticity of the external stressors causes small-scale fluctuations in the system response. In some systems, the decomposition of these signal fluctuations into precursor signals can reveal early warning signs prior to the critical transition. Here, we present a dynamical analysis of a power system subjected to an increasing load level and small-scale stochastic load perturbations. We show that the auto- and cross-correlations of bus voltage magnitudes increase, leading up to a Hopf bifurcation point, and further grow until the system collapses. This evidences a gradual transition into a state of "critical coupling," which is complementary to the established concept of "critical slowing down." Furthermore, we analyze the effects of the type of load perturbation and load characteristics on early warning signs and find that gradient changes in the autocorrelation provide early warning signs of the imminent critical transition under white-noise but not for auto-correlated load perturbations. Furthermore, the cross-correlation between all voltage magnitude pairs generally increases prior to and beyond the Hopf bifurcation point, indicating "critical coupling," but cannot provide early warning indications. Finally, we show that the established early warning indicators are oblivious to limit-induced bifurcations and, in the case of the power system model considered here, only react to an approaching Hopf bifurcation.

  18. Toward Control of Universal Scaling in Critical Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-27

    program that aims to synergistically combine two powerful and very successful theories for non-linear stochastic dynamics of cooperative multi...RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER Uwe Tauber Uwe C. T? uber , Michel Pleimling, Daniel J. Stilwell 611102 c. THIS PAGE The public reporting burden...to synergistically combine two powerful and very successful theories for non-linear stochastic dynamics of cooperative multi-component systems, namely

  19. Transient analysis of carbon monoxide transport phenomena and adsorption kinetics in HT-PEMFC during dynamic current extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Kamal Abdul Rasheedj; Chan, Siew Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the fuel cell temperature reduces outlet CO concentration. • Increasing the CO inlet (initial) concentration increases outlet CO concentration. • Increasing current density step and dwell time increases outlet CO concentration. • Increasing in the CL and GDL porosities reduces outlet CO concentration. - Abstract: This paper investigates the transport phenomena of carbon monoxide (CO) and adsorption kinetics, in a high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) during step-wise current extraction (step-change in current extraction). Step-wise current extraction is a common process done to accommodate a sudden power surge during an operation. Since HT-PEMFCs are capable of handling high impurity of CO, hydrogen fuel that is contaminated with trace amount of CO is usually considered for commercial benefits. Thus, a transient three-dimensional isothermal anodic electro-kinetic numerical model is developed to determine the effect of operating parameters such as fuel cell temperature, CO inlet (initial) concentration, step-change of current density and dwell time on the transport phenomena of CO and adsorption kinetics. In addition, geometrical factors such as the catalyst layer (CL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) porosity are also varied as well. The results show that the above-mentioned operating parameters can affect the maximum CO concentration at the CL, especially at the outlet of the channel. Specifically, a reduction of fuel cell temperature can significantly increase the CO concentration near the outlet, while increasing CO inlet (initial) concentration, step-change amplitude of current density and current density dwell time can cause an increase in CO concentration at the outlet, albeit to different extent. In addition, the increase in the porosity of CL and GDL, results in the reduction of the maximum CO concentration at the outlet, albeit to different extent. In addition, the CO and hydrogen surface coverage

  20. Consciousness viewed in the framework of brain phase space dynamics, criticality, and the Renormalization Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The topic of this paper will be addressed in three stages: I will first review currently prominent theoretical conceptualizations of the neurobiology of consciousness and, where appropriate, identify ill-advised and flawed notions in theoretical neuroscience that may impede viewing consciousness as a phenomenon in the physics of brain. In this context, I will also introduce relevant facts that tend not to receive adequate attention in much of the current consciousness discourse. Next, I will review the evidence that accrued in the last decade that identifies the resting brain as being in a state of criticality. In the framework of state phase dynamics of statistical physics, this observational evidence also entails that the resting brain is poised at the brink of a second order phase transition. On this basis, I will in the third stage propose applying the framework of the Renormalization Group to viewing consciousness as a phenomenon in statistical physics. In physics, concepts of phase space transitions and the Renormalization Group are powerful tools for interpreting phenomena involving many scales of length and time in complex systems. The significance of these concepts lies in their accounting for the emergence of different levels of new collective behaviors in complex systems, each level with its distinct macroscopic physics, organization, and laws, as a new pattern of reality. In this framework, I propose to view subjectivity as the symbolic description of the physical brain state of consciousness that emerges as one of the levels of phase transitions of the brain-body-environment system, along the trajectory of Renormalization Group Transformations

  1. Spin dynamics in Tb studied by critical neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, O. W.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1971-01-01

    The inelasticity of the critical neutron scattering in Tb was measured at and above the Neel temperature. In the hydrodynamic region the line width Gamma (q=0, kappa 1)=C kappa z1, with z=1.4+or-0.1 and c=4.3+or-0.3 meVAAz. This result deviates from the conventional theory, which predicts...

  2. Dynamics and Control of Distillation Columns - A Critical Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigurd Skogestad

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Distillation column dynamics and control have been viewed by many as a very mature or even dead field. However, as is discussed in this paper significant new results have appeared over the last 5-10 years. These results include multiple steady states and instability in simple columns with ideal thermodynamics (which was believed to be impossible, the understanding of the difference between various control configurations and the systematic transformation between these, the feasibility of using the distillate-bottom structure, for control (which was believed to be impossible, the importance of flow dynamics for control studies, the fundamental problems in identifying models from open-loops responses, the use of simple regression estimators to estimate composition from temperatures, and an improved general understanding of the dynamic behavior of distillation columns which includes a better understanding of the fundamental difference between internal and external flow, simple formulas for estimating the dominant time constant, and a derivation of the linearizing effect of logarithmic transformations. These issues apply to all columns, even for ideal mixtures and simple columns with only two products. In addition, there have been significant advances for cases with complex thermodynamics and complex column configurations. These include the behavior and control of azeotropic distillation columns, and the possible complex dynamics of nonideal mixtures and of interlinked columns. However, both for the simple and more complex cases there are still a number of areas where further research is needed.

  3. Kawasaki dynamics with two types of particles : critical droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, den W.Th.F.; Nardi, F.R.; Troiani, A.

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of three papers in which we study a two-dimensional lattice gas consisting of two types of particles subject to Kawasaki dynamics at low temperature in a large finite box with an open boundary. Each pair of particles occupying neighboring sites has a negative binding

  4. Kawasaki dynamics with two types of particles : critical droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, den W.Th.F.; Nardi, F.R.; Troiani, A.

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of three papers in which we study a two-dimensional lattice gas consisting of two types of particles subject to Kawasaki dynamics at low temperature in a large ¿nite box with an open boundary. Each pair of particles occupying neighboring sites has a negative binding

  5. Pump instability phenomena generated by fluid forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.

    1985-01-01

    Rotor dynamic behavior of high energy centrifugal pumps is significantly affected by two types of fluid forces; one due to the hydraulic interaction of the impeller with the surrounding volute or diffuser and the other due to the effect of the wear rings. The available data on these forces is first reviewed. A simple one degree-of-freedom system containing these forces is analytically solved to exhibit the rotor dynamic effects. To illustrate the relative magnitude of these phenomena, an example of a multistage boiler feed pump is worked out. It is shown that the wear ring effects tend to suppress critical speed and postpone instability onset. But the volute-impeller forces tend to lower the critical speed and the instability onset speed. However, for typical boiler feed pumps under normal running clearances, the wear ring effects are much more significant than the destabilizing hydraulic interaction effects.

  6. The Dynamics of Agile Practices for Safety-Critical Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Axel; Tordrup Heeager, Lise

    2017-01-01

    This short paper reports from a case study of the agile development of safety-critical software. It utilizes a framework of dynamic relationships between agile practices with the purpose of demonstrating the utility of the framework to understand a case in its context, and it shows significant...... dynamics. The study is concluded by pointing at which further research on the framework is required to use the framework in managing the agile development of safety-critical software....

  7. Critical properties of Sudden Quench Dynamics in the anisotropic XY Model

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Hongli; Liu, Zhao; Fan, Heng; Chen, Shu

    2010-01-01

    We study the zero temperature quantum dynamical critical behavior of the anisotropic XY chain under a sudden quench in a transverse field. We demonstrate theoretically that both quench magnetic susceptibility and two-particle quench correlation can be used to describe the dynamical quantum phase transition (QPT) properties. Either the quench magnetic susceptibility or the derivative of correlation functions as a function of initial magnetic field $a$ exhibits a divergence at the critical poin...

  8. Study of simple super-critical fluids (CO2, C2D6) through neutron scattering, Raman spectroscopy and molecular dynamic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longelin, St.

    2004-04-01

    Super-critical fluids are largely used in industrial sectors. However the knowledge of the physical phenomena in which they are involved stays insufficient because of their particular properties. A new model of adjusting molecular structures is proposed, this model has been validated through neutron scattering experiments with high momentum transfer on C 2 D 6 . The experimental representation of the critical universal function for C 2 D 6 and CO 2 has been obtained through the neutron echo spin and by relying on structure measurements made through neutron elastic scattering at small angles. Raman spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation have been used to feature structure and dynamics. Scattering as well as microscopic molecular density fluctuations have been analysed

  9. Chaotic phenomena in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Y.

    1991-08-01

    It has recently been recognized that the research on various aspects of chaotic dynamics grows rapidly as one of some areas in nonlinear science. On the other hands, the plasma has long been called a treasure-house of nonlinear phenomena, so it is easy to imagine that the plasma is abundant in chaotic phenomena. In fact, the research on plasma chaos is going on, such as the research on the stochastic magnetic field and the chaotic orbit in the toroidal helical system, as well as the research in other experiments. To review the present status of the research on plasma chaos and to make clear the basic common physics, a working group was organized in 1990 as a collaboration research of National Institute for Fusion Science. This is the report on its activity in 1990, with a stress on experimental data obtained in basic plasma experiments and RFP, and on the relaxed theories and computer simulations. (author)

  10. Mathematical modeling of phenomena of dynamic recrystallization during hot plastic deformation in high-carbon bainitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dembiczak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the research results, coefficients were determined in constitutive equations, describing the kinetics of dynamic recrystallization in high-carbon bainitic steel during hot deformation. The developed mathematical model takes into account the dependence of changing kinetics in the size evolution of the initial austenite grains, the value of strain, strain rate, temperature and time. Physical simulations were carried out on rectangular specimens measuring 10 × 15 × 20 mm. Compression tests with a plane state of deformation were carried out using a Gleeble 3800.

  11. Peak load-impulse characterization of critical pulse loads in structural dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamson, G.R.; Lindberg, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    In presenting the characterization scheme, some general features are described first. A detailed analysis is given for the rigid-plastic system of one degree of freedom to illustrate the calculation of critical load curves in terms of peak load and impulse. This is followed by the presentation of critical load curves for uniformly loaded rigid-plastic beams and plates and for dynamic buckling of cylindrical shells under uniform lateral loads. The peak load-impulse characterization of critical pulse loads is compared with the dynamic load factor characterization, and some aspects of the history of the peak load-pulse scheme are presented. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Study of the phenomena of crystallization of paraffin in the fluid-dynamic behavior of paraffinic crude - Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L; Castaneda, M

    2001-01-01

    The results obtained by relating the formation of wax crystals using traditional measurements such as cloud point, pour point and viscosity show the importance of analyzing the interactions among the chemical nature of crude oils, the physical-chemical variables and the fluid dynamics that cause different shapes and rates of crystallization. In addition, the specific value of viscosity should be measured at a certain temperature, as well as the rheological behavior of the crude oils during the process of formation and destruction of crystals due to shear rate. In order to carry out this study, a group of waxy crude oils was chosen. They were characterized considering the parameters mentioned above, and they were subjected to different cooling rates to microscopically observe the resulting morphologies, and to relate them to rheological behavior in a range of similar conditions that are obtained during hydrocarbon transport through pipelines. For this effect, laboratory tests were carried out, in addition to the scaling of results at the pilot plant level in a simulator to analyze the behavior of the fluids in dynamic or static conditions, in relation to prolonged pipeline downtime. This type of studies improves operational safety, offers considerable savings on additives, power, an increase in pumping capacity, and it also facilitates the selection of the most appropriate technology to control wax deposition

  13. Dynamical and statistical phenomena of circulation and heat transfer in periodically forced rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterl, Sebastian; Li, Hui-Min; Zhong, Jin-Qiang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present results from an experimental study into turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection forced externally by periodically modulated unidirectional rotation rates. We find that the azimuthal rotation velocity θ ˙(t ) and thermal amplitude δ (t ) of the large-scale circulation (LSC) are modulated by the forcing, exhibiting a variety of dynamics including increasing phase delays and a resonant peak in the amplitude of θ ˙(t ) . We also focus on the influence of modulated rotation rates on the frequency of occurrence η of stochastic cessation or reorientation events, and on the interplay between such events and the periodically modulated response of θ ˙(t ) . Here we identify a mechanism by which η can be amplified by the modulated response, and these normally stochastic events can occur with high regularity. We provide a modeling framework that explains the observed amplitude and phase responses, and we extend this approach to make predictions for the occurrence of cessation events and the probability distributions of θ ˙(t ) and δ (t ) during different phases of a modulation cycle, based on an adiabatic approach that treats each phase separately. Last, we show that such periodic forcing has consequences beyond influencing LSC dynamics, by investigating how it can modify the heat transport even under conditions where the Ekman pumping effect is predominant and strong enhancement of heat transport occurs. We identify phase and amplitude responses of the heat transport, and we show how increased modulations influence the average Nusselt number.

  14. Fast fission phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, Christian.

    1982-03-01

    Experimental studies of fast fission phenomena are presented. The paper is divided into three parts. In the first part, problems associated with fast fission processes are examined in terms of interaction potentials and a dynamic model is presented in which highly elastic collisions, the formation of compound nuclei and fast fission appear naturally. In the second part, a description is given of the experimental methods employed, the observations made and the preliminary interpretation of measurements suggesting the occurence of fast fission processes. In the third part, our dynamic model is incorporated in a general theory of the dissipative processes studied. This theory enables fluctuations associated with collective variables to be calculated. It is applied to highly inelastic collisions, to fast fission and to the fission dynamics of compound nuclei (for which a schematic representation is given). It is with these calculations that the main results of the second part can be interpreted [fr

  15. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach for computing dynamically averaged vibrational spectra including critical nuclear quantum effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2007-10-18

    We have introduced a computational methodology to study vibrational spectroscopy in clusters inclusive of critical nuclear quantum effects. This approach is based on the recently developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics method that combines quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency of the dynamical procedure is drastically improved (by several orders of magnitude) through the utilization of wavelet-based techniques combined with the previously introduced time-dependent deterministic sampling procedure measure to achieve stable, picosecond length, quantum-classical dynamics of electrons and nuclei in clusters. The dynamical information is employed to construct a novel cumulative flux/velocity correlation function, where the wavepacket flux from the quantized particle is combined with classical nuclear velocities to obtain the vibrational density of states. The approach is demonstrated by computing the vibrational density of states of [Cl-H-Cl]-, inclusive of critical quantum nuclear effects, and our results are in good agreement with experiment. A general hierarchical procedure is also provided, based on electronic structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum-mechanical eigenstates, and employing quantum wavepacket ab initio dynamics to understand vibrational spectroscopy in hydrogen-bonded clusters that display large degrees of anharmonicities.

  16. Transport phenomena I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Transport Phenomena I includes viscosity, flow of Newtonian fluids, velocity distribution in laminar flow, velocity distributions with more than one independent variable, thermal con

  17. Large momentum transfer phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imachi, Masahiro; Otsuki, Shoichiro; Matsuoka, Takeo; Sawada, Shoji.

    1978-01-01

    The large momentum transfer phenomena in hadron reaction drastically differ from small momentum transfer phenomena, and are described in this paper. Brief review on the features of the large transverse momentum transfer reactions is described in relation with two-body reactions, single particle productions, particle ratios, two jet structure, two particle correlations, jet production cross section, and the component of momentum perpendicular to the plane defined by the incident protons and the triggered pions and transverse momentum relative to jet axis. In case of two-body process, the exponent N of the power law of the differential cross section is a value between 10 to 11.5 in the large momentum transfer region. The breaks of the exponential behaviors into the power ones are observed at the large momentum transfer region. The break would enable to estimate the order of a critical length. The large momentum transfer phenomena strongly suggest an important role of constituents of hadrons in the hard region. Hard rearrangement of constituents from different initial hadrons induces large momentum transfer reactions. Several rules to count constituents in the hard region have been proposed so far to explain the power behavior. Scale invariant quark interaction and hard reactions are explained, and a summary of the possible types of hard subprocess is presented. (Kato, T.)

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic flow phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbeth, G.; Mutschke, G.; Eckert, S.

    1995-01-01

    The MHD group of the Institute of Safety Research performs basic studies on fluid dynamics and heat/mass transfer in fluids, particularly for electrically conducting fluids (liquid metals) exposed to external magnetic fields (Magnetohydrodynamics - MHD). Such a contactless influence on transport phenomena is of principal importance for a variety of applied problems including safety and design aspects in liquid metal cooled fusion reactors, fast reactors, and chemical systems. Any electrically conducting flow can be influenced without any contact by means of an external electromagnetic field. This, of course, can change the known hydromechanically flow patterns considerably. In the following two examples of such magnetic field influence are presented. (orig.)

  19. Benford analysis of quantum critical phenomena: First digit provides high finite-size scaling exponent while first two and further are not much better

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Anindita; Mishra, Utkarsh; Singha Roy, Sudipto; Biswas, Anindya; Sen(De), Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2018-06-01

    Benford's law is an empirical edict stating that the lower digits appear more often than higher ones as the first few significant digits in statistics of natural phenomena and mathematical tables. A marked proportion of such analyses is restricted to the first significant digit. We employ violation of Benford's law, up to the first four significant digits, for investigating magnetization and correlation data of paradigmatic quantum many-body systems to detect cooperative phenomena, focusing on the finite-size scaling exponents thereof. We find that for the transverse field quantum XY model, behavior of the very first significant digit of an observable, at an arbitrary point of the parameter space, is enough to capture the quantum phase transition in the model with a relatively high scaling exponent. A higher number of significant digits do not provide an appreciable further advantage, in particular, in terms of an increase in scaling exponents. Since the first significant digit of a physical quantity is relatively simple to obtain in experiments, the results have potential implications for laboratory observations in noisy environments.

  20. Voltage Imaging of Waking Mouse Cortex Reveals Emergence of Critical Neuronal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Gregory; Fagerholm, Erik D.; Mutoh, Hiroki; Leech, Robert; Sharp, David J.; Shew, Woodrow L.

    2014-01-01

    Complex cognitive processes require neuronal activity to be coordinated across multiple scales, ranging from local microcircuits to cortex-wide networks. However, multiscale cortical dynamics are not well understood because few experimental approaches have provided sufficient support for hypotheses involving multiscale interactions. To address these limitations, we used, in experiments involving mice, genetically encoded voltage indicator imaging, which measures cortex-wide electrical activity at high spatiotemporal resolution. Here we show that, as mice recovered from anesthesia, scale-invariant spatiotemporal patterns of neuronal activity gradually emerge. We show for the first time that this scale-invariant activity spans four orders of magnitude in awake mice. In contrast, we found that the cortical dynamics of anesthetized mice were not scale invariant. Our results bridge empirical evidence from disparate scales and support theoretical predictions that the awake cortex operates in a dynamical regime known as criticality. The criticality hypothesis predicts that small-scale cortical dynamics are governed by the same principles as those governing larger-scale dynamics. Importantly, these scale-invariant principles also optimize certain aspects of information processing. Our results suggest that during the emergence from anesthesia, criticality arises as information processing demands increase. We expect that, as measurement tools advance toward larger scales and greater resolution, the multiscale framework offered by criticality will continue to provide quantitative predictions and insight on how neurons, microcircuits, and large-scale networks are dynamically coordinated in the brain. PMID:25505314

  1. In-situ Study of Dynamic Phenomena at Metal Nanosolder Interfaces Using Aberration Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microcopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Controlling metallic nanoparticle (NP) interactions plays a vital role in the development of new joining techniques (nanosolder) that bond at lower processing temperatures but remain viable at higher temperatures. The pr imary objective of this project is t o develop a fundamental understanding of the actual reaction processes, associated atomic mechanisms, and the resulting microstructure that occur during thermally - driven bond formation concerning metal - metal nano - scale (%3C50nm) interfaces. In this LDRD pr oject, we have studied metallic NPs interaction at the elevated temperatures by combining in - situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM ) using an aberration - corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC - STEM) and atomic - scale modeling such as m olecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Various metallic NPs such as Ag, Cu and Au are synthesized by chemical routines. Numerous in - situ e xperiments were carried out with focus of the research on study of Ag - Cu system. For the first time, using in - situ STEM he ating experiments , we directly observed t he formation of a 3 - dimensional (3 - D) epitaxial Cu - Ag core - shell nanoparticle during the thermal interaction of Cu and Ag NPs at elevated temperatures (150 - 300 o C). The reaction takes place at temperatures as low as 150 o C and was only observed when care was taken to circumvent the effects of electron beam irradiation during STEM imaging. Atomic - scale modeling verified that the Cu - Ag core - shell structure is energetically favored, and indicated that this phenomenon is a nano - scale effect related to the large surface - to - volume ratio of the NPs. The observation potentially can be used for developing new nanosolder technology that uses Ag shell as the "glue" that stic ks the particles of Cu together. The LDRD has led to several journal publications and numerous conference presentations, and a TA. In addition, we have developed new TEM characterization techniques and phase

  2. Bursting and critical layer frequencies in minimal turbulent dynamics and connections to exact coherent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Sung; Shekar, Ashwin; Graham, Michael D.

    2018-01-01

    The dynamics of the turbulent near-wall region is known to be dominated by coherent structures. These near-wall coherent structures are observed to burst in a very intermittent fashion, exporting turbulent kinetic energy to the rest of the flow. In addition, they are closely related to invariant solutions known as exact coherent states (ECS), some of which display nonlinear critical layer dynamics (motions that are highly localized around the surface on which the streamwise velocity matches the wave speed of ECS). The present work aims to investigate temporal coherence in minimal channel flow relevant to turbulent bursting and critical layer dynamics and its connection to the instability of ECS. It is seen that the minimal channel turbulence displays frequencies very close to those displayed by an ECS family recently identified in the channel flow geometry. The frequencies of these ECS are determined by critical layer structures and thus might be described as "critical layer frequencies." While the bursting frequency is predominant near the wall, the ECS frequencies (critical layer frequencies) become predominant over the bursting frequency at larger distances from the wall, and increasingly so as Reynolds number increases. Turbulent bursts are classified into strong and relatively weak classes with respect to an intermittent approach to a lower branch ECS. This temporally intermittent approach is closely related to an intermittent low drag event, called hibernating turbulence, found in minimal and large domains. The relationship between the strong burst and the instability of the lower branch ECS is further discussed in state space. The state-space dynamics of strong bursts is very similar to that of the unstable manifolds of the lower branch ECS. In particular, strong bursting processes are always preceded by hibernation events. This precursor dynamics to strong turbulence may aid in development of more effective control schemes by a way of anticipating dynamics

  3. The magnetic flux dynamics in the critical state of one-dimensional discrete superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, S.L.; Nakin, A.V.; Savitskaya, N.E.

    2006-01-01

    We give a theoretical description of avalanche-like dynamics of magnetic flux in the critical state of discrete superconductors using a one-dimensional model of a multijunction SQUID. We show that the system under consideration demonstrates the self-organized criticality. The avalanches of vortices manifest themselves as jumps of the total magnetic flux in the sample. The sizes of these jumps have a power-law distribution. We argue that similarities in the behavior of discrete and usual type-II superconductors allows to extend our results for description of avalanche-like dynamics in type-II superconductors with strong pinning

  4. Assessing the dynamic material criticality of infrastructure transitions: A case of low carbon electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelich, Katy; Dawson, David A.; Purnell, Phil; Knoeri, Christof; Revell, Ruairi; Busch, Jonathan; Steinberger, Julia K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a method to analyse material criticality of infrastructure transitions. • Criticality is defined as the potential for, and exposure to, supply disruption. • Our method is dynamic reducing the probability of lock-in to at-risk technologies. • We show that supply disruption potential is reducing but exposure is increasing. - Abstract: Decarbonisation of existing infrastructure systems requires a dynamic roll-out of technology at an unprecedented scale. The potential disruption in supply of critical materials could endanger such a transition to low-carbon infrastructure and, by extension, compromise energy security more broadly because low carbon technologies are reliant on these materials in a way that fossil-fuelled energy infrastructure is not. Criticality is currently defined as the combination of the potential for supply disruption and the exposure of a system of interest to that disruption. We build on this definition and develop a dynamic approach to quantifying criticality, which monitors the change in criticality during the transition towards a low-carbon infrastructure goal. This allows us to assess the relative risk of different technology pathways to reach a particular goal and reduce the probability of being ‘locked in’ to currently attractive but potentially future-critical technologies. To demonstrate, we apply our method to criticality of the proposed UK electricity system transition, with a focus on neodymium. We anticipate that the supply disruption potential of neodymium will decrease by almost 30% by 2050; however, our results show the criticality of low carbon electricity production increases ninefold over this period, as a result of increasing exposure to neodymium-reliant technologies

  5. Phase-separation phenomena in solutions of poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide). III. Pulse-induced critical scattering of solutions in toluene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenhen, D.M.; Smolders, C.A.; Gordon, M.

    1977-01-01

    For the polymer-solvent system poly(phenylene oxide) in toluene the mechanism and kinetics of crystallization have been studied with the Pulse Induced Critical Scattering technique. It was found that after a delay-time the growth mechanism was diffusion controlled. The delay-time is thought to be

  6. Firm Size, a Self-Organized Critical Phenomenon: Evidence from the Dynamical Systems Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Akhilesh

    This research draws upon a recent innovation in the dynamical systems literature called the theory of self -organized criticality (SOC) (Bak, Tang, and Wiesenfeld 1988) to develop a computational model of a firm's size by relating its internal and the external sub-systems. As a holistic paradigm, the theory of SOC implies that a firm as a composite system of many degrees of freedom naturally evolves to a critical state in which a minor event starts a chain reaction that can affect either a part or the system as a whole. Thus, the global features of a firm cannot be understood by analyzing its individual parts separately. The causal framework builds upon a constant capital resource to support a volume of production at the existing level of efficiency. The critical size is defined as the production level at which the average product of a firm's factors of production attains its maximum value. The non -linearity is inferred by a change in the nature of relations at the border of criticality, between size and the two performance variables, viz., the operating efficiency and the financial efficiency. The effect of breaching the critical size is examined on the stock price reactions. Consistent with the theory of SOC, it is hypothesized that the temporal response of a firm breaching the level of critical size should behave as a flicker noise (1/f) process. The flicker noise is characterized by correlations extended over a wide range of time scales, indicating some sort of cooperative effect among a firm's degrees of freedom. It is further hypothesized that a firm's size evolves to a spatial structure with scale-invariant, self-similar (fractal) properties. The system is said to be self-organized inasmuch as it naturally evolves to the state of criticality without any detailed specifications of the initial conditions. In this respect, the critical state is an attractor of the firm's dynamics. Another set of hypotheses examines the relations between the size and the

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of a binary mixture near the lower critical point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pousaneh, Faezeh; Edholm, Olle, E-mail: oed@kth.se [Theoretical Biological Physics, Department of Theoretical Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Maciołek, Anna [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Max-Planck-Institut für Intelligente Systeme, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-07-07

    2,6-lutidine molecules mix with water at high and low temperatures but in a wide intermediate temperature range a 2,6-lutidine/water mixture exhibits a miscibility gap. We constructed and validated an atomistic model for 2,6-lutidine and performed molecular dynamics simulations of 2,6-lutidine/water mixture at different temperatures. We determined the part of demixing curve with the lower critical point. The lower critical point extracted from our data is located close to the experimental one. The estimates for critical exponents obtained from our simulations are in a good agreement with the values corresponding to the 3D Ising universality class.

  8. Gauge dependence of the critical dynamics at the superconducting phase transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Dudka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The critical dynamics of superconductors in the charged regime is reconsidered within field-theory. For the dynamics, the Ginzburg-Landau model with complex order parameter coupled to the gauge field suggested earlier [Lannert et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 097004 (2004] is used. Assuming relaxational dynamics for both quantities, the renormalization group functions within one loop approximation are recalculated for different choices of the gauge. A gauge independent result for the divergence of the melectric conductivity is obtained only at the weak scaling fixed point unstable in one loop order where the timescales of the order parameter and the gauge field are different.

  9. Renormalization group and instantons in stochastic nonlinear dynamics, from self-organized criticality to thermonuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volchenkov, D.

    2009-01-01

    Stochastic counterparts of nonlinear dynamics are studied by means of nonperturbative functional methods developed in the framework of quantum field theory (QFT). In particular, we discuss fully developed turbulence, including leading corrections on possible compressibility of fluids, transport through porous media, theory of waterspouts and tsunami waves, stochastic magnetohydrodynamics, turbulent transport in crossed fields, self-organized criticality, and dynamics of accelerated wrinkled flame fronts advancing in a wide canal. This report would be of interest to the broad auditorium of physicists and applied mathematicians, with a background in nonperturbative QFT methods or nonlinear dynamical systems, having an interest in both methodological developments and interdisciplinary applications. (author)

  10. Renormalization group and instantons in stochastic nonlinear dynamics, from self-organized criticality to thermonuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchenkov, D. [Bielefeld Univ., Center of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology (CITEC) (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Stochastic counterparts of nonlinear dynamics are studied by means of nonperturbative functional methods developed in the framework of quantum field theory (QFT). In particular, we discuss fully developed turbulence, including leading corrections on possible compressibility of fluids, transport through porous media, theory of waterspouts and tsunami waves, stochastic magnetohydrodynamics, turbulent transport in crossed fields, self-organized criticality, and dynamics of accelerated wrinkled flame fronts advancing in a wide canal. This report would be of interest to the broad auditorium of physicists and applied mathematicians, with a background in nonperturbative QFT methods or nonlinear dynamical systems, having an interest in both methodological developments and interdisciplinary applications. (author)

  11. A non-critical string approach to black holes, time and quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    1994-01-01

    We review our approach to time and quantum dynamics based on non-critical string theory, developing its relationship to previous work on non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics and the microscopic arrow of time. We exhibit specific non-factorizing contributions to the {\

  12. Euler Strut: A Mechanical Analogy for Dynamics in the Vicinity of a Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobnar, Jaka; Susman, Katarina; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Rand, Peter R.; Cepic, Mojca; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    An anchored elastic filament (Euler strut) under an external point load applied to its free end is a simple model for a second-order phase transition. In the static case, a load greater than the critical load causes a Euler buckling instability, leading to a change in the filament's shape. The analysis of filament dynamics with an external point…

  13. Phase transitions, nonequilibrium dynamics, and critical behavior of strongly interacting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottola, E.; Bhattacharya, T.; Cooper, F.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In this effort, large-scale simulations of strongly interacting systems were performed and a variety of approaches to the nonequilibrium dynamics of phase transitions and critical behavior were investigated. Focus areas included (1) the finite-temperature quantum chromodynamics phase transition and nonequilibrium dynamics of a new phase of matter (the quark-gluon plasma) above the critical temperature, (2) nonequilibrium dynamics of a quantum fields using mean field theory, and (3) stochastic classical field theoretic models with applications to spinodal decomposition and structural phase transitions in a variety of systems, such as spin chains and shape memory alloys

  14. Phase transitions, nonequilibrium dynamics, and critical behavior of strongly interacting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mottola, E.; Bhattacharya, T.; Cooper, F. [and others

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In this effort, large-scale simulations of strongly interacting systems were performed and a variety of approaches to the nonequilibrium dynamics of phase transitions and critical behavior were investigated. Focus areas included (1) the finite-temperature quantum chromodynamics phase transition and nonequilibrium dynamics of a new phase of matter (the quark-gluon plasma) above the critical temperature, (2) nonequilibrium dynamics of a quantum fields using mean field theory, and (3) stochastic classical field theoretic models with applications to spinodal decomposition and structural phase transitions in a variety of systems, such as spin chains and shape memory alloys.

  15. Optimal system size for complex dynamics in random neural networks near criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wainrib, Gilles, E-mail: wainrib@math.univ-paris13.fr [Laboratoire Analyse Géométrie et Applications, Université Paris XIII, Villetaneuse (France); García del Molino, Luis Carlos, E-mail: garciadelmolino@ijm.univ-paris-diderot.fr [Institute Jacques Monod, Université Paris VII, Paris (France)

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we consider a model of dynamical agents coupled through a random connectivity matrix, as introduced by Sompolinsky et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61(3), 259–262 (1988)] in the context of random neural networks. When system size is infinite, it is known that increasing the disorder parameter induces a phase transition leading to chaotic dynamics. We observe and investigate here a novel phenomenon in the sub-critical regime for finite size systems: the probability of observing complex dynamics is maximal for an intermediate system size when the disorder is close enough to criticality. We give a more general explanation of this type of system size resonance in the framework of extreme values theory for eigenvalues of random matrices.

  16. Optimal system size for complex dynamics in random neural networks near criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wainrib, Gilles; García del Molino, Luis Carlos

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we consider a model of dynamical agents coupled through a random connectivity matrix, as introduced by Sompolinsky et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61(3), 259–262 (1988)] in the context of random neural networks. When system size is infinite, it is known that increasing the disorder parameter induces a phase transition leading to chaotic dynamics. We observe and investigate here a novel phenomenon in the sub-critical regime for finite size systems: the probability of observing complex dynamics is maximal for an intermediate system size when the disorder is close enough to criticality. We give a more general explanation of this type of system size resonance in the framework of extreme values theory for eigenvalues of random matrices

  17. Non-linear quantum critical dynamics and fluctuation-dissipation ratios far from equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamani, Farzaneh [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Nöthnitzer Str. 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Nöthnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Ribeiro, Pedro [CeFEMA, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Russian Quantum Center, Novaya Street 100 A, Skolkovo, Moscow Area, 143025 (Russian Federation); Kirchner, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.kirchner@correlated-matter.com [Center for Correlated Matter, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Non-thermal correlations of strongly correlated electron systems and the far-from-equilibrium properties of phases of condensed matter have become a topical research area. Here, an overview of the non-linear dynamics found near continuous zero-temperature phase transitions within the context of effective temperatures is presented. In particular, we focus on models of critical Kondo destruction. Such a quantum critical state, where Kondo screening is destroyed in a critical fashion, is realized in a number of rare earth intermetallics. This raises the possibility of experimentally testing for the existence of fluctuation-dissipation relations far from equilibrium in terms of effective temperatures. Finally, we present an analysis of a non-interacting, critical reference system, the pseudogap resonant level model, in terms of effective temperatures and contrast these results with those obtained near interacting quantum critical points. - Highlights: • Critical Kondo destruction explains the unusual properties of quantum critical heavy fermion compounds. • We review the concept of effective temperatures in models of critical Kondo destruction. • We compare effective temperatures found near non-interacting and fully interacting fixed points. • A comparison with non-interacting quantum impurity models is presented.

  18. Analysis of neutronics and dynamic characteristics with reactivity injection in LBE cooled sub-critical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Sen; Wu Yican; Jin Ming; Chen Zhibin; Bai Yunqing; Zhao Zhumin

    2014-01-01

    Accelerator Driven Sub-critical System (ADS) has particular neutronics behaviors compared with the critical system. Prompt jump approximation point reactor kinetics equations taken external source into account have been deduced using an approach of prompt jump approximation. And the relationship between injection reactivity and power ampliation has been achieved. In addition, based on the RELAP5 code the prolong development of point reactor kinetics code used into assessing sub-critical system have been promoted. Different sub-criticality (k eff = 0.90, 0.95, 0.97, 0.98 and 0.99) have been assessed in preliminary design of a type of natural circulation cooling sub-critical reactor under conditions of reactivity injection +1 β in one second. It shows that the external source prompt transient approximation method has an accurate solution after injecting reactivity around short time and has a capacity to solve the dynamic equation, and the sub-critical system has an inner stability while the deeper sub-criticality the less impact on the sub-critical system. (authors)

  19. Collective motion of macroscopic spheres floating on capillary ripples: Dynamic heterogeneity and dynamic criticality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanli, Ceyda; Saitoh, K.; Luding, Stefan; van der Meer, Roger M.

    2014-01-01

    When a densely packed monolayer of macroscopic spheres floats on chaotic capillary Faraday waves, a coexistence of large scale convective motion and caging dynamics typical for glassy systems is observed. We subtract the convective mean flow using a coarse graining (homogenization) method and reveal

  20. Unified Treatise of Phenomena of Seismic Fusion-Fission Under Seismonomy in the Light of Monistic Weltanschauung: the Doctrine of Dynamics Monism With Implication to the Earthquake Source Physics}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaurov, D.

    2006-12-01

    Established profoundly new conceptual framework by the five postulates of seismonomy, enables unified treatise of processes such as dynamic structural devastation, seismic blowing up of mount ridges, collision physics, meteorite impact cratering, and seismic global faulting with insight into the earthquake source physics. Hence, by establishing the parametric method of identification of natural modes and then Parametric Scan- Window Observation of Dynamic Responses (PSW-method), it becomes possible to obtain crucial field data. Thus, earth-dam dynamics data revealed an essential non-stationarity of dam's dynamic characteristics throughout earthquakes, the effect of stochastic alternation of the locally-stationary modal states with the discrete characteristics of their spectral distribution. At this point, in the course of other, separate line of far beyond lasting quest concerning metaphysical constituents of matter, and then constitutive relation between excited modal oscillation of structures and causal pattern of their fracture, the results of such analysis, resuming obscurity of the well known jaggedness of observing earthquake spectra, were illuminated and perceived. It was succeeded, on the one hand, to establish unitary conceptualized framework of seismic records analysis consisting both the PSW- and spectral- analysis, which reformulated to be a statistical representation complementary to PSW-method, and, on the other hand, to realize genesis of the doctrine of dynamics monism consisting concepts of both: fission-fusion dynamics and dynamics coherentism as an inspiration of the paradigm of seismic fusion-fission phenomena. Global faulting originating straight plane faults, which often stretch through large scale substantially inhomogeneous volumes, are, uncontestably, the result of dynamics fission, the first step of dynamics binary division of an emerged geoseismoid onto two secondary seismoids with a potential, occasionally stretched rupture plane. That

  1. Coherent inflationary dynamics for Bose-Einstein condensates crossing a quantum critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lei; Clark, Logan W.; Gaj, Anita; Chin, Cheng

    2018-03-01

    Quantum phase transitions, transitions between many-body ground states, are of extensive interest in research ranging from condensed-matter physics to cosmology1-4. Key features of the phase transitions include a stage with rapidly growing new order, called inflation in cosmology5, followed by the formation of topological defects6-8. How inflation is initiated and evolves into topological defects remains a hot topic of debate. Ultracold atomic gas offers a pristine and tunable platform to investigate quantum critical dynamics9-21. We report the observation of coherent inflationary dynamics across a quantum critical point in driven Bose-Einstein condensates. The inflation manifests in the exponential growth of density waves and populations in well-resolved momentum states. After the inflation stage, extended coherent dynamics is evident in both real and momentum space. We present an intuitive description of the quantum critical dynamics in our system and demonstrate the essential role of phase fluctuations in the formation of topological defects.

  2. msiDBN: A Method of Identifying Critical Proteins in Dynamic PPI Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of protein-protein interactions (PPIs reveals the recondite principles of biological processes inside a cell. Shown in a wealth of study, just a small group of proteins, rather than the majority, play more essential roles at crucial points of biological processes. This present work focuses on identifying these critical proteins exhibiting dramatic structural changes in dynamic PPI networks. First, a comprehensive way of modeling the dynamic PPIs is presented which simultaneously analyzes the activity of proteins and assembles the dynamic coregulation correlation between proteins at each time point. Second, a novel method is proposed, named msiDBN, which models a common representation of multiple PPI networks using a deep belief network framework and analyzes the reconstruction errors and the variabilities across the time courses in the biological process. Experiments were implemented on data of yeast cell cycles. We evaluated our network construction method by comparing the functional representations of the derived networks with two other traditional construction methods. The ranking results of critical proteins in msiDBN were compared with the results from the baseline methods. The results of comparison showed that msiDBN had better reconstruction rate and identified more proteins of critical value to yeast cell cycle process.

  3. System Dynamics Approach for Critical Infrastructure and Decision Support. A Model for a Potable Water System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, D.; Witkowski, M.

    2005-12-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Protection / Decision Support System (CIP/DSS) project, supported by the Science and Technology Office, has been developing a risk-informed Decision Support System that provides insights for making critical infrastructure protection decisions. The system considers seventeen different Department of Homeland Security defined Critical Infrastructures (potable water system, telecommunications, public health, economics, etc.) and their primary interdependencies. These infrastructures have been modeling in one model called CIP/DSS Metropolitan Model. The modeling approach used is a system dynamics modeling approach. System dynamics modeling combines control theory and the nonlinear dynamics theory, which is defined by a set of coupled differential equations, which seeks to explain how the structure of a given system determines its behavior. In this poster we present a system dynamics model for one of the seventeen critical infrastructures, a generic metropolitan potable water system (MPWS). Three are the goals: 1) to gain a better understanding of the MPWS infrastructure; 2) to identify improvements that would help protect MPWS; and 3) to understand the consequences, interdependencies, and impacts, when perturbations occur to the system. The model represents raw water sources, the metropolitan water treatment process, storage of treated water, damage and repair to the MPWS, distribution of water, and end user demand, but does not explicitly represent the detailed network topology of an actual MPWS. The MPWS model is dependent upon inputs from the metropolitan population, energy, telecommunication, public health, and transportation models as well as the national water and transportation models. We present modeling results and sensitivity analysis indicating critical choke points, negative and positive feedback loops in the system. A general scenario is also analyzed where the potable water system responds to a generic disruption.

  4. Dynamic Recrystallization Behavior and Critical Conditions of SiCp/A1-Cu Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Shiming

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Using the Gleeble-1500D simulator, the high temperature plastic deformation behavior of 40%SiCP/Al-Cu composite were investigated at 350-500℃ with the strain rate of 0.01-10 s-1. The stress-strain curves were obtained during the tests. The critical conditions of dynamic recrystallization for onset of DRX during deformation of 40%SiCP/Al-Cu composite was obtained by computation of the strain hardening rate (θ from initial stress-strain data and introduction of the inflection point criterion of ln θ-ε curves and the minimum value criterion of (-∂(ln θ/∂ε-ε curves. The results indicate that the softening mechanism of the dynamic recrystallization is a feature of high-temperature flow stress strain curves of the composites, and the peak stress increases with the decrease of deformation temperature or the increase of strain rate. The inflection point in the ln θ-ε curve appears, and the minimum value of the (-∂(ln θ/∂ε-ε curve is presented when the critical state is attained for this composite. The critical strain decreases with the decrease of strain rate and the increase of deformation temperature. There is linear relationship between critical strain and peak strain, i.e. εc=0.528εp. The predicting model of critical strain is described by the function of εc=4.58×10-3Z0.09. Electron microscopic analysis show that the dynamic recrystallization occurs when the strain is 0.06 (T=400℃, ε=10 s-1, and the dynamic recrystallization grains fully grow up when the strain is 0.2.

  5. Dynamics and controls of urban heat sink and island phenomena in a desert city: Development of a local climate zone scheme using remotely-sensed inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Ahmed K.; Blackburn, G. Alan; Whyatt, J. Duncan

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to determine the dynamics and controls of Surface Urban Heat Sinks (SUHS) and Surface Urban Heat Islands (SUHI) in desert cities, using Dubai as a case study. A Local Climate Zone (LCZ) schema was developed to subdivide the city into different zones based on similarities in land cover and urban geometry. Proximity to the Gulf Coast was also determined for each LCZ. The LCZs were then used to sample seasonal and daily imagery from the MODIS thermal sensor to determine Land Surface Temperature (LST) variations relative to desert sand. Canonical correlation techniques were then applied to determine which factors explained the variability between urban and desert LST. Our results indicate that the daytime SUHS effect is greatest during the summer months (typically ∼3.0 °C) with the strongest cooling effects in open high-rise zones of the city. In contrast, the night-time SUHI effect is greatest during the winter months (typically ∼3.5 °C) with the strongest warming effects in compact mid-rise zones of the city. Proximity to the Arabian Gulf had the largest influence on both SUHS and SUHI phenomena, promoting daytime cooling in the summer months and night-time warming in the winter months. However, other parameters associated with the urban environment such as building height had an influence on daytime cooling, with larger buildings promoting shade and variations in airflow. Likewise, other parameters such as sky view factor contributed to night-time warming, with higher temperatures associated with limited views of the sky.

  6. High temperature aqueous potassium and sodium phosphate solutions: two-liquid-phase boundaries and critical phenomena, 275-4000C; potential applications for steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.L.

    1981-12-01

    Two-liquid-phase boundaries at temperatures between 275 and 400 0 C were determined for potassium phosphate and sodium phosphate aqueous solutions for compositions from 0 to 60 wt % dissolved salt. The stoichiometric mole ratios, K/PO 4 or Na/PO 4 , were varied from 1.00 to 2.12 and from 1.00 to 2.16 for the potassium and sodium systems, respectively. Liquid-vapor critical temperatures were also determined for most of the dilute liquid phases that formed. The minimum temperatures (below which a single solution existed) of two-liquid-phase formation were 360 0 C for the potassium system and 279 0 C for the sodium system at mole ratios of 2.00 and 2.16, respectively. For the sodium system at mole ratios greater than 2.16, solids crystallized at lower temperatures as expected from earlier studies. In contrast, potassium solutions that were explored at mole ratios from 2.12 to 3.16 and at temperatures below 360 0 C did not produce solid phases nor liquid-liquid immiscibilities. Aside from the generally unusual observations of two immiscible liquids in an aqueous inorganic salt system, the results could possibly be applied to the use of phosphate additives in steam power generators. 16 refs

  7. Critical current densities and vortex dynamics in FeTexSe1-x single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taen, T.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Nakajima, Y.; Tamegai, T.

    2010-01-01

    The critical current density and the normalized relaxation rate are reported in FeTe 0.59 Se 0.41 single crystal. Critical current density is of order of 10 5 A/cm 2 , which is comparable to that in Co-doped BaFe 2 As 2 . In low temperature and low field region, the vortex dynamics of this system is well defined by the collective creep theory, which is quite similar to Co-doped BaFe 2 As 2 reported before. We also discuss the origin of the anomaly in the field dependence of the relaxation rate.

  8. Predicting critical transitions in dynamical systems from time series using nonstationary probability density modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasniok, Frank

    2013-11-01

    A time series analysis method for predicting the probability density of a dynamical system is proposed. A nonstationary parametric model of the probability density is estimated from data within a maximum likelihood framework and then extrapolated to forecast the future probability density and explore the system for critical transitions or tipping points. A full systematic account of parameter uncertainty is taken. The technique is generic, independent of the underlying dynamics of the system. The method is verified on simulated data and then applied to prediction of Arctic sea-ice extent.

  9. Dynamical simulation of a linear sigma model near the critical point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesp, Christian; Meistrenko, Alex; Greiner, Carsten [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Hees, Hendrik van [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The intention of this study is the search for signatures of the chiral phase transition. To investigate the impact of fluctuations, e.g. of the baryon number, on the transition or a critical point, the linear sigma model is treated in a dynamical 3+1D numerical simulation. Chiral fields are approximated as classical fields, quarks are described by quasi particles in a Vlasov equation. Additional dynamic is implemented by quark-quark and quark-sigma-field interaction. For a consistent description of field-particle interactions, a new Monte-Carlo-Langevin-like formalism has been developed and is discussed.

  10. Magnetic phenomena in holographic superconductivity with Lifshitz scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Dector

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effects of Lifshitz dynamical critical exponent z on a family of minimal D=4+1 holographic superconducting models, with a particular focus on magnetic phenomena. We see that it is possible to have a consistent Ginzburg–Landau approach to holographic superconductivity in a Lifshitz background. By following this phenomenological approach we are able to compute a wide array of physical quantities. We also calculate the Ginzburg–Landau parameter for different condensates, and conclude that in systems with higher dynamical critical exponent, vortex formation is more strongly unfavored energetically and exhibits a stronger Type I behavior. Finally, following the perturbative approach proposed by Maeda, Natsuume and Okamura, we calculate the critical magnetic field of our models for different values of z.

  11. Simulation Based Exploration of Critical Zone Dynamics in Intensively Managed Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.

    2017-12-01

    The advent of high-resolution measurements of topographic and (vertical) vegetation features using areal LiDAR are enabling us to resolve micro-scale ( 1m) landscape structural characteristics over large areas. Availability of hyperspectral measurements is further augmenting these LiDAR data by enabling the biogeochemical characterization of vegetation and soils at unprecedented spatial resolutions ( 1-10m). Such data have opened up novel opportunities for modeling Critical Zone processes and exploring questions that were not possible before. We show how an integrated 3-D model at 1m grid resolution can enable us to resolve micro-topographic and ecological dynamics and their control on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes over large areas. We address the computational challenge of such detailed modeling by exploiting hybrid CPU and GPU computing technologies. We show results of moisture, biogeochemical, and vegetation dynamics from studies in the Critical Zone Observatory for Intensively managed Landscapes (IMLCZO) in the Midwestern United States.

  12. A power law of order 1/4 for critical mean field Swendsen-Wang dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Yun; Ning, Weiyang; Peres, Yuval

    2014-01-01

    The Swendsen-Wang dynamics is a Markov chain widely used by physicists to sample from the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution of the Ising model. Cooper, Dyer, Frieze and Rue proved that on the complete graph K_n the mixing time of the chain is at most O(\\sqrt{n}) for all non-critical temperatures. In this paper the authors show that the mixing time is \\Theta(1) in high temperatures, \\Theta(\\log n) in low temperatures and \\Theta(n^{1/4}) at criticality. They also provide an upper bound of O(\\log n) for Swendsen-Wang dynamics for the q-state ferromagnetic Potts model on any tree of n vertices.

  13. Relative criterion for validity of a semiclassical approach to the dynamics near quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Qin, Pinquan; Wang, Wen-ge

    2015-10-01

    Based on an analysis of Feynman's path integral formulation of the propagator, a relative criterion is proposed for validity of a semiclassical approach to the dynamics near critical points in a class of systems undergoing quantum phase transitions. It is given by an effective Planck constant, in the relative sense that a smaller effective Planck constant implies better performance of the semiclassical approach. Numerical tests of this relative criterion are given in the XY model and in the Dicke model.

  14. Analysis of critical neutron- scattering data from iron and dynamical scaling theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1970-01-01

    Experimental three- axis spectrometer data of critical neutron- scattering data from Fe are reanalyzed and compared with the recent theoretical prediction by P. Resibois and C. Piette. The reason why the spin- diffusion parameter did not obey the prediction of dynamical scaling theory is indicated....... Double- axis spectrometer data have previously been interpreted in terms of a non- Lorentzian susceptibility. It is shown that with proper corrections for the inelasticity of the scattering the data are consistent with a Lorentzian form of susceptibility....

  15. Dropout Phenomena at Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Søgaard; Kornbeck, Kasper Pihl; Kristensen, Rune

    Dropout from university studies comprises a number of complex phenomena with serious complex consequences and profound political attention. Further analysis of the field is, therefore, warranted. Such an analysis is offered here as a systematic review which gives answers based on the best possible...... such dropout phenomena occur at universities? What can be done by the universities to prevent or reduce such dropout phenomena?...

  16. Molecular dynamics study of combustion reactions in supercritical environment. Part 1: Carbon dioxide and water force field parameters refitting and critical isotherms of binary mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunov, Artem E.; Atlanov, Arseniy Alekseyevich; Vasu, Subith S.

    2016-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion process is expected to drastically increase the energy efficiency and enable easy carbon sequestration. In this technology the combustion products (carbon dioxide and water) are used to control the temperature and nitrogen is excluded from the combustion chamber, so that nitrogen oxide pollutants do not form. Therefore, in oxycombustion the carbon dioxide and water are present in large concentrations in their transcritical state, and may play an important role in kinetics. The computational chemistry methods may assist in understanding these effects, and Molecular Dynamics with ReaxFF force field seem to be a suitable tool for such a study. Here we investigate applicability of the ReaxFF to describe the critical phenomena in carbon dioxide and water and find that several nonbonding parameters need adjustment. We report the new parameter set, capable to reproduce the critical temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, the critical isotherms of CO 2 /H 2 O binary mixtures are computationally studied here for the first time and their critical parameters are reported.

  17. A novel reformulation of the Theory of Critical Distances to design notched metals against dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, T.; Tyas, A.; Plekhov, O.; Terekhina, A.; Susmel, L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The proposed method is successful in estimating dynamic strength of metals. • The critical distance varies as the loading/strain/displacement rate increases. • The reference strength varies as the loading/strain/displacement rate increases. • This method is recommended to be used with safety factors larger than 1.25. - Abstract: In the present study the linear-elastic Theory of Critical Distances (TCD) is reformulated to make it suitable for predicting the strength of notched metallic materials subjected to dynamic loading. The accuracy and reliability of the proposed reformulation of the TCD was checked against a number of experimental results generated by testing, under different loading/strain rates, notched cylindrical samples of aluminium alloy 6063-T5, titanium alloy Ti–6Al–4V, aluminium alloy AlMg6, and an AlMn alloy. To further validate the proposed design method also different data sets taken from the literature were considered. Such an extensive validation exercise allowed us to prove that the proposed reformulation of the TCD is successful in predicting the dynamic strength of notched metallic materials, this approach proving to be capable of estimates falling within an error interval of ±20%. Such a high level of accuracy is certainly remarkable, especially in light of the fact that it was reached without the need for explicitly modelling the stress vs. strain dynamic behaviour of the investigated ductile metals

  18. The dynamics of marginality and self-organized criticality as a paradigm for turbulent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.E.; Carreras, B.A.; Diamond, P.H.; Hahm, T.S.

    1995-01-01

    A general paradigm, based on the concept of self-organized criticality (SOC), for turbulent transport in magnetically confined plasmas has been recently suggested as an explanation for some of the apparent discrepancies between most theoretical models of turbulent transport and experimental observations of the transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This model describes the dynamics of the transport without relying on the underlying local fluctuation mechanisms. Computations based on a cellular automata realization of such a model have found that noise driven SOC systems can maintain average profiles that are linearly stable (submarginal) and yet are able to sustain active transport dynamics. It is also found that the dominant scales in the transport dynamics in the absence of sheared flow are system scales rather than the underlying local fluctuation scales. The addition of sheared flow into the dynamics leads to a large reduction of the system-scale transport events and a commensurate increase in the fluctuation-scale transport events needed to maintain the constant flux. The dynamics of these models and the potential ramifications for transport studies are discussed

  19. Mathematical Modeling of Diverse Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Tensor calculus is applied to the formulation of mathematical models of diverse phenomena. Aeronautics, fluid dynamics, and cosmology are among the areas of application. The feasibility of combining tensor methods and computer capability to formulate problems is demonstrated. The techniques described are an attempt to simplify the formulation of mathematical models by reducing the modeling process to a series of routine operations, which can be performed either manually or by computer.

  20. SACS2: Dynamic and Formal Safety Analysis Method for Complex Safety Critical System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Kwang Yong; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Fault tree analysis (FTA) is one of the most widely used safety analysis technique in the development of safety critical systems. However, over the years, several drawbacks of the conventional FTA have become apparent. One major drawback is that conventional FTA uses only static gates and hence can not capture dynamic behaviors of the complex system precisely. Although several attempts such as dynamic fault tree (DFT), PANDORA, formal fault tree (FFT) and so on, have been made to overcome this problem, they can not still do absolute or actual time modeling because they adapt relative time concept and can capture only sequential behaviors of the system. Second drawback of conventional FTA is its lack of rigorous semantics. Because it is informal in nature, safety analysis results heavily depend on an analyst's ability and are error-prone. Finally reasoning process which is to check whether basic events really cause top events is done manually and hence very labor-intensive and timeconsuming for the complex systems. In this paper, we propose a new safety analysis method for complex safety critical system in qualitative manner. We introduce several temporal gates based on timed computational tree logic (TCTL) which can represent quantitative notion of time. Then, we translate the information of the fault trees into UPPAAL query language and the reasoning process is automatically done by UPPAAL which is the model checker for time critical system

  1. Black hole critical phenomena without black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    large values of Ф, black holes do form and for small values the scalar field ... on the near side of the ridge ultimately evolve to form black holes while those configu- ... The inset shows a bird's eye view looking down on the saddle point.

  2. Quantum phase transition and critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, A.; Chakrabarti, B.K.

    1998-01-01

    We intend to describe briefly the generic features associated with the zero temperature transition in quantum mechanical systems. We elucidate the discussion of the introductory section using the very common example of Ising model in a transverse field. We discuss the method of fermionisation for one dimensional systems. The quantum-classical correspondence is discussed using Suzuki-Trotter method. We then introduce the quantum rotor model and discuss its spherical limit. We finally discuss novel features arising due to the presence of quenched randomness in the quantum Ising and rotor systems. (author)

  3. A novel critical infrastructure resilience assessment approach using dynamic Bayesian networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Baoping; Xie, Min; Liu, Yonghong; Liu, Yiliu; Ji, Renjie; Feng, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    The word resilience originally originates from the Latin word "resiliere", which means to "bounce back". The concept has been used in various fields, such as ecology, economics, psychology, and society, with different definitions. In the field of critical infrastructure, although some resilience metrics are proposed, they are totally different from each other, which are determined by the performances of the objects of evaluation. Here we bridge the gap by developing a universal critical infrastructure resilience metric from the perspective of reliability engineering. A dynamic Bayesian networks-based assessment approach is proposed to calculate the resilience value. A series, parallel and voting system is used to demonstrate the application of the developed resilience metric and assessment approach.

  4. Classical dynamics of the Abelian Higgs model from the critical point and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.C. Katsimiga

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present two different families of solutions of the U(1-Higgs model in a (1+1 dimensional setting leading to a localization of the gauge field. First we consider a uniform background (the usual vacuum, which corresponds to the fully higgsed-superconducting phase. Then we study the case of a non-uniform background in the form of a domain wall which could be relevantly close to the critical point of the associated spontaneous symmetry breaking. For both cases we obtain approximate analytical nodeless and nodal solutions for the gauge field resulting as bound states of an effective Pöschl–Teller potential created by the scalar field. The two scenaria differ only in the scale of the characteristic localization length. Numerical simulations confirm the validity of the obtained analytical solutions. Additionally we demonstrate how a kink may be used as a mediator driving the dynamics from the critical point and beyond.

  5. Calculations of critical micelle concentration by dissipative particle dynamics simulations: the role of chain rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V

    2013-09-05

    Micelle formation in surfactant solutions is a self-assembly process governed by complex interplay of solvent-mediated interactions between hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, which are commonly called heads and tails. However, the head-tail repulsion is not the only factor affecting the micelle formation. For the first time, we present a systematic study of the effect of chain rigidity on critical micelle concentration and micelle size, which is performed with the dissipative particle dynamics simulation method. Rigidity of the coarse-grained surfactant molecule was controlled by the harmonic bonds set between the second-neighbor beads. Compared to flexible molecules with the nearest-neighbor bonds being the only type of bonded interactions, rigid molecules exhibited a lower critical micelle concentration and formed larger and better-defined micelles. By varying the strength of head-tail repulsion and the chain rigidity, we constructed two-dimensional diagrams presenting how the critical micelle concentration and aggregation number depend on these parameters. We found that the solutions of flexible and rigid molecules that exhibited approximately the same critical micelle concentration could differ substantially in the micelle size and shape depending on the chain rigidity. With the increase of surfactant concentration, primary micelles of more rigid molecules were found less keen to agglomeration and formation of nonspherical aggregates characteristic of flexible molecules.

  6. Critical Domain Problem for the Reaction–Telegraph Equation Model of Population Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weam Alharbi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A telegraph equation is believed to be an appropriate model of population dynamics as it accounts for the directional persistence of individual animal movement. Being motivated by the problem of habitat fragmentation, which is known to be a major threat to biodiversity that causes species extinction worldwide, we consider the reaction–telegraph equation (i.e., telegraph equation combined with the population growth on a bounded domain with the goal to establish the conditions of species survival. We first show analytically that, in the case of linear growth, the expression for the domain’s critical size coincides with the critical size of the corresponding reaction–diffusion model. We then consider two biologically relevant cases of nonlinear growth, i.e., the logistic growth and the growth with a strong Allee effect. Using extensive numerical simulations, we show that in both cases the critical domain size of the reaction–telegraph equation is larger than the critical domain size of the reaction–diffusion equation. Finally, we discuss possible modifications of the model in order to enhance the positivity of its solutions.

  7. Nonuniversal critical behaviour in a model for charge density wave dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritala, R.K.; Hertz, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    We have studied short range fluctuations around the infinite-range model of charge density wave (CDW) dynamics. We find that the inhomogeneity of the local field, which is neglected in the infinite-range approximation has a dramatic effect on the transition. In the Bethe approximation the critical behaviour is nonuniversal. In particular, the current exponent is ζ = 3/2 log(z-1)/[log(z)]+log(1+f/J)], where z is the number of neighbors, f the pinning strength, and J the elastic coupling. (orig.)

  8. Dynamical scaling and critical scattering in pure and disordered ferromagnets probed by NSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alba, M. [LLB, CEA-CNRS UMR12, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France)]. E-mail: michel.alba@cea.fr; Pouget, S. [DRFMC/SPSMS, CEN-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Fouquet, P. [ILL, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Farago, B. [ILL, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Pappas, C. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Glienickerstr. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    We have studied the 3D Heisenberg ferromagnetic model system CdCr{sub 2} {sub x} In{sub 2-2} {sub x} S{sub 4} in the ferromagnetic and reentrant phases as a function of temperature and momentum transfer using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy. The results from the pure sample CdCr{sub 2}S{sub 4} are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the renormalization group theory. In the presence of disorder, we see the evolution from a simple critical ferromagnetic scattering with single fast relaxation times to a more complex slow dynamics characteristic of spin glasses.

  9. A critical oscillation constant as a variable of time scales for half-linear dynamic equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řehák, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2010), s. 237-256 ISSN 0139-9918 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100190701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : dynamic equation * time scale * half-linear equation * (non)oscillation criteria * Hille-Nehari criteria * Kneser criteria * critical constant * oscillation constant * Hardy inequality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.316, year: 2010 http://link.springer.com/article/10.2478%2Fs12175-010-0009-7

  10. Finite-temperature spin dynamics in a perturbed quantum critical Ising chain with an E₈ symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianda; Kormos, Márton; Si, Qimiao

    2014-12-12

    A spectrum exhibiting E₈ symmetry is expected to arise when a small longitudinal field is introduced in the transverse-field Ising chain at its quantum critical point. Evidence for this spectrum has recently come from neutron scattering measurements in cobalt niobate, a quasi-one-dimensional Ising ferromagnet. Unlike its zero-temperature counterpart, the finite-temperature dynamics of the model has not yet been determined. We study the dynamical spin structure factor of the model at low frequencies and nonzero temperatures, using the form factor method. Its frequency dependence is singular, but differs from the diffusion form. The temperature dependence of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation rate has an activated form, whose prefactor we also determine. We propose NMR experiments as a means to further test the applicability of the E₈ description for CoNb₂O₆.

  11. Signals for the QCD phase transition and critical point in a Langevin dynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herold, Christoph; Bleicher, Marcus; Yan, Yu-Peng

    2013-01-01

    The search for the critical point is one of the central issues that will be investigated in the upcoming FAIR project. For a profound theoretical understanding of the expected signals we go beyond thermodynamic studies and present a fully dynamical model for the chiral and deconfinement phase transition in heavy ion collisions. The corresponding order parameters are propagated by Langevin equations of motions on a thermal background provided by a fluid dynamically expanding plasma of quarks. By that we are able to describe nonequilibrium effects occurring during the rapid expansion of a hot fireball. For an evolution through the phase transition the formation of a supercooled phase and its subsequent decay crucially influence the trajectories in the phase diagram and lead to a significant reheating of the quark medium at highest baryon densities. Furthermore, we find inhomogeneous structures with high density domains along the first order transition line within single events.

  12. Dynamic data-driven integrated flare model based on self-organized criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitropoulou, M.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Georgoulis, M. K.

    2013-05-01

    Context. We interpret solar flares as events originating in active regions that have reached the self-organized critical state. We describe them with a dynamic integrated flare model whose initial conditions and driving mechanism are derived from observations. Aims: We investigate whether well-known scaling laws observed in the distribution functions of characteristic flare parameters are reproduced after the self-organized critical state has been reached. Methods: To investigate whether the distribution functions of total energy, peak energy, and event duration follow the expected scaling laws, we first applied the previously reported static cellular automaton model to a time series of seven solar vector magnetograms of the NOAA active region 8210 recorded by the Imaging Vector Magnetograph on May 1 1998 between 18:59 UT and 23:16 UT until the self-organized critical state was reached. We then evolved the magnetic field between these processed snapshots through spline interpolation, mimicking a natural driver in our dynamic model. We identified magnetic discontinuities that exceeded a threshold in the Laplacian of the magnetic field after each interpolation step. These discontinuities were relaxed in local diffusion events, implemented in the form of cellular automaton evolution rules. Subsequent interpolation and relaxation steps covered all transitions until the end of the processed magnetograms' sequence. We additionally advanced each magnetic configuration that has reached the self-organized critical state (SOC configuration) by the static model until 50 more flares were triggered, applied the dynamic model again to the new sequence, and repeated the same process sufficiently often to generate adequate statistics. Physical requirements, such as the divergence-free condition for the magnetic field, were approximately imposed. Results: We obtain robust power laws in the distribution functions of the modeled flaring events with scaling indices that agree well

  13. Computational multi-fluid dynamics predictions of critical heat flux in boiling flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimouni, S.; Baudry, C.; Guingo, M.; Lavieville, J.; Merigoux, N.; Mechitoua, N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new mechanistic model dedicated to DNB has been implemented in the Neptune_CFD code. • The model has been validated against 150 tests. • Neptune_CFD code is a CFD tool dedicated to boiling flows. - Abstract: Extensive efforts have been made in the last five decades to evaluate the boiling heat transfer coefficient and the critical heat flux in particular. Boiling crisis remains a major limiting phenomenon for the analysis of operation and safety of both nuclear reactors and conventional thermal power systems. As a consequence, models dedicated to boiling flows have being improved. For example, Reynolds Stress Transport Model, polydispersion and two-phase flow wall law have been recently implemented. In a previous work, we have evaluated computational fluid dynamics results against single-phase liquid water tests equipped with a mixing vane and against two-phase boiling cases. The objective of this paper is to propose a new mechanistic model in a computational multi-fluid dynamics tool leading to wall temperature excursion and onset of boiling crisis. Critical heat flux is calculated against 150 tests and the mean relative error between calculations and experimental values is equal to 8.3%. The model tested covers a large physics scope in terms of mass flux, pressure, quality and channel diameter. Water and R12 refrigerant fluid are considered. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity to the grid refinement was acceptable.

  14. Computational multi-fluid dynamics predictions of critical heat flux in boiling flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimouni, S., E-mail: stephane.mimouni@edf.fr; Baudry, C.; Guingo, M.; Lavieville, J.; Merigoux, N.; Mechitoua, N.

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • A new mechanistic model dedicated to DNB has been implemented in the Neptune-CFD code. • The model has been validated against 150 tests. • Neptune-CFD code is a CFD tool dedicated to boiling flows. - Abstract: Extensive efforts have been made in the last five decades to evaluate the boiling heat transfer coefficient and the critical heat flux in particular. Boiling crisis remains a major limiting phenomenon for the analysis of operation and safety of both nuclear reactors and conventional thermal power systems. As a consequence, models dedicated to boiling flows have being improved. For example, Reynolds Stress Transport Model, polydispersion and two-phase flow wall law have been recently implemented. In a previous work, we have evaluated computational fluid dynamics results against single-phase liquid water tests equipped with a mixing vane and against two-phase boiling cases. The objective of this paper is to propose a new mechanistic model in a computational multi-fluid dynamics tool leading to wall temperature excursion and onset of boiling crisis. Critical heat flux is calculated against 150 tests and the mean relative error between calculations and experimental values is equal to 8.3%. The model tested covers a large physics scope in terms of mass flux, pressure, quality and channel diameter. Water and R12 refrigerant fluid are considered. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity to the grid refinement was acceptable.

  15. Analytical description of critical dynamics for two-dimensional dissipative nonlinear maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méndez-Bermúdez, J.A.; Oliveira, Juliano A. de; Leonel, Edson D.

    2016-01-01

    The critical dynamics near the transition from unlimited to limited action diffusion for two families of well known dissipative nonlinear maps, namely the dissipative standard and dissipative discontinuous maps, is characterized by the use of an analytical approach. The approach is applied to explicitly obtain the average squared action as a function of the (discrete) time and the parameters controlling nonlinearity and dissipation. This allows to obtain a set of critical exponents so far obtained numerically in the literature. The theoretical predictions are verified by extensive numerical simulations. We conclude that all possible dynamical cases, independently on the map parameter values and initial conditions, collapse into the universal exponential decay of the properly normalized average squared action as a function of a normalized time. The formalism developed here can be extended to many other different types of mappings therefore making the methodology generic and robust. - Highlights: • We analytically approach scaling properties of a family of two-dimensional dissipative nonlinear maps. • We derive universal scaling functions that were obtained before only approximately. • We predict the unexpected condition where diffusion and dissipation compensate each other exactly. • We find a new universal scaling function that embraces all possible dissipative behaviors.

  16. Three-dimensional multi-phase flow computational fluid dynamics model for analysis of transport phenomena and thermal stresses in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, A.R.; Al-Baghdadi, S. [International Technological Univ., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Haroun, A.K.; Al-Janabi, S. [Babylon Univ., Babylon (Iraq). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Fuel cell technology is expected to play an important role in meeting the growing demand for distributed generation because it can convert the chemical energy of a clean fuel directly into electrical energy. An operating fuel cell has varying local conditions of temperature, humidity, and power generation across the active area of the fuel cell in 3D. This paper presented a model that was developed to improve the basic understanding of the transport phenomena and thermal stresses in PEM fuel cells, and to investigate the behaviour of polymer membrane under hygro and thermal stresses during the cell operation. This comprehensive 3D, multiphase, non-isothermal model accounts for the major transport phenomena in a PEM fuel cell, notably convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer; electrode kinetics; transport and phase change mechanism of water; and potential fields. The model accounts for the liquid water flux inside the gas diffusion layers by viscous and capillary forces and can therefore predict the amount of liquid water inside the gas diffusion layers. This study also investigated the key parameters affecting fuel cell performance including geometry, materials and operating conditions. The model considers the many interacting, complex electrochemical, transport phenomena, thermal stresses and deformation that cannot be studied experimentally. It was concluded that the model can provide a computer-aided tool for the design and optimization of future fuel cells with much higher power density and lower cost. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs.

  17. Towards a dynamic assessment of raw materials criticality: Linking agent-based demand — With material flow supply modelling approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoeri, Christof; Wäger, Patrick A.; Stamp, Anna; Althaus, Hans-Joerg; Weil, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technologies such as information and communication-, photovoltaic- or battery technologies are expected to increase significantly the demand for scarce metals in the near future. The recently developed methods to evaluate the criticality of mineral raw materials typically provide a ‘snapshot’ of the criticality of a certain material at one point in time by using static indicators both for supply risk and for the impacts of supply restrictions. While allowing for insights into the mechanisms behind the criticality of raw materials, these methods cannot account for dynamic changes in products and/or activities over time. In this paper we propose a conceptual framework intended to overcome these limitations by including the dynamic interactions between different possible demand and supply configurations. The framework integrates an agent-based behaviour model, where demand emerges from individual agent decisions and interaction, into a dynamic material flow model, representing the materials' stocks and flows. Within the framework, the environmental implications of substitution decisions are evaluated by applying life-cycle assessment methodology. The approach makes a first step towards a dynamic criticality assessment and will enhance the understanding of industrial substitution decisions and environmental implications related to critical metals. We discuss the potential and limitation of such an approach in contrast to state-of-the-art methods and how it might lead to criticality assessments tailored to the specific circumstances of single industrial sectors or individual companies. - Highlights: ► Current criticality assessment methods provide a ‘snapshot’ at one point in time. ► They do not account for dynamic interactions between demand and supply. ► We propose a conceptual framework to overcomes these limitations. ► The framework integrates an agent-based behaviour model with a dynamic material flow model. ► The approach proposed makes

  18. Cinematic Operation of the Cerebral Cortex Interpreted via Critical Transitions in Self-Organized Dynamic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Robert; Freeman, Walter J

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of local field potentials over the cortical surface and the scalp of animals and human subjects reveal intermittent bursts of beta and gamma oscillations. During the bursts, narrow-band metastable amplitude modulation (AM) patters emerge for a fraction of a second and ultimately dissolve to the broad-band random background activity. The burst process depends on previously learnt conditioned stimuli (CS), thus different AM patterns may emerge in response to different CS. This observation leads to our cinematic theory of cognition when perception happens in discrete steps manifested in the sequence of AM patterns. Our article summarizes findings in the past decades on experimental evidence of cinematic theory of cognition and relevant mathematical models. We treat cortices as dissipative systems that self-organize themselves near a critical level of activity that is a non-equilibrium metastable state. Criticality is arguably a key aspect of brains in their rapid adaptation, reconfiguration, high storage capacity, and sensitive response to external stimuli. Self-organized criticality (SOC) became an important concept to describe neural systems. We argue that transitions from one AM pattern to the other require the concept of phase transitions, extending beyond the dynamics described by SOC. We employ random graph theory (RGT) and percolation dynamics as fundamental mathematical approaches to model fluctuations in the cortical tissue. Our results indicate that perceptions are formed through a phase transition from a disorganized (high entropy) to a well-organized (low entropy) state, which explains the swiftness of the emergence of the perceptual experience in response to learned stimuli.

  19. Dynamic Stability Analysis and Critical Speed of Rotor supported by a Worn Fluid film Journal Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan naji jameel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of wear in the fluid film journal bearings on the dynamic stability of rotor bearing system has been studied depending on the development of new analytical equations for motion, instability threshold speed and steady state harmonic response for rotor with offset disc supported by worn journal bearings. Finite element method had been used for modeling the rotor bearing system. The analytical model is verified by comparing its results with that obtained numerically for a rotor supported on the short bearings. The analytical and numerical results showed good agreement with about 8.5% percentage error in the value of critical speed and about 3.5% percentage error in the value of harmonic response. The results obtained show that the wear in journal bearing decrease the instability threshold speed by 2.5% for wear depth 0.02 mm and 12.5% for wear depth 0.04 mm as well as decrease critical speed by 4.2% and steady state harmonic response amplitude by 4.3% for wear depth 0.02 mm and decrease the critical speed by 7.1% and steady state harmonic response amplitude by 13.9% for wear depth 0.04 mm.

  20. Non-critical string theory formulation of microtubule dynamics and quantum aspects of brain function

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nikolaos E

    1995-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) networks, subneural paracrystalline cytosceletal structures, seem to play a fundamental role in the neurons. We cast here the complicated MT dynamics in the form of a 1+1-dimensional non-critical string theory, thus enabling us to provide a consistent quantum treatment of MTs, including enviromental {\\em friction} effects. We suggest, thus, that the MTs are the microsites, in the brain, for the emergence of stable, macroscopic quantum coherent states, identifiable with the {\\em preconscious states}. Quantum space-time effects, as described by non-critical string theory, trigger then an {\\em organized collapse} of the coherent states down to a specific or {\\em conscious state}. The whole process we estimate to take {\\cal O}(1\\,{\\rm sec}), in excellent agreement with a plethora of experimental/observational findings. The {\\em microscopic arrow of time}, endemic in non-critical string theory, and apparent here in the self-collapse process, provides a satisfactory and simple resolution to the age...

  1. Dynamic balancing of super-critical rotating structures using slow-speed data via parametric excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresser, Shachar; Dolev, Amit; Bucher, Izhak

    2018-02-01

    High-speed machinery is often designed to pass several "critical speeds", where vibration levels can be very high. To reduce vibrations, rotors usually undergo a mass balancing process, where the machine is rotated at its full speed range, during which the dynamic response near critical speeds can be measured. High sensitivity, which is required for a successful balancing process, is achieved near the critical speeds, where a single deflection mode shape becomes dominant, and is excited by the projection of the imbalance on it. The requirement to rotate the machine at high speeds is an obstacle in many cases, where it is impossible to perform measurements at high speeds, due to harsh conditions such as high temperatures and inaccessibility (e.g., jet engines). This paper proposes a novel balancing method of flexible rotors, which does not require the machine to be rotated at high speeds. With this method, the rotor is spun at low speeds, while subjecting it to a set of externally controlled forces. The external forces comprise a set of tuned, response dependent, parametric excitations, and nonlinear stiffness terms. The parametric excitation can isolate any desired mode, while keeping the response directly linked to the imbalance. A software controlled nonlinear stiffness term limits the response, hence preventing the rotor to become unstable. These forces warrant sufficient sensitivity required to detect the projection of the imbalance on any desired mode without rotating the machine at high speeds. Analytical, numerical and experimental results are shown to validate and demonstrate the method.

  2. Transport phenomena in multiphase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mauri, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    This textbook provides a thorough presentation of the phenomena related to the transport of mass, momentum and energy.  It lays all the basic physical principles, then for the more advanced readers, it offers an in-depth treatment with advanced mathematical derivations and ends with some useful applications of the models and equations in specific settings. The important idea behind the book is to unify all types of transport phenomena, describing them within a common framework in terms of cause and effect, respectively represented by the driving force and the flux of the transported quantity. The approach and presentation are original in that the book starts with a general description of transport processes, providing the macroscopic balance relations of fluid dynamics and heat and mass transfer, before diving into the mathematical realm of continuum mechanics to derive the microscopic governing equations at the microscopic level. The book is a modular teaching tool and can be used either for an introductory...

  3. Towards the Verification of Safety-critical Autonomous Systems in Dynamic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina Aniculaesei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing necessity to deploy autonomous systems in highly heterogeneous, dynamic environments, e.g. service robots in hospitals or autonomous cars on highways. Due to the uncertainty in these environments, the verification results obtained with respect to the system and environment models at design-time might not be transferable to the system behavior at run time. For autonomous systems operating in dynamic environments, safety of motion and collision avoidance are critical requirements. With regard to these requirements, Macek et al. [6] define the passive safety property, which requires that no collision can occur while the autonomous system is moving. To verify this property, we adopt a two phase process which combines static verification methods, used at design time, with dynamic ones, used at run time. In the design phase, we exploit UPPAAL to formalize the autonomous system and its environment as timed automata and the safety property as TCTL formula and to verify the correctness of these models with respect to this property. For the runtime phase, we build a monitor to check whether the assumptions made at design time are also correct at run time. If the current system observations of the environment do not correspond to the initial system assumptions, the monitor sends feedback to the system and the system enters a passive safe state.

  4. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Diels, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena, 2e serves as an introduction to the phenomena of ultra short laser pulses and describes how this technology can be used to examine problems in areas such as electromagnetism, optics, and quantum mechanics. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena combines theoretical backgrounds and experimental techniques and will serve as a manual on designing and constructing femtosecond (""faster than electronics"") systems or experiments from scratch. Beyond the simple optical system, the various sources of ultrashort pulses are presented, again with emphasis on the basic

  5. Science and Paranormal Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, H. Pierre

    1999-06-03

    In order to ground my approach to the study of paranormal phenomena, I first explain my operational approach to physics, and to the ''historical'' sciences of cosmic, biological, human, social and political evolution. I then indicate why I believe that ''paranormal phenomena'' might-but need not- fit into this framework. I endorse the need for a new theoretical framework for the investigation of this field presented by Etter and Shoup at this meeting. I close with a short discussion of Ted Bastin's contention that paranormal phenomena should be defined as contradicting physics.

  6. Nonlinear surface electromagnetic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Ponath, H-E

    1991-01-01

    In recent years the physics of electromagnetic surface phenomena has developed rapidly, evolving into technologies for communications and industry, such as fiber and integrated optics. The variety of phenomena based on electromagnetism at surfaces is rich and this book was written with the aim of summarizing the available knowledge in selected areas of the field. The book contains reviews written by solid state and optical physicists on the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves at and with surfaces and films. Both the physical phenomena and some potential applications are

  7. Simulations of Biomechanical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jose Cruz

    Recent studies have published breakthroughs in the application of finite element (FEA) studies in the design and analysis of advanced orthodontics. However, FEA has not captured bone remodeling responses to advanced orthodontics. The results of these simulations report unrealistic displacement around the nasal bridge, which impeded correlation with clinical data. Bone remodeling has been previously documented in FEA and has shown bone response to mechanical stimulus in femur bone models. However, the relationship between mechanical stimulus and bone remodeling has not been reported in orthodontic studies due to the complexity of the skull. In the current study, strain energy is used as the mechanical stimulus to control remodeling, from which density and modulus evolve. Due to the localization of forces in orthodontics, current remodeling algorithms have limited application. In turn, we developed an algorithm that dynamically collects, sorts, and bins stresses in all elements for regional remodeling based on the proximity of the element to the load. The results demonstrate that bone response to orthodontic appliances is different than that of an FEA without bone remodeling, due to load path changes based upon evolution of the bone properties. It was also found that density and moduli proximal to the load application site exhibit faster remodeling than those located remotely. Modeling another biomechanical phenomena, a 3D simulation was created to simulate recent experimental results that discovered a difference in impact mitigation properties of dense-polymer/foam bilayer structure based on the orientation of the dense-polymer with respect to the impact site. The impact energy transmitted varied in time of arrival and amplitude depending on the orientation of the structure (thin layer up or down). By creating a 3D explicit dynamic FEA simulation, it is expected to reduce costly experiments and time consumed in set up, and offer opportunities for optimization for

  8. Interfacial transport phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Slattery, John C; Oh, Eun-Suok

    2007-01-01

    Revised and updated extensively from the previous editionDiscusses transport phenomena at common lines or three-phase lines of contactProvides a comprehensive summary about the extensions of continuum mechanics to the nanoscale.

  9. Investigations of Relaxation Dynamics and Observation of Nearly Constant Loss Phenomena in PEO_2_0-LiCF_3SO_3-ZrO_2 Based Polymer Nano-Composite Electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, Tapabrata; Tripathy, Satya N.; Paluch, Marian; Jena, Sidhartha S.; Pradhan, Dillip K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ion conduction mechanism is studied using broad band dielectric spectroscopy. • Existence and cause of Nearly Constant Loss is explored. • The crossover between UDR to NCL phenomena is investigated. • Effect of filler concentration on ion transport using scaling approach is discussed. - Abstract: The conduction mechanism of polymer nano-composite electrolytes are studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy over a wide range of frequency and temperature. The polymer nano-composites consisting of polyethylene oxide as polymer host, lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate as salt, and nano-crystalline zirconia as filler are prepared using solution casting method. Formation of polymer salt complex and nano-composites are confirmed from x-ray diffraction studies. The electrical conductivity and relaxation phenomena of the polymer salt complex as well as the composites are studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy. At room temperature, the dc conductivity of the polymer nano-composites are found higher by two orders of magnitude than that of corresponding polymer salt complex. Temperature dependence of dc conductivity is following Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher trend, suggesting strong coupling between ionic conductivity and segmental relaxation in polymer electrolytes. Relaxation phenomena are studied with dielectric and modulus formalism. Frequency dependent ac conductivity show universal dielectric response and nearly constant loss features at high and low temperature regions respectively. The origin of universal dielectric response and nearly constant loss are analysed and discussed using different approaches. Kramer - Krönig approach suggests the origin of nearly constant loss is due to caged ion dynamics feature.

  10. Severe accident phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokiniemi, J.; Kilpi, K.; Lindholm, I.; Maekynen, J.; Pekkarinen, E.; Sairanen, R.; Silde, A.

    1995-02-01

    Severe accidents are nuclear reactor accidents in which the reactor core is substantially damaged. The report describes severe reactor accident phenomena and their significance for the safety of nuclear power plants. A comprehensive set of phenomena ranging from accident initiation to containment behaviour and containment integrity questions are covered. The report is based on expertise gained in the severe accident assessment projects conducted at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). (49 refs., 32 figs., 12 tabs.)

  11. Nonlinear Photonics and Novel Optical Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Morandotti, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear Photonics and Novel Optical Phenomena contains contributed chapters from leading experts in nonlinear optics and photonics, and provides a comprehensive survey of fundamental concepts as well as hot topics in current research on nonlinear optical waves and related novel phenomena. The book covers self-accelerating airy beams, integrated photonics based on high index doped-silica glass, linear and nonlinear spatial beam dynamics in photonic lattices and waveguide arrays, polariton solitons and localized structures in semiconductor microcavities, terahertz waves, and other novel phenomena in different nanophotonic and optical systems.

  12. Sixteenth International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Corkum, Paul; Nelson, Keith A; Riedle, Eberhard; Schoenlein, Robert W; Ultrafast Phenomena XVI

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XVI presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including both ultrafast optical technology and the study of ultrafast phenomena. It covers picosecond, femtosecond and attosecond processes relevant to applications in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Ultrafast technology has a profound impact in a wide range of applications, amongst them biomedical imaging, chemical dynamics, frequency standards, material processing, and ultrahigh speed communications. This book summarizes the results presented at the 16th International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena and provides an up-to-date view of this important and rapidly advancing field.

  13. Critical ionisation velocity and the dynamics of a coaxial plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The dynamics of an ionising wave in a coaxial plasma gun with an azimuthal bias magnetic field is analysed in a theoretical model. Only the radial dependence is treated and instead of including a treatment of the energy balance two separate physical assumptions are made. In the first case it is assumed that the total internal electric field is given by the critical ionisation velocity condition and in the second that the ionisation rate is constant. For consistency wall sheaths are assumed to match the internal plasma potential to that of the walls. On the basis of momentum and particle balance the radial dependence of the electron density, current density, electric field and drift velocity are found. An electron source is required at the cathode and the relative contribution from ionisation within the plasma is deduced. The assumption that there are no ion sources at the electrodes leads to a restriction on the possible values of the axial electric field. (author)

  14. Inhomogeneous quasi-adiabatic driving of quantum critical dynamics in weakly disordered spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rams, Marek M; Mohseni, Masoud; Campo, Adolfo del

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an inhomogeneous protocol to drive a weakly disordered quantum spin chain quasi-adiabatically across a quantum phase transition and minimize the residual energy of the final state. The number of spins that simultaneously reach the critical point is controlled by the length scale in which the magnetic field is modulated, introducing an effective size that favors adiabatic dynamics. The dependence of the residual energy on this length scale and the velocity at which the magnetic field sweeps out the chain is shown to be nonmonotonic. We determine the conditions for an optimal suppression of the residual energy of the final state and show that inhomogeneous driving can outperform conventional adiabatic schemes based on homogeneous control fields by several orders of magnitude. (paper)

  15. A Dynamic Hydrology-Critical Zone Framework for Rainfall-triggered Landslide Hazard Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialynas, Y. G.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Dietrich, W. E.; Bras, R. L.

    2017-12-01

    Watershed-scale coupled hydrologic-stability models are still in their early stages, and are characterized by important limitations: (a) either they assume steady-state or quasi-dynamic watershed hydrology, or (b) they simulate landslide occurrence based on a simple one-dimensional stability criterion. Here we develop a three-dimensional landslide prediction framework, based on a coupled hydrologic-slope stability model and incorporation of the influence of deep critical zone processes (i.e., flow through weathered bedrock and exfiltration to the colluvium) for more accurate prediction of the timing, location, and extent of landslides. Specifically, a watershed-scale slope stability model that systematically accounts for the contribution of driving and resisting forces in three-dimensional hillslope segments was coupled with a spatially-explicit and physically-based hydrologic model. The landslide prediction framework considers critical zone processes and structure, and explicitly accounts for the spatial heterogeneity of surface and subsurface properties that control slope stability, including soil and weathered bedrock hydrological and mechanical characteristics, vegetation, and slope morphology. To test performance, the model was applied in landslide-prone sites in the US, the hydrology of which has been extensively studied. Results showed that both rainfall infiltration in the soil and groundwater exfiltration exert a strong control on the timing and magnitude of landslide occurrence. We demonstrate the extent to which three-dimensional slope destabilizing factors, which are modulated by dynamic hydrologic conditions in the soil-bedrock column, control landslide initiation at the watershed scale.

  16. Towards a dynamic assessment of raw materials criticality: linking agent-based demand--with material flow supply modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoeri, Christof; Wäger, Patrick A; Stamp, Anna; Althaus, Hans-Joerg; Weil, Marcel

    2013-09-01

    Emerging technologies such as information and communication-, photovoltaic- or battery technologies are expected to increase significantly the demand for scarce metals in the near future. The recently developed methods to evaluate the criticality of mineral raw materials typically provide a 'snapshot' of the criticality of a certain material at one point in time by using static indicators both for supply risk and for the impacts of supply restrictions. While allowing for insights into the mechanisms behind the criticality of raw materials, these methods cannot account for dynamic changes in products and/or activities over time. In this paper we propose a conceptual framework intended to overcome these limitations by including the dynamic interactions between different possible demand and supply configurations. The framework integrates an agent-based behaviour model, where demand emerges from individual agent decisions and interaction, into a dynamic material flow model, representing the materials' stocks and flows. Within the framework, the environmental implications of substitution decisions are evaluated by applying life-cycle assessment methodology. The approach makes a first step towards a dynamic criticality assessment and will enhance the understanding of industrial substitution decisions and environmental implications related to critical metals. We discuss the potential and limitation of such an approach in contrast to state-of-the-art methods and how it might lead to criticality assessments tailored to the specific circumstances of single industrial sectors or individual companies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A statistical approach to strange diffusion phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligen, B.Ph. van; Carreras, B.A.; Sanchez, R.

    2005-01-01

    The study of particle (and heat) transport in fusion plasmas has revealed the existence of what might be called 'unusual' transport phenomena. Such phenomena are: unexpected scaling of the confinement time with system size, power degradation (i.e. sub-linear scaling of energy content with power input), profile stiffness (also known as profile consistency), rapid transient transport phenomena such as cold and heat pulses (travelling much faster than the diffusive timescale would allow), non-local behaviour and central profile peaking during off-axis heating, associated with unexplained inward pinches. The standard modelling framework, essentially equal to Fick's Law plus extensions, has great difficulty in providing an all-encompassing and satisfactory explanation of all these phenomena. This difficulty has motivated us to reconsider the basics of the modelling of diffusive phenomena. Diffusion is based on the well-known random walk. The random walk is captured in all its generality in the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) formalism. The CTRW formalism is directly related to the well-known Generalized Master Equation, which describes the behaviour of tracer particle diffusion on a very fundamental level, and from which the phenomenological Fick's Law can be derived under some specific assumptions. We show that these assumptions are not necessarily satisfied under fusion plasma conditions, in which case other equations (such as the Fokker-Planck diffusion law or the Master Equation itself) provide a better description of the phenomena. This fact may explain part of the observed 'strange' phenomena (namely, the inward pinch). To show how the remaining phenomena mentioned above may perhaps find an explanation in the proposed alternative modelling framework, we have designed a toy model that incorporates a critical gradient mechanism, switching between rapid (super-diffusive) and normal diffusive transport as a function of the local gradient. It is then demonstrated

  18. Quench dynamics near a quantum critical point: Application to the sine-Gordon model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Grandi, C.; Polkovnikov, A.; Gritsev, V.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the quench dynamics near a quantum critical point focusing on the sine-Gordon model as a primary example. We suggest a unified approach to sudden and slow quenches, where the tuning parameter λ(t) changes in time as λ(t)∼υt r , based on the adiabatic expansion of the excitation probability in powers of υ. We show that the universal scaling of the excitation probability can be understood through the singularity of the generalized adiabatic susceptibility χ 2r+2 (λ), which for sudden quenches (r=0) reduces to the fidelity susceptibility. In turn this class of susceptibilities is expressed through the moments of the connected correlation function of the quench operator. We analyze the excitations created after a sudden quench of the cosine potential using a combined approach of form-factors expansion and conformal perturbation theory for the low-energy and high-energy sector, respectively. We find the general scaling laws for the probability of exciting the system, the density of excited quasiparticles, the entropy and the heat generated after the quench. In the two limits where the sine-Gordon model maps to hard-core bosons and free massive fermions we provide the exact solutions for the quench dynamics and discuss the finite temperature generalizations.

  19. Toward an improved understanding of the role of transpiration in critical zone dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, B.; Papuga, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of the total water balance across any ecosystem. In subalpine mixed-conifer ecosystems, transpiration (T) often dominates the total water flux and therefore improved understanding of T is critical for accurate assessment of catchment water balance and for understanding of the processes that governs the complex dynamics across critical zone (CZ). The interaction between T and plant vegetation not only modulates soil water balance but also influences water transit time and hydrochemical flux - key factors in our understanding of how the CZ evolves and responds. Unlike an eddy covariance system which provides only an integrated ET flux from an ecosystem, a sap flow system can provide an estimate of the T flux from the ecosystem. By isolating T, the ecohydrological drivers of this major water loss from the CZ can be identified. Still, the species composition of mixed-conifer ecosystems vary and the drivers of T associated with each species are expected to be different. Therefore, accurate quantification of T from a mixed-conifer requires knowledge of the unique transpiration dynamics of each of the tree species. Here, we installed a sap flow system within two mixed-conifer study sites of the Jemez River Basin - Santa Catalina Mountains Critical Zone Observatory (JRB - SCM CZO). At both sites, we identified the dominant tree species and installed sap flow sensors on healthy representatives for each of those species. At the JRB CZO site, sap sensors were installed in fir (4) and spruce (4) trees; at the SCM CZO site, sap sensors were installed at white fir (4) and maple (4) and one dead tree. Meteorological data as well as soil temperature (Ts) and soil moisture (θ) at multiple depths were also collected from each of the two sites. Preliminary analysis of two years of sap flux rate at JRB - SCM CZO shows that the environmental drivers of fir, spruce, and maple are different and also vary throughout the year. For JRB fir

  20. Ion exchange phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  1. DMPD: IRAK1: a critical signaling mediator of innate immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17890055 IRAK1: a critical signaling mediator of innate immunity. Gottipati S, Rao ...IRAK1: a critical signaling mediator of innate immunity. PubmedID 17890055 Title IRAK1: a critical signaling mediator

  2. Sustainability from the Occurrence of Critical Dynamic Power System Blackout Determined by Using the Stochastic Event Tree Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Murtadha Othman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of advanced technology in smart grid, the implementation of renewable energy in a stressed and complicated power system operation, aggravated by a competitive electricity market and critical system contingencies, this will inflict higher probabilities of the occurrence of a severe dynamic power system blackout. This paper presents the proposed stochastic event tree technique used to assess the sustainability against the occurrence of dynamic power system blackout emanating from implication of critical system contingencies such as the rapid increase in total loading condition and sensitive initial transmission line tripping. An extensive analysis of dynamic power system blackout has been carried out in a case study of the following power systems: IEEE RTS-79 and IEEE RTS-96. The findings have shown that the total loading conditions and sensitive transmission lines need to be given full attention by the utility to prevent the occurrence of dynamic power system blackout.

  3. SEPARATION PHENOMENA LOGISTIC REGRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikaro Daniel de Carvalho Barreto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an application of concepts about the maximum likelihood estimation of the binomial logistic regression model to the separation phenomena. It generates bias in the estimation and provides different interpretations of the estimates on the different statistical tests (Wald, Likelihood Ratio and Score and provides different estimates on the different iterative methods (Newton-Raphson and Fisher Score. It also presents an example that demonstrates the direct implications for the validation of the model and validation of variables, the implications for estimates of odds ratios and confidence intervals, generated from the Wald statistics. Furthermore, we present, briefly, the Firth correction to circumvent the phenomena of separation.

  4. Rheological phenomena in focus

    CERN Document Server

    Boger, DV

    1993-01-01

    More than possibly any other scientific discipline, rheology is easily visualized and the relevant literature contains many excellent photographs of unusual and often bizarre phenomena. The present book brings together these photographs for the first time. They are supported by a full explanatory text. Rheological Phenomena in Focus will be an indispensable support manual to all those who teach rheology or have to convince colleagues of the practical relevance of the subject within an industrial setting. For those who teach fluid mechanics, the book clearly illustrates the difference be

  5. Modelling of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae-I.

    2001-01-01

    The physics of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas based on an analytic point model of toroidal plasmas is discussed. The combined mechanism of the transport and radiation loss of energy is analyzed, and the achievable density is derived. A scaling law of the density limit is discussed. The dependence of the critical density on the heating power, magnetic field, plasma size and safety factor in the case of L-mode energy confinement is explained. The dynamic evolution of the plasma energy and radiation loss is discussed. Assuming a simple model of density evolution, of a sudden loss of density if the temperature becomes lower than critical value, then a limit cycle oscillation is shown to occur. A condition that divides the limit cycle oscillation and the complete radiation collapse is discussed. This model seems to explain the density limit oscillation that has been observed on the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator. (author)

  6. Modelling of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2000-03-01

    The physics of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas based on an analytic point model of toroidal plasmas is discussed. The combined mechanism of the transport and radiation loss of energy is analyzed, and the achievable density is derived. A scaling law of the density limit is discussed. The dependence of the critical density on the heating power, magnetic field, plasma size and safety factor in the case of L-mode energy confinement is explained. The dynamic evolution of the plasma energy and radiation loss is discussed. Assuming a simple model of density evolution, of a sudden loss of density if the temperature becomes lower than critical value, then a limit cycle oscillation is shown to occur. A condition that divides the limit cycle oscillation and the complete radiation collapse is discussed. This model seems to explain the density limit oscillation that has been observed on the W7-AS stellarator. (author)

  7. Effect of colored noise on the critical dynamics of the Time-Dependent Landau-Ginzburg Model A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korutcheva, E.; Rubia, J. de la

    1999-08-01

    By using the dynamical renormalization-group method, we show that the introduction of an additive colored noise with weak long-range correlations in the Time-Dependent Landau-Ginzburg Model A, does not give perturbative corrections for the dynamical critical exponent at least up to order O(ε 2 ). This result differs for a system with random quenched impurities, where a similar type of impurity correlation leads to corrections even of order O(ε). (author)

  8. Bioelectrochemistry II membrane phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, M

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the lectures of the second course devoted to bioelectro­ chemistry, held within the framework of the International School of Biophysics. In this course another very large field of bioelectrochemistry, i. e. the field of Membrane Phenomena, was considered, which itself consists of several different, but yet related subfields. Here again, it can be easily stated that it is impossible to give a complete and detailed picture of all membrane phenomena of biological interest in a short course of about one and half week. Therefore the same philosophy, as the one of the first course, was followed, to select a series of lectures at postgraduate level, giving a synthesis of several membrane phenomena chosen among the most'important ones. These lectures should show the large variety of membrane-regulated events occurring in living bodies, and serve as sound interdisciplinary basis to start a special­ ized study of biological phenomena, for which the investigation using the dual approach, physico-che...

  9. Sawtooth phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuvshinov, B.N.; Savrukhin, P.V.

    1989-01-01

    A review of experimental and theoretical investigaions of sawtooth phenomena in tokamaks is presented. Different types of sawtooth oscillations, scaling laws and methods of interanl disruption stabilization are described. Theoretical models of the sawtooth instability are discussed. 122 refs.; 4 tabs

  10. Fundamentals of wave phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Hirose, Akira

    2010-01-01

    This textbook provides a unified treatment of waves that either occur naturally or can be excited and propagated in various media. This includes both longitudinal and transverse waves. The book covers both mechanical and electrical waves, which are normally covered separately due to their differences in physical phenomena.

  11. The QCD Critical Point and Related Observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahrgang, Marlene

    2016-12-15

    The search for the critical point of QCD in heavy-ion collision experiments has sparked enormous interest with the completion of phase I of the RHIC beam energy scan. Here, I review the basics of the thermodynamics of the QCD phase transition and its implications for experimental multiplicity fluctuations in heavy-ion collisions. Several sources of noncritical fluctuations impact the observables and need to be understood in addition to the critical phenomena. Recent progress has been made in dynamical modeling of critical fluctuations, which ultimately is indispensable to understand potential signals of the QCD critical point in heavy-ion collision.

  12. Dynamic Critical Rainfall-Based Flash Flood Early Warning and Forecasting for Medium-Small Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Yang, D.; Hu, J.

    2012-04-01

    China is extremely frequent food disasters hit countries, annual flood season flash floods triggered by rainfall, mudslides, landslides have caused heavy casualties and property losses, not only serious threaten the lives of the masses, but the majority of seriously restricting the mountain hill areas of economic and social development and the people become rich, of building a moderately prosperous society goals. In the next few years, China will focus on prevention and control area in the flash flood disasters initially built "for the surveillance, communications, forecasting, early warning and other non-engineering measure based, non-engineering measures and the combinations of engineering measures," the mitigation system. The latest progresses on global torrential flood early warning and forecasting techniques are reviewed in this paper, and then an early warning and forecasting approach is proposed on the basis of a distributed hydrological model according to dynamic critical rainfall index. This approach has been applied in Suichuanjiang River basin in Jiangxi province, which is expected to provide valuable reference for building a national flash flood early warning and forecasting system as well as control of such flooding.

  13. Dynamical susceptibility near a long-wavelength critical point with a nonconserved order parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Avraham; Lederer, Samuel; Chowdhury, Debanjan; Berg, Erez; Chubukov, Andrey

    2018-04-01

    We study the dynamic response of a two-dimensional system of itinerant fermions in the vicinity of a uniform (Q =0 ) Ising nematic quantum critical point of d - wave symmetry. The nematic order parameter is not a conserved quantity, and this permits a nonzero value of the fermionic polarization in the d - wave channel even for vanishing momentum and finite frequency: Π (q =0 ,Ωm)≠0 . For weak coupling between the fermions and the nematic order parameter (i.e., the coupling is small compared to the Fermi energy), we perturbatively compute Π (q =0 ,Ωm)≠0 over a parametrically broad range of frequencies where the fermionic self-energy Σ (ω ) is irrelevant, and use Eliashberg theory to compute Π (q =0 ,Ωm) in the non-Fermi-liquid regime at smaller frequencies, where Σ (ω )>ω . We find that Π (q =0 ,Ω ) is a constant, plus a frequency-dependent correction that goes as |Ω | at high frequencies, crossing over to |Ω| 1 /3 at lower frequencies. The |Ω| 1 /3 scaling holds also in a non-Fermi-liquid regime. The nonvanishing of Π (q =0 ,Ω ) gives rise to additional structure in the imaginary part of the nematic susceptibility χ″(q ,Ω ) at Ω >vFq , in marked contrast to the behavior of the susceptibility for a conserved order parameter. This additional structure may be detected in Raman scattering experiments in the d - wave geometry.

  14. Critical insight into the influence of the potential energy surface on fission dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurek, K.; Schmitt, C.; Wieleczko, J. P.; Ademard, G.; Nadtochy, P. N.

    2011-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to a careful investigation of the influence of the potential energy surface on the fission process. The time evolution of nuclei at high excitation energy and angular momentum is studied by means of three-dimensional Langevin calculations performed for two different parametrizations of the macroscopic potential: the Finite Range Liquid Drop Model (FRLDM) and the Lublin-Strasbourg Drop (LSD) prescription. Depending on the mass of the system, the topology of the potential throughout the deformation space of interest in fission is observed to noticeably differ within these two approaches, due to the treatment of curvature effects. When utilized in the dynamical calculation as the driving potential, the FRLDM and LSD models yield similar results in the heavy-mass region, whereas the predictions can be strongly dependent on the Potential Energy Surface (PES) for medium-mass nuclei. In particular, the mass, charge, and total kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments are found to be narrower with the LSD prescription. The influence of critical model parameters on our findings is carefully investigated. The present study sheds light on the experimental conditions and signatures well suited for constraining the parametrization of the macroscopic potential. Its implication regarding the interpretation of available experimental data is briefly discussed.

  15. Critical current density, vortex dynamics, and phase diagram of single-crystal FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Ryo; Watashige, Tatsuya; Kasahara, Shigeru; Matsuda, Yuji; Shibauchi, Takasada

    2015-10-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the vortex pinning and dynamics in a high-quality FeSe single crystal which is free from doping-introduced inhomogeneities and charged quasiparticle scattering because of its innate superconductivity. The critical current density Jc is found to be almost isotropic and reaches a value of ˜3 ×104 A /cm2 at 2 K (self-field) for both H ∥c and a b . The normalized magnetic relaxation rate S (=∣d ln M /d ln t ∣ ) shows a temperature-insensitive plateau behavior in the intermediate temperature range with a relatively high creep rate (S ˜ 0.02 under zero field), which is interpreted in the framework of the collective creep theory. A crossover from the elastic to plastic creep is observed, while the fishtail effect is absent for both H ∥c and a b . Based on this observation, the origin of the fishtail effect is also discussed. Combining the results of Jc and S , the vortex motion in the FeSe single crystal is found to be dominated by sparse, strong pointlike pinning from nanometer-sized defects or imperfections. The weak collective pinning is also observed and proved in the form of large bundles. Besides, the vortex phase diagram of FeSe is also constructed and discussed.

  16. Evolution of dynamic susceptibility in molecular glass formers-a critical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodin, A; Gainaru, C; Porokhonskyy, V; Roessler, E A

    2007-01-01

    Dielectric, depolarized light scattering (LS) and optical Kerr effect (OKE) data are critically discussed in an attempt to achieve a common interpretation of the evolution of dynamic susceptibility in molecular glass formers at temperatures down to the glass transition T g . The so-called intermediate power-law, observed in OKE data below a certain temperature T x , is identified with the excess wing, long since known from dielectric spectroscopy, with a temperature-independent exponent. This is in contrast with several recent analyses that concluded a considerable temperature dependence of spectral shapes. We introduce a new approach to disentangle α-peak and excess wing contributions in the dielectric spectra, which allows for frequency-temperature superposition (FTS) of the α-process at all temperatures above T g . From the LS spectra we conclude, in particular, that FTS holds even at temperatures well above the melting point, i.e. in normal equilibrium liquids. Attempting to correlate the fragility and stretching, our conclusions are opposite to those made previously. Specifically, we observe that a high fragility is associated with a less stretched relaxation function

  17. Critical Dynamics of the Xy-Model on the One-Dimensional Superlattice by Position Space Renormalization Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, J. P. De; Gonçalves, L. L.

    The critical dynamics of the isotropic XY-model on the one-dimensional superlattice is considered in the framework of the position space renormalization group theory. The decimation transformation is introduced by considering the equations of motion of the operators associated to the excitations of the system, and it corresponds to an extension of the procedure introduced by Stinchcombe and dos Santos (J. Phys. A18, L597 (1985)) for the homogeneous lattice. The dispersion relation is obtained exactly and the static and dynamic scaling forms are explicitly determined. The dynamic critical exponent is also obtained and it is shown that it is identical to the one of the XY-model on the homogeneous chain.

  18. Stress map for ion irradiation: Depth-resolved dynamic competition between radiation-induced viscoelastic phenomena in SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillen, T. van; Siem, M.Y.S.; Polman, A.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamic competition between structural transformation, Newtonian viscous flow, and anisotropic strain generation during ion irradiation of SiO 2 , leads to strongly depth-dependent evolution of the mechanical stress, ranging between compressive and tensile. From independent in situ stress measurements during irradiation, generic expressions are derived of the nuclear stopping dependence of both the structural transformation rate and the radiation-induced viscosity. Using these data we introduce and demonstrate the concept of a 'stress map' that predicts the depth-resolved saturation stress in SiO 2 for any irradiation up to several MeV

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of diffusion and clustering along critical isotherms of medium-chain n-alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutoru, J W; Smith, W; O'Hern, C S; Firoozabadi, A

    2013-01-14

    Understanding the transport properties of molecular fluids in the critical region is important for a number of industrial and natural systems. In the literature, there are conflicting reports on the behavior of the self diffusion coefficient D(s) in the critical region of single-component molecular systems. For example, D(s) could decrease to zero, reach a maximum, or remain unchanged and finite at the critical point. Moreover, there is no molecular-scale understanding of the behavior of diffusion coefficients in molecular fluids in the critical regime. We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations in the critical region of single-component fluids composed of medium-chain n-alkanes-n-pentane, n-decane, and n-dodecane-that interact via anisotropic united-atom potentials. For each system, we calculate D(s), and average molecular cluster sizes κ(cl) and numbers N(cl) at various cluster lifetimes τ, as a function of density ρ in the range 0.2ρ(c) ≤ ρ ≤ 2.0ρ(c) at the critical temperature T(c). We find that D(s) decreases with increasing ρ but remains finite at the critical point. Moreover, for any given τ critical point.

  20. Fluid Physical and Transport Phenomena Studies aboard the International Space Station: Planned Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments planned for the International Spare Station. NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Science and Applications has established a world-class research program in fluid physics and transport phenomena. This program combines the vast expertise of the world research community with NASA's unique microgravity facilities with the objectives of gaining new insight into fluid phenomena by removing the confounding effect of gravity. Due to its criticality to many terrestrial and space-based processes and phenomena, fluid physics and transport phenomena play a central role in the NASA's Microgravity Program. Through widely publicized research announcement and well established peer-reviews, the program has been able to attract a number of world-class researchers and acquired a critical mass of investigations that is now adding rapidly to this field. Currently there arc a total of 106 ground-based and 20 candidate flight principal investigators conducting research in four major thrust areas in the program: complex flows, multiphase flow and phase change, interfacial phenomena, and dynamics and instabilities. The International Space Station (ISS) to be launched in 1998, provides the microgravity research community with a unprecedented opportunity to conduct long-duration microgravity experiments which can be controlled and operated from the Principal Investigators' own laboratory. Frequent planned shuttle flights to the Station will provide opportunities to conduct many more experiments than were previously possible. NASA Lewis Research Center is in the process of designing a Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) to be located in the Laboratory Module of the ISS that will not only accommodate multiple users but, allow a broad range of fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments to be conducted in a cost effective manner.

  1. Theory of threshold phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel

    2002-01-01

    Theory of Threshold Phenomena in Quantum Scattering is developed in terms of Reduced Scattering Matrix. Relationships of different types of threshold anomalies both to nuclear reaction mechanisms and to nuclear reaction models are established. Magnitude of threshold effect is related to spectroscopic factor of zero-energy neutron state. The Theory of Threshold Phenomena, based on Reduced Scattering Matrix, does establish relationships between different types of threshold effects and nuclear reaction mechanisms: the cusp and non-resonant potential scattering, s-wave threshold anomaly and compound nucleus resonant scattering, p-wave anomaly and quasi-resonant scattering. A threshold anomaly related to resonant or quasi resonant scattering is enhanced provided the neutron threshold state has large spectroscopic amplitude. The Theory contains, as limit cases, Cusp Theories and also results of different nuclear reactions models as Charge Exchange, Weak Coupling, Bohr and Hauser-Feshbach models. (author)

  2. Wolf-Rayet phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, P.S.

    1982-01-01

    The author reviews in broad terms the concept of Wolf-Rayet (W-R) phenomena, outlines what we currently know about the properties of stars showing such phenomena and indicates the directions in which future work is leading. He begins by listing the characteristics of W-R spectra and then considers the following specific problems: the absolute visual magnitudes; the heterogeneity of WN spectra; the existence of transition type spectra and compositions; the mass loss rates; the existence of very luminous and possibly very massive W-R stars. He discusses briefly our current understanding of the theoretical aspects of stellar evolution and stellar winds and the various scenarios that have been proposed to understand W-R stars. (Auth.)

  3. Interface-induced phenomena in magnetism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellman, Frances; Hoffmann, A.; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Beach, Geoffrey S.D.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Leighton, Chris; Macdonald, Allan H.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Arena, Dario A.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Fischer, Peter; Grollier, Julie; Heremans, Joseph P.; Jungwirth, Tomas; Kimel, Alexey V.; Koopmans, B.; Krivorotov, Ilya N.; May, Steven J.; Petford-Long, Amanda K.; Rondinelli, James M.; Samarth, Nitin; Schuller, Ivan K.; Slavin, Andrei N.; Stiles, Mark D.; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Thiaville, André; Zink, Barry L.

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews static and dynamic interfacial effects in magnetism, focusing on interfacially driven magnetic effects and phenomena associated with spin-orbit coupling and intrinsic symmetry breaking at interfaces. It provides a historical background and literature survey, but focuses on

  4. A dynamic modelling approach for estimating critical loads of nitrogen based on plant community changes under a changing climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyazid, Salim; Kurz, Dani; Braun, Sabine; Sverdrup, Harald; Rihm, Beat; Hettelingh, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic model of forest ecosystems was used to investigate the effects of climate change, atmospheric deposition and harvest intensity on 48 forest sites in Sweden (n = 16) and Switzerland (n = 32). The model was used to investigate the feasibility of deriving critical loads for nitrogen (N) deposition based on changes in plant community composition. The simulations show that climate and atmospheric deposition have comparably important effects on N mobilization in the soil, as climate triggers the release of organically bound nitrogen stored in the soil during the elevated deposition period. Climate has the most important effect on plant community composition, underlining the fact that this cannot be ignored in future simulations of vegetation dynamics. Harvest intensity has comparatively little effect on the plant community in the long term, while it may be detrimental in the short term following cutting. This study shows: that critical loads of N deposition can be estimated using the plant community as an indicator; that future climatic changes must be taken into account; and that the definition of the reference deposition is critical for the outcome of this estimate. - Research highlights: → Plant community changes can be used to estimate critical loads of nitrogen. → Climate change is decisive for future changes of geochemistry and plant communities. → Climate change cannot be ignored in estimates of critical loads. → The model ForSAFE-Veg was successfully used to set critical loads of nitrogen. - Plant community composition can be used in dynamic modelling to estimate critical loads of nitrogen deposition, provided the appropriate reference deposition, future climate and target plant communities are defined.

  5. DMPD: Toll like receptors and autoimmunity: a critical appraisal. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17959357 Toll like receptors and autoimmunity: a critical appraisal. Papadimitraki ...ml) Show Toll like receptors and autoimmunity: a critical appraisal. PubmedID 17959357 Title Toll like receptors and auto

  6. Modelling of transport phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi.

    1993-09-01

    In this review article, we discuss key features of the transport phenomena and theoretical modelling to understand them. Experimental observations have revealed the nature of anomalous transport, i.e., the enhancement of the transport coefficients by the gradients of the plasma profiles, the pinch phenomena, the radial profile of the anomalous transport coefficients, the variation of the transport among the Bohm diffusion, Pseudo-classical confinement, L-mode and variety of improved confinement modes, and the sudden jumps such as L-H transition. Starting from the formalism of the transport matrix, the modelling based on the low frequency instabilities are reviewed. Theoretical results in the range of drift wave frequency are examined. Problems in theories based on the quasilinear and mixing-length estimates lead to the renewal of the turbulence theory, and the physics picture of the self-sustained turbulence is discussed. The theory of transport using the fluid equation of plasma is developed, showing that the new approach is very promising in explaining abovementioned characteristics of anomalous transport in both L-mode and improved confinement plasmas. The interference of the fluxes is the key to construct the physics basis of the bifurcation theory for the L-H transition. The present status of theories on the mechanisms of improved confinement is discussed. Modelling on the nonlocal nature of transport is briefly discussed. Finally, the impact of the anomalous transport on disruptive phenomena is also described. (author) 95 refs

  7. Transport phenomena in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Ingham, Derek B

    1998-01-01

    Research into thermal convection in porous media has substantially increased during recent years due to its numerous practical applications. These problems have attracted the attention of industrialists, engineers and scientists from many very diversified disciplines, such as applied mathematics, chemical, civil, environmental, mechanical and nuclear engineering, geothermal physics and food science. Thus, there is a wealth of information now available on convective processes in porous media and it is therefore appropriate and timely to undertake a new critical evaluation of this contemporary information. Transport Phenomena in Porous Media contains 17 chapters and represents the collective work of 27 of the world's leading experts, from 12 countries, in heat transfer in porous media. The recent intensive research in this area has substantially raised the expectations for numerous new practical applications and this makes the book a most timely addition to the existing literature. It includes recent major deve...

  8. On Equivalence between Critical Probabilities of Dynamic Gossip Protocol and Static Site Percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Hayakawa, Tomohisa

    The relationship between the critical probability of gossip protocol on the square lattice and the critical probability of site percolation on the square lattice is discussed. Specifically, these two critical probabilities are analytically shown to be equal to each other. Furthermore, we present a way of evaluating the critical probability of site percolation by approximating the saturation of gossip protocol. Finally, we provide numerical results which support the theoretical analysis.

  9. Dynamic modeling of the tradeoff between productivity and safety in critical engineering systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowing, Michelle M.; Elisabeth Pate-Cornell, M.; Glynn, Peter W.

    2004-01-01

    Short-term tradeoffs between productivity and safety often exist in the operation of critical facilities such as nuclear power plants, offshore oil platforms, or simply individual cars. For example, interruption of operations for maintenance on demand can decrease short-term productivity but may be needed to ensure safety. Operations are interrupted for several reasons: scheduled maintenance, maintenance on demand, response to warnings, subsystem failure, or a catastrophic accident. The choice of operational procedures (e.g. timing and extent of scheduled maintenance) generally affects the probabilities of both production interruptions and catastrophic failures. In this paper, we present and illustrate a dynamic probabilistic model designed to describe the long-term evolution of such a system through the different phases of operation, shutdown, and possibly accident. The model's parameters represent explicitly the effects of different components' performance on the system's safety and reliability through an engineering probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). In addition to PRA, a Markov model is used to track the evolution of the system and its components through different performance phases. The model parameters are then linked to different operations strategies, to allow computation of the effects of each management strategy on the system's long-term productivity and safety. Decision analysis is then used to support the management of the short-term trade-offs between productivity and safety in order to maximize long-term performance. The value function is that of plant managers, within the constraints set by local utility commissions and national (e.g. energy) agencies. This model is illustrated by the case of outages (planned and unplanned) in nuclear power plants to show how it can be used to guide policy decisions regarding outage frequency and plant lifetime, and more specifically, the choice of a reactor tripping policy as a function of the state of the

  10. Poverty alleviation strategies in eastern China lead to critical ecological dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Dearing, John A; Dawson, Terence P; Dong, Xuhui; Yang, Xiangdong; Zhang, Weiguo

    2015-02-15

    Poverty alleviation linked to agricultural intensification has been achieved in many regions but there is often only limited understanding of the impacts on ecological dynamics. A central need is to observe long term changes in regulating and supporting services as the basis for assessing the likelihood of sustainable agriculture or ecological collapse. We show how the analyses of 55 time-series of social, economic and ecological conditions can provide an evolutionary perspective for the modern Lower Yangtze River Basin region since the 1950s with powerful insights about the sustainability of modern ecosystem services. Increasing trends in provisioning ecosystem services within the region over the past 60 years reflect economic growth and successful poverty alleviation but are paralleled by steep losses in a range of regulating ecosystem services mainly since the 1980s. Increasing connectedness across the social and ecological domains after 1985 points to a greater uniformity in the drivers of the rural economy. Regime shifts and heightened levels of variability since the 1970s in local ecosystem services indicate progressive loss of resilience across the region. Of special concern are water quality services that have already passed critical transitions in several areas. Viewed collectively, our results suggest that the regional social-ecological system passed a tipping point in the late 1970s and is now in a transient phase heading towards a new steady state. However, the long-term relationship between economic growth and ecological degradation shows no sign of decoupling as demanded by the need to reverse an unsustainable trajectory. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Global properties of symmetric competition models with riddling and blowout phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giant-italo Bischi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the problem of chaos synchronization, and the related phenomena of riddling, blowout and on–off intermittency, are considered for discrete time competition models with identical competitors. The global properties which determine the different effects of riddling and blowout bifurcations are studied by the method of critical curves, a tool for the study of the global dynamical properties of two-dimensional noninvertible maps. These techniques are applied to the study of a dynamic market-share competition model.

  12. A novel approach to locomotion learning: Actor-Critic architecture using central pattern generators and dynamic motor primitives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai; Lowe, Robert; Ziemke, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose an architecture of a bio-inspired controller that addresses the problem of learning different locomotion gaits for different robot morphologies. The modeling objective is split into two: baseline motion modeling and dynamics adaptation. Baseline motion modeling aims to achieve fundamental functions of a certain type of locomotion and dynamics adaptation provides a "reshaping" function for adapting the baseline motion to desired motion. Based on this assumption, a three-layer architecture is developed using central pattern generators (CPGs, a bio-inspired locomotor center for the baseline motion) and dynamic motor primitives (DMPs, a model with universal "reshaping" functions). In this article, we use this architecture with the actor-critic algorithms for finding a good "reshaping" function. In order to demonstrate the learning power of the actor-critic based architecture, we tested it on two experiments: (1) learning to crawl on a humanoid and, (2) learning to gallop on a puppy robot. Two types of actor-critic algorithms (policy search and policy gradient) are compared in order to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of different actor-critic based learning algorithms for different morphologies. Finally, based on the analysis of the experimental results, a generic view/architecture for locomotion learning is discussed in the conclusion.

  13. A Novel Approach to Locomotion Learning: Actor-Critic Architecture using Central Pattern Generators and Dynamic Motor Primitives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai eLi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we propose an architecture of a bio-inspired controller that addresses the problem of learning different locomotion gaits for different robot morphologies. The modelling objective is split into two: baseline motion modelling and dynamics adaptation. Baseline motion modelling aims to achieve fundamental functions of a certain type of locomotion and dynamics adaptation provides a ``reshaping function for adapting the baseline motion to desired motion. Based on this assumption, a three-layer architecture is developed using central pattern generators (CPGs, a bio-inspired locomotor center for the the baseline motion and dynamic motor primitives (DMPs, a model with universal ``reshaping functions. In this article, we use this architecture with the actor-critic algorithms for finding a good ``reshaping function. In order to demonstrate the learning power of the actor-critic based architecture, we tested it on two experiments: 1 learning to crawl on a humanoid and, 2 learning to gallop on a puppy robot. Two types of actor-critic algorithms (policy search and policy gradient are compared in order to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of different actor-critic based learning algorithms for different morphologies. Finally, based on the analysis of the experimental results, a generic view/architecture for locomotion learning is discussed in the conclusion.

  14. Quantification of natural phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botero Alvarez, Javier

    1997-01-01

    The science is like a great spider's web in which unexpected connections appear and therefore it is frequently difficult to already know the consequences of new theories on those existent. The physics is a clear example of this. The Newton mechanics laws describe the physical phenomena observable accurately by means of our organs of the senses or by means of observation teams not very sophisticated. After their formulation at the beginning of the XVIII Century, these laws were recognized in the scientific world as a mathematical model of the nature. Together with the electrodynamics law, developed in the XIX century, and the thermodynamic one constitutes what we call the classic physics. The state of maturity of the classic physics at the end of last century it was such that some scientists believed that the physics was arriving to its end obtaining a complete description of the physical phenomena. The spider's web of the knowledge was supposed finished, or at least very near its termination. It ended up saying, in arrogant form, that if the initial conditions of the universe were known, we could determine the state of the same one in any future moment. Two phenomena related with the light would prove in firm form that mistaken that they were, creating unexpected connections in the great spider's web of the knowledge and knocking down part of her. The thermal radiation of the bodies and the fact that the light spreads to constant speed in the hole, without having an absolute system of reference with regard to which this speed is measured, they constituted the decisive factors in the construction of a new physics. The development of sophisticated of measure teams gave access to more precise information and it opened the microscopic world to the observation and confirmation of existent theories

  15. Dissipative phenomena in condensed matter some applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dattagupta, Sushanta

    2004-01-01

    From the field of nonequilibrium statistical physics, this graduate- and research-level volume treats the modeling and characterization of dissipative phenomena. A variety of examples from diverse disciplines like condensed matter physics, materials science, metallurgy, chemical physics etc. are discussed. Dattagupta employs the broad framework of stochastic processes and master equation techniques to obtain models for a wide range of experimentally relevant phenomena such as classical and quantum Brownian motion, spin dynamics, kinetics of phase ordering, relaxation in glasses, dissipative tunneling. It provides a pedagogical exposition of current research material and will be useful to experimentalists, computational physicists and theorists.

  16. Acoustic phenomena during boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorofeev, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Applied and theoretical significance of investigation into acoustic phenomena on boiling is discussed. Effect of spatial and time conditions on pressure vapour bubble has been elucidated. Collective effects were considered: acoustic interaction of bubbles, noise formation ion developed boiling, resonance and hydrodynamic autooscillations. Different methods for predicting heat transfer crisis using changes of accompanying noise characteristics were analysed. Principle peculiarities of generation mechanism of thermoacoustic autooscillations were analysed as well: formation of standing waves; change of two-phase medium contraction in a channel; relation of alternating pressure with boiling process as well as with instantaneous and local temperatures of heat transfer surface and liquid in a boundary layer

  17. Random phenomena; Phenomenes aleatoires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, G. [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, C.E.N.G., Service d' Electronique, Section d' Electronique, Grenoble (France)

    1963-07-01

    This document gathers a set of conferences presented in 1962. A first one proposes a mathematical introduction to the analysis of random phenomena. The second one presents an axiomatic of probability calculation. The third one proposes an overview of one-dimensional random variables. The fourth one addresses random pairs, and presents basic theorems regarding the algebra of mathematical expectations. The fifth conference discusses some probability laws: binomial distribution, the Poisson distribution, and the Laplace-Gauss distribution. The last one deals with the issues of stochastic convergence and asymptotic distributions.

  18. Switch of Sensitivity Dynamics Revealed with DyGloSA Toolbox for Dynamical Global Sensitivity Analysis as an Early Warning for System's Critical Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumuratova, Tatiana; Dobre, Simona; Bastogne, Thierry; Sauter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Systems with bifurcations may experience abrupt irreversible and often unwanted shifts in their performance, called critical transitions. For many systems like climate, economy, ecosystems it is highly desirable to identify indicators serving as early warnings of such regime shifts. Several statistical measures were recently proposed as early warnings of critical transitions including increased variance, autocorrelation and skewness of experimental or model-generated data. The lack of automatized tool for model-based prediction of critical transitions led to designing DyGloSA – a MATLAB toolbox for dynamical global parameter sensitivity analysis (GPSA) of ordinary differential equations models. We suggest that the switch in dynamics of parameter sensitivities revealed by our toolbox is an early warning that a system is approaching a critical transition. We illustrate the efficiency of our toolbox by analyzing several models with bifurcations and predicting the time periods when systems can still avoid going to a critical transition by manipulating certain parameter values, which is not detectable with the existing SA techniques. DyGloSA is based on the SBToolbox2 and contains functions, which compute dynamically the global sensitivity indices of the system by applying four main GPSA methods: eFAST, Sobol's ANOVA, PRCC and WALS. It includes parallelized versions of the functions enabling significant reduction of the computational time (up to 12 times). DyGloSA is freely available as a set of MATLAB scripts at http://bio.uni.lu/systems_biology/software/dyglosa. It requires installation of MATLAB (versions R2008b or later) and the Systems Biology Toolbox2 available at www.sbtoolbox2.org. DyGloSA can be run on Windows and Linux systems, -32 and -64 bits. PMID:24367574

  19. Switch of sensitivity dynamics revealed with DyGloSA toolbox for dynamical global sensitivity analysis as an early warning for system's critical transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumuratova, Tatiana; Dobre, Simona; Bastogne, Thierry; Sauter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Systems with bifurcations may experience abrupt irreversible and often unwanted shifts in their performance, called critical transitions. For many systems like climate, economy, ecosystems it is highly desirable to identify indicators serving as early warnings of such regime shifts. Several statistical measures were recently proposed as early warnings of critical transitions including increased variance, autocorrelation and skewness of experimental or model-generated data. The lack of automatized tool for model-based prediction of critical transitions led to designing DyGloSA - a MATLAB toolbox for dynamical global parameter sensitivity analysis (GPSA) of ordinary differential equations models. We suggest that the switch in dynamics of parameter sensitivities revealed by our toolbox is an early warning that a system is approaching a critical transition. We illustrate the efficiency of our toolbox by analyzing several models with bifurcations and predicting the time periods when systems can still avoid going to a critical transition by manipulating certain parameter values, which is not detectable with the existing SA techniques. DyGloSA is based on the SBToolbox2 and contains functions, which compute dynamically the global sensitivity indices of the system by applying four main GPSA methods: eFAST, Sobol's ANOVA, PRCC and WALS. It includes parallelized versions of the functions enabling significant reduction of the computational time (up to 12 times). DyGloSA is freely available as a set of MATLAB scripts at http://bio.uni.lu/systems_biology/software/dyglosa. It requires installation of MATLAB (versions R2008b or later) and the Systems Biology Toolbox2 available at www.sbtoolbox2.org. DyGloSA can be run on Windows and Linux systems, -32 and -64 bits.

  20. Direct channel problems and phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutkosky, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    Direct channel problems and phenomena are considered covering the need for precision hadron spectroscopy, the data base for precision hadron spectroscopy, some relations between direct-channel and cross-channel effects, and spin rotation phenomena

  1. Phenomena Associated With EIT Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, B. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss phenomena associated with "EIT Wave" transients. These phenomena include coronal mass ejections, flares, EUV/SXR dimmings, chromospheric waves, Moreton waves, solar energetic particle events, energetic electron events, and radio signatures. Although the occurrence of many phenomena correlate with the appearance of EIT waves, it is difficult to mfer which associations are causal. The presentation will include a discussion of correlation surveys of these phenomena.

  2. Geochemical modelling: what phenomena are missing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, P.

    1989-12-01

    In the framework of safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal, retention phenomena are usually taken into account by the Kd concept. It is well recognized that this concept is not enough for safety assessment models, because of the several and strong assumptions which are involved in this kind of representation. One way to have a better representation of the retention phenomena, is to substitute for this Kd concept an explicit description of geochemical phenomena and then couple transport codes with geochemical codes in a fully or a two-step procedure. We use currently such codes, but the scope of this paper is to display the limits today of the geochemical modelling in connection with sites analysis for deep disposal. In this paper, we intend to give an overview of phenomena which are missing in the geochemical models, or which are not completely introduced in the models. We can distinguish, on one hand phenomena for which modelling concepts exist such as adsorption/desorption and, on the other hand, phenomena for which modelling concepts do not exist for the moment such as colloids, and complexation by polyelectrolyte solutions (organics). Moreover we have to take care of very low concentrations of radionuclides, which can be expected from the leaching processes in the repository. Under those conditions, some reactions may not occur. After a critical review of the involved phenomena, we intend to stress the main directions of the wishful evolution of the geochemical modelling. This evolution should improve substantially the quality of the above-mentioned site assessments

  3. Determination of the Critical Stress Associated with Dynamic Phase Transformation in Steels by Means of Free Energy Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clodualdo Aranas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The double differentiation method overestimates the critical stress associated with the initiation of dynamic transformation (DT because significant amounts of the dynamic phase must be present in order for its effect on the work hardening rate to be detectable. In this work, an alternative method (referred to here as the free energy method is presented based on the thermodynamic condition that the driving force is equal to the total energy obstacle during the exact moment of transformation. The driving force is defined as the difference between the DT critical stress (measured in the single-phase austenite region and the yield stress of the fresh ferrite that takes its place. On the other hand, the energy obstacle consists of the free energy difference between austenite and ferrite, and the work of shear accommodation and dilatation associated with the phase transformation. Here, the DT critical stresses in a C-Mn steel were calculated using the free energy method at temperatures ranging from 870 °C to 1070 °C. The results show that the calculated critical stress using the present approach appears to be more accurate than the values measured by the double differentiation method.

  4. Transport phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontani, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive overview. Written by an expert of this topic. Provides the reader with current developments in the field. In conventional metals, various transport coefficients are scaled according to the quasiparticle relaxation time, τ, which implies that the relaxation time approximation (RTA) holds well. However, such a simple scaling does not hold in many strongly correlated electron systems, reflecting their unique electronic states. The most famous example would be cuprate high-Tc superconductors (HTSCs), where almost all the transport coefficients exhibit a significant deviation from the RTA results. To better understand the origin of this discrepancy, we develop a method for calculating various transport coefficients beyond the RTA by employing field theoretical techniques. Near the magnetic quantum critical point, the current vertex correction (CVC), which describes the electron-electron scattering beyond the relaxation time approximation, gives rise to various anomalous transport phenomena. We explain anomalous transport phenomena in cuprate HTSCs and other metals near their magnetic or orbital quantum critical point using a uniform approach. We also discuss spin related transport phenomena in strongly correlated systems. In many d- and f-electron systems, the spin current induced by the spin Hall effect is considerably greater because of the orbital degrees of freedom. This fact attracts much attention due to its potential application in spintronics. We discuss various novel charge, spin and heat transport phenomena in strongly correlated metals.

  5. PREFACE Integrability and nonlinear phenomena Integrability and nonlinear phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ullate, David; Lombardo, Sara; Mañas, Manuel; Mazzocco, Marta; Nijhoff, Frank; Sommacal, Matteo

    2010-10-01

    Back in 1967, Clifford Gardner, John Greene, Martin Kruskal and Robert Miura published a seminal paper in Physical Review Letters which was to become a cornerstone in the theory of integrable systems. In 2006, the authors of this paper received the AMS Steele Prize. In this award the AMS pointed out that `In applications of mathematics, solitons and their descendants (kinks, anti-kinks, instantons, and breathers) have entered and changed such diverse fields as nonlinear optics, plasma physics, and ocean, atmospheric, and planetary sciences. Nonlinearity has undergone a revolution: from a nuisance to be eliminated, to a new tool to be exploited.' From this discovery the modern theory of integrability bloomed, leading scientists to a deep understanding of many nonlinear phenomena which is by no means reachable by perturbation methods or other previous tools from linear theories. Nonlinear phenomena appear everywhere in nature, their description and understanding is therefore of great interest both from the theoretical and applicative point of view. If a nonlinear phenomenon can be represented by an integrable system then we have at our disposal a variety of tools to achieve a better mathematical description of the phenomenon. This special issue is largely dedicated to investigations of nonlinear phenomena which are related to the concept of integrability, either involving integrable systems themselves or because they use techniques from the theory of integrability. The idea of this special issue originated during the 18th edition of the Nonlinear Evolution Equations and Dynamical Systems (NEEDS) workshop, held at Isola Rossa, Sardinia, Italy, 16-23 May 2009 (http://needs-conferences.net/2009/). The issue benefits from the occasion offered by the meeting, in particular by its mini-workshops programme, and contains invited review papers and contributed papers. It is worth pointing out that there was an open call for papers and all contributions were peer reviewed

  6. Vacuum arc anode phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review of anode phenomena in vacuum arcs is presented. Discussed in succession are: the transition of the arc into the anode spot mode; the temperature of the anode before, during and after the anode spot forms; and anode ions. Characteristically the anode spot has a temperature of the order of the atmospheric boiling point of the anode material and is a copious source of vapor and energetic ions. The dominant mechanism controlling the transition of the vacuum arc into the anode spot mode appears to depend upon the electrode geometry, the electrode material, and the current waveform of the particular vacuum arc being considered. Either magnetic constriction in the gap plasma or gross anode melting can trigger the transition; indeed, a combination of the two is a common cause of anode spot formation

  7. Foot morphometric phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agić, Ante

    2007-06-01

    Knowledge of the foot morphometry is important for proper foot structure and function. Foot structure as a vital part of human body is important for many reasons. The foot anthropometric and morphology phenomena are analyzed together with hidden biomechanical descriptors in order to fully characterize foot functionality. For Croatian student population the scatter data of the individual foot variables were interpolated by multivariate statistics. Foot morphometric descriptors are influenced by many factors, such as life style, climate, and things of great importance in human society. Dominant descriptors related to fit and comfort are determined by the use 3D foot shape and advanced foot biomechanics. Some practical recommendations and conclusions for medical, sportswear and footwear practice are highlighted.

  8. Workshop on Interface Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the first Workshop on Interface Phenomena, organized jointly by the surface science groups at Dalhousie University and the University of Maine. It was our intention to concentrate on just three topics related to the kinetics of interface reactions which, in our opinion, were frequently obscured unnecessarily in the literature and whose fundamental nature warranted an extensive discussion to help clarify the issues, very much in the spirit of the Discussions of the Faraday Society. Each session (day) saw two principal speakers expounding the different views; the session chairmen were asked to summarize the ensuing discussions. To understand the complexity of interface reactions, paradigms must be formulated to provide a framework for the interpretation of experimen­ tal data and for the construction of theoretical models. Phenomenological approaches have been based on a small number of rate equations for the concentrations or mole numbers of the various species involved i...

  9. Transport phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Kontani, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In conventional metals, various transport coefficients are scaled according to the quasiparticle relaxation time, \\tau, which implies that the relaxation time approximation (RTA) holds well. However, such a simple scaling does not hold in many strongly correlated electron systems, reflecting their unique electronic states. The most famous example would be cuprate high-Tc superconductors (HTSCs), where almost all the transport coefficients exhibit a significant deviation from the RTA results. To better understand the origin of this discrepancy, we develop a method for calculating various transport coefficients beyond the RTA by employing field theoretical techniques. Near the magnetic quantum critical point, the current vertex correction (CVC), which describes the electron-electron scattering beyond the relaxation time approximation, gives rise to various anomalous transport phenomena. We explain anomalous transport phenomena in cuprate HTSCs and other metals near their magnetic or orbital quantum critical poi...

  10. Trophic dynamics and fishery potentials of the Indian Occean - critical assessment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dalal, S.G.; Parulekar, A.H.

    A critical review of the status of the Indian Ocean marine fisheries reveals that the presently exploited annual catch is less than one third of the projected potentials as estimated from the biological productivity and exploratory fishery survey...

  11. High-sensitivity strain measurements from underground interferometric stations: geodynamic phenomena at Gran Sasso and first records from Canfranc

    OpenAIRE

    Botta, Verdiana

    2013-01-01

    2011 - 2012 Earth's surface and interior continuously deform as a result of geological and geophys- ical processes. To study these phenomena and to understand better the rheological properties of the Earth, measurements of Earth's deformation become of fundamental importance, providing a critical link between Earth's structure and dynamics, also in order to optimize the response to natural hazards and identify potential risk areas. The study of crustal deformation is a compl...

  12. Phase transition in anisotropic holographic superfluids with arbitrary dynamical critical exponent z and hyperscaling violation factor α

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Miok [Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jiwon; Oh, Jae-Hyuk [Hanyang University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    Einstein-scalar-U(2) gauge field theory is considered in a spacetime characterized by α and z, which are the hyperscaling violation factor and the dynamical critical exponent, respectively. We consider a dual fluid system of such a gravity theory characterized by temperature T and chemical potential μ. It turns out that there is a superfluid phase transition where a vector order parameter appears which breaks SO(3) global rotation symmetry of the dual fluid system when the chemical potential becomes a certain critical value. To study this system for arbitrary z and α, we first apply Sturm-Liouville theory and estimate the upper bounds of the critical values of the chemical potential. We also employ a numerical method in the ranges of 1 ≤ z ≤ 4 and 0 ≤ α ≤ 4 to check if the Sturm-Liouville method correctly estimates the critical values of the chemical potential. It turns out that the two methods are agreed within 10 percent error ranges. Finally, we compute free energy density of the dual fluid by using its gravity dual and check if the system shows phase transition at the critical values of the chemical potential μ{sub c} for the given parameter region of α and z. Interestingly, it is observed that the anisotropic phase is more favored than the isotropic phase for relatively small values of z and α. However, for large values of z and α, the anisotropic phase is not favored. (orig.)

  13. Experimental investigation of the discharge valve dynamics in a reciprocating compressor for trans-critical CO2 refrigeration cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yuan; He Zhilong; Peng Xueyuan; Xing Ziwen

    2012-01-01

    The self-acting valve has a significant influence on the efficiency and reliability of the reciprocating compressor. In the trans-critical CO 2 cycle, the large density and high pressure difference across the valve cause serious bending and impact stresses in the valve, offering great challenges for successful valve design. Experimental investigation of the valve dynamics is required in order to design a self-acting valve with a high efficiency and long life span for the trans-critical CO 2 compressor. A semi-hermetic reciprocating compressor was developed for application in CO 2 refrigeration, and a test system was incorporated into the compressor performance test rig, with a focus on investigating the dynamics of the discharge valves. With the experimental results, the movement of the valve was discussed in detail for the trans-critical CO 2 compressor, allowing for the study of the thermodynamic performance of the compressor. While varying design parameters such as pressure ratio, valve lift, spring stiffness and compressor speed, the movement of the discharge valve in the reciprocating CO 2 compressor was measured in order to investigate the major factors that influence the valve dynamics. The average valve speed increased from 0.71 m/s to 0.81 m/s as the discharge pressure changed from 7.8 MPa to 12 MPa. The experimental methods and results discussed in this paper could provide useful information for both valve testing and the optimization of their reliability in trans-critical CO 2 compressors.

  14. Power system dynamics: same phenomena; new challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansour, Yakout; Vaahedi, Ebraim; Xu, Wilsun; Chang, Allen [British Columbia Hydro, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Regional System Planning

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a summary of how a utility met some challenges recently in two areas: transient angular stability and voltage stability. The paper also includes a view of what is evolving in these two areas. (author) 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Coherent topological phenomena in protein folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    A theory is presented for coherent topological phenomena in protein dynamics with implications for protein folding and stability. We discuss the relationship to the writhing number used in knot diagrams of DNA. The winding state defines a long-range order along the backbone of a protein with long......-range excitations, `wring' modes, that play an important role in protein denaturation and stability. Energy can be pumped into these excitations, either thermally or by an external force....

  16. Workshop on Nonlinear Phenomena in Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    This book contains a thorough treatment of neural networks, cellular-automata and synergetics, in an attempt to provide three different approaches to nonlinear phenomena in complex systems. These topics are of major interest to physicists active in the fields of statistical mechanics and dynamical systems. They have been developed with a high degree of sophistication and include the refinements necessary to work with the complexity of real systems as well as the more recent research developments in these areas.

  17. Taking the Step towards a More Dynamic View on Raw Material Criticality: An Indicator Based Analysis for Germany and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Glöser-Chahoud

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to mounting concerns about the security of raw material supplies, numerous studies dealing with the quantification of supply risks and material criticality at the national level have been carried out in previous years. Regarding these studies, most approaches are indicator based static screening methods analyzing large numbers of raw materials and identifying those which are most critical for an economy. The majority of these screening methods quantify supply risks and vulnerabilities for one base year without taking into account temporal changes. Dynamic approaches for specific raw materials analyzing affected value chains in detail have been introduced recently; however, these studies do not intend to provide a screening of larger numbers of commodities. In this paper, we present a simple dynamic screening approach to assess raw material criticality at the country level building upon methods from innovation economics. The indicators applied in this study are only based on broadly available production and trade data, which makes this approach relatively easy to apply. We test our methodology on the example of Germany and Japan—two economies with highly specialized industries and low domestic raw material deposits, and, hence, high import dependency. The results are comparable to those of previously conducted multi indicator based static screening methods. However, they provide additional insight into temporal developments over the previous decade.

  18. Nuclear fuel deformation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Brutzel, L.; Dingreville, R.; Bartel, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear fuel encounters severe thermomechanical environments. Its mechanical response is profoundly influenced by an underlying heterogeneous microstructure but also inherently dependent on the temperature and stress level histories. The ability to adequately simulate the response of such microstructures, to elucidate the associated macroscopic response in such extreme environments is crucial for predicting both performance and transient fuel mechanical responses. This chapter discusses key physical phenomena and the status of current modelling techniques to evaluate and predict fuel deformations: creep, swelling, cracking and pellet-clad interaction. This chapter only deals with nuclear fuel; deformations of cladding materials are discussed elsewhere. An obvious need for a multi-physics and multi-scale approach to develop a fundamental understanding of properties of complex nuclear fuel materials is presented. The development of such advanced multi-scale mechanistic frameworks should include either an explicit (domain decomposition, homogenisation, etc.) or implicit (scaling laws, hand-shaking,...) linkage between the different time and length scales involved, in order to accurately predict the fuel thermomechanical response for a wide range of operating conditions and fuel types (including Gen-IV and TRU). (authors)

  19. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  20. Acid Deposition Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, A.E.K.

    2004-01-01

    Acid deposition, commonly known as acid rain, occurs when emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and other industrial processes undergo complex chemical reactions in the atmosphere and fall to the earth as wet deposition (rain, snow, cloud, fog) or dry deposition (dry particles, gas). Rain and snow are already naturally acidic, but are only considered problematic when less than a ph of 5.0 The main chemical precursors leading to acidic conditions are atmospheric concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). When these two compounds react with water, oxygen, and sunlight in the atmosphere, the result is sulfuric (H 2 SO 4 ) and nitric acids (HNO 3 ), the primary agents of acid deposition which mainly produced from the combustion of fossil fuel and from petroleum refinery. Airborne chemicals can travel long distances from their sources and can therefore affect ecosystems over broad regional scales and in locations far from the sources of emissions. According to the concern of petroleum ministry with the environment and occupational health, in this paper we will discussed the acid deposition phenomena through the following: Types of acidic deposition and its components in the atmosphere Natural and man-made sources of compounds causing the acidic deposition. Chemical reactions causing the acidic deposition phenomenon in the atmosphere. Factors affecting level of acidic deposition in the atmosphere. Impact of acid deposition. Procedures for acidic deposition control in petroleum industry

  1. Feedback control stabilization of critical dynamics via resource transport on multilayer networks: How glia enable learning dynamics in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkar, Yogesh S.; Shew, Woodrow L.; Restrepo, Juan G.; Ott, Edward

    2016-10-01

    Learning and memory are acquired through long-lasting changes in synapses. In the simplest models, such synaptic potentiation typically leads to runaway excitation, but in reality there must exist processes that robustly preserve overall stability of the neural system dynamics. How is this accomplished? Various approaches to this basic question have been considered. Here we propose a particularly compelling and natural mechanism for preserving stability of learning neural systems. This mechanism is based on the global processes by which metabolic resources are distributed to the neurons by glial cells. Specifically, we introduce and study a model composed of two interacting networks: a model neural network interconnected by synapses that undergo spike-timing-dependent plasticity; and a model glial network interconnected by gap junctions that diffusively transport metabolic resources among the glia and, ultimately, to neural synapses where they are consumed. Our main result is that the biophysical constraints imposed by diffusive transport of metabolic resources through the glial network can prevent runaway growth of synaptic strength, both during ongoing activity and during learning. Our findings suggest a previously unappreciated role for glial transport of metabolites in the feedback control stabilization of neural network dynamics during learning.

  2. Dynamic Mechanical Compression of Chondrocytes for Tissue Engineering: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Devon E; Johnstone, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage functions to transmit and translate loads. In a classical structure-function relationship, the tissue resides in a dynamic mechanical environment that drives the formation of a highly organized tissue architecture suited to its biomechanical role. The dynamic mechanical environment includes multiaxial compressive and shear strains as well as hydrostatic and osmotic pressures. As the mechanical environment is known to modulate cell fate and influence tissue development toward a defined architecture in situ , dynamic mechanical loading has been hypothesized to induce the structure-function relationship during attempts at in vitro regeneration of articular cartilage. Researchers have designed increasingly sophisticated bioreactors with dynamic mechanical regimes, but the response of chondrocytes to dynamic compression and shear loading remains poorly characterized due to wide variation in study design, system variables, and outcome measurements. We assessed the literature pertaining to the use of dynamic compressive bioreactors for in vitro generation of cartilaginous tissue from primary and expanded chondrocytes. We used specific search terms to identify relevant publications from the PubMed database and manually sorted the data. It was very challenging to find consensus between studies because of species, age, cell source, and culture differences, coupled with the many loading regimes and the types of analyses used. Early studies that evaluated the response of primary bovine chondrocytes within hydrogels, and that employed dynamic single-axis compression with physiologic loading parameters, reported consistently favorable responses at the tissue level, with upregulation of biochemical synthesis and biomechanical properties. However, they rarely assessed the cellular response with gene expression or mechanotransduction pathway analyses. Later studies that employed increasingly sophisticated biomaterial-based systems, cells derived from different

  3. Dynamic Mechanical Compression of Chondrocytes for Tissue Engineering: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon E. Anderson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage functions to transmit and translate loads. In a classical structure–function relationship, the tissue resides in a dynamic mechanical environment that drives the formation of a highly organized tissue architecture suited to its biomechanical role. The dynamic mechanical environment includes multiaxial compressive and shear strains as well as hydrostatic and osmotic pressures. As the mechanical environment is known to modulate cell fate and influence tissue development toward a defined architecture in situ, dynamic mechanical loading has been hypothesized to induce the structure–function relationship during attempts at in vitro regeneration of articular cartilage. Researchers have designed increasingly sophisticated bioreactors with dynamic mechanical regimes, but the response of chondrocytes to dynamic compression and shear loading remains poorly characterized due to wide variation in study design, system variables, and outcome measurements. We assessed the literature pertaining to the use of dynamic compressive bioreactors for in vitro generation of cartilaginous tissue from primary and expanded chondrocytes. We used specific search terms to identify relevant publications from the PubMed database and manually sorted the data. It was very challenging to find consensus between studies because of species, age, cell source, and culture differences, coupled with the many loading regimes and the types of analyses used. Early studies that evaluated the response of primary bovine chondrocytes within hydrogels, and that employed dynamic single-axis compression with physiologic loading parameters, reported consistently favorable responses at the tissue level, with upregulation of biochemical synthesis and biomechanical properties. However, they rarely assessed the cellular response with gene expression or mechanotransduction pathway analyses. Later studies that employed increasingly sophisticated biomaterial-based systems, cells

  4. Hysteresis phenomena in hydraulic measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran, H J; Farhat, M; Luo, X W; Chen, Y L; Xu, H Y

    2012-01-01

    Hysteresis phenomena demonstrate the lag between the generation and the removal of some physical phenomena. This paper studies the hysteresis phenomena of the head-drop in a scaled model pump turbine using experiment test and CFD methods. These lag is induced by complicated flow patterns, which influenced the reliability of rotating machine. Keeping the same measurement procedure is concluded for the hydraulic machine measurement.

  5. Haters Phenomena in Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Pradipta, Angga; Lailiyah, S.Sos, M.I.Kom, Nuriyatul

    2016-01-01

    Social media is internet-basic media, functioned as interaction media room based on multimedia technology. And social media created some effects. One of the negative effects of social media is haters phenomena. Haters are a person who easily said dirty words, harass, and humiliate to others. This phenomena causes anxiety—especially in Indonesia, even the Government issued public policy and letter of regulation about this phenomena, through Paragraph 27 verse (3) IT Constitution, Paragraph 45 ...

  6. The Mock Trial: A Dynamic Exercise for Thinking Critically about Management Theories, Topics, and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kevin; Meisel, Steven I.; Seltzer, Joe; Kane, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The Mock Trial is an experiential exercise adapted from a law school process that encourages students to think critically about theories, topics, and the practice of management in an innovative classroom experience. Playing the role of attorneys and witnesses, learners ask questions and challenge assumptions by playing roles in a trial with…

  7. Validation of programmable industrial automation systems for safety critical applications in NPP's dynamic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapanen, P.; Korhonen, J.

    1995-01-01

    The safety assessment of programmable automation systems can not totally be based on conventional probabilistic methods because of the difficulties in quantification of the reliability of the software as well as the hardware. Additional means shall therefore be used to gain more confidence on the system dependability. One central confidence building measure is the independent dynamic testing of the completed system. An automated test harness is needed to run the required large amount of test cases in a restricted time span. The prototype dynamic testing harness for programmable digital systems developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) is described in the presentation. (12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.)

  8. Validation of programmable industrial automation systems for safety critical applications in NPP's; dynamic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapanen, P.; Korhonen, J.

    1995-01-01

    The safety assessment of programmable automation systems cannot be totally be based on conventional probabilistic methods because of the difficulties in quantification of the reliability of the software as well as the hardware. Additional means shall therefore be used to gain more confidence on the system dependability. One central confidence building measure is the independent dynamic testing of the completed system. An automated test harness is needed to run the required large amount of test cases in a restricted time span. This paper describes a prototype dynamic testing harness for programmable digital systems developed at VTT. (author). 12 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Transport phenomena in environmental engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Aleksandra; Kardum, Jasna Prlić; Matijašić, Gordana; Žižek, Krunoslav

    2018-01-01

    A term transport phenomena arises as a second paradigm at the end of 1950s with high awareness that there was a strong need to improve the scoping of chemical engineering science. At that point, engineers became highly aware that it is extremely important to take step forward from pure empirical description and the concept of unit operations only to understand the specific process using phenomenological equations that rely on three elementary physical processes: momentum, energy and mass transport. This conceptual evolution of chemical engineering was first presented with a well-known book of R. Byron Bird, Warren E. Stewart and Edwin N. Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena, published in 1960 [1]. What transport phenomena are included in environmental engineering? It is hard to divide those phenomena through different engineering disciplines. The core is the same but the focus changes. Intention of the authors here is to present the transport phenomena that are omnipresent in treatment of various process streams. The focus in this chapter is made on the transport phenomena that permanently occur in mechanical macroprocesses of sedimentation and filtration for separation in solid-liquid particulate systems and on the phenomena of the flow through a fixed and a fluidized bed of particles that are immanent in separation processes in packed columns and in environmental catalysis. The fundamental phenomena for each thermal and equilibrium separation process technology are presented as well. Understanding and mathematical description of underlying transport phenomena result in scoping the separation processes in a way that ChEs should act worldwide.

  10. Catchment organisation, free energy dynamics and network control on critical zone water flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehe, E.; Ehret, U.; Kleidon, A.; Jackisch, C.; Scherer, U.; Blume, T.

    2012-04-01

    as that these flow structures organize and dominate flows of water, dissolved matter and sediments during rainfall driven conditions at various scales: - Surface connected vertical flow structures of anecic worm burrows or soil cracks organize and dominated vertical flows at the plot scale - this is usually referred to as preferential flow; - Rill networks at the soil surface organise and dominate hillslope scale overland flow response and sediment yields; - Subsurface pipe networks at the bedrock interface organize and dominate hillslope scale lateral subsurface water and tracer flows; - The river net organizes and dominates flows of water, dissolved matter and sediments to the catchment outlet and finally across continental gradients to the sea. Fundamental progress with respect to the parameterization of hydrological models, subscale flow networks and to understand the adaptation of hydro-geo ecosystems to change could be achieved by discovering principles that govern the organization of catchments flow networks in particular at least during steady state conditions. This insight has inspired various scientists to suggest principles for organization of ecosystems, landscapes and flow networks; as Bejans constructural law, Minimum Energy Expenditure , Maximum Entropy Production. In line with these studies we suggest that a thermodynamic/energetic treatment of the catchment is might be a key for understanding the underlying principles that govern organisation of flow and transport. Our approach is to employ a) physically based hydrological model that address at least all the relevant hydrological processes in the critical zone in a coupled way, behavioural representations of the observed organisation of flow structures and textural elements, that are consistent with observations in two well investigated research catchments and have been tested against distributed observations of soil moisture and catchment scale discharge; to simulate the full concert of hydrological

  11. Falsification of matching theory and confirmation of an evolutionary theory of behavior dynamics in a critical experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, J J; Calvin, Olivia L; Hackett, Ryan; Klapes, Bryan

    2017-07-01

    Two competing predictions of matching theory and an evolutionary theory of behavior dynamics, and one additional prediction of the evolutionary theory, were tested in a critical experiment in which human participants worked on concurrent schedules for money (Dallery et al., 2005). The three predictions concerned the descriptive adequacy of matching theory equations, and of equations describing emergent equilibria of the evolutionary theory. Tests of the predictions falsified matching theory and supported the evolutionary theory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The blowdown, refill and reflood phase during a LOCA. Survey of the main physical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reocreux, M.

    1980-05-01

    In this paper, the main physical phenomena occuring during a LOCA are reviewed. They are presented in a chronological order. For each phenomena, a detailed physical description is given followed by the review of the general modelling problems. For some of these phenomena, modelling details are given for critical flow, for two-phase flow and heat transfer, for critical heat flux and post critical heat flux heat transfer, for reflood and rewet heat transfer and in the survey on LOCA computation codes

  13. Critical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Models. Part II: Kinetic and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: This paper presents state of art in the field of coal gasification modeling using kinetic and computational fluid dynamics approach. The paper also presents own comparative analysis (concerned with mathematical formulation, input data and parameters, basic assumptions, obtained results etc. of the most important models of underground coal gasification.

  14. Dynamic behavior of HTSC opening switch models controlled by short over-critical current pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agafonov, A.V.; Krastelev, E.G.; Voronin, V.S.

    1999-01-01

    We present results of experimental research of dynamical properties of thin films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 HTSC-switch models under action of short overcritical current pulses to test this method of control of fast high-power opening switches for accelerator applications

  15. Feigenbaum scenario in the dynamics of a metal-oxide semiconductor heterostructure under harmonic perturbation. Golden mean criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, C.P.; Mereu, B.; Stan, Cristina; Agop, M.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental investigations and theoretical analysis on the dynamics of a metal-oxide semiconductor heterostructure used as nonlinear capacity in a series RLC electric circuit are presented. A harmonic voltage perturbation can induce various nonlinear behaviours, particularly evolution to chaos by period doubling and torus destabilization. In this work we focus on the change in dynamics induced by a sinusoidal driving with constant frequency and variable amplitude. Theoretical treatment based on the microscopic mechanisms involved led us to a dynamic system with a piecewise behaviour. Consequently, a model consisting of a nonlinear oscillator described by a piecewise second order ordinary differential equation is proposed. This kind of treatment is required by the asymmetry in the behaviour of the metal-oxide semiconductor with respect to the polarization of the perturbing voltage. The dynamics of the theoretical model is in good agreement with the experimental results. A connection with El Naschie's E-infinity space-time is established based on the interpretation of our experimental results as evidence of the importance of the golden mean criticality in the microscopic world.

  16. Renormalization and Central limit theorem for critical dynamical systems with weak external noise

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Espinosa, O

    2006-01-01

    We study of the effect of weak noise on critical one dimensional maps; that is, maps with a renormalization theory. We establish a one dimensional central limit theorem for weak noises and obtain Berry--Esseen estimates for the rate of this convergence. We analyze in detail maps at the accumulation of period doubling and critical circle maps with golden mean rotation number. Using renormalization group methods, we derive scaling relations for several features of the effective noise after long times. We use these scaling relations to show that the central limit theorem for weak noise holds in both examples. We note that, for the results presented here, it is essential that the maps have parabolic behavior. They are false for hyperbolic orbits.

  17. Intermittency at critical transitions and aging dynamics at the onset of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cO Indian Academy of Sciences. Vol. ... Pf. 1. Introduction. Ever since the proposition, in 1988, by Tsallis [1,2] of a ... namics associated with critical attractors in prototypical nonlinear one-dimensional maps ... Here we review briefly the specific .... power-law decay of the form τ−1/1−q with q = 1−ln 2/(ζ −1) ln α(ζ), where α(ζ) is.

  18. Critical current and flux dynamics in Ag-doped FeSe superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, A.; Polichetti, M.; Buchkov, K.; Nazarova, E.; Mancusi, D.; Pace, S.

    2017-02-01

    The measurements of DC magnetization as a function of the temperature M(T), magnetic field M(H), and time M(t) have been performed in order to compare the superconducting and pinning properties of an undoped FeSe0.94 sample and a silver doped FeSe0.94 + 6 wt% Ag sample. The M(T) curves indicate an improvement of the superconducting critical temperature and a reduction of the non-superconducting phase Fe7Se8 due to the silver doping. This is confirmed by the field and temperature dependent critical current density Jc(H,T) extracted from the superconducting hysteresis loops at different temperatures within the Bean critical state model. Moreover, the combined analysis of the Jc(T) and of the pinning force Fp(H/Hirr) indicate that the pinning mechanisms in both samples can be described in the framework of the collective pinning theory. The U*(T, J) curves show a pinning crossover from an elastic creep regime of intermediate size flux bundles, for low temperatures, to a plastic creep regime at higher temperatures for both the samples. Finally, the vortex hopping attempt time has been evaluated for both samples and the results are comparable with the values reported in the literature for high Tc materials.

  19. Reduplication phenomena: body, mind and archetype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, J

    2000-09-01

    The many biological and few psychodynamic explanations of reduplicative syndromes tend to have paralleled the dualism of the phenomenon with organic theories concentrating on form and dynamic theories emphasising content. This paper extends the contribution of psychoanalytic thinking to an elucidation of the form of the delusion. Literature on clinical and aetiological aspects of reduplicative phenomena is reviewed alongside a brief examination of psychoanalytic models not overtly related to these phenomena. The human experience of doubles as universal archetype is considered. There is an obvious aetiological role for brain lesions in delusional misidentifications, but psychological symptoms in an individual can rarely be reduced to an organic disorder. The splitting and doubling which occurs in the phenomena have resonances in cultural mythology and in theories from different schools of psychodynamic thought. For the individual patient and doctor, it is a diverting but potentially empty debate to endeavour to draw strict divisions between what is physical and what is psychological although both need to be investigated. Nevertheless, in patients in whom there is clear evidence of an organic contribution to aetiology a psychodynamic understanding may serve to illuminate the patient's experience. Organic brain disease or serious functional illness predispose to regression to earlier modes of archetypical and primitive thinking with concretization of the metaphorical and mythological world. Psychoanalytic models have a contribution in describing the form as well as the content of reduplicative phenomena.

  20. Critical analysis of partial discharge dynamics in air filled spherical voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, G.; Golosnoy, I. O.; Rapisarda, P.; Lewin, P. L.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper partial discharge (PD) is investigated inside a spherical air filled void at atmospheric pressure using a drift diffusion model. Discharge dynamics consisted of an electron avalanche transitioning into positive streamer, in agreement with earlier work on dielectric barrier discharges. Different model configurations were utilised to test many of the concepts employed in semi-analytical PD activity models, which use simplistic descriptions of the discharge dynamics. The results showed that many of these concepts may be erroneous, with significant discrepancies between the canonical reasoning and the simulation results. For example, the residual electric field, the electric field after a discharge, is significantly lower than the estimates used by classical PD activity models in the literature.

  1. Critical dynamics of the Potts model: short-time Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Roberto da; Drugowich de Felicio, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the new dynamic exponent θ of the 4-state Potts model, using short-time simulations. Our estimates θ1=-0.0471(33) and θ2=-0.0429(11) obtained by following the behavior of the magnetization or measuring the evolution of the time correlation function of the magnetization corroborate the conjecture by Okano et al. [Nucl. Phys. B 485 (1997) 727]. In addition, these values agree with previous estimate of the same dynamic exponent for the two-dimensional Ising model with three-spin interactions in one direction, that is known to belong to the same universality class as the 4-state Potts model. The anomalous dimension of initial magnetization x0=zθ+β/ν is calculated by an alternative way that mixes two different initial conditions. We have also estimated the values of the static exponents β and ν. They are in complete agreement with the pertinent results of the literature

  2. Pinning effect on critical dynamics in Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 films before and after introducing columnar defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.-T.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of columnar defects on the critical dynamics of superconducting Tl 2 Ba 2 CaCu 2 O 8 (Tl-2212) film has been investigated. The Tl-2212 film was irradiated at 0 C by 1.3 GeV U-ions along the normal of the film surface. The dose of 6.0 x 10 10 ions/cm 2 of the U-ion irradiation corresponds to a matching field of 1.2 T. The in-plane longitudinal resistivity of the irradiated Tl-2212 has been measured as a function of magnetic field H and temperature T. The extracted fluctuation part of the conductivity σ xx (T, H) of the unirradiated sample exhibits 3D-XY scaling behavior that reveals dynamic critical exponent z = 1.8 ± 0.1 and static critical exponent v ∼ 1.338. The results indicate that the weak interlayer coupling along the c-axis of Tl-2212 significantly influences static critical exponent v and does not change dynamical critical exponent. After the irradiation, the fluctuation conductivities are enhanced by the strong pinnings and do not exhibit the same 3D-XY scaling behavior as for the unirradiated Tl-2212. Particularly at the low magnetic field values near the matching field of 1.2 T, the fluctuation conductivities show a clear deviation from the critical dynamics, suggesting that the pinning effect on the critical dynamics is significant

  3. 3D Discrete Dislocation Dynamics: Influence of Segment Mobility on Critical Shear Stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Záležák, Tomáš; Dlouhý, Antonín

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 4 (2015), s. 654-656 ISSN 0587-4246. [ISPMA 13 - International Symposium on Physics of Materials /13./. Praha, 31.08.2014-04.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0214; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22834S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : metal matrix composites * discrete dislocation dynamics * high temperature creep Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.525, year: 2015

  4. Dynamical criticality during induction of anesthesia in human ECoG recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro M. Alonso

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we analyze electro-corticography (ECoG recordings in human sub- jects as they are anesthetized. We hypothesize that the decrease in responsiveness that defines anesthesia induction is concomitant with the stabilization of neuronal dynamics. To test this hypothesis, we performed a moving vector autoregressive analysis and quantified stability of neuronal dynamics using eigenmode decompo- sition of the autoregressive matrices, independently fitted to short sliding temporal windows. Consistent with the hypothesis we show that while the subject is awake, many modes of oscillations of neuronal activity are found at the edge of instabil- ity, but as the subject becomes anesthetized the fitted dynamics becomes more damped. Analysis of eigenmode distributions in the awake and anesthetized brain revealed statistically significant stabilization not present in surrogate data. Sta- bility analysis thus offer a novel way of quantifying changes in neuronal activity that characterize loss of consciousness induced by general anesthetics. Specifically, our analysis suggests that the effect of the anesthetic procedure is to damp out high frequency activity while still allowing for low frequency modes to perform a function.

  5. Renormalization of weak noises of arbitrary shape for one-dimensional critical dynamical systems Announcement of results and numerical explorations

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Espinosa, O

    2006-01-01

    We study the effect of noise on one--dimensional critical dynamical systems (that is, maps with a renormalization theory). We consider in detail two examples of such dynamical systems: unimodal maps of the interval at the accumulation of period--doubling and smooth homeomorphisms of the circle with a critical point and with golden mean rotation number. We show that, if we scale the space and the time, several properties of the noise (the cumulants or Wick--ordered moments) satisfy some scaling relations. A consequence of the scaling relations is that a version of the central limit theorem holds. Irrespective of the shape of the initial noise, if the bare noise is weak enough, the effective noise becomes close to Gaussian in several senses that we can make precise. We notice that the conclusions are false for maps with positive Lyapunov exponents. The method of analysis is close in spirit to the study of scaling limits in renormalization theory. We also perform several numerical experiments that confirm the ri...

  6. Critical scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, W.G.; Perry, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO 3 is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs

  7. Control of quantum phenomena: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brif, Constantin; Chakrabarti, Raj; Rabitz, Herschel

    2010-01-01

    Quantum control is concerned with active manipulation of physical and chemical processes on the atomic and molecular scale. This work presents a perspective of progress in the field of control over quantum phenomena, tracing the evolution of theoretical concepts and experimental methods from early developments to the most recent advances. Among numerous theoretical insights and technological improvements that produced the present state-of-the-art in quantum control, there have been several breakthroughs of foremost importance. On the technology side, the current experimental successes would be impossible without the development of intense femtosecond laser sources and pulse shapers. On the theory side, the two most critical insights were (i) realizing that ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics can be controlled via manipulation of quantum interferences and (ii) understanding that optimally shaped ultrafast laser pulses are the most effective means for producing the desired quantum interference patterns in the controlled system. Finally, these theoretical and experimental advances were brought together by the crucial concept of adaptive feedback control (AFC), which is a laboratory procedure employing measurement-driven, closed-loop optimization to identify the best shapes of femtosecond laser control pulses for steering quantum dynamics towards the desired objective. Optimization in AFC experiments is guided by a learning algorithm, with stochastic methods proving to be especially effective. AFC of quantum phenomena has found numerous applications in many areas of the physical and chemical sciences, and this paper reviews the extensive experiments. Other subjects discussed include quantum optimal control theory, quantum control landscapes, the role of theoretical control designs in experimental realizations and real-time quantum feedback control. The paper concludes with a perspective of open research directions that are likely to attract significant attention in

  8. Movement, demographics, and occupancy dynamics of a federally-threatened salamander: evaluating the adequacy of critical habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan F. Bendik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Critical habitat for many species is often limited to occupied localities. For rare and cryptic species, or those lacking sufficient data, occupied habitats may go unrecognized, potentially hindering species recovery. Proposed critical habitat for the aquatic Jollyville Plateau salamander (Eurycea tonkawae and two sister species were delineated based on the assumption that surface habitat is restricted to springs and excludes intervening stream reaches. To test this assumption, we performed two studies to understand aspects of individual, population, and metapopulation ecology of E. tonkawae. First, we examined movement and population demographics using capture-recapture along a spring-influenced stream reach. We then extended our investigation of stream habitat use with a study of occupancy and habitat dynamics in multiple headwater streams. Indications of extensive stream channel use based on capture-recapture results included frequent movements of >15 m, and high juvenile abundance downstream of the spring. Initial occupancy of E. tonkawae was associated with shallow depths, maidenhair fern presence and low temperature variation (indicative of groundwater influence, although many occupied sites were far from known springs. Additionally, previously dry sites were three times more likely to be colonized than wet sites. Our results indicate extensive use of stream habitats, including intermittent ones, by E. tonkawae. These areas may be important for maintaining population connectivity or even as primary habitat patches. Restricting critical habitat to occupied sites will result in a mismatch with actual habitat use, particularly when assumptions of habitat use are untested, thus limiting the potential for recovery.

  9. Critical properties of the SIS model dynamics on the Apollonian network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, L F; Costa Filho, R N; Cunha, A R; Macedo-Filho, A; Serva, M; Fulco, U L; Albuquerque, E L

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the classical SIS (susceptible–infected–susceptible) model on the Apollonian network which is scale free and displays the small word effect. Numerical simulations show a continuous absorbing-state phase transition at a finite critical value λ c of the control parameter λ. Since the coordination number k of the vertices of the Apollonian network is cumulatively distributed according to a power-law P(k) ∝ 1/k η−1 , with exponent η ≃ 2.585, finite size effects are large and the infinite network limit cannot be reached in practice. Consequently, our study requires the application of finite size scaling theory, allowing us to characterize the transition by a set of critical exponents β/ν ⊥ , γ/ν ⊥ , ν ⊥ , β. We found that the phase transition belongs to the mean-field directed percolation universality class in regular lattices but, very peculiarly, is associated with a short-range distribution whose power-law distribution of k is defined by an exponent η larger than 3. (paper)

  10. Coherence Phenomena in Coupled Optical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.

    2004-01-01

    We predict a variety of photonic coherence phenomena in passive and active coupled ring resonators. Specifically, the effective dispersive and absorptive steady-state response of coupled resonators is derived, and used to determine the conditions for coupled-resonator-induced transparency and absorption, lasing without gain, and cooperative cavity emission. These effects rely on coherent photon trapping, in direct analogy with coherent population trapping phenomena in atomic systems. We also demonstrate that the coupled-mode equations are formally identical to the two-level atom Schrodinger equation in the rotating-wave approximation, and use this result for the analysis of coupled-resonator photon dynamics. Notably, because these effects are predicted directly from coupled-mode theory, they are not unique to atoms, but rather are fundamental to systems of coherently coupled resonators.

  11. Dynamic Simulation of the Water-steam System in Once-through Boilers - Sub-critical Power Boiler Case -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seongil; Choi, Sangmin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    The dynamics of a water-steam system in a once-through boiler was simulated based on the physics-based modeling approach, representing the system in response to large load change or scale disturbance simulations. The modeling considered the mass, energy conservation, and momentum equation in the water pipe and the focus was limited to the sub-critical pressure region. An evaporator tube modeling was validated against the reference data. A simplified boiler system consisting of economizer, evaporator, and superheater was constructed to match a 500 MW power boiler. The dynamic response of the system following a disturbance was discussed along with the quantitative response characteristics. The dynamic response of the boiler system was further evaluated by checking the case of an off-design point operation of the feedwater-to-fuel supply ratio. The results re-emphasized the significance of controlling the feedwater-to-fuel supply ratio and additional design requirements of the water-steam separator and spray attemperator.

  12. Dynamic Simulation of the Water-steam System in Once-through Boilers - Sub-critical Power Boiler Case -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seongil; Choi, Sangmin

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of a water-steam system in a once-through boiler was simulated based on the physics-based modeling approach, representing the system in response to large load change or scale disturbance simulations. The modeling considered the mass, energy conservation, and momentum equation in the water pipe and the focus was limited to the sub-critical pressure region. An evaporator tube modeling was validated against the reference data. A simplified boiler system consisting of economizer, evaporator, and superheater was constructed to match a 500 MW power boiler. The dynamic response of the system following a disturbance was discussed along with the quantitative response characteristics. The dynamic response of the boiler system was further evaluated by checking the case of an off-design point operation of the feedwater-to-fuel supply ratio. The results re-emphasized the significance of controlling the feedwater-to-fuel supply ratio and additional design requirements of the water-steam separator and spray attemperator.

  13. Plasma dynamics near critical density inferred from direct measurements of laser hole boring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Tochitsky, Sergei Ya.; Fiuza, Frederico; Pigeon, Jeremy J.; Joshi, Chan

    2016-06-01

    We have used multiframe picosecond optical interferometry to make direct measurements of the hole boring velocity, vHB, of the density cavity pushed forward by a train of C O2 laser pulses in a near critical density helium plasma. As the pulse train intensity rises, the increasing radiation pressure of each pulse pushes the density cavity forward and the plasma electrons are strongly heated. After the peak laser intensity, the plasma pressure exerted by the heated electrons strongly impedes the hole boring process and the vHB falls rapidly as the laser pulse intensity falls at the back of the laser pulse train. A heuristic theory is presented that allows the estimation of the plasma electron temperature from the measurements of the hole boring velocity. The measured values of vHB, and the estimated values of the heated electron temperature as a function of laser intensity are in reasonable agreement with those obtained from two-dimensional numerical simulations.

  14. Study of critical behavior in concrete during curing by application of dynamic linear and nonlinear means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacouture, Jean-Christoph; Johnson, Paul A; Cohen-Tenoudji, Frederic

    2003-03-01

    The monitoring of both linear and nonlinear elastic properties of a high performance concrete during curing is presented by application of compressional and shear waves. To follow the linear elastic behavior, both compressional and shear waves are used in wide band pulse echo mode. Through the value of the complex reflection coefficient between the cell material (Lucite) and the concrete within the cell, the elastic moduli are calculated. Simultaneously, the transmission of a continuous compressional sine wave at progressively increasing drive levels permits us to calculate the nonlinear properties by extracting the harmonics amplitudes of the signal. Information regarding the chemical evolution of the concrete based upon the reaction of hydration of cement is obtained by monitoring the temperature inside the sample. These different types of measurements are linked together to interpret the critical behavior.

  15. Lunar magma transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    An outline of magma transport theory relevant to the evolution of a possible Lunar Magma Ocean and the origin and transport history of the later phase of mare basaltic volcanism is presented. A simple model is proposed to evaluate the extent of fractionation as magma traverses the cold lunar lithosphere. If Apollo green glasses are primitive and have not undergone significant fractionation en route to the surface, then mean ascent rates of 10 m/s and cracks of widths greater than 40 m are indicated. Lunar tephra and vesiculated basalts suggest that a volatile component plays a role in eruption dynamics. The predominant vapor species appear to be CO CO2, and COS. Near the lunar surface, the vapor fraction expands enormously and vapor internal energy is converted to mixture kinetic energy with the concomitant high-speed ejection of vapor and pyroclasts to form lunary fire fountain deposits such as the Apollo 17 orange and black glasses and Apollo 15 green glass.

  16. Advanced diffusion processes and phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas; Belova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    This topical volume on Advanced Diffusion Processes and Phenomena addresses diffusion in a wider sense of not only mass diffusion but also heat diffusion in fluids and solids. Both diffusion phenomena play an important role in the characterization of engineering materials and corresponding structures. Understanding these different transport phenomena at many levels, from atomistic to macro, has therefore long attracted the attention of many researchers in materials science and engineering and related disciplines. The present topical volume captures a representative cross-section of some of the

  17. Kinetic effects on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Taro

    2001-01-01

    Resistive and ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theories are insufficient to adequately explain MHD phenomena in the high-temperature plasma. Recent progress in numerical simulations concerning kinetic effects on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena is summarized. The following three topics are studied using various models treating extended-MHD phenomena. (1) Kinetic modifications of internal kink modes in tokamaks with normal and reversed magnetic shear configurations. (2) Temporal evolution of the toroidal Alfven eigenmode and fishbone mode in tokamaks with energetic ions. (3) Kinetic stabilization of a title mode in field-reversed configurations by means of anchoring ions and beam ions. (author)

  18. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SuperMat, Via Salvador Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: grimaldi@sa.infn.it

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  19. Micro transport phenomena during boiling

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    "Micro Transport Phenomena During Boiling" reviews the new achievements and contributions in recent investigations at microscale. It presents some original research results and discusses topics at the frontier of thermal and fluid sciences.

  20. Mixed Fluid Conditions: Capillary Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Santamarina, Carlos; Sun, Zhonghao

    2017-01-01

    Mixed fluid phenomena in porous media have profound implications on soil-atmosphere interaction, energy geotechnology, environmental engineering and infrastructure design. Surface tension varies with pressure, temperature, solute concentration

  1. National implementation of the UNECE convention on long-range transboundary air pollution (effects). Pt. 2. Impacts and risk estimation, critical loads, biodiversity, dynamic modelling, critical level violation, material corrosion; Nationale Umsetzung UNECE-Luftreinhaltekonvention (Wirkungen). T. 2. Wirkungen und Risikoabschaetzungen Critical Loads, Biodiversitaet, Dynamische Modellierung, Critical Levels Ueberschreitungen, Materialkorrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauger, Thomas [Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Braunschweig (DE). Inst. fuer Agraroekologie (FAL-AOE); Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Navigation; Haenel, Hans-Dieter; Roesemann, Claus [Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Braunschweig (DE). Inst. fuer Agraroekologie (FAL-AOE); Nagel, Hans-Dieter; Becker, Rolf; Kraft, Philipp; Schlutow, Angela; Schuetze, Gudrun; Weigelt-Kirchner, Regine [OeKO-DATA Gesellschaft fuer Oekosystemanalyse und Umweltdatenmanagement mbH, Strausberg (Germany); Anshelm, Frank [Geotechnik Suedwest Frey Marx GbR, Bietigheim-Bissingen (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    The report on the implementation of the UNECE convention on long-range transboundary air pollution Pt.2 covers the following issues: The tasks of the NFC (National Focal Center) Germany including the ICP (international cooperative program) modeling and mapping and the expert panel for heavy metals. Results of the work for the multi-component protocol cover the initial data for the calculation of the critical loads following the mass balance method, critical loads for acid deposition, critical loads for nitrogen input, critical load violations (sulfur, nitrogen). The results of work for the heavy metal protocol cover methodology development and recommendations for ICO modeling and mapping in accordance with international development, contributions of the expert group/ task force on heavy metals (WGSR), data sets on the critical loads for lead, cadmium and mercury, and critical load violations (Pb, Cd, Hg). The results of work on the inclusion of biodiversity (BERN) cover data compilation, acquisition and integration concerning ecosystems, model validation and verification and the possible interpretation frame following the coupling with dynamic modeling. The future development and utilization of dynamic modeling covers model comparison, applicability, the preparation of a national data set and preparations concerning the interface to the BERN model.

  2. Critical dynamics in the evolution of stochastic strategies for the iterated prisoner's dilemma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Iliopoulos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The observed cooperation on the level of genes, cells, tissues, and individuals has been the object of intense study by evolutionary biologists, mainly because cooperation often flourishes in biological systems in apparent contradiction to the selfish goal of survival inherent in Darwinian evolution. In order to resolve this paradox, evolutionary game theory has focused on the Prisoner's Dilemma (PD, which incorporates the essence of this conflict. Here, we encode strategies for the iterated Prisoner's Dilemma (IPD in terms of conditional probabilities that represent the response of decision pathways given previous plays. We find that if these stochastic strategies are encoded as genes that undergo Darwinian evolution, the environmental conditions that the strategies are adapting to determine the fixed point of the evolutionary trajectory, which could be either cooperation or defection. A transition between cooperative and defective attractors occurs as a function of different parameters such as mutation rate, replacement rate, and memory, all of which affect a player's ability to predict an opponent's behavior. These results imply that in populations of players that can use previous decisions to plan future ones, cooperation depends critically on whether the players can rely on facing the same strategies that they have adapted to. Defection, on the other hand, is the optimal adaptive response in environments that change so quickly that the information gathered from previous plays cannot usefully be integrated for a response.

  3. A CRITICAL AND COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE INDUSTRIAL CORPORATIONS IN THEIR EVOLUTIONARY DYNAMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHERGHEL Sabina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 2000s, a series of mergers and acquisitions of brand at industrial corporations’ level has been observed in the global industry landscape, and an even more pronounced dynamism was manifested in Europe. The wave of mergers and acquisitions continues nowadays, when the concentration of the dominant "actors" on the industrial stage is followed by a similar process of creating enterprises able to compete with the first ones, either by the size of production or financial strength, or by innovativeness and introduction of new and competitive products. The existence of the Common Market and the EU on our continent has contributed enormously to the process of restructuring the "old" Europe. In the first phase of the European construction, the stage where national markets were still dominant, but there could be noticed a serious growth of competition, in Europe there has been produced a huge wave of mergers, for many surprising. Once with the consolidation of the European Community, a new phase begins, in which enterprises begin to adopt "continental" strategies and policies, reasoning according to the logic of a market area. Through international mergers means, is implemented a strategy that adapts the minimization of costs and simultaneously an insurance policy against a future possible currency devaluation. Today we are witnessing the third stage, with rules that tend quickly towards a complete unification and a single currency. The agreements between the European enterprises can be considered favorable because they often lead to high levels of efficiency without decreasing elements that make them competitive.

  4. Constitutive relations for determining the critical conditions for dynamic recrystallization behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, J. I.

    2016-04-01

    A series mathematical model has been developed for the prediction of flow stress and microstructure evolution during the hot deformation of metals such as copper or austenitic steels with low stacking fault energies, involving features of both diffusional flow and dislocation motion. As the strain rate increases, multiple peaks on the stress-strain curve decrease. At a high strain rate, the stress rises to a single peak, while dynamic recrystallization causes an oscillatory behavior. At a low strain rate (when there is sufficient time for the recrystallizing grains to grow before they become saturated with high dislocation density with an increase in strain rate), the difference in stored stress between recrystallizing and old grains diminishes, resulting in reduced driving force for grain growth and rendering smaller grains in the alloy. The final average grain size at the steady stage (large strain) increases with a decrease in the strain rate. During large strain deformation, grain size reduction accompanying dislocation creep might be balanced by the grain growth at the border delimiting the ranges of realization (field boundary) of the dislocation-creep and diffusion-creep mechanisms.

  5. THE DETERMINATION OF A CRITICAL VALUE FOR DYNAMIC STABILITY OF SEMICONDUCTOR LASER DIODE WITH EXTERNAL OPTICAL FEEDBACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remzi YILDIRIM

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, dynamic stability analysis of semiconductor laser diodes with external optical feedback has been realized. In the analysis the frequency response of the transfer function of laser diode H jw( , the transfer m function of laser diode with external optical feedback TF jw( , and optical feedback transfer function m K jw( obtained from small signal equations has been m accomplished using Nyquist stability analysis in complex domain. The effect of optical feedback on the stability of the system has been introduced and to bring the laser diode to stable condition the working critical boundary range of dampig frequency and reflection power constant (R has been determined. In the study the reflection power has been taken as ( .

  6. Two-liquid-phase boundaries and critical phenomena at 275 to 4000C for high-temperature aqueous potassium phosphate and sodium phosphate solutions. Potential applications for steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    Two-liquid-phase boundaries at temperatures between 275 and 400 0 C were determined for potassium phosphate and sodium phosphate aqueous solutions for compositions from 0 to 60 wt % dissolved salt. The stoichiometric mole ratios, K/PO 4 or Na/PO 4 , were varied from 1.00 to 2.12 and from 1.00 to 2.16 for the potassium and sodium systems, respectively. Liquid-vapor critical temperatures were also determined for most of the dilute liquid phases that formed. The minimum temperatures (below which a single solution existed) of two-liquid-phase formation were 360 0 C for the potassium system and 279 0 C for the sodium system at mole ratios of 2.00 and 2.16, respectively. For the sodium system at mole ratios greater than 2.16, solids crystallized at lower temperatures as expected from earlier studies. In contrast, potassium solutions that were explored at mole ratios from 2.12 to 3.16 and at temperatures below 360 0 C did not produce solid phases or liquid-liquid immisibilities. Aside from the generally unusual observations of two immiscible liquids in an aqueous inorganic salt system, the results could possibly be applied to the use of phosphate additives in steam power generators

  7. Computational study of the activity, dynamics, energetics and conformations of insulin analogues using molecular dynamics simulations: Application to hyperinsulinemia and the critical residue B26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Papaioannou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes, finding therapeutic analogues for insulin has become an urgent issue. While many experimental studies have been performed towards this end, they have limited scope to examine all aspects of the effect of a mutation. Computational studies can help to overcome these limitations, however, relatively few studies that focus on insulin analogues have been performed to date. Here, we present a comprehensive computational study of insulin analogues—three mutant insulins that have been identified with hyperinsulinemia and three mutations on the critical B26 residue that exhibit similar binding affinity to the insulin receptor—using molecular dynamics simulations with the aim of predicting how mutations of insulin affect its activity, dynamics, energetics and conformations. The time evolution of the conformers is studied in long simulations. The probability density function and potential of mean force calculations are performed on each insulin analogue to unravel the effect of mutations on the dynamics and energetics of insulin activation. Our conformational study can decrypt the key features and molecular mechanisms that are responsible for an enhanced or reduced activity of an insulin analogue. We find two key results: 1 hyperinsulinemia may be due to the drastically reduced activity (and binding affinity of the mutant insulins. 2 Y26BS and Y26BE are promising therapeutic candidates for insulin as they are more active than WT-insulin. The analysis in this work can be readily applied to any set of mutations on insulin to guide development of more effective therapeutic analogues.

  8. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Ishida, Naoki

    1995-01-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity

  9. Layered phenomena in the mesopause region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, J. M. C.; Bailey, S. M.; Baumgarten, G.; Rapp, M.

    2015-05-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics comprises a collection of papers which were mostly presented at the 11th Layered Phenomena in the Mesopause Region (LPMR) Workshop, held at the University of Leeds between 29th July 2013 and 1st August 2013. The topics covered at the workshop included atmospheric dynamics, mesospheric ice clouds, meteoric metal layers, meteoric smoke particles, and airglow layers. There was also a session on the potential of planned sub-orbital spacecraft for making measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT).

  10. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan); Ishida, Naoki [Daihatsu Motor Company, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity.

  11. Critical dynamics and domain motion from permittivity of the electronic ferroelectric (TMTTF){sub 2}AsF{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazovskii, Serguei, E-mail: brazov@lptms.u-psud.fr [LPTMS, UMR8626, CNRS & University Paris-Sud, Bat. 100, Orsay F-91405 (France); International Institute of Physics, 59078-400 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Monceau, Pierre [CNRS & University Grenoble Alpes, Institute NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Nad, Felix Ya.

    2015-03-01

    The quasi one-dimensional organic conductor (TMTTF){sub 2}AsF{sub 6} shows the charge ordering transition at T{sub CO}=101 K to a state of the ferroelectric Mott insulator which is still well conducting. We present and interpret the experimental data on the gigantic dielectric response in the vicinity of T{sub CO}, concentrating on the frequency dependence of the inverse 1/ε of the complex permittivity ε=ε′+iε′′. Surprisingly for a ferroelectric, we could closely approach the 2nd order phase transition and to deeply reach the critical dynamics of the polarization. We could analyze the critical slowing-down when approaching T{sub CO} from both sides and to extract the anomalous power law for the frequency dependence of the order parameter viscosity. Moreover, below T{sub CO} we could extract a sharp absorption feature coming from a motion of domain walls which shows up at a frequency well below the relaxation rate.

  12. Soil Moisture/ Tree Water Status Dynamics in Mid-Latitude Montane Forest, Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsough, P. C.; Malazian, A.; Meadows, M. W.; Roudneva, K.; Storch, J.; Bales, R. C.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    As part of an effort to understand the root-water-nutrient interactions in the multi-dimensional soil/vegetation system surrounding large trees, in August 2008 we instrumented a mature white fir (Abies concolor) and the surrounding soil to better define the water balance in a single tree. In July 2010, we instrumented a second tree, a Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) in shallower soils on a drier, exposed slope. The trees are located in a mixed-conifer forest at an elevation of 2000m in the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory. The deployment of more than 250 sensors to measure temperature, volumetric water content, matric potential, and snow depth surrounding the two trees complements sap-flow measurements in the trunk and stem-water-potential measurements in the canopy to capture the seasonal cycles of soil wetting and drying. We show here the results of a multi-year deployment of soil moisture sensors as critical integrators of hydrologic/ biotic interaction in a forested catchment. Sensor networks such as deployed here are a valuable tool in closing the water budget in dynamic forested catchments. While the exchange of energy, water and carbon is continuous, the pertinent fluxes are strongly heterogeneous in both space and time. Thus, the prediction of the behavior of the system across multiple scales constitutes a major challenge.

  13. Optimal and robust control of a class of nonlinear systems using dynamically re-optimised single network adaptive critic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shivendra N.; Padhi, Radhakant

    2018-01-01

    Following the philosophy of adaptive optimal control, a neural network-based state feedback optimal control synthesis approach is presented in this paper. First, accounting for a nominal system model, a single network adaptive critic (SNAC) based multi-layered neural network (called as NN1) is synthesised offline. However, another linear-in-weight neural network (called as NN2) is trained online and augmented to NN1 in such a manner that their combined output represent the desired optimal costate for the actual plant. To do this, the nominal model needs to be updated online to adapt to the actual plant, which is done by synthesising yet another linear-in-weight neural network (called as NN3) online. Training of NN3 is done by utilising the error information between the nominal and actual states and carrying out the necessary Lyapunov stability analysis using a Sobolev norm based Lyapunov function. This helps in training NN2 successfully to capture the required optimal relationship. The overall architecture is named as 'Dynamically Re-optimised single network adaptive critic (DR-SNAC)'. Numerical results for two motivating illustrative problems are presented, including comparison studies with closed form solution for one problem, which clearly demonstrate the effectiveness and benefit of the proposed approach.

  14. Thermal transport phenomena in nanoparticle suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardellini, Annalisa; Fasano, Matteo; Bozorg Bigdeli, Masoud; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle suspensions in liquids have received great attention, as they may offer an approach to enhance thermophysical properties of base fluids. A good variety of applications in engineering and biomedicine has been investigated with the aim of exploiting the above potential. However, the multiscale nature of nanosuspensions raises several issues in defining a comprehensive modelling framework, incorporating relevant molecular details and much larger scale phenomena, such as particle aggregation and their dynamics. The objectives of the present topical review is to report and discuss the main heat and mass transport phenomena ruling macroscopic behaviour of nanosuspensions, arising from molecular details. Relevant experimental results are included and properly put in the context of recent observations and theoretical studies, which solved long-standing debates about thermophysical properties enhancement. Major transport phenomena are discussed and in-depth analysis is carried out for highlighting the role of geometrical (nanoparticle shape, size, aggregation, concentration), chemical (pH, surfactants, functionalization) and physical parameters (temperature, density). We finally overview several computational techniques available at different scales with the aim of drawing the attention on the need for truly multiscale predictive models. This may help the development of next-generation nanoparticle suspensions and their rational use in thermal applications. (topical review)

  15. Hidden symmetries and critical dimensions in the theory of modulated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babich, A.V.; Berezovsky, S.V.; Klepikov, V.F.

    2009-01-01

    Some aspects of the theory of the critical phenomena in systems with spontaneous symmetry breaking are considered. The applicability range of the mean field approximation for the systems with modulated structures is discussed. Connection between symmetries of a corresponding model and the existence of exact solutions is showed. The role of symmetries in the theory of dynamic long range ordering is discussed

  16. Containment severe accident thermohydraulic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.

    1991-08-01

    This report describes and discusses the containment accident progression and the important severe accident containment thermohydraulic phenomena. The overall objective of the report is to provide a rather detailed presentation of the present status of phenomenological knowledge, including an account of relevant experimental investigations and to discuss, to some extent, the modelling approach used in the MAAP 3.0 computer code. The MAAP code has been used in Sweden as the main tool in the analysis of severe accidents. The dependence of the containment accident progression and containment phenomena on the initial conditions, which in turn are heavily dependent on the in-vessel accident progression and phenomena as well as associated uncertainties, is emphasized. The report is in three parts dealing with: * Swedish reactor containments, the severe accident mitigation programme in Sweden and containment accident progression in Swedish PWRs and BWRs as predicted by the MAAP 3.0 code. * Key non-energetic ex-vessel phenomena (melt fragmentation in water, melt quenching and coolability, core-concrete interaction and high temperature in containment). * Early containment threats due to energetic events (hydrogen combustion, high pressure melt ejection and direct containment heating, and ex-vessel steam explosions). The report concludes that our understanding of the containment severe accident progression and phenomena has improved very significantly over the parts ten years and, thereby, our ability to assess containment threats, to quantify uncertainties, and to interpret the results of experiments and computer code calculations have also increased. (au)

  17. Teaching optical phenomena with Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M.; Simeão Carvalho, P.

    2014-11-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a relatively complex setup. Fortunately, nowadays it is possible to analyse optical phenomena in a simple and quantitative way using the freeware video analysis software ‘Tracker’. In this paper, we show the advantages of video-based experimental activities for teaching concepts in optics. We intend to show: (a) how easy the study of such phenomena can be, even at home, because only simple materials are needed, and Tracker provides the necessary measuring instruments; and (b) how we can use Tracker to improve students’ understanding of some optical concepts. We give examples using video modelling to study the laws of reflection, Snell’s laws, focal distances in lenses and mirrors, and diffraction phenomena, which we hope will motivate teachers to implement it in their own classes and schools.

  18. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  19. Whistlers and related ionospheric phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Helliwell, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    The investigation of whistlers and related phenomena is a key element in studies of very-low-frequency propagation, satellite communication, the outer ionosphere, and solar-terrestrial relationships. This comprehensive text presents a history of the study of the phenomena and includes all the elements necessary for the calculation of the characteristics of whistlers and whistler-mode signals.An introduction and brief history are followed by a summary of the theory of whistlers and a detailed explanation of the calculation of their characteristics. Succeeding chapters offer a complete atlas of

  20. A self-organized criticality model for plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.A.; Newman, D.; Lynch, V.E.

    1996-01-01

    Many models of natural phenomena manifest the basic hypothesis of self-organized criticality (SOC). The SOC concept brings together the self-similarity on space and time scales that is common to many of these phenomena. The application of the SOC modelling concept to the plasma dynamics near marginal stability opens new possibilities of understanding issues such as Bohm scaling, profile consistency, broad band fluctuation spectra with universal characteristics and fast time scales. A model realization of self-organized criticality for plasma transport in a magnetic confinement device is presented. The model is based on subcritical resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence. Three-dimensional nonlinear calculations based on this model show the existence of transport under subcritical conditions. This model that includes fluctuation dynamics leads to results very similar to the running sandpile paradigm

  1. Effects of the Hot Alignment of a Power Unit on Oil-Whip Instability Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vania

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the results of the analysis of the dynamic behaviour of a power unit, whose shaft-train alignment was significantly influenced by the machine thermal state, that was affected in operating condition by high subsynchronous vibrations caused by oil-whip instability phenomena. The dynamic stiffness coefficients of the oil-film journal bearings of the generator were evaluated considering the critical average journal positions that caused the instability onsets. By including these bearing coefficients in a mathematical model of the fully assembled machine, the real part of the eigenvalue associated with the first balance resonance of the generator rotor became positive. This paper shows the successful results obtained by combining diagnostic techniques based on mathematical models of journal bearings and shaft train with detailed analyses of monitoring data aimed to investigate the effects of the hot alignment of rotating machines on the occurrence of oil-whip instability onsets.

  2. The study of the phase structure of hadronic matter by searching for the deconfined quark-gluon phase transition using 2 TeV bar pp collisions; and by searching for critical phenomena in an exclusive study of multifragmentation using 1 GeV/nucleon heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharenberg, R.P.; Hirsch, A.S.; Tincknell, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    An experiment to search for the production of quark endash gluon plasma in proton endash antiproton interactions is described with emphasis on 1992 results. Next, a search for critical phenomena using the EOS Time Projection Chamber is similarly described, including the results of 1992 test runs, nucleus endash nucleus collision simulations, and the extraction of critical indices from small percolation lattices. Analysis of results from experiments to detect the possible production of anomalous photons in the central rapidity region with transverse momentum between 5 and 50 MeV/c are discussed. Initial work on an experiment to study the high-density, high-temperature state of matter formed in collisions of heavy nuclei at relativistic energies, planned to begin in fall 1997, is related. Finally, work on a research and development project to investigate silicon avalanche diodes as time-of-flight detectors for nuclear and particle physics applications is reviewed. The principle is to detect the ionization of charged particles directly in the Si; feasibility has been demonstrated

  3. Critical Zone Co-dynamics: Quantifying Interactions between Subsurface, Land Surface, and Vegetation Properties Using UAV and Geophysical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafflon, B.; Leger, E.; Peterson, J.; Falco, N.; Wainwright, H. M.; Wu, Y.; Tran, A. P.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Versteeg, R.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2017-12-01

    Improving understanding and modelling of terrestrial systems requires advances in measuring and quantifying interactions among subsurface, land surface and vegetation processes over relevant spatiotemporal scales. Such advances are important to quantify natural and managed ecosystem behaviors, as well as to predict how watershed systems respond to increasingly frequent hydrological perturbations, such as droughts, floods and early snowmelt. Our study focuses on the joint use of UAV-based multi-spectral aerial imaging, ground-based geophysical tomographic monitoring (incl., electrical and electromagnetic imaging) and point-scale sensing (soil moisture sensors and soil sampling) to quantify interactions between above and below ground compartments of the East River Watershed in the Upper Colorado River Basin. We evaluate linkages between physical properties (incl. soil composition, soil electrical conductivity, soil water content), metrics extracted from digital surface and terrain elevation models (incl., slope, wetness index) and vegetation properties (incl., greenness, plant type) in a 500 x 500 m hillslope-floodplain subsystem of the watershed. Data integration and analysis is supported by numerical approaches that simulate the control of soil and geomorphic characteristic on hydrological processes. Results provide an unprecedented window into critical zone interactions, revealing significant below- and above-ground co-dynamics. Baseline geophysical datasets provide lithological structure along the hillslope, which includes a surface soil horizon, underlain by a saprolite layer and the fractured Mancos shale. Time-lapse geophysical data show very different moisture dynamics in various compartments and locations during the winter and growing season. Integration with aerial imaging reveals a significant linkage between plant growth and the subsurface wetness, soil characteristics and the topographic gradient. The obtained information about the organization and

  4. Transport phenomena in particulate systems

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, José Teixeira; Ferreira, Maria do Carmo

    2012-01-01

    This volume spans 10 chapters covering different aspects of transport phenomena including fixed and fluidized systems, spouted beds, electrochemical and wastewater treatment reactors. This e-book will be valuable for students, engineers and researchers aiming to keep updated on the latest developments on particulate systems.

  5. Discovery potential for new phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, S.; Price, L.E.

    1997-03-01

    The authors examine the ability of future facilities to discover and interpret non-supersymmetric new phenomena. The authors first explore explicit manifestations of new physics, including extended gauge sectors, leptoquarks, exotic fermions, and technicolor models. They then take a more general approach where new physics only reveals itself through the existence of effective interactions at lower energy scales

  6. Frustration and quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, Matthias

    2018-06-01

    This review article is devoted to the interplay between frustrated magnetism and quantum critical phenomena, covering both theoretical concepts and ideas as well as recent experimental developments in correlated-electron materials. The first part deals with local-moment magnetism in Mott insulators and the second part with frustration in metallic systems. In both cases, frustration can either induce exotic phases accompanied by exotic quantum critical points or lead to conventional ordering with unconventional crossover phenomena. In addition, the competition of multiple phases inherent to frustrated systems can lead to multi-criticality.

  7. Frustration and quantum criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, Matthias

    2018-03-15

    This review article is devoted to the interplay between frustrated magnetism and quantum critical phenomena, covering both theoretical concepts and ideas as well as recent experimental developments in correlated-electron materials. The first part deals with local-moment magnetism in Mott insulators and the second part with frustration in metallic systems. In both cases, frustration can either induce exotic phases accompanied by exotic quantum critical points or lead to conventional ordering with unconventional crossover phenomena. In addition, the competition of multiple phases inherent to frustrated systems can lead to multi-criticality. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. Regenerative potential and healing dynamics of the periodontium: a critical-size supra-alveolar periodontal defect study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, Giuseppe; Susin, Cristiano; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2009-03-01

    The nature and characteristics of the newly formed periodontium obtained following regenerative procedures remain a matter of controversy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regenerative potential of the periodontal attachment and healing dynamics as observed from the spatial distribution of newly formed cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone following optimal circumstances for wound healing/regeneration in a discriminating animal model. Critical-size, 6-mm, supra-alveolar, periodontal defects were surgically created in six young adult Beagle dogs. Space-providing ePTFE devices with 300-microm laser-drilled pores were implanted to support wound stability and space provision in one jaw quadrant/animal. Treatments were alternated between left and right jaw quadrants in subsequent animals. The gingival flaps were advanced to submerge the defect sites for primary intention healing. Histometric analysis followed an 8-week healing interval. Healing was uneventful in all animals. The histometric analysis showed that cementum regeneration (2.99 +/- 0.22 mm) was significantly greater than PDL (2.54 +/- 0.18 mm, p=0.03) and bone regeneration (2.46 +/- 0.26 mm, p=0.03). The wound area showed significant positive non-linear effect on cementum (log beta=1.25, palveolar bone virtually regenerate in parallel under optimal circumstances for periodontal wound healing/regeneration. Moreover, space provision positively influences the extent of periodontal regeneration.

  9. Reflections on Gibbs: From Critical Phenomena to the Amistad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadanoff, Leo P.

    2003-03-01

    J. Willard Gibbs, the younger was the first American theorist. He was one of the inventors of statistical physics. His introduction and development of the concepts of phase space, phase transitions, and thermodynamic surfaces was remarkably correct and elegant. These three concepts form the basis of different but related areas of physics. The connection among these areas has been a subject of deep reflection from Gibbs' time to our own. I shall talk about these connections by using concepts suggested by the work of Michael Berry and explicitly put forward by the philosopher Robert Batterman. This viewpoint relates theory-connection to the applied mathematics concepts of asymptotic analysis and singular perturbations. J. Willard Gibbs, the younger, had all his achievements concentrated in science. His father, also J. Willard Gibbs, also a Professor at Yale, had one great achievement that remains unmatched in our day. I shall describe it.

  10. Anomalous critical and supercritical phenomena in explosive percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Raissa M.; Nagler, Jan

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of large-scale connectivity on an underlying network or lattice, the so-called percolation transition, has a profound impact on the system’s macroscopic behaviours. There is thus great interest in controlling the location of the percolation transition to either enhance or delay its onset and, more generally, in understanding the consequences of such control interventions. Here we review explosive percolation, the sudden emergence of large-scale connectivity that results from repeated, small interventions designed to delay the percolation transition. These transitions exhibit drastic, unanticipated and exciting consequences that make explosive percolation an emerging paradigm for modelling real-world systems ranging from social networks to nanotubes.

  11. Critical Behavior of Light in Mode-Locked Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill, Rafi; Rosen, Amir; Gordon, Ariel; Gat, Omri; Fischer, Baruch

    2005-06-01

    Light is shown to exhibit critical and tricritical behavior in passively mode-locked lasers with externally injected pulses. It is a first and unique example of critical phenomena in a one-dimensional many-body light-mode system. The phase diagrams consist of regimes with continuous wave, driven parapulses, spontaneous pulses via mode condensation, and heterogeneous pulses, separated by phase transition lines that terminate with critical or tricritical points. Enhanced non-Gaussian fluctuations and collective dynamics are present at the critical and tricritical points, showing a mode system analog of the critical opalescence phenomenon. The critical exponents are calculated and shown to comply with the mean field theory, which is rigorous in the light system.

  12. Migration and sorption phenomena in packaged foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekharan, V; Floros, J D

    1997-10-01

    Rapidly developing analytical capabilities and continuously evolving stringent regulations have made food/package interactions a subject of intense research. This article focuses on: (1) the migration of package components such as oligomers and monomers, processing aids, additives, and residual reactants in to packaged foods, and (2) sorption of food components such as flavors, lipids, and moisture into packages. Principles of diffusion and thermodynamics are utilized to describe the mathematics of migration and sorption. Mathematical models are developed from first principles, and their applicability is illustrated using numerical simulations and published data. Simulations indicate that available models are system (polymer-penetrant) specific. Furthermore, some models best describe the early stages of migration/sorption, whereas others should be used for the late stages of these phenomena. Migration- and/or sorption-related problems with respect to glass, metal, paper-based and polymeric packaging materials are discussed, and their importance is illustrated using published examples. The effects of migrating and absorbed components on food safety, quality, and the environment are presented for various foods and packaging materials. The impact of currently popular packaging techniques such as microwavable, ovenable, and retortable packaging on migration and sorption are discussed with examples. Analytical techniques for investigating migration and sorption phenomena in food packaging are critically reviewed, with special emphasis on the use and characteristics of food-simulating liquids (FSLs). Finally, domestic and international regulations concerning migration in packaged foods, and their impact on food packaging is briefly presented.

  13. Progress in the theory of magnetic reconnection phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottaviani, M.; Arcis, N.; Maget, P.; Zwingmann, W.; Grasso, D.; Militello, F.; Porcelli, F.

    2004-01-01

    Recent theoretical work on magnetic reconnection in hot plasma confinement devices is reviewed. The presentation highlights the common aspects of reconnection phenomena, and current research trends are emphasised. Progress in understanding the dynamics of slowly evolving modes of the tearing family, based on advanced analytic techniques and numerical simulation, as well as of faster modes that lead to internal disruptions, is reported. (authors)

  14. Comprehending emergent systems phenomena through direct-manipulation animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Priscilla Abel

    This study seeks to understand the type of interaction mode that best supports learning and comprehension of emergent systems phenomena. Given that the literature has established that students hold robust misconceptions of such phenomena, this study investigates the influence of using three types of interaction; speed-manipulation animation (SMN), post-manipulation animation (PMA) and direct-manipulation animation (DMA) for increasing comprehension and testing transfer of the phenomena, by looking at the effect of simultaneous interaction of haptic and visual channels on long term and working memories when seeking to comprehend emergent phenomena. The questions asked were: (1) Does the teaching of emergent phenomena, with the aid of a dynamic interactive modeling tool (i.e., SMA, PMA or DMA), improve students' mental model construction of systems, thus increasing comprehension of this scientific concept? And (2) does the teaching of emergent phenomena, with the aid of a dynamic interactive modeling tool, give the students the necessary complex cognitive skill which can then be applied to similar (near transfer) and/or novel, but different, (far transfer) scenarios? In an empirical study undergraduate and graduate students were asked to participate in one of three experimental conditions: SMA, PMA, or DMA. The results of the study found that it was the participants of the SMA treatment condition that had the most improvement in post-test scores. Students' understanding of the phenomena increased most when they used a dynamic model with few interactive elements (i.e., start, stop, and speed) that allowed for real time visualization of one's interaction on the phenomena. Furthermore, no indication was found that the learning of emergent phenomena, with the aid of a dynamic interactive modeling tool, gave the students the necessary complex cognitive skill which could then be applied to similar (near transfer) and/or novel, but different, (far transfer) scenarios

  15. A Review on the Linear and Nonlinear Critical Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    True, Hans

    2013-01-01

    In recent years several authors have proposed 'easier numerical methods' to find multiple attractors and the critical speed in railway dynamical problems. Actually, the methods do function in some cases, but they are not safe in the sense that you will calculate the relevant critical parameter...... values with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases the 'easier numerical methods' are really just a gamble. In this presentation the methods will be discussed. For this purpose linearisations of the nonlinear dynamical problem are made. A linearisation of the nonlinear dynamical problem simplifies...... the calculations and may give relevant answers to important questions such as the possibility of resonance phenomena in the designs, but a linearisation is not always allowed, and it does not help to find the critical speed of a railway vehicle. We shall also address the curious fact that the hunting motion...

  16. Cultivating Critical Reflection: Educators Making Sense and Meaning of Professional Identity and Relational Dynamics in Complex Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Critical reflection underpins socially just and inclusive practices that are distinguishing features of democratic learning communities. Critical reflection supports educators' interrogation of the underlying assumptions, intentions, values and beliefs that shape their worldview and sociocultural standpoint. Dominant sociocultural norms…

  17. Multiparticle phenomena and Landau damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talman, R.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to survey various methods of studying multiparticle phenomena in accelerators. Both experimental and theoretical methods are described. An effort has been made to emphasize the intuitive and qualitative aspects rather than the detailed mathematics. Some of the terms or concepts to be explained are coherent and incoherent tunes, normal modes, Landau damping, beam-transfer functions, and feedback. These are all of daily importance in the interpretation of colliding-beam observations and the control of performance

  18. Soil water stable isotopes reveal evaporation dynamics at the soil–plant–atmosphere interface of the critical zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sprenger

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the influence of vegetation on water storage and flux in the upper soil is crucial in assessing the consequences of climate and land use change. We sampled the upper 20 cm of podzolic soils at 5 cm intervals in four sites differing in their vegetation (Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris and heather (Calluna sp. and Erica Sp and aspect. The sites were located within the Bruntland Burn long-term experimental catchment in the Scottish Highlands, a low energy, wet environment. Sampling took place on 11 occasions between September 2015 and September 2016 to capture seasonal variability in isotope dynamics. The pore waters of soil samples were analyzed for their isotopic composition (δ2H and δ18O with the direct-equilibration method. Our results show that the soil waters in the top soil are, despite the low potential evaporation rates in such northern latitudes, kinetically fractionated compared to the precipitation input throughout the year. This fractionation signal decreases within the upper 15 cm resulting in the top 5 cm being isotopically differentiated to the soil at 15–20 cm soil depth. There are significant differences in the fractionation signal between soils beneath heather and soils beneath Scots pine, with the latter being more pronounced. But again, this difference diminishes within the upper 15 cm of soil. The enrichment in heavy isotopes in the topsoil follows a seasonal hysteresis pattern, indicating a lag time between the fractionation signal in the soil and the increase/decrease of soil evaporation in spring/autumn. Based on the kinetic enrichment of the soil water isotopes, we estimated the soil evaporation losses to be about 5 and 10 % of the infiltrating water for soils beneath heather and Scots pine, respectively. The high sampling frequency in time (monthly and depth (5 cm intervals revealed high temporal and spatial variability of the isotopic composition of soil waters, which can be critical

  19. Parameterization of Nitrogen Limitation for a Dynamic Ecohydrological Model: a Case Study from the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastola, S.; Bras, R. L.

    2017-12-01

    Feedbacks between vegetation and the soil nutrient cycle are important in ecosystems where nitrogen limits plant growth, and consequently influences the carbon balance in the plant-soil system. However, many biosphere models do not include such feedbacks, because interactions between carbon and the nitrogen cycle can be complex, and remain poorly understood. In this study we coupled a nitrogen cycle model with an eco-hydrological model by using the concept of carbon cost economics. This concept accounts for different "costs" to the plant of acquiring nitrogen via different pathways. This study builds on tRIBS-VEGGIE, a spatially explicit hydrological model coupled with a model of photosynthesis, stomatal resistance, and energy balance, by combining it with a model of nitrogen recycling. Driven by climate and spatially explicit data of soils, vegetation and topography, the model (referred to as tRIBS-VEGGIE-CN) simulates the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in the soil-plant system; the dynamics of vegetation; and different components of the hydrological cycle. The tRIBS-VEGGIE-CN is applied in a humid tropical watershed at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO). The region is characterized by high availability and cycling of nitrogen, high soil respiration rates, and large carbon stocks.We drive the model under contemporary CO2 and hydro-climatic forcing and compare results to a simulation under doubling CO2 and a range of future climate scenarios. The results with parameterization of nitrogen limitation based on carbon cost economics show that the carbon cost of the acquisition of nitrogen is 14% of the net primary productivity (NPP) and the N uptake cost for different pathways vary over a large range depending on leaf nitrogen content, turnover rates of carbon in soil and nitrogen cycling processes. Moreover, the N fertilization simulation experiment shows that the application of N fertilizer does not significantly change the simulated NPP. Furthermore, an

  20. Heat Transfer Phenomena of Supercritical Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krau, Carmen Isabella; Kuhn, Dietmar; Schulenberg, Thomas [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In concepts for supercritical water cooled reactors, the reactor core is cooled and moderated by water at supercritical pressures. The significant temperature dependence of the fluid properties of water requires an exact knowledge of the heat transfer mechanism to avoid fuel pin damages. Near the pseudo-critical point a deterioration of heat transfer might happen. Processes, that take place in this case, are not fully understood and are due to be examined systematically. In this paper a general overview on the properties of supercritical water is given, experimental observations of different authors will be reviewed in order to identify heat transfer phenomena and onset of occurrence. The conceptional design of a test rig to investigate heat transfer in the boundary layer will be discussed. Both, water and carbon dioxide, may serve as operating fluids. The loop, including instrumentation and safety devices, is shown and suitable measuring methods are described. (authors)

  1. Augmented Visual Experience of Simulated Solar Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, A. O., IV; Berardino, R. A.; Hahne, D.; Schreurs, B.; Fox, N. J.; Raouafi, N.

    2017-12-01

    The Parker Solar Probe (PSP) mission will explore the Sun's corona, studying solar wind, flares and coronal mass ejections. The effects of these phenomena can impact the technology that we use in ways that are not readily apparent, including affecting satellite communications and power grids. Determining the structure and dynamics of corona magnetic fields, tracing the flow of energy that heats the corona, and exploring dusty plasma near the Sun to understand its influence on solar wind and energetic particle formation requires a suite of sensors on board the PSP spacecraft that are engineered to observe specific phenomena. Using models of these sensors and simulated observational data, we can visualize what the PSP spacecraft will "see" during its multiple passes around the Sun. Augmented reality (AR) technologies enable convenient user access to massive data sets. We are developing an application that allows users to experience environmental data from the point of view of the PSP spacecraft in AR using the Microsoft HoloLens. Observational data, including imagery, magnetism, temperature, and density are visualized in 4D within the user's immediate environment. Our application provides an educational tool for comprehending the complex relationships of observational data, which aids in our understanding of the Sun.

  2. Complex hydro- and sediment dynamics survey of two critical reaches on the Hungarian part of river Danube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranya, Sandor; Jozsa, Janos; Goda, Laszlo; Rakoczi, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    Detailed hydrodynamic survey of two critical river reaches has been performed from hydro- and sediment dynamics points of view, in order to explore the main features, moreover, provide calibration and verification data to related 3D flow and sediment transport modelling. Special attention has been paid to compare moving and fix boat measurement modes for estimating various flow and large-scale bed form features, resulting in recommendations e.g. on the time period needed in stationary mode operation to obtain sufficiently stabilized average velocity profiles and related parameter estimations. As to the study reaches, the first comprises a 5 km long sandy-gravel bed reach of river Danube located in Central-Hungary, presenting problems for navigation. As a conventional remedy, groyne fields have been implemented to make and maintain the reach sufficiently deep, navigable even in low flow periods. As is usually the case, these works resulted in rather complex flow characteristics and related bed topography at places. The second site is another 5 km long reach of river Danube, close to the southern border to Serbia. There the river presents navigational problems similar to the previously mentioned reach, however, having entirely sand bed conditions, abundant in a variety of dunes, especially in the shallower parts. In both study reaches ADCP measurements were done with around 2.5 Hz sampling frequency both in moving boat operation mode providing overall, though locally moderately representative picture, and in fixed boat mode at a considerable number of selected verticals with 10 minutes long measuring time.

  3. Luminous Phenomena - A Scientific Investigation of Anomalous Luminous Atmospheric Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorani, M.

    2003-12-01

    Anomalous atmospheric luminous phenomena reoccur in several locations of Earth, in the form of multi-color light balls characterized by large dimensions, erratic motion, long duration and a correlated electromagnetic field. The author (an astrophysicist) of this book, which is organized as a selection of some of his technical and popularizing papers and seminars, describes and discusses all the efforts that have been done in 10 years, through several missions and a massive data analysis, in order to obtain some scientific explanation of this kind of anomalies, in particular the Hessdalen anomaly in Norway. The following topics are treated in the book: a) geographic archive of the areas of Earth where such phenomena are known to reoccur most often; b) observational techniques of astrophysical kind that have been used to acquire the data; c) main scientific results obtained so far; d) physical interpretation and natural hypothesis vs. ETV hypothesis; e) historical and chronological issues; f) the importance to brindle new energy sources; g) the importance to keep distance from any kind of "ufology". An unpublished chapter is entirely devoted to a detailed scientific investigation project of light phenomena reoccurring on the Ontario lake; the chosen new-generation multi-wavelength sensing instrumentation that is planned to be used in future missions in that specific area, is described together with scientific rationale and planned procedures. The main results, which were obtained in other areas of the world, such as the Arizona desert, USA and the Sibillini Mountains, Italy, are also briefly mentioned. One chapter is entirely dedicated to the presentation of extensive abstracts of technical papers by the author concerning this specific subject. The book is accompanied with a rich source of bibliographic references.

  4. Real time animation of space plasma phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, K.F.; Greenstadt, E.W.

    1987-01-01

    In pursuit of real time animation of computer simulated space plasma phenomena, the code was rewritten for the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP). The program creates a dynamic representation of the global bowshock which is based on actual spacecraft data and designed for three dimensional graphic output. This output consists of time slice sequences which make up the frames of the animation. With the MPP, 16384, 512 or 4 frames can be calculated simultaneously depending upon which characteristic is being computed. The run time was greatly reduced which promotes the rapid sequence of images and makes real time animation a foreseeable goal. The addition of more complex phenomenology in the constructed computer images is now possible and work proceeds to generate these images

  5. Discrete computational mechanics for stiff phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Michels, Dominik L.

    2016-11-28

    Many natural phenomena which occur in the realm of visual computing and computational physics, like the dynamics of cloth, fibers, fluids, and solids as well as collision scenarios are described by stiff Hamiltonian equations of motion, i.e. differential equations whose solution spectra simultaneously contain extremely high and low frequencies. This usually impedes the development of physically accurate and at the same time efficient integration algorithms. We present a straightforward computationally oriented introduction to advanced concepts from classical mechanics. We provide an easy to understand step-by-step introduction from variational principles over the Euler-Lagrange formalism and the Legendre transformation to Hamiltonian mechanics. Based on such solid theoretical foundations, we study the underlying geometric structure of Hamiltonian systems as well as their discrete counterparts in order to develop sophisticated structure preserving integration algorithms to efficiently perform high fidelity simulations.

  6. Nonmodal phenomena in differentially rotating dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poedts, Stefaan; Rogava, Andria D.

    2000-10-01

    In this paper the foundation is layed for the nonmodal investigation of velocity shear induced phenomena in a differentially rotating flow of a dusty plasma. The simplest case of nonmagnetized flow is considered. It is shown that, together with the innate properties of the dusty plasma, the presence of differential rotation, Coriolis forces, and self-gravity casts a considerable richness on the nonmodal dynamics of linear perturbations in the flow. In particular: (i) dust-acoustic waves acquire the ability to extract energy from the mean flow and (ii) shear-induced, nonperiodic modes of collective plasma behavior-shear-dust-acoustic vortices-are generated. The presence of self-gravity and the nonzero Coriolis parameter (``epicyclic shaking'') makes these collective modes transiently unstable. .

  7. Nonmodal phenomena in differentially rotating dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poedts, Stefaan; Rogava, Andria D.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the foundation is layed for the nonmodal investigation of velocity shear induced phenomena in a differentially rotating flow of a dusty plasma. The simplest case of nonmagnetized flow is considered. It is shown that, together with the innate properties of the dusty plasma, the presence of differential rotation, Coriolis forces, and self-gravity casts a considerable richness on the nonmodal dynamics of linear perturbations in the flow. In particular: (i) dust-acoustic waves acquire the ability to extract energy from the mean flow and (ii) shear-induced, nonperiodic modes of collective plasma behavior--shear-dust-acoustic vortices--are generated. The presence of self-gravity and the nonzero Coriolis parameter ('epicyclic shaking') makes these collective modes transiently unstable

  8. Spin-transfer phenomena in layered magnetic structures: Physical phenomena and materials aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenberg, P.; Buergler, D.E.; Dassow, H.; Rata, A.D.; Schneider, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    During the past 20 years, layered structures consisting of ferromagnetic layers and spacers of various material classes with a thickness of only a few nanometers have revealed a variety of exciting and potentially very useful phenomena not present in bulk material. Representing distinct manifestations of spin-transfer processes, these phenomena may be categorized into interlayer exchange coupling (IEC), giant magnetoresistance (GMR), tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), and the more recently discovered spin-transfer torque effect leading to current-induced magnetization switching (CIMS) and current-driven magnetization dynamics. These phenomena clearly confer novel material properties on magnetic layered structures with respect to the (magneto-)transport and the magnetostatic as well as magnetodynamic behavior. Here, we will first concentrate on the less well understood aspects of IEC across insulating and semiconducting interlayers and relate the observations to TMR in the corresponding structures. In this context, we will also discuss more recent advances in TMR due to the use of electrodes made from Heusler alloys and the realization of coherent tunneling in epitaxial magnetic tunneling junctions. Finally, we will review our results on CIMS in epitaxial magnetic nanostructures showing that normal and inverse CIMS can occur simultaneously in a single nanopillar device. In all cases discussed, material issues play a major role in the detailed understanding of the spin-transfer effects, in particular in those systems that yield the largest effects and are thus of utmost interest for applications

  9. Chaotic state to self-organized critical state transition of serrated flow dynamics during brittle-to-ductile transition in metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y., E-mail: hybai@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Sun, B. A. [Centre for Advanced Structural Materials, Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2016-02-07

    We study serrated flow dynamics during brittle-to-ductile transition induced by tuning the sample aspect ratio in a Zr-based metallic glass. The statistical analysis reveals that the serrated flow dynamics transforms from a chaotic state characterized by Gaussian-distribution serrations corresponding to stick-slip motion of randomly generated and uncorrelated single shear band and brittle behavior, into a self-organized critical state featured by intermittent scale-free distribution of shear avalanches corresponding to a collective motion of multiple shear bands and ductile behavior. The correlation found between serrated flow dynamics and plastic deformation might shed light on the plastic deformation dynamic and mechanism in metallic glasses.

  10. Correlated randomness and switching phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Havlin, S.; Mallamace, F.; Kumar, P.; Plerou, V.; Preis, T.

    2010-08-01

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these serious scientific disciplines have no perfect metronome in time and no perfect spatial architecture-crystalline or otherwise. Nonetheless, as if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time and remarkably fine-tuned structures in space. Further, many of these processes and structures have the remarkable feature of “switching” from one behavior to another as if by magic. The past century has, philosophically, been concerned with placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a fine-tuned machine. Here we will address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at some of the many spatial and temporal patterns in biology, medicine, and economics and even begin to characterize the switching phenomena that enables a system to pass from one state to another. Inspired by principles developed by A. Nihat Berker and scores of other statistical physicists in recent years, we discuss some applications of correlated randomness to understand switching phenomena in various fields. Specifically, we present evidence from experiments and from computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water’s anomalies are related to a switching point (which is not unlike the “tipping point” immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell), and that the bubbles in economic phenomena that occur on all scales are not “outliers” (another Gladwell immortalization). Though more speculative, we support the idea of disease as arising from some kind of yet-to-be-understood complex switching phenomenon, by discussing data on selected examples, including heart disease and Alzheimer disease.

  11. Phenomena and Diosignes of Aratous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgoloupis, S. I.

    2013-01-01

    Aratous (305-240B.C.) was a singular intellectual, writer and poet which engage himself to compose a very interesting astronomical poet, using the "Dactylous sixstage' style, the formal style of the ancient Greek Epic poetry. This astronomic poem of Aratous "Phenomena and Diosignes" became very favorite reading during the Alexandrine, the Romman and the Byzandin eras as well and had received many praises from significant poets and particularly from Hipparchous and from Theonas from Alexandria, an astronomer of 4rth century A.C.(in Greeks)

  12. Nonlinear phenomena in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahyari, Alireza; Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Mansouri, Reza

    2018-04-01

    The perturbation theory plays an important role in studying structure formation in cosmology and post-Newtonian physics, but not all phenomena can be described by the linear perturbation theory. Thus, it is necessary to study exact solutions or higher-order perturbations. Specifically, we study black hole (apparent) horizons and the cosmological event horizon formation in the perturbation theory. We emphasize that in the perturbative regime of the gravitational potential these horizons cannot form in the lower order. Studying the infinite plane metric, we show that, to capture the cosmological constant effect, we need at least a second-order expansion.

  13. Nonlinear phenomena at cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbarao, D.; Uma, R.

    1986-01-01

    Finite amplitude electromagnetic waves in a magnetoplasma which typically occur in situations as in present day wave heating, current drives and other schemes in magnetically confined fusion systems, can show qualitatively different absorption and emission characteristics around resonant frequencies of the plasma because of anharmonicity. Linear wave plasma coupling as well as weak nonlinear effects such as parametric instabilities generally overlook this important effect even though the thresholds for the two phenomena as shown here are comparable. Though the effects described here are relevant to a host of nonlinear resonance effects in fusion plasmas, the authors mainly limit themselves to ECRH

  14. Violent phenomena in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Jayant V

    2007-01-01

    The serenity of a clear night sky belies the evidence-gathered by balloons, rockets, satellites, and telescopes-that the universe contains centers of furious activity that pour out vast amounts of energy, some in regular cycles and some in gigantic bursts. This reader-friendly book, acclaimed by Nature as ""excellent and uncompromising,"" traces the development of modern astrophysics and its explanations of these startling celestial fireworks.This lively narrative ranges from the gravitational theories of Newton and Einstein to recent exciting discoveries of such violent phenomena as supernova

  15. Quantum theory of collective phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Sewell, G L

    2014-01-01

    ""An excellent and competent introduction to the field … [and] … a source of information for the expert."" - Physics Today""This a book of major importance…. I trust that this book will be used as a basis for the teaching of a balanced, modern and rigorous course on statistical mechanics in all universities."" - Bulletin of the London Mathematical Society""This is one of the best introductions to the subject, and it is strongly recommended to anyone interested in collective phenomena."" - Physics Bulletin ""The book may be recommended for students as a well-balanced introduction to this rich s

  16. Foot anthropometry and morphology phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agić, Ante; Nikolić, Vasilije; Mijović, Budimir

    2006-12-01

    Foot structure description is important for many reasons. The foot anthropometric morphology phenomena are analyzed together with hidden biomechanical functionality in order to fully characterize foot structure and function. For younger Croatian population the scatter data of the individual foot variables were interpolated by multivariate statistics. Foot structure descriptors are influenced by many factors, as a style of life, race, climate, and things of the great importance in human society. Dominant descriptors are determined by principal component analysis. Some practical recommendation and conclusion for medical, sportswear and footwear practice are highlighted.

  17. Gravitational Anomaly and Transport Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsteiner, Karl; Megias, Eugenio; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Quantum anomalies give rise to new transport phenomena. In particular, a magnetic field can induce an anomalous current via the chiral magnetic effect and a vortex in the relativistic fluid can also induce a current via the chiral vortical effect. The related transport coefficients can be calculated via Kubo formulas. We evaluate the Kubo formula for the anomalous vortical conductivity at weak coupling and show that it receives contributions proportional to the gravitational anomaly coefficient. The gravitational anomaly gives rise to an anomalous vortical effect even for an uncharged fluid.

  18. Quantum phenomena in gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdel, Th.; Doser, M.; Ernest, A. D.; Voronin, A. Yu.; Voronin, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    The subjects presented here are very different. Their common feature is that they all involve quantum phenomena in a gravitational field: gravitational quantum states of ultracold antihydrogen above a material surface and measuring a gravitational interaction of antihydrogen in AEGIS, a quantum trampoline for ultracold atoms, and a hypothesis on naturally occurring gravitational quantum states, an Eötvös-type experiment with cold neutrons and others. Considering them together, however, we could learn that they have many common points both in physics and in methodology.

  19. Quantum phenomena in gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdel, Th.; Doser, M.; Ernest, A.D.; Voronin, A.Y.; Voronin, V.V.

    2010-01-01

    The subjects presented here are very different. Their common feature is that they all involve quantum phenomena in a gravitational field: gravitational quantum states of ultracold anti-hydrogen above a material surface and measuring a gravitational interaction of anti-hydrogen in AEGIS, a quantum trampoline for ultracold atoms, and a hypothesis on naturally occurring gravitational quantum states, an Eoetvoes-type experiment with cold neutrons and others. Considering them together, however, we could learn that they have many common points both in physics and in methodology. (authors)

  20. Time evolution and dynamical phase transitions at a critical time in a system of one-dimensional bosons after a quantum quench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Aditi

    2012-12-28

    A renormalization group approach is used to show that a one-dimensional system of bosons subject to a lattice quench exhibits a finite-time dynamical phase transition where an order parameter within a light cone increases as a nonanalytic function of time after a critical time. Such a transition is also found for a simultaneous lattice and interaction quench where the effective scaling dimension of the lattice becomes time dependent, crucially affecting the time evolution of the system. Explicit results are presented for the time evolution of the boson interaction parameter and the order parameter for the dynamical transition as well as for more general quenches.